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Sample records for deep-inspiration breath-hold perfusion

  1. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Tang, Xiaoli; Jones, Ellen E; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K; Green, Rebecca L; Sheikh, Arif; Khandani, Amir H; McCartney, William H; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z; Marks, Lawrence B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25Gy was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Latty, Drew; Stuart, Kirsty E; Wang, Wei; Ahern, Verity

    2015-03-15

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully.

  3. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, L; Quirk, S; Smith, WL; Yeung, R; Phan, T; Hudson, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients.

  5. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold-Based Radiation Therapy: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Wertz, Hansjörg; Stieler, Florian; Jahnke, Anika; Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Vogel, Lena; Arns, Anna; Blessing, Manuel; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Several recent developments in linear accelerator-based radiation therapy (RT) such as fast multileaf collimators, accelerated intensity modulation paradigms like volumeric modulated arc therapy and flattening filter-free (FFF) high-dose-rate therapy have dramatically shortened the duration of treatment fractions. Deliverable photon dose distributions have approached physical complexity limits as a consequence of precise dose calculation algorithms and online 3-dimensional image guided patient positioning (image guided RT). Simultaneously, beam quality and treatment speed have continuously been improved in particle beam therapy, especially for scanned particle beams. Applying complex treatment plans with steep dose gradients requires strategies to mitigate and compensate for motion effects in general, particularly breathing motion. Intrafractional breathing-related motion results in uncertainties in dose delivery and thus in target coverage. As a consequence, generous margins have been used, which, in turn, increases exposure to organs at risk. Particle therapy, particularly with scanned beams, poses additional problems such as interplay effects and range uncertainties. Among advanced strategies to compensate breathing motion such as beam gating and tracking, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) gating is particularly advantageous in several respects, not only for hypofractionated, high single-dose stereotactic body RT of lung, liver, and upper abdominal lesions but also for normofractionated treatment of thoracic tumors such as lung cancer, mediastinal lymphomas, and breast cancer. This review provides an in-depth discussion of the rationale and technical implementation of DIBH gating for hypofractionated and normofractionated RT of intrathoracic and upper abdominal tumors in photon and proton RT.

  6. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique guided by an opto- electronic system for extracranial stereotactic treatments.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Catalano, Gianpiero; Baroni, Guido; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Ciocca, Mario; Cambria, Raffaella; Serafini, Flavia; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-07-08

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the intrapatient tumor position reproducibility in a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique based on two infrared optical tracking systems, ExacTrac and ELITETM, in stereotactic treatment of lung and liver lesions. After a feasibility study, the technique was applied to 15 patients. Each patient, provided with a real-time visual feedback of external optical marker displacements, underwent a full DIBH, a free-breathing (FB), and three consecutive DIBH CT-scans centered on the lesion to evaluate the tumor position reproducibility. The mean reproducibility of tumor position during repeated DIBH was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in laterolateral (LL), 1.0 ± 0.9 mm in anteroposterior (AP), and 1.4 ± 0.9 mm in craniocaudal (CC) direction for lung lesions, and 1.0 ± 0.6 mm in LL, 1.1 ± 0.5 mm in AP, and 1.2 ± 0.4 mm in CC direction for liver lesions. Intra- and interbreath-hold reproducibility during treatment, as determined by optical markers displacements, was below 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively, in all directions for all patients. Optically-guided DIBH technique provides a simple noninvasive method to minimize breathing motion for collaborative patients. For each patient, it is important to ensure that the tumor position is reproducible with respect to the external markers configuration.

  7. Development of a deep inspiration breath-hold system for radiotherapy utilizing a laser distance measurer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Skottner, Nils; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) is a technique for treating left-sided breast cancer (LSBC). In modern radiotherapy, one of the main aims is to exclude the heart from the beam aperture with an individualized beam design for LSBC. A deep inhalation will raise the chest wall while the volume of the lungs increase, this will again push the heart away from the breast to be treated. There are a few commercial DIBH systems, both invasive and noninvasive. We present an alternative noninvasive DIBH system based upon an industrial laser distance measurer. This system can be installed in a treatment room at a low cost; it is very easy to use and requires limited amount of training for the personnel and the patient. The system is capable of measuring the position of the chest wall with high frequency and precision in real time. The patient views its breathing curve through video glasses, and gets instructions during the treatment session. The system is well tolerated by test subjects due to its noninvasiveness. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. SU-C-19A-01: A Simple Deep Inspiration Breath Hold System

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, B; Kaznowski, L; Blackburn, J; Chu, K; Duelge, J; Baldwin, B; Valenti, M; Hunsader, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Radiation therapy for left sided breast can reduce dose to the lungs and heart. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how to implement a simple method of DIBH for simulation and treatment using equipment readily available in most radiation oncology clinics. Methods: For simulation and treatment, a foam block is placed on the patient's abdomen or chest and a horizontal laser mounted on a movable slide is aimed at the center of the foam block. After a coaching session the block is marked at the average free breathing position and average DIBH position. The position of block relative to laser can be seen by the patient via prism glasses as well as the radiation therapists via a video camera system. Simulation CT scans and treatment delivery are performed under DIBH conditions. Imaging and treatment are performed by manually turning the beam on once the patient has achieved DIBH after being given verbal instructions. Results: Manually triggered imaging was used daily to verify DIBH reproducibility for all patients treated using this system. Sets of before and during port images were used to ensure patient position was appropriate for treatment. Results of the laser on block method were compared to a sister facility using surface mapping techniques for DIBH and the two methods were found to have clinically equivalent reproducibility. Conclusion: The laser and block system was found to be simple to implement and robust during patient treatment. This system can be created from readily available materials at low cost and provides adequate feedback to patient and therapists. During treatment images document the reproducibility of setup and give confidence to clinicians that this method is reproducible from day to day.

  9. Clinical Results of Image-Guided Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Hollander, Suzanne den; Betgen, Anja; Remeijer, Peter; Giersbergen, Aline van; Russell, Nicola S.; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Bartelink, Harry; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, cardiac dose reduction, and the influence of the setup error on the delivered dose for fluoroscopy-guided deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) irradiation using a cone-beam CT for irradiation of left-sided breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients treated according to the DIBH protocol were evaluated regarding dose to the ipsilateral breast (or thoracic wall), heart, (left ventricle [LV]and left anterior descending artery [LAD]), and lung. The DIBH treatment plan was compared to the free-breathing (FB) treatment planning and to the dose data in which setup error was taken into account (i.e., actual delivered dose). Results: The largest setup variability was observed in the direction perpendicular to the RT field ({mu} = -0.8 mm, {Sigma} = 2.9 mm, {sigma} = 2.0 mm). The mean (D{sub mean}) and maximum (D{sub max}) doses of the DIBH treatment plan was significantly lower compared with the FB treatment plan for the heart (34% and 25%, p < 0.001), LV (71% and 28%, p < 0.001), and LAD (52% and 39.8%, p < 0.001). For some patients, large differences were observed between the heart D{sub max} according to the DIBH treatment plan and the actual delivered dose (up to 71%), although D{sub max} was always smaller than the planned FB dose (mean group reduction = 29%, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The image-guided DIBH treatment protocol is a feasible irradiation method with small setup variability that significantly reduces the dose to the heart, LV, and LAD.

  10. Modeled risk of ischemic heart disease following left breast irradiation with deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Eldredge-Hindy, Harriet B; Duffy, Danielle; Yamoah, Kosj; Simone, Nicole L; Skowronski, Jenna; Dicker, Adam P; Anne, Pramila R

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) dramatically reduces radiation dose to the heart during radiation therapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer, but the subsequent risk of radiation-related ischemic heart disease (IHD) is unknown. Our primary objective was to quantify the risk of IHD following RT with DIBH using modeled risk estimates (MRE). Patients with stage 0-III left-sided breast cancer who received RT with DIBH were retrospectively studied. Computed tomography simulations were performed with DIBH and during free breathing (FB) for comparison of dosimetry. Patients were classified as high risk, at risk, or at optimal risk for IHD and baseline risk estimates for IHD were obtained from historic controls. The excess relative risk of IHD because of left breast RT was calculated using patient-specific dosimetry and an existing dose-effect model. MRE were determined from the sum of baseline risk estimates and excess risk. Between 2002 and 2011, 111 patients were treated using DIBH and 104 were available for analysis. MRE for 10-year risk of IHD with DIBH and FB were 3.25% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.20-3.44) and 3.64% (IQR, 1.43-3.81) (P < .0001), respectively. MRE for lifetime risk of IHD with DIBH and FB were 9.71% (IQR, 1.98-16.62) and 10.28% (IQR, 2.05-16.97) (P < .0001), respectively. MRE were significantly reduced by use of DIBH in all risk groups. The largest absolute risk reduction resulting from the DIBH technique was observed in patients at high risk for IHD. The median relative risk reduction in MRE resulting from DIBH was 11.4% (range, 0-32.0) and 6.4% (range, 0-23.4) at 10 years and throughout the patients' lifetime, respectively. After a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 1.3-11.2), the estimated 10-year freedom from IHD was 99.0% (95% confidence interval 93.4-99.8). RT with DIBH may provide breast cancer survivors a clinically significant reduction in the risk of IHD. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by

  11. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R{sup 2}=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were {<=}0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were {<=}0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  12. Poster - Thur Eve - 67: Clinical results of deep inspiration breath hold radiation treatment for the left breast patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Gopaul, D; Osei, E

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for left breast cancers increases local tumor control, but also increases the risk of radiation-induced cardiac disease. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) can minimize dose to the heart for left breast patients where the heart is within the tangential field. In this study, we evaluated the dosimetric benefit of DIBH technique comparing to free breathing (FB) radiotherapy for left breast cancer patients. Five patients with left breast cancer treated with DIBH technique were selected randomly. The CT scans of breath hold (BH) and FB were taken for every DIBH patient. Standard clinical DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated with BH scan dataset using the Varian Eclipse TP system. The prescription dose is 4250 cGy in 16 fractions. The BH plan was copied to the FB scan dataset and shifted accordingly to have the same coverage for the breast tissue, and the dose was re-calculated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the heart and lung; mean dose and maximum dose of the heart were calculated and compared from the BH and FB plans for every patient. The lung volume is increased during BH and hence the heart is moved out of the field, resulting in the lower heart maximum dose. The mean dose is almost less than 1 Gy for all BH plans. The average mean heart dose is 0.8 Gy for BH plan compared to 1.6 Gy for FB plan. Patients benefit significantly from DIBH technique due to the very low heart dose. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Lloyd M; Knight, Kellie A; Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  14. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    SciTech Connect

    Aznar, Marianne C.; Maraldo, Maja V.; Schut, Deborah A.; Lundemann, Michael; Brodin, N Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients.

  15. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  16. Monitoring ABC-assisted deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast radiotherapy with an optical tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, Kathryn E.; Deraniyagala, Rohan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray; Samant, Sanjiv S.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Recent knowledge on the effects of cardiac toxicity warrants greater precision for left-sided breast radiotherapy. Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal vs thoracic breathing) can lead to chest wall positional variations, even though the patient’s tidal volume remains consistent. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using optical tracking for real-time quality control of active breathing coordinator (ABC)-assisted deep inspiration BH (DIBH). Methods: An in-house optical tracking system (OTS) was used to monitor ABC-assisted DIBH. The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS were assessed with a ball-bearing phantom. Seven patients with left-sided breast cancer were included. A free-breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT) scan and an ABC-assisted BH CT scan were acquired for each patient. The OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the patient’s xiphoid process to measure the positional variation of each individual BH. Using the BH within which the CT scan was performed as the reference, the authors quantified intra- and interfraction BH variations for each patient. To estimate the dosimetric impact of BH variations, the authors studied the positional correlation between the marker and the left breast using the FB CT and BH CT scans. The positional variations of 860 BHs as measured by the OTS were retrospectively incorporated into the original treatment plans to evaluate their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs [heart and left anterior descending (LAD) artery]. Results: The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS was within 0.2 mm along each direction. The mean intrafraction variation among treatment BHs was less than 2.8 mm in all directions. Up to 12.6 mm anteroposterior undershoot, where the patient’s chest wall displacement of a BH is less than that of a reference BH, was observed with averages of 4.4, 3.6, and 0.1 mm in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and mediolateral directions

  17. SU-E-T-383: Evaluation of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique for Post-Mastectomy Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Depauw, N; Patel, S; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid, an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size.

  18. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT of lung cancer: maximum standardized uptake value analysis of 108 patients.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Ohtake, Eiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2008-08-01

    Our aim was to compare the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) between breath-hold (BH) PET/CT and free-breathing (FB) PET/CT. The features of phantom data were analyzed, after which a clinical study was performed. A total of 108 consecutive patients with lung cancer were examined using lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT. The patients were instructed to breathe freely during FB PET/CT. In BH PET/CT, the patients were instructed to hold their breath in the maximal inspiration position during the scout scan, for 10 s of the CT scan, and for as long as possible during the PET scan. BH time was recorded using a respiratory monitoring device. The %BH-index was defined as the percentage difference between SUVmax of FB PET and that of BH PET. Statistical analyses were performed using the following factors: %BH-index, age, body mass index, 18F-FDG dosage, blood glucose, BH time, lesion size, and location. The highest %BH-index was 223.2. %BH-index in the lower lung area was significantly higher than that in the upper lung area (51.8 +/- 49.5 vs. 16.9 +/- 25.6, respectively). Lesion volume and maximum diameter in the high-%BH-index group were significantly lower than those in the low-%BH-index group, with the use of a %BH-index cutoff value of 37.l. SUVmax of FB PET should not be taken as accurate, especially in the lower lung area and for small pulmonary lesions. BH PET/CT is expected to enable precise measurement of SUVmax and is thus recommended as part of the standard protocol for lung cancer.

  19. Deep inspiration breath hold with electromagnetic confirmation of chest wall position for adjuvant therapy of left-sided breast cancer: Technique and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kathpal, Madeera; Tinnel, Brent; Sun, Kelly; Ninneman, Stephanie; Malmer, Cynthia; Wendt, Stacie; Buff, Sheena; Valentich, David; Gossweiler, Marisa; Macdonald, Dusten

    2016-01-01

    With most patients now living long after their breast cancer diagnosis, minimizing long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as reducing late cardiac and pulmonary side effects of radiation therapy (RT), is particularly important. It is now possible to use an electromagnetic tracking system to allow real-time tracking of chest wall (CW) position during the delivery of RT. Here, we report our experience using electromagnetic surface transponders as an added measure of CW position during deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We conducted a single-institution institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 15 female left-sided breast cancer patients treated between July 2012 and June 2013 with conventional whole breast radiation. We compared daily port films with treatment planning digitally reconstructed radiographs to establish daily setup accuracy, then used Calypso tracings to compare the position of the CW during the daily port film with the position of the CW during that day's treatment to determine the reproducibility of the breath hold position. Finally, we created competing treatment plans not using DIBH and used a paired t test to compare mean heart (MH) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dose between the 2 techniques. Mean total error (inter- and intrafraction) was dominated by interfraction error and was greatest in the longitudinal direction with a mean of 2.13 mm and 2 standard deviations of 8.2 mm. DIBH significantly reduced MH and LAD dose versus free breathing plans (MH, 1.26 Gy vs 2.84 Gy, P ≤ .001; LAD, 5.49 Gy vs 18.15 Gy, P ≤ .001). This study demonstrates that DIBH with electromagnetic confirmation of CW position is feasible, and allows potential improvement in the accurate delivery of adjuvant RT therapy for breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Deep-inspiration breath-hold kilovoltage cone-beam CT for setup of stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Dennis M; Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W; Kirby, Wyndee; Hallahan, Dennis E; Malcolm, Arnold; Lu, Bo

    2007-04-01

    We report our initial experience with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) cone-beam CT (CBCT) on the treatment table, using the kilovoltage imager integrated into our linear accelerator, for setting up patients for DIBH stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (seven stage I), were given 60Gy in three fractions. All nine patients could perform a DIBH for 35s. For each patient we used a diagnostic reference CT volume image acquired during a DIBH to design an SBRT plan consisting of 7-10 noncoplanar conformal beams. Four patients were setup by registering DIBH kilovoltage projection radiographs or megavoltage portal images on the treatment table to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the reference CT. Each of the last 14 fractions out of a total of 27 was setup by acquiring a CBCT volume image on the treatment table in three breath-holds. The CBCT and reference CT volume images were directly registered and the shift was calculated from the registration. The CBCT volume images contained excellent detail on soft tissue and bony anatomy for matching to the reference CT. Most importantly, the tumor was always clearly visible in the CBCT images, even when it was difficult or impossible to see in the radiographs or portal images. The accuracy of the CBCT method was confirmed by DIBH megavoltage portal imaging and each treatment beam was delivered during a DIBH. CBCT acquisition typically required five more minutes than radiograph acquisition but the overall setup time was often shorter using CBCT because repeat imaging was minimized. We conclude that for setting up SBRT treatments of lung tumors, DIBH CBCT is feasible, fast and may result in less variation among observers than using bony anatomy in orthogonal radiographs.

  1. Development and application of a real-time monitoring and feedback system for deep inspiration breath hold based on external marker tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Markus; Kontrisova, Kristina; Dieckmann, Karin; Bogner, Joachim; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-08-15

    Respiration can cause tumor movements in thoracic regions of up to 3 cm. To minimize motion effects several approaches, such as gating and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), are still under development. The goal of our study was to develop and evaluate a noninvasive system for gated DIBH (GDIBH) based on external markers. DIBH monitoring was based on an infrared tracking system and an in-house-developed software. The in-house software provided the breathing curve in real time and was used as on-line information for a prototype of a feedback device. Reproducibility and stability of the breath holds were evaluated without and with feedback. Thirty-five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) performed DIBH maneuvers after each treatment. For 16 patients dynamic imaging sequences on a multislice CT were used to determine the correlation between tumor and external markers. The relative reproducibility of DIBH maneuvers was improved with the feedback device (74.5%{+-}17.1% without versus 93.0%{+-}4.4% with feedback). The correlation between tumor and marker was good (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.83{+-}0.17). The regression slopes showed great intersubject variability but on average the internal margin in a DIBH treatment situation could be theoretically reduced by 3 mm with the feedback device. DIBH monitoring could be realized in a noninvasive manner through external marker tracking. We conclude that reduction of internal margins can be achieved with a feedback system but should be performed with great care due to the individual behavior of target motion.

  2. Development and application of a real-time monitoring and feedback system for deep inspiration breath hold based on external marker tracking.

    PubMed

    Stock, Markus; Kontrisova, Kristina; Dieckmann, Karin; Bogner, Joachim; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-08-01

    Respiration can cause tumor movements in thoracic regions of up to 3 cm. To minimize motion effects several approaches, such as gating and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), are still under development. The goal of our study was to develop and evaluate a noninvasive system for gated DIBH (GDIBH) based on external markers. DIBH monitoring was based on an infrared tracking system and an in-house-developed software. The in-house software provided the breathing curve in real time and was used as on-line information for a prototype of a feedback device. Reproducibility and stability of the breath holds were evaluated without and with feedback. Thirty-five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) performed DIBH maneuvers after each treatment. For 16 patients dynamic imaging sequences on a multislice CT were used to determine the correlation between tumor and external markers. The relative reproducibility of DIBH maneuvers was improved with the feedback device (74.5% +/- 17.1% without versus 93.0% +/- 4.4% with feedback). The correlation between tumor and marker was good (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.83 +/- 0.17). The regression slopes showed great intersubject variability but on average the internal margin in a DIBH treatment situation could be theoretically reduced by 3 mm with the feedback device. DIBH monitoring could be realized in a noninvasive manner through external marker tracking. We conclude that reduction of internal margins can be achieved with a feedback system but should be performed with great care due to the individual behavior of target motion.

  3. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Mahadev, D. Shankar; Subramanyam, K.; Sudarshan, G.; Raju, A. Krishnam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs) from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers. PMID:19893708

  4. Life years lost attributable to late effects after radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma: The impact of proton therapy and/or deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Laura Ann; Maraldo, Maja Vestmø; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald; Dabaja, Bouthaina Shbib; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2017-08-21

    Due to the long life expectancy after treatment, the risk of late effects after radiotherapy (RT) is of particular importance for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Both deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and proton therapy have been shown to reduce the dose to normal tissues for mediastinal HL, but the impact of these techniques in combination is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the life years lost (LYL) attributable to late effects after RT for mediastinal HL using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in free breathing (FB) and DIBH, and proton therapy in FB and DIBH. Plans for each technique were created for 22 patients with HL. Doses were extracted and the risk of late effects and LYL were estimated. We found that the use of DIBH, proton therapy, and the combination significantly reduced the LYL compared to IMRT in FB. The lowest LYL was found for proton therapy in DIBH. However, when IMRT in DIBH was compared to proton therapy in FB, no significant difference was found. Patient-specific plan comparisons should be used to select the optimal technique when comparing IMRT in DIBH and proton therapy in FB. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p < 0.001 for reproducibility, p < 0.01 for stability). Significant changes (>2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  6. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei; Amestoy, William; Wright, Jean

    2015-04-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V{sub 20} (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation.

  7. Deep inspiration breath-hold produces a clinically meaningful reduction in ipsilateral lung dose during locoregional radiation therapy for some women with right-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jessica L; Conroy, Leigh; Harper, Lindsay; Scheifele, Marie; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy L; Graham, Tannis; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A

    The goal of the work described here was to determine whether deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) produces a clinically meaningful reduction in pulmonary dose compared with free breathing (FB) during locoregional radiation for right-sided breast cancer. Four-field, modified-wide tangent plans with full nodal coverage were developed for 30 consecutive patients on paired DIBH and FB CT scans. Nodes were contoured according to European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Plan metrics were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank testing. In 21 patients (70%), there was a ≥5% reduction in ipsilateral lung V20Gy with DIBH compared with FB. The mean decrease in ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 7.8% (0%-20%, P < .001). The mean lung dose decreased on average by 3.4 Gy with DIBH (-0.2 to 9.1, P < .001). The mean reduction in liver volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose was 42.3 cm(3) (0-178.9 cm(3), P < .001). DIBH reduced ipsilateral lung V20Gy by ≥5% in the majority of patients. For some patients, the volume of liver receiving a potentially toxic dose decreased with DIBH. DIBH should be available as a treatment strategy to reduce ipsilateral lung V20Gy prior to compromising internal mammary chain nodal coverage for patients with right-sided breast cancer during locoregional radiation therapy if the V20Gy on FB exceeds 30%. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SU-E-J-32: Calypso(R) and Laser-Based Localization Systems Comparison for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients Using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S; Kaurin, D; Sweeney, L; Kim, J; Fang, L; Tran, A; Holloway, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our institution uses a manual laser-based system for primary localization and verification during radiation treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). This primary system was compared with sternum-placed Calypso(R) beacons (Varian Medical Systems, CA). Only intact breast patients are considered for this analysis. Methods: During computed tomography (CT) simulation, patients have BB and Calypso(R) surface beacons positioned sternally and marked for free-breathing and DIBH CTs. During dosimetry planning, BB longitudinal displacement between free breathing and DIBH CT determines laser mark (BH mark) location. Calypso(R) beacon locations from the DIBH CT are entered at the Tracking Station. During Linac simulation and treatment, patients inhale until the cross-hair and/or lasers coincide with the BH Mark, which can be seen using our high quality cameras (Pelco, CA). Daily Calypso(R) displacement values (difference from the DIBH-CT-based plan) are recorded.The displacement mean and standard deviation was calculated for each patient (77 patients, 1845 sessions). An aggregate mean and standard deviation was calculated weighted by the number of patient fractions.Some patients were shifted based on MV ports. A second data set was calculated with Calypso(R) values corrected by these shifts. Results: Mean displacement values indicate agreement within 1±3mm, with improvement for shifted data (Table). Conclusion: Both unshifted and shifted data sets show the Calypso(R) system coincides with the laser system within 1±3mm, demonstrating either localization/verification system will Resultin similar clinical outcomes. Displacement value uncertainty unilaterally reduces when shifts are taken into account.

  9. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  10. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). Methods Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. Results When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. Conclusions This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice. PMID:24548307

  11. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold [(18)F]FDG PET-CT on 4-rings scanners in evaluating lung lesions: evidences from a phantom and a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Puta, Erinda; Kaiser, Stefano Ren; Massetti, Valentina; Andreoli, Michela; Mostarda, Angelica; Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of a Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) (18)F-FDG PET-CT acquisition in apnea and compare the results obtained between these acts of acquisition in apnea and in Free Breathing in the evaluation of lung lesions. A pre-clinical phantom study was performed to evaluate the shortest simulated DIBH time according to the minimum detectable lesion that can be detected by our ultrasound scanner. This study was conducted by changing acquisition time and sphere-to-background activity ratio values and by using radioactivity densities similar to those generally found in clinical examinations. In the clinical study, 25 patients with pulmonary lesions underwent a standard whole body (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan in free breathing followed by a 20s single thorax acquisition PET/CT in DIBH acquisition. The phantom study indicated that a 20-s acquisition time provides an accurate evaluation of smallest sphere shaped lesions. In the clinical study, PET-CT scans obtained in DIBH studies showed a significant reduction of misalignment between the PET and CT scan images and an increase of SUVmax compared to free breathing acquisitions. A correlation between the %BH-index and lesion displacement between PET and CT images in FB acquisition was demonstrated, significantly higher for lesions with a displacement>8mm. The single 20s acquisition of DIBH PET-CT is a feasible technique for lung lesion detection in the clinical setting. It only requires a minor increase in examination time without special patient training. 20s DIBH scan provided a more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially for lesions in the lower lung lobes which usually show greater displacement between PET and CT scan images in FB acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for Free Breath and Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D; Shekel, E; Levin, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to verify the accuracy of the dose distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular LN region for both free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique. Methods: We performed in vivo measurements for nine breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast/CW and to the supraclavicular LN region. Six patients were treated to the left breast/CW using DIBH technique and three patients were treated to the right breast/CW in free breath. We used five microMOSFET dosimeters: three located along the field junction, one located 1 cm above the junction and the fifth microMOSFET located 1 cm below the junction. We performed consecutive measurements over several days for each patient and compared the measurements to the TPS calculation (Eclipse, Varian™). Results: The calculated and measured doses along the junction were 0.97±0.08 Gy and 1.02±0.14 Gy, respectively. Above the junction calculated and measured doses were 0.91±0.08 Gy and 0.98±0.09 Gy respectively, and below the junction calculated and measured doses were 1.70±0.15 Gy and 1.61±0.09 Gy, respectively. All differences were not statistically significant. When comparing calculated and measured doses for DIBH patients only, there was still no statistically significant difference between values for all dosimeter locations. Analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney Rank-Sum Test. Conclusion: We found excellent correlation between calculated doses from the TPS and measured skin doses at the junction of several half beam fields. Even for the DIBH technique, where there is more potential for variance due to depth of breath, there is no over or underdose along the field junction. This correlation validates the TPS, as well an accurate, reproducible patient setup.

  13. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-04-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5 Gy (0.7 to 9.6 Gy) at FB, 1.2 Gy (0.6 to 3.8 Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1 Gy (0.6 to 3.1 Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 3.0 Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 2.8 Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9 Gy (2.4 to 46.4 Gy), 8.6 Gy (2.0 to 43.8 Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2 Gy (1.9 to 40.1 Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5 Gy (1.8 to 34.7 Gy), and 5.3 Gy (1.5 to 31.5 Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan.

  14. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  16. SU-F-BRB-03: Quantifying Patient Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Using the ABC System with Simultaneous Surface Photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Y; Rahimi, A; Sawant, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Active breathing control (ABC) has been used to reduce treatment margin due to respiratory organ motion by enforcing temporary breath-holds. However, in practice, even if the ABC device indicates constant lung volume during breath-hold, the patient may still exhibit minor chest motion. Consequently, therapists are given a false sense of security that the patient is immobilized. This study aims at quantifying such motion during ABC breath-holds by monitoring the patient chest motion using a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Methods: A female patient with breast cancer was selected to evaluate chest motion during ABC breath-holds. During the entire course of treatment, the patient’s chest surface was monitored by a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Specifically, a user-defined region-of-interest (ROI) on the chest surface was selected for the system to track at a rate of ∼3Hz. The surface motion was estimated by rigid image registration between the current ROI image captured and a reference image. The translational and rotational displacements computed were saved in a log file. Results: A total of 20 fractions of radiation treatment were monitored by VisionRT. After removing noisy data, we obtained chest motion of 79 breath-hold sessions. Mean chest motion in AP direction during breath-holds is 1.31mm with 0.62mm standard deviation. Of the 79 sessions, the patient exhibited motion ranging from 0–1 mm (30 sessions), 1–2 mm (37 sessions), 2–3 mm (11 sessions) and >3 mm (1 session). Conclusion: Contrary to popular assumptions, the patient is not completely still during ABC breath-hold sessions. In this particular case studied, the patient exhibited chest motion over 2mm in 14 out of 79 breath-holds. Underestimating treatment margin for radiation therapy with ABC could reduce treatment effectiveness due to geometric miss or overdose of critical organs. The senior author receives research funding from NIH, VisionRT, Varian Medical Systems

  17. SU-F-BRB-02: Towards Quantitative Clinical Decision On Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Or Prone for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Gao, Y; Liu, T; Gelblum, D; Ho, A; Powell, S; Tang, X; Xu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop quantitative clinical guidelines between supine Deep Inspiratory Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing treatments for breast patients, we applied 3D deformable phantoms to perform Monte Carlo simulation to predict corresponding Dose to the Organs at Risk (OARs). Methods: The RPI-adult female phantom (two selected cup sizes: A and D) was used to represent the female patient, and it was simulated using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code. Doses to OARs were investigated for supine DIBH and prone treatments, considering two breast sizes. The fluence maps of the 6-MV opposed tangential fields were exported. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the fluence maps allow each simulated photon particle to be weighed in the final dose calculation. The relative error of all dose calculations was kept below 5% by simulating 3*10{sup 7} photons for each projection. Results: In terms of dosimetric accuracy, the RPI Adult Female phantom with cup size D in DIBH positioning matched with a DIBH treatment plan of the patient. Based on the simulation results, for cup size D phantom, prone positioning reduced the cardiac dose and the dose to other OARs, while cup size A phantom benefits more from DIBH positioning. Comparing simulation results for cup size A and D phantom, dose to OARs was generally higher for the large breast size due to increased scattering arising from a larger portion of the body in the primary beam. The lower dose that was registered for the heart in the large breast phantom in prone positioning was due to the increase of the distance between the heart and the primary beam when the breast was pendulous. Conclusion: Our 3D deformable phantom appears an excellent tool to predict dose to the OARs for the supine DIBH and prone positions, which might help quantitative clinical decisions. Further investigation will be conducted. National Institutes of Health R01EB015478.

  18. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  19. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan.

  20. A case study evaluating deep inspiration breath-hold and intensity-modulated radiotherapy to minimise long-term toxicity in a young patient with bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M; Crook, Sarah; Wan, Kenneth; Scott, Lucille; Foroudi, Farshad

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but late toxicities such as cardiovascular disease and second malignancy are a major concern. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce cardiac dose from mediastinal radiotherapy. A 24 year-old male with early-stage bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma received involved-site radiotherapy as part of a combined modality programme. Simulation was performed in free breathing (FB) and DIBH. The target and organs at risk were contoured on both datasets. Free breathing-3D conformal (FB-3DCRT), DIBH-3DCRT, FB-IMRT and DIBH-IMRT were compared with respect to target coverage and doses to organs at risk. A 'butterfly' IMRT technique was used to minimise the low-dose bath. In our patient, both DIBH (regardless of mode of delivery) and IMRT (in both FB and DIBH) achieved reductions in mean heart dose. DIBH improved all lung parameters. IMRT reduced high dose (V20), but increased low dose (V5) to lung. DIBH-IMRT was chosen for treatment delivery. Advanced radiotherapy techniques have the potential to further optimise the therapeutic ratio in patients with mediastinal lymphoma. Benefits should be assessed on an individualised basis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  1. Dose evaluation and risk estimation for secondary cancer in contralateral breast and a study of correlation between thorax shape and dose to organs at risk following tangentially breast irradiation during deep inspiration breath-hold and free breathing.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Safora; Vikström, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari Helene Blihovde; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2011-05-01

    To assess the impact of using breathing adapted radiotherapy on contralateral breast (CB) dose, to relate the thorax shape with the dose to the organs at risk (OARs) and to predict the risk for induced malignancies in CB using linear and non-linear models, following tangential irradiation of breast. Sixteen patients with stage I-II breast cancer treatment planned with tangential fields using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) techniques were included in this analysis. The dose results mainly based on DVH analysis were compared. Four parameters were defined to describe thoracic shape. Excess relative risk (ERR) for cancer induction in CB, employing linear and non-linear models was calculated. Average CB volumes exposed to a dose of 1 Gy is 1.3 times higher in DIBH plans than in FB plans. No significant difference in average V3Gy and V5Gy for DIBH and FB plans is observed. The average mean CB dose for DIBH and FB plans is 0.33 and 0.28 Gy, respectively. No correlation between thorax shape parameters and mean OARs dose is observed. The estimated average mean ERR with linear model is lower in FB plans (0.12) than for the DIBH plans (0.14). The estimated ERR with non-linear model is 0.14 for DIBH plans and 0.15 for FB plans. No significant difference in CB dose between DIBH and FB plans is observed. The four thorax shape parameters defined in this study can not be related to the dose at OARs using DIBH and FB radiation techniques. The ERR estimates for secondary CB cancer are nearly the same for FB and DIBH planning when using a linear and non-linear risk prediction models.

  2. Is the Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique Superior to the Free Breathing Technique in Cardiac and Lung Sparing while Treating both Left-Sided Post-Mastectomy Chest Wall and Supraclavicular Regions?

    PubMed Central

    Darapu, Anupama; Balakrishnan, Rajesh; Sebastian, Patricia; Hussain, Mohamathu Rafic Kather; Ravindran, Paul; John, Subhashini

    2017-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the efficacy of the deep inspirational breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its dosimetric advantages over the free breathing (FB) technique in cardiac (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]) and ipsilateral lung sparing in left-sided post-mastectomy field-in-field conformal radiotherapy. DIBH is highly reproducible, and this study aims to find out its dosimetric benefits over FB. Materials and Methods Nineteen left-sided mastectomy patients were immobilized using breast boards with both arms positioned above the head. All patients had 2 sets of planning CT images (one in FB and another in DIBH) with a Biograph TruePoint HD CT scanner in the same setup. DIBH was performed by tracking the respiratory cycles using a Varian Real-Time Position Management system. The target (chest wall and supraclavicular region), organs at risk (OARs; ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, LAD, and contralateral breast), and other organs of interests were delineated as per the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) contouring guidelines. The single-isocenter conformal fields in the field treatment plans were generated with the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (Varian Medical Systems) for both FB and DIBH images, and the doses to the target and OARs were compared. The standard fractionation regimen of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over a period of 5 weeks was used for all patients in this study. Results and Discussion The target coverage parameters (V95, V105, V107, and Dmean) were found to be 97.8 ± 0.9, 6.1 ± 3.4, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.5% in the FB plans and 98.1 ± 0.8, 6.1 ± 3.2, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.4% in the DIBH plans, respectively. The plan quality indices (conformity index and homogeneity index) also showed 1.3 ± 0.2 and 0.1 for the FB plans and 1.2 ± 0.3 and 0.1 for the DIBH plans, respectively. There was a significant reduction in dose to the heart in the DIBH plans compared to the FB plans, with p values of nearly 0 for the V

  3. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells ( ... tests may be done to check for an iron deficiency. Other tests that may be done include: EKG ...

  4. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Breath-Holding ... > For Parents > Breath-Holding Spells Print A A A What's ...

  5. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-06-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P < 0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P < 0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease.

  6. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  7. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  8. The Physics of Breath-Hold Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilella, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcelo

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes physical features of breath-hold diving. Considers the diver's descent and the initial surface dive and presents examples that show the diver's buoyancy equilibrium varying with depth, the driving force supplied by finning, and the effect of friction between the water and the diver. (Author/JRH)

  9. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  10. Piracetam in severe breath holding spells.

    PubMed

    Azam, Matloob; Bhatti, Nasera; Shahab, Naheed

    2008-01-01

    Breath holding spells (BHS) are apparently frightening events occurring in otherwise healthy children. Generally, no medical treatment is recommended and parental reassurance is believed to be enough, however, severe BHS can be very stressful for the parents and a pharmacological agent may be desired in some of these children. In this prospective study aim was to determine the usefulness of piracetam as prophylactic treatment for severe BHS. Children were recruited from Neurology Clinic in Children's Hospital, Islamabad between January 2002 to December 2004. Diagnosis of BHS was based on characteristic history and normal physical examination. Piracetam was prescribed to those children who were diagnosed as severe BHS in a dose ranging from 50-100 mg/kg/day. Iron supplements were added if hemoglobin was less than 10 gm%. Patients were seen at 2-4 weeks interval and follow-up was continued until 3 months after the cessation of drug therapy. Fifty-two children were enrolled in the study, 34 boys and 18 girls. Ages ranged from 4 weeks to 5 years with mean age of 17 months. In 81% of children, spells disappeared completely and in 9% frequency was reduced to less than one per month and of much lesser intensity. Prophylaxis was given for 3-6 months (mean 5) duration. Piracetam is an effective prophylactic treatment for severe BHS.

  11. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Acute Effects of Cannabis on Breath-Holding Duration

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Metrik, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual’s perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a bio-behavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress post-cannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath-holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were non-treatment seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed breath-holding task. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly lower breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration x frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may be exacerbating distress intolerance (via breath-holding duration). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis’ acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. PMID:27454678

  13. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned.

  14. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  15. The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Peter; Lundgren, Claes E G

    2009-01-01

    This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute physiological limits are being approached as indicated by findings of pulmonary edema and alveolar hemorrhage postdive. However, a remarkable, and so far poorly understood, variation in individual disposition for such problems exists. Mortality connected with breath-hold diving is primarily concentrated to less well-trained recreational divers and competitive spearfishermen who fall victim to hypoxia. Particularly vulnerable are probably also individuals with preexisting cardiac problems and possibly, essentially healthy divers who may have suffered severe alternobaric vertigo as a complication to inadequate pressure equilibration of the middle ears. The specific topics discussed include the diving response and its expression by the cardiovascular system, which exhibits hypertension, bradycardia, oxygen conservation, arrhythmias, and contraction of the spleen. The respiratory system is challenged by compression of the lungs with barotrauma of descent, intrapulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and the effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation. Various mechanisms associated with hypoxia and loss of consciousness are discussed, including hyperventilation, ascent blackout, fasting, and excessive postexercise O(2) consumption. The potential for high nitrogen pressure in the lungs to cause decompression sickness and N(2) narcosis is also illuminated.

  16. Evaluation of QT Dispersion in Children with Breath Holding Spells.

    PubMed

    Movahedian, Amir Hosein; Heidarzadeh Arani, Marzieh; Motaharizad, Davood; Mousavi, Gholam Abbas; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-01-01

    Breath holding spells (BHS) are common involuntary reflexes in infancy and early childhood. Differential diagnosis should embrace Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) and paroxysmal abnormalities of rhythm. The aim of this study was to compare QT dispersion (QTd) in children with breath holding spells and normal controls. QT dispersion and Corrected QT(QTc) dispersion were measured in 12 lead surface electrocardiograms in 56 patients with BHS and compared with healthy children of the same age referred to the clinic for regular checkup visits. The most common type of BHS was cyanotic (83.9%). Seven patients (12.5%) had pallid and two patients (3.5%) had mixed spells. There was a history of breath holding spells in 33.9% of the children. QT dispersion was 61.6± 22.5 and 47.1±18.8 ms in patient and control groups, respectively. QTc dispersion (QTcd) was 104 ± 29.6 and 71.9 ±18.2 ms, respectively. There was a significant difference between patient and control groups in terms of QTd and QTcd (P<0.001). QTd and QTcd were increased in children with BHS. Therefore, the evaluation of EKG for early diagnosis of rhythm abnormalities seems reasonable in these children.

  17. Preliminary observations on the effect of hypoxic and hyperbaric stress on pulmonary gas exchange in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Garbella, Erika; Piarulli, Andrea; Fornai, Edo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Prediletto, Renato

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane integrity and ventilation/perfusion mismatch after breath-hold diving. Pulmonary diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO), haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Hct) were measured in six elite divers before and at 2, 10 and 25 minutes after a maximal breath-hold dive to a depth of 10 metres' sea water. Compared to pre-dive, DLCO showed a slight increase at 2 minutes in five subjects and a tendency to decrease at 25 minutes (P < 0.001) in all subjects. DLNO showed an increase at 10 minutes in three divers and a slight decrease at 25 minutes in five subjects. There was a small but significant (P < 0.001) increase in Hb and Hct at 2 minutes, possibly affecting the DLCO measurements. An early but transient increase in DLCO in five divers may reflect the central shift in blood volume during a breath-hold dive. The late parallel decrease in DLCO and DLNO likely reflects alveolar-capillary distress (interstitial oedema). The DLNO increase in three subjects at 10 minutes may suggest ventilation/perfusion mismatch.

  18. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity.

  19. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-07

    We present a new model for calculating locomotion costs in breath-hold divers. Starting from basic mechanics principles, we calculate the work that the diver must provide through propulsion to counterbalance the action of drag, the buoyant force and weight during immersion. Compared to those in previous studies, the model presented here accurately analyses breath-hold divers which alternate active swimming with prolonged glides during the dive (as is the case in mammals). The energy cost of the dive is strongly dependent on these prolonged gliding phases. Here we investigate the length and impacts on energy cost of these glides with respect to the diver characteristics, and compare them with those observed in different breath-hold diving species. Taking into account the basal metabolic rate and chemical energy to propulsion transformation efficiency, we calculate optimal swim velocity and the corresponding total energy cost (including metabolic rate) and compare them with observations. Energy cost is minimised when the diver passes through neutral buoyancy conditions during the dive. This generally implies the presence of prolonged gliding phases in both ascent and descent, where the buoyancy (varying with depth) is best used against the drag, reducing energy cost. This is in agreement with past results (Miller et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013) where, when the buoyant force is considered constant during the dive, the energy cost was minimised for neutral buoyancy. In particular, our model confirms the good physical adaption of dolphins for diving, compared to other breath-hold diving species which are mostly positively buoyant (penguins for example). The presence of prolonged glides implies a non-trivial dependency of optimal speed on maximal depth of the dive. This extends previous findings (Sato et al., 2010; Watanabe et al., 2011) which found no dependency of optimal speed on dive depth for particular conditions. The energy cost of the dive can be further

  20. Real-time cardiac MRI without triggering, gating, or breath holding.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Wu, Yi-Jen L; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T Kevin; Ye, Qing; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2008-01-01

    State-of-the-art cardiac MRI can perform real-time 2D scans without cardiac triggering during a single breath hold; however, real-time cardiac MRI in rats is difficult due to the high heart rate (330 bpm) and presence of respiratory motion. These challenges are overcome by using a dynamic imaging method based on Partially Separable Function (PSF) theory with an acceleration factor of 256. This paper demonstrates that this method can be used in the study of transplanted rat hearts for both anatomical and perfusion applications. The study was carried out with a 200 microm in-plane resolution with a 17.2 msec temporal resolution, and the results show improved spatial resolution (2x) and reduced acquisition time (3x) relative to Electrocardiogram (ECG) triggered, respiratory gated cine imaging.

  1. Decompression sickness in breath-hold divers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardette, Bernard; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-12-01

    Although it has been generally assumed that the risk of decompression sickness is virtually zero during a single breath-hold dive in humans, repeated dives may result in a cumulative increase in the tissue and blood nitrogen tension. Many species of marine mammals perform extensive foraging bouts with deep and long dives interspersed by a short surface interval, and some human divers regularly perform repeated dives to 30-40 m or a single dive to more than 200 m, all of which may result in nitrogen concentrations that elicit symptoms of decompression sickness. Neurological problems have been reported in humans after single or repeated dives and recent necropsy reports in stranded marine mammals were suggestive of decompression sickness-like symptoms. Modelling attempts have suggested that marine mammals may live permanently with elevated nitrogen concentrations and may be at risk when altering their dive behaviour. In humans, non-pathogenic bubbles have been recorded and symptoms of decompression sickness have been reported after repeated dives to modest depths. The mechanisms implicated in these accidents indicate that repeated breath-hold dives with short surface intervals are factors that predispose to decompression sickness. During deep diving, the effect of pulmonary shunts and/or lung collapse may play a major role in reducing the incidence of decompression sickness in humans and marine mammals.

  2. Essential Hypertension: Cardiovascular Response to Breath Hold Combined with Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, U; Urban, P; Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2015-07-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a widespread disease and might be prevalent in apnea divers and master athletes. Little is known about the influence of EH and the antihypertensive drugs (AHD) on cardiovascular reactions to combined breath hold (BH) and exercise. In this pilot study, healthy divers (HCON) were compared with treated hypertensive divers with regard to heart rate (HR) and mean blood-pressure (MAP) responses to BH, exercise and the combination of both. Ten subjects with EH and ten healthy divers were tested. 3 different 20 s stimuli were applied: BH combined with 30 W or 150 W and 150 W without BH. The time-charts during the stress intervals and during recovery were compared. Subjects treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor showed higher changes for MAP values if breath hold was performed. HR responses were obviously changed if a β-blocker was part of the medication. One subject showed extreme MAP responses to all stimuli and conspicuous HR if BH was involved. The modulation of HR-/MAP-response in EH subjects depends on the mechanisms of antihypertensive agents. The combination of an ACE inhibitor and a β-blocker may give the best protection. It is recommended to include short apnea tests in the fitness-to-dive examination to individually predict potential endangerment.

  3. Considerable pancreatic tumor motion during breath-holding.

    PubMed

    Lens, Eelco; van der Horst, Astrid; Versteijne, Eva; Bel, Arjan; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2016-11-01

    Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce abdominal organ motion during radiotherapy. However, for inhale BH, abdominal tumor motion during BH has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify tumor motion during inhale BH and tumor position variations between consecutive inhale BHs in pancreatic cancer patients. Twelve patients with intratumoral fiducials were included and asked to perform three consecutive 30-second inhale BHs on each of three measurement days. During BH, lateral fluoroscopic movies were obtained and a two-dimensional (2D) image correlation algorithm was used to track the fiducials and the diaphragm, yielding the tumor and diaphragm motion during each BH. The tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was obtained from the difference in initial tumor position between consecutive BHs on a single measurement day. We observed tumor motion during BH with a mean absolute maximum displacement over all BHs of 4.2 mm (range 1.0-11.0 mm) in inferior-superior (IS) direction and 2.7 mm (range 0.5-8.0 mm) in anterior-posterior (AP) direction. We found only a moderate correlation between tumor and diaphragm motion in the IS direction (Pearson's correlation coefficient |r|>0.6 in 45 of 76 BHs). The mean tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was 0.2 [standard deviation (SD) 1.7] mm in the inferior direction and 0.5 (SD 0.8) mm in the anterior direction. We observed substantial pancreatic tumor motion during BH as well as considerable position variation between consecutive BHs on a single day. We recommend further quantifying these uncertainties before introducing breath-hold during radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. Also, the diaphragm cannot be used as a surrogate for pancreatic tumor motion.

  4. Alveolar gas composition and exchange during deep breath-hold diving and dry breath holds in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G; Costa, M; Ferrigno, M; Grassi, B; Marconi, C; Lundgren, C E; Cerretelli, P

    1991-02-01

    End tidal O2 and CO2 (PETCO2) pressures, expired volume, blood lactate concentration ([Lab]), and arterial blood O2 saturation [dry breath holds (BHs) only] were assessed in three elite breath-hold divers (ED) before and after deep dives and BH and in nine control subjects (C; BH only). After the dives (depth 40-70 m, duration 88-151 s), end-tidal O2 pressure decreased from approximately 140 Torr to a minimum of 30.6 Torr, PETCO2 increased from approximately 25 Torr to a maximum of 47.0 Torr, and expired volume (BTPS) ranged from 1.32 to 2.86 liters. Pulmonary O2 exchange was 455-1,006 ml. CO2 output approached zero. [Lab] increased from approximately 1.2 mM to at most 6.46 mM. Estimated power output during dives was 513-929 ml O2/min, i.e. approximately 20-30% of maximal O2 consumption. During BH, alveolar PO2 decreased from approximately 130 to less than 30 Torr in ED and from 125 to 45 Torr in C. PETCO2 increased from approximately 30 to approximately 50 Torr in both ED and C. Contrary to C, pulmonary O2 exchange in ED was less than resting O2 consumption, whereas CO2 output approached zero in both groups. [Lab] was unchanged. Arterial blood O2 saturation decreased more in ED than in C. ED are characterized by increased anaerobic metabolism likely due to the existence of a diving reflex.

  5. Qualitative assessment of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using breath-hold and non-breath-hold techniques in the portal venous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Kwang-Choul; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the image quality in delineation of the portal venous systems with two different methods, breath-hold and non-breath-hold by using the 3D FLASH sequence. We used a 1.5 T system to obtain magnetic resonance(MR)images. Arterial and portal phase 3D FLASH images were obtained with breath-hold after a bolus injection of GD-DOTA. The detection of PVS on the MR angiograms was classified into three grades. First, the angiograms of the breath-hold method showed well the portal vein, the splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein systems in 13 of 15 patients (86%) and the inferior mesenteric vein system in 6 of 15 patients (40%), Second, MR angiograms of the non-breath-hold method demonstrated the PVS and the SMV in 12 of 15 patients (80%) and the IMV in 5 of 15 patients (33%). Our study showed contrast-enhanced 3D FLASH MR angiography, together with the breath-hold technique, may provide reliable and accurate information on the portal venous system.

  6. Hemodynamic adjustments during breath-holding in trained divers.

    PubMed

    Costalat, Guillaume; Coquart, Jeremy; Castres, Ingrid; Tourny, Claire; Lemaitre, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Voluntary breath-holding (BH) elicits several hemodynamic changes, but little is known about maximal static immersed-body BH. We hypothesized that the diving reflex would be strengthened with body immersion and would spare more oxygen than maximal dry static BH, resulting in a longer BH duration. Eleven trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) performed a maximal dry-body BH and a maximal immersed-body BH. Cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), contractility index (CTI), and ventricular ejection time (VET) were continuously recorded by bio-impedancemetry (PhysioFlow PF-05). Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) was assessed with a finger probe oximeter. In both conditions, BHDs presented a bi-phasic kinetic for CO and a tri-phasic kinetic for SV and HR. In the first phase of immersed-body BH and dry-body BH, results (mean ± SD) expressed as percentage changes from starting values showed decreased CO (55.9 ± 10.4 vs. 39.3 ± 16.8 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions), due to drops in both SV (24.9 ± 16.2 vs. 9.0 ± 8.5 %, respectively; p < 0.05 between conditions) and HR (39.7 ± 16.7 vs. 33.6 ± 17.0 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions). The second phase was marked by an overall stabilization of hemodynamic variables. In the third one, CO kept stabilizing due to increased SV (17.0 ± 20.2 vs. 10.9 ± 13.8 %, respectively; p < 0.05 between conditions) associated with a second HR drop (14.0 ± 10.0 vs. 12.7 ± 8.9 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions). This study highlights similar time-course patterns for cardiodynamic variables during dry-body and immersed-body BH, although the phenomenon was more pronounced in the latter condition.

  7. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  8. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  9. Alveolar gas composition before and after maximal breath-holds in competitive divers.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, P; Lundgren, C E G

    2006-01-01

    The urge to breathe, as stimulated by hypercapnia, is generally considered to cause a breath-hold diver to end the breath-hold, and pre-breath hold hyperventilation has been suggested to cause hypoxic loss of consciousness (LOC) due to the reduced urge to breathe. Competitors hyperventilate before "Static Apnea", yet only 10% surface with symptoms of hypoxia such as loss of motor control (LMC) or LOC. We hypothesized that the extensive hyperventilation would prevent hypercapnia even during prolonged breath-holding and we also recorded breaking-point end-tidal PO2 in humans. Nine breath-hold divers performed breath-holds of maximal duration according to their chosen "Static Apnea" procedure. They floated face down in a swimming pool (28 degrees C). The only non-standard procedure was that they exhaled into a sampling tube for end-expiratory air, before starting the breath-hold and before resuming breathing. Breath-hold duration was 284 +/- 25 (SD) seconds. End-tidal PCO2 was 18.9 +/- 2.0 mmHg before apnea and 38.3 +/- 4.7 mmHg at apnea termination. End-tidal PO2 was 131.7 +/- 2.7 mmHg before apnea and 26.9 +/- 7.5 mmHg at apnea termination. Two of the subjects showed LMC after exhaling into the sampling tube; their end-tidal PAO2 values were 19.6 and 21.0 mmHg, respectively. End-tidal CO2 was normocapnic or hypocapnic at the termination of breath-holds. These data suggest that the athletes rely primarily on the hypoxic stimuli, probably in interaction with CO2 stimuli to determine when to end breath-holds. The severity of hypoxia close to LOC was similar to that reported for acute hypobaric hypoxia in humans.

  10. Respiratory hypoalgesia? Breath-holding, but not respiratory phase modulates nociceptive flexion reflex and pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hassan; Van de Broek, Karlien; Plaghki, Léon; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2016-03-01

    Several observations suggest that respiratory phase (inhalation vs. exhalation) and post-inspiratory breath-holds could modulate pain and the nociceptive reflex. This experiment aimed to investigate the role of both mechanisms. Thirty-two healthy participants received supra-threshold electrocutaneous stimulations to elicit both the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex (NFR) and pain, either during spontaneous inhalations or exhalations, or during three types of instructed breath-holds: following exhalation, at mid-inhalation and at full-capacity inhalation. Whether the electrocutaneous stimulus was applied during inhalation or exhalation did not affect the NFR or pain. Self-reported pain was reduced and the NFR was increased during breath-holding compared to spontaneous breathing. Whereas the type of breath-hold did not impact on self-reported pain, breath-holds at full-capacity inhalation and following exhalation were associated with a lower NFR amplitude compared to breath-holds at mid-inhalation. The present findings confirm that breath-holding can modulate pain (sensitivity) and suggest that both attentional distraction and changes in vagal activity may underlie the observed effects.

  11. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  12. Cardiac Repolarization Changes in the Children with Breath-Holding Spells

    PubMed Central

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Saleh, Fazl; Farhani, Nahal; Rafiei, Mohammad; Inaloo, Soroor; Asadipooya, Ali-Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Objective Breath-holding spells are known as benign attacks, frequencies of which decrease by the development of the autonomic nervous system. The present study aims to compare the electrocardiographic repolarization in children with breath-holding spells. Methods In this study, QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, T peak to T end dispersion, and P wave dispersion of the twelve-lead surface electrocardiography of fifty children who had breath-holding spells were measured and compared with normal children from April 2011 to August 2012. Findings Forty-four (88%) patients had cyanotic spells, while 6 (12%) had pallid spells. QTc dispersion was increased in the patients with breath-holding spells (148.2±33.1) compared to the healthy children (132±27.3) and the difference was statically significant (P = 0.01). Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between the patients and the control subjects regarding the other parameters (P > 0.05). Conclusion QTc dispersion was significantly increased in the patients with breath-holding spells compared to normal children and this is a sign of cardiac repolarization abnormality as well as the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with breath-holding spells. PMID:24910749

  13. Respiration-correlated treatment delivery using feedback-guided breath hold: A technical study

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Starkschall, George; Balter, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Mathew J.; Antolak, John A.; Tolani, Naresh; Prado, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes movement of internal structures in the thorax and abdomen, making accurate delivery of radiation therapy to tumors in those areas a challenge. To reduce the uncertainties caused by this motion, we have developed feedback-guided breath hold (FGBH), a novel delivery technique in which radiation is delivered only during a voluntary breath hold that is sustained for as long as the patient feels comfortable. Here we present the technical aspects of FGBH, which involve (1) fabricating the hardware so the respiratory trace can be displayed to the patient, (2) assembling a delay box to be used as a breath-hold detector, and (3) performing quality control tests to ensure that FGBH can be delivered accurately and safely. A commercial respiratory tracking system that uses an external fiducial to monitor abdominal wall motion generates and displays the breathing trace and specific positions in the breathing cycle where a breath hold needs to occur. Hardware was developed to present this display to the patient in the treatment position. Patients view the presentation either on a liquid crystal display or through a pair of virtual reality goggles. Using the respiratory trace as a visual aid, the patient performs a breath hold so that the position representing the location of a fiducial is held within a specified gating window. A delay box was fabricated to differentiate between gating signals received during free breathing and those received during breath hold, allowing radiation delivery only when the fiducial was within the breath-hold gating window. A quality control analysis of the gating delay box and the integrated system was performed to ensure that all of the hardware and components were ready for clinical use.

  14. Risk of Neurological Insult in Competitive Deep Breath-Hold Diving.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Schöppenthau, Holger; Schipke, Jochen D

    2017-02-01

    It has been widely believed that tissue nitrogen uptake from the lungs during breath-hold diving would be insufficient to cause decompression stress in humans. With competitive free diving, however, diving depths have been ever increasing over the past decades. A case is presented of a competitive free-diving athlete who suffered stroke-like symptoms after surfacing from his last dive of a series of 3 deep breath-hold dives. A literature and Web search was performed to screen for similar cases of subjects with serious neurological symptoms after deep breath-hold dives. A previously healthy 31-y-old athlete experienced right-sided motor weakness and difficulty speaking immediately after surfacing from a breathhold dive to a depth of 100 m. He had performed 2 preceding breath-hold dives to that depth with surface intervals of only 15 min. The presentation of symptoms and neuroimaging findings supported a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Three more cases of neurological insults were retrieved by literature and Web search; in all cases the athletes presented with stroke-like symptoms after single breath-hold dives of depths exceeding 100 m. Two of these cases only had a short delay to recompression treatment and completely recovered from the insult. This report highlights the possibility of neurological insult, eg, stroke, due to cerebral arterial gas embolism as a consequence of decompression stress after deep breath-hold dives. Thus, stroke as a clinical presentation of cerebral arterial gas embolism should be considered another risk of extreme breath-hold diving.

  15. Voluntary breath-holding for breast cancer radiotherapy is consistent and stable.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Ruth; James, Matthew; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate breath-hold stability and constancy for a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) technique in a retrospective analysis. Movie loop sequences of electronic portal image data from multiple breath holds in a cohort of 19 patients were used to assess within and between breath-hold stability. In vivo dosimetry data based on electronic portal imaging (EPI) were analysed for 31 VBH patients plus a cohort of free-breathing (FB) patients to provide a reference. A phantom experiment simulated the impact on dose of FB, breath hold and unplanned release of breath hold. 165/174 (93%) movie loop data sets had no detectable displacement. For the remaining 12, median displacement = 1.5 mm and maximum displacement = 3 mm (one patient on one fraction). In vivo dosimetry data analysis showed a median dose difference measured to planned of -0.2% (VBH) and -0.1% (FB). Dose distribution evaluation (γ) pass rates were 84% (VBH) and 91% (FB) including the lung region; 93% and 96% with a lung override. Unplanned release of phantom breath-hold position changed median dose by ≤1% and degraded γ pass rates to 79-62%. Failing regions were mostly in the periphery of the treated volume. The data confirmed that multiple VBHs using visual monitoring are stable; in vivo dose verification via EPI was within expected and acceptable levels. These data provide further reassurance that VBH is a safe technique for cardiac sparing breast radiotherapy and support its rapid, widespread implementation.

  16. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  17. The ins and outs of breath holding: simple demonstrations of complex respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Skow, Rachel J; Day, Trevor A; Fuller, Jonathan E; Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D

    2015-09-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology behind breath-hold duration. These activities require minimal equipment and are easily adapted to small-group demonstrations or a larger-group inquiry format where students can design a protocol and collect and analyze data from their classmates. Specifically, breath-hold duration is measured during a number of maneuvers, including after end expiration, end inspiration, voluntary prior hyperventilation, and inspired hyperoxia. Further activities illustrate the potential contribution of chemoreflexes through rebreathing and repeated rebreathing after a maximum breath hold. The outcome measures resulting from each intervention are easily visualized and plotted and can comprise a comprehensive data set to illustrate and discuss complex and integrated cardiorespiratory physiology. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  18. Decompression sickness in breath-hold diving, and its probable connection to the growth and dissolution of small arterial gas emboli.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Saul; Solano-Altamirano, J M

    2015-04-01

    We solved the Laplace equation for the radius of an arterial gas embolism (AGE), during and after breath-hold diving. We used a simple three-region diffusion model for the AGE, and applied our results to two types of breath-hold dives: single, very deep competitive-level dives and repetitive shallower breath-hold dives similar to those carried out by indigenous commercial pearl divers in the South Pacific. Because of the effect of surface tension, AGEs tend to dissolve in arterial blood when arteries remote from supersaturated tissue. However if, before fully dissolving, they reach the capillary beds that perfuse the brain and the inner ear, they may become inflated with inert gas that is transferred into them from these contiguous temporarily supersaturated tissues. By using simple kinetic models of cerebral and inner ear tissue, the nitrogen tissue partial pressures during and after the dive(s) were determined. These were used to theoretically calculate AGE growth and dissolution curves for AGEs lodged in capillaries of the brain and inner ear. From these curves it was found that both cerebral and inner ear decompression sickness are expected to occur occasionally in single competitive-level dives. It was also determined from these curves that for the commercial repetitive dives considered, the duration of the surface interval (the time interval separating individual repetitive dives from one another) was a key determinant, as to whether inner ear and/or cerebral decompression sickness arose. Our predictions both for single competitive-level and repetitive commercial breath-hold diving were consistent with what is known about the incidence of cerebral and inner ear decompression sickness in these forms of diving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS) is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS. PMID:24575029

  20. The Utilization of an Insertable Cardiac Monitor in a Child With Pallid Breath-Holding Spells.

    PubMed

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Goldshmit, Yuval; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Cicurel, Assi; Katz, Uriel; Mishali, David; Glikson, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Pacing can be a successful treatment for pallid breath-holding spells, primarily in individuals with severe bradycardia. We describe an 18-month-old girl experiencing severe pallid breath-holding spells in whom repeated electrocardiographic, Holter, and electroencephalographic monitoring tests were all normal. Using a subcutaneous insertable cardiac monitor, severe bradycardia was detected during one of this girl's episodes. This finding led to a pacemaker implantation. Subsequently, her breath-holding spells completely resolved. This child illustrates the ability of the insertable cardiac monitor to help and diagnose arrhythmias in children with unresolved clinical findings. The ability to implant it with a minimal scar makes it ideal for uncooperative individuals with relative few and unexpected episodes that are hard to diagnose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic shear wave elastography in children under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Caroline; Groth, Michael; Petersen, Kay Uwe; Hammel, Anna; Brinkert, Florian; Grabhorn, Enke; Weidemann, Sören Alexander; Busch, Jasmin; Adam, Gerhard; Herrmann, Jochen

    2017-06-20

    To compare hepatic 2D shear wave elastography (2D SWE) in children between free-breathing and breath-hold conditions, in terms of measurement agreement and time expenditure. A cohort of 57 children (12.7±4.3 years) who underwent standardized 2D SWE between May and October 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Liver elastograms were obtained under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions and time expenditure was measured. Median stiffness, interquartile range (IQR), and IQR/median ratio were calculated based on 12, six, and three elastograms. Results were compared using Pearson correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman analysis, and Student's t. Median liver stiffness under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions correlated strongly (7.22±4.5kPa vs. 7.21±4.11kPa; r=0.97, P<0.001). Time to acquire 12 elastograms with free-breathing was lower than that with breath-holding (79.3±32.5sec vs. 143.7±51.8sec, P<0.001). Results for median liver stiffness based of 12, six, and three elastograms demonstrated very high agreement for free-breathing (ICC 0.993) and for breath-hold conditions (ICC 0.994). Hepatic 2D SWE performed with free-breathing yields results similar to the breath-hold condition. With a substantially lower time requirement, which can be further reduced by lowering the number of elastograms, the free-breathing technique may be suitable for infants and less cooperative children not capable of breath-holding. • Hepatic 2D SWE performed with free-breathing yields results similar to breath-hold condition. • Benefit of the free-breathing approach is the substantially lower time requirement. • Lowering the number of elastograms can further reduce time expenditure. • Free-breathing 2D SWE is suitable in children with suspected liver disease.

  2. Changes of autonomic nervous system function in patients with breath-holding spells treated with iron.

    PubMed

    Orii, Kenji E; Kato, Zenichiro; Osamu, Fukutomi; Funato, Michinori; Kubodera, Uniko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2002-05-01

    To evaluate the autonomic nervous system of patients with breath-holding spells after iron treatment, we attempted to determine whether a dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system reflexes exists in children with severe cyanotic breathholding spells. An electrocardiogram for each subject was recorded for 24 hours in the subject's home and parasympathetic activity was investigated by the fast Fourier transform method. Hematologic data and clinical symptoms of all three patients treated with iron improved and attacks of severe breath-holding spells disappeared. After iron treatment was started, the heart rate variability increased during sleep. It appears that supplementation of iron is effective in improving the dysregulation of autonomic nervous system reflexes.

  3. Free-breathing radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination vs breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination magnetic resonance imaging of the liver at 1.5T

    PubMed Central

    Yedururi, Sireesha; Kang, HyunSeon C; Wei, Wei; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Marcal, Leonardo P; Stafford, R Jason; Willis, Brandy J; Szklaruk, Janio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (cVIBE) and free-breathing radial VIBE (rVIBE) and determine whether rVIBE could replace cVIBE in routine liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS In this prospective study, 15 consecutive patients scheduled for routine MRI of the abdomen underwent pre- and post-contrast breath-hold cVIBE imaging (19 s acquisition time) and free-breathing rVIBE imaging (111 s acquisition time) on a 1.5T Siemens scanner. Three radiologists with 2, 4, and 8 years post-fellowship experience in abdominal imaging evaluated all images. The radiologists were blinded to the sequence types, which were presented in a random order for each patient. For each sequence, the radiologists scored the cVIBE and rVIBE images for liver edge sharpness, hepatic vessel clarity, presence of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, fat saturation, and overall image quality using a five-point scale. RESULTS Compared to rVIBE, cVIBE yielded significantly (P < 0.001) higher scores for liver edge sharpness (mean score, 3.87 vs 3.37), hepatic-vessel clarity (3.71 vs 3.18), artifacts (3.74 vs 3.06), lesion conspicuity (3.81 vs 3.2), and overall image quality (3.91 vs 3.24). cVIBE and rVIBE did not significantly differ in quality of fat saturation (4.12 vs 4.03, P = 0.17). The inter-observer variability with respect to differences between rVIBE and cVIBE scores was close to zero compared to random error and inter-patient variation. Quality of rVIBE images was rated as acceptable for all parameters. CONCLUSION rVIBE cannot replace cVIBE in routine liver MRI. At 1.5T, free-breathing rVIBE yields acceptable, although slightly inferior image quality compared to breath-hold cVIBE. PMID:27551341

  4. Single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle using Cartesian sampling.

    PubMed

    Wetzl, Jens; Schmidt, Michaela; Pontana, François; Longère, Benjamin; Lugauer, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Forman, Christoph

    2017-05-26

    Our objectives were to evaluate a single-breath-hold approach for Cartesian 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle with a nearly isotropic resolution of [Formula: see text] and a breath-hold duration of [Formula: see text]19 s against a standard stack of 2-D CINE slices acquired in multiple breath-holds. Validation is performed with data sets from ten healthy volunteers. A Cartesian sampling pattern based on the spiral phyllotaxis and a compressed sensing reconstruction method are proposed to allow 3-D CINE imaging with high acceleration factors. The fully integrated reconstruction uses multiple graphics processing units to speed up the reconstruction. The 2-D CINE and 3-D CINE are compared based on ventricular function parameters, contrast-to-noise ratio and edge sharpness measurements. Visual comparisons of corresponding short-axis slices of 2-D and 3-D CINE show an excellent match, while 3-D CINE also allows reformatting to other orientations. Ventricular function parameters do not significantly differ from values based on 2-D CINE imaging. Reconstruction times are below 4 min. We demonstrate single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging in volunteers and three example patient cases, which features fast reconstruction and allows reformatting to arbitrary orientations.

  5. Breath-Holding During Exhalation as a Simple Manipulation to Reduce Pain Perception.

    PubMed

    Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A; Muñoz Ladrón de Guevara, Cristina; Montoro, Casandra I

    2015-09-01

    Baroreceptor stimulation yields antinociceptive effects. In this study, baroreceptors were stimulated by a respiratory maneuver, with the effect of this manipulation on pain perception subsequently measured. Thirty-eight healthy participants were instructed to inhale slowly (control condition) and to hold the air in lungs after a deep inhalation (experimental condition). It was expected that breath-holding would increases blood pressure (BP) and thus stimulate the baroreceptors, which in turn would reduce pain perception. Pain was induced by pressure algometry on the nail of the left-index finger, at three different pressure intensities, and quantified by visual analogue scales. Heart rate (HR) and BP were continuously recorded. Pain perception was lower when pain pressure was administered during the breath-holding phase versus the slow inhalation phase, regardless of the pressure intensity. During breath-holding, a rapid increase in BP and decrease in HR were observed, demonstrating activation of the baroreceptor reflex. Pain perception is reduced when painful stimulation is applied during breath-holding immediately following a deep inhalation. These results suggest that a simple and easy-to-perform respiratory maneuver could be used to reduce acute pain perception. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of heart rate variability in breath holding children by 24 hour Holter monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Osman; Ciftel, Murat; Ozturk, Kezban; Kilic, Omer; Kahveci, Hasan; Laloğlu, Fuat; Ceylan, Ozben

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism in children with breath holding may be generalised autonomic dysregulation. Thus, we performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability analyses using 24-hour Holter monitoring to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children with breath-holding spells. We performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate analyses using 24-hour Holter monitors to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children during a breath-holding spell. Our study group consisted of 68 children with breath-holding spells - 56 cyanotic type and 12 pallid type - and 39 healthy controls. Clinical and heart rate variability results were compared between each spell type - cyanotic or pallid - and the control group; significant differences (p<0.05) in standard deviation of all NN intervals, mean of the standard deviations of all NN intervals for all 5-minute segments, percentage of differences between adjacent RR intervals >50 ms, and square root of the mean of the sum of squares of the differences between adjacent NN intervals values were found between the pallid and cyanotic groups. Holter monitoring for 24 hours and heart rate variability parameters, particularly in children with pallid spells, are crucial for evaluation of cardiac rhythm changes.

  7. Mean heart dose variation over a course of breath-holding breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunkerley, Nicolle; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Evans, Philip M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the work was to estimate the dose received by the heart throughout a course of breath-holding breast radiotherapy. 113 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired for 20 patients treated within the HeartSpare 1A study, in which both an active breathing control (ABC) device and a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) method were used. Predicted mean heart doses were obtained from treatment plans. CBCT scans were imported into a treatment planning system, heart outlines defined, images registered to the CT planning scan and mean heart dose recorded. Two observers outlined two cases three times each to assess interobserver and intraobserver variation. There were no statistically significant differences between ABC and VBH heart dose data from CT planning scans, or in the CBCT-based estimates of heart dose, and no effect from the order of the breath-hold method. Variation in mean heart dose per fraction over the three imaged fractions was <6 cGy without setup correction, decreasing to 3.3 cGy with setup correction. If scaled to 15 fractions, all differences between predicted and estimated mean heart doses were <0.5 Gy and in 80% of cases, they were <0.25 Gy. Variation in mean heart dose was at an acceptable level over the duration of breath-holding radiotherapy and was well predicted by the planning system. Advances in knowledge: Mean heart dose was not adversely affected by fraction-to-fraction variations throughout a course of heart-sparing radiotherapy using two well-established breath-holding methods.

  8. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David . E-mail: dsarrut@univ-lyon2.fr; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm{sup 3} and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  9. Immediate effects of breath holding maneuvers onto composition of exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Pritam; Trefz, Phillip; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2014-09-01

    Rapid concentration changes due to physiological or pathophysiological effects rather than appearance of unique disease biomarkers are important for clinical application of breath research. Simple maneuvers such as breath holding may significantly affect breath biomarker concentrations. In this study, exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were assessed in real time before and after different breath holding maneuvers. Continuous breath-resolved measurements (PTR-ToF-MS-8000) were performed in 31 healthy human subjects in a side-stream sampling mode. After 1 min of tidal breathing participants held their breath for 10, 20, 40, 60 s and as long as possible. Afterwards they continued to breathe normally for another minute. VOC profiles could be monitored in real time by assigning online PTR-ToF-MS data to alveolar or inspired phases of breath. Sudden and profound changes of exhaled VOC concentrations were recorded after different breath holding maneuvers. VOC concentrations returned to base line levels 10-20 s after breath holding. Breath holding induced concentration changes depended on physico-chemical properties of the substances. When substance concentrations were normalized onto end-tidal CO2 content, variation of acetone concentrations decreased, whereas variations of isoprene concentrations were not affected. As the effects of breathing patterns on exhaled substance concentrations depend on individual substance properties, sampling procedures have to be validated for each compound by means of appropriate real-time analysis. Normalization of exhaled concentrations onto exhaled CO2 is only valid for substances having similar physico-chemical properties as CO2.

  10. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noël; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sébastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm(3) and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  11. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  12. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  13. Brain responses to emotional stimuli during breath holding and hypoxia: an approach based on the independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Danilo; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; Landi, Alberto; L'Abbate, Antonio; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary breath holding represents a physiological model of hypoxia. It consists of two phases of oxygen saturation dynamics: an initial slow decrease (normoxic phase) followed by a rapid drop (hypoxic phase) during which transitory neurological symptoms as well as slight impairment of integrated cerebral functions, such as emotional processing, can occur. This study investigated how breath holding affects emotional processing. To this aim we characterized the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional-laden pictures as a function of breath holding time course. We recorded ERPs during free breathing and breath holding performed in air by elite apnea divers. We modeled brain responses during free breathing with four independent components distributed over different brain areas derived by an approach based on the independent component analysis (ICASSO). We described ERP changes during breath holding by estimating amplitude scaling and time shifting of the same components (component adaptation analysis). Component 1 included the main EEG features of emotional processing, had a posterior localization and did not change during breath holding; component 2, localized over temporo-frontal regions, was present only in unpleasant stimuli responses and decreased during breath holding, with no differences between breath holding phases; component 3, localized on the fronto-central midline regions, showed phase-independent breath holding decreases; component 4, quite widespread but with frontal prevalence, decreased in parallel with the hypoxic trend. The spatial localization of these components was compatible with a set of processing modules that affects the automatic and intentional controls of attention. The reduction of unpleasant-related ERP components suggests that the evaluation of aversive and/or possibly dangerous situations might be altered during breath holding.

  14. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon

    PubMed Central

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results. Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon–oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images. Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects. Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images

  15. WHICH AIRWAY PRESSURE SHOULD BE APPLIED DURING BREATH-HOLD IN DOGS UNDERGOING THORACIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY?

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Alessandro; Lacitignola, Luca; Auriemma, Edoardo; De Monte, Valentina; Grasso, Salvatore; Crovace, Antonio; Staffieri, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    This randomized controlled trial study aimed to identify the optimal positive pressure (PP) level that can clear atelectasis while avoiding pulmonary hyperinflation during the breath-hold technique in dogs undergoing thoracic computed tomography (CT). Sixty dogs affected by mammary tumors undergoing thoracic CT for the screening of pulmonary metastases were randomly assigned to six groups with different levels of PP during the breath-hold technique: 0 (control), 5 (PP5), 8 (PP8), 10 (PP10), 12 (PP12), and 15 (PP15) cmH2 O. The percentage of atelectatic lung region was lower in the PP10 (3.7 ± 1.1%; P = 0.002), PP12 (3.4 ± 1.3%; P = 0.0001), and PP15 (2.8 ± 0.9%; P = 0.006) groups than in the control group (5.0 ± 2.3%), and the percentage of poorly aerated lung region was lower in the PP8 (15.1 ± 2.6%; P = 0.0009), PP10 (13.0 ± 2.0 %; P = 0.002), PP12 (13.0 ± 2.2 %; P = 0.0002), and PP15 (11.1 ± 1.9%; P = 0.0002) groups than in the control group (19.8 ± 5.0). The percentage of normally aerated lung region, however, was higher in the PP10 (79.7 ± 4.1%; P = 0.005), PP12 (79.8 ± 5.1%; P = 0.0002), and PP15 (80.2 ± 4.9%; P = 0.002) groups than in the control group (73.4 ± 6.6%). A PP of 10-12 cmH2 O during the breath-hold technique should be considered to improve lung aeration during a breath-hold technique in dogs undergoing thoracic CT.

  16. Underwater study of arterial blood pressure in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Arne; L'abbate, Antonio; Passera, Mirko; Garbella, Erika; Benassi, Antonio; Bedini, Remo

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge regarding arterial blood pressure (ABP) values during breath-hold diving is scanty. It derives from a few reports of measurements performed at the water's surface, showing slight or no increase in ABP, and from a single study of two simulated deep breath-hold dives in a hyperbaric chamber. Simulated dives showed an increase in ABP to values considered life threatening by standard clinical criteria. For the first time, using a novel noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer, we successfully measured ABP in 10 healthy elite breath-hold divers at a depth of 10 m of freshwater (mfw). ABP was measured in dry conditions, at the surface (head-out immersion), and twice at a depth of 10 mfw. Underwater measurements of ABP were obtained in all subjects. Each measurement lasted 50-60 s and was accomplished without any complications or diver discomfort. In the 10 subjects as a whole, mean ABP values were 124/93 mmHg at the surface and 123/94 mmHg at a depth of 10 mfw. No significant statistical differences were found when blood pressure measurements at the water surface were compared with breath-hold diving conditions at a depth of 10 mfw. No systolic blood pressure values >140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure values >115 mmHg were recorded. In conclusion, direct measurements of ABP during apnea diving showed no or only mild increases in ABP. However, our results cannot be extended over environmental conditions different from those of the present study.

  17. Multiview 3-D Echocardiography Fusion with Breath-Hold Position Tracking Using an Optical Tracking System.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; McNulty, Alexander; Biamonte, Marina; He, Allen; Noga, Michelle; Boulanger, Pierre; Becher, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in echocardiography allow real-time 3-D dynamic image acquisition of the heart. However, one of the major limitations of 3-D echocardiography is the limited field of view, which results in an acquisition insufficient to cover the whole geometry of the heart. This study proposes the novel approach of fusing multiple 3-D echocardiography images using an optical tracking system that incorporates breath-hold position tracking to infer that the heart remains at the same position during different acquisitions. In six healthy male volunteers, 18 pairs of apical/parasternal 3-D ultrasound data sets were acquired during a single breath-hold as well as in subsequent breath-holds. The proposed method yielded a field of view improvement of 35.4 ± 12.5%. To improve the quality of the fused image, a wavelet-based fusion algorithm was developed that computes pixelwise likelihood values for overlapping voxels from multiple image views. The proposed wavelet-based fusion approach yielded significant improvement in contrast (66.46 ± 21.68%), contrast-to-noise ratio (49.92 ± 28.71%), signal-to-noise ratio (57.59 ± 47.85%) and feature count (13.06 ± 7.44%) in comparison to individual views.

  18. A survey of neurological decompression illness in commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Wong, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in the northern district of Yamaguchi, Japan to determine the relationship between neurological diving accidents and risk factors among commercial breath-hold divers (Ama). A questionnaire was distributed to 381 Ama divers who are members of the Ama diving union. We sought information on their dive practices (depth of single dive, single dive time, surface interval, length of dive shifts, lunch break) and the presence or absence of medical problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetic mellitus and other issues. Of the 381 Ama divers, 173 responded (45%): 29 were Funado (assisted-descent using weights) and 144 Cachido (unassisted) divers. Twelve had experienced strokelike symptoms during or after repetitive breath-hold diving; 11 were assisted and one unassisted (Funado vs. Cachido). Only two of 12 divers with neurological diving accidents had musculoskeletal symptoms. Neurological events were significantly correlated with dive depth, dive time, and surface interval; however, they were not related to medical history. Neurological diving accidents are more likely to happen among assisted Ama divers than unassisted ones. Repetitive breath-hold diving with a deep dive depth, long dive time, and short surface interval predisposes divers to decompression illness, which characteristically manifests as cerebral stroke.

  19. [Hemodynamic and respiratory changes in athletes during deep breath-hold diving].

    PubMed

    Gentile, C; La Scala, S

    2001-12-01

    The study analysed the hemodynamic and respiratory aspects of deep breath-hold diving. One male (59-year-old) and one female (32-year-old) subject were enrolled. They were both champion deep breath-hold divers. The dives were performed in the wet compartment of the hyperbaric chamber, first in thermoneutral (35 degrees C) and then cool (25 degrees C) water. The subjects were monitored using ECG recordings; percentage cannulation of the right radial artery using an aseptic technique. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were measured using impedance cardiography (Bomed). Variations were observed in heart rhythm, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure and breathing. Both bradycardia and many hemodynamically effective dysrhythmias influenced CO, which showed a tendency to decrease in the diver in cool water. Changes in CO were caused by concomitant changes in HR as SV showed no significant variations. During breath-hold diving, a drop in intra-thoracic pressure is likely to enhance redistribution of blood from the periphery to the chest, which might distend the heart even more, contributing to dysrhythmogenesis. The observation that dysrhythmias were more frequent in cool water is in line with these concepts. Only two leading divers were recruited in this study and observed for hemodynamic and respiratory changes. However, these findings are in line with similar studies carried out by other authors.

  20. STATIC VS PROSPECTIVE GATED, NON-BREATH HOLD VOLUMETRIC MDCT IMAGING OF THE LUNGS

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Osama I.; Chon, Deokiee; Beck, Kenneth; McLennan, Geoffrey; Sieren, Jered; Reinhardt, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We seek to establish lung imaging methods which provide for the ability to image the lung under dynamic, non-breath hold conditions while providing “virtual breath hold,” quantifiable volumetric image data sets. We use static, breath hold images as the gold standard for evaluating these virtual breath hold images in both a phantom and sheep. Materials and Methods: We have developed axial methods for gating image acquisition to multiple points in the respiratory cycle interleaved with incremental table stepping during multidetector-row CT (MDCT) scanning. Datasets are generated over multiple breaths, providing volume images representative of multiple points within a respiratory cycle. To determine the reproducibility and accuracy of the methods , 6 anesthetized sheep were studied by MDCT in non-gated and airway-pressure (Pawy)-gated modes where Pawy was 0, 7 and 15 cmH2O. Results: No significant differences were found between the coefficient of variation in air volume measured from repeated static scans (1.74±1.78%), gated scans: Inspiratory gated (1.2±0.44%) or expiratory-gated (1.39±0.98%), or between static (1.74±1.78%) and gated (1.39+/-0.98%) scanning at similar Pawy (p>0.1). Measured air volumes were larger from static vs. gated scans by 5.85±3.77% at 7cmH2O and 4.45±3.6% at 15cmHL2O Pawy (p<0.05) consistent with hysteresis. Differences between air volumes at 7 and 15 cmH2O measured from either static or gated scans or that delivered by a supersyringe were insignificant (p<0.05). Visual accuracy of 3D anatomic geometry was achieved, and landmark certainty was within 1mm across respiratory cycles. Conclusion: A method has been demonstrated which provides for accurate gating to respiratory signals during axial scanning. High resolution volumetric image datasets are achievable while the scanned subject is breathing.Images are quantitatively similar to breath hold images with differences likely explained by known P-V hysteresis

  1. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  2. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test

    PubMed Central

    Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n = 14), 45 to 60 years (n = 13), 60 to 75 years (n = 12), and older than 75 years (n = 8). Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO2) test was performed the following day. Results. No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding (r = 0.13) and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2 (r = 0.07). In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO2 test. Conclusion. A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia. PMID:28251147

  3. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test.

    PubMed

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n = 14), 45 to 60 years (n = 13), 60 to 75 years (n = 12), and older than 75 years (n = 8). Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO2) test was performed the following day. Results. No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding (r = 0.13) and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2 (r = 0.07). In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO2 test. Conclusion. A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia.

  4. Validation of 3D surface imaging in breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer: one central camera unit versus three camera units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigated the benefit of the use of two lateral camera units additional to a central camera unit for 3D surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy by comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery were included. The performance of surface imaging using one and three camera units was compared to using CBCT for setup verification. Breast-surface registrations were performed for CBCT as well as for 3D surfaces, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors an assessment of the group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement was made. Correlations between derived surface-imaging [one camera unit;three camera units] and CBCT setup errors were: R2=[0.67;0.75], [0.76;0.87], [0.88;0.91] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. Group mean, systematic and random errors were slightly smaller (sub-millimeter differences) and the limits of agreement were 0.10 to 0.25cm tighter when using three camera units compared with one. For the majority of the data, the use of three camera units compared with one resulted in setup errors more similar to the CBCT derived setup errors for the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions (p<0.01, Wilcoxon-signed-ranks test). This study shows a better correlation and agreement between 3D surface imaging and CBCT when three camera units are used instead of one and further outlines the conditions under which the benefit of using three camera units is significant.

  5. 3D Late Gadolinium Enhancement in a Single Prolonged Breath-hold using Supplemental Oxygenation and Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H.; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 3D single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Methods: Breath-hold metrics (breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of RR interval) without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (FOV=320×320×100 mm3, resolution=1.6×1.6×5.0 mm3, acceleration rate of 4) and a free breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semi-quantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Results: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35±11 s to 58±21 s, p<0.0125) without significant impact on diaphragmatic/LV position drift or maximum variation of RR interval (both p>0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared to free breathing acquisitions but with reduced total scan time (85±22 s to 35±6 s, p<0.001). Conclusions: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. PMID:24186772

  6. 3D late gadolinium enhancement in a single prolonged breath-hold using supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Breath-hold metrics [breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of R wave to R wave (RR) interval] without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real-time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (field of view = 320 × 320 × 100 mm(3) , resolution = 1.6 × 1.6 × 5.0 mm(3) , acceleration rate of 4) and a free-breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semiquantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35 ± 11 s to 58 ± 21 s; P < 0.0125) without significant impact on diaphragmatic/LV position drift or maximum variation of RR interval (both P > 0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared with free-breathing acquisitions, but with reduced total scan time (85 ± 22 s to 35 ± 6 s; P < 0.001). Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Muscle characteristics in career breath-hold divers: effect of water temperature.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Bae; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jae Cheol; Lutan, Rusli; Kim, Chang Keun

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study we reported that Korean female breath-hold divers (BHD) with life-long experience of diving in cold water (10-12 degrees C in winter and 25-27 degrees C in summer) had reduced muscle fiber size and increased capillary density. The hypothesis tested in the present study was whether prolonged habitual diving at a moderate water temperature (MWT, 29-30 degrees C all year round) similarly caused a reduction in muscle fiber size. The subjects were 14 Indonesian BHDs with long experience of diving at MWT, and a control group of 10 age-matched non-diving Indonesian men (CON), selected from the same tribe among which the BHDs lived. Muscle samples obtained from the middle portion of the vastus lateralis muscle were analyzed for muscle morphology by histochemical analysis and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein by Western blotting. Muscle fiber type composition was identical in both groups, and no difference in cross-sectional area (CSA), VEGF protein, or capillarity between the BHD and the CON was observed. The present study demonstrated that prolonged habitual breath-hold diving at MWT does not cause any alteration in muscle fiber composition, fiber size, or capillarity.

  8. Correlational analysis of electroencephalographic and end-tidal carbon dioxide signals during breath-hold exercise.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Vanello, Nicola; Giannoni, Alberto; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina; Maestri, Michelangelo; Bonanni, Enrica; Carnicelli, Luca; Positano, Vincenzo; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Landini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The central mechanism of breathing control is not totally understood. Several studies evaluated the correlation between electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and respiratory signals by performing resting state tasks or adopting hypercapnic/hypoxic stimuli. The observation of brain activity during voluntary breath hold tasks, might be an useful approach to highlight the areas involved in mechanism of breath regulation. Nevertheless, studies of brain activity with EEG could present some limitations due to presence of severe artifacts. When artifact rejection methods, as independent component analysis, cannot reliably clean EEG data, it is necessary to exclude noisy segments. In this study, global field power in the delta band and end-tidal CO2 were derived from EEG and CO2 signals respectively in 4 healthy subjects during a breath-hold task. The cross correlation function between the two signals was estimated taking into account the presence of missing samples. The statistical significance of the correlation coefficients at different time lags was assessed using surrogate data. Some simulations are introduced to evaluate the effect of missing data on the correlational analysis and their results are discussed. Results obtained on subjects show a significant correlation between changes in EEG power in the delta band and end-tidal CO2. Moreover, the changes in end-tidal CO2 were found to precede those of global field power. These results might help to better understand the cortical mechanisms involved in the control of breathing.

  9. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing (‘clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23  to 37 mm Hg (30±7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54±24% versus 34±26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6±28% and 83.4±38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  10. Time course of carbon monoxide transfer factor after breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Prediletto, R; Fornai, E; Catapano, G; Carli, C; Garbella, E; Passera, M; Cialoni, D; Bedini, R; L'Abbate, A

    2009-01-01

    Breath-hold divers may experience haemoptysis during diving. Central pooling of blood as well as compression of pulmonary gas content can damage the integrity of the blood-gas barrier, resulting in alveolar hemorrhage. The single-breath carbon monoxide test (DL,CO) was used to investigate the blood-gas barrier following diving. The study population consisted of 30 divers recruited from a training course. DL,CO levels were measured before diving and at 2, 10 and 25 min after the last of a series of four dives to depths of 10, 15, 20 and 30 m. When compared to pre-diving values, DL,CO values increased significantly at 2 min following diving in all subjects except one. Thereafter values progressively decreased toward baseline at 10 and 25 min in all subjects but one, while in four divers DL,CO values decreased below baseline. The early but transient increase in DL,CO levels shortly after diving supports the persistence of capillary pooling of red blood cells following emersion. Persistence at 25 min of high DL,CO values in one subject could be attributed by lung CT to extravasation of blood into the alveoli. Early or late DL,CO values >10% below baseline values suggest the presence of pulmonary edema. The relatively high prevalence of DL,CO alterations found suggests caution on the safety of breath-hold diving activities.

  11. Presumed Arterial Gas Embolism After Breath-Hold Diving in Shallow Water.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Stefani; Schramm, Dirk; Karenfort, Michael; Christaras, Andreas; Euler, Michael; Mayatepek, Ertan; Tibussek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Dive-related injuries are relatively common, but almost exclusively occur in recreational or scuba diving. We report 2 children with acute central nervous system complications after breath-hold diving. A 12-year-old boy presented with unilateral leg weakness and paresthesia after diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After ascent, he suddenly felt extreme thoracic pain that resolved spontaneously. Neurologic examination revealed right leg weakness and sensory deficits with a sensory level at T5. Spinal MRI revealed a nonenhancing T2-hyperintense lesion in the central cord at the level of T1/T2 suggesting a spinal cord edema. A few weeks later, a 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute dizziness, personality changes, confusion, and headache. Thirty minutes before, she had practiced diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After stepping out, she felt sudden severe thoracic pain and lost consciousness. Shortly later she reported headache and vertigo, and numbness of the complete left side of her body. Neurologic examination revealed reduced sensibility to all modalities, a positive Romberg test, and vertigo. Cerebral MRI revealed no pathologic findings. Both children experienced a strikingly similar clinical course. The chronology of events strongly suggests that both patients were suffering from arterial gas embolism. This condition has been reported for the first time to occur in children after breath-hold diving beneath the water surface without glossopharyngeal insufflation.

  12. Deep inspiration increases the absorption of inhaled sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R; Fowler, C; Simpson, S F; Renwick, A G; Holgate, S T

    1989-01-01

    The plasma concentrations of sodium cromoglycate were measured for 4 h following a single dose of 20 mg given by inhalation to six normal volunteers. A series of forced expiratory manoeuvres was performed 2 h after the dose, which resulted in a rapid and marked increase in the plasma concentrations of the drug. A similar increase was found in three volunteers who undertook a single deep inspiration at 4 h. These data indicate that the absorption of cromoglycate from the airways can be affected by manoeuvres used to assess lung function. PMID:2503020

  13. Laughter is not always funny: breath-holding spells in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Maayan, Channa; Katz, Eliot; Begin, Michal; Yuvchev, Ivelin; Kharasch, Virginia S

    2015-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disease characterized by primary autonomic dysfunction including parasympathetic hypersensitivity. Breath-holding spells (BHS) are believed to be caused by autonomic dysregulation mediated via the vagus nerve and increased in patients with a family history of BHS. Details and understanding of its pathophysiology are lacking. In this retrospective study of patients with FD, the incidence of BHS was higher at 53.3%, compared with previous studies in normal children. Laughter as a precipitating factor for BHS has not been previously reported in FD and occurred in 10% of patients in this study. Lower lung volumes, chronic lung disease, chronic CO2 retention, and inadequate autonomic compensation occur in those with FD leading to a higher incidence and severity of BHS when crying or laughing. Thus, FD may be a good model for understanding manifestations of the autonomic nervous system dysfunction and contribute to our knowledge of BHS mechanisms.

  14. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance.

  15. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control

    PubMed Central

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance. PMID:23908639

  16. Effects of Piracetam on Pediatric Breath Holding Spells: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; EHTESHAMI, Sara; SAJJADI, Sadegh; REZAI, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Breath holding spells (BHS) are common paroxysmal non-epileptic events in the pediatric population which are very stressfull despite their harmless nature. There has been no specific treatment found for the spells yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam (2-oxo-l-pyrrolidine) on these children. Materials & Methods In this randomized double blind clinical trial study, 150 children with severe BHS referred to our pediatric outpatient service were enrolled from August 2011 to July 2012. The patients were randomized into two equal groups. One received 40mg/kg/day piracetam and the other group received placebo, twice daily. Patients were followed monthly for three months. The number of attacks/month before and after treatment were documented. Results Of the enrolled patients, 86 were boys. The mean age of the patients was 17 months (range, 6 to 24 months). In the piracetam group, 1 month after treatment an 81% response to treatment was found. In the placebo group, none of the patients had complete remission and 7% of the cases had partial remission. Overall, control of breath-holding spells was observed in 91% of the patients in the group taking piracetam as compared with 16% in the group taking placebo at the end of the study. There was no significant difference detected between the groups regarding the prevalence of drug side effects. Conclusion A significant difference was detected between piracetam and placebo in prevention and controlling BHS. Piracetam (40mg/kg/day) had a good effect on our patients. PMID:24665274

  17. Breath-holding ability of offshore workers inadequate to ensure escape from ditched helicopters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S S; D'Eon, N J; Brooks, C J

    2001-10-01

    Following a helicopter ditching in water, the survival rate of individuals not mortally injured by the impact ranges from 50-85%. One possible cause for this low survival rate is that the crew and passengers cannot hold their breath underwater long enough to make the often difficult escape from an inverted and submerged helicopter. We investigated pulmonary function, breath-holding times in air (BHTa) and water (BHTw) of 228 students enrolled in offshore survival courses required to work in either the offshore petroleum industry or in military marine aviation. Comparisons were performed based on occupation, SCUBA experience, and smoking. In 25 degrees C pool water, the overall BHTw ranged from 5.4 to 120 s with a median of 37 s. Of the 228 subjects, 34% had a BHTw less than the 28 s required for the complete evacuation of a Super Puma helicopter under ideal conditions. No significant differences in BHTw were observed based on either smoking history (Non-Smoker, 41.5 +/- 21.6 s; Smoker, 37.2 +/- 20.2 s) or occupation (Novice, 37.5 +/- 21.1 s; Offshore, 40.5 +/- 21.1 s; Military, 45.2 +/- 20.9 s). However, SCUBA-trained individuals had a significantly longer BHT, (47.4 +/- 21.6 s) than non-SCUBA (37.6 +/- 20.6 s), as well as a greater force vital capacity (FVC), BHTa, and subjective comfort in water. It is concluded that the inability to breath-hold in emergency situations is a major contributor to the low survival rates of marine helicopter ditchings. Therefore, efforts must be made to both decrease escape times and to increase survival time underwater.

  18. Effect of breath holding on cerebrovascular hemodynamics in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Teelkien R; Panerai, Ronney B; Haeri, Sina; Zeeman, Gerda G; Belfort, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired autonomic function, which is hypothesized to cause cerebral hemodynamic abnormalities. Our aim was to test this hypothesis by estimating the difference in the cerebrovascular response to breath holding (BH; known to cause sympathetic stimulation) between women with preeclampsia and a group of normotensive controls. In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, noninvasive arterial volume clamping), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) were simultaneously recorded during a 20-s breath hold maneuver. CBFV changes were broken down into standardized subcomponents describing the relative contributions of BP, cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRi), critical closing pressure (CrCP), and resistance area product (RAP). The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for changes in relation to baseline values. A total of 25 preeclamptic (before treatment) and 25 normotensive women in the second half of pregnancy were enrolled, and, 21 patients in each group were included in the analysis. The increase in CBFV and EtCO2 was similar in both groups. However, the AUC for CVRi and RAP during BH was significantly different between the groups (3.05 ± 2.97 vs. -0.82 ± 4.98, P = 0.006 and 2.01 ± 4.49 vs. -2.02 ± 7.20, P = 0.037), indicating an early, transient increase in CVRi and RAP in the control group, which was absent in PE. BP had an equal contribution in both groups. Women with preeclampsia have an altered initial CVRi response to the BH maneuver. We propose that this is due to blunted sympathetic or myogenic cerebrovascular response in women with preeclampsia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Brief airway obstructions during sleep in infants with breath-holding spells.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Rebuffat, E; Sottiaux, M; Muller, M F; Bochner, A; Grosswasser, J

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the possibility that infants with breath-holding spells have breathing disorders during sleep. Seventy-one breath holders with a median age of 14 weeks were selected from a well babies clinic because of their histories: 34 infants without loss of consciousness, and 37 with loss of consciousness (21 of the latter had had cyanotic spells, 14 pallid spells, and 2 combined cyanotic and pallid spells). For each breath holder, one control infant without a history of breath holding was chosen from the same clinic. All infants were healthy and had no known cause of disrupted breathing during sleep. Their histories indicated that the breath holders were covered with sweat during sleep (p = 0.005) or wakefulness (p = 0.006) significantly more often than were the control infants. The infants were studied during a one-night monitoring session, and the 142 sleep recordings were analyzed without knowledge of the history. The breath holders had significantly less nonrapid eye movement (stage III) sleep, more indeterminate sleep, more arousals, and more sleep-stage changes than the control infants had. Central apneas were evenly distributed in the two groups. Airway obstructions were found in 41 breath holders and six control infants; the obstruction lasted longer in the breath holders. The infants with airway obstruction during sleep snored more often (p = 0.023) and sweated more (p = 0.035) during sleep. The water evaporation rate, measured on the forehead with an evaporation meter, was significantly greater in the breath holders (p = 0.001). Ocular compression induced longer asystoles in the infants with pallid syncopes than in either those with cyanotic syncopes (p = 0.036) or those without loss of consciousness (p = 0.031). We conclude that the obstructed breathing during both wakefulness and sleep could be related to a common immature breathing control.

  20. Efficacy of non-breath-hold magnetic resonance cholangiography at midfield strength.

    PubMed

    Govil, S; Justus, A; Korah, I; Cherian, R; Chacko, A

    1999-12-01

    The efficacy of non-breath-hold magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiography at mid-field strength (0.5 Tesla) was evaluated for delineating biliary anatomy and the cause and extent of biliary obstruction. We performed 65 MR cholangiograms on a mid-field 0.5 Tesla MR unit and correlated them with contrast cholangiography and/or surgery. MR cholangiography was found to be both sensitive and specific in the detection of biliary obstruction and in the definition of its cause (sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 85.7%, accuracy 98%). MR cholangiography accurately predicted the level of obstruction in 94 per cent of strictures. Normal caliber intra-hepatic biliary radicles were visualised in only 6 per cent of the MR cholangiograms. In contrast, 94 per cent of dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles were demonstrated. The confluence, and right and left hepatic ducts were visualized in 98 per cent; the gall bladder in 65 per cent; the cystic duct in 45 per cent and the cystic duct insertion in 25 per cent. The extrahepatic bile duct was seen in 82.7 per cent. A normal caliber pancreatic duct was seen in 18 per cent while a dilated pancreatic duct was seen in 86 per cent. The pancreatico-biliary junction was visualised in 7 per cent. Non-breath-hold MR cholangiography at midfield strength is a highly accurate method of evaluating the cause and level of biliary obstruction, comparable to high-field MR cholangiography. The spatial resolution however is inadequate for the detection of variations in biliary or pancreatic ductal anatomy when the ducts are of normal caliber.

  1. Single-breath breath-holding estimate of pulmonary blood flow in man: comparison with direct Fick cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, A H; Rozkovec, A; Papouchado, M; West, J; Laszlo, G

    1989-06-01

    1. Resting pulmonary blood flow (Q), using the uptake of the soluble inert gas Freon-22 and an indirect estimate of lung tissue volume, has been estimated during breath-holding (Qc) and compared with direct Fick cardiac output (Qf) in 16 patients with various cardiac disorders. 2. The effect of breath-hold time was investigated by comparing Qc estimated using 6 and 10 s of breath-holding in 17 patients. Repeatability was assessed by duplicate measurements of Qc in the patients and in six normal subjects. 3. Qc tended to overestimate Qf, the bias and error being 0.09 l/min and 0.59, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability for Qc in the patients was 0.75 l/min and in the normal subjects was 0.66 l/min. For Qf it was 0.72 l/min. There was no significant difference in Qc measured at the two breath-hold times. 4. The technique is simple to perform, and provides a rapid estimate of Q, monitoring acute and chronic changes in cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with cardiac disease.

  2. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  3. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  4. The effect of climbing Mount Everest on spleen contraction and increase in hemoglobin concentration during breath holding and exercise.

    PubMed

    Engan, Harald K; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica; Schagatay, Fanny; Schagatay, Erika

    2014-04-01

    Release of stored red blood cells resulting from spleen contraction improves human performance in various hypoxic situations. This study determined spleen volume resulting from two contraction-evoking stimuli: breath holding and exercise before and after altitude acclimatization during a Mount Everest ascent (8848 m). Eight climbers performed the following protocol before and after the climb: 5 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m during rest, 20 min oxygen respiration, 20 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m, three maximal-effort breath holds spaced by 2 min, 10 min ambient air respiration, 5 min of cycling at 100 W, and finally 10 min ambient air respiration. We measured spleen volume by ultrasound and capillary hemoglobin (HB) concentration after each exposure, and heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) continuously. Mean (SD) baseline spleen volume was unchanged at 213 (101) mL before and 206 (52) mL after the climb. Before the climb, spleen volume was reduced to 184 (83) mL after three breath holds, and after the climb three breath holds resulted in a spleen volume of 132 (26) mL (p=0.032). After exercise, the preclimb spleen volume was 186 (89) mL vs. 112 (389) mL) after the climb (p=0.003). Breath hold duration and cardiovascular responses were unchanged after the climb. We concluded that spleen contraction may be enhanced by altitude acclimatization, probably reflecting both the acclimatization to chronic hypoxic exposure and acute hypoxia during physical work.

  5. [The use of Pantogam syrup in treating small children's breath holding spells].

    PubMed

    Polskaya, A V; Chutko, L S; Jakovenko, E V

    To study the efficacy of pantogam syrup 10% (hopantenic acid) in the treatment of breath-holding spells (BHS). Sixty children, aged from 2 to 4 years, with BHS were studied. The evaluation of clinical manifestations and anxiety level was performed. Results of neurophysiological examination (long-term video-EEG-monitoring) were analyzed. Children were divided into 2 groups: main, in which the patients received pantogam syrup, and control group, in which only psychological methods were used. The results of the clinical and neurophysiological studies performed after the treatment, showed the clinical improvement in 73.3% of patients of the main group compared with similar data from the children in the control group (16.7%). The anxiety level significantly decreased after the neuroprotective therapy. A comparative analysis of electroencephalographic indicators demonstrated a significant (р<0.05) reduction in the power range of slow rhythms and manifestations of functional immaturity of the brain in patients of the main group. These results give evidence for the high efficacy of pantogam syrup in the treatment of children with BHS.

  6. Suffocation and respiratory responses to carbon dioxide and breath holding challenges in individuals with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Rassovsky, Yuri; Abrams, Kenneth; Kushner, Matt G

    2006-03-01

    Findings showing that individuals with panic disorder (PD) are prone to experience panic attacks when inhaling CO2-enriched air have given rise to the hypothesis that physiological systems underlying the experience of suffocation may be important in the etiology of PD. In this study, we tested several predictions stemming from this view. Forty individuals with PD and 32 controls underwent both a breath-holding challenge and a CO2 rebreathing challenge. A wide array of physiological and psychological responses, including continuous measurements of subjective suffocation, was recorded. Individuals with PD experienced elevated physiological reactivity to both challenges and greater levels of suffocation sensations during the rebreathing challenge. Furthermore, PD individuals who experienced a panic attack in response to the rebreathing challenge exhibited faster but shallower breathing during the challenge than did other PD individuals. Findings are consistent with theories linking PD to hypersensitive brain systems underlying the experience of suffocation. The possibility that subjective suffocation was in part mediated by peripheral interoceptive disturbances (vs. brainstem dysregulation) is discussed.

  7. Effects of dietary inorganic nitrate on static and dynamic breath-holding in humans.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Larsen, Filip J; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lindholm, Peter

    2013-01-15

    Inorganic nitrate has been shown to reduce oxygen cost during exercise. Since the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is facilitated during hypoxia, we investigated the effects of dietary nitrate on oxygen consumption and cardiovascular responses during apnea. These variables were measured in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover protocols at rest and ergometer exercise in competitive breath-hold divers. Subjects held their breath for predetermined times along with maximum effort apneas after two separate 3-day periods with supplementation of potassium nitrate/placebo. In contrast to our hypothesis, nitrate supplementation led to lower arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2), 77 ± 3%) compared to placebo (80 ± 2%) during static apnea, along with lower end-tidal fraction of oxygen (FETO(2)) after 4 min of apnea (nitrate 6.9 ± 0.4% vs. placebo 7.6 ± 0.4%). Maximum apnea duration was shorter after nitrate (329 ± 13 s) compared to placebo (344 ± 13 s). During cycle ergometry nitrate had no effect on SaO(2), FETO(2) or maximum apnea duration. The negative effects of inorganic nitrate during static apnea may be explained by an attenuated diving response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah; Minddal, Valentina; Nørgaard, Annette; Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Myschetzky, Peter Sand; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    Background Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. Methods Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized to biopsy either with (N=201) or without (N=206) IBC. Biopsy accuracy, procedure time, radiation, and complications were compared in the two groups. Predictors for pneumothorax were analyzed. Results Procedures performed with the use of IBC (N=130) did not show higher biopsy accuracy (P=0.979) but were associated with a higher risk of pneumothorax (P=0.022) compared to procedures without the use of IBC (N=171). Overall, 50% of the biopsies were malignant, 13% were benign, and 33% were inconclusive (4% missing). Long needle time (P=0.037) and small nodule size (P=0.001) were predictors of pneumothorax. Conclusions The use of IBC for CT-guided lung biopsy was not an advantage for unselected patients in our care, since it did not improve the biopsy accuracy and the risk of pneumothorax was increased. PMID:28706921

  9. Modified ventilatory response characteristics to exercise in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Kai; Metzger, Jule; Scholz, Tobias; Tetzlaff, Kay; Sorichter, Stephan; Walterspacher, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Specific adjustments to repeated extreme apnea are not fully known and understood. While a blunted ventilatory chemosensitivity to CO2 is described for elite breath-hold divers (BHDs) at rest, it is unclear whether specific adaptations affect their response to dynamic exercise. Eight elite BHDs with a previously validated decrease in CO2 chemosensitivity, 8 scuba divers (SCDs), and 8 matched control subjects were included in a study where markers of ventilatory response, Fowler's dead space, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and blood lactate concentrations during cycle exercise were measured. Maximal power output did not differ between the groups, but lactate threshold (θL) appeared at a significantly lowered respiratory compensation point (RCP) and at a higher VO2 for the BHDs. End-tidal (petCO2) and estimated arterial pCO2 (paCO2) were significantly higher in BHDs at θL, the RCP, and maximum exhaustion. BHDs showed a significantly (P < .01) slower breathing pattern in relation to a given tidal volume at a specific work rate. In summary, BHDs presented signs of a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy supply, decreased chemosensitivity during exercise, and a distinct ventilatory-response pattern during cycle exercise that differs from SCDs and controls.

  10. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  11. Pacemaker in complicated and refractory breath-holding spells: when to think about it?

    PubMed

    Sartori, Stefano; Nosadini, Margherita; Leoni, Loira; de Palma, Luca; Toldo, Irene; Milanesi, Ornella; Cerutti, Alessia; Suppiej, Agnese

    2015-01-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are benign non-epileptic paroxysmal events of infancy, rarely occurring with high frequency and complicated by prolonged syncope, convulsions and even status epilepticus. In these cases response to medical treatment is often unsatisfactory. Pacemaker implantation is a possible therapeutic option, but its indications, efficacy and complications have not been clarified yet. To report a new case of BHS treated with pacemaker and to review its indications and efficacy in patients with severe BHS. We extensively searched the literature in PubMed on cardiac pacing in patients with BHS and we described a new case. A previously healthy boy presented at the age of 4 months with frequent BHS inconstantly associated to prolonged syncope and post-anoxic non-epileptic and epileptic seizures. Parental reassurance, iron supplementation and piracetam were ineffective. After cardiac pacing at the age of 16 months, BHS and their complications disappeared. We identified 47 patients with BHS treated with pacemaker in the literature. Based on the available data, in all patients asystole or marked bradycardia were documented during BHS or stimulating maneuvers; syncope complicated BHS in 100% of cases and post-anoxic convulsions in 78.3%. Medical treatment before pacing, when administered, was ineffective or poorly tolerated. After pacing, BHS complications disappeared in 86.4% of cases, and decreased in 13.6%. Technical problems with the device were reported in 25.7% of patients and mild medical complications in 11.4%. Pacemaker could be reasonably considered in subjects with frequent and severe BHS, poor response to medications, and demonstration of cardioinhibition during spells. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of Breath-hold CT in Treatment Planning for Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Charles; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Filion, Édith; Roberge, David; Bahig, Houda; Vu, Toni; Lambert, Louise; Boudam, Karim; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are (1) to measure concordance of tumor position on breath-hold (BH) computed tomography (CT) scans relative to the natural tumor path during free breathing (FB) and (2) to evaluate the benefits of the breathing monitoring device Abches (Apex Medical, Tokyo) for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatment planning. Methods: In 53 lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife™ robotic radiosurgery system, FB four-dimensional computerized tomography (4DCT) and end-expiration (EE) BH CT images were obtained. Extent of natural tumor motion was assessed with rigid registration derived from end-inspiration (EI) and EE phases of the 4DCT. Tumor displacement in BH scans relative to the natural tumor path was measured relative to the EE 4DCT phase. Results: Mean tumor motion (+/- 1 SD) during natural FB was 1 ± 1 mm, 2 ± 2 mm, and 6 ± 6 mm in medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. Tumor position on BH CT scan was closer to EE than EI 4DCT phase for 35/53 patients (66%). Difference of BH tumor position vs. EE state was 4 ± 3 mm. Gross tumor displacements perpendicular to natural tumor path were as great as 11 mm (anterior-posterior) and were seen with or without the breathing monitoring device. Conclusion: Tumor position during BH CT may not accurately correspond to positions observed on FB 4DCT. Hence, accurate and custom 4D analysis for each individual patient is recommended for treatment planning, especially those involving BH acquisitions. PMID:28003937

  13. Caffeine challenge and breath-holding duration in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Vaidakis, Nikolaos; Papakostas, Yiannis G; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    Breath-holding (BH) has been used as a simple probe to increase endogenous carbon dioxide (CO2). In patients with Panic Disorder (PD), lower baseline BH duration is associated with caffeine-induced panic attacks. In this paper, we assessed BH duration in PD patients in relation to panic attacks induced by caffeine intake. BH duration and state anxiety were assessed in 40 PD patients (12 males), both at baseline and after a 400-mg caffeine challenge test. Patients panicking after caffeine administration (14 patients, 4 males) exhibited a significant reduction of their post-challenge BH duration, while no change of the BH duration was observed in non-panicking patients (26 patients, 8 males). Reduction in post-challenge BH duration was not related to higher anxiety levels--as reflected in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Form scores--independently of the occurrence of a panic attack. Panickers exhibited significantly lower baseline BH duration, compared to non-panickers. Our findings indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are strongly associated with a significant reduction of BH duration at both pre- and post-challenge. Jointly, these findings suggest that in a subgroup of PD patients, sensitivity to endogenous CO2 accumulation may underlie both the lower BH durations and the caffeine-induced panic attacks. In this subgroup of PD patients, caffeine might exert its panicogenic properties through the exacerbation of patients' already pathological hypersensitivity to CO2 accumulation, as indicated by both the significant decrease of their BH duration at post-challenge and by their significantly lower baseline BH duration respectively.

  14. Nasal contribution to exhaled nitric oxide during exhalation against resistance or during breath holding

    PubMed Central

    Kharitonov, S. A.; Barnes, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of patients with inflammation of the airways, suggesting that this may be a useful measurement to monitor inflammation in diseases such as asthma. However, there have been concerns that exhaled NO may be contaminated by the high concentrations of NO derived from the upper airways, and that this may account for differences in reported values of exhaled NO using different techniques. A study was performed, with argon as a tracer, to determine the extent of nasal contamination of exhaled NO using different expiratory manoeuvres. METHODS: Exhaled and nasal NO were measured by a chemiluminescence analyser. Argon (4.8%) was delivered continuously to the nose. Gas was sampled from the posterior oropharynx and argon and carbon dioxide were measured by mass spectrometry at the same time as NO. RESULTS: During a single expiration against a low resistance and during breath holding there was no evidence for nasal contamination, whereas during exhalation without resistance argon concentration in the oropharynx was increased from 0.91% (95% CI 0.84% to 0.98%) in ambient air to 1.28% (0.9% to 2.24%, p < 0.0001) during a single breath or 2.37% (2.29% to 2.51%, p < 0.0001) during tidal breathing. CONCLUSIONS: Collection of exhaled NO in a reservoir during tidal breathing is likely to be contaminated by NO derived from the nose and this may underestimate any increases in NO derived from the lower respiratory tract in inflammatory diseases. However, with slow expiration against a resistance and created back pressure to close the soft palate, there is no contamination of exhaled air which then reflects concentrations of NO in the lower airways. 


 PMID:9227721

  15. Nasal contribution to exhaled nitric oxide during exhalation against resistance or during breath holding.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, S A; Barnes, P J

    1997-06-01

    The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of patients with inflammation of the airways, suggesting that this may be a useful measurement to monitor inflammation in diseases such as asthma. However, there have been concerns that exhaled NO may be contaminated by the high concentrations of NO derived from the upper airways, and that this may account for differences in reported values of exhaled NO using different techniques. A study was performed, with argon as a tracer, to determine the extent of nasal contamination of exhaled NO using different expiratory manoeuvres. Exhaled and nasal NO were measured by a chemiluminescence analyser. Argon (4.8%) was delivered continuously to the nose. Gas was sampled from the posterior oropharynx and argon and carbon dioxide were measured by mass spectrometry at the same time as NO. During a single expiration against a low resistance and during breath holding there was no evidence for nasal contamination, whereas during exhalation without resistance argon concentration in the oropharynx was increased from 0.91% (95% CI 0.84% to 0.98%) in ambient air to 1.28% (0.9% to 2.24%, p < 0.0001) during a single breath or 2.37% (2.29% to 2.51%, p < 0.0001) during tidal breathing. Collection of exhaled NO in a reservoir during tidal breathing is likely to be contaminated by NO derived from the nose and this may underestimate any increases in NO derived from the lower respiratory tract in inflammatory diseases. However, with slow expiration against a resistance and created back pressure to close the soft palate, there is no contamination of exhaled air which then reflects concentrations of NO in the lower airways.

  16. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix.

  17. Treatment of cyanotic breath-holding spells with oral theophylline in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Meenal; Goraya, Jatinder S

    2015-06-01

    Cyanotic breath-holding spells are generally benign and resolve spontaneously by 4 to 5 years of age. Treatment with iron and other drugs has been employed in selected cases with very frequent and severe episodes. We describe a 10-year-old boy with recent-onset cyanotic breath-holding spells that were activity limiting. He was unable to participate in physical activities with his peers as any argument or emotional upset provoked these spells. Treatment with oral iron and piracetam was ineffective. However, treatment with oral theophylline produced dramatic amelioration of symptoms, and he was once again able to participate in play activities with his peers. We believe that general central nervous system stimulant and respirogenic effects of theophylline were instrumental in control of symptoms in our child. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration in freshly isolated sheep lungs.

    PubMed

    Wong, William D; Wang, Lu; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2017-02-01

    Taking a big breath is known to reverse bronchoconstriction induced by bronchochallenge in healthy subjects; this bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration (DI) is diminished in asthmatics. The mechanism underlying the DI effect is not clear. Observations from experiments using isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) preparations and airway segments suggest that straining of ASM due to DI could lead to bronchodilation, possibly due to strain-induced reduction in ASM contractility. However, factors external to the lung cannot be excluded as potential causes for the DI effect. Neural reflex initiated by stretch receptors in the lung are known to inhibit the broncho-motor tone and enhance vasodilatation; the former directly reduces airway resistance, and the latter facilitates removal of contractile agonists through the bronchial circulation. If the DI effect is solely mediated by factors extrinsic to the lung, the DI effect would be absent in isolated, nonperfused lungs. Here we examined the DI effect in freshly isolated, nonperfused sheep lungs. We found that imposition of DI on isolated lungs resulted in significant bronchodilation, that this DI effect was present only after the lungs were challenged with a contractile agonist (acetylcholine or histamine), and that the effect was independent of the difference in lung volume observed pre- and post-DI. We conclude that a significant portion of the bronchodilatory DI effect stems from factors internal to the lung related to the activation of ASM. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Impact of beam angle choice on pencil beam scanning breath-hold proton therapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Perrin, Rosalind; Lomax, Antony J; Persson, Gitte F; Josipovic, Mirjana; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Weber, Damien C; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per

    2017-06-01

    The breath-hold technique inter alia has been suggested to mitigate the detrimental effect of motion on pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy dose distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the robustness of incident proton beam angles to day-to-day anatomical variations in breath-hold. Single field PBS plans at five degrees increments in the transversal plane were made and water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) were derived on the planning breath-hold CT (BHCT) for 30 patients diagnosed with locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), early stage NSCLC or lung metastasis. Our treatment planning system was subsequently used to recalculate the plans and derive WEPL on a BHCT scan acquired at the end of the treatment. Changes to the V95%, D95 and mean target dose were evaluated. The difference in WEPL as a function of the beam angle was highly patient specific, with a median of 3.3 mm (range: 0.0-41.1 mm). Slightly larger WEPL differences were located around the lateral or lateral anterior/posterior beam angles. Linear models revealed that changes in dose were associated to the changes in WEPL and the tumor baseline shift (p < 0.05). WEPL changes and tumor baseline shift can serve as reasonable surrogates for dosimetric uncertainty of the target coverage and are well-suited for routine evaluation of plan robustness. The two lateral beam angles are not recommended to use for PBS proton therapy of lung cancer patients treated in breath-hold, due to the poor robustness for several of the patients evaluated.

  20. Single breath-hold assessment of ventricular volumes using 32-channel coil technology and an extracellular contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Parish, Victoria; Hussain, Tarique; Beerbaum, Philip; Greil, Gerald; Nagel, Eike; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Uribe, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence after gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) injection for volumetric cardiac assessment. Fifteen adult patients routinely referred for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent quantitative ventricular volumetry on a clinical 1.5T MR-scanner using a 32-channel cardiac coil. A stack of 2D cine b-SSFP slices covering the ventricles was used as reference, followed by a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced SSFP protocol acquired before and after administration of Gd-DTPA. The acquisition was accelerated using SENSE in both phase encoding directions. Volumetric and contrast-to-noise data for each technique were assessed and compared. The 3D cine protocol was accomplished within one breath-hold (mean acquisition time 20 sec; spatial resolution 2.1 x 2.1 x 10 mm; temporal resolution 51 msec). The contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and myocardium was 234 determined for the multiple 2D cine data, and could be increased for the 3D acquisition from 136 (3D precontrast) to 203 (3D postcontrast) after injecting Gd-DTPA. In addition the endocardial definition was significantly improved in postcontrast 3D cine b-SSFP. There was no significant difference for left and right ventricular volumes between standard 2D and 3D postcontrast cine b-SSFP. However, Bland-Altman plots showed greater bias and scatter when comparing 2D with 3D cine b-SSFP without contrast. 3D cine b-SSFP imaging of the heart using 32 channel coil technology and spatial undersampling allows reliable volumetric assessment within a single breath-hold after application of Gd-DTPA. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effect of piracetam on breath-holding spells.

    PubMed

    Sawires, Happy; Botrous, Osama

    2012-07-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are apparently frightening events occurring in otherwise healthy children.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of breath-holding spells. Forty patients with BHS (who were classified into two groups)were involved in a double-blinded placebo-controlled prospective study. Piracetam was given to group A while group B received placebo. Patients were followed monthly for a total period of 4 months. The numbers of attacks/month before and monthly after treatment were documented, and the overall number of attacks/month after treatment was calculated in both groups. The median number of attacks/month before treatment in the two groups was 5.5 and 5,respectively, while after the first month of treatment, it was 2 and 5, respectively. The median overall number of attacks/month after treatment in both groups was 1 and 5, respectively.There was a significant decline of number of attacks after piracetam treatment compared to placebo (p value<0.001). There were no reported side effects of the piracetam throughout the study period. In conclusion, piracetam is a safe and effective drug for the treatment of breath-holding spells in children.

  2. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  3. Modeling airway resistance dynamics after tidal and deep inspirations.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, C William; Salome, Cheryl M; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2004-11-01

    Using the forced oscillation technique, we tracked airway resistance continuously during quiet breathing (QB) and deep inspiration (DI), thus observing fluctuations in resistance that may reflect mechanisms of airway stretch and renarrowing. After DI, however, the resistance may be depressed for a period not related to volume changes. We hypothesized that this gradual increase in resistance after DI-induced dilation was determined by a simple time constant. Furthermore, to the extent that this effect reflects dynamic characteristics of airway renarrowing, the resistance change after each tidal inspiration should also be constrained by this temporal limit. A model relating resistance fluctuations to the breathing pattern, including both instantaneous and delayed effects, was developed and applied to data from 14 nonasthmatic and 17 asthmatic subjects (forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 103 +/- 13 and 83 +/- 12%, respectively, means +/- SD) after methacholine challenge (dose 145 +/- 80 and 3.0 +/- 3.4 micromol, respectively) that resulted in respective forced expiratory volume in 1 s reductions of 16 +/- 7 and 24 +/- 6% from baseline. Resistance was measured continuously for 1 min of QB, a DI, followed by a further minute of QB. Resistance values at end expiration (Ree) and end inspiration were calculated. We found that the sequence of Ree after DI was best modeled by a power-law function of time rather than an exponential decay (r2 = 0.82 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.63 +/- 0.16; P < 0.01). Furthermore, the coefficient characterizing this "renarrowing function" was close to equal to the coefficient characterizing the equivalent function of resistance change between each resistance value at end inpiration and subsequent Ree during QB, particularly in the nonasthmatic subjects for whom the intraclass correlation was 0.66. This suggests that the same time-dependent factors determine renarrowing after both large and small breaths.

  4. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Akira; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  5. Dosimetric investigation of breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kishimoto, Shun; Iwamura, Kohei; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate the effects of variations in respiratory motion during breath-holding (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (BH-IMRT) dose distribution using a motor-driven base, films, and an ionization chamber. Methods: Measurements were performed on a linear accelerator, which has a 120-leaf independently moving multileaf collimator with 5-mm leaf width at the isocenter for the 20-cm central field. Polystyrene phantoms with dimensions of 40 x 40 x 10 cm were set on a motor-driven base. All gantry angles of seven IMRT plans (a total of 35 fields) were changed to zero, and doses were then delivered to a film placed at a depth of 4 cm and an ionization chamber at a depth of 5 cm in the phantom with a dose rate of 600 MU/min under the following conditions: pulsation from the abdominal aorta and baseline drift with speeds of 0.2 mm/s (BD{sub 0.2mm/s}) and 0.4 mm/s (BD{sub 0.4mm/s}). As a reference for comparison, doses were also delivered to the chamber and film under stationary conditions. Results: In chamber measurements, means {+-} standard deviations of the dose deviations between stationary and moving conditions were -0.52% {+-} 1.03% (range: -3.41-1.05%), -0.07% {+-} 1.21% (range: -1.88-4.31%), and 0.03% {+-} 1.70% (range: -2.70-6.41%) for pulsation, BD{sub 0.2mm/s}, and BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, respectively. The {gamma} passing rate ranged from 99.5% to 100.0%, even with the criterion of 2%/1 mm for pulsation pattern. In the case of BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, the {gamma} passing rate for four of 35 fields (11.4%) did not reach 90% with a criterion of 3%/3 mm. The differences in {gamma} passing rate between BD{sub 0.2mm/s} and BD{sub 0.4mm/s} were statistically significant for each criterion. Taking {gamma} passing rates of > 90% as acceptable with a criterion of 3%/3 mm, large differences were observed in the {gamma} passing rate between the baseline drift of {<=}5 mm and that of >5 mm (minimum {gamma} passing rate: 92.0% vs 82

  6. Deposition of Particles in the Alveolar Airways: Inhalation and Breath-Hold with Pharmaceutical Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that factors such as airway wall motion, inhalation waveform, and geometric complexity influence the deposition of aerosols in the alveolar airways. However, deposition fraction correlations are not available that account for these factors in determining alveolar deposition. The objective of this study was to generate a new space-filling model of the pulmonary acinus region and implement this model to develop correlations of aerosol deposition that can be used to predict the alveolar dose of inhaled pharmaceutical products. A series of acinar models was constructed containing different numbers of alveolar duct generations based on space-filling 14-hedron elements. Selected ventilation waveforms were quick-and-deep and slow-and-deep inhalation consistent with the use of most pharmaceutical aerosol inhalers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to predict aerosol transport and deposition in the series of acinar models across various orientations with gravity where ventilation was driven by wall motion. Primary findings indicated that increasing the number of alveolar duct generations beyond 3 had a negligible impact on total acinar deposition, and total acinar deposition was not affected by gravity orientation angle. A characteristic model containing three alveolar duct generations (D3) was then used to develop correlations of aerosol deposition in the alveolar airways as a function of particle size and particle residence time in the geometry. An alveolar deposition parameter was determined in which deposition correlated with d2t over the first half of inhalation followed by correlation with dt2, where d is the aerodynamic diameter of the particles and t is the potential particle residence time in the alveolar model. Optimal breath-hold times to allow 95% deposition of inhaled 1, 2, and 3 μm particles once inside the alveolar region were approximately >10, 2.7, and 1.2 s, respectively. Coupling of the deposition

  7. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  8. Determination of ethane, pentane and isoprene in exhaled air--effects of breath-holding, flow rate and purified air.

    PubMed

    Lärstad, M A E; Torén, K; Bake, B; Olin, A-C

    2007-01-01

    Exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene have been proposed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. The objectives were to explore whether ethane, pentane and isoprene are produced within the airways and to explore the effect of different sampling parameters on analyte concentrations. The flow dependency of the analyte concentrations, the concentrations in dead-space and alveolar air after breath-holding and the influence of inhaling purified air on analyte concentrations were investigated. The analytical method involved thermal desorption from sorbent tubes and gas chromatography. The studied group comprised 13 subjects with clinically stable asthma and 14 healthy controls. Ethane concentrations decreased slightly, but significantly, at higher flow rates in subjects with asthma (P = 0.0063) but not in healthy controls. Pentane levels were increased at higher flow rates both in healthy and asthmatic subjects (P = 0.022 and 0.0063 respectively). Isoprene levels were increased at higher flow rates, but only significantly in healthy subjects (P = 0.0034). After breath-holding, no significant changes in ethane levels were observed. Pentane and isoprene levels increased significantly after 20 s of breath-holding. Inhalation of purified air before exhalation resulted in a substantial decrease in ethane levels, a moderate decrease in pentane levels and an increase in isoprene levels. The major fractions of exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene seem to be of systemic origin. There was, however, a tendency for ethane to be flow rate dependent in asthmatic subjects, although to a very limited extent, suggesting that small amounts of ethane may be formed in the airways.

  9. Feasibility of single breath-hold left ventricular function with 3 Tesla TSENSE acquisition and 3D modeling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2008-01-01

    Background A single breath-hold evaluation of ventricular function would allow assessment in cases where scan time or patient tolerance is limited. Spatiotemporal acceleration techniques such as TSENSE decrease cardiovascular MR acquisition time, but standard slice summation analysis requires enough short axis slices to cover the left ventricle (LV). By reducing the number of short axis slices, incorporating long axis slices, and applying a 3D model based analysis, it may be possible to obtain accurate LV mass and volumes. We evaluated LV volume, mass and ejection fraction at 3.0T using a 3D modeling analysis in 9 patients with a history of myocardial infarction and one healthy volunteer. Acquisition consisted of a standard short axis SSFP stack and a 15 heart-beat single breath-hold six slice multi-planar (4 short and 2 long axis) TSENSE SSFP protocol with an acceleration factor of R = 4. Results Differences (standard minus accelerated protocol mean ± s.d.) and coefficients of variation (s.d. of differences as a percentage of the average estimate) were 7.5 ± 9.6 mL and 6% for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.035), 0.4 ± 5.1 mL and 7% for end-systolic volume (p = NS), 7.1 ± 8.1 mL and 9% for stroke volume (p = 0.022), 2.2 ± 2.8% and 5% for ejection fraction (p = 0.035), and -7.1 ± 6.2 g and 4% for LV mass (p = 0.005), respectively. Intra- and inter-observer errors were similar for both protocols (p = NS for all measures). Conclusion These results suggest that clinically useful estimates of LV function can be obtained in a TSENSE accelerated single breath-hold reduced slice acquisition at 3T using 3D modeling analysis techniques. PMID:18495040

  10. Single breath hold 3D cardiac cine MRI using kat-ARC: preliminary results at 1.5T.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Daniel; Schiebler, Mark L; Lai, Peng; Wang, Kang; Vigen, Karl K; François, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Validation of a new single breath-hold, three-dimensional, cine balanced steady-state free precession (3D cine bSSFP) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequence for left ventricular function. CMR examinations were performed on fifteen patients and three healthy volunteers on a clinical 1.5T scanner using a two-dimensional (2D) cine balanced SSFP CMR sequence (2D cine bSSFP) followed by an investigational 3D cine bSSFP pulse sequence acquired within a single breath hold. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), end systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass were independently segmented on a workstation by two experienced radiologists. Blood pool to myocardial contrast was evaluated in consensus using a Likert scale. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare these quantitative and nominal measurements for the two sequences. The average acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D cine bSSFP than for 2D cine bSSFP (0.36 ± 0.03 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3 min) p = 0.0002. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] of the data derived from these two methods revealed that the LVEF 0.9% (-4.7, 6.4), LVEDV 4.9 ml (-23.0, 32.8), LVESV -0.2 ml (-22.4, 21.9), and myocardial mass -0.4 g (-23.8, 23.0) were not significantly different. There was excellent intraclass correlation for intra-observer variability (0.981, 0.989, 0.997, 0.985) and inter-observer variability (0.903, 0.954, 0.970, 0.842) for LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV, and myocardial mass respectively. 3D cine bSSFP allows for accurate single breath-hold volumetric cine CMR which enables substantial improvements in scanner time efficiency without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  11. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90{sup o} within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180{sup o}-kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  12. Intravenous Gadoxetate Disodium Administration Reduces Breath-holding Capacity in the Hepatic Arterial Phase: A Multi-Center Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Taylor R.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Middleton, Michael S.; Allen, Brian C.; Jaffe, Tracy A.; Miller, Chad M.; Reeder, Scott B.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine, in a multicenter double-blinded placebo-controlled trial, whether maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is affected by gadoxetate disodium administration. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this prospective multi-institutional HIPAA-compliant study; written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. At three sites, a total of 44 volunteers underwent a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examination in which images were acquired before and dynamically after bolus injection of gadoxetate disodium, normal saline, and gadoterate meglumine, administered in random order in a single session. The technologist and volunteer were blinded to the agent. Arterial phase breath-holding duration was timed after each injection, and volunteers reported subjective symptoms. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation were monitored. Images were independently analyzed for motion artifacts by three radiologists. Arterial phase breath-holding duration and motion artifacts after each agent were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test and the McNemar test. Factors affecting the above outcomes were assessed by using a univariate, multivariable model. Results Arterial phase breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium (mean, 32 seconds ± 19) than after saline (mean, 40 seconds ± 17; P <.001) or gadoterate meglumine (43 seconds ± 21, P < .001) administration. In 80% (35 of 44) of subjects, arterial phase breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium than after both saline and gadoterate meglumine. Three (7%) of 44 volunteers had severe arterial phase motion artifacts after gadoxetate disodium administration, one (2%; P = .62) had them after gadoterate meglumine administration, and none (P = .25) had them after saline administration. HR and oxygen saturation changes were not significantly associated with contrast agent. Conclusion Maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is reduced after

  13. Comparison between in-phase and opposed-phase T1-weighted breath-hold FLASH sequences for hepatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rofsky, N.M.; Weinreb, J.C.; Ambrosino, M.M.; Safir, J.; Krinsky, G.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare in-phase (IP) and opposed-phase (OP) sequences for GRE breath-hold hepatic imaging. Non-contrast-enhanced IP and OP GRE breath-hold images were obtained in 104 consecutive patients referred for abdominal MRI at 1.0 T. For both sequences, the TR, FA, matrix, FOV, slice thickness, interslice gap, and measurements were kept constant. Images were compared quantitatively [liver/spleen and liver/lesion signal difference/noise ratio, (SD/N)] and qualitatively (artifacts, lesion detection and conspicuity, and intrahepatic anatomy). There was no statistically significant difference when comparing IP and OP sequences for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N or for the qualitative parameters. In patients with fatty infiltration, the OP sequences yielded substantially lower values for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N (0.9 and - 1.2, respectively) than the IP sequences (20 and 17, respectively). Furthermore, in several cases with fatty infiltration, many more lesions were identified using IP images. The use of IP and OP GRE sequences provides complementary diagnostic information. Focal liver lesions may be obscured in the setting of fatty infiltration if only OP sequences are employed. A complete assessment of the liver with MR should include both IP and OP imaging. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 2D Free-breathing Dual Navigator-gated Cardiac Function Validated against the 2D Breath-hold Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Nezafat, Reza; Eggers, Holger; Stehning, Christian; Manning, Warren J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a free-breathing cardiac cine acquisition, with potential to simplify cardiac MR studies, provide registered slices and increase spatial resolution. Materials and Methods A 2D free-breathing (FB) navigator-gated cine radial acquisition for cardiac function was developed which used two navigators (one placed prior to the QRS, and another 500 ms after the QRS complex, after systole) to provide complete motion-compensated assessment of systole, without loss of end-diastole. Eleven subjects were studied. Results The 2D FB method provided results visually and quantitatively similar to the 2D breath-hold (BH) methods. Comparison of volumes measured with the free-breathing to those measured by standard 2D BH cine resulted in mean bias ± 2 standard deviations of 1.0 ml ± 13.7 ml, 1.1 ml ± 7.6 ml, 3.0 g ± 18.8 g, and 0.3 %± 2.5%, for end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left-ventricular mass, and ejection fraction, respectively. Slice misregistration was identified in 4 (36%) of the BH studies, but none (0%) of the FB studies. In subjects with slice misregistration, there was greater discordance in LV volume measurements (P<0.05 for end-diastolic mass). Conclusion The free-breathing cine acquisition provided results qualitatively and quantitatively similar to 2D breath-hold methods with improved slice registration. PMID:18777547

  15. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  16. Clinico-laboratory profile of breath-holding spells in children in Sohag University Hospital, Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou; Mohamed, Montaser Mohamed; Sharaf, El-Zahraa El-Said Ahmed; Magdy, Rofaida Mohamed; Allam, Ahmed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breath-holding spells (BHSs) are involuntary pauses of breathing, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness. They usually occur in response to an upsetting or surprising situation. Breath-holding spells are usually caused by either a change in the usual breathing pattern or a slowing of the heart rate. In some children, BHSs may be related to iron deficiency anemia. The aim of the work was to study the clinical and laboratory profile of BPHs in children presented to the Neuropediatric Clinic at Sohag University Hospital. Methods An observational prospective study was done at Sohag University Hospital over a period of one year on children diagnosed as having BHSs by clinical history and laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and Electroencephalography (EEG). Results During the period of study (one year), we reviewed data of 32 children who had been diagnosed as having BHSs. We found that cyanotic spells (71.88%) predominated over pallid spells. There were positive family histories (31.25%) and consanguinity (53.135) in the studied patients. We found a high incidence of iron deficiency anemia (62.5%) in association with BHS. Abnormal EEGs were found in (65.63%) of studied children. Conclusion BHS is a common, important problem associated with iron deficiency anemia, which is, in turn, a common nutritional problem in our country. PMID:27279996

  17. Hypoxic syncope in a competitive breath-hold diver with elevation of the brain damage marker S100B.

    PubMed

    Linér, Mats H; Andersson, Johan P A

    2009-12-01

    Competitive breath-hold divers can accomplish previously unbelievable performances; e.g., the current world record for apnea during rest ("static apnea") is 11 min 35 s. However, whether such performances are associated with a risk for hypoxic brain damage has not been established. A breath-hold diver's competitive performance resulted in a loss of consciousness, after which he was subjected to a medical examination by the event physician. Blood samples were collected for analysis of the brain damage marker S100B in serum. The S100B in serum was 0.100 microg x L(-1) in the blood sample collected 15 min after the loss of consciousness. At 1 and 5 d after the incident it was 0.097 microg x L(-1) and 0.045 microg x L(-1) respectively. The elevated level of S100B, close to the upper reference limit (0.105 microg x L(-1)) indicates that the incident affected the integrity of the central nervous system. Even though this case does not establish that hypoxic brain damage is an inherent risk with loss of consciousness in competitive breathhold diving, the observation raises concerns. We suggest that it should be considered that repetitive exposures to prolonged apneas leading to severe hypoxia may be associated with negative long-term effects.

  18. Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Germonpré, Peter; Balestra, Costantino; Musimu, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

  19. Whole-heart magnetic resonance coronary angiography with multiple breath-holds and automatic breathing-level tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhara, Shigehide; Ninomiya, Ayako; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanao, Shotaro; Kamae, Toshikazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-05-01

    Whole-heart (WH) magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) studies are usually performed during free breathing while monitoring the position of the diaphragm with real-time motion correction. However, this results in a long scan time and the patient's breathing pattern may change, causing the study to be aborted. Alternatively, WH MRCA can be performed with multiple breath-holds (mBH). However, one problem in the mBH method is that patients cannot hold their breath at the same position every time, leading to image degradation. We have developed a new WH MRCA imaging method that employs both the mBH method and automatic breathing-level tracking to permit automatic tracking of the changes in breathing or breath-hold levels. Evaluation of its effects on WH MRCA image quality showed that this method can provide high-quality images within a shorter scan time. This proposed method is expected to be very useful in clinical WH MRCA studies.

  20. T2-weighted MRI of the uterus: fast spin echo vs. breath-hold fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Ascher, S M; O'Malley, J; Semelka, R C; Patt, R H; Rajan, S; Thomasson, D

    1999-03-01

    This study compared one routine T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2FSE) sequence with a breath-hold T2FSE (BH T2FSE) sequence of the female pelvis for image quality, uterine anatomy, lesion detection, and signal intensity measurements. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age 41.7 years) were imaged at 1.5 T with one high-resolution routine T2FSE sequence and one BH T2FSE sequence in the sagittal plane as part of comprehensive pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. The different image sets were rated separately for imaging characteristics (overall image quality, uterine anatomy definition, lesion detection, and free fluid conspicuity) and then compared side by side. The image sets were also compared for artifacts (ghosting, blurring, pulsatility, and chemical shift misregistration). Signal-to-noise (S/N) and signal difference-to-noise (SD/N) ratios were calculated for the different uterine zones, uterine abnormalities, free fluid, rectus abdominis muscle, and bladder. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for uterine abnormalities. Twenty-eight uterine abnormalities were detected in 20 patients and included leiomyomata (13 patients), adenomyosis (7 patients), benign endometrial polyps (6 patients), endometrial carcinoma (1 patient), and pregnancy (1 patient). BH T2FSE was superior or equivalent to T2FSE for overall image quality in 23/32 patients (71.8%), uterine anatomy definition in 19/32 patients (59.3%), and lesion detection in 13/20 patients (65%). BH T2FSE performed less well than T2FSE for free fluid conspicuity in 5/5 (100%) patients. BH T2FSE was equivalent to or less affected than T2FSE for ghosting artifact in 24/32 patients (75%) and blurring artifact in 29/32 patients (90.6%). Pulsatility and chemical shift artifacts were not problematic for either image set. S/N and SD/N were higher for all BH T2FSE determinations compared with T2FSE. For the endometrium, junctional zone, myometrium, and bladder, these differences were statistically significant. There

  1. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  2. Colorectal hepatic metastases: detection with SPIO-enhanced breath-hold MR imaging--comparison of optimized sequences.

    PubMed

    Ward, Janice; Guthrie, J Ashley; Wilson, Daniel; Arnold, Paul; Lodge, J Peter; Toogood, Giles J; Wyatt, Judith I; Robinson, Philip J

    2003-09-01

    To compare the accuracy of four breath-hold magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences to establish the most effective superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced sequence for detection of colorectal hepatic metastases. Thirty-one patients with colorectal hepatic metastases underwent T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) MR imaging before and after SPIO enhancement. Four sequences were optimized for lesion detection: T2-weighted FSE, multiecho data image combination (MEDIC), T2-weighted GRE with an 11-msec echo time (TE), and T2-weighted GRE with a 15-msec TE. Images were reviewed independently by three blinded observers. The accuracy of each sequence was measured by using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. All results were correlated with findings at surgery, intraoperative ultrasonography, or histopathologic examination. Differences between the mean results of the three observers were measured by using the Student t test. Postcontrast T2-weighted GRE sequences were the most accurate and were significantly superior to postcontrast T2-weighted FSE and unenhanced sequences alone (P <.05). For all lesions that were malignant or smaller than 1 cm, respectively, mean accuracies of postcontrast sequences were 0.082 and 0.64 for T2-weighted FSE, 0.90 and 0.78 for MEDIC, 0.92 and 0.80 for GRE with an 11-msec TE, 0.93 and 0.82 for GRE with a 15-msec TE, and 0.81 and 0.62 for unenhanced sequences. Optimized SPIO-enhanced T2-weighted GRE combined with unenhanced T2-weighted FSE MR sequences were the most sensitive. Breath-hold FSE postcontrast sequences offer no improvement in sensitivity compared with unenhanced sequences alone.

  3. Breath-hold MR cine angiography of coronary arteries in healthy volunteers: value of multiangle oblique imaging planes.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, H; Caputo, G R; Steffens, J C; O'Sullivan, M; Bourne, M W; Shimakawa, A; Foo, T K; Higgins, C B

    1994-09-01

    Breath-hold MR cine angiography was used to depict the coronary arteries in healthy volunteers. Multiangle oblique imaging planes were evaluated for feasibility in showing continuous segments of the proximal and middle portions of the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Eighteen healthy subjects were examined with a 1.5-T MR imager. Fat-suppressed fast gradient-echo images (TR = 9.8 msec, TE = 3.5 msec) were acquired with a 13-cm receive surface coil. A segmented k-space data acquisition was used to obtain images of the coronary arteries at several phases of the cardiac cycle within a single breath-hold. Multiangle double oblique images that were tangential and sequential to the epicardial surface of the left ventricle were used to show the left anterior descending artery, and oblique coronal images were used to show the right coronary artery. Images of consecutive slice locations were shown in a cine format, and the length of each major coronary artery that was continuously visualized was measured. The left main coronary artery, proximal left anterior descending artery, and right coronary artery were demonstrated in all subjects. The mid and distal portions of the left anterior descending artery and diagonal branches were visualized best on multiangle oblique imaging planes. Continuous segments (> 6 cm) of the left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery were imaged in 14 subjects (78%) and 12 subjects (67%), respectively. Cine display was useful for showing the continuity of the coronary arterial segments and also for distinguishing arteries from veins. Double oblique imaging planes were useful in showing long segments of left anterior descending and right coronary arteries on coronary MR angiograms. Further work is necessary to improve detection of the left circumflex artery.

  4. SU-F-207-13: Comparison of Four Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Versus Breath Hold Images to Determine Pulmonary Nodule Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Elasticity may distinguish malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. To compare determining of malignant pulmonary nodule (MPN) elasticity from four dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images versus inhale/exhale breath-hold CT images. Methods: We analyzed phase 00 and 50 of 4D CT and deep inhale and natural exhale of breath-hold CT images of 30 MPN treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The radius of the smallest MPN was 0.3 cm while the biggest one was 2.1 cm. An intensity based deformable image registration (DIR) workflow was applied to the 4D CT and breath-hold images to determine the volumes of the MPNs and a 1 cm ring of surrounding lung tissue (ring) in each state. Next, an elasticity parameter was derived by calculating the ratio of the volume changes of MPN (exhale:inhale or phase50:phase00) to that of a 1 cm ring of lung tissue surrounding the MPN. The proposed formulation of elasticity enables us to compare volume changes of two different MPN in two different locations of lung. Results: The calculated volume ratio of MPNs from 4D CT (phase50:phase00) and breath-hold images (exhale:inhale) was 1.00±0.23 and 0.95±0.11, respectively. It shows the stiffness of MPN and comparably bigger volume changes of MPN in breath-hold images because of the deeper degree of inhalation. The calculated elasticity of MPNs from 4D CT and breath-hold images was 1.12±0.22 and 1.23±0.26, respectively. For five patients who have had two MPN in their lung, calculated elasticity of tumor A and tumor B follows same trend in both 4D CT and breath-hold images. Conclusion: We showed that 4D CT and breath-hold images are comparable in the ability to calculate the elasticity of MPN. This study has been supported by Department of Defense LCRP 2011 #W81XWH-12-1-0286.

  5. Association between reduced bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration and loss of alveolar attachments

    PubMed Central

    Scichilone, Nicola; Bruno, Andreina; Marchese, Roberto; Vignola, Antonio Maurizio; Togias, Alkis; Bellia, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that the bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration is attenuated in individuals with COPD. This study was designed to investigate whether the impairment in this effect is associated with loss of alveolar attachments. Methods We measured deep inspiration (DI)-induced bronchodilation in 15 individuals with and without COPD (67 ± 2.2 yrs of age, mean ± SEM) undergoing lobar resection for peripheral pulmonary nodule. Prior to surgery, we measured TLCO and determined the bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration after constricting the airways with methacholine. The number of destroyed alveolar attachments, as well as airway wall area and airway smooth muscle area, were determined in tumor-free, peripheral lung tissue. Results The bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration correlated inversely with the % destroyed attachments (r = -0.51, p = 0.05) and directly with the airway smooth muscle area (r = 0.59, p = 0.03), but not with the total wall area (r = 0.39, p = 0.15). Conclusion We postulate that attenuation of airway stretch due to loss of alveolar attachments contributes to the loss of the bronchodilatory effect of lung inflation in COPD. PMID:15943872

  6. Rapid acquisition of helium-3 and proton three-dimensional image sets of the human lung in a single breath-hold using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A; Tustison, Nicholas J; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F; Miller, G Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Mugler, John P

    2015-10-01

    To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 ((3) He) and proton ((1) H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared with fully sampled images. The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using (3) He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both (3) He and (1) H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k-space with reconstruction by means of minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled image sets. Helium-3 and (1) H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled (3) He and (1) H images yielded mean absolute errors <10% and structural similarity indices >0.9. By randomly undersampling k-space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality (3) He and (1) H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rapid Acquisition of Helium-3 and Proton 3D Image Sets of the Human Lung in a Single Breath-hold using Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A.; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E.; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 (3He) and proton (1H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared to fully-sampled images. Methods The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using 3He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both 3He and 1H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k space with reconstruction via minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully-sampled and retrospectively-undersampled image sets. Results Helium-3 and 1H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully-sampled and retrospectively-undersampled 3He and 1H images yielded mean absolute errors <10% and structural similarity indices >0.9. Conclusion By randomly undersampling k space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality 3He and 1H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. PMID:25335080

  8. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    PubMed

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R(2 )= 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  9. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  10. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  11. Long-term effects of frequent maximal breath-holding on the cardiac health of elite freedivers.

    PubMed

    Zelenkova, I; Chomahidze, P

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are commonly reported in freedivers during maximal voluntary breath-holds, but their influence on the cardiological status and their long-term effects on the cardiac health of these athletes have not been investigated. Here we present the results of a study on 32 healthy young men (mean age 32.6 ± 1.3 years) who were divided into two groups of 16 subjects. One group included 16 continuously training freedivers at the "high achievers in sports" level (DIVERS group). The CONTROL group included 16 healthy young men not involved in sports. The subjects were monitored using 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG), and echocardiological study (EchoCG) for all the subjects was performed. The mean heart rate in the DIVERS group was 69.5 ± 1.7 bpm compared with 70.9 ± 1.5 bpm in the CONTROL group. The minimal heart rate was 42.3 ± 1.0 bpm in the DIVERS group and 48.8 ± 1.7 bpm in the CONTROL group (P < 0.005). The maximal heart rate was 132.8 ± 4.6 bpm in the DIVERS group and 132.1 ± 2.9 bpm in the CONTROL group. ECG analysis revealed supraventricular arrhythmias in the DIVERS group: four of the DIVERS (25%) exhibited supraventricular couplets and triplets, three (19%) exhibited transient first- and second-degree AV blocks (Mobitz type 1) at night, and one (6%) exhibited a second-degree sinoatrial block at night. According to the echocardiogram, the DIVERS had slightly larger left ventricles (5.1 ± 1.33, P < 0.05) and left atriums (41.1 ± 12.7) compared with the CONTROL group without exceeding the normal values. The right ventricle volume (3.6 ± 0.69, P < 0.05) was somewhat above the upper normal value (up to 3.5 cm). In conclusion, freediving athletes exhibited changes in their cardiac status, most likely due to the regular exercise, that were not associated with regular maximal voluntary breath-holds. These changes are within the normal physiological values and do not limit their

  12. Rapidly reversible myocardial edema in patients with acromegaly: assessment with ultrafast T2 mapping in a single-breath-hold MRI sequence.

    PubMed

    Gouya, Hervé; Vignaux, Olivier; Le Roux, Patrick; Chanson, Philippe; Bertherat, Jérome; Bertagna, Xavier; Legmann, Paul

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a single-breath-hold T2-mapping MRI sequence to evaluate the reversibility of myocardial edema in patients treated for acromegaly. Before and after treatment, 15 patients with acromegaly underwent myocardial T2 mapping with an experimental single-breath-hold black-blood fast spin-echo sequence. Myocardial T2 mapping with both a multiple-breath-hold fast spinecho sequence and the experimental sequence also was performed on 14 volunteers. T2 relaxation times were calculated with a standard linear least-squares fit applied to myocardial signal intensity. The T2 relaxation times of patients were compared with those of volunteers and correlated with levels of serum growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1. Left ventricular function and mass index were determined with cine MRI. T2 values before treatment were higher in patients (71 +/- 12 milliseconds) than in volunteers (55.9 +/- 3.6 milliseconds) (p = 0.0003). These T2 values in patients decreased soon after treatment (57.6 +/- 6.6 milliseconds, p = 0.0007). This reduction correlates with successful reduction of levels of serum growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1. In volunteers, myocardial T2 values did not vary significantly between the single-breath-hold sequence and the multiple-breath-hold fast spin-echo sequence. In patients, myocardial mass and left ventricular function did not differ significantly before and after treatment. Patients with acromegaly have increased myocardial T2 values, which decrease soon after treatment, reflecting reversible myocardial edema. T2 value is more sensitive than left ventricular mass index in the detection of early reversal of acromegalic cardiomyopathy. These results highlight the potential role of MRI in direct assessment of the tissular effects of growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1 and in evaluation of the efficacy of treatment.

  13. 2D free-breathing dual navigator-gated cardiac function validated against the 2D breath-hold acquisition.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dana C; Nezafat, Reza; Eggers, Holger; Stehning, Christian; Manning, Warren J

    2008-09-01

    To develop and validate a free-breathing cardiac cine acquisition, with potential to simplify cardiac MR studies, provide registered slices, and increase spatial resolution. A 2D free-breathing (FB) navigator-gated cine radial acquisition for cardiac function was developed that used two navigators (one placed prior to the QRS, and another 500 msec after the QRS complex, after systole) to provide complete motion-compensated assessment of systole, without loss of end-diastole. Eleven subjects were studied. The 2D FB method provided results visually and quantitatively similar to the 2D breath-hold (BH) methods. Comparison of volumes measured with FB to those measured by standard 2D BH cine resulted in mean bias+/-2 standard deviations of 1.0 mL+/-13.7 mL, 1.1 mL+/-7.6 mL, 3.0 g+/-18.8 g, and 0.3%+/-2.5%, for end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, left ventricular (LV) mass, and ejection fraction, respectively. Slice misregistration was identified in four (36%) of the BH studies, but none (0%) of the FB studies. In subjects with slice misregistration, there was greater discordance in LV volume measurements (P<0.05 for end-diastolic mass). The FB cine acquisition provided results qualitatively and quantitatively similar to 2D BH methods with improved slice registration. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Compressed sensing reconstruction for undersampled breath-hold radial cine imaging with auxiliary free-breathing data.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seunghoon; Hong, Susie N; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kwak, Yongjun; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    To improve compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of accelerated breath-hold (BH) radial cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting auxiliary data acquired between different BHs. Cardiac function is usually assessed using segmented cine acquisitions over multiple BHs to cover the entire left ventricle (LV). Subjects are given a resting period between adjacent BHs, when conventionally no data are acquired and subjects rest in the scanner. In this study the resting periods between BHs were used to acquire additional free-breathing (FB) data, which are subsequently used to generate a sparsity constraint for each cardiac phase. Images reconstructed using the proposed sparsity constraint were compared with conventional CS using a composite image generated by averaging different cardiac phases. The efficacy of the proposed reconstruction was compared using indices of LV function and blood-myocardium sharpness. The proposed method provided accurate LV ejection fraction measurements for 33% and 20% sampled datasets compared with fully sampled reference images, and showed 14% and 11% higher blood-myocardium border sharpness scores compared to the conventional CS. The FB data acquired during resting periods can be efficiently used to improve the image quality of the undersampled BH data without increasing the total scan time. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Compressed Sensing Reconstruction for Undersampled Breath-Hold Radial Cine Imaging with Auxiliary Free-Breathing Data

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seunghoon; Hong, Susie N.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kwak, Yongjun; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Manning, Warren J.; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To improve compressed sensing reconstruction of accelerated breath-hold (BH) radial cine MRI by exploiting auxiliary data acquired between different BHs. Materials and Methods Cardiac function is usually assessed using segmented cine acquisitions over multiple BHs to cover the entire left ventricle (LV). Subjects are given a resting period between adjacent BHs, when conventionally no data is acquired and subjects rest in the scanner. In this study, the resting periods between BHs are utilized to acquire additional free-breathing (FB) data, which are subsequently used to generate a sparsity constraint for each cardiac phase. Images reconstructed using the proposed sparsity constraint were compared with conventional compressed sensing (CS) using a composite image generated by averaging different cardiac phases. The efficacy of the proposed reconstruction is compared using indices of LV function and blood-myocardium sharpness. Results The proposed method provides accurate LV ejection fraction measurements for 33% and 20% sampled data sets compared with fully-sampled reference images, and shows 14% and 11% higher blood-myocardium border sharpness scores compared to the conventional CS. Conclusion The FB data acquired during rest periods can be efficiently used to improve the image quality of the undersampled BH data without increasing the total scan time. PMID:23857797

  16. [Cerebral vasoreactivity: Concordance of breath holding test and acetazolamide injection in current practice: 20 cases of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    De Bortoli, M; Maillet, A; Skopinski, S; Sassoust, G; Constans, J; Boulon, C

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral vasoreactivity (CVR) is the ability of the brain's vascular system to keep cerebral blood inflow stable. Impaired CVR is a risk marker of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. The gold standard to assess CVR with transcranial ultrasound is acetazolamide (ACTZ) injection. The breath holding test (BHT) might be easier to perform. CVR proved to be efficient in laboratory conditions but not in routine practice. To study the validity of BHT versus ACTZ in routine practice in a vascular exploration unit in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Study of concordance of BHT and ACTZ, to assess CVR in patients consecutively explored on the same day. Eighteen patients with 20 carotid stenosis were included. The temporal window was missing in 20% of cases. Only 11 out of the 20 procedures were analyzed. Concordance was low between BHT and ACTZ to assess CVR (k=0.3714). BHT cannot replace ACTZ injection. It might be a first-step test so that ACTZ injection might be avoided if CVR is normal. Our present results must be confirmed by further study enrolling many more patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. An Atypical Case of Taravana Syndrome in a Breath-Hold Underwater Fishing Champion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Foresta, Grazia; Strano, Giustino; Strano, Maria Teresa; Montalto, Francesca; Garbo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Dysbaric accidents are usually referred to compressed air-supplied diving. Nonetheless, some cases of decompression illness are known to have occurred among breath-hold (BH) divers also, and they are reported in the medical literature. A male BH diver (57 years old), underwater fishing champion, presented neurological disorders as dizziness, sensory numbness, blurred vision, and left frontoparietal pain after many dives to a 30–35 meters sea water depth with short surface intervals. Symptoms spontaneously regressed and the patient came back home. The following morning, pain and neurological impairment occurred again and the diver went by himself to the hospital where he had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure and lost consciousness. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclofsed a cortical T1-weighted hypointense area in the temporal region corresponding to infarction with partial hemorrhage. An early hyperbaric oxygen therapy led to prompt resolution of neurological findings. All clinical and imaging characteristics were referable to the Taravana diving syndrome, induced by repetitive prolonged deep BH dives. The reappearance of neurological signs after an uncommon 21-hour symptom-free interval may suggest an atypical case of Taravana syndrome. PMID:23970902

  18. Effects of low oxygen dead space ventilation and breath-holding test in evaluating cerebrovascular reactivity: A comparative observation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ke-Ju; Zhong, Ling-Ling; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Lei; Xue, Liu-Jun; Cheng, Guan-Liang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application prospect of low oxygen dead space ventilation (LODSV) in evaluating vasomotor reactivity (VMR) by comparison between LODSV and breath-holding test (BHT). Outpatient or inpatient patients who underwent transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were enrolled into this study. These patients successively underwent BHT and LODSV. The cooperation degree, tolerance conditions and adverse reactions in patients were recorded, and VMR was calculated, compared and analyzed. Patients had poor cooperation during BHT. Except for compensatory tachypnea after BHT, patients basically had no adverse reaction. The main manifestations of patients undergoing LODSV were deepened breathing and accelerated frequency in the end of the ventilation, and increased heart rate and a slight decline in pulse oxygen that rapidly recovered after ventilation. The increase rate of blood flow velocity in patients undergoing LODSV was significantly higher than in BHT (P<0.001), and its calculated VMR value was approximately 15% higher than BHT (P<0.001). BHT revealed a monophasic curve that slightly descends and rapidly increases, and LODSV revealed a curve that descends for a short time and slowly increases with a platform. LODSV can effectively eliminate the affect of poor cooperation in patients, and avoid intolerance caused by hypoxia. Hence, VMR value is more accurate than that determined by BHT; and this can reflect the maximum reaction ability of the blood vessels. Therefore, this method has higher clinical application value.

  19. Nonrigid groupwise registration for motion estimation and compensation in compressed sensing reconstruction of breath-hold cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Royuela-del-Val, Javier; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Simmross-Wattenberg, Federico; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Compressed sensing methods with motion estimation and compensation techniques have been proposed for the reconstruction of accelerated dynamic MRI. However, artifacts that naturally arise in compressed sensing reconstruction procedures hinder the estimation of motion from reconstructed images, especially at high acceleration factors. This work introduces a robust groupwise nonrigid motion estimation technique applied to the compressed sensing reconstruction of dynamic cardiac cine MRI sequences. A spatio-temporal regularized, groupwise, nonrigid registration method based on a B-splines deformation model and a least squares metric is used to estimate and to compensate the movement of the heart in breath-hold cine acquisitions and to obtain a quasistatic sequence with highly sparse representation in temporally transformed domains. Short axis in vivo datasets are used for validation, both original multicoil as well as DICOM data. Fully sampled data were retrospectively undersampled with various acceleration factors and reconstructions were compared with the two well-known methods k-t FOCUSS and MASTeR. The proposed method achieves higher signal to error ratio and structure similarity index for medium to high acceleration factors. Reconstruction methods based on groupwise registration show higher quality reconstructions for cardiac cine images than the pairwise counterparts tested. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon: Results of a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results.Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon-oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images.Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects.Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images reflected

  1. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause kids to stop breathing and sometimes lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ... pose a choking hazard once your child regains consciousness roll your child over onto his or her ...

  2. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  3. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Mastorci, Francesca; Allegrini, Paolo; Piarulli, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo P.; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; L'Abbate, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena, from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular to metabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological condition characterizing voluntary breath-holding (BH). BH induces several autonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular and cutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim of this study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC) recordings were collected from 14 elite divers during three conditions: free breathing (FB), normoxic phase of BH (NPBH) and hypoxic phase of BH (HPBH). Thus, we compared a set of features describing signal dynamics between the three experimental conditions: from heart rate variability (HRV) features (in time and frequency-domains and by using nonlinear methods) to rate and shape of spontaneous SC responses (SCRs). The main result of the study rises by applying a Factor Analysis to the subset of features significantly changed in the two BH phases. Indeed, the Factor Analysis allowed to uncover the structure of latent factors which modeled the autonomic response: a factor describing the autonomic balance (AB), one the information increase rate (IIR), and a latter the central nervous system driver (CNSD). The BH did not disrupt the FB factorial structure, and only few features moved among factors. Factor Analysis indicates that during BH (1) only the SC described the emotional output, (2) the sympathetic tone on heart did not change, (3) the dynamics of interbeats intervals showed an increase of long-range correlation that anticipates the HPBH, followed by a drop to a random behavior. In conclusion, data show that the autonomic control on heart rate and SC are differentially modulated during BH, which could be related to a more pronounced effect on emotional control induced by the mental training to BH. PMID:22461774

  4. Positional Reproducibility of Pancreatic Tumors Under End-Exhalation Breath-Hold Conditions Using a Visual Feedback Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To assess positional reproducibility of pancreatic tumors under end-exhalation (EE) breath-hold (BH) conditions with a visual feedback technique based on computed tomography (CT) images. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved trial. All patients were placed in a supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. At the time of CT scan, they held their breath at EE with the aid of video goggles displaying their abdominal displacement. Each three-consecutive helical CT data set was acquired four times (sessions 1-4; session 1 corresponded to the time of CT simulation). The point of interest within or in proximity to a gross tumor volume was defined based on certain structural features. The positional variations in point of interest and margin size required to cover positional variations were assessed. Results: The means {+-} standard deviations (SDs) of intrafraction positional variations were 0.0 {+-} 1.1, 0.1 {+-} 1.2, and 0.1 {+-} 1.0 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively (p = 0.726). The means {+-} SDs of interfraction positional variations were 0.3 {+-} 2.0, 0.8 {+-} 1.8, and 0.3 {+-} 1.8 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively (p = 0.533). Population-based margin sizes required to cover 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations were 4.7, 5.3, and 4.9 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Conclusions: A margin size of 5 mm was needed to cover the 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations under EE-BH conditions, using this noninvasive approach to motion management for pancreatic tumors.

  5. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  6. Classifying geometric variability by dominant eigenmodes of deformation in regressing tumours during active breath-hold lung cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ahmed M; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-01-21

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a lung tumour interfraction geometric variability classification scheme as a means to guide adaptive radiotherapy and improve measurement of treatment response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to generate statistical shape models of the gross tumour volume (GTV) for 12 patients with weekly breath hold CT scans. Each eigenmode of the PCA model was classified as 'trending' or 'non-trending' depending on whether its contribution to the overall GTV variability included a time trend over the treatment course. Trending eigenmodes were used to reconstruct the original semi-automatically delineated GTVs into a reduced model containing only time trends. Reduced models were compared to the original GTVs by analyzing the reconstruction error in the GTV and position. Both retrospective (all weekly images) and prospective (only the first four weekly images) were evaluated. The average volume difference from the original GTV was 4.3% ± 2.4% for the trending model. The positional variability of the GTV over the treatment course, as measured by the standard deviation of the GTV centroid, was 1.9 ± 1.4 mm for the original GTVs, which was reduced to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm for the trending-only model. In 3/13 cases, the dominant eigenmode changed class between the prospective and retrospective models. The trending-only model preserved GTV and shape relative to the original GTVs, while reducing spurious positional variability. The classification scheme appears feasible for separating types of geometric variability by time trend.

  7. Hemodynamic Changes Following Visual Stimulation and Breath-holding Provide Evidence for an Uncoupling of Cerebral Blood Flow and Volume from Oxygen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Stevens, Robert D.; de Boorder, Michiel; Pekar, James J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is most commonly performed using the blood-oxygenation-level-depend (BOLD) approach, which is sensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). However, the precise mechanism by which neuronal activity elicits a hemodynamic response remains controversial. Here, separate visual stimulation (14s flashing checkerboard) and breath-hold (4s exhale + 14s breath-hold) experiments were performed in parallel on healthy volunteers using BOLD, CBV-weighted (CBVw) and CBF-weighted (CBFw) fMRI. Following visual stimulation, the BOLD signal persisted for 33±5s (n=9) and was bi-phasic with a negative component (undershoot), whereas CBV and CBF returned to baseline without an undershoot at 20±5s and 20±3s, respectively. Following breath-hold, the BOLD signal returned to baseline (23±7s) at the same time (p>0.05) as CBV (21±6s) and CBF (18±3s), without a post-stimulus undershoot. These data indicate that following visual activation, the BOLD undershoot is likely due to continued elevated CMRO2. Furthermore, persisting elevated CMRO2 is found when CBF and CBV have returned to baseline levels, providing evidence for an uncoupling of CBV and CBF responses from CMRO2 changes. Persisting elevated CMRO2 following elevated neuronal activity may be necessary to reverse neurotransmitter movements arising from excitatory postsynaptic currents. PMID:18797471

  8. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window.

  9. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Objective First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Results Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Conclusion Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR

  10. Three-dimensional MR Cholangiopancreatography in a Breath Hold with Sparsity-based Reconstruction of Highly Undersampled Data

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ankur M.; Shanbhogue, Alampady; Babb, James S.; Bruno, Mary T.; Zhao, Tiejun; Raithel, Esther; Zenge, Michael O.; Li, Guobin; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional breath-hold (BH) magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatographic protocol with sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) acquisition and sparsity-based iterative reconstruction (SPARSE) of prospectively sampled 5% k-space data and to compare the results with conventional respiratory-triggered (RT) acquisition. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was institutional review board approved. Twenty-nine patients underwent conventional RT SPACE and BH–accelerated SPACE acquisition with 5% k-space sampling at 3 T. Spatial resolution and other parameters were matched when possible. BH SPACE images were reconstructed by enforcing joint multicoil sparsity in the wavelet domain (SPARSE-SPACE). Two board-certified radiologists independently evaluated BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images for image quality parameters in the pancreatic duct and common bile duct by using a five-point scale. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images. Results Acquisition time for BH SPARSE-SPACE was 20 seconds, which was significantly (P < .001) shorter than that for RT SPACE (mean ± standard deviation, 338.8 sec ± 69.1). Overall image quality scores were higher for BH SPARSE-SPACE than for RT SPACE images for both readers for the proximal, middle, and distal pancreatic duct, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > .05). For reader 1, distal common bile duct scores were significantly higher with BH SPARSE-SPACE acquisition (P = .036). More patients had acceptable or better overall image quality (scores ≥ 3) with BH SPARSE-SPACE than with RT SPACE acquisition, respectively, for the proximal (23 of 29 [79%] vs 22 of 29 [76%]), middle (22 of 29 [76%] vs 18 of 29 [62%]), and distal (20 of 29 [69%] vs 13 of 29 [45%]) pancreatic duct and the proximal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 22 of 28 [79%]) and distal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 24

  11. Breath-hold PET/CT-guided tumour ablation under general anaesthesia: accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation zone overlap.

    PubMed

    Shyn, P B; Tremblay-Paquet, S; Palmer, K; Tatli, S; Tuncali, K; Olubiyi, O I; Hata, N; Silverman, S G

    2017-03-01

    To assess single-breath-hold combined positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation volume overlap in patients undergoing percutaneous PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures under general anaesthesia. Eight patients underwent 12 PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures to treat 20 tumours in the lung, liver, or adrenal gland. Using breath-hold PET/CT, the centre of the tumour was marked on each PET and CT acquisition by four readers to assess two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) spatial misregistration. Overlap of PET and CT projected ablation volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Interobserver differences were assessed with repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Technical success and local progression rates were noted. Mean tumour 2D PET/CT misregistrations were 1.02 mm (range 0.01-5.02), 1.89 (0.03-7.85), and 3.05 (0-10) in the x, y, and z planes. Mean 3D misregistration was 4.4 mm (0.36-10.74). Mean projected PET/CT ablation volume DSC was 0.72 (±0.19). No significant interobserver differences in 3D misregistration (p=0.73) or DSC (p=0.54) were observed. Technical success of ablations was 100%; one (5.3%) of 19 tumours progressed. Accurate spatial registration of tumours and substantial overlap of projected ablation volumes are achievable when comparing PET and CT acquisitions from single-breath-hold PET/CT. The results suggest that tumours visible only at PET could be accurately targeted and ablated using this technique. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma—detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bärwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-four patients with melanoma were examined. BhPET and fbPET findings of 117 lesions were compared and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, and mVic40) were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman correlation. The impact of lesion size and time interval between investigations was analyzed. In 1 patient, a CT-confirmed liver metastasis was seen only on bhPET but not on fbPET. At bhPET, SUVmax, and SUVmean proved significantly higher and mVic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. The positive effect on SUVmax and SUVmean was more pronounced in smaller lesions, whereas the time interval between bhPET and fbPET did not influence SUV or mVic40. In our patient cohort, bhPET yielded significantly higher SUV and provided improved volumetric lesion definition, particularly of smaller lesions. Also one additional liver lesion was identified. Breath-hold PET/CT is technically feasible, and may become clinically useful when fine quantitative evaluations are needed. PMID:28079829

  13. Breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: detection of additional lesions and effects on quantitative parameters.

    PubMed

    Zirnsak, Mariana; Bärwolf, Robert; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-11-08

    Respiratory motion during PET/CT acquisition generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which influences the lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to verify whether breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT (bhPET) allows detection of additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET), and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and isocontoured volume (Vic40) in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients with NET (n=39) were included in this study. BhPET and fbPET characteristics of 96 lesions were compared, and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters SUV (max and mean) and Vic40 were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman's correlation. The impact of lesion size, localization and time interval between investigations was also analyzed. bhPET identified one additional metastasis not seen at fbPET but visible at ceMRI. Another additional bhPET focus did not have a morphological correlate. At bhPET, the SUVmax and SUVmean proved significantly higher and the Vic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. Lesion size, localization and time intervals did not impact significantly on SUV or Vic40. Currently, routine use of breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT cannot be recommended as only one additional lesion was identified. Therefore, bhPET has currently no indication in patients with NET. If technical improvements regarding PET/CT scanner sensitivity are available, bhPET should be reevaluated in the future.

  14. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  15. Radiation during deep inspiration allows loco-regional treatment of left breast and axillary-, supraclavicular- and internal mammary lymph nodes without compromising target coverage or dose restrictions to organs at risk.

    PubMed

    Hjelstuen, Mari H B; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Vikström, Johan; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2012-03-01

    Loco-regional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer represents a treatment planning challenge when the internal mammary chain (IMC) lymph nodes are included in the target volume. This treatment planning study evaluates the reduction in cardiopulmonary doses when radiation is given during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). This was achieved without compromising dose coverage to the planning target volume (PTV). Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two computed tomography (CT)-scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio-visual guidance was used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed focusing on good coverage (V95% > 98%) of the PTV. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, lungs and contralateral breast were assessed. With equal PTV coverage, average mean heart dose was reduced from 6.2 Gy to 3.1 Gy in DIBH plans as compared to FB. Average volume receiving 25 Gy or more (V25Gy) was reduced from 6.7% to 1.2%, and the number of patients with V25Gy > 5% was reduced from 8 to 1 utilizing DIBH. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 25.0 Gy to 10.9 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more (V20Gy) was reduced from 44.5% to 32.7% with DIBH. In 11 of the DIBH plans V20Gy was lower than 35%, in accordance with national guidelines, while none of the FB plans fulfilled this recommendation. Respiratory gated radiotherapy during DIBH is a suitable technique for loco-regional breast irradiation even when IMC lymph nodes are included in the PTV. Cardiopulmonary doses are considerably decreased for all dose levels without compromising the dose coverage to PTV.

  16. Exploratory analysis of nonlinear coupling between EEG global field power and end-tidal carbon dioxide in free breathing and breath-hold tasks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Brain activations underlying control of breathing are not completely known. Furthermore, the coupling between neural and respiratory dynamics is usually estimated through linear correlation measures, thus totally disregarding possible underlying nonlinear interactions. To overcome these limitations, in this preliminary study we propose a nonlinear coupling analysis of simultaneous recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiratory signals at rest and after variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) level. Specifically, a CO2 increase was induced by a voluntary breath hold task. EEG global field power (GFP) in different frequency bands and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) were estimated in both conditions. The maximum information coefficient (MIC) and MIC-ρ2 (where ρ represents the Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the two signals were calculated to identify generic associations (i.e. linear and nonlinear correlations) and nonlinear correlations, respectively. With respect to a free breathing state, our results suggest that a breath hold state is characterized by an increased coupling between respiration activity and specific EEG oscillations, mainly involving linear and nonlinear interactions in the delta band (1-4 Hz), and prevalent nonlinear interactions in the alpha band (8-13 Hz).

  17. Magnetic resonance coronary angiography with Vasovist: in-vivo T1 estimation to improve image quality of navigator and breath-hold techniques.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Kai; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Kelle, Sebastian; Schlosser, Thomas; Breuckmann, Frank; Maderwald, Stefan; Hunold, Peter; Nagel, Eike; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate T1 values of blood and myocardium after a single injection of Vasovist and to assess Vasovist for magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA). For all exams 0.05 mmol/kg of Vasovist was injected. T1 values of blood and myocardium were estimated over 30 min after injection. Twelve volunteers were examined on a 1.5-T Siemens system using a SSFP sequence with incrementally increasing inversion times for T1-estimation and a breath-hold 3D IR-FLASH sequence for MRCA. Eleven examinations were performed on 1.5-T Philips system using the Look-Locker approach for T1 estimation and a whole-heart inversion-prepared, 3D SSFP sequence for MRCA. SNR, CNR and image quality were assessed. T1 values of blood (5 min: 230 ms vs. 30 min: 275 ms) and myocardium (5 min: 99 ms vs. 30 min: 130 ms) increased over time. Whereas the blood SNR (1 min: 23.6 vs. 30 min: 21.2) showed no significant differences, the blood-to-myocardium CNR (1 min: 18.1 vs. 30 min: 13.8) and the image quality (1 min: 2.9 vs. 30 min: 3.8) degraded over time. Due to long plasma half-time the T1-shortening effect of Vasovist remains effective over 30 min, which allows for multiple breath-hold or high-resolution MRCA.

  18. Exploratory analysis of nonlinear coupling between EEG global field power and end-tidal carbon dioxide in free breathing and breath-hold tasks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola; Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola; Morelli, Maria Sole; Passino, Claudio; Greco, Alberto; Vanello, Nicola; Valenza, Gaetano; Giannoni, Alberto; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2016-08-01

    Brain activations underlying control of breathing are not completely known. Furthermore, the coupling between neural and respiratory dynamics is usually estimated through linear correlation measures, thus totally disregarding possible underlying nonlinear interactions. To overcome these limitations, in this preliminary study we propose a nonlinear coupling analysis of simultaneous recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiratory signals at rest and after variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) level. Specifically, a CO2 increase was induced by a voluntary breath hold task. EEG global field power (GFP) in different frequency bands and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) were estimated in both conditions. The maximum information coefficient (MIC) and MIC-ρ(2) (where ρ represents the Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the two signals were calculated to identify generic associations (i.e. linear and nonlinear correlations) and nonlinear correlations, respectively. With respect to a free breathing state, our results suggest that a breath hold state is characterized by an increased coupling between respiration activity and specific EEG oscillations, mainly involving linear and nonlinear interactions in the delta band (1-4 Hz), and prevalent nonlinear interactions in the alpha band (8-13 Hz).

  19. Compressed sensing real-time cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance: accurate assessment of left ventricular function in a single-breath-hold.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tomoyuki; Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Watanabe, Kouki; Schmidt, Michaela; Forman, Christoph; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2016-08-24

    Cardiovascular cine magnetic resonance (CMR) accelerated by compressed sensing (CS) is used to assess left ventricular (LV) function. However, it is difficult for prospective CS cine CMR to capture the complete end-diastolic phase, which can lead to underestimation of the end-diastolic volume (EDV), stroke volume (SV), and ejection fraction (EF), compared to retrospective standard cine CMR. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic quality and accuracy of single-breath-hold full cardiac cycle CS cine CMR, acquired over two heart beats, to quantify LV volume in comparison to multi-breath-hold standard cine CMR. Eighty-one participants underwent standard segmented breath-hold cine and CS real-time cine CMR examinations to obtain a stack of eight contiguous short-axis images with same high spatial (1.7 × 1.7 mm(2)) and temporal resolution (41 ms). Two radiologists independently performed qualitative analysis of image quality (score, 1 [i.e., "nondiagnostic"] to 5 [i.e., "excellent"]) and quantitative analysis of the LV volume measurements. The total examination time was 113 ± 7 s for standard cine CMR and 24 ± 4 s for CS cine CMR (p < 0.0001). The CS cine image quality was slightly lower than standard cine (4.8 ± 0.5 for standard vs. 4.4 ± 0.5 for CS; p < 0.0001). However, all image quality scores for CS cine were above 4 (i.e., good). No significant differences existed between standard and CS cine MR for all quantitative LV measurements. The mean differences with 95 % confidence interval (CI), based on Bland-Altman analysis, were 1.3 mL (95 % CI, -14.6 - 17.2) for LV end-diastolic volume, 0.2 mL (95 % CI, -9.8 to10.3) for LV end-systolic volume, 1.1 mL (95 % CI, -10.5 to 12.7) for LV stroke volume, 1.0 g (95 % CI, -11.2 to 13.3) for LV mass, and 0.4 % (95 % CI, -4.8 - 5.6) for LV ejection fraction. The interobserver and intraobserver variability for CS cine MR ranged from -4.8 - 1.6 % and from -7.3 - 9.3

  20. Length oscillation mimicking periodic individual deep inspirations during tidal breathing attenuates force recovery and adaptation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Raqeeb, Abdul; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) is able to generate maximal force under static conditions, and this isometric force can be maintained over a large length range due to length adaptation. The increased force at short muscle length could lead to excessive narrowing of the airways. Prolonged exposure of ASM to submaximal stimuli also increases the muscle's ability to generate force in a process called force adaptation. To date, the effects of length and force adaptation have only been demonstrated under static conditions. In the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung, ASM is constantly subjected to periodic stretches by the parenchyma due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration. It is not known whether force recovery due to muscle adaptation to a static environment could occur in a dynamic environment. In this study the effect of length oscillation mimicking tidal breathing and deep inspiration was examined. Force recovery after a length change was attenuated in the presence of length oscillation, except at very short lengths. Force adaptation was abolished by length oscillation. We conclude that in a healthy lung (with intact airway-parenchymal tethering) where airways are not allowed to narrow excessively, large stretches (associated with deep inspiration) may prevent the ability of the muscle to generate maximal force that would occur under static conditions irrespective of changes in mean length; mechanical perturbation on ASM due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration, therefore, is the first line of defense against excessive bronchoconstriction that may result from static length and force adaptation.

  1. MR imaging of focal lung lesions: elimination of flow and motion artifact by breath-hold ECG-gated and black-blood techniques on T2-weighted turbo SE and STIR sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Yokoyama, T; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Ando, M

    1999-05-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion correction may result in better turbo spin-echo (SE) imaging of the lung. To compare breath-hold cardiac-gated black-blood T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo short-inversion-time inversion-recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pulse sequences with conventional breath-hold turbo SE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences for lesion conspicuity of focal lung lesions, 42 patients with focal lung lesions were prospectively studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. Helical computed tomography was used as a reference. In comparison with the conventional breath-hold turbo SE sequence, all black-blood sequences had fewer image artifacts arising from the heart and blood flow. The overall image quality for the black-blood turbo SE and turbo STIR sequences was superior to that for the breath-hold turbo SE and HASTE sequence (P < 0.01). Not only focal lung lesions but also surrounding inflammatory changes were clearly visualized with these two sequences. With the HASTE sequence, although several slices could be obtained in one breath-hold, both the tumor and vessels appeared blurred. We conclude that T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo STIR imaging of the lung with effective suppression of flow and motion artifacts provide high-quality images in patients with focal lung lesions.

  2. Multiple breath-hold proton spectroscopy of human liver at 3T: Relaxation times and concentrations of glycogen, choline, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Weis, Jan; Kullberg, Joel; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-04-17

    To evaluate the feasibility of an expiration multiple breath-hold (1) H-MRS technique to measure glycogen (Glycg), choline-containing compounds (CCC), and lipid relaxation times T1 , T2 , and their concentrations in normal human liver. Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited. Experiments were performed at 3T. Multiple expiration breath-hold single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) technique was used for localization. Water-suppressed spectra were used for the estimation of Glycg, CCC, lipid methylene (CH2 )n relaxation times and concentrations. Residual water lines were removed by the Hankel Lanczos singular value decomposition filter. After phase correction and frequency alignment, spectra were averaged and processed by LCModel. Summed signals of Glycg resonances H2H4', H3, and H5 between 3.6 and 4 ppm were used to estimate their apparent relaxation times and concentration. Glycg, CCC, and lipid content were estimated from relaxation corrected spectral intensity ratios to unsuppressed water line. Relaxation times were measured for liver Glycg (T1 , 892 ± 126 msec; T2 , 13 ± 4 msec), CCC (T1 , 842 ± 75 msec; T2 , 50 ± 5 msec), lipid (CH2 )n (T1 , 402 ± 19 msec; T2 , 52 ± 3 msec), and water (T1 , 990 ± 89 msec; T2 , 30 ± 2 msec). Mean CCC and lipid concentrations of healthy liver were 7.8 ± 1.3 mM and 15.8 ± 23.6 mM, respectively. Glycg content was found lower in the morning (48 ± 21 mM) compared to the afternoon (145 ± 50 mM). Multiple breath-hold (1) H-MRS together with dedicated postprocessing is a feasible technique for the quantification of liver Glycg, CCC, and lipid relaxation times and concentrations. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Park, Yang-Kyun; Youn, Kaylin K.; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-11-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE90%) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min-1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min-1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH biofeedback

  4. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers

    PubMed Central

    Winklewski, Pawel J.; Barak, Otto; Madden, Dennis; Gruszecka, Agnieszka; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Drvis, Ivan; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ), the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP), pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP), cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS). Methods The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men). During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs)). Heart rate (HR) was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations. Results Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs. Conclusions Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and

  5. Whole-heart cine MRI in a single breath-hold--a compressed sensing accelerated 3D acquisition technique for assessment of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Wech, T; Pickl, W; Tran-Gia, J; Ritter, C; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform functional MR imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold using an undersampled 3 D trajectory for data acquisition in combination with compressed sensing for image reconstruction. Measurements were performed using an SSFP sequence on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a 32-channel body array coil. A 3 D radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme was utilized enabling efficient undersampling of the k-space and thereby accelerating data acquisition. Compressed sensing was applied for the reconstruction of the missing data. A validation study was performed based on a fully sampled dataset acquired by standard Cartesian cine imaging of 2 D slices on a healthy volunteer. The results were investigated with regard to systematic errors and resolution losses possibly introduced by the developed reconstruction. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied for in-vivo functional cardiac imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold of 27  s. The developed technique was tested on three healthy volunteers to examine its reproducibility. By means of the results of the simulation (temporal resolution: 47  ms, spatial resolution: 1.4 × 1.4 × 8  mm, 3 D image matrix: 208 × 208 × 10), an overall acceleration factor of 10 has been found where the compressed sensing reconstructed image series shows only very low systematic errors and a slight in-plane resolution loss of 15 %. The results of the in-vivo study (temporal resolution: 40.5  ms, spatial resolution: 2.1 × 2.1 × 8  mm, 3 D image matrix: 224 × 224 × 12) performed with an acceleration factor of 10.7 confirm the overall good image quality of the presented technique for undersampled acquisitions. The combination of 3 D radial data acquisition and model-based compressed sensing reconstruction allows high acceleration factors enabling cardiac functional imaging of the whole heart within only one breath-hold. The

  6. Total removal of unwanted harmonic peaks (TruHARP) MRI for single breath-hold high-resolution myocardial motion and strain quantification.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Harsh K; Prince, Jerry L; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z

    2010-08-01

    Current MRI methods for myocardial motion and strain quantification have limited resolution because of Fourier space spectral peak interference. Methods have been proposed to remove this interference in order to improve resolution; however, these methods are clinically impractical due to the prolonged imaging times. In this paper, we propose total removal of unwanted harmonic peaks (TruHARP); a myocardial motion and strain quantification methodology that uses a novel single breath-hold MR image acquisition protocol. In post-processing, TruHARP separates the spectral peaks in the acquired images, enabling high-resolution motion and strain quantification. The impact of high resolution on calculated circumferential and radial strains is studied using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and the improvement in strain maps is demonstrated in six human subjects.

  7. A comparison of a T1 weighted 3D gradient-echo sequence with three different parallel imaging reduction factors, breath hold and free breathing, using a 32 channel coil at 1.5 T. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Herédia, V; Dale, B; Op de Campos, R; Ramalho, M; Burke, L B; Sams, C; de Toni, M; Semelka, R C

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether increasing temporal resolution with higher parallel imaging (PI) reduction factors (RF) in both breath-hold and free breathing approaches, using a non-contrast T1-weighted 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and a 32-channel phased array coil, permits diagnostic image quality, with potential application in patients unable to cooperate with breath-hold requirements. The 9 healthy subjects (5 females and 4 males; age range was 20-49, mean 36 yrs) were recruited. A 3D GRE MR imaging of the abdomen was performed on 1.5 T MR system using a 32-element phased-array torso coil with PI RFs of 2, 4 and 6, breath hold and free breathing. Two reviewers retrospectively qualitatively evaluated all sequences for image quality, extent of artifacts, including motion, truncation, aliasing, pixel graininess and signal heterogeneity. The results were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank and a Bonferroni adjustment was applied for multiple comparisons. Image quality and extent of artifacts were better with breath hold than with free breathing acquisitions. The rate of artifacts increased with higher RF. The best quality was acquired with breath hold sequence using RF=2. RF=4 had lower but diagnostic rates (P=.004). The severity of artifacts, mainly pixel graininess (P=.004), rendered sequences with RF=6 non-diagnostic. All sequences were non-diagnostic in free breathing acquisitions. Breath hold sequences with RF=2 had excellent quality and RF=4 had good quality and may be potentially used in partially cooperative patients. None of the sequences was considered diagnostic in free breathing acquisitions. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography for predicting residual pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sudoh, Manabu; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Mitsutaka, Jinbo; Li, Tao-Sheng; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2006-05-01

    We sought to evaluate the utility of integrated breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography imaging compared with that of simple calculation with the lung segment-counting technique for predicting residual pulmonary function in patients undergoing surgical intervention for lung cancer. A prospective series of 22 patients undergoing anatomic lung resection for cancer were enrolled in this study. Postoperative residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second was predicted by measuring the radioactivity counts of the affected lobes or segments to be resected within the entire lungs by placement of regions of interest on single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography images. Residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second was also estimated by using the segment-counting technique. Both predicted values agreed well with postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Although the residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted by means of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography correlated well with that predicted by using segment counting, the values were significantly underestimated by the segment-counting technique in 4 outliers with severe emphysema. There were 2 patients with borderline pulmonary functional reserve whose residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second values were predicted more accurately by means of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography than by using segment counting. Integrated breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography images allow the accurate prediction of postoperative pulmonary function but without statistical superiority over the simple segment-counting technique. Further study of the usefulness of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography in patients with severe emphysema and borderline lung function should prove valuable because the segment-counting technique underestimates pulmonary functional reserve in these

  9. Effects of bronchoconstriction, minute ventilation, and deep inspiration on the composition of exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Debley, Jason S; Ohanian, Arpy S; Spiekerman, Charles F; Aitken, Moira L; Hallstrand, Teal S

    2011-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is composed of droplets of airway surface liquid (ASL) diluted by water vapor. The goal of this study was to determine if the composition of EBC is affected by changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or forceful exhalation, factors that may differ among subjects with asthma in cross-sectional studies. In a group of subjects with asthma, we measured the effects of the following: (1) a series of three deep-inspiration and forceful-exhalation maneuvers; (2) a doubling of minute ventilation; and (3) acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine on EBC volume, dilution of ASL, and concentration of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). With the exception of an increase in EBC volume with increased minute ventilation, there were no significant changes in the volume, dilution, or levels of CysLTs in EBC introduced by each of these factors. The CIs surrounding the differences introduced by each factor showed that the maximum systematic errors due to these factors were modest. These results indicate that changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern among subjects with asthma do not significantly alter the measurements of mediator concentrations in EBC.

  10. The importance of synergy between deep inspirations and fluidization in reversing airway closure.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M; Sneyd, James; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-01-01

    Deep inspirations (DIs) and airway smooth muscle fluidization are two widely studied phenomena in asthma research, particularly for their ability (or inability) to counteract severe airway constriction. For example, DIs have been shown effectively to reverse airway constriction in normal subjects, but this is impaired in asthmatics. Fluidization is a connected phenomenon, wherein the ability of airway smooth muscle (ASM, which surrounds and constricts the airways) to exert force is decreased by applied strain. A maneuver which sufficiently strains the ASM, then, such as a DI, is thought to reduce the force generating capacity of the muscle via fluidization and hence reverse or prevent airway constriction. Understanding these two phenomena is considered key to understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness, and while both have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DIs fail in asthmatics remains elusive. Here we show for the first time the synergistic interaction between DIs and fluidization which allows the combination to provide near complete reversal of airway closure where neither is effective alone. This relies not just on the traditional model of airway bistability between open and closed states, but also the critical addition of previously-unknown oscillatory and chaotic dynamics. It also allows us to explore the types of subtle change which can cause this interaction to fail, and thus could provide the missing link to explain DI failure in asthmatics.

  11. Can tidal breathing with deep inspirations of intact airways create sustained bronchoprotection or bronchodilation?

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuating forces imposed on the airway smooth muscle due to breathing are believed to regulate hyperresponsiveness in vivo. However, recent animal and human isolated airway studies have shown that typical breathing-sized transmural pressure (Ptm) oscillations around a fixed mean are ineffective at mitigating airway constriction. To help understand this discrepancy, we hypothesized that Ptm oscillations capable of producing the same degree of bronchodilation as observed in airway smooth muscle strip studies requires imposition of strains larger than those expected to occur in vivo. First, we applied increasingly larger amplitude Ptm oscillations to a statically constricted airway from a Ptm simulating normal functional residual capacity of 5 cmH2O. Tidal-like oscillations (5–10 cmH2O) imposed 4.9 ± 2.0% strain and resulted in 11.6 ± 4.8% recovery, while Ptm oscillations simulating a deep inspiration at every breath (5–30 cmH2O) achieved 62.9 ± 12.1% recovery. These same Ptm oscillations were then applied starting from a Ptm = 1 cmH2O, resulting in approximately double the strain for each oscillation amplitude. When extreme strains were imposed, we observed full recovery. On combining the two data sets, we found a linear relationship between strain and resultant recovery. Finally, we compared the impact of Ptm oscillations before and after constriction to Ptm oscillations applied only after constriction and found that both loading conditions had a similar effect on narrowing. We conclude that, while sufficiently large strains applied to the airway wall are capable of producing substantial bronchodilation, the Ptm oscillations necessary to achieve those strains are not expected to occur in vivo. PMID:23722710

  12. Can tidal breathing with deep inspirations of intact airways create sustained bronchoprotection or bronchodilation?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian C; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2013-08-15

    Fluctuating forces imposed on the airway smooth muscle due to breathing are believed to regulate hyperresponsiveness in vivo. However, recent animal and human isolated airway studies have shown that typical breathing-sized transmural pressure (Ptm) oscillations around a fixed mean are ineffective at mitigating airway constriction. To help understand this discrepancy, we hypothesized that Ptm oscillations capable of producing the same degree of bronchodilation as observed in airway smooth muscle strip studies requires imposition of strains larger than those expected to occur in vivo. First, we applied increasingly larger amplitude Ptm oscillations to a statically constricted airway from a Ptm simulating normal functional residual capacity of 5 cmH2O. Tidal-like oscillations (5-10 cmH2O) imposed 4.9 ± 2.0% strain and resulted in 11.6 ± 4.8% recovery, while Ptm oscillations simulating a deep inspiration at every breath (5-30 cmH2O) achieved 62.9 ± 12.1% recovery. These same Ptm oscillations were then applied starting from a Ptm = 1 cmH2O, resulting in approximately double the strain for each oscillation amplitude. When extreme strains were imposed, we observed full recovery. On combining the two data sets, we found a linear relationship between strain and resultant recovery. Finally, we compared the impact of Ptm oscillations before and after constriction to Ptm oscillations applied only after constriction and found that both loading conditions had a similar effect on narrowing. We conclude that, while sufficiently large strains applied to the airway wall are capable of producing substantial bronchodilation, the Ptm oscillations necessary to achieve those strains are not expected to occur in vivo.

  13. Abdominal 4D flow MR imaging in a breath hold: combination of spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing for highly accelerated acquisition.

    PubMed

    Dyvorne, Hadrien; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-04-01

    To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30-70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: -8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95% limits of agreement: -10.6 and 14.6 m

  14. Abdominal 4D Flow MR Imaging in a Breath Hold: Combination of Spiral Sampling and Dynamic Compressed Sensing for Highly Accelerated Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. Materials and Methods This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30–70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. Results There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: −8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95

  15. Quantifying the Reproducibility of Heart Position During Treatment and Corresponding Delivered Heart Dose in Voluntary Deep Inhalation Breath Hold for Left Breast Cancer Patients Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Alyson; Shoushtari, Asal N.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Voluntary deep inhalation breath hold (VDIBH) reduces heart dose during left breast irradiation. We present results of the first study performed to quantify reproducibility of breath hold using bony anatomy, heart position, and heart dose for VDIBH patients at treatment table. Methods and Materials: Data from 10 left breast cancer patients undergoing VDIBH whole-breast irradiation were analyzed. Two computed tomography (CT) scans, free breathing (FB) and VDIBH, were acquired to compare dose to critical structures. Pretreatment weekly kV orthogonal images and tangential ports were acquired. The displacement difference from spinal cord to sternum across the isocenter between coregistered planning Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) and kV imaging of bony thorax is a measure of breath hold reproducibility. The difference between bony coregistration and heart coregistration was the measured heart shift if the patient is aligned to bony anatomy. Results: Percentage of dose reductions from FB to VDIBH: mean heart dose (48%, SD 19%, p = 0.002), mean LAD dose (43%, SD 19%, p = 0.008), and maximum left anterior descending (LAD) dose (60%, SD 22%, p = 0.008). Average breath hold reproducibility using bony anatomy across the isocenter along the anteroposterior (AP) plane from planning to treatment is 1 (range, 0-3; SD, 1) mm. Average heart shifts with respect to bony anatomy between different breath holds are 2 {+-} 3 mm inferior, 1 {+-} 2 mm right, and 1 {+-} 3 mm posterior. Percentage dose changes from planning to delivery: mean heart dose (7%, SD 6%); mean LAD dose, ((9%, SD 7%)S, and maximum LAD dose, (11%, SD 11%) SD 11%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: We observed excellent three-dimensional bony registration between planning and pretreatment imaging. Reduced delivered dose to heart and LAD is maintained throughout VDIBH treatment.

  16. Breath Holding Duration and Self-Reported Smoking Abstinence Intolerance as Predictors of Smoking Lapse Behavior in a Laboratory Analog Task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Distress intolerance (DI) is elevated in smokers and confers increased risk for relapse following a quit attempt. Intolerance of respiratory distress and of nicotine withdrawal may be particularly relevant predictors of smoking cessation outcomes. However, no studies to date have examined the association between smoking relevant DI and smoking lapse behavior in a laboratory setting. The current study examined whether DI was associated with the risk of initiating smoking in a laboratory-based lapse analog task. Methods: This study is a secondary data analysis from a study of the impact of alcohol administration on smoking behavior. Ninety-six cigarette smokers completed measures of DI and a smoking lapse analog task. Breath holding (BH) duration and self-reported intolerance of smoking abstinence were analyzed as predictors of smoking initiation in a survival analysis model. Results: Shorter BH duration was associated with greater risk of smoking initiation, controlling for nicotine dependence, nicotine withdrawal symptoms, and demographics. Self-report measures of smoking abstinence DI were not associated with BH duration or time to smoking initiation when controlling for nicotine dependence severity. Conclusions: BH captures a domain of DI that is specifically associated with a higher risk of initiating smoking in this analog of smoking lapse. The prediction of smoking in an analog lapse task adds to the extant literature identifying an association between DI and smoking lapse and may enable further research to understand and address the mechanism through which BH affects smoking lapse risk. PMID:23132658

  17. Effects of nicotine withdrawal on panic-like response to breath holding: a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover patch study.

    PubMed

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Bertoli, Giuly; Abrams, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Cigarette smoking may increase the likelihood of developing panic disorder. Periods of nicotine withdrawal, in particular, may promote panic in individuals high in anxiety sensitivity. We examined the importance of nicotine withdrawal in the occurrence of smoking and panic. We utilized a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Fifty smokers underwent a breath-holding (BH) challenge after the transdermal administration of nicotine on one test day and a placebo on another test day. Physiological and psychological variables were assessed at baseline as well as directly before and after the challenges. Nicotine abstinence induced a decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure (BP) before the BH procedure (heart rate: 78.80 ± 11.43 under nicotine, 70.88 ± 10.83 under placebo; systolic BP: 124.90 ± 11.34 under nicotine, 121.18 ± 13.44 under placebo) and shorter BH duration relative to the nicotine patch condition. Nicotine abstinence did not, though, increase fear reactivity to the challenge. The findings for heart rate and BP are consistent with the stimulant properties of nicotine. The reduced capacity to maintain apnea under placebo might be due to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) hypersensitivity during periods of nicotine abstinence. The negative findings regarding fear reactivity might be due to BH being a relatively weak anxiogen. Future researchers are encouraged to employ CO2 -inhalation procedures to study the relationship between nicotine withdrawal and panic. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Registration and Summation of Respiratory-Gated or Breath-Hold PET Images Based on Deformation Estimation of Lung from CT Image

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Masayuki; Tamai, Yoshitaka; Sakohira, Atsushi; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung motion due to respiration causes image degradation in medical imaging, especially in nuclear medicine which requires long acquisition times. We have developed a method for image correction between the respiratory-gated (RG) PET images in different respiration phases or breath-hold (BH) PET images in an inconsistent respiration phase. In the method, the RG or BH-PET images in different respiration phases are deformed under two criteria: similarity of the image intensity distribution and smoothness of the estimated motion vector field (MVF). However, only these criteria may cause unnatural motion estimation of lung. In this paper, assuming the use of a PET-CT scanner, we add another criterion that is the similarity for the motion direction estimated from inhalation and exhalation CT images. The proposed method was first applied to a numerical phantom XCAT with tumors and then applied to BH-PET image data for seven patients. The resultant tumor contrasts and the estimated motion vector fields were compared with those obtained by our previous method. Through those experiments we confirmed that the proposed method can provide an improved and more stable image quality for both RG and BH-PET images. PMID:28096896

  19. Evaluation of Free Breathing Versus Breath Hold Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Terms Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) Values for Solid Abdominal Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herek, Duygu; Karabulut, Nevzat; Kocyıgıt, Ali; Yagcı, Ahmet Baki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Our aim was to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal abdominal parenchymal organs and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements in the same patients with breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Material/Methods Forty-eight patients underwent both BH and FB DWI. Spherical region of interest (ROI) was placed on the right hepatic lobe, spleen, pancreas, and renal cortices. ADC values were calculated for each organ on each sequence using an automated software. Image noise, defined as the standard deviation (SD) of the signal intensities in the most artifact-free area of the image background was measured by placing the largest possible ROI on either the left or the right side of the body outside the object in the recorded field of view. SNR was calculated using the formula: SNR=signal intensity (SI)(organ)/standard deviation (SD)(noise). Results There were no statistically significant differences in ADC values of the abdominal organs between BH and FB DWI sequences (p>0.05). There were statistically significant differences between SNR values of organs on BH and FB DWIs. SNRs were found to be better on FB DWI than BH DWI (p<0.001). Conclusions Free breathing DWI technique reduces image noise and increases SNR for abdominal examinations. Free breathing technique is therefore preferable to BH DWI in the evaluation of abdominal organs by DWI. PMID:27822326

  20. Breath-hold Multi-Echo Fast Spin-Echo Pulse Sequence for Accurate R2 Measurement in the Heart and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Jensen, Jens H.; Wu, Ed X.; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) is a generally useful means for quantitative characterization of pathological changes in tissue with a variety of clinical applications. The most widely used R2 measurement method is the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence but its relatively long scan time requires respiratory gating for chest or body MRI, rendering this approach impractical for comprehensive assessment within a clinically acceptable examination time. The purpose of our study was to develop a breath-hold multi-echo fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence for accurate measurement of R2 in the liver and heart. Phantom experiments and studies of subjects in vivo were performed to compare the FSE data with the corresponding even-echo CPMG data. For pooled data, the R2 measurements were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.99) and in excellent agreement (mean difference [CPMG-FSE] = 0.10 s−1; 95% limits of agreement were 1.98 and −1.78 s−1) between the two pulse sequences. PMID:19526516

  1. Anatomy, Variants, and Pathologies of the Superior Glenohumeral Ligament: Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Three-Dimensional Volumetric Interpolated Breath-Hold Examination Sequence and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL. PMID:25053912

  2. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  3. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Tsuda, S.; Ozawa, S; Ohno, Y.; Kimura, T.; Nagata, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Aita, M.; Ochi, Y.; Okumura, T.; Masuda, H.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor.

  4. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  5. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Kelli A; Read, Paul W; Morris, Monica M; Reardon, Michael A; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  6. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa . E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.

  7. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using SW-CG-HYPR and motion correction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Griswold, Mark; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2010-10-01

    First-pass perfusion MRI is a promising technique to detect ischemic heart disease. Sliding window (SW) conjugate-gradient (CG) highly constrained back-projection reconstruction (HYPR) (SW-CG-HYPR) has been proposed to increase spatial coverage, spatial resolution, and SNR. However, this method is sensitive to respiratory motion and thus requires breath-hold. This work presents a non-model-based motion correction method combined with SW-CG-HYPR to perform free-breathing myocardial MR imaging. Simulation studies were first performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed motion correction method and its independence from the pattern of the respiratory motion. After that, in vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers. From all of the volunteer studies, the image quality score of free breathing perfusion images with motion correction (3.11 ± 0.34) is improved compared with that of images without motion correction (2.27 ± 0.32), and is comparable with that of successful breath-hold images (3.12 ± 0.38). This result was further validated by a quantitative sharpness analysis. The left ventricle and myocardium signal changes in motion corrected free-breathing perfusion images were closely correlated to those observed in breath-hold images. The correlation coefficient is 0.9764 for myocardial signals. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the agreement between the free-breathing SW-CG-HYPR method with motion correction and the breath-hold SW-CG-HYPR. This technique may allow myocardial perfusion MRI during free breathing.

  9. Breath-hold imaging of the coronary arteries using Quiescent-Interval Slice-Selective (QISS) magnetic resonance angiography: pilot study at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Robert R; Giri, S; Pursnani, A; Botelho, M P F; Li, W; Koktzoglou, I

    2015-11-23

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is usually obtained with a free-breathing navigator-gated 3D acquisition. Our aim was to develop an alternative breath-hold approach that would allow the coronary arteries to be evaluated in a much shorter time and without risk of degradation by respiratory motion artifacts. For this purpose, we implemented a breath-hold, non-contrast-enhanced, quiescent-interval slice-selective (QISS) 2D technique. Sequence performance was compared at 1.5 and 3 Tesla using both radial and Cartesian k-space trajectories. The left coronary circulation was imaged in six healthy subjects and two patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold QISS was compared with T2-prepared 2D balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) and free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D bSSFP. Approximately 10 2.1-mm thick slices were acquired in a single ~20-s breath-hold using two-shot QISS. QISS contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 1.5-fold higher at 3 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. Cartesian QISS provided the best coronary-to-myocardium CNR, whereas radial QISS provided the sharpest coronary images. QISS image quality exceeded that of free-breathing 3D coronary MRA with few artifacts at either field strength. Compared with T2-prepared 2D bSSFP, multi-slice capability was not restricted by the specific absorption rate at 3 Tesla and pericardial fluid signal was better suppressed. In addition to depicting the coronary arteries, QISS could image intra-cardiac structures, pericardium, and the aortic root in arbitrary slice orientations. Breath-hold QISS is a simple, versatile, and time-efficient method for coronary MRA that provides excellent image quality at both 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Image quality exceeded that of free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D MRA in a much shorter scan time. QISS also allowed rapid multi-slice bright-blood, diastolic phase imaging of the heart, which may have complementary value to multi-phase cine imaging. We conclude that, with further clinical

  10. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  11. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  12. Clinical experience using a video-guided spirometry system for deep inhalation breath-hold radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Burnison, Michele; Shiao, Stephen; Mirhadi, Amin; Hakimian, Behrooz; Reznik, Robert; Tuli, Richard; Sandler, Howard; Fraass, Benedick A

    2015-03-08

    The purpose was to report clinical experience of a video-guided spirometry system in applying deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer, and to study the systematic and random uncertainties, intra- and interfraction motion and impact on cardiac dose associated with DIBH. The data from 28 left-sided breast cancer patients treated with spirometer-guided DIBH radiation were studied. Dosimetric comparisons between free-breathing (FB) and DIBH plans were performed. The distance between the heart and chest wall measured on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and MV portal images, dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH), respectively, was compared as a measure of DIBH setup uncertainty. The difference (Δd) between dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH) was defined as the systematic uncertainty. The standard deviation of Δd for each patient was defined as the random uncertainty. MV cine images during radiation were acquired. Affine registrations of the cine images acquired during one fraction and multiple fractions were performed to study the intra- and interfraction motion of the chest wall. The median chest wall motion was used as the metric for intra- and interfraction analysis. Breast motions in superior-inferior (SI) direction and "AP" (defined on the DRR or MV portal image as the direction perpendicular to the SI direction) are reported. Systematic and random uncertainties of 3.8 mm and 2mm, respectively, were found for this spirometer-guided DIBH treatment. MV cine analysis showed that intrafraction chest wall motions during DIBH were 0.3mm in "AP" and 0.6 mm in SI. The interfraction chest wall motions were 3.6 mm in "AP" and 3.4 mm in SI. Utilization of DIBH with this spirometry system led to a statistically significant reduction of cardiac dose relative to FB treatment. The DIBH using video-guided spirometry provided reproducible cardiac sparing with minimal intra- and interfraction chest wall motion, and thus is a valuable adjunct to modern

  13. Non-contrast-enhanced 3D MR portography within a breath-hold using compressed sensing acceleration: A prospective noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ayako; Arizono, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Koji; Akasaka, Thai; Yamashita, Rikiya; Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-07-05

    To evaluate images of non-contrast-enhanced 3D MR portography within a breath-hold (BH) using compressed sensing (CS) compared to standard respiratory-triggered (RT) sequences. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers underwent MR portography using two sequences of balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP): BH bSSFP-CS and RT bSSFP. Two radiologists independently scored the diagnostic acceptability to delineate the portal branches (MPV: main portal vein; RPV: right portal vein; LPV: left portal vein; RPPV: right posterior portal vein; and P4 and P8: portal branch of segment 4 and segment 8, respectively) and the overall image quality on a four-point scale. We assessed noninferiority of BH bSSFP-CS to RT bSSFP. For quantitative analysis, vessel-to-liver contrast (Cv-l) was calculated in MPV, RPV and LPV. BH bSSFP sequence was successfully performed with a 30-second acquisition time. The diagnostic acceptability scores of BH bSSFP-CS compared with RT bSSFP were statistically noninferior: MPV (95% CI for score difference of Reader 1 and Reader 2, respectively: [-0.16, 0.06], [-0.05, 0.02]), RPV ([-0.00, 0.11], [-0.01, 0.08]), LPV ([-0.03, 0.10], [-0.10, 0.03]), RPPV ([-0.03, 0.10], [-0.05, 0.05]), P4 ([-0.13, 0.34], [-0.28, 0.21]) and P8 ([-0.21, 0.11], [-0.25, -0.02]). However, the overall image quality of BH bSSFP-CS did not show noninferiority ([-0.61, -0.24], [-0.54, -0.17]). Cv-l values were significantly lower in BH bSSFP-CS (P<0.001). CS enabled non-contrast-enhanced 3D bSSFP MR portography to be performed within a BH while maintaining noninferior diagnostic acceptability compared to standard RT bSSFP MR portography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Localized Spatio-Temporal Constraints for Accelerated CMR Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Pflugi, Silvio; Foppa, Murilo; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an image reconstruction technique for cardiac MRI (CMR)perfusion that utilizes localized spatio-temporal constraints. Methods CMR perfusion plays an important role in detecting myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold k-t based image acceleration techniques are typically used in CMR perfusion for superior spatial/temporal resolution, and improved coverage. In this study, we propose a novel compressed sensing based image reconstruction technique for CMR perfusion, with applicability to free-breathing examinations. This technique uses local spatio-temporal constraints by regularizing image patches across a small number of dynamics. The technique is compared to conventional dynamic-by-dynamic reconstruction, and sparsity regularization using a temporal principal-component (pc) basis, as well as zerofilled data in multi-slice 2D and 3D CMR perfusion. Qualitative image scores are used (1=poor, 4=excellent) to evaluate the technique in 3D perfusion in 10 patients and 5 healthy subjects. On 4 healthy subjects, the proposed technique was also compared to a breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging in terms of signal intensity curves. Results The proposed technique results in images that are superior in terms of spatial and temporal blurring compared to the other techniques, even in free-breathing datasets. The image scores indicate a significant improvement compared to other techniques in 3D perfusion (2.8±0.5 vs. 2.3±0.5 for x-pc regularization, 1.7±0.5 for dynamic-by-dynamic, 1.1±0.2 for zerofilled). Signal intensity curves indicate similar dynamics of uptake between the proposed method with a 3D acquisition and the breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging. Conclusion The proposed reconstruction utilizes sparsity regularization based on localized information in both spatial and temporal domains for highly-accelerated CMR perfusion with potential utility in free

  15. Changes in respiratory elastance after deep inspirations reflect surface film functionality in mice with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension in the lung and prevents alveolar collapse. Following a deep inspiration (DI), respiratory elastance first drops then gradually increases due to surface film and tissue viscoelasticity. In acute lung injury (ALI), this increase is faster and governed by alveolar collapse due to increased surface tension. We hypothesized that the rate of increase in elastance reflects the deficiency of surfactant in the lung. To test this, mice were ventilated before (baseline) and after saline lavage obtained by injecting 0.8 ml and withdrawing 0.7 ml fluid (severe ALI) or injecting 0.1 ml (mild ALI). After two DIs, elastance was tracked for 10 min followed by a full lavage to assess surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) content. Following 2 DIs, the increases in elastance during 10 min ventilation (ΔH) were 3.60 ± 0.61, 5.35 ± 1.04, and 8.33 ± 0.84 cmH2O/ml in baseline mice and mice with mild and severe ALI, respectively (P < 0.0001). SP-B and SP-C in the lavage fluid dropped by 32.4% and 24.9% in the mild and 50.4% and 39.6% in the severe ALI, respectively. Furthermore, ΔH showed a strong negative correlation with both SP-B (r(2) = 0.801) and SP-C (r(2) = 0.810) content. The ΔH was, however, much smaller when the lavage fluid also contained exogeneous SP-B and SP-C. Thus ΔH can be interpreted as an organ level measure of surface film functionality in lavage-induced ALI in mice. This method could prove useful in clinical situations such as diagnosing surfactant problems, monitoring recovery from lung injury or the effectiveness of surfactant therapy.

  16. Changes in respiratory elastance after deep inspirations reflect surface film functionality in mice with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension in the lung and prevents alveolar collapse. Following a deep inspiration (DI), respiratory elastance first drops then gradually increases due to surface film and tissue viscoelasticity. In acute lung injury (ALI), this increase is faster and governed by alveolar collapse due to increased surface tension. We hypothesized that the rate of increase in elastance reflects the deficiency of surfactant in the lung. To test this, mice were ventilated before (baseline) and after saline lavage obtained by injecting 0.8 ml and withdrawing 0.7 ml fluid (severe ALI) or injecting 0.1 ml (mild ALI). After two DIs, elastance was tracked for 10 min followed by a full lavage to assess surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) content. Following 2 DIs, the increases in elastance during 10 min ventilation (ΔH) were 3.60 ± 0.61, 5.35 ± 1.04, and 8.33 ± 0.84 cmH2O/ml in baseline mice and mice with mild and severe ALI, respectively (P < 0.0001). SP-B and SP-C in the lavage fluid dropped by 32.4% and 24.9% in the mild and 50.4% and 39.6% in the severe ALI, respectively. Furthermore, ΔH showed a strong negative correlation with both SP-B (r2 = 0.801) and SP-C (r2 = 0.810) content. The ΔH was, however, much smaller when the lavage fluid also contained exogeneous SP-B and SP-C. Thus ΔH can be interpreted as an organ level measure of surface film functionality in lavage-induced ALI in mice. This method could prove useful in clinical situations such as diagnosing surfactant problems, monitoring recovery from lung injury or the effectiveness of surfactant therapy. PMID:26066828

  17. Rapid 3D imaging of the lower airway by MRI in patients with congenital heart disease: A retrospective comparison of delayed volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) to turbo spin echo (TSE).

    PubMed

    Goot, Benjamin H; Patel, Sonali; Fonseca, Brian

    2017-01-01

    When imaging the lower airway by MRI, the traditional technique turbo spin echo (TSE) results in high quality 2D images, however planning and acquisition times are lengthy. An alternative, delayed volume interpolated breath-holds examination (VIBE), is a 3D gradient echo technique that produces high spatial resolution imaging of the airway in one breath-hold. The objective of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of lower airway measurements obtained by delayed VIBE when compared to TSE. Patients with congenital heart disease who underwent a cardiac MRI (CMR) that included a delayed VIBE sequence from 5/2008 to 9/2013 were included. Standard TSE imaging was performed and delayed VIBE was acquired 5 min after gadolinium contrast administration. Airway measurements were made on both sequences by two observers in a blinded fashion to the other observer and other technique. Intraclass correlations (ICC) were calculated to assess for agreement between both techniques and the observers. 29 studies met inclusion criteria with a mean patient age of 8.8 years (2 months to 63 years) and mean patient weight of 30.2 kg (3.5-110). All delayed VIBE and TSE sequences were found to be of diagnostic quality. Mean acquisition time was shorter for the delayed VIBE (13.1 seconds) than TSE (949.9 seconds). Overall there was very good agreement between the delayed VIBE and TSE measurements for both observers (ICC 0.78-0.94) with the exception of the distal right bronchus (ICC 0.67) The interobserver agreement was also excellent for both TSE (ICC 0.78-0.96) and VIBE (ICC 0.85-0.96). Delayed VIBE is rapid and at least as accurate as the alternative TSE imaging for assessment of the lower airway by MRI across a wide spectrum of patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prospective Randomized Comparison of High-pitch CT at 80 kVp Under Free Breathing with Standard-pitch CT at 100 kVp Under Breath-Hold for Detection of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Martini, K; Meier, A; Higashigaito, K; Saltybaeva, N; Alkadhi, H; Frauenfelder, T

    2016-11-01

    To prospectively compare high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) under free breathing (FB) with standard-pitch CT (SPCT) under breath-hold (BH) for detection of pulmonary embolism (PE). One hundred consecutive patients (47 females; mean age 58.7 ± 16.6) randomly underwent HPCT-FB (n = 50) or SPCT-BH (n = 50). Radiation doses were documented. One reader measured pulmonary artery attenuation and noise; mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated. Two readers assessed image quality, diagnostic confidence for detection of PE, motion artifacts, assessability of anatomical structures, and presence of transient interruption of contrast as sign of Valsalva maneuver. Inter-reader agreement was calculated. Radiation dose was significantly lower in HPCT compared to SPCT (2.68 ± 0.60 mGy vs 6.01 ± 2.26 mGy; P < .001). Mean pulmonary artery attenuation and image noise were significantly higher in HPCT (attenuation: 479 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs 343HU; P < .001; noise: 16 HU vs 10 HU; P < .001) whereas SNR was similar between groups (34 HU vs 38 HU; P = .258). HPCT had significantly higher diagnostic confidence for PE detection (P = .048), less cardiac and breathing artifacts (P < .001), better assessability of anatomical structures, and fewer cases of transient interruption of contrast (P < .001) compared to the SPCT. HPCT-FB allows for a significant reduction of breathing and motion artifacts compared to SPCT-BH. Diagnostic confidence, assessability of vascular and bronchial structures, as well as SNR are maintained. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SU-D-18A-06: Variation of Controlled Breath Hold From CT Simulation to Treatment and Its Dosimetric Impact for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy with a Real-Time Optical Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, K; Deraniyagala, R; Li, J; Lu, B; Liu, C; Lightsey, J; Yan, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal breathing vs. chest breathing) during CT simulation and treatment can lead to chest wall positional variation. The purpose of this study is to quantify the variation of active breathing control (ABC)-assisted BH and estimate its dosimetric impact for left-sided whole-breast radiotherapy with a real-time optical tracking system (OTS). Methods: Seven breast cancer patients were included. An in-house OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the xiphoid process of the patient at CT simulation and throughout the treatment course to measure BH variations. Correlation between the IR marker and the breast was studied for dosimetric purposes. The positional variations of 860 BHs were retrospectively incorporated into treatment plans to assess their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]). Results: The mean intrafraction variations were 2.8 mm, 2.7 mm, and 1.6 mm in the anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral (ML) directions, respectively. Mean stability in any direction was within 1.5 mm. A general trend of BH undershoot at treatment relative to CT simulation was observed with an average of 4.4 mm, 3.6 mm, and 0.1 mm in the AP, CC, and ML directions, respectively. Undershoot up to 12.6 mm was observed for individual patients. The difference between the planned and delivered dose to breast targets was negligible. The average planned/delivered mean heart doses, mean LAD doses, and max LAD doses were 1.4/2.1, 7.4/15.7, and 18.6/31.0 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Systematic undershoot was observed in ABC-assisted BHs from CT simulation to treatment. Its dosimetric impact on breast coverage was minimized with image guidance, but the benefits of cardiac organ sparing were degraded. A real-time tracking system can be used in junction with the ABC device to improve BH reproducibility.

  20. CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE): a new technique for fast time-resolved dynamic 3-dimensional imaging of the abdomen with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Michaely, Henrik J; Morelli, John N; Budjan, Johannes; Riffel, Philipp; Nickel, Dominik; Kroeker, Randall; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and image quality of a novel, highly accelerated T1-weighted sequence for time-resolved imaging of the abdomen during the first pass of contrast media transit using controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration (CAIPIRINHA) under sampling, view-sharing techniques, and Dixon water-fat separation (CAIPRINHA-Dixon-time-resolved imaging with interleaved stochastic trajectories-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination [CDT-VIBE]). In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, 47 patients (median age, 62 years; 25 men, 22 women) scanned on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (Skyra; Siemens) were included. The CDT-VIBE (repetition time/echo time1/echo time2, 4.1/1.33/2.56 milliseconds; acquisition time, 29 seconds) was used in place of the standard arterial phase acquisition and started 15 seconds after the injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DOTA (Dotarem, Guerbet). Within 29 seconds, 14 high spatial resolution (1.2 × 1.2 × 3 mm) 3-dimensional data sets were acquired and reconstructed using view sharing (temporal resolution, 2.1 seconds). The CDT-VIBE images were evaluated independently by 2 blinded, experienced radiologists with regard to image quality and the number of hepatic arterial-dominant phases present on an ordinal 5-point scale (5, excellent; 1, nondiagnostic). Added diagnostic information with CDT-VIBE relative to portal venous phase VIBE was assessed. In all patients, CDT-VIBE measurements were successfully acquired. The image quality was diagnostic in 46 of the 47 patients. Both readers assessed the highest image quality present in the data sets with a median score of 4 (range, 3-5 for both readers; κ, 0.789) and the worst image quality with a median score of 3 (range, 1-4 for both readers; κ, 0.689). With a range between 1 and 8 (median, 5), hepatic arterial-dominant data sets (of the 14 acquired) were obtained in each case. There was an added diagnostic

  1. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in humans by performing hyperventilation-breath-hold single-breath measurements before, during, and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity during the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) mission. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase IV, were markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60% of their preflight standing size, and the height of phase IV was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of the preflight standing value. The terminal change in expired CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity, indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close and those that remain open at the end of expiration. A possible explanation of this observation is the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographic inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity, probably in lung regions that are not within the same acinus.

  2. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in humans by performing hyperventilation-breath-hold single-breath measurements before, during, and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity during the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) mission. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase IV, were markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60% of their preflight standing size, and the height of phase IV was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of the preflight standing value. The terminal change in expired CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity, indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close and those that remain open at the end of expiration. A possible explanation of this observation is the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographic inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity, probably in lung regions that are not within the same acinus.

  3. Steal phenomenon-induced lung perfusion defects in pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas: assessment with automated perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Osamu; Okada, Munemasa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2010-09-01

    Lung perfusion impairment in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was evaluated by automated deep inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Participants were 14 patients with a single (N=6) or multiple nodular AVFs (N=8) diagnosed by contrast-enhanced CT scan and/or pulmonary angiography. After the injection of 185MBq Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin, a whole-body scan was obtained to quantify an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt. Subsequently, DIBrH SPECT was obtained using the continuous rotating acquisition mode of a dual-headed SPECT system, which was automatically coregistered with DIBrH CT. The anatomic relationship between AVF and perfusion defects was assessed on the fusion images. The whole-body scan depicted systemic organs indicating the presence of an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt in all the patients. DIBrH SPECT showed 34 perfusion defects in these patients, which were located at the AVF and in the surrounding lungs of the AVF on the fusion images, regardless of the absence of morphologic abnormality on CT in all the patients. These defects were considered to be caused by the 'steal phenomenon' associated with the high and fast pulmonary arterial flow to each AVF, which were more extensive and severe in the multiple AVFs compared with a single AVF (P=0.0012), occasionally extending to the entire lobe with AVF or even to the adjacent lobe. In five patients, the fusion images detected a total of six tiny AVFs with unexpectedly extensive 'steal phenomenon'-induced defects, which had been missed by other radiological imaging techniques. The summed value of the shunt index estimated by the whole-body scan and the lung perfusion defect extent estimated by DIBrH SPECT was significantly correlated with PaO2 in all the patients (P < 0.0001), with a better correlation compared with the shunt index alone. In addition to the right-to-left shunt, 'steal phenomenon

  4. In vivo cardiac diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: quantification of normal perfusion and diffusion coefficients with intravoxel incoherent motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Benedicte M A; Viallon, Magalie; Wei, Hongjiang; Zhu, Yuemin M; Feiweier, Thorsten; Pai, Vinay M; Wen, Han; Croisille, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the introduction of the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model have provided a unique method for evaluating perfusion and diffusion within a tissue without the need for a contrast agent. Despite its relevance, cardiac DWI has thus far been limited by low b values because of signal loss induced by physiological motion. The goal of this study was to develop a methodology for estimating IVIM parameters of in vivo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using an efficient DWI acquisition framework. This was achieved by investigating various acquisition strategies (principal component analysis [PCA] filtering and temporal maximum intensity projection [PCATMIP] and single trigger delay [TD]) and fitting methods. Simulations were performed on a synthetic dataset of diffusion-weighted signal intensity (SI) to determine the fitting method that would yield IVIM parameters with the greatest accuracy. The required number of b values to correctly estimate IVIM parameters was also investigated. Breath-hold DWI scans were performed for 12 volunteers to collect several TD values during diastole. Thirteen b values ranging from 0 to 550 s/mm were used. The IVIM parameters derived using the data from all the acquired TDs (PCATMIP technique) were compared with those derived using a single acquisition performed at an optimized diastolic time point (1TD). The main result of this study was that PCATMIP, when combined with a fitting model that accounted for T1 and T2 relaxation, provided IVIM parameters with less variability. However, an acquisition performed with 1 optimized diastolic TD provided results that were as good as those provided using PCATMIP if the R-R variability during the acquisition was sufficiently low (± 5%). Furthermore, the use of only 9 b values (that could be acquired in 2 breath-holds), instead of 13 b values (requiring 3 breath-holds), was sufficient to determine the IVIM parameters. This study demonstrates that IVIM is

  5. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  6. Iterative k-t principal component analysis with nonrigid motion correction for dynamic three-dimensional cardiac perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Wissmann, Lukas; Manka, Robert; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    In this study, an iterative k-t principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm with nonrigid frame-to-frame motion correction is proposed for dynamic contrast-enhanced three-dimensional perfusion imaging. An iterative k-t PCA algorithm was implemented with regularization using training data corrected for frame-to-frame motion in the x-pc domain. Motion information was extracted using shape-constrained nonrigid image registration of the composite of training and k-t undersampled data. The approach was tested for 10-fold k-t undersampling using computer simulations and in vivo data sets corrupted by respiratory motion artifacts owing to free-breathing or interrupted breath-holds. Results were compared to breath-held reference data. Motion-corrected k-t PCA image reconstruction resolved residual aliasing. Signal intensity curves extracted from the myocardium were close to those obtained from the breath-held reference. Upslopes were found to be more homogeneous in space when using the k-t PCA approach with motion correction. Iterative k-t PCA with nonrigid motion correction permits correction of respiratory motion artifacts in three-dimensional first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hepatocellular nodules in liver cirrhosis: state of the art CT evaluation (perfusion CT/volume helical shuttle scan/dual-energy CT, etc.).

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Kim, Tonsok; Murakami, Takamichi

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the role of advanced liver CT imaging, including perfusion CT, dual-energy CT, and volume helical shuttle (VHS) scanning, with regard to its clinical applications. Perfusion CT is a promising method for calculating hepatic blood flow and portal blood flow, including microcirculation, using a color-encoded display of parameters obtained from the liver time-density curve, with iodine contrast agent. Tumor angiogenesis and assessment of the response to antiangiogenesis treatment (e.g., Sorafenib) can be analyzed by perfusion CT of the liver. VHS scan has very high temporal resolution due to the reciprocating movement employed during scanning, enabling the acquisition of 24 scans of the whole liver in the arterial dominant phase during a 40-s breath hold, and a reduction in radiation dose. Dual-energy CT enables differentiation of materials and tissues based on their CT density values, using two different energy spectra. This method includes a low tube voltage CT technique that increases the contrast enhancement of vascular structures while simultaneously reducing radiation dose. Images obtained at the preferred settings of low tube voltage and high tube current, with dose reduction in the hepatic arterial phase, are useful for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  9. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  10. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    PubMed

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  11. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation.

  13. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  14. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  15. Steady-state free precession sequences in myocardial first-pass perfusion MR imaging: comparison with TurboFLASH imaging.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Maderwald, Stefan; Eggebrecht, Holger; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of a saturation-recovery gradient-recalled echo (GRE; TurboFLASH) and a saturation-recovery SSFP (SR-TrueFISP) sequence for myocardial first-pass perfusion MRI. Eight patients with chronic myocardial infarction and 8 volunteers were examined with a TurboFLASH (TR 2.1 ms, TE 1 ms, FA 8 degrees ) and a SR-TrueFISP sequence (TR 2.1 ms, TE 0.9 ms, FA, 50 degrees ) on a 1.5 T scanner. During injection of 0.05 mmol/kg BW Gd-DTPA at 4 ml/s, three short axis slices (8 mm) of the left ventricle (LV) were simultaneously scanned during breath-hold. Maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between infarcted and normal myocardium, and percentage signal intensity change (PSIC) were measured within the LV lumen and in four regions of the LV myocardium for the three slices separately. For the LV lumen, SR-TrueFISP was superior in SNR and PSIC (factor 3.2 and 1.6, respectively). Mean maximum SNR, PSIC, and CNR during peak enhancement in the LV myocardium were higher for SR-TrueFISP compared with TurboFLASH (factor 2.4, 1.25, and 1.24, respectively). The SNR was higher in the septal portion of the ventricle than in anterior/posterior and lateral regions. The SR-TrueFISP provides higher SNR and improves image quality compared with TurboFLASH in first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI.

  16. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J; Kent, M; Wisner, E; Fujita, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R{sup 2}=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  17. Perfusion abnormalities in hemimegalencephaly.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, P; Roulet-Perez, E; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Moessinger, A C; Gudinchet, F; Meuli, R

    2009-04-01

    Cerebrovascular changes are rarely discussed in patients with hemimegalencephaly. These alterations have previously been associated with epileptical activity. We report the case of a 36-week gestation neonate presenting with total right hemimegalencephaly, as demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the first days of life. Perfusion-weighted imaging displayed a clear hypervascularization of the right hemisphere. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed an arrangement of white matter fibers concentrically around the ventricle on the right hemisphere. AngioMRI showed an obvious asymmetry in the size of the middle cerebral arteries, with the right middle cerebral artery being prominent. The baby was free of clinical seizures during his first week of life. An electroencephalogram at that time displayed an asymmetric background activity, but no electrical seizures. Perfusion anomalies in hemimegalencephaly may not necessarily be related to epileptical activity, but may be related to vessel alterations. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  18. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S.; Wisner, Erik R.; Johnson, Lynelle R.; Stern, Joshua A.; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t

  19. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S; Wisner, Erik R; Johnson, Lynelle R; Stern, Joshua A; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test. The mean TRE

  20. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  1. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  2. Harmonic analysis of perfusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, F Carroll; Donovan, F M; Townsley, Mary I

    2003-12-01

    The controversy over the use of nonpulsatile versus pulsatile pumps for maintenance of normal organ function during ex vivo perfusion has continued for many years, but resolution has been limited by lack of a congruent mathematical definition of pulsatility. We hypothesized that the waveform frequency and amplitude, as well as the underlying mean distending pressure are all key parameters controlling vascular function. Using discrete Fourier Analysis, our data demonstrate the complexity of the pulmonary arterial pressure waveform in vivo and the failure of commonly available perfusion pumps to mimic in vivo dynamics. In addition, our data show that the key harmonic signatures are intrinsic to the perfusion pumps, are similar for flow and pressure waveforms, and are unchanged by characteristics of the downstream perfusion circuit or perfusate viscosity.

  3. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  4. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  5. Cerebral-Body Perfusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    compared to the 0.5g curve) fall in flow. Fig. 9b, showing the 5g case, strongly suggests a possible, so-called, " luxury perfusion ", in which natural...as the luxury perfusion situation which bypasses the flow with the nutrients it carries (through newly opened collaterals) and result in a "blackout...89-0054 CEREBRAL-BODY PERFUSION MODEL S. Sorek’, J. Bear2, and M., Feinsod3 in Collaboration with K. Allen4, L. Bunt5 and S. Ben-IHaiM6 July 1990

  6. Distributed Perfusion Educational Model: A Shift in Perfusion Economic Realities

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jon W.; Evans, Edward L.; Hoerr, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  7. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  8. Nifedipine increases fetoplacental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Altinboga, Orhan; Akpinar, Funda; Demirdag, Erhan; Ozdemirci, Safak; Akyol, Aysegul; Yalvac, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the effect of nifedipine on fetoplacental hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary center with 30 patients for whom nifedipine treatment was used as a tocolytic therapy for preterm labor. Initiation of this treatment was at 31.6±2.5 weeks of gestation. We combined the pulse Doppler imaging parameters with grayscale imaging via the Bernoulli theorem, which is called the "continuity equation", to get the fetoplacental perfusion (FPP). Evaluated parameters were the resistance index (RI), the pulsatility index (PI), systole/diastole ratios (S/D), the velocity-time integral of the umbilical artery (VTI), the radius of the umbilical artery, the peak systolic velocity and the mean pressure gradient in the umbilical artery. From these parameters, the FPP was acquired. We found that the RI, the PI and the S/D ratio did not change after treatment with nifedipine. The mean pressure gradient, the VTI and the peak systolic velocity increased after treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine increases FPP from 166±73.81 beat.cm3/min to 220±83.3 beat.cm3/min. Although nifedipine had no effect on the PI, the RI or the S/D, it increased the mean pressure gradient, the VTI and FPP.

  9. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  10. MO-G-18C-05: Real-Time Prediction in Free-Breathing Perfusion MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H; Liu, W; Ruan, D; Jung, S; Gach, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to minimize frame-wise difference errors caused by respiratory motion and eliminate the need for breath-holds in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with long acquisitions and repeat times (TRs). The technique is being applied to perfusion MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods: Respiratory motion prediction (RMP) using navigator echoes was implemented in ASL. A least-square method was used to extract the respiratory motion information from the 1D navigator. A generalized artificial neutral network (ANN) with three layers was developed to simultaneously predict 10 time points forward in time and correct for respiratory motion during MRI acquisition. During the training phase, the parameters of the ANN were optimized to minimize the aggregated prediction error based on acquired navigator data. During realtime prediction, the trained ANN was applied to the most recent estimated displacement trajectory to determine in real-time the amount of spatial Results: The respiratory motion information extracted from the least-square method can accurately represent the navigator profiles, with a normalized chi-square value of 0.037±0.015 across the training phase. During the 60-second training phase, the ANN successfully learned the respiratory motion pattern from the navigator training data. During real-time prediction, the ANN received displacement estimates and predicted the motion in the continuum of a 1.0 s prediction window. The ANN prediction was able to provide corrections for different respiratory states (i.e., inhalation/exhalation) during real-time scanning with a mean absolute error of < 1.8 mm. Conclusion: A new technique enabling free-breathing acquisition during MRI is being developed. A generalized ANN development has demonstrated its efficacy in predicting a continuum of motion profile for volumetric imaging based on navigator inputs. Future work will enhance the robustness of ANN and verify its effectiveness with human

  11. Viable neurons with luxury perfusion in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Luciano, M G; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Hahn, J F; Go, R T

    1997-09-01

    A woman with hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis had functional imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism to demonstrate the effects of endoscopic third ventriculostomy--a new form of internal surgical shunting. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT and 18F-FDG PET showed regional luxury perfusion at the left frontal region. Three months after a successful third ventriculostomy, a repeated imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism showed resolution of luxury perfusion and global improvement of both perfusion and metabolism. This concurred with postoperative clinical improvement. The paired imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism provides more information than just imaging perfusion or metabolism. Thus, the detection of perfusion and metabolism mismatch may open a new window of opportunity for surgical intervention.

  12. Ascent exhalations of Antarctic fur seals: a behavioural adaptation for breath-hold diving?

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Sascha K.; Miller, Patrick J. O.; Johnson, Mark P.; Cox, Oliver P.; Boyd, Ian L.

    2005-01-01

    Novel observations collected from video, acoustic and conductivity sensors showed that Antarctic fur seals consistently exhale during the last 50–85% of ascent from all dives (10–160 m, n>8000 dives from 50 seals). The depth of initial bubble emission was best predicted by maximum dive depth, suggesting an underlying physical mechanism. Bubble sound intensity recorded from one seal followed predictions of a simple model based on venting expanding lung air with decreasing pressure. Comparison of air release between dives, together with lack of variation in intensity of thrusting movement during initial descent regardless of ultimate dive depth, suggested that inhaled diving lung volume was constant for all dives. The thrusting intensity in the final phase of ascent was greater for dives in which ascent exhalation began at a greater depth, suggesting an energetic cost to this behaviour, probably as a result of loss of buoyancy from reduced lung volume. These results suggest that fur seals descend with full lung air stores, and thus face the physiological consequences of pressure at depth. We suggest that these regular and predictable ascent exhalations could function to reduce the potential for a precipitous drop in blood oxygen that would result in shallow-water blackout. PMID:15734689

  13. Ascent exhalations of Antarctic fur seals: a behavioural adaptation for breath-hold diving?

    PubMed

    Hooker, Sascha K; Miller, Patrick J O; Johnson, Mark P; Cox, Oliver P; Boyd, Ian L

    2005-02-22

    Novel observations collected from video, acoustic and conductivity sensors showed that Antarctic fur seals consistently exhale during the last 50-85% of ascent from all dives (10-160 m, n > 8000 dives from 50 seals). The depth of initial bubble emission was best predicted by maximum dive depth, suggesting an underlying physical mechanism. Bubble sound intensity recorded from one seal followed predictions of a simple model based on venting expanding lung air with decreasing pressure. Comparison of air release between dives, together with lack of variation in intensity of thrusting movement during initial descent regardless of ultimate dive depth, suggested that inhaled diving lung volume was constant for all dives. The thrusting intensity in the final phase of ascent was greater for dives in which ascent exhalation began at a greater depth, suggesting an energetic cost to this behaviour, probably as a result of loss of buoyancy from reduced lung volume. These results suggest that fur seals descend with full lung air stores, and thus face the physiological consequences of pressure at depth. We suggest that these regular and predictable ascent exhalations could function to reduce the potential for a precipitous drop in blood oxygen that would result in shallow-water blackout.

  14. Perfusion decellularization of whole organs.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Jacques P; Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Tapias, Luis F; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2014-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) outlines the architecture of organs and tissues. It provides a unique niche of composition and form, which serves as a foundational scaffold that supports organ-specific cell types and enables normal organ function. Here we describe a standard process for pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization of whole organs for generating acellular 3D scaffolds with preserved ECM protein content, architecture and perfusable vascular conduits. By applying antegrade perfusion of detergents and subsequent washes to arterial vasculature at low physiological pressures, successful decellularization of complex organs (i.e., hearts, lungs and kidneys) can be performed. By using appropriate modifications, pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization can be achieved in small-animal experimental models (rat organs, 4-5 d) and scaled to clinically relevant models (porcine and human organs, 12-14 d). Combining the unique structural and biochemical properties of native acellular scaffolds with subsequent recellularization techniques offers a novel platform for organ engineering and regeneration, for experimentation ex vivo and potential clinical application in vivo.

  15. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-08-01

    TI-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in six patients with clinically documented myocarditis. Each case manifested electrocardiographic abnormalities with elevation of serum cardiac enzymes and no significant stenosis of the coronary arteries observed on angiogram. Resting TI-201 images were visually assessed by three observers. Focal perfusion defects were observed in three cases (50%), among which two showed multiple perfusion defects. Emission computed tomography using TI-201 clearly delineated multifocal lesions in the first case. On the other hand, no significant perfusion defects were noted in the remaining three cases. Thus, myocarditis should be considered as one of the disease entities that may produce perfusion defects on TI-201 myocardial imaging.

  16. Perfusion studies in cholera: methods and procedures.

    PubMed

    van Loon, F P; Gyr, K; Banik, A K

    1992-09-01

    This paper reviews the characteristics of perfusion techniques in the study of intestinal functions by specifically examining the methods and procedures of perfusion in patients with diarrhoea due to infection with V. cholerae 01. Because of abundant jejunal secretion of water and electrolytes in cholera, perfusion studies require special approaches with regard to patient preparation, use of tubing material, selection of markers, and rate of perfusion. A discussion on specific problems involved in marker perfusion techniques in cholera and on the interpretation of the results is followed by practical recommendations.

  17. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  18. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  19. Quantitative pixelwise myocardial perfusion maps from first-pass perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, A M; Ritter, C O; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-07-01

    To calculate and evaluate absolute quantitative myocardial perfusion maps from rest first-pass perfusion MRI. 10 patients after revascularization of myocardial infarction underwent cardiac rest first-pass perfusion MRI. Additionally, perfusion examinations were performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Quantitative myocardial perfusion maps were calculated by using a deconvolution technique, and results were compared were the findings of a sector-based quantification. Maps were typically calculated within 3 min per slice. For the volunteers, myocardial blood flow values of the maps were 0.51 ± 0.16 ml g(-1) per minute, whereas sector-based evaluation delivered 0.52 ± 0.15 ml g(-1) per minute. A t-test revealed no statistical difference between the two sets of values. For the patients, all perfusion defects visually detected in the dynamic perfusion series could be correctly reproduced in the maps. Calculation of quantitative perfusion maps from myocardial perfusion MRI examinations is feasible. The absolute quantitative maps provide additional information on the transmurality of perfusion defects compared with the visual evaluation of the perfusion series and offer a convenient way to present perfusion MRI findings. Voxelwise analysis of myocardial perfusion helps clinicians to assess the degree of tissue damage, and the resulting maps are a good tool to present findings to patients.

  20. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  1. Mapping the literature of perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E F

    1999-01-01

    Perfusionists select and operate the equipment necessary for monitoring, supporting, or temporarily replacing the patient's circulatory or respiratory function. There are over 3,000 perfusionists working in U.S. hospitals, medical and perfusionist groups, and as independent contractors. The purpose of this study was to identify the core literature of perfusion and to determine which major databases provide the most thorough access to this literature. This paper is part of the Medical Library Association Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section's project to map the literature of the allied health professions. It uses a bibliometric methodology to identify core journals. A group of forty-three journals was determined to make up the core journal literature of perfusion. MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing coverage for these journals, but librarians and perfusionists will wish to supplement its use with the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature in order to access the journals written primarily for perfusionists. The study results can guide purchasing and database searching decisions of collection development and reference librarians, encourage the database producer to increase coverage of titles that are unindexed or underindexed, and advise perfusionists of the best access to their core literature. PMID:10427432

  2. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction. PMID:23070072

  3. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  4. Technetium myocardial perfusion agents: an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Kozlowski, J.; Tumeh, S.S.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-09-01

    This is the third in a series of four Continuing Education articles on developing radiopharmaceuticals. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) understand the basic concepts of myocardial perfusion imaging; and 2) discuss the advantages of the technetium myocardial perfusion complexes over thallium-201.

  5. Luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Friedland, S; Winterkorn, J M; Burde, R M

    1996-09-01

    We present five patients who developed luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in whom fluorescein angiography was misinterpreted as "capillary hemangioma" or neovascularization of the disc. In each case, the segment of disc hyperemia corresponded to a spared region of visual field. Luxury perfusion represents a reparative autoregulatory reaction to ischemia.

  6. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  7. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  8. [Compromized myocardial perfusion in arrhythmias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Neumann, G; Felix, R; Hedde, H; Schaede, A; Thurn, P; Winkler, C

    1977-09-15

    In 7 patients with arrhythmias of various origin the myocardial scintigram displayed either a diffuse or circumscript defect of the perfusion. The coronary arteriogram was normal in all patients. The localized defect of the perfusion in 2 patients was in the region of the upper part of the interventricular septum. Both had a left bundle brunch block. A correlation between the perfusion defect and the electrophysiological abnormality seems probable. The perfusion defect in one of the patients is most probably caused by a previous myocarditis followed by fibrous changes. In the other 6 patients the cause for the perfusion defect is not obvious. A history of myocarditis is missing. The presence of "small vessel disease" in those patients has however to be considered. Our results point to the relation between an abnormality of the microcirculation and arrhythmias in younger patients.

  9. The Mouse Isolated Perfused Kidney Technique.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Schweda, Frank; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-11-17

    The mouse isolated perfused kidney (MIPK) is a technique for keeping a mouse kidney under ex vivo conditions perfused and functional for 1 hr. This is a prerequisite for studying the physiology of the isolated organ and for many innovative applications that may be possible in the future, including perfusion decellularization for kidney bioengineering or the administration of anti-rejection or genome-editing drugs in high doses to prime the kidney for transplantation. During the time of the perfusion, the kidney can be manipulated, renal function can be assessed, and various pharmaceuticals administered. After the procedure, the kidney can be transplanted or processed for molecular biology, biochemical analysis, or microscopy. This paper describes the perfusate and the surgical technique needed for the ex vivo perfusion of mouse kidneys. Details of the perfusion apparatus are given and data are presented showing the viability of the kidney's preparation: renal blood flow, vascular resistance, and urine data as functional, transmission electron micrographs of different nephron segments as morphological readouts, and western blots of transport proteins of different nephron segments as molecular readout.

  10. Use of 3D DCE-MRI for the estimation of renal perfusion and glomerular filtration rate: an intrasubject comparison of FLASH and KWIC with a comprehensive framework for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eikefjord, Eli; Andersen, Erling; Hodneland, Erlend; Zöllner, Frank; Lundervold, Arvid; Svarstad, Einar; Rørvik, Jarle

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare two 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI measurement techniques for MR renography, a radial k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) sequence and a cartesian FLASH sequence, in terms of intrasubject differences in estimates of renal functional parameters and image quality characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Ten healthy volunteers underwent repeated breath-hold KWIC and FLASH sequence examinations with temporal resolutions of 2.5 and 2.8 seconds, respectively. A two-compartment model was used to estimate MRI-derived perfusion parameters and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The latter was compared with the iohexol GFR and the estimated GFR. Image quality was assessed using a visual grading characteristic analysis of relevant image quality criteria and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. RESULTS. Perfusion estimates from FLASH were closer to literature reference values than were the KWIC sequences. In relation to the iohexol GFR (mean [± SD], 103 ± 11 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), KWIC produced significant underestimations and larger bias in GFR values (mean, 70 ± 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = -33.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) compared with the FLASH GFR (110 ± 29 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = 6.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). KWIC was statistically significantly (p < 0.005) more impaired by artifacts than was FLASH (AUC = 0.18). The average signal-enhancement ratio (delta ratio) in the cortex was significantly lower for KWIC (delta ratio = 0.99) than for FLASH (delta ratio = 1.40). Other visually graded image quality characteristics and signal-to-noise ratio measurements were not statistically significantly different. CONCLUSION. Using the same postprocessing scheme and pharmacokinetic model, FLASH produced more accurate perfusion and filtration parameters than did KWIC compared with clinical reference methods. Our data suggest an apparent relationship between image quality characteristics and the degree of stability in the numeric model

  11. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Espinola, D; Rupani, H; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  12. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  13. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  14. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawnfrom basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner’s membrane, while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA Reissner’s membrane (RM) was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken of RM, which likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed

  15. [Perfusion computed tomography for diffuse liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S A; Juchems, M S

    2012-08-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) has its main application in the clinical routine diagnosis of neuroradiological problems. Polyphase multi-detector spiral computed tomography is primarily used in liver diagnostics. The use of perfusion CT is also possible for the diagnostics and differentiation of diffuse hepatic diseases. The differentiation between cirrhosis and cirrhosis-like parenchymal changes is possible. It also helps to detect early stages of malignant tumors. However, there are some negative aspects, particularly that of radiation exposure. This paper summarizes the technical basics and possible applications of perfusion CT in cases of diffuse liver disease and weighs up the advantages and disadvantages of the examinations.

  16. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  17. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  18. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  19. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  20. Vicarious Audiovisual Learning in Perfusion Education

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Thomas E.; Holt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video. These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW standalone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today’s perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p < .05). The same was true for test #2 where video learners (n = 10) had an average score of 77% while text learners (n = 9) scored 60% (p < .05). Survey results indicated video learners were more satisfied with their learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important

  1. Role of perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, N

    2013-03-01

    Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and classification of acute stroke, the triage of patients to different treatment approaches and the prediction of the clinical outcome and the risk of hemorrhagic complications. A multimodal imaging protocol that includes a perfusion study allows diagnostics beyond anatomical findings by enabling the characterization of the ischemic brain tissue and the cerebral hemodynamic state. This information potentially leads to more accurate clinical decision making with the intention to select the right patients for different revascularization therapies regardless of fixed time windows. Perfusion imaging enables the detection and quantification of the irreversibly damaged infarct core and the at-risk penumbra. Parameters derived from perfusion studies can serve as surrogate markers for stroke severity and are independent predictors of the clinical outcome and the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications. The validation and standardization of the perfusion methodology is still ongoing. Currently there is emerging but no high level evidence that perfusion imaging improves the clinical outcome or has a direct impact on the decision to treat the patient with intravenous thrombolytic therapy or intra-arterial interventions. Thus, definite guidelines on the role of the perfusion imaging in the context of acute stroke cannot yet be given.

  2. Hydroxyethyl starch solution for extracorporeal tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Taeger, Christian D; Friedrich, Oliver; Drechsler, Caroline; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Geppert, Carol I; Münch, Frank; Birkholz, Torsten; Buchholz, Rainer; Horch, Raymund E; Präbst, Konstantin

    2016-11-04

    In the field of free flap transfer in reconstructive surgery, the trans- or replanted tissue always undergoes cell damage during ischemia to a more or less strong extent. In previous studies we already showed that conserving muscle transplants by means of extracorporeal perfusion over a period of 6 hours by using a crystalloid solution for perfusion. However, we observed significant edema formation. In this study we aimed at reducing the edema formation by using an iso-oncotic colloid as perfusion solution. This way we wanted to evaluate a possible new application of hydroxyl-ethyl starch in an extracorporeal setup to exploit potential benefits of the colloid.Examined parameters include the muscles' functionality with external field stimulation, histological examination and edema formation. Perfused muscles showed a statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, as perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. Substituting the electrolyte perfusion solution with a colloidal one shows the tendency to reduce the edema formation however without statistical significance.

  3. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  4. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women. PMID:26356576

  5. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  6. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Cao, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10-6. The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  7. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  8. GPU-Accelerated Voxelwise Hepatic Perfusion Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-01-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using CUDA-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, non-linear least squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626400 voxels in a patient’s liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10−6. The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  9. [An automatic system controlled by microcontroller for carotid sinus perfusion].

    PubMed

    Yi, X L; Wang, M Y; Fan, Z Z; He, R R

    2001-08-01

    To establish a new method for controlling automatically the carotid perfusion pressure. A cheap practical automatic perfusion unit based on AT89C2051 micro controller was designed. The unit, LDB-M perfusion pump and the carotid sinus of an animal constituted an automatic perfusion system. This system was able to provide ramp and stepwise updown perfusion pattern and has been used in the research of baroreflex. It can insure the precision and reproducibility of perfusion pressure curve, and improve the technical level in corresponding medical field.

  10. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostopoulos, C.; Cerqueira, M.; Ell, P. J.; Flint, E. J.; Harbinson, M.; Kelion, A. D.; Al-Mohammad, A.; Prvulovich, E. M.; Shaw, L. J.; Tweddel, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  11. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  12. Lowering heart rate with an optimised breathing protocol for prospectively ECG-triggered CT coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Husmann, L; Herzog, B A; Pazhenkottil, A P; Buechel, R R; Nkoulou, R; Ghadri, J R; Valenta, I; Burger, I A; Gaemperli, O; Wyss, C A; Kaufmann, P A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to prospectively characterise the effect of the level of breath-hold on heart rate in CT coronary angiography (CTCA) with prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering and its impact on coronary artery attenuation. Methods 260 patients (86 women; mean age 59 ± 11 years) underwent 64-slice CTCA using prospective ECG triggering. Prior to CTCA, heart rates were recorded during 15 s of breath-hold at three different levels of inspiration (normal, intermediate and deep). The inspiration level with the lowest heart rate was chosen for actual CTCA scanning. Coronary artery attenuation was measured, and the presence of backflow of contrast material into the inferior vena cava (as an indicator of increased intrathoracic pressure) was recorded. Results The mean heart rate at breath-hold was significantly different for the three inspiration levels (normal, 60 ± 8 bpm; intermediate, 59 ± 8 bpm; deep, 57 ± 7 bpm; p<0.001). The maximum heart rate reduction in each patient at breath-hold averaged 5.3 ± 5.1 bpm, and was observed at a normal inspiration depth in 23 (9%) patients, at an intermediate inspiration depth in 102 (39%) patients and at deep inspiration in 135 (52%) patients. Overall, there was no association between the level of breath-hold and coronary vessel attenuation (p-value was not significant). However, the backflow of contrast material into the inferior vena cava (n = 26) was found predominantly at deep inspiration levels (p<0.001), and, when it occurred, it was associated with reduced coronary attenuation compared with patients with no backflow (p<0.05). Conclusion The breath-hold level to best reduce heart rate for CTCA should be individually assessed prior to scanning because a mean heart rate reduction of 5 bpm can be achieved. PMID:21849364

  13. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  14. Distributions of perfusion and lung water.

    PubMed

    Ekeh, S U; Chu, R Y; Ficken, V J; Allen, E W; Ryals, C J

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using 123I-iodoantipyrine (123I-IAP) and 99mTc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) to describe and compare the distributions of perfusion and water content in lung injuries. These radiopharmaceuticals were administered to 9 rabbits, 5 control and 4 with lung injuries. Isolated lungs were imaged by a scintillation gamma camera. The distribution of 123I-IAP outlined the entire lung mass whereas perfusion defect in the distribution of 99mTc-MAA was seen clearly in the case of severe lung injury.

  15. Stress-first Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Nasir; Parker, Matthew W; Henzlova, Milena J; Duvall, William Lane

    2016-02-01

    Stress-first approaches to myocardial perfusion imaging provide diagnostically and prognostically accurate perfusion data equivalent to a full rest-stress study, save time in the imaging laboratory, and reduce the radiation exposure to patients and laboratory staff. Converting a nuclear cardiology laboratory from a conventional rest-stress strategy to a stress-first approach involves challenges such as the need for attenuation correction, triage of patients to an appropriate protocol, real-time review of stress images, and consideration of differential reimbursement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic Characteristics of Human Hearts Preserved for 12 Hours by Static Storage, Antegrade Perfusion or Retrograde Coronary Sinus Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cobert, Michael L.; Merritt, Matthew E.; West, LaShondra M.; Ayers, Colby; Jessen, Michael E.; Peltz, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Machine perfusion of donor hearts is a promising strategy to increase the donor pool. Antegrade perfusion is effective but can lead to aortic valve incompetence and non-nutrient flow. Experience with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion of donor hearts has been limited. We tested the hypothesis that retrograde perfusion could support myocardial metabolism over an extended donor ischemic interval. Methods Human hearts from donors rejected or not offered for transplantation were preserved for 12 hours in University of Wisconsin Machine Perfusion Solution by: 1. Static hypothermic storage 2. Hypothermic antegrade machine perfusion or 3. Hypothermic retrograde machine perfusion. Myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), and lactate accumulation were measured. Ventricular tissue was collected for proton (1H) and phosphorus-31 (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to evaluate the metabolic state of the myocardium. Myocardial water content was determined at end-experiment. Results Stable perfusion parameters were maintained throughout the perfusion period with both perfusion techniques. Lactate/alanine ratios were lower in perfused hearts compared to static hearts (p<.001). Lactate accumulation (Antegrade 2.0±.7, Retrograde 1.7±.1 mM) and MVO2 (Antegrade 0.25±.2, Retrograde 0.26±.3 mL O2/min/100g) were similar in machine perfused groups. High energy phosphates were better preserved in both perfused groups (p<.05). Left ventricular myocardial water content was increased in retrograde perfused (80.2±.8%) compared to both antegrade perfused (76.6±.8%, p=.02) and static storage hearts (76.7±1%, p=.02). Conclusions In conclusion, machine perfusion by either the antegrade or the retrograde technique can support myocardial metabolism over long intervals. Machine perfusion appears promising for long term preservation of human donor hearts. PMID:24642559

  17. Meta-Analysis of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Coronary Disease; Echocardiography; Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial; Hemodynamics; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Myocardial Perfusion Imaging; Perfusion; Predictive Value of Tests; Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Multidetector Computed Tomography; Echocardiography, Stress; Coronary Angiography

  18. Blood leakage and melphalan leakage from the perfusion circuit during regional hyperthermic perfusion for malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hafstroem, L.; Hugander, A.; Joensson, P.E.; Westling, H.; Ehrsson, H.

    1984-06-01

    In regional hyperthermic perfusion with melphalan for patients with malignant melanoma of the leg, plasma leakage between the perfusion circuit and the systemic circulation was 4-7 ml X min-1. The melphalan concentration in the perfusate was biphasic, with half-lives of 8-12 mins for the initial phase and 19-28 mins for the second phase, after the first dose. After a second dose, the corresponding values were 11-13 and 26-34 mins. The highest concentration in general circulation was 0.38 micrograms X ml-1.

  19. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  20. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  1. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  2. Increased sinusoidal volume and solute extraction during retrograde liver perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, N.M.; Manning, J.A.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    Retrograde isolated liver perfusion has been used to probe acinar functional heterogeneity, but the hemodynamic effects of backward flow have not been characterized. In this study, extraction of a long-chain fatty acid derivative, 12-N-methyl-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-amino stearate (12-NBDS), was greater during retrograde than during anterograde perfusion of isolated rat liver. To determine whether hemodynamic differences between anterograde and retrograde perfused livers could account for this finding, the hepatic extracellular space was measured for both directions of flow by means of (/sup 14/C)sucrose washout during perfusion as well as by direct measurement of (/sup 14/C)sucrose entrapped during perfusion. A three- to fourfold enlargement of the total hepatic extracellular space was found during retrograde perfusion by both approaches. Examination of perfusion-fixed livers by light microscopy and morphometry revealed that marked distension of the sinusoids occurred during retrograde perfusion and that this accounts for the observed increase in the (/sup 14/C)sucrose space. These findings support the hypothesis that maximum resistance to perfusate flow in the isolated perfused rat liver is located at the presinusoidal level. In addition, increased transit time of perfusate through the liver and greater sinusoidal surface area resulting from sinusoidal distension may account for the higher extraction of 12-NBDS and possibly other compounds by retrograde perfused liver.

  3. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed. PMID:22307393

  4. Lung Perfusion Scanning in Hepatic Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, N. N.; Ackrill, P.; Wood, J.

    1972-01-01

    Abnormal lung perfusion scans using radioactive particles were found in five out of six cases of hepatic cirrhosis with arterial hypoxaemia. None had clinical evidence of cardiopulmonary disease or signs of pulmonary embolism on arteriography. The scan defects are probably caused by a disorder of the pulmonary microvasculature, which may show regional variation in severity. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4645896

  5. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  6. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  7. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  8. Coupling between resting cerebral perfusion and EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Poil, S-S; Brandeis, D; Klaver, P; Bollmann, S; Ghisleni, C; Lüchinger, R; Martin, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Alsop, D C; Michels, L

    2013-07-01

    While several studies have investigated interactions between the electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal fluctuations, less is known about the associations between EEG oscillations and baseline brain haemodynamics, and few studies have examined the link between EEG power outside the alpha band and baseline perfusion. Here we compare whole-brain arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI and EEG in a group of healthy adults (n = 16, ten females, median age: 27 years, range 21-48) during an eyes closed rest condition. Correlations emerged between perfusion and global average EEG power in low (delta: 2-4 Hz and theta: 4-7 Hz), middle (alpha: 8-13 Hz), and high (beta: 13-30 Hz and gamma: 30-45 Hz) frequency bands in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. The correlations were predominately positive in middle and high-frequency bands, and negative in delta. In addition, central alpha frequency positively correlated with perfusion in a network of brain regions associated with the modulation of attention and preparedness for external input, and central theta frequency correlated negatively with a widespread network of cortical regions. These results indicate that the coupling between average EEG power/frequency and local cerebral blood flow varies in a frequency specific manner. Our results are consistent with longstanding concepts that decreasing EEG frequencies which in general map onto decreasing levels of activation.

  9. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  10. Volume perfusion CT imaging of cerebral vasospasm: diagnostic performance of different perfusion maps.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Afat, Saif; Nikoubashman, Omid; Müller, Marguerite; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander; Bier, Georg; Brockmann, Marc A; Wiesmann, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of different volume perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of cerebral vasospasm compared to angiographic findings. Forty-one datasets of 26 patients (57.5 ± 10.8 years, 18 F) with subarachnoid hemorrhage and suspected cerebral vasospasm, who underwent VPCT and angiography within 6 h, were included. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated the presence and severity of vasospasm on perfusion maps on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting <50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting >50 % of vascular territory). A third neuroradiologist independently assessed angiography for the presence and severity of vasospasm on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting < 50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting > 50 % of vessel diameter). Perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and time to drain (TTD) were evaluated regarding diagnostic accuracy for cerebral vasospasm with angiography as reference standard. Correlation analysis of vasospasm severity on perfusion maps and angiographic images was performed. Furthermore, inter-reader agreement was assessed regarding findings on perfusion maps. Diagnostic accuracy for TTD and MTT was significantly higher than for all other perfusion maps (TTD, AUC = 0.832; MTT, AUC = 0.791; p < 0.001). TTD revealed higher sensitivity than MTT (p = 0.007). The severity of vasospasm on TTD maps showed significantly higher correlation levels with angiography than all other perfusion maps (p ≤ 0.048). Inter-reader agreement was (almost) perfect for all perfusion maps (kappa ≥ 0.927). The results of this study indicate that TTD maps have the highest sensitivity for the detection of cerebral vasospasm and highest correlation with angiography regarding the severity of vasospasm.

  11. Optimal pulmonary artery perfusion mode and perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Wang, Z; Wang, H; Song, H; Zhang, N; Fang, M

    2010-06-01

    Reducing lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is important for patients' recovery. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of pulmonary artery perfusion pressure on the extent of lung injury during CPB in an animal model. Twenty healthy mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups, including a control group and three perfusion groups designed to simulate clinical cardiopulmonary bypass-induced lung injury. During pulmonary ischemia and cardiopulmonary bypass, protective perfusions were performed using different perfusion pressures (15-20, 25-30, and 40-45 mmHg), while animals in the control group were not perfused. After pulmonary reperfusion, the changes in pulmonary function and tissue histopathology were determined. Compared with the control group, lung compliance, oxygenation and vascular resistance after reperfusion were significantly improved in both low- and moderate-pressure groups. The malonaldehyde concentration, neutrophil sequestration ratio, and expression of ICAM-1 were also decreased significantly in the two groups. However, there were no significant differences in any of these parameters between the control group and the high-pressure group. Histopathological examination demonstrated that there were obvious inflammatory cell infiltration and tissue damage in the control and high-pressure groups, which was prevented in the low- and moderate-pressure groups. The perfusion pressure is an important factor that determines the extent of lung protection, and the use of pressures below 30 mmHg is optimal, with the safest and most effective range being 15-20 mmHg.

  12. The Perfusion Downunder collaborative database project.

    PubMed

    Newland, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Stanley, Rebecca; Place, Katherine; Willcox, Timothy W

    2008-09-01

    The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration provides research infrastructure and support to the Australian and New Zealand perfusion community, with the objective of determining best practices and producing relevant research publications. The Perfusion Downunder Collaborative Database (PDUCD) has been created for the purpose of collecting a dataset for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedures that includes integration with commercially available CPB data collection software. Initial testing of the PDUCD involved collection of data from four Australian and New Zealand hospitals from March to July 2007. Data from 513 procedures were compared with the concurrent Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ASCTS) database report to assess the validity of the collected data. Demographic, preoperative, and procedural variables were comparable between databases. Perfusion variables showed a median nasopharyngeal temperature of 36.7degrees C at separation from CPB (range, 35.3-37.5 degrees C), which was similar to maximum nasopharyngeal temperature (median, 36.8 degrees C). Median arterial flow and mean arterial pressure were 4.2 L/min and 57.2 mmHg, respectively. Control charts indicate a central tendency of 12.5 minutes for mean arterial pressure < 50 mmHg and 3.5 minutes for arterial flow < 1.6 L/min/m2 (cumulative time). There was no difference in median minimum and maximum blood glucose between diabetic and nondiabetic patients during CPB with 40% of patients receiving insulin. Median minimum and maximum activated clotting time (ACT) during CPB was 581 and 692 seconds, respectively. Outcome data for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were similar for mortality (only) (both 1.8%). Initial data collection showed concurrent validity compared with the ASCTS database. The inclusion of a large quantity of calculated CPB variables in the dataset highlights the benefits of electronic data collection as a research tool within a collaborative research network and the

  13. Ventilation-perfusion distribution in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kenneth C; Johnson, Bruce D; Olson, Thomas P; Wilson, Theodore A

    2012-09-01

    Functional values of LogSD of the ventilation distribution (σ(V)) have been reported previously, but functional values of LogSD of the perfusion distribution (σ(q)) and the coefficient of correlation between ventilation and perfusion (ρ) have not been measured in humans. Here, we report values for σ(V), σ(q), and ρ obtained from wash-in data for three gases, helium and two soluble gases, acetylene and dimethyl ether. Normal subjects inspired gas containing the test gases, and the concentrations of the gases at end-expiration during the first 10 breaths were measured with the subjects at rest and at increasing levels of exercise. The regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion was described by a bivariate log-normal distribution with parameters σ(V), σ(q), and ρ, and these parameters were evaluated by matching the values of expired gas concentrations calculated for this distribution to the measured values. Values of cardiac output and LogSD ventilation/perfusion (Va/Q) were obtained. At rest, σ(q) is high (1.08 ± 0.12). With the onset of ventilation, σ(q) decreases to 0.85 ± 0.09 but remains higher than σ(V) (0.43 ± 0.09) at all exercise levels. Rho increases to 0.87 ± 0.07, and the value of LogSD Va/Q for light and moderate exercise is primarily the result of the difference between the magnitudes of σ(q) and σ(V). With known values for the parameters, the bivariate distribution describes the comprehensive distribution of ventilation and perfusion that underlies the distribution of the Va/Q ratio.

  14. Near-infrared measurements of hemodynamic and oxygenation changes on the frontal cortex during breath holding, hyperventilation, and natural sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noponen, Tommi E.; Kotilahti, Kalle; Toppila, Jussi; Nissila, Ilkka T.; Salmi, Tapani; Kajava, Timo T.; Katila, Toivo E.

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a frequency-domain near-infrared device suitable for physiological studies in human. In this work, a four-channel configuration of the instrument is applied to monitor hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in the frontal cortex of volunteers during different ventilation tasks. We use four different source-receiver separations (2, 3, 4, and 5 cm) and three wavelengths (760, 808, and 830 nm) to test the sensitivity of these parameters to cardiovascular and metabolic changes. Low-frequency oscillations (~ 0.02 Hz) and variations in heart rate during different ventilation tasks are investigated as well. We also study physiological changes during natural sleep using the frequency-domain instrument simultaneously with a polysomnography system containing a pulse oximeter. Our results indicate that hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in the frontal cortex during natural sleep can be detected using near-infrared measurements.

  15. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in obstructive sleep apnea at rest and in response to breath-hold challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Leinwand, Sarah E; Keenan, Brendan T; Kini, Lohith G; Schwab, Richard J; Wehrli, Felix W

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with extensive neurologic comorbidities. It is hypothesized that the repeated nocturnal apneas experienced in patients with OSA may inhibit the normal apneic response, resulting in hypoxic brain injury and subsequent neurologic dysfunction. In this study, we applied the recently developedOxFlowMRI method for rapid quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during a volitional apnea paradigm. MRI data were analyzed in 11 OSA subjects and 10 controls (mean ± SD apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 43.9 ± 18.1 vs. 2.9 ± 1.6 events/hour,P < 0.0001; age: 53.8 ± 8.2 vs. 45.3 ± 8.5 years,P = 0.027; BMI: 36.6 ± 4.4 vs. 31.9 ± 2.2 kg/m(2),P = 0.0064). Although total cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen difference were not significantly different between apneics and controls (P > 0.05), apneics displayed reduced baseline CMRO2(117.4 ± 37.5 vs. 151.6 ± 29.4 µmol/100 g/min,P = 0.013). In response to apnea, CMRO2decreased more in apneics than controls (-10.9 ± 8.8 % vs. -4.0 ± 6.7 %,P = 0.036). In contrast, group differences in flow-based cerebrovascular reactivity were not significant. Results should be interpreted with caution given the small sample size, and future studies with larger independent samples should examine the observed associations, including potential independent effects of age or BMI. Overall, these data suggest that dysregulation of the apneic response may be a mechanism for OSA-associated neuropathology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Shin, Su Mi; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One

    2015-06-01

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences.

  17. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  18. Selective cerebral perfusion for cerebral protection: what we do know

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gilbert H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) for aortic arch surgery has evolved considerably since it was first reported. Various pressure rates have been investigated through animal models, as has the effect of warmer perfusate temperatures and hematocrit. Clinical research into pH management, the role of unilateral and bilateral perfusion, and core temperatures have further refined the procedure. We recommend the following protocol for SACP: perfusion pressure between 40-60 mmHg, flow rates between 6-10 mL/kg/min, and perfusate temperature of 20-28 °C; core cooling to 18-30 °C contingent on duration of arrest; alpha-stat pH management; hematocrit between 25-30%; near infrared spectroscopy to monitor cerebral perfusion; and bilateral perfusion when prolonged durations of SACP is anticipated. PMID:23977601

  19. Pulmonary ventilation and perfusion abnormalities and ventilation perfusion imbalance in children with pulmonary atresia or extreme tetralogy of Fallot

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdle, S.C.; Human, D.G.; Mann, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 lung ventilation and perfusion scans were done preoperatively after cardiac catheterization and cineangiocardiography in 19 children; 6 had pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and hypoplastic right ventricle, 4 pulmonary atresia with associated complex univentricular heart, and 9 extreme Tetralogy of Fallot. The four patients with discrepancies in the sizes of the left and right pulmonary arteries on angiography had marked asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance on scintigraphy. Similar degrees of asymmetry and imbalance were present in 6 of the 15 children with equal-size pulmonary vessels. Asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance were associated with a poor prognosis.

  20. The Groningen hypothermic liver perfusion pump: functional evaluation of a new machine perfusion system.

    PubMed

    van der Plaats, A; Maathuis, M H J; 'T Hart, N A; Bellekom, A A; Hofker, H S; van der Houwen, E B; Verkerke, G J; Leuvenink, H G D; Verdonck, P; Ploeg, R J; Rakhorst, G

    2006-12-01

    To improve preservation of donor livers, we have developed a portable hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) system as an alternative for static cold storage. A prototype of the system was built and evaluated on functionality. Evaluation criteria included 24 h of adequate pressure controlled perfusion, sufficient oxygenation, a maintained 0-4 degrees C temperature and sterile conditions. Porcine livers were perfused with pump pressures that were set at 4 mmHg (continuous, portal vein) and 30/20 mmHg, at 60 BPM (pulsatile, hepatic artery). Control livers were preserved using the clinical golden standard: static cold storage. In the HMP group, pressure, flow and temperature were continuously monitored for 24 h. At time-points t = 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h samples of University of Wisconsin machine preservation solution were taken for measurement of partial oxygen pressure (pO(2)) and lacto-dehydrogenase. Biopsies in every lobe were taken for histology and electron microscopy; samples of ice, preservation solution, liver surface, and bile were taken and cultured to determine sterility. Results showed that temperature was maintained at 0-4 degrees C; perfusion pressure was maintained at 4 mmHg and 30/20 mmHg for portal vein and hepatic artery, respectively. Flow was approximately 350 and 80 ml/min, respectively, but decreased in the portal vein, probably due to edema formation. Arterial pO(2) was kept at 100 kPa. Histology showed complete perfusion of the liver with no major damage to hepatocytes, bile ducts, and non-parenchymal cells compared to control livers. The machine perfusion system complied to the design criteria and will have to demonstrate the superiority of machine perfusion over cold storage in transplant experiments.

  1. Effect of cardiac dysrhythmia on cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sand, B J; Rose, H B; Barker, W F

    1976-07-01

    Extracranial carotid arterial obstructive disease has been the entity most commonly associated with transient cerebrovascular insufficiency. A nonobstructive, frequently overlooked cause of cerebral ischemia is cardiac dysrhythmia. We have explored this by observations of experimental animals and of man. Blood flow and pressure in the carotid arteries of dogs were shown to be decreased by mechnically induced premature ventricular contractions. The significance of the cardiogenic contribution to altered cerebrovascular perfusion was studied by ocular and brachial plethysmography in 210 patients suspected by history of having carotid arterial insufficiency. Of the 210 patients, 62 demonstrated abnormal ocular plethysmographic recordings, and of those, nine had dysrhythmias associated with significant deficits of ocular perfusion. Five patients whose recordings were technically suitable for publication are presented to demonstrate the bizarre ocular plethysmographic recordings seen during the dysrhythmic cycle.

  2. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  3. Comparison of BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and DSC MR perfusion imaging for prediction of neurovascular uncoupling potential in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Jay J; Zacà, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    The coupling mechanism between neuronal firing and cerebrovascular dilatation can be significantly compromised in cerebral diseases, making it difficult to identify eloquent cortical areas near or within resectable lesions by using Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Several metabolic and vascular factors have been considered to account for this lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU), but no imaging gold standard exists currently for the detection of NVU. However, it is critical in clinical fMRI studies to evaluate the risk of NVU because the presence of NVU may result in false negative activation that may result in inadvertent resection of eloquent cortex, resulting in permanent postoperative neurologic deficits. Although NVU results from a disruption of one or more components of a complex cellular and chemical neurovascular coupling cascade (NCC) MR imaging is only able to evaluate the final step in this NCC involving the ultimate cerebrovascular response. Since anything that impairs cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) will necessarily result in NVU, regardless of its effect more proximally along the NCC, we can consider mapping of CVR as a surrogate marker of NVU potential. We hypothesized that BOLD breath-hold (BH) CVR mapping can serve as a better marker of NVU potential than T2* Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast gadolinium perfusion MR imaging, because the latter is known to only reflect NVU risk associated with high grade gliomas by determining elevated relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) related to tumor angiogenesis. However, since low and intermediate grade gliomas are not associated with such tumoral hyperperfusion, BOLD BH CVR mapping may be able to detect such NVU potential even in lower grade gliomas without angiogenesis, which is the hallmark of glioblastomas. However, it is also known that glioblastomas are associated with variable NVU, since angiogenesis may not always result in NVU. Perfusion

  4. Assessment of differential pulmonary blood flow using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with radionuclide perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesco; Fink, Christian; Risse, Frank; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-08-01

    We sought to assess the agreement between lung perfusion ratios calculated from pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and those calculated from radionuclide (RN) perfusion scintigraphy. A retrospective analysis of MR and RN perfusion scans was conducted in 23 patients (mean age, 60 +/- 14 years) with different lung diseases (lung cancer = 15, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease = 4, cystic fibrosis = 2, and mesothelioma = 2). Pulmonary perfusion was assessed by a time-resolved contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-echo pulse sequence using parallel imaging and view sharing (TR = 1.9 milliseconds; TE = 0.8 milliseconds; parallel imaging acceleration factor = 2; partition thickness = 4 mm; matrix = 256 x 96; in-plane spatial resolution = 1.87 x 3.75 mm; scan time for each 3D dataset = 1.5 seconds), using gadolinium-based contrast agents (injection flow rate = 5 mL/s, dose = 0.1 mmol/kg of body weight). The peak concentration (PC) of the contrast agent bolus, the pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and blood volume (PBV) were computed from the signal-time curves of the lung. Left-to-right ratios of pulmonary perfusion were calculated from the MR parameters and RN counts. The agreement between these ratios was assessed for side prevalence (sign test) and quantitatively (Deming-regression). MR and RN ratios agreed on side prevalence in 21 patients (91%) with PC, in 20 (87%) with PBF, and in 17 (74%) with PBV. The MR estimations of left-to-right perfusion ratios correlated significantly with those of RN perfusion scans (P < 0.01). The correlation was higher using PC (r = 0.67) and PBF (r = 0.66) than using PBV (r = 0.50). The MR ratios computed from PBF showed the highest accuracy, followed by those from PC and PBV. Independently from the MR parameter used, in some patients the quantitative difference between the MR and RN ratios was not negligible. Pulmonary perfusion MRI can be used to assess the differential blood flow of the lung. Further studies in a larger group

  5. Maximal perfusion of skeletal muscle in man.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P; Saltin, B

    1985-01-01

    Five subjects exercised with the knee extensor of one limb at work loads ranging from 10 to 60 W. Measurements of pulmonary oxygen uptake, heart rate, leg blood flow, blood pressure and femoral arterial-venous differences for oxygen and lactate were made between 5 and 10 min of the exercise. Flow in the femoral vein was measured using constant infusion of saline near 0 degrees C. Since a cuff was inflated just below the knee during the measurements and because the hamstrings were inactive, the measured flow represented primarily the perfusion of the knee extensors. Blood flow increased linearly with work load right up to an average value of 5.7 l min-1. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged up to a work load of 30 W, but increased thereafter from 100 to 130 mmHg. The femoral arterial-venous oxygen difference at maximum work averaged 14.6% (v/v), resulting in an oxygen uptake of 0.80 l min-1. With a mean estimated weight of the knee extensors of 2.30 kg the perfusion of maximally exercising skeletal muscle of man is thus in the order of 2.5 l kg-1 min-1, and the oxygen uptake 0.35 l kg-1 min-1. Limitations in the methods used previously to determine flow and/or the characteristics of the exercise model used may explain why earlier studies in man have failed to demonstrate the high perfusion of muscle reported here. It is concluded that muscle blood flow is closely related to the oxygen demand of the exercising muscles. The hyperaemia at low work intensities is due to vasodilatation, and an elevated mean arterial blood pressure only contributes to the linear increase in flow at high work rates. The magnitude of perfusion observed during intense exercise indicates that the vascular bed of skeletal muscle is not a limiting factor for oxygen transport. PMID:4057091

  6. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function indices assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Dadpour, Bita; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid R; Afshari, Reza; Dorri-Giv, Masoumeh; Mohajeri, Seyed A R; Ghahremani, Somayeh

    2016-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is associated with alterations of cardiac structure and function, although it is less known. In this study, we assessed possible abnormality in myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Fifteen patients with MA abuse, on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) MA dependency determined by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, underwent 2-day dipyridamole stress/rest Tc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. An average daily dose of MA use was 0.91±1.1 (0.2-4) g. The duration of MA use was 3.4±2.1 (1-7) years. In visual and semiquantitative analyses, all patients had normal gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, with no perfusion defects. In all gated SPECT images, there was no abnormality in left ventricular wall motion and thickening. All summed stress scores and summed rest scores were below 3. Calculated left ventricular functional indices including the end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were normal. Many cardiac findings because of MA mentioned in previous reports are less likely because of significant epicardial coronary artery stenosis.

  7. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  8. Perfusion patterns in migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Kerl, Hans U; Brockmann, Marc A; Groden, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    Migraine with aura is a common neurological disorder, and differentiation from transient ischemic attack or stroke based on clinical symptoms may be difficult. From an MRI report database we identified 33 patients with migraine with aura and compared these to 33 age-matched ischemic stroke patients regarding perfusion patterns on perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)-derived maps: time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT), and cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF, CBV). In 18/33 (54.5%) patients with migraine with aura, TTP showed areas of hypoperfusion, most of these not limited to the territory of a specific artery but affecting two or more vascular territories. In patients with migraine with aura, TTP (1.09 ± 0.05 vs. 1.47 ± 0.40, p < 0.001) and MTT ratios (1.01 ± 0.10 vs. 1.19 ± 0.21, p = 0.003) were significantly lower compared to patients with ischemic stroke. In contrast to this, CBF and CBV ratios did not differ significantly between both groups. Migraine aura is usually associated with a perfusion deficit not limited to a specific vascular territory, and only a moderate increase of TTP. Thus, hypoperfusion restricted to a single vascular territory in combination with a marked increase of TTP or MTT may be regarded as atypical for migraine aura and suggestive of acute ischemic stroke. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  10. Vascular perfusion in horses with chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Hood, D M; Grosenbaugh, D A; Slater, M R

    1994-05-01

    Vascular perfusion casts were used to define and characterise the macroscopic perfusion defects present in the distal digit of 11 horses affected by chronic laminitis. Five clinically normal horses were used as controls. Based on clinical history and clinical status, horses with chronic laminitis were classified as being potentially treatable or clinically refractory. Eleven macroscopic vascular defects were noted in the casts from horses with laminitis. Four types of lesions were identified in the submural laminar circulation, 3 in the coronary bed and 4 were associated with the solar circulation. Multiple defects were present and a definite trend was noted for the perfusion defects to be worse in the casts of clinically refractory subjects than in those considered treatable. This information suggests that evaluation of circulatory status should add significantly to the ability to separate treatable from clinically refractory patients. Results also indicated that ventral displacement of the third phalanx (sinkers) and compression of the solar vasculature are more prevalent than is presently thought.

  11. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  12. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  13. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  14. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  15. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  16. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  17. Noninvasive stress testing of myocardial perfusion defects: head-to-head comparison of thallium-201 SPECT to MRI perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Nkoulou, René; Steiner, Charles; Imperiano, Hestia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Mach, François; Ratib, Osman; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Schindler, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion in the assessment of flow-limiting epicardial stenosis in a head-to-head comparison with abnormal thallium-201 ((201)TI) single photon emission tomography (SPECT) studies in patients with predominantly known coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients (mean age 65 +/- 10 years) with reversible myocardial perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT images during dipyridamole-stimulated hyperemia were recruited for study purpose. Within 5 days of the (201)TI-SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was studied again with MRI during dipyridamole stimulation and at rest. Overall, (201)TI-SPECT identified 30 reversible regional perfusion defects. The sensitivity to detect hypoperfused segments was 70% (21/30) with the GRE-MRI perfusion analysis with (201)TI-SPECT as reference. When patients were subgrouped according to the extent of regional reversible perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT, mild- (SDS: 2-4), moderate- (SDS: 5-8), and severe- (SDS > 8) perfusion defects were also identified by GRE-MRI perfusion analysis in 75% (6/8), in 56% (9/16) and 100% (6/6), respectively. GRE-MRI first-pass stress perfusion imaging may not identify up to 30% of mild-to-moderate perfusion defects in a group of preselected patients with predominantly known CAD and abnormal (201)TI-SPECT studies.

  18. Perfusion phantom: An efficient and reproducible method to simulate myocardial first-pass perfusion measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chiribiri, Amedeo; Schuster, Andreas; Ishida, Masaki; Hautvast, Gilion; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Morton, Geraint; Otton, James; Plein, Sven; Breeuwer, Marcel; Batchelor, Philip; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nagel, Eike

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a novel hardware perfusion phantom that simulates myocardial first-pass perfusion allowing comparisons between different MR techniques and validation of the results against a true gold standard. MR perfusion images were acquired at different myocardial perfusion rates and variable doses of gadolinium and cardiac output. The system proved to be sensitive to controlled variations of myocardial perfusion rate, contrast agent dose, and cardiac output. It produced distinct signal intensity curves for perfusion rates ranging from 1 to 10 mL/mL/min. Quantification of myocardial blood flow by signal deconvolution techniques provided accurate measurements of perfusion. The phantom also proved to be very reproducible between different sessions and different operators. This novel hardware perfusion phantom system allows reliable, reproducible, and efficient simulation of myocardial first-pass MR perfusion. Direct comparison between the results of image-based quantification and reference values of flow and myocardial perfusion will allow development and validation of accurate quantification methods.

  19. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  20. Developing a Benchmarking Process in Perfusion: A Report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert A.; Newland, Richard F.; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W.; Merry, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCO2 management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose ≥4 mmol/L and ≤10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature ≤37°C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 ≥ 35 and ≤45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37–96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16–98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21–91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice. PMID:22730861

  1. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  3. Reversible ventilation and perfusion abnormalities in unilateral obstructed lung

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, H.E.; Jones, R.L.; King, E.G.; Sproule, B.J.; Fortune, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    An intraluminal carcinoid tumor obstructing the left mainstem bronchus produced hypoxemia through alteration in ventilation/perfusion matching. Studies of regional lung function using 133-xenon (/sup 133/Xe) and a multiprobe computerized instrumentation system documented a reduction of perfusion to 22 percent and ventilation to 6 percent of the total. There was negligible washout of intravenously injected /sup 133/Xe from the left lung consistent with air trapping. Four days after left mainstem bronchial sleeve resection, perfusion, ventilation and washout of injected xenon had significantly improved and by four months postresection, all measurements were virtually normal, although complete restoration of perfusion in relation to ventilation was delayed. Regional lung function studied with a multiprobe system in this patient provided a clinical model for the study of ventilation and perfusion inter-relationships in large airway obstruction and demonstrated that a prolonged time may be required for return of perfusion to normal.

  4. Comparison of computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging perfusion-diffusion mismatch in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Levi, Christopher R; Desmond, Patricia M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M; Parsons, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    Perfusion imaging has the potential to select patients most likely to respond to thrombolysis. We tested the correspondence of computed tomography perfusion (CTP)-derived mismatch with contemporaneous perfusion-diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Acute ischemic stroke patients 3 to 6 hours after onset had CTP and perfusion-diffusion MRI within 1 hour, before thrombolysis. Relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) and time to peak of the deconvolved tissue residue function (Tmax) were calculated. The diffusion lesion (diffusion-weighted imaging) was registered to the CTP slabs and manually outlined to its maximal visual extent. Volumetric accuracy of CT-relCBF infarct core (compared with diffusion-weighted imaging) was tested. To reduce false-positive low CBF regions, relCBF core was restricted to voxels within a relative time-to-peak (relTTP) >4 seconds for lesion region of interest. The MR-Tmax >6 seconds perfusion lesion was automatically segmented and registered to CTP. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined the optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds. Agreement of these CT parameters with MR perfusion-diffusion mismatch in coregistered slabs was assessed (mismatch ratio >1.2, absolute mismatch >10 mL, infarct core <70 mL). In analysis of 49 patients (mean onset to CT, 213 minutes; mean CT to MR, 31 minutes), constraining relCBF <31% within the automated relTTP perfusion lesion region of interest reduced the median magnitude of volumetric error (vs diffusion-weighted imaging) from 47.5 mL to 15.8 mL (P<0.001). The optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds was 6.2 seconds (95% confidence interval, 5.6-7.3 seconds; sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 70%; area under the curve, 0.87). Using CT-Tmax >6 seconds "penumbra" and relTTP-constrained relCBF "core," CT-based and MRI-based mismatch status was concordant in 90% (kappa=0.80). Quantitative CTP mismatch classification using relCBF and Tmax is similar to perfusion

  5. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  6. Perfusion scintigraphy and patient selection for lung volume reduction surgery.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A; Hoffman, Eric A; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C; Decamp, Malcolm M; Reilly, John J; Washko, George R

    2010-10-01

    It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non-high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non-upper lobe-predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non-upper lobe-predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung.

  7. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Technical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This and its companion article address the 10 most frequently asked questions that radiologists face when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting different MR perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23255738

  8. Microvascular Perfusion Changes following Transarterial Hepatic Tumor Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carmen Gacchina; Sharma, Karun V.; Levy, Elliot B.; Woods, David L.; Morris, Aaron H.; Bacher, John D.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify changes in tumor microvascular (< 1 mm) perfusion relative to commonly used angiographic endpoints. Materials and Methods Rabbit Vx2 liver tumors were embolized with 100–300-µm LC Bead particles to endpoints of substasis or complete stasis (controls were not embolized). Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by delivering two different fluorophore-conjugated perfusion markers (ie, lectins) through the catheter before embolization and 5 min after reaching the desired angiographic endpoint. Tumor microvasculature was labeled with an anti-CD31 antibody and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy for perfusion marker overlap/mismatch. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and post hoc test (n = 3–5 per group; 18 total). Results Mean microvascular density was 70 vessels/mm2 ± 17 (standard error of the mean), and 81% ± 1 of microvasculature (ie, CD31+ structures) was functionally perfused within viable Vx2 tumor regions. Embolization to the extent of substasis eliminated perfusion in 37% ± 9 of perfused microvessels (P > .05 vs baseline), whereas embolization to the extent of angiographic stasis eliminated perfusion in 56% ± 8 of perfused microvessels. Persistent microvascular perfusion following embolization was predominantly found in the tumor periphery, adjacent to normal tissue. Newly perfused microvasculature was evident following embolization to substasis but not when embolization was performed to complete angiographic stasis. Conclusions Nearly half of tumor microvasculature remained patent despite embolization to complete angiographic stasis. The observed preservation of tumor microvasculature perfusion with angiographic endpoints of substasis and stasis may have implications for tumor response to embolotherapy. PMID:26321051

  9. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  10. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  11. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  12. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  13. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time.

    PubMed

    Taeger, C D; Präbst, K; Beier, J P; Meyer, A; Horch, R E

    2016-04-01

    In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery.

  14. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  15. Perfusion lung scanning: differentiation of primary from thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Kreisman, H.; Novales-Diaz, J.; Derbekyan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Of eight patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, final diagnosis established by autopsy or angiography, four had primary hypertension and four hypertension from thromboembolism. The perfusion lung scan was distinctly different in the two groups. The lung scan in primary pulmonary hypertension was associated with nonsegmental, patchy defects of perfusion, while in thromboembolic hypertensives it was characterized by segmental and/or lobar defects of perfusion with or without subsegmental defects. The perfusion lung scan is a valuable, noninvasive study in the evaluation of the patient with pulmonary hypertension of undetermined cause and in the exclusion of occult large-vessel pulmonary thromboembolism.

  16. Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Negin; Matton, Alix P.M.; Westerkamp, Andrie C.; Burlage, Laura C.; op den Dries, Sanna; Leuvenink, Henri G.D.; Lisman, Ton; Uygun, Korkut; Markmann, James F.; Porte, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to conventional static cold preservation (0-4 °C), ex situ machine perfusion may provide better preservation of donor livers. Continuous perfusion of organs provides the opportunity to improve organ quality and allows ex situ viability assessment of donor livers prior to transplantation. This video article provides a step by step protocol for ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (37 °C) of human donor livers using a device that provides a pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous perfusion of the portal vein. The perfusion fluid is oxygenated by two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators and the temperature can be regulated between 10 °C and 37 °C. During perfusion, the metabolic activity of the liver as well as the degree of injury can be assessed by biochemical analysis of samples taken from the perfusion fluid. Machine perfusion is a very promising tool to increase the number of livers that are suitable for transplantation. PMID:26067131

  17. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Dynamic perfusion CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Fainardi, Enrico; Macdonald, David; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic perfusion CT (PCT) is an imaging technique for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of brain tumors by measuring blood flow, blood volume, and permeability-surface area product. These PCT parameters provide information complementary to histopathologic assessments and have been used for grading brain tumors, distinguishing high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, differentiating true progression from post-treatment effects, and predicting prognosis after treatments. In this review, the basic principles of PCT are described, and applications of PCT of brain tumors are discussed. The advantages and current challenges, along with possible solutions, of PCT are presented. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Impact of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation on liver perfusion measured by volume perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Preibsch, Heike; Spira, Daniel; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Syha, Roland; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Ketelsen, Dominik; Lauer, Ulrich M; Horger, Marius

    2017-10-01

    Background Implantation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) induces changes of liver perfusion. Purpose To determine the changes in arterial, portal venous, and total perfusion of the liver parenchyma induced by TIPS using the technique of volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT) and compare results with invasively measured hepatic intravascular pressure values. Material and Methods VPCT quantification of liver perfusion was performed in 23 patients (mean age, 62.5 ± 8.8 years) with portal hypertension in the pre-TIPS and post-TIPS setting, respectively. A commercially available software package was used for post-processing, enabling separate calculation of the dual (arterial [ALP] and portal venous [PVP]) blood supply and additionally of the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) (HPI = ALP/(ALP + PVP)*100%). Invasive pressure measurements were performed during the intervention, before and after TIPS placement. Liver function tests performed before and after the procedure were compared. Results Mean decrease of pressure gradient through TIPS was 13.3 mmHg. Mean normal values for ALP, PVP, and total perfusion (ALP + PVP) before TIPS were 15.9, 37.7, and 53.5 mL/100 mL/min, respectively, mean HPI was 35.4%. After TIPS, ALP increased to a mean value of 37.7 mL/100 mL/min, PVP decreased (15.7 mL/100 mL/min, P < 0.05), whereas total perfusion remained unchanged (53.4 mL/100 mL/min, P = 0.97). HPI increased (71.9%; P < 0.05). No correlation between invasive pressure measurement and VPCT parameters was observed. After TIPS, liver function tests were found to worsen with a significant increase of bilirubin ( P < 0.05). Conclusion Following TIPS placement, ALP and HPI increased in all patients, whereas PVP markedly decreased. Interestingly, the magnitude of decrease in portosystemic pressure gradients was not found to correlate with VPCT parameters.

  20. Machine perfusion of the liver: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Diethard; Brassil, John

    2010-04-01

    This review considers the potential of machine perfusion to preserve livers for clinical transplantation, including steatotic or ischaemically damaged grafts and aims to go over the most significant achievements in liver machine perfusion over the last year. To reach acceptance in liver preservation, machine perfusion will need to improve outcomes compared with simple cold storage (SCS), provide objective measures of graft viability, and resuscitate less-than-ideal grafts before transplantation. Current machine perfusion protocols comprise both hypothermic (HMP) and normothermic (NMP) approaches. HMP increases energy stores compared to SCS, and NMP shows additional resuscitative potential. Dutkowski transplanted ischaemically damaged pig livers after HMP following SCS, which avoided graft failure observed after SCS alone. Guarrera performed 20 clinical transplants after 4-7 h HMP. Friend has performed porcine transplantations after NMP of 4-20 h and univocally demonstrated the significant resuscitative effects on ischaemically damaged grafts otherwise destined to fail. Whereas NMP promises resuscitative effects, it demands challenging, near-physiologic conditions. Subnormothermic perfusion is being tested as a promising medium in between. Despite recent substantial improvements, liver preservation by machine perfusion remains limited and in contrast to the global revival of kidney machine perfusion. However, liver machine perfusion may be close to returning to clinical practice if it has not already done so. History shows that superiority alone does not guarantee immediate clinical use. Further clear-cut benefits of machine perfusion such as viability assessment will have to be accompanied by usability and human factors, and innovative and improved perfusion solutions applied in novel perfusion protocols.

  1. Sodium Movements in Perfused Squid Giant Axons

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Eduardo; Canessa-Fischer, Mitzy

    1968-01-01

    Sodium movements in internally perfused giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were studied with varying internal sodium concentrations and with fluoride as the internal anion. It was found that as the internal concentration of sodium was increased from 2 to 200 mM the resting sodium efflux increased from 0.09 to 34.0 pmoles/cm2sec and the average resting sodium influx increased from 42.9 to 64.5 pmoles/cm2sec but this last change was not statistically significant. When perfusing with a mixture of 500 mM K glutamate and 100 mM Na glutamate the resting efflux was 10 ± 3 pmoles/cm2sec and 41 ± 10 pmoles/cm2sec for sodium influx. Increasing the internal sodium concentration also increased both the extra influx and the extra efflux of sodium due to impulse propagation. At any given internal sodium concentration the net extra influx was about 5 pmoles/cm2impulse. This finding supports the notion that the inward current generated in a propagated action potential can be completely accounted for by movements of sodium. PMID:5672003

  2. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  3. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development.

  4. Free flap rescue using an extracorporeal perfusion device.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Andreas M; Ritschl, Lucas M; Rau, Andrea; Schwarzer, Claudia; von Bomhard, Achim; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The warm ischaemia time of microvascular free flaps is limited. Incalculable events, such as lack of adequate recipient vessels or intraoperative medical emergencies, can lead to prolonged ischaemia and potentially to flap loss. In this study, critically perfused ischaemic or congested flaps were temporarily perfused with an extracorporeal perfusion system until anastomosis could be commenced. Temporary extracorporeal perfusion was performed in 8 radial forearm flaps for 147 ± 52 (range 77-237) minutes. Flap perfusion was assessed using Indocyanine Green fluorescence angiography and combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy. Results were compared with those of 30 patients who underwent conventional reconstruction with radial forearm flaps. Flap survival, flap microcirculation, postoperative complications, and hospital stay did not differ between groups. We report successful free flap transfer after short-term extracorporeal perfusion for up to 4 h in 8 patient cases. Temporary extracorporeal free flap perfusion reduces the warm ischaemia time in emergency situations and can help to prevent flap failure in critically perfused or congested flaps. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02449525.

  5. Variability in quantitative cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bratis, K.

    2013-01-01

    By taking advantage of its high spatial resolution, noninvasive and nontoxic nature first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has rendered an indispensable tool for the noninvasive detection of reversible myocardial ischemia. A potential advantage of perfusion CMR is its ability to quantitatively assess perfusion reserve within a myocardial segment, as expressed semi- quantitatively by myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) and fully- quantitatively by absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). In contrast to the high accuracy and reliability of CMR in evaluating cardiac function and volumes, perfusion CMR is adversely affected by multiple potential reasons during data acquisition as well as post-processing. Various image acquisition techniques, various contrast agents and doses as well as variable blood flow at rest as well as variable reactions to stress all influence the acquired data. Mechanisms underlying the variability in perfusion CMR post processing, as well as their clinical significance, are yet to be fully elucidated. The development of a universal, reproducible, accurate and easily applicable tool in CMR perfusion analysis remains a challenge and will substantially enforce the role of perfusion CMR in improving clinical care. PMID:23825774

  6. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  7. Prolonged cerebral "luxury perfusion" after removal of a convexity meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L D; Selker, R G

    1979-04-01

    Following total removal of a convexity meningioma, serial computerized tomographic scans disclosed massive hemispheric contrast enhancement compatible with "luxury perfusion". Maximum enhancement occurred one month following the operation and resolved two months postoperatively. Luxury perfusion appeared to be associated with slowly resolving cerebral edema.

  8. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides.

  9. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  11. Impedance plethysmography: a new method for continuous muscle perfusion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Concannon, M J; Stewart, D H; Welsh, C F; Puckett, C L

    1991-08-01

    Vigilant postoperative monitoring of the buried muscle flap is critical after free transfer because early diagnosis of vascular insufficiency is essential to allow prompt correction. We have identified a monitoring method utilizing needle electrodes and impedance plethysmography that gives a beat-to-beat representation of muscular perfusion. In 25 New Zealand White rabbits the gastrocnemius muscle was isolated on its vascular pedicle, and two intramuscular needle electrodes were placed. The instantaneous impedance changes of the muscle (corresponding to the pulsatile volume changes of perfusion) were measured and recorded. Using this representation of perfusion, an independent judge was able to correctly diagnose muscular ischemia 100 percent of the time (n = 25). Further, the judge was able to correctly distinguish the ischemia as arterial (n = 10) or venous (n = 10) in origin 100 percent of the time. Additionally, we monitored muscle perfusion transcutaneously in five free muscle flaps and demonstrated a reliable impedance signal that correlated with perfusion.

  12. CMR First-Pass Perfusion for Suspected Inducible Myocardial Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Robert C; Friedrich, Matthias G; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Zemmrich, Claudia; Bengel, Frank; Berman, Daniel S; Camici, Paolo G; Flamm, Scott D; Le Guludec, Dominique; Kim, Raymond; Lombardi, Massimo; Mahmarian, John; Sechtem, Udo; Nagel, Eike

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has evolved from a pioneering research tool to an established noninvasive imaging method for detecting inducible myocardial perfusion deficits. In this consensus document, experts of different imaging techniques summarize the existing body of evidence regarding CMR perfusion as a viable complement to other established noninvasive tools for the assessment of perfusion and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of the technique. A rapid, standardized CMR perfusion protocol is described, which is safe, clinically feasible, and cost-effective for centers with contemporary magnetic resonance equipment. CMR perfusion can be recommended as a routine diagnostic tool to identify inducible myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automated quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion lung scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.H.; Vernon, P.; Seed, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    An automated computer analysis of ventilation (Kr-81m) and perfusion (Tc-99m) lung images has been devised that produces a graphical image of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, and of ventilation-perfusion ratios. The analysis has overcome the following problems: the identification of the midline between two lungs and the lung boundaries, the exclusion of extrapulmonary radioactivity, the superimposition of lung images of different sizes, and the format for presentation of the data. Therefore, lung images of different sizes and shapes may be compared with each other. The analysis has been used to develop normal ranges from 55 volunteers. Comparison of younger and older age groups of men and women show small but significant differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, but no differences in ventilation-perfusion ratios.

  14. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  15. [Ocular perfusion pressure and its relevance for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-02-01

    Ocular perfusion pressure is defined as the difference between arterial and venous pressure in ocular vessels. In practice, mean arterial pressure is used to substitute for arterial pressure in ocular vessels while intraocular pressure gives an estimate for ocular venous pressure. This results in a value that is easy to calculate and which is of importance since several studies have shown that it is correlated to the prevalence, incidence and progression of primary open angle glaucoma. Today, ocular perfusion pressure is used to estimate individual risks. Since no target value for ocular perfusion pressure can be defined, direct therapeutic intervention is difficult. Still, it has to be kept in mind that lowering intraocular pressure automatically leads to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure. The present article also points out problems and limitations in the concept of ocular perfusion pressure and suggests possible solutions for these problems in the future.

  16. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  17. Transport of benzo[alpha]pyrene in the dually perfused human placenta perfusion model: effect of albumin in the perfusion medium.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Line; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2009-09-01

    Transport of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BaP) across the placenta was examined because it is a ubiquitous and highly carcinogenic substance found in tobacco smoke, polluted air and certain foods. Foetal exposure to this substance is highly relevant but is difficult to estimate. The human placenta is unique compared to other species; since it is available without major ethical obstacles, we have used the human placenta perfusion model to study transport from mother to foetus. Placentas were donated after births at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen from pregnant mothers who signed an informed consent. BaP is lipophilic and studies using cell culture medium in 6-hr placenta perfusions showed minimal transport through the placenta. To increase the solubility of BaP in perfusion medium and to increase physiological relevance, perfusions were also performed with albumin added to the perfusion medium [2 and 30 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 30 mg/ml human serum albumin (HSA)]. The addition of albumin resulted in increased transfer of BaP from maternal to foetal reservoirs. The transfer was even higher in the presence of an HSA formulation containing acetyltryptophanate and caprylate, resulting in a foetal-maternal concentration (FM) ratio of 0.71 +/- 0.10 after 3 hr and 0.78 +/- 0.11 after 6 hr, whereas the FM ratio in perfusions without albumin was only 0.05 +/- 0.03 after 6 hr of perfusion. Less BaP accumulated in placental tissue in perfusions with added albumin. This shows that transplacental transport of the pro-carcinogenic substance BaP occurs, and emphasizes the importance of adding physiological concentrations of albumin when studying the transport of lipophilic substances.

  18. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lum, Mark A; Martin, Alastair J; Alexander, Matthew D; McCoy, David B; Cooke, Daniel L; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; McDermott, Michael W; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion.

  19. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Alexander, Matthew D.; McCoy, David B.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R.; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Higashida, Randall T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Methods Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. Results 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion. PMID:27802268

  20. Evaluation of Perfusion Quantification Methods with Ultrasound Contrast Agents in a Machine-Perfused Pig Liver.

    PubMed

    Averkiou, M; Keravnou, C P; Izamis, M L; Leen, E

    2016-05-03

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) as a tool for measuring blood flow in the macro- and microcirculation of an ex-vivo machine-perfused pig liver and to confirm the ability of DCEUS to accurately detect induced flow rate changes so that it could then be used clinically for monitoring flow changes in liver tumors. Materials and Methods: Bolus injections of contrast agents in the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) were administered to 3 machine-perfused pig livers. Flow changes were induced by the pump of the machine perfusion system. The induced flow rates were of clinical relevance (150 - 400 ml/min for HA and 400 - 1400 ml/min for PV). Quantification parameters from time-intensity curves [rise time (RT), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI)] were extracted in order to evaluate whether the induced flow changes were reflected in these parameters. Results: A linear relationship between the image intensity and the microbubble concentration was confirmed first, while time parameters (RT and MMT) were found to be independent of concentration. The induced flow changes which propagated from the larger vessels to the parenchyma were reflected in the quantification parameters. Specifically, RT, MTT and AUC correlated with flow rate changes. Conclusion Machine-perfused pig liver is an excellent test bed for DCEUS quantification approaches for the study of the hepatic vascular networks. DCEUS quantification parameters (RT, MTT, and AUC) can measure relative flow changes of about 20 % and above in the liver vasculature. DCEUS quantification is a promising tool for real-time monitoring of the vascular network of tumors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  2. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  3. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  4. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  5. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-23

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs.

  6. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics© system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs. PMID:19166591

  7. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of bronchial circulation perfusion in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietholt, Christian; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Roerig, David L.; Dawson, Christopher A.; Clough, Anne V.

    2004-04-01

    The bronchial circulation is thought to be the primary blood supply for pulmonary carcinomas. Thus, we have developed a method for imaging and quantifying changes in perfusion in the rat lung due to development of the bronchial circulation. A dual-modality micro-CT/SPECT system was used to detect change in perfusion in two groups of rats: controls and those with a surgically occluded left pulmonary artery. Both groups were imaged following injections on separate days i) 2mCi of Tc99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (MAA) into the left carotid artery (IA) and ii) a similar injection into the femoral vein (IV). The IA injection resulted in Tc99m accumulation in capillaries of the systemic circulation including the bronchial circulation, whereas the IV resulted in Tc99m accumulation in the pulmonary capillaries. Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) was used to reconstruct the SPECT image volumes and a Feldkamp algorithm was used to reconstruct the micro-CT image volumes. The micro-CT and SPECT volumes were registered, the SPECT image volume was segmented using the right and left lung boundaries defined from the micro-CT volume, and the ratio of IA radioactivity accumulation in the left lung to IV radioactivity accumulation in both lungs was used as a measure of left lung flow via the bronchial circulation. This ratio was ~0.02 for the untreated rats compared to the treated animals that had an increased flow ratio of ~0.21 40 days after left pulmonary artery occlusion. This increase in flow to the occluded left lung via the bronchial circulation suggests this will be a useful model for further investigating antiangiogenic treatments.

  9. Heart rate variability as a marker of myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Schechter, D; Sapoznikov, D; Luria, M H; Mendelson, S; Bocher, M; Chisin, R

    1998-01-01

    RR variability (HRV), an independent predictor of death following myocardial infarction, may also be related to other features of coronary artery disease. We evaluated its ability to differentiate among sedentary patients with chest pain >/=45 years of age demonstrating either normal or abnormal myocardial perfusion with rest and exercise thallium-210 tomographic imaging. The major HRV difference between 48 men and 50 women with normal perfusion was a significantly higher high frequency power in women. No significant differences in mean HRV values were found between the 57 men with abnormal perfusion scans and the 48 men with normal perfusion. In both men and women with normal perfusion scans, duration of exercise was significantly related to age. In men with abnormal scans, impaired myocardial perfusion alters the relationship between exercise duration and age, and a group of individuals with diminished HRV and low levels of physical fitness, regardless of age, can be identified. Despite these latter selective findings, we conclude that HRV is not a sensitive indicator to differentiate patients with normal and abnormal myocardial perfusion.

  10. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  11. Experimental study on the segmental perfusion and preservation of spleen.

    PubMed

    Limin, H; Hongchi, J; Wenjie, D; Haiquan, Q; Jun, X

    1999-12-01

    Spleen transplanlation has developed to be an effective strategy for hemophilia A. But it has not been reported up to date that which kind of established solutions is most suitable for perfusion and preservation of spleen. This study aimed to establish some experiences with the comparison among Hartmann's solution, Collins' solution and WMO-I solution, in order to instruct the clinical spleen transplantation. After the splenic artery and vein were dissociated clearly, three kinds of perfusion solutions began to perfuse the corresponding segments of spleen with a randomized sequence. When the efferent fluids from the splenic vein became clear, the perfused spleen segments were preserved for different durations with the same perfusing solution to calculate the survival rate of splencocyte (SRS) and were examined with light and electron microscopy. Among the three solutions, SRS with WMO-I solution was significantly higher than those of the other two (P<0.001). The perfused spleen with WMO-I solution showed the slightest morphological changes and a significant longer preservation duration than those with the other two (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Among the three solutions, WMO-I solution was most suitable for perfusion and preservation of spleen.

  12. Ex Situ Perfusion of Human Limb Allografts for 24 Hours.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole L; Alghanem, Fares; Rakestraw, Stephanie L; Sarver, Dylan C; Nicely, Bruce; Pietroski, Richard E; Lange, Paul; Rudich, Steven M; Mendias, Christopher L; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Magee, John C; Bartlett, Robert H; Ozer, Kagan

    2017-03-01

    Vascularized composite allografts, particularly hand and forearm, have limited ischemic tolerance after procurement. In bilateral hand transplantations, this demands a 2 team approach and expedited transfer of the allograft, limiting the recovery to a small geographic area. Ex situ perfusion may be an alternative allograft preservation method to extend allograft survival time. This is a short report of 5 human limbs maintained for 24 hours with ex situ perfusion. Upper limbs were procured from brain-dead organ donors. Following recovery, the brachial artery was cannulated and flushed with 10 000 U of heparin. The limb was then attached to a custom-made, near-normothermic (30-33°C) ex situ perfusion system composed of a pump, reservoir, and oxygenator. Perfusate was plasma-based with a hemoglobin concentration of 4 to 6 g/dL. Average warm ischemia time was 76 minutes. Perfusion was maintained at an average systolic pressure of 93 ± 2 mm Hg, flow 310 ± 20 mL/min, and vascular resistance 153 ± 16 mm Hg/L per minute. Average oxygen consumption was 1.1 ± 0.2 mL/kg per minute. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation continually displayed contraction until the end of perfusion, and histology showed no myocyte injury. Human limb allografts appeared viable after 24 hours of near-normothermic ex situ perfusion. Although these results are early and need validation with transplantation, this technology has promise for extending allograft storage times.

  13. Ventilation-perfusion-chest radiography match is less likely to represent pulmonary embolism if perfusion is decreased rather than absent.

    PubMed

    Kim, C K; Worsley, D F; Alavi, A

    2000-09-01

    The authors' goal was to determine whether the prevalence of pulmonary embolism in patients with matching ventilation-perfusion (V-Q) defects and chest radiographic opacities differs depending on the degree of perfusion deficit (absent versus decreased). The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the data obtained from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. In 233 patients, angiograms were of diagnostic quality for 275 lung zones that showed matching V-Q defects and chest radiographic opacities (triple matches). Of these, V-Q scans and chest radiographs from 217 patients with triple matches in 255 lung zones were retrieved and reviewed. Areas corresponding to chest radiographic opacities were scored as having either decreased perfusion or absent perfusion by consensus. Information regarding the presence or absence of pulmonary embolism in corresponding lung zones was obtained from the PIOPED database. The overall prevalence of pulmonary embolism in all lung zones with triple matches was 27% (69 of 255). Of the 255 areas of triple matches, the perfusion was decreased in 153 (60%) and absent in 102 (40%). The prevalence of pulmonary embolism in areas of triple matches with decreased perfusion and triple matches with absent perfusion was 13% (20 of 153) and 48% (49 of 102), respectively (P = 0.0001 by the chi-square test). When these were divided further by lung zones, triple matches with decreased perfusion and triple matches with absent perfusion in the upper-middle lung zone were associated with a prevalence of 0% (O of 44), and 25% (9 of 36), respectively. The prevalence of pulmonary embolism in areas of triple matches with decreased perfusion and triple matches with absent perfusion in the lower lung zone was 18% (20 of 109), and 61% (40 of 66), respectively. A V-Q/chest radiographic match is less likely to represent pulmonary embolism if perfusion is decreased rather than absent. The overall prevalence of pulmonary

  14. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  15. Warm vs. cold perfusion techniques to rescue rodent liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Kron, Philipp; Graf, Rolf; Dutkowski, Philipp; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2014-12-01

    A variety of liver perfusion techniques have been proposed to protect liver grafts prior to implantation. We compared hypothermic and normothermic oxygenated perfusion techniques in a rat liver transplant model, using higher risk grafts obtained after cardiac arrest (DCD). Rat livers were subjected to 30 or 60 min in situ warm ischemia, without application of heparin. Livers were excised and stored for 4 h at 4°C, mimicking DCD organ procurement, followed by conventional organ transport. In experimental groups, DCD liver grafts received a 4 h normothermic oxygenated perfusion through the portal vein and the hepatic artery instead of cold storage. The perfusate consisted of either full blood or leukocyte-depleted blood (normothermic groups). Other livers underwent hypothermic oxygenated perfusion (HOPE) for 1 h after warm ischemia and 4 h cold storage (HOPE group). Liver injury was assessed during machine perfusion and after isolated liver reperfusion, and by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). DCD livers, subjected to normothermic perfusion, disclosed reduced injury and improved survival compared to cold storage after limited warm ischemia of 30 min (70%; 7/10), but failed to protect from lethal injury in grafts exposed to 60 min warm ischemia (0%; 0/10). This finding was consistent with Kupffer and endothelial cell activation in cold stored and normothermic perfused livers. In contrast, HOPE protected from hepatocyte and non-parenchymal cell injury and led to 90% (9/10) and 63% (5/8) animal survival after 30 and 60 min of donor warm ischemia, respectively. This is the first evidence that HOPE is superior to normothermic oxygenated perfusion in a clinically relevant model through modulation of the innate immunity and endothelial cell activation. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contactless mapping of rhythmical phenomena in tissue perfusion using PPGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelsbusch, Markus; Blazek, Vladimir

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental setup and preliminary results of a near infrared CCD camera based Photoplethysmography Imaging (PPGI) system, which has been shown to be suitable for contactless and spatially resolved assessment of rhythmical blood volume changes in the skin. To visualize the complex rhythmical patterns in the dermal perfusion the Wavelet Transform is utilized. It is able to jointly assess time and frequency behavior of signals and thus allows to analyze instationary oscillations and variabilities in the different human rhythmics. The presented system is expected to provide new insights into the functional sequences of physiological tissue perfusion as well as of the perfusion status in ulcer formation and wound healing.

  17. Luxury perfusion phenomenon in acute herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Uesugi, M; Igeta, Y; Kondo, S; Sun, X; Hirai, S

    1995-02-01

    In a patient with acute herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased cerebral blood flow in the affected temporal lobe accompanied by reduction in the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, i.e., luxury perfusion. Follow-up PET studies showed reduction in cerebral perfusion until it was more closely coupled with oxygen metabolism after the resolution of the acute inflammation. These findings support previous single photon emission computed tomographic data and provide a pathophysiological background for the occurrence of hyperperfusion in HSV encephalitis. This is an interesting example of the luxury perfusion phenomenon occurring in a disease other than cerebral ischemia.

  18. Dual-energy perfusion-CT of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Klauss, M; Stiller, W; Pahn, G; Fritz, F; Kieser, M; Werner, J; Kauczor, H U; Grenacher, L

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT)-perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas for assessing the differences in perfusion, permeability and blood volume of healthy pancreatic tissue and histopathologically confirmed solid pancreatic carcinoma. 24 patients with histologically proven pancreatic carcinoma were examined prospectively with a 64-slice dual source CT using a dynamic sequence of 34 dual-energy (DE) acquisitions every 1.5s (80 ml of iodinated contrast material, 370 mg/ml, flow rate 5 ml/s). 80 kV(p), 140 kV(p), and weighted average (linearly blended M0.3) 120 kV(p)-equivalent dual-energy perfusion image data sets were evaluated with a body-perfusion CT tool (Body-PCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) for estimating perfusion, permeability, and blood volume values. Color-coded parameter maps were generated. In all 24 patients dual-energy CT-perfusion was. All carcinomas could be identified in the color-coded perfusion maps. Calculated perfusion, permeability and blood volume values were significantly lower in pancreatic carcinomas compared to healthy pancreatic tissue. Weighted average 120 kV(p)-equivalent perfusion-, permeability- and blood volume-values determined from DE image data were 0.27 ± 0.04 min(-1) vs. 0.91 ± 0.04 min(-1) (p<0.0001), 0.5 ± 0.07 *0.5 min(-1) vs. 0.67 ± 0.05 *0.5 min(-1) (p=0.06) and 0.49 ± 0.07 min(-1) vs. 1.28 ± 0.11 min(-1) (p<0.0001). Compared with 80 and 140 kV(p) the standard deviations of the kV(p)120 kV(p)-equivalent values were manifestly smaller. Dual-energy CT-perfusion of the pancreas is feasible. The use of DECT improves the accuracy of CT-perfusion of the pancreas by fully exploiting the advantages of enhanced iodine contrast at 80 kV(p) in combination with the noise reduction at 140 kV(p). Therefore using dual-energy perfusion data could improve the delineation of pancreatic carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy. Multiple applications besides pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sinzinger, Helmut; Rodrigues, Margarida; Kummer, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy is the diagnostic tool of choice for detection and monitoring of pulmonary embolism. However, the knowledge on its value for other or concurrent pathologies is poor. In this review scintigraphic characteristics of the main pathologies, interpretation and artefacts are described. Together with the understanding of pathophysiology of the lung, the potential gain of information derived from ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy is much higher than generally believed. In conclusion, ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy not only in PE but also in other lung diseases is underused, its value and clinical potential underestimated.

  20. Prognostic value of normal regadenoson stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regadenoson is a vasodilator stress agent that selectively activates the A2A receptor. Compared to adenosine, regadenoson is easier to administer and results in fewer side effects. Although extensively studied in patients undergoing nuclear perfusion imaging (MPI), its use for perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is not well described. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of a normal regadenoson perfusion CMR in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Methods Patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease were prospectively enrolled to receive perfusion CMR (Philips 1.5 T) with regadenoson. Three short-axis slices of the left ventricle (LV) were obtained during first pass of contrast using a hybrid GRE-EPI pulse sequence (0.075 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA-BMA at 4 ml/sec). Imaging was performed 1 minute after injection of regadenoson (0.4 mg) and repeated 15 minutes after reversal of hyperemia with aminophylline (125 mg). Perfusion defects were documented if they persisted for ≥2 frames after peak enhancement of the LV cavity. CMR was considered abnormal if there was a resting wall motion abnormality, decreased LVEF (<40%), presence of LGE, or the presence of a perfusion defect during hyperemia. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year for major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) defined as coronary revascularization, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death. Results 149 patients were included in the final analysis. Perfusion defects were noted in 43/149 (29%) patients; 59/149 (40%) had any abnormality on CMR. During the mean follow-up period of 24 ± 9 months, 17/149 (11.4%) patients experienced MACE. The separation in the survival distributions for those with perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects was highly significant (log-rank p = 0.0001). When the absence of perfusion defects was added to the absence of other resting CMR

  1. Prevalence of ECG changes during adenosine stress and its association with perfusion defect on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Taywade, Sameer K; Ramaiah, Vijayaraghavan L; Basavaraja, Harish; Venkatasubramaniam, Parameswaran R; Selvakumar, Job

    2017-04-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is a valuable, noninvasive imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease. Adenosine stress may occasionally be associated with ECG changes. This study evaluated the strength of association between adenosine stress-related ECG changes and perfusion defects on Tc-MPS. 117 (mean age: 61.25±9.27 years; sex: men 87, women 30) patients with known/suspected coronary artery disease underwent adenosine stress MPS. ECG was monitored continuously during adenosine stress for ST-depression. On the basis of the summed difference score, reversible perfusion defects were categorized as follows: normal: less than 4, mild: 4-8, moderate: 9-13, and severe: more than 13. ST-depression was observed in 27/117 (23.1%) and reversible perfusion defects were observed in 18/27 (66.66%) patients. 2/27, 6/27, and 10/27 patients had mild, moderate, and severe ischemia, respectively. 9/27 patients had normal perfusion. ECG changes and perfusion defects showed a moderate strength of association (correlation coefficient r=0.35, P=0.006). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of ECG findings for prediction of ischemia were 35.29, 86.36, 67.67, and 63.33%, respectively. ECG changes during adenosine stress are not uncommon. It shows a moderate strength of association with reversible perfusion defects. ECG changes during adenosine merit critical evaluation of MPS findings.

  2. Analysis of perfusates during hypothermic machine perfusion by NMR spectroscopy: a potential tool for predicting kidney graft outcome.

    PubMed

    Bon, Delphine; Billault, Claire; Claire, Billault; Thuillier, Raphaël; Hebrard, William; Boildieu, Nadège; Celhay, Olivier; Irani, Jacques; Seguin, François; Hauet, Thierry

    2014-04-27

    Machine perfusion use has been reported to promote graft outcome in case of donation after cardiac death. Our objective was to evaluate the potential for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to predict graft outcome by analyzing perfusates during machine perfusion time. We used a renal autotransplantation model mimicking deceased after cardiac death donors with pigs. Organs were subjected to 60 min of warm ischemia before the hypothermic machine preservation during 22 hr. We studied the correlation between creatinemia after transplantation and the NMR data from perfusates. A metabonomic analysis allowed us to highlight the evolution of several metabolites during perfusion: the concentration of lactate, choline, or amino acids such as valine, glycine, or glutamate increased with time, whereas there was a diminution of total glutathione during this period. The changes in these biomarkers were less severe in the group with the better outcome. Statistical analysis revealed a strong association between the level of those metabolites during machine perfusion and function recovery (Spearman rank ≥0.89; P<0.05). Multivariate analysis of lesion biomarkers during kidney perfusion using NMR data could be an interesting tool to assess graft quality, particularly because analyses times (2 hr total) are compatible with clinical application.

  3. The Effect of Perfusate Volume on Amikacin Concentration in the Metacarpophalangeal Joint Following Cephalic Regional Limb Perfusion in Standing Horses.

    PubMed

    Oreff, Gil L; Dahan, Roee; Tatz, Amos J; Raz, Tal; Britzi, Malka; Kelmer, Gal

    2016-07-01

    To determine the influence of 3 perfusate volumes on amikacin concentration in the metacarpophalangeal joint following cephalic regional limb perfusion (RLP) in standing horses. Seven healthy horses. Three perfusate volumes (100, 60, and 30 mL), containing 2 grams of amikacin, were tested during intravenous RLP at the cephalic vein, placing the tourniquet at mid antebrachium, in standing sedated horses. Synovial fluid was collected from the metacarpophalangeal joint before perfusion and at 30 and 120 minutes after perfusion. Serum samples were taken from the jugular vein at the same time points. Samples were analyzed for amikacin concentrations and a repeated measures ANOVA, followed by least squares difference pairwise comparisons to identify differences in amikacin concentration across perfusate volumes. Differences were considered significant at P<.05. The mean amikacin concentration in synovial fluid at 30 minutes after perfusion was significantly higher following perfusate volume of 100 mL (579 μg/mL), compared to volumes of 60 mL (227 μg/mL) or 30 mL (282 μg/mL) (P<.05). When a threshold of 160 μg/mL was used, more horses reached the synovial therapeutic threshold following perfusate volume of 100 mL (100%), than horses receiving 60 mL (43%) and 30 mL (57%) at 30 minutes after injection. The use of 100 mL volume for RLP at the cephalic vein in standing horses resulted in higher concentration of amikacin in the synovial fluid and is recommended for use in clinical cases. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  5. Human males and females body thermoregulation: perfusion effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Saraswati; Gurung, D B; Saxena, V P

    2014-10-01

    Skin temperature is a common physiological parameter that reflects thermal responses. Blood perfusion is an important part of the physiological processes that the human body undergoes in order to maintain homeostasis. This study focuses on the effect of perfusion on the temperature distribution in human males and females body in different thermal environment. The study has been carried out for one dimensional steady cases using finite element method. The input parameter of the model is the blood perfusion or volumetric flow rate within the tissue. The appropriate physical and physiological parameters together with suitable boundary conditions that affect the heat regulations have been incorporated in the model. The study is to have a better understanding that how does thermoregulation change in human males and females skin layered due to perfusion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  7. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  8. The low specificity of postoperative perfusion lung scan defects.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, I; Aukland, P; Hirsh, J; Coates, G; Cockshott, P; Taylor, R; Hull, R

    1981-01-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were performed preoperatively and postoperatively in 169 patients and classified blindly according to preset criteria. Perfusion lung scan abnormalities were present in 25 (15%) of the preoperative scans and 42 (25%) of the postoperative scans; 16 (38%) of the 42 abnormal postoperative scans were identical to the preoperative scans. Perfusion defects indicating a "high probability" of pulmonary embolism (lobar or segmental defects) were present in 5 preoperative scans and 10 postoperative scans; the 10 postoperative scans were classified as showing "definite" (5), "possible" (1) or "no" (4) pulmonary embolism on the basis of the preoperative scan and the ventilation scan; none of the 10 patients had clinical evidence of pulmonary embolism. Venous thrombosis was present in 12 patients, including 4 of the patients whose lung scans showed definite pulmonary embolism. Thus, postoperative perfusion lung scan defects are potentially misleading even when large. PMID:7459778

  9. Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; McElduff, Patrick; Miteff, Ferdi; Spratt, Neil J.; Bateman, Grant; Donnan, Geoffrey; Davis, Stephen; Parsons, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of perfusion imaging to guide selection of patients for stroke thrombolysis remains controversial because of lack of supportive phase three clinical trial evidence. We aimed to measure the outcomes for patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) at a comprehensive stroke care facility where perfusion computed tomography was routinely used for thrombolysis eligibility decision assistance. Our overall hypothesis was that patients with ‘target’ mismatch on perfusion computed tomography would have improved outcomes with rtPA. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive ischaemic stroke patients who fulfilled standard clinical/non-contrast computed tomography eligibility criteria for treatment with intravenous rtPA, but for whom perfusion computed tomography was used to guide the final treatment decision. The ‘real-time’ perfusion computed tomography assessments were qualitative; a large perfusion computed tomography ischaemic core, or lack of significant perfusion lesion-core mismatch were considered relative exclusion criteria for thrombolysis. Specific volumetric perfusion computed tomography criteria were not used for the treatment decision. The primary analysis compared 3-month modified Rankin Scale in treated versus untreated patients after ‘off-line’ (post-treatment) quantitative volumetric perfusion computed tomography eligibility assessment based on presence or absence of ‘target’ perfusion lesion-core mismatch (mismatch ratio >1.8 and volume >15 ml, core <70 ml). In a second analysis, we compared outcomes of the perfusion computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients to an Australian historical cohort of non-contrast computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients. Of 635 patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for rtPA by standard criteria, thrombolysis was given to 366 patients, with 269 excluded based on visual real-time perfusion computed tomography assessment. After off

  10. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  11. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  12. Australian and New Zealand Perfusion Survey: Management and Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Tuble, Sigrid C.; Willcox, Timothy W.; Baker, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: In this report, we will discuss management and procedural aspects of perfusion practice. This report allows us to compare and contrast recent trends and changes in perfusion with historic practices. A survey comprised of 233 single-answer and 12 open-ended questions was sent by e-mail to senior perfusionists or individuals in charge of perfusion in 40 hospital groups. The survey encompasses a review of the perfusion practices for the calendar year of 2003, and respondents were required to answer the survey based on the predominant practice in their institutions. Standard management of routine adult cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 2003 consisted of perfusion strategies that achieved a target temperature of 32.0°C (range, 28.0–35.0°C), a flow index of 2.4 L/min/m2 (range, 1.6–3.0 L/min/m2) during normothermia and 1.8 L/min/m2 (range, 1.2–3.0 L/min/m2) during hypothermia, and a pressure during CPB between 50 (range, 30–65 mmHg) and 70 mmHg (range, 60–95 mmHg). Myocardial protection with blood cardioplegia was used in 77% of the 20,688 CPB cases, whereas in 53% cases, cardiotomy blood was never processed. Pre-operatively, 76% of perfusion groups assessed their patients (21% directly with the patient), and 85% responded that perfusionists performed or participated in a formal pre-bypass checklist. The majority of the perfusion groups used a handwritten perfusion record (62%), 12% used an electronic perfusion record, and 26% used both, whereas more than one half of the groups were involved in quality assurance (79%), incident reporting (74%), audits (62%), research (53%), participating in interdisciplinary meetings (53%), and morbidity and mortality meetings (65%). Only 26% conducted formal perfusion team meetings. This report outlines the status of clinical management and procedural performance for perfusion practices in Australia and New Zealand in 2003. Awareness of these trends will allow perfusionists to assess both individual practices and

  13. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, TCA; Bezerra, BSP; Vianello, MP; Corradi, J; Dorairaj, SK; Prata, TS

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the diurnal variation of the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal, suspects and glaucoma patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine subjects were enrolled in a prospective study. The diurnal curve of intraocular pressure (IOP) was performed and blood pressure measurements were obtained. Each participant was grouped into one of the following based upon the clinical evaluation of the optic disk, IOP and standard achromatic perimetry (SAP): 18 eyes were classified as normal (normal SAP, normal optic disk evaluation and IOP < 21 mm Hg in two different measurements), 30 eyes as glaucoma suspect (GS) (normal SAP and mean deviation (MD), C/D ration > 0.5 or asymmetry > 0.2 and/or ocular hypertension), 31 eyes as early glaucoma (MD < -6 dB, glaucomatous optic neuropathy and SAP and MDs on SAP. Standard achromatic perimetry was performed with the Octopus 3.1.1 Dynamic 24-2 program. Intraocular pressure and blood pressure measurements were taken at 6 am, 9 am, 12, 3 and 6 pm. The patients stayed in the seated position for 5 minutes prior to blood pressure measurements. Results: The mean IOP values in all groups did not follow any regular pattern. The peak IOP was found to be greater in suspect [18.70 ± 3.31 (mm Hg ± SD)] and glaucoma (18.77 ± 4.30 mm Hg) patients as compared to normal subjects (16.11 ± 2.27 mm Hg). In studying the diurnal variation of the OPP, we found lower values at 3 pm in normals (34.21 ± 2.07 mm Hg), at 9 am in suspects (54.35 ± 3.32 mm Hg) and at 12 pm in glaucoma patients (34.84 ± 1.44 mm Hg). Conclusion: Each group has a specific OPP variation during the day with the most homogeneous group being the suspect one. It is important to keep studying the IOP and OPP variation for increased comprehension of the pathophysiology of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Kanadani FN, Moreira TCA, Bezerra BSP, Vianello MP, Corradi J, Dorairaj SK, Prata TS. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion

  14. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  15. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas G; Gunser, John M; Saviello, George M

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience.

  16. Perfusion characteristics of preserved canine kidneys subjected to warm ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Modgill, V K; Wiggins, P A; Giles, G R

    1978-02-01

    Canine kidneys were subjected to 0, 15 or 30 min of warm ischaemia followed by 24 hours preservation by perfusion. Changes in perfusate concentration of acid radicles, lactate, free fatty acid and lactice dehydrogenase were assessed at 1 hour and 24 hours. With the exception of LDH concentration at 1 hour, no single parameter was capable of detecting kidneys which were so damaged as to be non-life supporting.

  17. Three-dimensional tumor perfusion reconstruction using fractal interpolation functions.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, O I; Das, S K; Poulson, J M; Samulski, T V

    2001-04-01

    It has been shown that the perfusion of blood in tumor tissue can be approximated using the relative perfusion index determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) of the tumor blood pool. Also, it was concluded in a previous report that the blood perfusion in a two-dimensional (2-D) tumor vessel network has a fractal structure and that the evolution of the perfusion front can be characterized using invasion percolation. In this paper, the three-dimensional (3-D) tumor perfusion is reconstructed from the 2-D slices using the method of fractal interpolation functions (FIF), i.e., the piecewise self-affine fractal interpolation model (PSAFIM) and the piecewise hidden variable fractal interpolation model (PHVFIM). The fractal models are compared to classical interpolation techniques (linear, spline, polynomial) by means of determining the 2-D fractal dimension of the reconstructed slices. Using FIFs instead of classical interpolation techniques better conserves the fractal-like structure of the perfusion data. Among the two FIF methods, PHVFIM conserves the 3-D fractality better due to the cross correlation that exists between the data in the 2-D slices and the data along the reconstructed direction. The 3-D structures resulting from PHVFIM have a fractal dimension within 3%-5% of the one reported in literature for 3-D percolation. It is, thus, concluded that the reconstructed 3-D perfusion has a percolation-like scaling. As the perfusion term from bio-heat equation is possibly better described by reconstruction via fractal interpolation, a more suitable computation of the temperature field induced during hyperthermia treatments is expected.

  18. Progressive gastric perfusion in rats: role of ischemic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Alfabet, Charles; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Paes Leme, Luís Fernando; Higashi, Viviane S; Sallum Fo, Celso F C; Fagundes, Djalma José; Gomes, Paulo Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Occult ischemia of the mobilized stomach is usually related to the dehiscence of an esophagogastric anastomosis. The principle of ischemic conditioning was studied to verify its clinic use. This study aims to evaluate progressively the tissue perfusion of the stomach in ischemic conditioning, establishing the best moment for gastric transposition. Twenty-four male EPM-1 Wistar rats were used, which also underwent partial desvacularization of the stomach by ligature of the left gastric vessels. Tissue perfusion was measured through flowmetry by laser Doppler (tissue perfusion unit; TPU) in the antrum (10 mm distal from the cardiac region). This measurement was done before (baseline) and immediately after the ligature, and on different postoperative days (POD) (days 3, 7, 10, and 14). A statistical analysis was done with nonparametric tests (P perfusion, during the whole study period, was 88 +/- 6 (baseline), 23 +/- 5 (postligature), 31 +/- 5 (3rd POD), 55 +/- 4 (7th POD), 71 +/- 16 (10th POD), and 84 +/- 6 (14th POD), respectively. Perfusion immediately after the artery ligature was significantly lower (74%) than the baseline of the gastric perfusion; therefore, in the following days, tissue perfusion increased progressively (35%, 63%, 81%, and 96%, respectively). The flowmetry of the stomach reached basal values in the 14th POD of desvascularization, suggesting that this would the best day to perform a gastric transposition. However, on the 10th POD, good tissue perfusion was observed. The extrapolation from these data to the clinic could improve the results of esophagogastric anastomosis.

  19. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Peripheral Tissue Perfusion Using Spatiotemporal Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsul; Koh, Gou Young; Kwon, Kihwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion is challenging but necessary to diagnose peripheral vascular insufficiency. Because near infrared (NIR) radiation can penetrate relatively deep into tissue, significant attention has been given to intravital NIR fluorescence imaging. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new optical imaging-based strategy for quantitative measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion by time-series analysis of local pharmacokinetics of the NIR fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Time-series NIR fluorescence images were obtained after injecting ICG intravenously in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. Mathematical modeling and computational simulations were used for translating time-series ICG images into quantitative pixel perfusion rates and a perfusion map. We could successfully predict the prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs based on the perfusion profiles obtained immediately after surgery, which were dependent on the preexisting collaterals. This method also reflected increases in perfusion and improvements in prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs induced by treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor and COMP-angiopoietin-1. Conclusions/Significance We propose that this novel NIR-imaging-based strategy is a powerful tool for biomedical studies related to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions directed at stimulating angiogenesis. PMID:19169354

  1. A pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy N.; Tran, Elizabeth; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform for passive fluid pumping for pump-free perfusion cell culture, cell-based assay, and chemical applications. By adapting the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle from the previously developed perfusion microplate, which utilizes a combination of hydrostatic pressure generated by different liquid levels in the wells and fluid wicking through narrow strips of a porous membrane connecting the wells to generate fluid flow, a series of pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic devices was developed and their use for pump-free perfusion cell culture and cell-based assays was demonstrated. Each pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic device comprises at least three basic components: an open well for generating fluid flow, a micron-sized deep chamber/channel for cell culture or for fluid connection, and a wettable porous membrane for controlling the fluid flow. Each component is fluidically connected either by the porous membrane or by the micron-sized deep chamber/channel. By adapting and incorporating the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle into microfluidic devices, all the benefits of microfluidic technologies, such as small sample volumes, fast and efficient fluid exchanges, and fluid properties at the micro-scale, can be fully taken advantage of with this pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform. PMID:26392835

  2. Influence of tissue movements on laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Daniel M.; Larsson, Marcus; Stroemberg, Tomas; Wardell, Karin

    2002-05-01

    The microvascular perfusion can be measured using laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF), a technique sensitive to the concentration of moving blood cells and their velocity. However, movements of the tissue itself can cause artifacts in the perfusion readings. In a clinical situation, these movement induced artifacts may arise from patient movements or from movements of internal organs e.g. the intestines or the beating heart. Therefore, we have studied how a well-controlled tissue movement affects the LDF signals during different flow conditions and for different surface structures. Tissue perfusion was recorded non-touch in one point using a laser Doppler perfusion imager. During the measurements the object was placed on a shaker that generated the movement (both horizontal and vertical). Measurements were carried out both on DELRIN (polyacetal plastic) and the fingertip, for a wide range of velocities (0-3 cm/s). The influence of the microvascular perfusion was evaluated by occluding the brachial artery as well as blood emptying the finger and by using a flow model. The LDF signals were correlated to the movement. In vivo measurements showed that velocities above 0.8 cm/s gave a significant contribution to the perfusion signal. Corresponding velocities for the DELRIN piece were higher (1.4 - 2.6 cm/s), and dependent on the surface structures and reflecting properties. By reducing the amount of specular reflection the movement influence was substantially lowered.

  3. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  4. Mucosal blood flow measurements using laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Dag Arne Lihaug; Gregersen, Hans; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    Perfusion of individual tissues is a basic physiological process that is necessary to sustain oxygenation and nutrition at a cellular level. Ischemia, or the insufficiency of perfusion, is a common mechanism for tissue death or degeneration, and at a lower threshold, a mechanism for the generation of sensory signalling including pain. It is of considerable interest to study perfusion of peripheral abdominal tissues in a variety of circumstances. Microvascular disease of the abdominal organs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders, including peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease and chest pain. The basic principle of laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) is to analyze changes in the spectrum of light reflected from tissues as a response to a beam of monochromatic laser light emitted. It reflects the total local microcirculatory blood perfusion, including perfusion in capillaries, arterioles, venules and shunts. During the last 20-25 years, numerous studies have been performed in different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using LDPM. In recent years we have developed a multi-modal catheter device which includes a laser Doppler probe, with the intent primarily to investigate patients suffering from functional chest pain of presumed oesophageal origin. Preliminary studies show the feasibility of incorporating LDPM into such catheters for performing physiological studies in the GI tract. LDPM has emerged as a research and clinical tool in preference to other methods; but, it is important to be aware of its limitations and account for them when reporting results. PMID:19132770

  5. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging in persistent hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Mourand, Isabelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Carra-Dallière, Clarisse; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Roubertie, Agathe; Bonafé, Alain; Thouvenot, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare type of migraine that has an aura characterized by the presence of motor weakness, which may occasionally last up to several days, and then resolve without sequela. Pathogenesis of migraine remains unclear and, recently, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) has provided a non-invasive method to study hemodynamic changes during acute attacks. Two female patients were admitted in our hospital suffering from prolonged hemiparesis. In both cases, they underwent MRI examination using a 1.5 T magnet including axial diffusion-weighted and perfusion sequences. From each perfusion MRI acquisition two regions of interest were delineated on each hemisphere and, the index of flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and time to peak were recorded and asymmetry indices from each perfusion parameter were calculated. Perfusion alterations were detected during the attacks. In one case, we observed, after 3 h of left hemiparesia, hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere. In the other case, who presented a familial hemiplegic migraine attack, on the third day of a persistent aura consisting of right hemiplegia and aphasia, PWI revealed hyperperfusion of the left hemisphere. Asymmetry indices for temporal parameters (mean transit time and time to peak) were the most sensitive. These findings resolved spontaneously after the attacks without any permanent sequel or signs of cerebral ischemia on follow-up MRI. PWI should be indicated for patients with migraine attacks accompanied by auras to assess the sequential changes in cerebral perfusion and to better understand its pathogenesis.

  6. Quantitative measurement of tissue perfusion and diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Pipe, J G; Williams, D M; Brunberg, J A

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques designed for sensitivity to microscopic motions of water diffusion and blood flow in the capillary network are also exceptionally sensitive to bulk motion properties of the tissue, which may lead to contrast artifact and large quantitative errors. The magnitude of bulk motion error that exists in human brain perfusion/diffusion imaging and the inability of cardiac gating to adequately control this motion are demonstrated by direct measurement of phase stability of voxels localized in the brain. Two methods are introduced to reduce bulk motion phase error. The first, a postprocessing phase correction algorithm, reduces coarse phase error but is inadequate by itself for quantitative perfusion/diffusion MRI. The second method employs orthogonal slice selection gradients to define a column of tissue in the object, from which echoes may be combined in a phase-insensitive manner to measure more reliably the targeted signal attenuation. Applying this acquisition technique and a simplistic model of perfusion and diffusion signal attenuations yields an estimated perfusion fraction of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and diffusion coefficient of 1.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-5) cm2/s in the white matter of one normal volunteer. Successful separation of perfusion and diffusion effects by this technique is supported in a dynamic study of calf muscle. Periods of normal blood flow, low flow, and reactive hyperemia are clearly distinguished in the quantitative perfusion results, whereas measured diffusion remained nearly constant.

  7. Chemosaturation Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Arndt; Gupta, Sanjay; Zeile, Martin; von Haken, Rebecca; Brüning, Roland; Lotz, Gösta; Vahrmeijer, Alexander; Vogl, Thomas; Wacker, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The Hepatic CHEMOSAT(®) Delivery System is an innovative medical device for the treatment of patients with unresectable primary liver tumors or unresectable hepatic metastases from solid organ malignancies. This system is used to perform chemosaturation percutaneous hepatic perfusion (CS-PHP), a procedure in which a high dose of the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan is delivered directly to the liver while limiting systemic exposure. In a clinical trial program, CS-PHP with melphalan significantly improved hepatic progression-free survival in patients with unresectable hepatic metastases from ocular or cutaneous melanoma. Clinically meaningful hepatic responses were also observed in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors. Furthermore, the results of published studies and case reports demonstrated that CS-PHP with melphalan resulted in favorable tumor response rates in a range of tumor histologies (ocular or cutaneous melanoma, colorectal cancer, and hepatobiliary tumors). Analyses of the safety profile of CS-PHP revealed that the most common adverse effects were hematologic events (thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia), which were clinically manageable. Taken together, these findings indicate that CS-PHP is a promising locoregional therapy for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors and has a acceptable safety profile.

  8. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  9. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  10. In vitro perfused human capillary networks.

    PubMed

    Moya, Monica L; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Abraham P; Hughes, Christopher C W; George, Steven C

    2013-09-01

    Replicating in vitro the complex in vivo tissue microenvironment has the potential to transform our approach to medicine and also our understanding of biology. In order to accurately model the 3D arrangement and interaction of cells and extracellular matrix, new microphysiological systems must include a vascular supply. The vasculature not only provides the necessary convective transport of oxygen, nutrients, and waste in 3D culture, but also couples and integrates the responses of organ systems. Here we combine tissue engineering and microfluidic technology to create an in vitro 3D metabolically active stroma (∼1 mm(3)) that, for the first time, contains a perfused, living, dynamic, interconnected human capillary network. The range of flow rate (μm/s) and shear rate (s(-1)) within the network was 0-4000 and 0-1000, respectively, and thus included the normal physiological range. Infusion of FITC dextran demonstrated microvessels (15-50 μm) to be largely impermeable to 70 kDa. Our high-throughput biology-directed platform has the potential to impact a broad range of fields that intersect with the microcirculation, including tumor metastasis, drug discovery, vascular disease, and environmental chemical toxicity.