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Sample records for deeply supercooled confined

  1. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  2. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, F.; Corsaro, C.; Broccio, M.; Branca, C.; González-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Chen, S.-H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift δ, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because δ is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat CP(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of CP(T) in the range 290–370 K. We find that −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P displays a pronounced maximum upon crossing the locus of maximum correlation length at ≈240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water, which predicts that CP(T) displays a maximum on crossing the Widom line. PMID:18753633

  3. Transport properties of supercooled confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, F.; Branca, C.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Gonzalez-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Stanley, H. E.; Chen, S.-H.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nanometer-scale environments. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70 K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  4. Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Alexander L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-02-26

    In spite of its simple chemical structure, water remains one of the most puzzling liquids with many anomalies at low temperatures. Combining neutron scattering and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, we show that quantum fluctuations are not negligible in deeply supercooled water. Our dielectric measurements reveal the anomalously weak temperature dependence of structural relaxation in vapor-deposited water close to the glass transition temperature Tg~136K. We demonstrate that this anomalous behavior can be explained well by quantum effects. In conclusion, these results have significant implications for our understanding of water dynamics.

  5. Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, Alexander L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-02-26

    In spite of its simple chemical structure, water remains one of the most puzzling liquids with many anomalies at low temperatures. Combining neutron scattering and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, we show that quantum fluctuations are not negligible in deeply supercooled water. Our dielectric measurements reveal the anomalously weak temperature dependence of structural relaxation in vapor-deposited water close to the glass transition temperature Tg~136K. We demonstrate that this anomalous behavior can be explained well by quantum effects. In conclusion, these results have significant implications for our understanding of water dynamics.

  6. More accurate X-ray scattering data of deeply supercooled bulk liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Neuefeind, Joerg C; Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Paschek, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Deeply supercooled water droplets held container-less in an acoustic levitator are investigated with high energy X-ray scattering. The temperature dependence X-ray structure function is found to be non-linear. Comparison with two popular computer models reveals that structural changes are predicted too abrupt by the TIP5P model, while the rate of change predicted by TIP4P is in much better agreement with experiment. The abrupt structural changes predicted by the TIP5P model to occur in the temperature range between 260-240K as water approaches the homogeneous nucleation limit are unrealistic. Both models underestimate the distance between neighbouring oxygen atoms and overestimate the sharpness of the OO distance distribution, indicating that the strength of the H-bond is overestimated in these models.

  7. Evidence of the existence of the low-density liquid phase in supercooled, confined water

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Majolino, Domenico; Venuti, Valentina; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2007-01-01

    By confining water in a nanoporous structure so narrow that the liquid could not freeze, it is possible to study properties of this previously undescribed system well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature TH = 231 K. Using this trick, we were able to study, by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrational spectra (HOH bending and OH-stretching modes) of deeply supercooled water in the temperature range 183 < T < 273 K. We observed, upon decreasing temperature, the building up of a new population of hydrogen-bonded oscillators centered around 3,120 cm−1, the contribution of which progressively dominates the spectra as one enters into the deeply supercooled regime. We determined that the fractional weight of this spectral component reaches 50% just at the temperature, TL ≈ 225 K, where the confined water shows a fragile-to-strong dynamic cross-over phenomenon [Ito, K., Moynihan, C. T., Angell, C. A. (1999) Nature 398:492–494]. Furthermore, the fact that the corresponding OH stretching spectral peak position of the low-density-amorphous solid water occurs exactly at 3,120 cm−1 [Sivakumar, T. C., Rice, S. A., Sceats, M. G. (1978) J. Chem. Phys. 69:3468–3476.] strongly suggests that these oscillators originate from existence of the low-density-liquid phase derived from the occurrence of the first-order liquid–liquid (LL) phase transition and the associated LL critical point in supercooled water proposed earlier by a computer molecular dynamics simulation [Poole, P. H., Sciortino, F., Essmann, U., Stanley, H. E. (1992) Nature 360:324–328]. PMID:17192402

  8. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  9. Using nanoscale amorphous solid water films to create and study deeply supercooled liquid water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bruce

    Molecular beam vapor deposition of water on cryogenic substrates is known to produce amorphous solid films. When heated above their glass transition these films transform into deeply supercooled liquid water. These nanoscale liquid films can be used to study kinetic processes such as diffusion, isotope exchange, crystallization, and solvent mediated reactions in unprecedented detail. This talk will highlight our recent advances in this area. My colleagues Yuntao Xu, Chunqing Yuan, Collin Dibble, R. Scott Smith, Nick Petrik, and Greg Kimmel made important contributions to this work.This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle, operated for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  10. Dynamic mechanical analysis of supercooled water in nanoporous confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soprunyuk, Viktor; Schranz, Wilfried; Huber, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical mechanical analysis (\\text{DMA})(f=0.2\\text{--}100 \\text{Hz}) is used to study the dynamics of confined water in mesoporous Gelsil (2.6 nm and 5 nm pores) and Vycor (10 nm) in the temperature range from T=80 \\text{K} to 300 K. Confining water into nanopores partly suppresses crystallization and allows us to perform measurements of supercooled water below 235 K, i.e., in water's so-called “no man's land”, in parts of the pores. Two distinct relaxation peaks are observed in tan δ around T1 ≈ 145 \\text{K} (P1) and T2 ≈ 205 \\text{K}~(P2) for Gelsil 2.6 nm and Gelsil 5 nm at 0.2 Hz. Both peaks shift to higher T with increasing pore size d and change with f in a systematic way, typical of an Arrhenius behaviour of the corresponding relaxation times. For P 1 we obtain an average activation energy of E\\text{a} = 0.47 \\text{eV} , in good agreement with literature values, suggesting that P 1 corresponds to the glass transition of supercooled water. The observation of a pronounced softening of the Young's modulus around 165 K (for Gelsil 2.6 nm at 0.2 Hz) supports the conjecture of a glass-to-liquid transition in the vicinity of P 1. In addition we find a clear-cut (1/d)-dependence of the calculated glass transition temperatures which extrapolates to T_\\text{g}(1/d=0)=136 \\text{K} , in agreement with the traditional value of water.

  11. High-frequency propagating density fluctuations in deeply supercooled water: evidence of a single viscous relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, F; Gapiński, J; Pochylski, M; Ponterio, R C; Saija, F; Salvato, G; Vasi, C

    2013-02-01

    We performed a Brillouin scattering experiment on deeply supercooled water and compared the results with similar literature data obtained both at the same and at higher values of the exchanged wave vector. The whole set of available experimental data can be well reproduced with the use of the generalized hydrodynamic model where all the involved thermodynamic parameters are fixed to their literature values. On the contrary, the model based on the memory function approach generates the wrong estimates for measurables when the same values of the thermodynamic parameters are used. This result confirms our recent criticisms against the utilization of models originating from linear response theory [Phys. Rev. E 84, 051202 (2011)]. The inconsistency between models explains apparent discrepancies between the different conclusions on water acoustic behavior which may be found in the literature. We demonstrate that the observed behavior can be explained by assuming only a single relaxation process that is typical of any viscoelastic system. With all thermodynamics quantities fixed, the hydrodynamic description needs only two parameters to model the experimental data, namely, the relaxation time and the high-frequency limit of the sound velocity. The whole body of the experimental data can be well reproduced when the relaxation time behaves in an Arrhenian manner and the difference between the relaxed and not relaxed sound velocities is a constant. The high-frequency sound velocity is never higher than 2200 m/s. We conclude that, at least from experiments performed within the hydrodynamic regime, there is no indication for a fast sound close to the hypersonic velocity observed in ice.

  12. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-09-29

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  13. Volume crossover in deeply supercooled water adiabatically freezing under isobaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V; Pochylski, Mikolaj; Ponterio, Rosina C; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Vasi, Cirino

    2013-05-14

    The irreversible return of a supercooled liquid to stable thermodynamic equilibrium often begins as a fast process which adiabatically drives the system to solid-liquid coexistence. Only at a later stage will solidification proceed with the expected exchange of thermal energy with the external bath. In this paper we discuss some aspects of the adiabatic freezing of metastable water at constant pressure. In particular, we investigated the thermal behavior of the isobaric gap between the molar volume of supercooled water and that of the warmer ice-water mixture which eventually forms at equilibrium. The available experimental data at ambient pressure, extrapolated into the metastable region within the scheme provided by the reference IAPWS-95 formulation, show that water ordinarily expands upon (partially) freezing under isenthalpic conditions. However, the same scheme also suggests that, for increasing undercoolings, the volume gap is gradually reduced and eventually vanishes at a temperature close to the currently estimated homogeneous ice nucleation temperature. This behavior is contrasted with that of substances which do not display a volumetric anomaly. The effect of increasing pressures on the alleged volume crossover from an expanded to a contracted ice-water mixture is also discussed.

  14. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes–Einstein and Stokes–Einstein–Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes–Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  15. Structure and dynamics of supercooled water in neutral confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klameth, F.; Vogel, M.

    2013-04-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in neutral nanopores, which are generated by pinning a suitable subset of water molecules in an equilibrium configuration of a bulk system. It is found that such neutral confinement does not disturb the structure of water, in particular, the local tetrahedral order, while it imposes a pronounced spatial inhomogeneity on the dynamics of water. Specifically, when the pore wall is approached, hopping motion sets in and water dynamics slows down. We show that the logarithm of the correlation time is an exponential function of the distance to the wall, indicating a tremendous gradient of water mobility across the confinement. Upon cooling, the length scale associated with this exponential distance dependence and, thus, the range of the wall effect increases, at least down to the critical temperature of mode coupling theory, Tc. Also, the temperature dependence of water dynamics varies across the pore, i.e., fragility is high in the pore center, while it is low near the pore wall. Due to all these effects, time-temperature superposition is violated. Our observations for a neutral confinement reveal that specific interactions at hydrophilic or hydrophobic walls are not the main cause of spatially inhomogeneous dynamics of confined water. In view of similarities with the behavior of Lennard-Jones liquids in neutral confinements, one may rather speculate that the effects observed for confined water are general and result from the existence of a static contribution to the energy landscape, which is imprinted by an immobile environment.

  16. Communication: Local structure-mobility relationships of confined fluids reverse upon supercooling.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Jonathan A; Jain, Avni; Carmer, James; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-04-28

    We examine the structural and dynamic properties of confined binary hard-sphere mixtures designed to mimic realizable colloidal thin films. Using computer simulations, governed by either Newtonian or overdamped Langevin dynamics, together with other techniques including a Fokker-Planck equation-based method, we measure the position-dependent and average diffusivities of particles along structurally isotropic and inhomogeneous dimensions of the fluids. At moderate packing fractions, local single-particle diffusivities normal to the direction of confinement are higher in regions of high total packing fraction; however, these trends are reversed as the film is supercooled at denser average packings. Auxiliary short-time measurements of particle displacements mirror data obtained for experimental supercooled colloidal systems. We find that average dynamics can be approximately predicted based on the distribution of available space for particle insertion across orders of magnitude in diffusivity regardless of the governing microscopic dynamics.

  17. Communication: Local structure-mobility relationships of confined fluids reverse upon supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Jain, Avni; Carmer, James; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2015-04-01

    We examine the structural and dynamic properties of confined binary hard-sphere mixtures designed to mimic realizable colloidal thin films. Using computer simulations, governed by either Newtonian or overdamped Langevin dynamics, together with other techniques including a Fokker-Planck equation-based method, we measure the position-dependent and average diffusivities of particles along structurally isotropic and inhomogeneous dimensions of the fluids. At moderate packing fractions, local single-particle diffusivities normal to the direction of confinement are higher in regions of high total packing fraction; however, these trends are reversed as the film is supercooled at denser average packings. Auxiliary short-time measurements of particle displacements mirror data obtained for experimental supercooled colloidal systems. We find that average dynamics can be approximately predicted based on the distribution of available space for particle insertion across orders of magnitude in diffusivity regardless of the governing microscopic dynamics.

  18. Communication: Local structure-mobility relationships of confined fluids reverse upon supercooling.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Jonathan A; Jain, Avni; Carmer, James; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-04-28

    We examine the structural and dynamic properties of confined binary hard-sphere mixtures designed to mimic realizable colloidal thin films. Using computer simulations, governed by either Newtonian or overdamped Langevin dynamics, together with other techniques including a Fokker-Planck equation-based method, we measure the position-dependent and average diffusivities of particles along structurally isotropic and inhomogeneous dimensions of the fluids. At moderate packing fractions, local single-particle diffusivities normal to the direction of confinement are higher in regions of high total packing fraction; however, these trends are reversed as the film is supercooled at denser average packings. Auxiliary short-time measurements of particle displacements mirror data obtained for experimental supercooled colloidal systems. We find that average dynamics can be approximately predicted based on the distribution of available space for particle insertion across orders of magnitude in diffusivity regardless of the governing microscopic dynamics. PMID:25933745

  19. On the behaviour of supercooled liquids and polymers in nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soprunyuk, V.; Reinecker, M.; Schranz, W.

    2016-08-01

    Size effects play an important role in structural phase transitions, melting transitions, in martensitic materials, glass transitions, etc. Very often the question arises, whether a measured size effect originates from the geometrical confinement itself, or if it appears due to the interaction with the limiting surface. Using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) technique we have studied various microphase segregated polymers, molecular glass forming liquids and supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica as well as in biological tissues. Here we show on some selected examples that DMA measurements can be used to study relaxation processes in detail and to disentangle in favourable cases pure pore size effects from effects that are induced by the confining surface.

  20. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    Water’s behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub p}) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated α{sub p} peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  1. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  2. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed thatmore » the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.« less

  3. Interaction of water with LiCl, LiBr, and LiI in the deeply supercooled region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2007-12-01

    The hydration mechanism of lithium halides was studied using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature. The lithium halides embedded in thin films of amorphous solid water segregate to the surface at temperatures higher than 135-140K, with efficiency increasing in the order of LiCl, LiBr, and LiI. A monolayer of LiCl and LiI adsorbed on the surface of amorphous solid water tends to diffuse into the bulk at 160K. The infrared absorption band revealed that the aqueous lithium-halide solutions and crystals are formed simultaneously at 160K; these phenomena are explicable as a consequence of the evolution of supercooled liquid water. The strong surfactant effect is inferred to arise from hydration of a contact ion pair having hydrophilic (lithium) and hydrophobic (halide) moieties. Furthermore, bulk diffusion of lithium halides might result from the formation of a solvent-separated ion pair in supercooled liquid water. The presence of two liquid phases of water with different local structures is probably responsible for the formation of these two hydrates, consistent with the calculated result reported by Jungwirth and Tobias[J. Phys. Chem. B 106, 6361 (2002)].

  4. Deeply-cooled water under strong confinement: neutron scattering investigations and the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Christopher E; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-01-21

    We present an overview of recent experimental investigations into the properties of strongly-confined water below the bulk freezing temperature. Under strong confinement, the crystallization of water is completely suppressed and the behavior of the confined liquid state can be measured at temperatures and pressures that are inaccessible to the bulk liquid. We focus on two phenomena that have recently been discovered in strongly confined water: the density minimum and the fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover. All experimental results seem to indicate that confined water undergoes a unique kind of transition below the bulk homogeneous nucleation limit. Much of the recent work on deeply-cooled water under strong confinement has been motivated by the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) hypothesis. We discuss this hypothesis in the context of the various experimental findings. PMID:23184078

  5. Melting Kinetics of Confined Systems at the Nanoscale: Superheating and Supercooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I. D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C. W.; Liao, C. Y.; Glaeser, A. M.; Chrzan, D. C.; Haller, E. E.; Yi, D. O.; Minor, A. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Ager, J. W. III; Ridgway, M. C.; Kluth, P.

    2007-04-10

    In situ electron diffraction measurements of silica-embedded Ge nanocrystals reveal a melting/solidification hysteresis of 470 K which is approximately symmetric about the bulk melting point. This surprising behavior, which is thought to be impossible in bulk systems, is well described by a simple, classical thermodynamic model. Surface pre-melting, which occurs for materials with free surfaces, is suppressed by the presence of the host matrix, thereby allowing both kinetic supercooling and kinetic superheating of the embedded nanocrystals.

  6. Breaking through the glass ceiling: The correlation between the self-diffusivity in and krypton permeation through deeply supercooled liquid nanoscale methanol films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures (100-115 K) near the glass transition temperature, Tg (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH3OH and CD3OH, are deposited on top of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above Tg. The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare-gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  7. Breaking through the Glass Ceiling: The Correlation Between the Self-Diffusivity in and Krypton Permeation through Deeply Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Methanol Films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-03-28

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures near (100-115 K) the glass transition temperature, Tg (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH3OH and CD3OH, are deposited ontop of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above Tg. The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  8. Breaking through the glass ceiling: the correlation between the self-diffusivity in and krypton permeation through deeply supercooled liquid nanoscale methanol films.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D

    2010-03-28

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures (100-115 K) near the glass transition temperature, T(g) (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH(3)OH and CD(3)OH, are deposited on top of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above T(g). The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare-gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  9. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally,more » the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.« less

  10. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally, the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled NaCl solution confined in porous cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang; Li, Kefei; Fen-Chong, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Clarifying the nucleation process of chloride-based deicing salt solution (e.g., NaCl solution) confined in cement-based porous materials remains an important issue to understand its detrimental effects on material substrates. In this study, the pore structures of hardened cement pastes were characterized by mercury-intrusion and nitrogen-sorption porosimetry. The ice nucleation temperature of NaCl solution of different concentrations confined in the hardened cement pastes was measured and analyzed by classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. The kinetic factor, contact-angle factor including the contact angle between ice and the substrate were evaluated. The results revealed that the contact angle between ice and the substrate showed the minimum value when adding 3% NaCl into water. The heterogeneous ice nucleation rates were found to be proportional to the water activity shifts.

  12. The Dynamics of Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    We present an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nano-meter-scale environments (nano-tubes and the protein hydration water) and in bulk solutions. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. In particular We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  13. Supercooled Water in Supramolecular Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, R. A.

    The suppression of water crystallization with appreciable water supercooling is challenging due to its large enthalpy of fusion. A common theme to supercool water is to confine the water in the pores of microporous/mesoporous solids where mechanical confinement prevents water crystallization. Nature takes a different approach with crystallization suppression through a combination of preferential adsorption on ice nuclei and confinement between hydrophobic residues using organic components only. Here, we demonstrate that mechanically robust confinement within a hard material is not necessary to significantly supercool water. In this case, a supramolecular hydrogel, based on a random amphiphilic copolymer, is used to provide soft confinement of water between the hydrophobic aggregates with an interdomain spacing <8 nm. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides insight into the structural evolution of the supramolecular structure of the hydrogel on supercooling. The structural changes are sensitive to the composition of the copolymer as determined by contrast variation SANS. Similarly, the dynamics of both the copolymer and water are probed using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Using QENS, a highly mobile water phase (tau ~23 ps) is identified to be present even when slowly cooling to as low as 220K.

  14. Do supercooled liquids freeze by spinodal decomposition?

    PubMed

    Bartell, Lawrence S; Wu, David T

    2007-11-01

    Two questions are addressed in this paper: Is it likely that spinodals occur in the freezing of one-component liquids at degrees of supercooling as moderate as T/T melt=0.6, and are the ramified solidlike structural fluctuations seen in simulations of supercooled liquids the tell-tale harbingers of spinodal decomposition? It has been suggested in several papers that in the freezing of argonlike systems, a spinodal can be expected to be encountered at T/T melt of approximately 0.6 or even at a shallower degree of supercooling. Heuristic evidence, particularly that found in molecular dynamics simulations in the system of selenium hexafluoride, a substance with properties similar in several respects to those of argon, suggests that a spinodal does not occur at supercoolings even considerably deeper than T/T melt=0.6. Reinforcing this conclusion are arguments based on nucleation kinetics in the Appendix. It has been found that many of the very thin, ramified solidlike fluctuations encountered in simulations of deeply supercooled liquids do not, in themselves, qualify as true nuclei for freezing but do, nevertheless, significantly influence the properties of the liquids. They contribute to the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation universally found in supercooled liquids, liquids which have not been seen to exhibit a spinodal. Although such ramified fluctuations have been postulated to be precursors of spinodal decomposition, that role has not yet been confirmed. PMID:17994827

  15. Evidence of the existence of the high-density and low-density phases in deeply-cooled confined heavy water under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Harriger, Leland; Leão, Juscelino B.

    2014-07-07

    The average density of D{sub 2}O confined in a nanoporous silica matrix (MCM-41-S) is studied with neutron scattering. We find that below ∼210 K, the pressure-temperature plane of the system can be divided into two regions. The average density of the confined D{sub 2}O in the higher-pressure region is about 16% larger than that in the lower-pressure region. These two regions could represent the so-called “low-density liquid” and “high-density liquid” phases. The dividing line of these two regions, which could represent the associated 1st order liquid-liquid transition line, is also determined.

  16. Dynamic crossover in deeply cooled water confined in MCM-41 at 4 kbar and its relation to the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Le, Peisi; Ito, Kanae; Leão, Juscelino B.; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-09-01

    With quasi-elastic neutron scattering, we study the single-particle dynamics of the water confined in a hydrophilic silica material, MCM-41, at 4 kbar. A dynamic crossover phenomenon is observed at 219 K. We compare this dynamic crossover with the one observed at ambient pressure and find that (a) above the crossover temperature, the temperature dependence of the characteristic relaxation time at ambient pressure exhibits a more evident super-Arrhenius behavior than that at 4 kbar. Especially, at temperatures below about 230 K, the relaxation time at 4 kbar is even smaller than that at ambient pressure. This feature is different from many other liquids. (b) Below the crossover temperature, the Arrhenius behavior found at ambient pressure has a larger activation energy compared to the one found at 4 kbar. We ascribe the former to the difference between the local structure of the low-density liquid (LDL) phase and that of the high-density liquid (HDL) phase, and the latter to the difference between the strength of the hydrogen bond of the LDL and that of the HDL. Therefore, we conclude that the phenomena observed in this paper are consistent with the LDL-to-HDL liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  17. Dynamic crossover in deeply cooled water confined in MCM-41 at 4 kbar and its relation to the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Le, Peisi; Ito, Kanae; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Leão, Juscelino B.; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2015-09-21

    With quasi-elastic neutron scattering, we study the single-particle dynamics of the water confined in a hydrophilic silica material, MCM-41, at 4 kbar. A dynamic crossover phenomenon is observed at 219 K. We compare this dynamic crossover with the one observed at ambient pressure and find that (a) above the crossover temperature, the temperature dependence of the characteristic relaxation time at ambient pressure exhibits a more evident super-Arrhenius behavior than that at 4 kbar. Especially, at temperatures below about 230 K, the relaxation time at 4 kbar is even smaller than that at ambient pressure. This feature is different from many other liquids. (b) Below the crossover temperature, the Arrhenius behavior found at ambient pressure has a larger activation energy compared to the one found at 4 kbar. We ascribe the former to the difference between the local structure of the low-density liquid (LDL) phase and that of the high-density liquid (HDL) phase, and the latter to the difference between the strength of the hydrogen bond of the LDL and that of the HDL. Therefore, we conclude that the phenomena observed in this paper are consistent with the LDL-to-HDL liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  18. The Ultimate Fate of Supercooled Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years it has become widely accepted that a dynamical length scale ξα plays an important role in supercooled liquids near the glass transition. We examine the implications of the interplay between the growing ξα and the size of the crystal nucleus, ξM, which shrinks on cooling. We argue that at low temperatures where ξα > ξM a new crystallization mechanism emerges enabling rapid development of a large scale web of sparsely connected crystallinity. Though we predict this web percolates the system at too low a temperature to be easily seen in the laboratory, there are noticeable residual effects near the glass transition that can account for several previously observed unexplained phenomena of deeply supercooled liquids including Fischer clusters, and anomalous crystal growth near Tg. PMID:21171637

  19. Supercooling Water: A Simple Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Ira W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a technique for the supercooling of water, for use in the science classroom, involving adding common salt to a mixture of ice and water. Several investigations are included for use during (and after) the process of supercooling. (DS)

  20. Preventing Supercooling Of Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massucco, Arthur A.; Wenghoefer, Hans M.; Wilkins, Ronnie

    1994-01-01

    Principle of heterogeneous nucleation exploited to prevent gallium from supercooling, enabling its use as heat-storage material that crystallizes reproducibly at its freezing or melting temperature of 29 to 30 degrees C. In original intended application, gallium used as heat-storage material in gloves of space suits. Terrestrial application lies in preparation of freezing-temperature reference samples for laboratories. Principle of heterogeneous nucleation also exploited similarly in heat pipes filled with sodium.

  1. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  2. Different behavior of water in confined solutions of high and low solute concentrations.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Khalid; Jansson, Helén; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Swenson, Jan

    2013-11-14

    Water-glycerol solutions confined in 21 Å pores of the silica matrix MCM-41 C10 have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). The results suggest a micro-phase separation caused by the confinement. Likely the water molecules coordinate to the hydroxyl surface groups of the pores, leaving most of the glycerol molecules in the centre of the pores. This makes the dynamics of glycerol almost concentration independent up to water concentrations of about 85 wt%. However, at higher water concentrations no substantial clustering of glycerol molecules should occur and the glass transition related dynamics exhibit an anomalous behaviour. Instead of a common plasticization effect of water, as for the corresponding bulk solutions (when no ice is formed), it is evident that water acts as an anti-plasticizer in the confinement at high water concentrations. We propose that the increased water concentration slows down the glass transition related dynamics in the deeply supercooled regime due to that a rigid hydrogen bonded network structure of water molecules is formed at low temperatures and low glycerol concentrations. This is in contrast to the situation in a homogenously mixed bulk solution of a high solute concentration where the water molecules will be less hydrogen bonded, and therefore are typically more mobile than the surrounding solute molecules. An almost complete hydrogen bonded network of water molecules may, even in confinements, be sufficiently rigid to slow down the relaxation of embedded solute molecules. It can also be expressed the other way around, i.e. small amounts of glycerol act as a plasticizer for water, due to its breaking up of the nearly tetrahedral network structure. From the here observed concentration dependent behaviour of the deeply supercooled bulk and confined solutions it seems, furthermore, evident that the Tg value of bulk water cannot be estimated from extrapolations of aqueous

  3. Supercooling Water in Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. J. Milón; Braga, S. L.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to investigate the supercooling phenomenon of water inside cylindrical capsules used for a cold storage process. The coolant is a water-alcohol mixture controlled by a constant temperature bath (CTB). Temperatures varying with time are measured inside and outside the capsule. Cylinders with an internal diameter and thickness of 45 and 1.5 mm, respectively, were made from four different materials: acrylic, PVC, brass, and aluminum. The supercooling period of the water and the nucleation temperature were investigated for different coolant temperatures. The supercooling and nucleation probabilities are shown as a function of the coolant temperature for the four different materials.

  4. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  5. Supercooled water escaping from metastability

    PubMed Central

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Ponterio, Rosina C.; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Salvato, Gabriele; Vasi, Cirino

    2014-01-01

    The return of supercooled water to a stable equilibrium condition is an irreversible process which, in large enough samples, takes place adiabatically. We investigated this phenomenon in water by fast imaging techniques. As water freezes, large energy and density fluctuations promote the spatial coexistence of solid and liquid phases at different temperatures. Upon synchronously monitoring the time evolution of the local temperature, we observed a sharp dynamic transition between a fast and a slow decay regime at about 266.6 K. We construe the observed phenomenon in terms of the temperature dependence of heat transfers from solid and liquid volumes already at their bulk coexistence temperature towards adjacent still supercooled liquid regions. These findings can be justified by observing that convective motions induced by thermal gradients in a supercooled liquid near coexistence are rapidly suppressed as the nucleated solid fraction overcomes, at low enough temperatures, a characteristic percolation threshold. PMID:25427603

  6. Structure of supercooled liquid silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, S.; Krishnan, S.; Felten, J. J.; Price, D. L.; Materials Science Division; Containerless Research Inc.

    1998-01-01

    We report x-ray diffraction measurements of the structure factor S(Q) and the radial distribution function g(r) of levitated liquid silicon in the stable and supercooled states. Supercooling results in a sharpening of the first peak in S(Q) and shift to an 8% higher Q value, the appearance of a double shoulder on the high-r side of the first peak in g(r), a sharpening of the first peak in g(r) and a decrease in coordination number. These changes are consistent with a significantly enhanced degree of covalent bonding.

  7. First-order transition in confined water between high-density liquid and low-density amorphous phases.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Tanaka, H; Zeng, X C

    2000-11-30

    Supercooled water and amorphous ice have a rich metastable phase behaviour. In addition to transitions between high- and low-density amorphous solids, and between high- and low-density liquids, a fragile-to-strong liquid transition has recently been proposed, and supported by evidence from the behaviour of deeply supercooled bilayer water confined in hydrophilic slit pores. Here we report evidence from molecular dynamics simulations for another type of first-order phase transition--a liquid-to-bilayer amorphous transition--above the freezing temperature of bulk water at atmospheric pressure. This transition occurs only when water is confined in a hydrophobic slit pore with a width of less than one nanometre. On cooling, the confined water, which has an imperfect random hydrogen-bonded network, transforms into a bilayer amorphous phase with a perfect network (owing to the formation of various hydrogen-bonded polygons) but no long-range order. The transition shares some characteristics with those observed in tetrahedrally coordinated substances such as liquid silicon, liquid carbon and liquid phosphorus. PMID:11117739

  8. Glass formation and thermodynamics of supercooled monatomic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vo Van; Odagaki, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Atomic mechanism of glass formation of a supercooled simple monatomic liquid with Lennard-Jones-Gauss (LJG) interatomic potential is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Supercooled and glassy states are obtained by cooling from the melt. Glassy state obtained at low temperatures is annealed for very long time, on the order of microsecond, and we find that glassy state remains unchanged and that the long-lived glassy state of a simple monatomic system in three dimensions is realized. We analyze the spatiotemporal properties of solid-like and liquid-like atoms that are defined by the Lindemann-like freezing criterion. The number of solid-like atoms, distributed throughout the liquid, increases with decreasing temperature toward glass transition and they form clusters. In the deeply supercooled region, almost all solid-like atoms form a single percolation cluster and its characteristic size increases sharply on further cooling. Glass formation in supercooled liquid occurs when a single percolation cluster of solid-like atoms involves a majority of atoms to form a relatively rigid solid phase. We also obtain several physical quantities of the system, including temperature dependence of mass density, Lindemann ratio, incoherent intermediate scattering function, α-relaxation time, evolution of radial distribution function, and local bond-pair orders detected by Honeycutt-Andersen analysis. We identify three characteristic temperatures related to the vitrification: a temperature at which crossover from liquid-like to solid-like dynamics occurs on cooling, the glass transition temperature, and the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann temperature. Behavior of liquid-like atoms in glassy state has been analyzed and discussed. PMID:21553835

  9. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  10. The supercooling ability of ticks (Acari, Ixodoidea).

    PubMed

    Dautel, H; Knülle, W

    1996-01-01

    The supercooling capacity of nine laboratory-held species of ticks originating from different geographical areas, as well as five field-collected species from Germany, was investigated. All but one tick species showed mean supercooling points between about -17 and -23 degrees C, suggesting that the capacity to supercool to temperatures of < or = -17 degrees C might be an inherent property of many tick species unrelated to their geographic origin. Photoperiod did not influence the mean supercooling point in any of the species and there was also no distinct seasonal pattern of supercooling in seasonally acclimatized Dermacentor marginatus. Thus, the supercooling ability was independent of the presence/absence of diapause. The finding of thermal hysteresis in D. marginatus hemolymph raises the question of whether or not anti-freeze proteins are involved in the supercooling capacity of that species. An interspecies comparison revealed a weak negative correlation between relative water content and supercooling point of the ticks and an even weaker correlation between body mass or body water mass and the supercooling point. Since the ticks exhibited low supercooling points both before and shortly after feeding, the blood used as food should lack potent ice nucleators.

  11. Crystallization of supercooled solutions. [atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, John

    1988-01-01

    Crystallization of uniformly supercooled solutions (Na2SO4, NaCl, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl) was studied. It is shown how crystal growth velocity and habit depend on solution and concentration. The segregation coefficient for the solute in ice is measured by analysis of ice and solution, separated immediately after initial freezing, at different supercoolings. Subsequent solidification gives ion rejection at a varying rate depending on the geometry of the freezing, and may result in separation of hydrates, particularly when the initial concentration is high, as in haze (inactivated) droplets and low temperatures found in the Antarctic stratosphere. Electrical effects associated with rapid freezing are also investigated. Results suggest that more extensive measurements need to be made in solutions at different supercoolings, and that substantial electrical effects may be present for higher concentrations under these conditions. Damage to vegetation could occur under specific conditions as concentrated solutions (possibly H2SO4) are rejected in the freezing of rime or dew.

  12. Differences between solid superheating and liquid supercooling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Li, Mo

    2005-10-15

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors for solid superheating and liquid supercooling were critically examined and compared via molecular-dynamics simulations. It is shown that the large elastic energy associated with internal melting and solid-liquid interface disorder play important roles in superheating. The growth rate is anisotropic for supercooling, but isotropic for superheating. Supercooling can be well described by the classical nucleation theory, whereas superheating shows many exceptions. The underlying mechanisms for these differences are discussed.

  13. Thermal Conductivity in Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan; Anisimov, Mikhail

    2013-03-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37 C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, the ratio of thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothetical liquid-liquid critical point in metastable water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. The data suggest that the thermal conductivity does not show a significant critical enhancement, in contrast to what is observed near the vapor-liquid critical point. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, and shown that indeed this effect would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical enhancements of thermal conductivity in water. We also discuss the discrepancy between the thermal conductivity calculated from experimental data and that obtained by computer simulations of the TIP5P water-like model. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund Grant No. 52666-ND6

  14. In-situ High-energy X-ray Diffraction Study of the Local Structure of Supercooled Liquid Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Kim, T. H.; Sieve, B.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, D. S.; Kelton, K. F.; Goldman, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    While changes in the coordination number for liquid silicon upon supercooling, signaling an underlying liquid-liquid phase transition, have been predicted, x-ray and neutron measurements have produced conflicting reports. In particular some studies have found an increase in the first shell coordination as temperature decreases in the supercooled regime, while others have reported increases in the coordination number with decreasing temperature. Employing the technique of electrostatic levitation coupled with high energy x-ray diffraction (125 keV), and rapid data acquisition (100ms collection times) using an area detector, we have obtained high quality structural data more deeply into the supercooled regime than has been possible before. No change in coordination number is observed in this temperature region, calling into question previous experimental claims of structural evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition.

  15. Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass transition

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2011-03-17

    Do liquid mixtures, cooled to temperatures below their freezing point, behave as normal liquids? We address this question using nanoscale films of methanol and ethanol supercooled liquid solutions of varying composition (7 -93% methanol) at temperatures near their glass transition,Tg. The permeation of Kr through these films is used to determine the diffusivities of the supercooled liquid mixtures. We find that the temperature dependent diffusivities of the mixtures are well-fit by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation indicating that the mixtures exhibit fragile behavior at temperatures just above their Tg. Further, for a given temperature, the composition dependent diffusivity is well-fit by a Vignes-type equation, i.e. the diffusivity of any mixture can be predicted using an exponential weighting of the diffusion of the pure methanol and ethanol diffusivities. These results show that deeply supercooled liquid mixtures can be used to provide valuable insight into the properties of normal liquid mixtures.

  16. A mechanism for supercooling in organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, P.E.

    1996-12-31

    In this investigation, a mechanism for supercooling inorganic liquids is formulated. By comparing the melting temperature and spontaneous freezing temperature of the chemicals evaluated with their molecular characteristics, the factors promoting supercooling are developed. The results obtained indicate that the following molecular characteristics promote supercooling in organic liquids: an unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms of a molecule; a three-dimensional chemical structure; a permanent, three-dimensional, and partially charged pocket within the chemical structure; a partially charged projection having a charge opposite that of the pocket and located on the side of the molecule opposite that of the pocket.

  17. In situ High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Local Structure of Supercooled Liquid Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.H.; Lee, G.W.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Kelton, K.F.; Sieve, B.; Robinson, D.S.; Goldman, A.I.; Hyers, R.W.; Rathz, T.J.; Rogers, J.R.

    2005-08-19

    Employing the technique of electrostatic levitation, coupled with high-energy x-ray diffraction and rapid data acquisition methods, we have obtained high quality structural data more deeply into the supercooled regime of liquid silicon than has been possible before. No change in coordination number is observed in this temperature region, calling into question previous experimental claims of structural evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition.

  18. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    been carried out to study the metastable phase formation in an Fe83B17 near eutectic alloy. Initial supercooling measurements using the ISU-ESL identified the formation of three metastable phases: a precipitate phase that shows stable coexistence with the deeply supercooled liquid, and two distinct bulk solidification phases. To identify the structure of the metastable phases, the Washington University Beamline ESL (WU-BESL) has been used to perform in-situ high energy x-ray diffraction measurements of the metastable phases. Based on the x-ray results, the precipitate phase has been identified as bcc-Fe, and the more commonly occurring bulk solidification product has been found to be a two-phase mixture of Fe23B6 plus fcc-Fe, which appears, upon cooling, to transform into a three phase mixture of Fe23B6, bcc-Fe, and an as-yet unidentified phase, with the transformation occurring at approximately the expected fcc-to-bcc transformation temperature of pure Fe. To further characterize the multi-phase metastable alloy, the ISU-ESL has been used to perform measurements of volume thermal expansion via the videographic technique, as well as RF susceptibility via the TDO technique. The results of the thermal expansion and susceptibility data have been found to be sensitive indicators of additional structural changes that may be occurring in the metastable solid at temperatures below 1000 K, and the susceptibility data has revealed that three distinct ferromagnetic phase transitions take place within the multi-phase mixture. Based on these results, it has been hypothesized that there may be an additional transformation taking place that leads to the formation of either bct- or o-Fe3B in addition to the Fe23B6 phase, although further work is required to test this hypothesis.

  19. Structural study of supercooled liquid silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.H.; Goldman, A.I.; Kelton, K.F.

    2007-11-06

    For many years, theoretical studies using model and ab initio potentials have predicated the existence of a liquid/liquid phase transition in silicon, based on a continuous change of the liquid A5 structure to A4. In contrast, we report here a quantitative analysis of data from high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements of containerlessly-processed supercooled liquid silicon that demonstrates that the fractions of regions with A5 and A4 order instead remain essentially constant with supercooling, but that the coherence length of the A5 order increases.

  20. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid.

    PubMed

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport. PMID:27208956

  1. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport.

  2. A study of the occurrence of supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kah-Chye; Ho, Wenxian; Katz, J. I.; Feng, Shi-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Supercooling of water can be easily studied with a simple apparatus suitable for the student laboratory. We describe such an apparatus and its capabilities. The parameters influencing supercooling include the initial water temperature, as well as the type and temperature of the chilling medium. We correlate the occurrence of supercooling with the ability of the chilling medium to promptly nucleate ice; if it nucleates promptly, the layer of ice crystals formed on the boundary will initiate freezing of the bulk water without supercooling. If the chilling medium is unable to nucleate ice promptly, ice nucleation is delayed and the water supercools. Students can study and compare supercooling of distilled and natural water. Even quite dirty river water may be supercooled by as much as 5 °C.

  3. Constriction of subglacial arteries via supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creyts, T.; Clarke, G.

    2003-04-01

    Beneath many glaciers and ice sheets, hydrology modulates basal processes, including sliding and erosion. Recently, the role of glaciohydraulic supercooling was exposed as an important process in the overdeepening near the toe of Matanuska Glacier, Alaska. Further investigations have shown that supercooling beneath wet-based glaciers occurs in other basins. With discharges for these environments exceeding 0.1 m3 s-1 m-1, one would expect high bedload transport in the glaciohydraulic system. However, recent field studies have shown that bedload transport is supply-limited. This limitation is either caused by a lack of clasts at the glacier's sole, by constricted hydraulic arteries that cannot pass larger clasts, or a combination of these hypotheses. The constriction occurs as a result of either supercooled water condensing and plugging the subglacial arteries, ice overburden pressures enhancing the collapse of pathways, or through a blend of these processes. We investigate these constrictions and the corresponding ice condensation using a numerical model of transient water flow up an overdeepened subglacial water system.

  4. Surface crystallization of supercooled water in clouds.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Djikaev, Y S; Reiss, H

    2002-12-10

    The process by which liquid cloud droplets homogeneously crystallize into ice is still not well understood. The ice nucleation process based on the standard and classical theory of homogeneous freezing initiates within the interior volume of a cloud droplet. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice in droplets of supercooled water, both in air and emulsion oil samples, show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 degrees C, the reported volume-based freezing rates of ice in supercooled water vary by as many as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Here, we show that the process of ice nucleus formation at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface may help to explain why experimental results on ice nucleation rates yield different results in different ambient phases. Our results also suggest that surface crystallization of ice in cloud droplets can explain why low amounts of supercooled water have been observed in the atmosphere near -40 degrees C.

  5. Vapor Pressure Measurement of Supercooled Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, N.; Gramada, C. M.

    2003-08-01

    A new dewpoint hygrometer was developed for subfreezing temperature application. Vapor pressure of supercooled water was determined by measuring temperatures at the dew-forming surface and the vapor source ice under the flux density balance, and by application of measured vapor pressure over ice from the Smithsonian Meteorological Table.The measured vapor pressure of supercooled water agreed well with the tables above approximately 20°C, but below that temperature, a significant lowering of the pressure was discovered. An empirical equation to best fit the measured data was obtained. At 30°C, the estimated specific latent heat of condensation became slightly higher than the table value by 3.4%, that of fusion considerably lower by as much as 66%, and the specific heat of supercooled water amounted to as much as 3.7 cal g1 °C1.Possible implications of the new results are pointed out. For example, the latent heat associated with cloud glaciation at temperatures colder than 20°C, and especially colder than 30°C, is found to be less than previously thought.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  7. Specific Heat Anomaly in a Supercooled Liquid with Amorphous Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mártin, Daniel A; Cavagna, Andrea; Grigera, Tomás S

    2015-06-01

    We study the specific heat of a model supercooled liquid confined in a spherical cavity with amorphous boundary conditions. We find the equilibrium specific heat has a cavity-size-dependent peak as a function of temperature. The cavity allows us to perform a finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis, which indicates that the peak persists at a finite temperature in the thermodynamic limit. We attempt to collapse the data onto a FSS curve according to different theoretical scenarios, obtaining reasonable results in two cases: a "not-so-simple" liquid with nonstandard values of the exponents α and ν, and random first-order theory, with two different length scales.

  8. Stabilization of supercooled fluids by thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P W; Leader, J P

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that thermal hysteresis proteins found in many cold-hardy, freeze-avoiding arthropods stabilize their supercooled body fluids. We give evidence that fish antifreeze proteins, which also produce thermal hysteresis, bind to and reduce the efficiency of heterogenous nucleation sites, rather than binding to embryonic ice nuclei. We discuss both possible mechanisms for stabilization of supercooled body fluids and also describe a new method for measuring and defining the supercooling point of small volumes of liquid. PMID:7612853

  9. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  10. Static and dynamic length scales in supercooled liquids: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of water and tri-propylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Klameth, F; Henritzi, P; Vogel, M

    2014-04-14

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study static and dynamic length scales in molecular supercooled liquids, in particular, water. For a determination of these scales, we use equilibrium configurations and pin appropriate subsets of molecules so as to obtain random matrices, cylindrical pores, and slit confinements. Static length scales ξ(s) are determined by analyzing overlap correlation functions for various fractions of pinned molecules or distances to the confining walls. For water in all confinements and for propylene oxide trimers in random geometry, a linear increase of ξ(s) with inverse temperature is found. Dynamic length scales ξ(d) are determined by analogous analysis of fraction-dependent or position-resolved correlation times of structural relaxation. While ξ(d) continuously grows upon cooling in the cylindrical and slit confinements, we find no evidence for a temperature dependence in random matrices, implying that molecular dynamics in parsed volumes is qualitatively different from that in bulk liquids. Finally, we study possible connections between the growth of the static and dynamic length scales and the slowdown of the structural relaxation of the supercooled bulk liquids. For water, we observe a linear relation between ln τ(α) and ξ(s)²/T in the whole accessible range down to the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory, T(c). In the weakly supercooled regime, the same relation holds also for ξ(d), as obtained from cylindrical and slit confinements, but deviations from this behavior are observed near T(c). The results are discussed in connection with random first-order theory and experimental studies of liquid dynamics in nanoscopic confinements and binary mixtures.

  11. Deeply Virtual Pseudoscalar Meson Production with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Paul Stoler; Ivan Bedlinsky

    2007-09-03

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering, cross sections and asymmetries for the pi^0 and eta exclusive electroproduction in a very wide kinematic range of Q^2, t and x_B have been measured with CLAS (Jlab). Initial analyzes already are showing remarkable results. These data will help us to better understand the transition from soft to hard mechanisms.

  12. Dynamics of Ice/Water Confined in Nanoporous Alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Steinhart, Martin; Graf, Robert; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-11-19

    Dielectric (DS), IR spectroscopy, and (1)H MAS NMR are employed in the study of ice/water confined in nanoporous alumina with pore diameters ranging from 400 nm down to 25 nm. Within nanoporous alumina there is a transformation from heterogeneous nucleation of hexagonal ice in the larger pores to homogeneous nucleation of cubic ice in the smaller pores. DS and IR show excellent agreement in the temperature interval and pore size dependence of the transformation. DS further revealed two dynamic processes under confinement. The "fast" and "slow" processes with an Arrhenius temperature dependence are attributed to ice and supercooled water relaxation, respectively. The main relaxation process of ice under confinement ("slow" process) has an activation energy of 44 ± 2 kJ/mol. The latter is in agreement with the reported relaxation times and activation energy of cubic ice prepared following a completely different route (by pressure). (1)H MAS NMR provided new insight in the state of ice structures as well as of supercooled water. Under confinement, a layer of liquid-like water coexists with ice structures. In addition, both ice structures under confinement appear to be more ordered than bulk hexagonal ice. Supercooled water in the smaller pores is different from bulk water. It shows a shift of the signal toward higher chemical shift values which may suggest stronger hydrogen bonding between the water molecules or increasing interactions with the AAO walls. PMID:26511073

  13. Dynamics of Ice/Water Confined in Nanoporous Alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Steinhart, Martin; Graf, Robert; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-11-19

    Dielectric (DS), IR spectroscopy, and (1)H MAS NMR are employed in the study of ice/water confined in nanoporous alumina with pore diameters ranging from 400 nm down to 25 nm. Within nanoporous alumina there is a transformation from heterogeneous nucleation of hexagonal ice in the larger pores to homogeneous nucleation of cubic ice in the smaller pores. DS and IR show excellent agreement in the temperature interval and pore size dependence of the transformation. DS further revealed two dynamic processes under confinement. The "fast" and "slow" processes with an Arrhenius temperature dependence are attributed to ice and supercooled water relaxation, respectively. The main relaxation process of ice under confinement ("slow" process) has an activation energy of 44 ± 2 kJ/mol. The latter is in agreement with the reported relaxation times and activation energy of cubic ice prepared following a completely different route (by pressure). (1)H MAS NMR provided new insight in the state of ice structures as well as of supercooled water. Under confinement, a layer of liquid-like water coexists with ice structures. In addition, both ice structures under confinement appear to be more ordered than bulk hexagonal ice. Supercooled water in the smaller pores is different from bulk water. It shows a shift of the signal toward higher chemical shift values which may suggest stronger hydrogen bonding between the water molecules or increasing interactions with the AAO walls.

  14. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structure-Dynamics Relationships of Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soklaski, Ryan

    of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, the decoupling of particle diffusivities, and the development of general "glassy" relaxation features are found to coincide with successive manifestation of icosahedral ordering that arise as the liquid is supercooled. Remarkably, we detect critical-like features in the growth of the icosahedron network, with signatures that suggest that a liquid-liquid phase transition may occur in the deeply supercooled regime to precede glass formation. Such a transition is predicted to occur in many supercooled liquids, although explicit evidence of this phenomenon in realistic systems is scarce. Ultimately this work concludes that icosahedral order characterizes all dynamical regimes of Cu64Zr 36, demonstrating the importance and utility of studying supercooled liquids in the context of locally-preferred structure. More broadly, it serves to confirm and inform recent theoretical and empirical findings that are central to understanding the physics underlying the glass transition.

  15. Molecular dynamics studies of supercooled water using a monatomic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Emily Brooke

    There remain many unanswered questions regarding the structure and behavior of water, particularly when cooled below the melting temperature into water's supercooled region. In this region, liquid water is metastable, and rapid crystallization makes it difficult to study experimentally the liquid and the crystallization process. Computational studies are hindered by the complexity of accurately modeling water and the computational cost of simulating processes such as crystallization. In this work, the development and validation of mW, a monatomic water model, is presented. This model is able to quantitatively reproduce the structure, dynamic anomalies and phase behavior of water without hydrogen atoms or electrostatics by reproducing water's propensity to form locally tetrahedral structures. Using the mW water model in molecular dynamics simulations, we show the evolution of the local structure of water from 300--100 K. We find that the thermodynamic and structural properties studied, density, tetrahedrality and structural correlation length, change maximally or are maximum at 202 +/- 2 K, the liquid-liquid transformation temperature. Shifting to water confined within cylindrical nanopores, we present the development of a rotationally invariant method, the CHILL algorithm, to distinguish between liquid, hexagonal and cubic ice. We analyze the process of homogeneous nucleation, growth and melting within hydrophilic pores, as well as the effect of water-pore interaction strength on the melting of ice and liquid-ice coexistence within pores. Crystallization within the nanopores results in cubic ice with hexagonal stacking faults in agreement with experiments. We also investigate crystallization of bulk liquid within water's experimentally inaccessible "no man's land." Crystallization occurs through rapid development of ice nuclei that grow and consolidate, precluding the measurement of diffusion within the liquid. Analysis of how ice structure develops shows that

  16. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. PMID:21087023

  17. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds.

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  19. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  20. Delivery after Operation for Deeply Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Allerstorfer, Christina; Oppelt, Peter; Enzelsberger, Simon H; Shamiyeh, Andreas; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Shebl, Omar Josef; Mayer, Richard Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been suggested that, during pregnancy, endometriosis can cause a variety of disease-related complications. Objectives. The purpose of the study was to find out if women with histologically confirmed endometriosis do have a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome and if they suffer from a higher rate of complications during labor. Study Design. 51 women who underwent surgery because of deeply infiltrating endometriosis in the General Hospital Linz and the Women's General Hospital Linz and who gave birth in the Women's General Hospital Linz after the surgery were included in our survey. Results. 31 women (60.8%) had a spontaneous delivery and in 20 women (39.2%) a caesarean section was performed. There were no cases of third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. Collectively there were 4 cases (7.8%) of preterm delivery and one case (2.0%) of premature rupture of membranes. In two women (6.5%) a retained placenta was diagnosed. Conclusions. Our study is the first description on delivery modes after surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis. We did not find an elevated risk for perineal or vaginal laceration in women with a history of surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis, even when a resection of the rectum or of the posterior vaginal wall had been performed. PMID:27517050

  1. Delivery after Operation for Deeply Infiltrating Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Allerstorfer, Christina; Enzelsberger, Simon H.; Shebl, Omar Josef; Mayer, Richard Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been suggested that, during pregnancy, endometriosis can cause a variety of disease-related complications. Objectives. The purpose of the study was to find out if women with histologically confirmed endometriosis do have a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome and if they suffer from a higher rate of complications during labor. Study Design. 51 women who underwent surgery because of deeply infiltrating endometriosis in the General Hospital Linz and the Women's General Hospital Linz and who gave birth in the Women's General Hospital Linz after the surgery were included in our survey. Results. 31 women (60.8%) had a spontaneous delivery and in 20 women (39.2%) a caesarean section was performed. There were no cases of third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. Collectively there were 4 cases (7.8%) of preterm delivery and one case (2.0%) of premature rupture of membranes. In two women (6.5%) a retained placenta was diagnosed. Conclusions. Our study is the first description on delivery modes after surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis. We did not find an elevated risk for perineal or vaginal laceration in women with a history of surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis, even when a resection of the rectum or of the posterior vaginal wall had been performed. PMID:27517050

  2. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Reactions with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery

    2011-03-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions offer an unique opportunity to study the structure of the nucleon at the parton level as one has access to Bjorken xB and momentum transfer to the nucleon t at the same time. Such processes can reveal much more information about the structure of the nucleon than either inclusive electroproduction or elastic form factors alone. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply VirtualMeson Production (DVMP) have been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. DVCS helicity–dependent and helicity–independent cross sections and beam spin asymmetries have been measured with CLAS, as well as cross sections and asymmetries for the p 0, h, r 0, r+, w and f for exclusive electroproduction. The data were taken in a wide kinematic range in Q2=1–4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1–0.5, and |t| up to 2 GeV2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of traditional Regge and Generalized Parton Distributions models. We view the work presented in this report as leading into the program of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The increased energy and luminosity will allow us to acquire data at much higher Q2 and xB, and perform Rosenbluth L/T separations of the cross sections.

  3. Continuous and Discontinuous Dynamic Crossover in Supercooled Water in Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhonghua; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2015-08-20

    The dynamic crossover behavior of supercooled water as described by the first-principle based WAIL potential was investigated. Below the second liquid-liquid critical point, the viscosity shows a discontinuous jump consistent with a first-order phase transition between the high density liquid and the low density liquid. Above the critical point, a continuous transition occurs with only the first derivative of viscosity being discontinuous, and the dynamic crossover temperature is about 8 K below the thermodynamic switchover temperature. The 8 K shift can be explained by a delay in dynamic crossover, which does not occur until the more viscous liquid starts to dominate the population and jams the flow. On the basis of finite-size effects observed in our simulations, we believe that dynamic discontinuity may be observable above the critical point in confined water when the confinement is on a length scale shorter than the spatial correlation. PMID:27476514

  4. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-12-01

    The nature of supercooled liquids and the glass transition has been debated by many scientists. Several theories have been put forth to describe the remarkable properties of this out-of-equilibrium material. Each of these theories makes specific predictions as to how the scaling of various transport properties in supercooled materials should behave. Given access to a large pool of high-quality supercooled liquid data we seek to compare these theories to one another. Moreover, we explore properties of a pair of models which are the basis for one particularly attractive theory---Chandler-Garrahan theory---and discuss the models' behavior in space-time and possible implications to the behavior of experimental supercooled liquids. Here we investigate the nature of dynamics in supercooled liquids using a two pronged approach. First we analyze the transport properties found in experiments and simulations of supercooled liquids. Then, we analyze simulation trajectories for lattice models which reproduce many of the interesting properties of supercooled liquids. In doing so, we illuminate several glass universalities, common properties of a wide variety of glass formers. By analyzing relaxation time and viscosity data for over 50 data sets and 1200 points, we find that relaxation time can be collapsed onto a single, parabolic curve. This collapse supports a theory of universal glass behavior based on facilitated models proposed by David Chandler and Juan Garrahan in 2003. We then show that the parabolic fit parameters for any particular liquid are a material property: they converge fast and are capable of predicting behavior in regions beyond the included data sets. We compare this property to other popular fitting schemes such as the Vogel-Fulcher, double exponential, and fractional exponential forms and conclude that these three forms result in parameters which are non predictive and therefore not material properties. Additionally, we examine the role of attractive

  5. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180  kV/cm. Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P_{6,6,6,14}][Cl] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models. PMID:27203333

  6. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v). PMID:24792543

  7. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Roling, B.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180 kV /cm . Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P6 ,6 ,6 ,14][Cl ] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models.

  8. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v).

  9. Extra large particle images at 12 km in a hurricane eyewall: Evidence of high-altitude supercooled water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert A.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hallett, John

    2003-11-01

    The conventional wisdom about hurricanes suggests that updrafts are weak and supercooled water is scarce in the eyewall, and almost non-existent at temperatures colder than about -5°C [Black and Hallett, 1986]. However, there is evidence that some hurricanes are different. Questions about the existence of high-altitude supercooled cloud water cannot be answered with only the instruments aboard the typical propeller-driven aircraft. During the summer of 1998, the NASA DC-8 aircraft made penetrations of the intensifying eyewall of Hurricane Bonnie at 12 km MSL, collecting the first truly high-altitude 2-D particle imagery in a hurricane. The similarity of the splash images in Hurricane Bonnie to those from raindrops obtained at higher temperatures in other hurricanes suggests that the large images obtained by the DC-8 were soft, low density graupel, rather than hard, high-density graupel particles or frozen raindrops. This implies that these particles grew to several millimeters in diameter at altitude, rather than simply advecting from lower, warmer altitudes. This growth in turn requires the presence of deeply supercooled cloud droplets. Thermal emission from supercooled water aloft increases the microwave brightness temperatures, giving a misleading impression that there is much less ice aloft than actually exists. The extra attenuation from the occasional presence of large graupel at these altitudes reduces the ability of microwave sensors to see precipitation at lower altitudes. Both of these effects impede efforts to accurately quantify condensate mass remotely from radiometric data such as that provided by the TRMM satellite.

  10. Nonlocal Nature of the Viscous Transport in Supercooled Liquids: Complex Fluid Approach to Supercooled Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Akira; Tanaka, Hajime

    2009-09-25

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show clear evidence for the nonlocal mesoscopic nature of the anomalous viscous transport in a supercooled liquid and its direct link to dynamic heterogeneity: (i) a distinct crossover from the microscopic to macroscopic viscosity at a mesoscopic length scale, which is comparable to the correlation length of dynamic heterogeneity and grows with an increase in the degree of supercooling; (ii) a strong anisotropic decay of the shear-stress autocorrelation at a finite wave number, which indicates intrinsic decoupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics. Our findings suggest the fundamental importance of the growing dynamic correlation in anomalous transport and shed new light on the nature of slow dynamics.

  11. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Reactions with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky

    2011-11-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions offer an unique opportunity to study the structure of the nucleon at the parton level as one has access to Bjorken x{sub B} and momentum transfer to the nucleon t at the same time. Such processes can reveal much more information about the structure of the nucleon than either inclusive electroproduction or elastic form factors alone. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. DVCS helicity–dependent and helicity–independent cross sections and beam spin asymmetries have been measured with CLAS, as well as cross sections and asymmetries for the {pi}{sup }0, {eta} , {rho}{sup }0, {rho}{sup +}, {omega} and {phi} for exclusive electroproduction. The data were taken in a wide kinematic range in Q{sup 2}=1–4.5 GeV{sup 2}, x{sub B}=0.1–0.5, and {absval t} up to 2 GeV{sup 2}. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of traditional Regge and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) models. The successful description of the recent CLAS pseudoscalar meson exclusive production data by GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the transversity GPDs. We view the work presented in this report as leading into the program of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The increased energy and luminosity will allow us to acquire data at much higher Q{sup 2} and x{sub B}, and perform Rosenbluth L/T separations of the cross sections.

  12. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  13. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  14. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2007-05-21

    An overview is given about the capabilities provided by the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade to measure deeply virtual exclusive processes with high statistics and covering a large kinematics range in the parameters that are needed to allow reconstruction of a spatial image of the nucleon's quark structure. The measurements planned with CLAS12 will cross section asymmetries with polarized beams and with longitudinally and transversely polarized proton targets in the constrained kinematics $x = \\pm \\xi$. In addition, unpolarized DVCS cross sections, and doubly polarized beam target asymmetries will be measured as well. In this talk only the beam and target asymmetries will be discussed.

  15. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  16. Some fundamental aspects of solidification in a supercooled melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1983-01-01

    A model of dendritic growth in both supercooled pure and alloy melts is presented. In a pure melt, dendrite morphology is determined by the value of the dimensionless parameter sigma = 2 alpha (L)d(o)/sq Rr(t) whereas, in an alloy melt it is determined by the parameter sigma = 2 lambda (c)D(L)/sq Rr(t). The application of the above analysis to cylindrical and spherical growth morphologies obtained in highly supercooled melts has been discussed. An upper and lower bound for the particle or tip radius in this case has been obtained in terms of the growth rate and the initial bath supercooling.

  17. Supercooling effects in faceted eutectic Nb-Si alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Sarkar, G.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Haygarth, J. C.; Wojcik, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of melt supercooling on the microstructure of an Nb-58 at. pct Si alloy is investigated experimentally using an electromagnetic levitation apparatus. It is found that, starting with an alloy nominally of eutectic composition, nucleation of Nb5Si3 occurs in the supercooled liquid first. Upon further cooling, the remaining liquid continues to supercool until the second phase, NbSi2 is nucleated, which is commonly accompanied by rapid recalescence. The primary phase exibits a eutectoid-type decomposition. The observations are discussed with reference to the results of quantitative microstructural measurements, compositional and thermal analysis, and preliminary thermodynamic modeling of the phase diagram.

  18. Pulsed dielectric spectroscopy of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, R.; Schiener, B.; Hemberger, J.; Chamberlin, R. V.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed dielectric spectroscopy is introduced as a technique for selectively emphasizing specific components of the non-exponential dielectric response of matter. Samples studied include supercooled liquid propanol, propylene carbonate, and poly(lauryl-methacrylate). It is shown that particular sequences of pulses can be used to emphasize the fast response regime, to produce a cross-over or memory effect, or to eliminate the response of selected components. Furthermore, for materials characterized by broad distributions of relaxation times, the technique facilitates the investigation of a relatively narrow band from that distribution. It is also shown that the time domain spectroscopy can be combined with conventional frequency domain techniques to provide the characterization of dielectric response over an extraordinarily broad spectral range.

  19. Theory of structural glasses and supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Wolynes, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    We review the random first-order transition theory of the glass transition, emphasizing the experimental tests of the theory. Many distinct phenomena are quantitatively predicted or explained by the theory, both above and below the glass transition temperature T(g). These include the following: the viscosity catastrophe and heat-capacity jump at T(g), and their connection; the nonexponentiality of relaxations and their correlation with the fragility; dynamic heterogeneity in supercooled liquids owing to the mosaic structure; deviations from the Vogel-Fulcher law, connected with strings or fractal cooperative rearrangements; deviations from the Stokes-Einstein relation close to T(g); aging and its correlation with fragility; and the excess density of states at cryogenic temperatures owing to two-level tunneling systems and the Boson peak.

  20. Supercooling in Overwintering Azalea Flower Buds 1

    PubMed Central

    George, Milon F.; Burke, Michael J.; Weiser, Conrad J.

    1974-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments on whole flower buds and excised floral primordia of azalea (Rhododendron kosterianum, Schneid.) proved that supercooling is the mode of freezing resistance (avoidance) of azalea flower primordia. Increase in the linewidth of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for water upon thawing supports the view that injury to the primordia occurs at the moment of freezing. Nonliving primordia freeze at the same temperatures as living primordia, indicating that morphological features of primordial tissues are a key factor in freezing avoidance of dormant azalea flower primordia. Differential thermal analyses was used to study the relationship of cooling rate to the freezing points of floral primordia in whole flower buds. At a cooling rate of 8.5 C per hour, primordia in whole buds froze at about the same subfreezing temperatures as did excised primordia cooled at 37 C per hour. At more rapid cooling rates primordia in intact buds froze at higher temperatures. PMID:16658832

  1. Properties of peach flower buds which facilitate supercooling.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, E N

    1982-11-01

    Water in dormant peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch. var. ;Harbrite') flower buds deep supercooled. Both supercooling and the freezing of water within the bud axis and primordium as distinct components depended on the viability of the bud axis tissue. The viability of the primordium was not critical. Supercooling was prevented by wounding buds with a dissecting needle, indicating that bud structural features were important. Bud morphological features appeared to prevent the propagation of ice through the vascular tissue and into the primordium. In dormant buds, procambial cells had not yet differentiated into xylem vessel elements. Xylem continuity between the bud primordium and adjacent tissues did not appear to be established until buds had deacclimated. It was concluded that structural, morphological, and physiological features of the bud facilitated supercooling.

  2. Compound chondrule formation via collision of supercooled droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Sota; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel model showing that compound chondrules are formed by collisions of supercooled droplets. This model reproduces two prominent observed features of compound chondrules: the nonporphyritic texture and the size ratio between two components.

  3. Ergodicity and slow diffusion in a supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P.

    2016-05-01

    A model for the slow dynamics of the supercooled liquid is formulated in terms of the standard equations of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics (FNH) with the inclusion of an extra diffusive mode for the collective density fluctuations. If the compressible nature of the liquid is completely ignored, this diffusive mode sets the longest relaxation times in the supercooled state and smooths off a possible sharp ergodicity-nonergodicity (ENE) transition predicted in a mode coupling theory. The scenario changes when the complete dynamics is considered with the inclusion of 1 / ρ nonlinearities in the FNH equations, reflecting the compressible nature of the liquid. The latter primarily determines the extent of slowing down in the supercooled liquid. The presence of slow diffusive modes in the supercooled liquid do not give rise to very long relaxation times unless the role of couplings between density and currents in the compressible liquid is negligible.

  4. An Easy Classroom Experiment on the Supercooling of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianino, Concetto

    2007-01-01

    The change from the state of supercooling to the solid state of ice is called superfreezing. This process is not uncommon and takes place in domestic freezers. It is also easy to reproduce in the laboratory. (Contains 6 figures.)

  5. Crystallization in supercooled liquid Cu: Homogeneous nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    E, J. C.; Wang, L.; Luo, S. N.; Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.

    2015-02-14

    Homogeneous nucleation and growth during crystallization of supercooled liquid Cu are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations, and the microstructure is characterized with one- and two-dimensional x-ray diffraction. The resulting solids are single-crystal or nanocrystalline, containing various defects such as stacking faults, twins, fivefold twins, and grain boundaries; the microstructure is subject to thermal fluctuations and extent of supercooling. Fivefold twins form via sequential twinning from the solid-liquid interfaces. Critical nucleus size and nucleation rate at 31% supercooling are obtained from statistical runs with the mean first-passage time and survival probability methods, and are about 14 atoms and 10{sup 32} m{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively. The bulk growth dynamics are analyzed with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami law and manifest three stages; the Avrami exponent varies in the range of 1–19, which also depends on thermal fluctuations and supercooling.

  6. Super-cooled and amorphous lipid-based colloidal dispersions for the delivery of phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H S; Gupta, R; Smith, K W; van Malssen, K F; Popp, A K; Velikov, K P

    2016-07-01

    Super-cooled and amorphous lipid-based colloids are highly desirable delivery systems because of their ability to encapsulate compounds in a soluble or in a non-crystalline state. In this study, we demonstrate the preparation and characterization of super-cooled and amorphous lipid-based nanoscale colloidal dispersions containing high concentrations of phytosterols (PSs). PSs are highly hydrophobic natural bioactive compounds that are known to significantly reduce blood cholesterol levels in humans, but are insoluble in water and are poorly soluble in common lipids such as triacylglycerols (TAGs). Using the ultrahigh pressure homogenization of pre-heated dispersions, followed by temperature quenching, colloidal dispersions with varying concentrations of PSs in the lipid phase are prepared. Long and medium chain TAGs in combination with a non-ionic surfactant are used. The particle size, morphology and stability are analysed by dynamic and static light scattering, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Rapid temperature quenching enables the formation of stable colloidal dispersions of 10 wt% PSs, more than five times the equilibrium solubility at room temperature. Super-cooled emulsions are formed using liquid TAG, whereas amorphous particles are formed in the case of solid TAG. In both cases, the complete suppression of the crystallization of both PSs and lipids is observed due to the nanoscale confinement. The colloidal dispersions are stable for at least four months. The insights of this work will help understand the colloid formation and particle morphology control in the development of delivery systems for hydrophobic bio-actives such as drugs, cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals, nutritional and agricultural nanoscale formulations. PMID:27174457

  7. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Tamsin L.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Brukhno, Andrey V.; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2012-01-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples. PMID:22232652

  8. Super-cooled droplet splash image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueqing; Barnes, Stuart; Fu, Shan

    2008-11-01

    It is proved that super-cooled large droplets (SLD) impingement onto airfoil have a great effect on aircraft icing. In the research facility of icing wind tunnel at Cranfield University in U.K, a great number of droplet splashing images are captured from aircraft icing experiments in order to understand the process of SLD impacting onto airfoil surfaces. Meanwhile, it also aims to classify the airfoil samples into wet/dry surface to determinate what material of samples is suitable for ice protection onto the aircraft. This paper defines a multi-dimensional feature space to characterize the images as criteria of classification. By k-means algorithm, images can be categorized into dry surface, wet surface, and ambiguous groups. Based on the results of image classification, eight of nine samples succeed to be identified into wet/dry behavior. However, one sample fell to the false identification since the raw images are insufficient to represent the entire droplets splash impact events.

  9. Frost halos from supercooled water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-01

    Water freezing on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature. Even though icing/frosting impairs the performance and safety in many processes, its mechanism remains inadequately understood. Changing atmospheric conditions, surface properties, the complexity of icing physics, and the unorthodox behavior of water are the primary factors that make icing and frost formation intriguing and difficult to predict. In addition to its unquestioned scientific and practical importance, unraveling the frosting mechanism under different conditions is a prerequisite to develop “icephobic” surfaces, which may avoid ice formation and contamination. In this work we demonstrate that evaporation from a freezing supercooled sessile droplet, which starts explosively due to the sudden latent heat released upon recalescent freezing, generates a condensation halo around the droplet, which crystallizes and drastically affects the surface behavior. The process involves simultaneous multiple phase transitions and may also spread icing by initiating sequential freezing of neighboring droplets in the form of a domino effect and frost propagation. Experiments under controlled humidity conditions using substrates differing up to three orders of magnitude in thermal conductivity establish that a delicate balance between heat diffusion and vapor transport determines the final expanse of the frozen condensate halo, which, in turn, controls frost formation and propagation. PMID:23012410

  10. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature. PMID:25707695

  11. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature.

  12. Supercooling and freezing processes in nanoconfined water by time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Marcelli, A; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2015-05-20

    Using heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (HD-OKE) measurements, we investigate the vibrational dynamics and the structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in Vycor porous silica samples (pore size ≃ 4 nm) at different levels of hydration and temperatures. At low levels of hydration corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and the water remains mobile at all the investigated temperatures with dynamic features similar, but not equal to, the bulk water. The fully hydrated sample shows the formation of ice at about 248 K. This process does not involve all the contained water; a part of it remains in a supercooled phase. The structural relaxation times measured from the decay of the time-dependent HD-OKE signal shows the temperature dependence largely affected by the hydration level; the low frequency (ν < 500 cm(-1)) vibrational spectra obtained by the Fourier transforms of the HD-OKE signal appear less affected by confinement.

  13. Supercooling and freezing processes in nanoconfined water by time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Marcelli, A; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2015-05-20

    Using heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (HD-OKE) measurements, we investigate the vibrational dynamics and the structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in Vycor porous silica samples (pore size ≃ 4 nm) at different levels of hydration and temperatures. At low levels of hydration corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and the water remains mobile at all the investigated temperatures with dynamic features similar, but not equal to, the bulk water. The fully hydrated sample shows the formation of ice at about 248 K. This process does not involve all the contained water; a part of it remains in a supercooled phase. The structural relaxation times measured from the decay of the time-dependent HD-OKE signal shows the temperature dependence largely affected by the hydration level; the low frequency (ν < 500 cm(-1)) vibrational spectra obtained by the Fourier transforms of the HD-OKE signal appear less affected by confinement. PMID:25924077

  14. Scaling limit of deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Radyushkin

    2000-07-01

    The author outlines a perturbative QCD approach to the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process {gamma}{sup *}p {r_arrow} {gamma}p{prime} in the limit of vanishing momentum transfer t=(p{prime}{minus}p){sup 2}. The DVCS amplitude in this limit exhibits a scaling behavior described by a two-argument distributions F(x,y) which specify the fractions of the initial momentum p and the momentum transfer r {equivalent_to} p{prime}{minus}p carried by the constituents of the nucleon. The kernel R(x,y;{xi},{eta}) governing the evolution of the non-forward distributions F(x,y) has a remarkable property: it produces the GLAPD evolution kernel P(x/{xi}) when integrated over y and reduces to the Brodsky-Lepage evolution kernel V(y,{eta}) after the x-integration. This property is used to construct the solution of the one-loop evolution equation for the flavor non-singlet part of the non-forward quark distribution.

  15. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, Sylvester; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The European Muon Collaboration (EMC) observed the first signs of a modification of the partonic structure of the nucleon when present in a nuclear medium. The precise nature of these effects, as well as their underlying cause, is yet to be determined. The generalized parton distribution (GPD) framework provides a powerful tool to study the partonic structure of nucleons inside a nucleus. Hard exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon off a nucleon, deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), is presently considered the cleanest experimental access to the GPDs, through the Compton form factors (CFFs). This is especially the case for scattering off the spin-zero helium nucleus, where only a single CFF contributes to the process. The real and imaginary parts of this CFF can be constrained through the beam-spin asymmetry (BSA). We will present the first measurements of the DVCS process off 4He using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam and the CLAS detector at JLab. The CLAS detector was supplemented with an inner electromagnetic calorimeter for photons produced at small angles, as well as a radial time projection chamber (RTPC) to detect low-energy recoil nuclei. This setup allowed for a clean measurement of the BSA in both the coherent and incoherent channels.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T(L) ≃ 225 K). The second, T* ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K(T)(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α(P)(T, P) in the P-T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T(L)) and the onset of the unfolding process (T*).

  17. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ≃ 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  18. {bar K}-NUCLEAR Deeply Bound States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Avraham

    Following the prediction by Akaishi and Yamazaki of relatively narrow {bar K}-nuclear states, deeply bound by over 100 MeV where the main decay channel {bar K} N -> π Σ is closed, several experimental signals in stopped K- reactions on light nuclei have been interpreted recently as due to such states. In this talk I review (i) the evidence from K--atom data for a deep bar K-nucleus potential, as attractive as V{bar K}(ρ 0) ˜ -(150 - 200) MeV at nuclear matter density, that could support such states; and (ii) the theoretical arguments for a shallow potential, V{bar K}(ρ 0) ˜ -(40 - 60) MeV. I then review a recent work by Mareš, Friedman and Gal in which {bar K}-nuclear bound states are generated dynamically across the periodic table, using a RMF Lagrangian that couples the {bar K} to the scalar and vector meson fields mediating the nuclear interactions. The reduced phase space available for {bar K} absorption from these bound states is taken into account by adding a density- and energy-dependent imaginary term, underlying the corresponding {bar K}-nuclear level widths, with a strength constrained by K--atom fits. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for light nuclei, with central nuclear densities enhanced by almost a factor of two. The binding energies and widths calculated in this dynamical model differ appreciably from those calculated for a static nucleus. These calculations provide a lower limit of Γ {bar K} ˜ 50 ± 10 MeV on the width of nuclear bound states for {bar K} binding energy in the range B{bar K} = 100 - 200 MeV.

  19. Dynamical heterogeneities in sols and supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Heidi

    This thesis explores the nature and causes of heterogeneous dynamics in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition and sols approaching the gel phase. In Chapter 1, we motivate the questions being addressed by giving an overview of the glass transition and gelation process, including the anomalous diffusive behavior and structural relaxation exhibited by liquids approaching the transition points. Evidence of spatially heterogeneous dynamics is presented and a connection is made between the glass transition, colloidal gelation and chemical gelation. The dynamics of a sol undergoing chemical gelation are studied in Chapter 2, An analysis of the static properties of the sol, especially the size distribution of molecules in the suspension, shows the model to be well-described by percolation theory. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the diffusive behavior of the molecules. The motion of the center of mass of the clusters is shown to be collective in high density systems near the gelation point. A structural signature of collective dynamics is demonstrated in Chapter 3 using a normal mode analysis. The dynamic behavior of a 2D model of a liquid is obtained with an isoconfigurational ensemble of molecular dynamics trajectories. A normal mode analysis performed on the initial configuration shows a high degree of correlation between the regions of high-amplitude vibrational motion and the spatial distribution of regions with a high probability of irreversible reorganization. This result demonstrates that the low-frequency quenched normal modes can be used to predict the spatial structure and length scale of irreversible reorganization, providing a long sought-after link between the local structure and the dynamics.

  20. Effects of PVA(Polyvinyl Alcohol) on Supercooling Phenomena of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji; Takizawa, Hiroshi

    In this paper, effects of polymer additive on supercooling of water were investigated experimentally. Poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) were used as the polymer, and the samples were prepared by dissolving PVA in ultra pure water. Concentration, degree of polymerization and saponification of PVA were varied as the experimental parameters. The sample was cooled, and the temperature at the instant when ice appears was measured. Since freezing of supercooled water is statistical phenomenon, many experiments were carried out and average degrees of supercooling were obtained for each experimental condition. As the result, it was found that PVA affects nucleation of supercooling and the degree of supercooling increases by adding the PVA. Especially, it is found that the average degree of supercooling increases and the standard deviation of average degree of supercooling decreases with increase of degree of saponification of PVA. However, the average degree of supercooling are independent of the degree of polymerization of PVA in the range of this study.

  1. Presence of supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleation) hydrolyzable tannins in deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells in Cercidiphyllum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghui; Kasuga, Jun; Kuwabara, Chikako; Endoh, Keita; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Fujikawa, Seizo; Arakawa, Keita

    2012-04-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in trees adapt to subzero temperatures by deep supercooling. Our previous study indicated the possibility of the presence of diverse kinds of supercooling-facilitating (SCF; anti-ice nucleation) substances in XPCs of katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), all of which might have an important role in deep supercooling of XPCs. In the previous study, a few kinds of SCF flavonol glycosides were identified. Thus, in the present study, we tried to identify other kinds of SCF substances in XPCs of katsura tree. SCF substances were purified from xylem extracts by silica gel column chromatography and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Then, four SCF substances isolated were identified by UV, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. The results showed that the four kinds of hydrolyzable gallotannins, 2,2',5-tri-O-galloyl-α,β-D-hamamelose (trigalloyl Ham or kurigalin), 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (trigalloyl Glc), 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (tetragalloyl Glc) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pentagalloyl Glc), in XPCs exhibited supercooling capabilities in the range of 1.5-4.5°C, at a concentration of 1 mg mL⁻¹. These SCF substances, including flavonol glycosides and hydrolyzable gallotannins, may contribute to the supercooling in XPCs of katsura tree.

  2. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Drosophila under Supercooled Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Makoto; Terayama, Hayato; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Matsushita, Masayuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Under subzero degree conditions, free water contained in biological cells tends to freeze and then most living things die due to low temperatures. We examined the effect of a variable magnetic field on Drosophila under supercooled conditions (a state in which freezing is not caused even below the freezing point). Under such supercooled conditions with the magnetic field at 0°C for 72 hours, −4°C for 24 hours and −8°C for 1 hour, the Drosophila all survived, while all conversely died under the supercooled conditions without the magnetic field. This result indicates a possibility that the magnetic field can reduce cell damage caused due to low temperatures in living things. PMID:23284809

  3. Supercooling and structure of levitation melted Fe-Ni alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, G. J.; Flemings, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of supercooling, quenching rate, growth inhibitors, and grain refiners on the structure of levitation-melted Fe- 25 pct Ni alloys. A combination of three morphologies, dendritic, spherical, and mixed dendritic and spherical, is observed in samples superheated or supercooled by less than 175 K. At larger supercooling, however, only the spherical morphology is observed. The grain size and the grain boundary shape are found to be strongly dependent on the subgrain morphology but not on the quenching temperature. Considerable grain growth is evident in samples with spherical and mixed morphologies but not in the dendriitic samples. The average cooling rates during solidification and the heat transfer coefficients at the metal-quenching medium boundary are calculated. For samples solidified in water, molten lead, and ceramic molds, the heat transfer coefficients are 0.41, 0.52, and 0.15 w/sq cm, respectively.

  4. Method and apparatus for supercooling and solidifying substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Katz, L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An enclosure provides a containerless environment in which a sample specimen is positioned. The specimen is heated in the containerless environment, and the specimen melt is dropped through the tube in which it cools by radiation. The tube is alternatively backfilled with an inert gas whereby the specimen melt cools by both radiation and convection during its free fall. During the free fall, the sample is in a containerless, low-gravity environment which enhances supercooling in the sample and prevents sedimentation and thermal convection influences. The sample continues to supercool until nucleation occurs which is detected by silicon photovoltaic detectors. The sample solidifies after nucleation and becomes completely solid before entering the detachable catcher. The amount of supercooling of the specimen can be measured by knowing the cooling ratio and determining the time for nucleation to occur.

  5. Supercooling Preservation Of The Rat Liver For Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Berendsen, Tim A.; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Yeh, Heidi; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-01-01

    The current standard for liver preservation is limited in duration. Employing a novel subzero preservation technique that includes supercooling and machine perfusion can significantly improve preservation and prolong storage times. By loading rat livers with cryoprotectants to prevent both intra- and extracellular ice formation and protect against hypothermic injury, livers can be cooled to −6 °C without freezing and kept viable for up to 96 hours. Here, we describe the procedures of loading cryoprotectants by means of subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP), controlled cooling to a supercooled state, followed by SNMP recovery and orthotopic liver transplantation. PMID:25692985

  6. Prevention of Initial Supercooling in Progressive Freeze-concentration.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Fujii, T; Hayakawa, K; Miyawaki, O

    1998-01-01

    A physical method is proposed that uses a cooling plate with many small holes to prevent initial supercooling in progressive freeze-concentration, and thus avoid serious contamination of the ice produced. The higher chance for ice nucleation of the water molecules in the holes due to the temperature gradient in the cooling plate resulted in the initial supercooling being completely prevented. Accordingly, the purity of the ice initially formed was substantially improved when compared with that by the standard vessel without holes in the cooling plate.

  7. Supercooling on the lunar surface - A review of analogue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.; Johnston, R.; Drever, H. I.

    1977-01-01

    Terrestrial analog studies of the phase petrology of supercooled melts and rapid crystal growth are reviewed for possible light shed on lunar crystallization, supercooling, and petrogenic processes, in particular rapid consolidation of lavas extruded on the lunar surface, and impact liquids. Crystallization of major constituent minerals (olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase) in dendritic or skeletal forms is found much more characteristic of lunar igneous rocks than of terrestrial counterparts. Olivine and pyroxene occur often as skeletal phenocrysts, and their stage of crystallization is crucial to the genesis and cooling history of porphyritic lavas. Widespread occurrence of glass and of immature radiate crystallization, particularly of highly zoned pyroxenes and zoned plagioclase, is noted.

  8. NMR-based structural biology of proteins in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Szyperski, Thomas; Mills, Jeffrey L

    2011-03-01

    NMR-based structural biology of proteins can be pursued efficiently in supercooled water at temperatures well below the freezing point of water. This enables one to study protein structure, dynamics, hydration and cold denaturation in an unperturbed aqueous solution at very low temperatures. Furthermore, such studies enable one to accurately measure thermodynamic parameters associated with protein cold denaturation. Presently available approaches to acquire NMR data for supercooled aqueous protein solutions are surveyed, new insights obtained from such studies are summarized, and future perspectives are discussed.

  9. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  10. Fast Scanning Calorimetry Studies of Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan

    This dissertation is a compilation of research results of extensive Fast Scanning Calorimetry studies of two non-crystalline materials: Toluene and Water. Motivation for fundamental studies of non-crystalline phases, a brief overview of glassy materials and concepts and definitions related to them is provided in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides fundamentals and details of experimental apparata, experimental protocol and calibration procedure. Chapter 3 & 4 provides extensive studies of stable non-crystalline toluene films of micrometer and nanometer thicknesses grown by vapor deposition at distinct deposition rates and temperatures and probed by Fast Scanning Calorimetry. Fast scanning calorimetry is shown to be extremely sensitive to the structure of the vapor-deposited phase and was used to characterize simultaneously its kinetic stability and its thermodynamic properties. According to our analysis, transformation of vapor -deposited samples of toluene during heating with rates in excess 100,000 K/s follows the zero-order kinetics. The transformation rate correlates strongly with the initial enthalpy of the sample, which increases with the deposition rate according to sub-linear law. Analysis of the transformation kinetics of vapor deposited toluene films of various thicknesses reveal a sudden increase in the transformation rate for films thinner than 250 nm. The change in kinetics correlates with the surface roughness scale of the substrate, which is interpreted as evidence for kinetic anisotropy of the samples. We also show that out-of-equilibrium relaxation kinetics and possibly the enthalpy of vapor-deposited (VD) films of toluene are distinct from those of ordinary supercooled (OS) phase even when the deposition takes place at temperatures above the glass softening (Tg). The implications of these findings for the formation mechanism and structure of vapor deposited stable glasses are discussed. Chapter 5 and 6 provide detailed Fast Scanning Calorimetry studies

  11. Adaptive elastic networks as models of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    The thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids correlate with their elasticity. In particular for covalent networks, the jump of specific heat is small and the liquid is strong near the threshold valence where the network acquires rigidity. By contrast, the jump of specific heat and the fragility are large away from this threshold valence. In a previous work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 6307 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1300534110], we could explain these behaviors by introducing a model of supercooled liquids in which local rearrangements interact via elasticity. However, in that model the disorder characterizing elasticity was frozen, whereas it is itself a dynamic variable in supercooled liquids. Here we study numerically and theoretically adaptive elastic network models where polydisperse springs can move on a lattice, thus allowing for the geometry of the elastic network to fluctuate and evolve with temperature. We show numerically that our previous results on the relationship between structure and thermodynamics hold in these models. We introduce an approximation where redundant constraints (highly coordinated regions where the frustration is large) are treated as an ideal gas, leading to analytical predictions that are accurate in the range of parameters relevant for real materials. Overall, these results lead to a description of supercooled liquids, in which the distance to the rigidity transition controls the number of directions in phase space that cost energy and the specific heat.

  12. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  13. Development of Active Control Method for Supercooling Releasing of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Daisuke; Kozawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanino, Masayuki; Inada, Takaaki

    We have tested the prototype ice-slurry generator that enables both production of supercooled water (-2°C) and releasing of its supercooling simultaneously and continuously in a closed piping system. In the experiment, we adopted the irradiation of ultrasonic wave as an active control method of triggering for supercooling releasing, and evaluated the reliability for a practical use compared with the seed ice-crystal trigger. As the results, it has been confirmed that the ultrasonic wave trigger acts assuredly at the same level of degree of supercooling as that by using the seed ice-crystal Trigger. Moreover, it can be found that the ultrasonic wave trigger has the advantage of removing the growing ice-crystals on the pipe wall at the same time. Finally, we have specified the bombardment condition of ultrasonic wave enough to make continuously the ice-slurry in a closed system as the output surface power density > 31.4kW/m2 and the superficial bombardment time > 4.1sec. We have also demonstrated the continuous ice-slurry making for more than 6hours by using the refrigerator system with the practical scale of 88kW.

  14. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  15. Supercooling points of Lysiphlebus testaceipes and its host Schizaphis graminum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercooling points (SCPs) were measured for various life stages of male and female Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) parasitoids, along with mummies and its aphid host, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani). Some parasitoids were acclimated (4 h at 10°C before cooling down to the SCP) to determine whether...

  16. Entropy Calculations for a Supercooled Liquid Crystalline Blue Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, U.

    2007-01-01

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example…

  17. Structure factor changes in supercooled yttria-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Martin C.; Greaves, G. Neville; Quang Vu Van; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Changes in the structure factor of yttria-alumina liquids have been identified in the supercooled range. Different inter-polyhedral configurations between AlO{sub 4} and YO{sub 6} groups distinguish low density and high density liquid phases. The coexistence of phases at high temperatures have been identified in simultaneous measurements of small angle x-ray scattering.

  18. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic vibration on freezing of supercooled water

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Takaaki; Zhang, Xu; Yabe, Akira; Tanaka, Makoto; Kozawa, Yoshiyuki

    1999-07-01

    A method to actively control the supercooling of water is one of the critical issues for cold-energy storage systems utilizing ice slurry. The authors experimentally studied the use of ultrasonic water to ice. Figure A-1 shows a schematic of the experimental apparatus. A heat transfer plate made of copper was immersed in water and cooled by coolant from its upper side. The authors measured the maximum degree of supercooling in the absence of ultrasonic vibration (Exp. 1), and they examined the tendency for the supercooled water to freeze on the heat transfer surface when ultrasonic vibration was applied to the water (Exp. 2). Figure A-2 shows the probability of the freezing for pure water as a function of the degree of supercooling. A{sub e} represents the rate of surface erosion on an aluminum film attached to the heat transfer surface, which is an index of the cavitation intensity. Comparing the results of Exp. 1 and Exp. 2 shows that ultrasonic vibration is effective for promoting freezing. The results of Exp. 2 indicate that the probability of freezing on the heat transfer surface exposed to ultrasonic vibration increased as the surface erosion increased. Furthermore, the authors found that ultrasonic vibration is effective not only for controlling the freezing temperature but also for making ice slurry.

  20. Analysis of supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleation) activity of flavonol glycosides.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Kuwabara, Chikako; Wang, Donghui; Nishioka, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Emiko; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2010-04-01

    Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) of katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) contain four kinds of flavonol glycosides with high supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleation) activities. These flavonol glycosides have very similar structures, but their supercooling-facilitating activities are very different. In this study, we analyzed the supercooling-facilitating activities of 12 kinds of flavonol glycosides in order to determine the chemical structures that might affect supercooling-facilitating activity. All of the flavonol glycosides tested showed supercooling-facilitating activity, although the magnitudes of activity differed among the compounds. It was clear that the combination of the position of attachment of the glycosyl moiety, the kind of attached glycosyl moiety and the structure of aglycone determined the magnitude of anti-ice nucleation activity. However, there is still some ambiguity preventing the exact identification of features that affect the magnitude of supercooling-facilitating activity.

  1. Analysis of supercooling activity of tannin-related polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Wang, Donghui; Endoh, Keita; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the discovery of novel supercooling-promoting hydrolyzable gallotannins from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree (see Wang et al. (2012) [38]), supercooling capability of a wide variety of tannin-related polyphenols (TRPs) was examined in order to find more effective supercooling-promoting substances for their applications. The TRPs examined were single compounds including six kinds of hydrolyzable tannins, 11 kinds of catechin derivatives, two kinds of structural analogs of catechin and six kinds of phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives, 11 kinds of polyphenol mixtures and five kinds of crude plant tannin extracts. The effects of these TRPs on freezing were examined by droplet freezing assays using various solutions containing different kinds of identified ice nucleators such as the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, the INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol as well as a solution containing only unintentionally included unidentified airborne ice nucleators. Among the 41 kinds of TRPs examined, all of the hydrolyzable tannins, catechin derivatives, polyphenol mixtures and crude plant tannin extracts as well as a few structural analogs of catechin and phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives exhibited supercooling-promoting activity (SCA) with significant differences (p>0.05) from at least one of the solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. It should be noted that there were no TRPs exhibiting ice nucleation-enhancing activity (INA) in all solutions containing identified ice nucleators, whereas there were many TRPs exhibiting INA with significant differences in solutions containing unidentified ice nucleators alone. An emulsion freezing assay confirmed that these TRPs did not essentially affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. It is thought that not only SCA but also INA in the TRPs are produced by interactions with heterogeneous ice nucleators, not by direct interaction with water

  2. Diminution of supercooling of electrolytes by carbon particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S.P.; Xu, K.; Zhang, S.S.; Jow, T.R.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G.L.

    1999-11-01

    A liquid solution composed of a pure or mixed solvent and a dissolved salt is the most common form of electrolyte used in electrochemical devices for energy storage and conversion, such as batteries and capacitors. For such an electrolyte, one of the most important properties is its crystallization temperature, which limits the low-temperature operation of a device containing such an electrolyte. If thermodynamic equilibria were strictly followed, crystallization of an electrolyte would start as soon as it is cooled to its liquidus temperature. But such is seldom the case, as an electrolyte by itself often supercools well below this temperature. This supercooling can delay or even eliminate the crystallization of an electrolyte, thus substantially extending its apparent liquid range. The authors studied the supercooling behavior of a number of solutions of LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate-ethyl methyl carbonate in 1:1 weight ratio with and without the presence of one of these carbons: activated carbon, carbon black, and mesocarbon microbeads. The results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the supercooling of less concentrated solutions is significantly diminished by the presence of a carbon, the degree and the nature of which depends on the concentration of the electrolyte and the type of carbon present. The results of conductivity measurements also indicate precipitation in some of the electrolytes at low temperatures, which correlates well with the DSC results. The authors therefore conclude that the temperature range in which an electrolyte supercools without a nucleating material is unreliable for the operation of an electrochemical device containing such an electrolyte. Instead, the liquidus temperature of an electrolyte should be used as the lower limit of operation if the possibility of its crystallization is to be excluded.

  3. Analysis of supercooling activity of tannin-related polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Wang, Donghui; Endoh, Keita; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the discovery of novel supercooling-promoting hydrolyzable gallotannins from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree (see Wang et al. (2012) [38]), supercooling capability of a wide variety of tannin-related polyphenols (TRPs) was examined in order to find more effective supercooling-promoting substances for their applications. The TRPs examined were single compounds including six kinds of hydrolyzable tannins, 11 kinds of catechin derivatives, two kinds of structural analogs of catechin and six kinds of phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives, 11 kinds of polyphenol mixtures and five kinds of crude plant tannin extracts. The effects of these TRPs on freezing were examined by droplet freezing assays using various solutions containing different kinds of identified ice nucleators such as the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, the INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol as well as a solution containing only unintentionally included unidentified airborne ice nucleators. Among the 41 kinds of TRPs examined, all of the hydrolyzable tannins, catechin derivatives, polyphenol mixtures and crude plant tannin extracts as well as a few structural analogs of catechin and phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives exhibited supercooling-promoting activity (SCA) with significant differences (p>0.05) from at least one of the solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. It should be noted that there were no TRPs exhibiting ice nucleation-enhancing activity (INA) in all solutions containing identified ice nucleators, whereas there were many TRPs exhibiting INA with significant differences in solutions containing unidentified ice nucleators alone. An emulsion freezing assay confirmed that these TRPs did not essentially affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. It is thought that not only SCA but also INA in the TRPs are produced by interactions with heterogeneous ice nucleators, not by direct interaction with water

  4. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense

  5. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense

  6. Shear viscosity of a supercooled polymer melt via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnik, F.; Binder, K.

    2002-10-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we compute the shear viscosity, ηs, of a glass forming polymer melt at temperatures ranging from the normal liquid state down to the supercooled state. For this purpose, the polymer melt is confined between two solid walls and a constant force pointing in direction parallel to the walls is applied on each monomer thus giving rise to a Poiseuille flow. It is shown that ηs(T) does not exhibit an Arrhenius-type behavior but can be described both by a power law (mode coupling theory) and by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. A similar behavior is observed in recent experiments above the glass transition temperature. The diffusion coefficient is computed using the mean square displacements in direction perpendicular to the flow. Combined with the knowledge of ηs(T), it is then shown that the Stokes-Einstein relation is valid at high temperatures, whereas deviations are observed in the supercooled regime in agreement with experiments. Moreover, the local viscosity, η(z), is also computed and its reliability is discussed. Using the sharp rise of η(z) close to the wall, we estimate zwall, the effective position of the wall. It is found that zwall moves towards the film center at lower T thus leading to a decrease of the (hydrodynamic) width of the system. Furthermore, we observe that the curves for η(z)/ηs at various temperatures superimpose if the data are depicted versus z-zwall(T). This suggests that the spatial and temperature dependence of the local viscosity separate if the effective position of the wall is chosen as a new reference plane.

  7. Suppression of phase transitions in a confined rodlike liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Christos; Duran, Hatice; Steinhart, Martin; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2011-11-22

    The nematic-to-isotropic, crystal-to-nematic, and supercooled liquid-to-glass temperatures are studied in the liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) confined in self-ordered nanoporous alumina. The nematic-to-isotropic and the crystal-to-nematic transition temperatures are reduced linearly with the inverse pore diameter. The finding that the crystalline phase is completely suppressed in pores having diameters of 35 nm and below yields an estimate of the critical nucleus size. The liquid-to-glass temperature is reduced in confinement as anticipated by the model of rotational diffusion within a cavity. These results provide the pertinent phase diagram for a confined liquid crystal and are of technological relevance for the design of liquid crystal-based devices with tunable optical, thermal, and dielectric properties.

  8. General constitutive model for supercooled liquids: anomalous transverse wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2013-03-01

    A transverse acoustic wave propagates through supercooled liquids in an anomalous manner: for a macroscopic wave number k, the wave propagates long distances, as in elastic solids, whereas it attenuates rapidly for a mesoscopic to microscopic wave number k, as in viscous liquids. In this work, we theoretically describe this anomalous wave propagation using the hydrodynamics of the two-mode Maxwell constitutive model, which were determined independently from the mechanical properties under oscillatory shear strains. To ensure that the Maxwell model can be applied down to a microscopic length scale, we extended it to a k-dependent equation, taking into account the recently reported k dependences of the shear viscosity and modulus [A. Furukawa and H. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135703 (2009); A. Furukawa H. Tanaka Phys. Rev. E 84, 061503 (2011)]. The anomalous wave propagation in supercooled liquids can also be understood in terms of a linear coupling of many independent normal modes, as in amorphous solids. PMID:23496725

  9. The hydrology of subglacial overdeepenings: A new supercooling threshold formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werder, Mauro A.

    2016-03-01

    Overdeepenings are a hallmark glacial landform of broad geomorphologlogical and glaciological interest. Their formation mechanism has not yet been fully uncovered, but subglacial drainage is likely a key factor. One prominent hypothesis states that the depth of an overdeepening stabilizes at the supercooling threshold. This threshold is reached when the adverse bed slope terminating an overdeepening is sufficiently large to shut down the efficient, channelized drainage system. Classic theory puts this threshold at a ratio of bed to surface slope of -1.6. Here I extend that theory by taking into account that downstream water pressure can be below overburden pressure. The new formula agrees well with results from one- and two-dimensional subglacial drainage models. Applying it to observations of 147 overdeepenings from alpine glaciers and ice sheets shows that the depth of overdeepenings rarely exceeds the new supercooling threshold. Thus, this work supports the stabilizing hypothesis.

  10. Behavior of severely supercooled water drops impacting on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Tiwari, Manish K.; Mularczyk, Adrian; Imeri, Zulkufli; Schoch, Philippe; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-11-01

    Surface icing, commonplace in nature and technology, has broad implications to daily life. To prevent surface icing, superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings with rationally controlled roughness features (both at micro and nano-scale) are considered to be a promising candidate. However, to fabricate/synthesize a high performance icephobic surface or coating, understanding the dynamic interaction between water and the surface during water drop impact in supercooled state is necessary. In this work, we investigate the water/substrate interaction using drop impact experiments down to -17°C. It is found that the resulting increased viscous effect of water at low temperature significantly affects all stages of drop dynamics such as maximum spreading, contact time and meniscus penetration into the superhydrophobic texture. Most interestingly, the viscous effect on the meniscus penetration into roughness feature leads to clear change in the velocity threshold for rebounding to sticking transition by 25% of supercooled drops. Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) Grant 200021_135479.

  11. Shear-accelerated crystallization in a supercooled atomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhen; Singer, Jonathan P; Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Ze; Li, Huiping; Gopinadhan, Manesh; O'Hern, Corey S; Schroers, Jan; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-02-01

    A bulk metallic glass forming alloy is subjected to shear flow in its supercooled state by compression of a short rod to produce a flat disk. The resulting material exhibits enhanced crystallization kinetics during isothermal annealing as reflected in the decrease of the crystallization time relative to the nondeformed case. The transition from quiescent to shear-accelerated crystallization is linked to strain accumulated during shear flow above a critical shear rate γ̇(c)≈0.3 s(-1) which corresponds to Péclet number, Pe∼O(1). The observation of shear-accelerated crystallization in an atomic system at modest shear rates is uncommon. It is made possible here by the substantial viscosity of the supercooled liquid which increases strongly with temperature in the approach to the glass transition. We may therefore anticipate the encounter of nontrivial shear-related effects during thermoplastic deformation of similar systems.

  12. Rapid Chemical Ordering in Supercooled Liquid Cu46Zr54

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Victor; Gangopadhyay, Anup; Sahu, K. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Canepari, S. M.; Rogers, J. R.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Goldman, Alan; Robinson, D.; Lee, Jae W; Morris, James R; Kelton, K. F.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for abrupt chemical ordering in a supercooled Cu46Zr54 liquid, obtained from high energy x-ray diffraction in a containerless processing environment, is presented. Relatively sudden changes were observed in the topological and chemical short-range order near 850oC, a temperature significantly below the liquidus and above the glass transition temperatures. A peak in the specific heat was observed with supercooling, with an onset near 850oC, the same temperature as the onset of chemical ordering, and a maximum near 700oC, consistent with the prediction of a molecular dynamics calculation using embedded atom potentials. The dominant short-range order below 850oC is incompatible with that of the primary crystallizing phases. This, and the possible development of strongly bonded, chemically ordered clustersmay explain unlikely bulk metallic glass formation in Cu-Zr and other binary alloys.

  13. Self-learning metabasin escape algorithm for supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Penghui; Li, Minghai; Heugle, Ravi J; Park, Harold S; Lin, Xi

    2012-07-01

    A generic history-penalized metabasin escape algorithm that contains no predetermined parameters is presented in this work. The spatial location and volume of imposed penalty functions in the configurational space are determined in self-learning processes as the 3N-dimensional potential energy surface is sampled. The computational efficiency is demonstrated using a binary Lennard-Jones liquid supercooled below the glass transition temperature, which shows an O(10(3)) reduction in the quadratic scaling coefficient of the overall computational cost as compared to the previous algorithm implementation. Furthermore, the metabasin sizes of supercooled liquids are obtained as a natural consequence of determining the self-learned penalty function width distributions. In the case of a bulk binary Lennard-Jones liquid at a fixed density of 1.2, typical metabasins are found to contain about 148 particles while having a correlation length of 3.09 when the system temperature drops below the glass transition temperature.

  14. Highly supercooled cirrus cloud water: confirmation and climatic implications.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K; Liou, K N; Kinne, S; Griffin, M

    1985-01-25

    Liquid cloud droplets supercooled to temperatures approaching -40 degrees C have been detected at the base of a cirrostratus cloud through a combination of ground-based, polarization laser radar (lidar) and in situ aircraft measurements, Solar and thermal infrared radiative budget calculations based on these observatoins indicate that significant changes in the atmospheric heating distribution and the surface radiative budget may be attributed to liquid layers in cirrus clouds.

  15. Substrate-enhanced supercooling in AuSi eutectic droplets.

    PubMed

    Schülli, T U; Daudin, R; Renaud, G; Vaysset, A; Geaymond, O; Pasturel, A

    2010-04-22

    The phenomenon of supercooling in metals-that is, the preservation of a disordered, fluid phase in a metastable state well below the melting point-has led to speculation that local atomic structure configurations of dense, symmetric, but non-periodic packing act as the main barrier for crystal nucleation. For liquids in contact with solids, crystalline surfaces induce layering of the adjacent atoms in the liquid and may prevent or lower supercooling. This seed effect is supposed to depend on the local lateral order adopted in the last atomic layers of the liquid in contact with the crystal. Although it has been suggested that there might be a direct coupling between surface-induced lateral order and supercooling, no experimental observation of such lateral ordering at interfaces is available. Here we report supercooling in gold-silicon (AuSi) eutectic droplets, enhanced by a Au-induced (6 x 6) reconstruction of the Si(111) substrate. In situ X-ray scattering and ab initio molecular dynamics reveal that pentagonal atomic arrangements of Au atoms at this interface favour a lateral-ordering stabilization process of the liquid phase. This interface-enhanced stabilization of the liquid state shows the importance of the solid-liquid interaction for the structure of the adjacent liquid layers. Such processes are important for present and future technologies, as fluidity and crystallization play a key part in soldering and casting, as well as in processing and controlling chemical reactions for microfluidic devices or during the vapour-liquid-solid growth of semiconductor nanowires.

  16. Units of freezing of deep supercooled water in woody xylem.

    PubMed

    Hong, S G; Sucoff, E

    1980-07-01

    The low temperature exotherms (LTE) of 1-year-old twigs of Haralson apple (Malus pumila Mill.), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata [Mill.] K. Koch), green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos L.), American chestnut (Castanea dentata [Marsh] Borkh.), and red oak (Quercus rubra L.) were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA). In one type of experiment freezing during a DTA experiment was halted for up to 2.5 hours after part of the supercooled water had frozen at temperatures between -25 and -42 C. Upon resumption of cooling the freezing started within 2 C of the stopping temperature. In a second type of experiment living and dead cells were microscopically observed in the same ray after partial freezing in the DTA apparatus. In another experiment, the LTE persisted even after tangential and radial sectioning of the twig to 0.13 millimeters. In a final experiment the LTE of a single multiseriate ray of red oak had the same shape as the LTE of wood with many uniseriate rays.These experiments confirm that the deep supercooled water in woody xylem or pith freezes in numerous independent events over a span of as much as 20 C. The units which freeze in an event are single cells or small groups of cells. Ice grows very slowly if at all from these units, and water moves very slowly from unfrozen cells to frozen ones. Deep supercooling of ray parenchyma does not require an intact ray. PMID:16661390

  17. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A.; Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S.; Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E.; Nava, M.; Grisenti, R. E.

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  18. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, M; Fernández, J M; Tramonto, F; Tejeda, G; Moreno, E; Kalinin, A; Nava, M; Galli, D E; Montero, S; Grisenti, R E

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH2) or orthodeuterium (oD2) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH2 and oD2 crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH2-oD2 liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites. PMID:26277142

  19. Photocreating supercooled spiral-spin states in a multiferroic manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Y. M.; Ogawa, N.; Kaneko, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the dynamics of the a b -spiral-spin order in a magnetoelectric multiferroic Eu0.55Y0.45MnO3 can be unambiguously probed through optical second harmonic signals, generated via spin-induced ferroelectric polarization. In the case of weak excitation, the ferroelectric and the spiral-spin order remains interlocked, both relaxing through spin-lattice relaxation in the nonequilibrium state. When the additional optical pulse illuminating the sample is intense enough to induce a local phase transition thermally, the system creates a metastable state of the b c -spiral-spin order (with the electric polarization P ∥c ) via supercooling across the first-order phase transition between the a b and b c spiral. The supercooled state of the b c -spiral spin is formed in the thermodynamical ground state of the a b spiral (P ∥a ), displaying a prolonged lifetime with strong dependence on the magnetic field along the a axis. The observed phenomena provide a different paradigm for photoswitching between the two distinct multiferroic states, motivating further research into a direct observation of the photocreated supercooled b c -spiral spin in multiferroic manganites.

  20. Growth of metal oxide nanowires from supercooled liquid nanodroplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. H.; Lee, B.; Lee, S.; Larson, C.; Balik, J. M.; Yavuz, C. T.; Seifert, S.; Vajda, S.; Winans, R. E.; Moskovits, M.; Stucky, G. D.; Wodtke, A. M.; Univ. of California at Santa Barbara; Yale Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Nanometer-sized liquid droplets formed at temperatures below the bulk melting point become supercooled as they grow through Ostwald ripening or coalescence and can be exploited to grow nanowires without any catalyst. We used this simple approach to synthesize a number of highly crystalline metal oxide nanowires in a chemical or physical vapor deposition apparatus. Examples of nanowires made in this way include VO{sub 2}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, RuO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, some of which have not been previously reported. Direct evidence of this new mechanism of nanowire growth is found from in situ 2-dimensional GISAXS (grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering) measurements of VO{sub 2} nanowire growth, which provides quantitative information on the shapes and sizes of growing nanowires as well as direct evidence of the presence of supercooled liquid droplets. We observe dramatic changes in nanowire growth by varying the choice of substrate, reflecting the influence of wetting forces on the supercooled nanodroplet shape and mobility as well as substrate-nanowire lattice matching on the definition of nanowire orientation. Surfaces with defects can also be used to pattern the growth of the nanowires. The simplicity of this synthesis concept suggests it may be rather general in its application.

  1. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnel, M.; Fernández, J. M.; Tramonto, F.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Kalinin, A.; Nava, M.; Galli, D. E.; Montero, S.; Grisenti, R. E.

    2015-08-01

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH2) or orthodeuterium (oD2) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH2 and oD2 crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH2-oD2 liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  2. Lack of supercooling evolution related to winter severity in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Michels-Boyce, Madeline; Zani, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    As organisms move into higher latitudes, they may evolve physiological mechanisms to survive in harsher climates. One such mechanism is supercooling, the capacity to survive at subzero temperatures without freezing. While interspecific comparisons reveal greater thermal tolerances at higher latitudes in insects and vertebrates, evidence for intraspecific evolution in supercooling related to latitude is only evident in insects. We measured the supercooling points of lizards from 12 populations reared from hatch in common laboratory conditions to test for evolved differences in supercooling related to winter. Results indicate that winter harshness (depth or length) cannot explain supercooling points regardless of how data are analyzed, which suggests that populations have not evolved greater supercooling capacity. While our results are consistent with the idea that thermal physiology is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates, we cannot reject several alternatives including the possibility that lizards are able to behaviorally avoid the extreme temperatures that would select for thermal evolution. PMID:26590458

  3. Lack of supercooling evolution related to winter severity in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Michels-Boyce, Madeline; Zani, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    As organisms move into higher latitudes, they may evolve physiological mechanisms to survive in harsher climates. One such mechanism is supercooling, the capacity to survive at subzero temperatures without freezing. While interspecific comparisons reveal greater thermal tolerances at higher latitudes in insects and vertebrates, evidence for intraspecific evolution in supercooling related to latitude is only evident in insects. We measured the supercooling points of lizards from 12 populations reared from hatch in common laboratory conditions to test for evolved differences in supercooling related to winter. Results indicate that winter harshness (depth or length) cannot explain supercooling points regardless of how data are analyzed, which suggests that populations have not evolved greater supercooling capacity. While our results are consistent with the idea that thermal physiology is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates, we cannot reject several alternatives including the possibility that lizards are able to behaviorally avoid the extreme temperatures that would select for thermal evolution.

  4. Crystallization in diblock copolymer thin films at different degrees of supercooling.

    PubMed

    Darko, C; Botiz, I; Reiter, G; Breiby, D W; Andreasen, J W; Roth, S V; Smilgies, D-M; Metwalli, E; Papadakis, C M

    2009-04-01

    The crystalline structures in thin films of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymers were studied in dependence on the degree of supercooling. Atomic force microscopy showed that the crystalline domains (lamellae) consist of grains, which are macroscopic at low and intermediate degrees of supercooling, but of submicrometer size for strong supercooling. Using grazing-incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering, we could determine the grain orientation distribution function which shows that the chain stems are perpendicular to the lamellae at low supercooling, but tilted at intermediate and strong supercooling. These results suggest that, at intermediate and strong supercooling, the crystalline PEO lamellae do not grow homogeneously, but by the formation of small crystallites at the growth front.

  5. Supercooling effects in Cu-10 wt pct Co alloys solidified at different cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munitz, A.; Elder-Randall, S. P.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-01-01

    Electromagnetic levitation and electron beam surface melting were employed to study the effects of supercooling and cooling rate on the solidification of Cu-10 wt pct Co alloys. Two major effects were observed in the supercooled alloys: the nucleation of a metastable copper-rich phase which contains 13 wt pct to 20 wt pct Co in samples supercooled between 105 and 150 K and liquid phase separation which occurs in samples supercooled 150 K or more. The microstructure of the electron beam melted surfaces consisted of very fine spheres which were similar to those of the sample supercooled more than 150 K but with a refined microstructure. The results indicate that a dynamic bulk supercooling of 150 K may exist in the molten pool during the solidification of electron beam melted surfaces.

  6. Evidence for the existence of supercooled ethane droplets under conditions prevalent in Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsson, Omar F; Signorell, Ruth

    2008-11-01

    Recent evidence for ethane clouds and condensation in Titan's atmosphere raise the question whether liquid ethane condensation nuclei and supercooled liquid ethane droplets exist under the prevalent conditions. We present laboratory studies on the phase behaviour of pure ethane aerosols and ethane aerosols formed in the presence of other ice nuclei under conditions relevant to Titan's atmosphere. Combining bath gas cooling with infrared spectroscopy, we find evidence for the existence of supercooled liquid ethane aerosol droplets. The observed homogeneous freezing rates imply that supercooled ethane could be a long-lived species in ethane-rich regions of Titan's atmosphere similar to supercooled water in the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Evidence for the existence of supercooled ethane droplets under conditions prevalent in Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsson, Omar F; Signorell, Ruth

    2008-11-01

    Recent evidence for ethane clouds and condensation in Titan's atmosphere raise the question whether liquid ethane condensation nuclei and supercooled liquid ethane droplets exist under the prevalent conditions. We present laboratory studies on the phase behaviour of pure ethane aerosols and ethane aerosols formed in the presence of other ice nuclei under conditions relevant to Titan's atmosphere. Combining bath gas cooling with infrared spectroscopy, we find evidence for the existence of supercooled liquid ethane aerosol droplets. The observed homogeneous freezing rates imply that supercooled ethane could be a long-lived species in ethane-rich regions of Titan's atmosphere similar to supercooled water in the Earth's atmosphere. PMID:18936843

  8. Change of supercooling capability in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators by flavonol glycosides from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells in trees.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Kasuga, Jun; Wang, Donghui; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Koyama, Toshie; Inada, Takaaki; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree contain flavonol glycosides with high supercooling-facilitating capability in solutions containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, which is thought to have an important role in deep supercooling of XPCs. The present study, in order to further clarify the roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs, the effects of these supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleating) flavonol glycosides, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K3Glc), kaempferol 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K7Glc) and quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (Q3Glc), in buffered Milli-Q water (BMQW) containing different kinds of ice nucleators, including INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol, were examined by a droplet freezing assay. The results showed that all of the flavonol glycosides promoted supercooling in all solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators, although the magnitudes of supercooling capability of each flavonol glycoside changed in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. On the other hand, these flavonol glycosides exhibited complicated nucleating reactions in BMQW, which did not contain identified ice nucleators but contained only unidentified airborne impurities. Q3Glc exhibited both supercooling-facilitating and ice nucleating capabilities depending on the concentrations in such water. Both K3Glc and K7Glc exhibited only ice nucleation capability in such water. It was also shown by an emulsion freezing assay in BMQW that K3Glc and Q3Glc had no effect on homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, whereas K7Glc increased ice nucleation temperature. The results indicated that each flavonol glycoside affected ice nucleation by very complicated and varied reactions. More studies are necessary to determine the exact roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs in which unidentified heterogeneous ice nucleators may exist.

  9. Change of supercooling capability in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators by flavonol glycosides from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells in trees.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Kasuga, Jun; Wang, Donghui; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Koyama, Toshie; Inada, Takaaki; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree contain flavonol glycosides with high supercooling-facilitating capability in solutions containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, which is thought to have an important role in deep supercooling of XPCs. The present study, in order to further clarify the roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs, the effects of these supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleating) flavonol glycosides, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K3Glc), kaempferol 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K7Glc) and quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (Q3Glc), in buffered Milli-Q water (BMQW) containing different kinds of ice nucleators, including INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol, were examined by a droplet freezing assay. The results showed that all of the flavonol glycosides promoted supercooling in all solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators, although the magnitudes of supercooling capability of each flavonol glycoside changed in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. On the other hand, these flavonol glycosides exhibited complicated nucleating reactions in BMQW, which did not contain identified ice nucleators but contained only unidentified airborne impurities. Q3Glc exhibited both supercooling-facilitating and ice nucleating capabilities depending on the concentrations in such water. Both K3Glc and K7Glc exhibited only ice nucleation capability in such water. It was also shown by an emulsion freezing assay in BMQW that K3Glc and Q3Glc had no effect on homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, whereas K7Glc increased ice nucleation temperature. The results indicated that each flavonol glycoside affected ice nucleation by very complicated and varied reactions. More studies are necessary to determine the exact roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs in which unidentified heterogeneous ice nucleators may exist. PMID

  10. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  11. Arrest as a General Property of the Supercooled Liquid State.

    PubMed

    Sluyters, Jan H; Sluyters-Rehbach, Margaretha

    2016-04-21

    Owing to the universal presence of intermolecular interactions, it has to be expected that at some well-defined lower temperature a liquid loses its dynamic properties like fluidity and self-diffusion. As a sequel to two earlier papers on the discovery of such an arrest temperature T0 for supercooled water at 243 K, where also the coexisting vapor pressure was found to become zero, in this paper a further study is undertaken of the behavior of a selection of other liquids. At first, two simple equations of state (van der Waals and virial) are shown in principle to predict a zero vapor pressure at a finite temperature. The interaction parameters B (second virial coefficient) and μJT (Joule-Thomson coefficient) of the vapor are found to become virtually infinite at a temperature T0,B, with a value equal or close to the T0 derived from the liquid properties. Just as earlier found for water, the latter is obtained by extrapolation of several available dynamic and equilibrium data, which should produce an intersection with the temperature axis at the same T0 value. With the exception of molten salts and liquid pure metals, this condition appears to be fulfilled quite accurately. Thus, the temperature of arrest is a general phenomenon for supercooled liquids. As an illustration, it is shown how the PVT diagram of carbon dioxide can be extended into the supercooled temperature region. It is argued that T0 is the temperature below which the Boltzmann energy, kT, is lower than the minimal energy needed for a molecule to break the interactions with its surrounding molecules. We propose to name this minimal energy, kT0, the multimolecular potential of the liquid object. The relationship of the liquid multimolecular potential with the pair potential, ε, of the molecular species is established for various examples and appears to be a proportionality with ε ≈ 2kT0. PMID:27070201

  12. A Database of Supercooled Large Droplet Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss

    2007-01-01

    A unique, publicly available database regarding supercooled large droplet ice accretions has been developed in NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel. Identical cloud and flight conditions were generated for five different airfoil models. The models chosen represent a variety of aircraft types from the horizontal stabilizer of a large trans-port aircraft to the wings of regional, business, and general aviation aircraft. In addition to the standard documentation methods of 2D ice shape tracing and imagery, ice mass measurements were also taken. This database will also be used to validate and verify the extension of the ice accretion code, LEWICE, into the SLD realm.

  13. A Database of Supercooled Large Droplet Ice Accretions [Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss

    2007-01-01

    A unique, publicly available database regarding supercooled large droplet (SLD) ice accretions has been developed in NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel. Identical cloud and flight conditions were generated for five different airfoil models. The models chosen represent a variety of aircraft types from the horizontal stabilizer of a large transport aircraft to the wings of regional, business, and general aviation aircraft. In addition to the standard documentation methods of 2D ice shape tracing and imagery, ice mass measurements were also taken. This database will also be used to validate and verify the extension of the ice accretion code, LEWICE, into the SLD realm.

  14. Ice-Crystal Fallstreaks from Supercooled Liquid Water Parent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; O'C. Starr, David; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    On 31 December 2001, ice-crystal fallstreaks (e.g., cirrus uncinus, or colloquially "Mare's Tails") from supercooled liquid water parent clouds were observed by ground-based lidars pointed vertically from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The incidence of liquid phase cloud with apparent ice-phase precipitation is investigated. Scenarios for mixed-phase particle nucleation, and fallstreak formation and sustenance are discussed. The observations are unique in the context of the historical reverence given to the commonly observed c h s uncinus fallstreak (wholly ice) versus this seemingly contradictory coincidence of liquid water begetting ice-crystal streaks.

  15. Supercooling of the normal state of a type I superconductor in the presence of surface superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V. A. Khlyustikov, I. N.

    2009-05-15

    Supercooling of the normal state of lead single crystals is studied experimentally in the range of surface superconductivity. The supercooling field is plotted on the phase diagram of the superconductor. The experimental data are compared with the results of theoretical calculations.

  16. Cold hardiness and supercooling capacity in the overwintering larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Khani, Abbas; Moharramipour, Saeid

    2010-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a worldwide apple pest, is classified as a freeze-intolerant organism and one of the most cold-tolerant pests. The objectives of this study were to examine the supercooling point of overwintering and non-diapausing larvae of C. pomonella as an index of its cold hardiness, and to assess larval mortality following 24 h exposure to extreme low temperatures ranging from -5 to -25 degrees C. The mean (+/-SE) supercooling point for feeding larvae (third through fifth instars) was -12.4 +/- 1.1 degrees C. The mean supercooling point for cocooned, non-diapausing larvae (i.e., non-feeding stages) decreased as the days that the arvae were cocooned increased and changed between -15.1 +/- 1.2 degrees C for one to two day cocooned arvae and -19.2 +/- 1.8 degrees C for less than five day cocooned larvae. The mean (+/-SE) supercooling point for other non-feeding stages containing pupae and overwintering larvae were -19.9 +/- 1.0 degrees C and -20.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively. Mean supercooling points of C. pomonella larvae were significantly lower during the winter months than the summer months, and sex had no effect on the supercooling point of C. pomonella larvae. The mortality of larvae increased significantly after individuals were exposed to temperatures below the mean supercooling point of the population. The supercooling point was a good predictor of cold hardiness.

  17. Neutron diffraction studies of structural phase transformations for water-ice in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, John; Webber, Beau; Hartl, Monika; Behrens, Peter; Hansen, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made for D 2O water in the confined geometry of various mesoporous silicas over a wide temperature range. The data have been taken for cooling and heating runs incorporating the nucleation and melting of the crystalline phases and the super-cooled liquid phase. The crystalline forms and the temperatures at which they change are shown to be strongly dependent on the pore size and type of silica used as the confining medium and relate to the phase relationship between hexagonal ice [ Ih] and cubic ice [ Ic].

  18. Role of intracellular contents to facilitate supercooling capability in beech (Fagus crenata) xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Miyaji, Natsuko; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2006-01-01

    In order to find the possible role of intracellular contents in facilitating the supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells, changes in the temperature of supercooling levels were compared before and after the release of intracellular substances from beech xylem parenchyma cells by DTA. Various methods were employed to release intracellular substances from xylem parenchyma cells and all resulted in a reduction of supercooling ability. It was concluded that the reduction of supercooling ability primarily resulted from changes of intracellular conditions, including the release of intracellular contents or their mixing with extracellular solutions, rather than due to changes of cell wall structures. It is therefore suggested that any unidentified intracellular contents may function to facilitate supercooling capability in xylem parenchyma cells.

  19. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Cansiz, Erol; Isler, Sabri Cemil; Gultekin, B Alper

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth.

  20. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  1. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  2. Generalized Parton Distributions And Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering At Clas

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, Rita

    2007-09-01

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering is the simplest process to access the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon. A dedicated large statistics experiment for the measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering with a 6 GeV polarized electron beam on a proton target has been performed at the Hall-B of Jefferson Laboratory with the CLAS spectrometer. The experiment covered a wide kinematic range, allowing the study of the beam spin asymmetry as function of the Bjorken variable xB, the Mandelstam variable t, the virtual photon four-momentum squared Q2 and the angle phi between leptonic and hadronic planes. The preliminary results are in agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted twist-2 dominance.

  3. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Isler, Sabri Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth. PMID:27429810

  4. Tensorial analysis of Eshelby stresses in 3D supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2015-10-28

    It was recently proposed that the local rearrangements governing relaxation in supercooled liquids impress on the liquid medium long-ranged (Eshelby) stress fluctuations that accumulate over time. From this viewpoint, events must be characterized by elastic dipoles, which are second order tensors, and Eshelby fields are expected to show up in stress and stress increment correlations, which are fourth order tensor fields. We construct here an analytical framework that permits analyzing such tensorial correlations in isotropic media in view of accessing Eshelby fields. Two spherical bases are introduced, which correspond to Cartesian and spherical coordinates for tensors. We show how they can be used to decompose stress correlations and thus test such properties as isotropy and power-law scalings. Eshelby fields and the predicted stress correlations in an infinite medium are shown to belong to an algebra that can conveniently be described using the spherical tensor bases. Using this formalism, we demonstrate that the inherent stress field of 3D supercooled liquids is power law correlated and carries the signature of Eshelby fields, thus supporting the idea that relaxation events give rise to Eshelby stresses that accumulate over time. PMID:26520535

  5. Ice nucleation by particles immersed in supercooled cloud droplets.

    PubMed

    Murray, B J; O'Sullivan, D; Atkinson, J D; Webb, M E

    2012-10-01

    The formation of ice particles in the Earth's atmosphere strongly affects the properties of clouds and their impact on climate. Despite the importance of ice formation in determining the properties of clouds, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) was unable to assess the impact of atmospheric ice formation in their most recent report because our basic knowledge is insufficient. Part of the problem is the paucity of quantitative information on the ability of various atmospheric aerosol species to initiate ice formation. Here we review and assess the existing quantitative knowledge of ice nucleation by particles immersed within supercooled water droplets. We introduce aerosol species which have been identified in the past as potentially important ice nuclei and address their ice-nucleating ability when immersed in a supercooled droplet. We focus on mineral dusts, biological species (pollen, bacteria, fungal spores and plankton), carbonaceous combustion products and volcanic ash. In order to make a quantitative comparison we first introduce several ways of describing ice nucleation and then summarise the existing information according to the time-independent (singular) approximation. Using this approximation in combination with typical atmospheric loadings, we estimate the importance of ice nucleation by different aerosol types. According to these estimates we find that ice nucleation below about -15 °C is dominated by soot and mineral dusts. Above this temperature the only materials known to nucleate ice are biological, with quantitative data for other materials absent from the literature. We conclude with a summary of the challenges our community faces.

  6. Slow dynamics of a tagged particle in a supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P.

    2015-12-01

    The ergodicity-nonergodicity (ENE) transition of the self-consistent mode-coupling theory (MCT) is marked by the point at which the time correlation of collective density fluctuations is not zero in the long-time limit. The nonergodic state, reaching beyond the ENE transition of simple MCT, is characterized by a finite shear modulus. The MCT, formulated in the current set of papers, predicts that the single-particle density correlation, unlike the collective density correlation, decays to zero at long times on either side of the ENE transition. The self-diffusion coefficient remains finite. This differs from the existing MCT results in which both collective and single-particle correlations are simultaniously frozen at the ENE transition. We discuss in this paper mechanisms by which a sharp fall in self-diffusion coefficient may occur within the present model. This overdamping or the so-called adiabatic approximation for the supercooled state does not maintain microscopic momentum conservation. Within this approximation, the self-diffusion constant approaches zero at the ENE transition point. This approximate result, which is similar to the prediction of the existing MCT models, further illustrates the process of cage formation with increase of density. At a qualitative level, our analysis shows that the self-diffusion process depends on the structure as well as short-time transport properties of the supercooled liquid. We solve the integral equations for the nonergodicity parameters to analyze the full implications of the adiabatic approximation.

  7. Spontaneous freezing of supercooled water under isochoric and adiabatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2013-07-11

    The return of a supercooled liquid to equilibrium usually begins with a fast heating up of the sample which ends when the system reaches the equilibrium freezing temperature. At this stage, the system is still a microsegregated mixture of solid and liquid. Only later is solidification completed through the exchange of energy with the surroundings. Using the IAPWS-95 formulation, we investigate the adiabatic freezing of supercooled water in a closed and rigid vessel, i.e., under thermally and mechanically isolated conditions, which captures the initial stage of the decay of metastable water to equilibrium. To improve realism further, we also account for a fixed amount of foreign gas in the vessel. Under the simplifying assumption that the system is at equilibrium immediately after the nominal freezing temperature has been attained, we determine-as a function of undercooling and gas mole number-the final temperature and pressure of the system, the fraction of ice at equilibrium, and the entropy increase. Assuming a nonzero energy cost for the ice-water interface, we also show that, unless sufficiently undercooled, perfectly isolated pure-water droplets cannot start freezing in the bulk.

  8. Magnetization Processes During FM Transitions of Supercooled Er Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2000-03-01

    FM transitions are generally accompanied by dimensional changes of the crystal lattice. In magnetic films, the in-plane dimensional changes are inhibited by clamping to the substrate, creating a rich variety of phenomena (e.g. supercooling, dislocation formation and motion, bowing of dislocations, and altered magnetization processes), which can be directly observed with x-rays. Here we characterize the magnetization processes exhibited by unstrained Er films. Below the Curie temperature, the film exhibits supercooling, remaining in a metastable non-FM state and only relaxing to the FM state when a magnetic field is applied. This occurs by two distinct processes. The first process, which broadens the x-ray line shape, is nucleation and growth of FM domains. The second, which produces no line broadening, is isotropic magnetization of the entire film. Once magnetized, the film remains in the FM state until the temperature is raised several degrees above the Curie temperature, at which point the film relaxes to the non-FM state via one of these two paths. This process depends on the temperature when the field is removed.

  9. Polyethylene glycol protects primary hepatocytes during supercooling preservation.

    PubMed

    Puts, C F; Berendsen, T A; Bruinsma, B G; Ozer, Sinan; Luitje, Martha; Usta, O Berk; Yarmush, M L; Uygun, K

    2015-08-01

    Cold storage (at 4°C) offers a compromise between the benefits and disadvantages of cooling. It allows storage of organs or cells for later use that would otherwise quickly succumb to warm ischemia, but comprises cold ischemia that, when not controlled properly, can result in severe damage as well by both similar and unique mechanisms. We hypothesized that polyethylene glycol (PEG) 35 kDa would ameliorate these injury pathways and improve cold primary hepatocyte preservation. We show that reduction of the storage temperature to below zero by means of supercooling, or subzero non-freezing, together with PEG supplementation increases the viable storage time of primary rat hepatocytes in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution from 1 day to 4 days. We find that the addition of 5% PEG 35 kDa to the storage medium prevents cold-induced lipid peroxidation and maintains hepatocyte viability and functionality during storage. These results suggest that PEG supplementation in combination with supercooling may enable a more optimized cell and organ preservation.

  10. Supercooling preservation and transplantation of the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Berendsen, Tim A; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Yeh, Heidi; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-03-01

    The current standard for liver preservation involves cooling of the organ on ice (0-4 °C). Although it is successful for shorter durations, this method of preservation does not allow long-term storage of the liver. The gradual loss of hepatic viability during preservation puts pressure on organ sharing and allocation, may limit the use of suboptimal grafts and necessitates rushed transplantation to achieve desirable post-transplantation outcomes. In an attempt to improve and prolong liver viability during storage, alternative preservation methods are under investigation. For instance, ex vivo machine perfusion systems aim to sustain and even improve viability by supporting hepatic function at warm temperatures, rather than simply slowing down deterioration by cooling. Here we describe a novel subzero preservation technique that combines ex vivo machine perfusion with cryoprotectants to facilitate long-term supercooled preservation. The technique improves the preservation of rat livers to prolong storage times as much as threefold, which is validated by successful long-term recipient survival after orthotopic transplantation. This protocol describes how to load rat livers with cryoprotectants to prevent both intracellular and extracellular ice formation and to protect against hypothermic injury. Cryoprotectants are loaded ex vivo using subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP), after which livers can be cooled to -6 °C without freezing and kept viable for up to 96 h. Cooling to a supercooled state is controlled, followed by 3 h of SNMP recovery and orthotopic liver transplantation.

  11. Supercooled water relaxation dynamics probed with heterodyne transient grating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschin, Andrea; Bartolini, Paolo; Eramo, Roberto; Torre, Renato

    2006-09-01

    We report results from a heterodyne-detected transient grating experiment on liquid and supercooled water in a wide temperature range, from -17.5to90°C . The measured signal covers an extremely large time window with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio that enables the investigation in a single experiment of the sound speed and attenuation, thermal diffusivity, and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. The experimental data clearly show the effect of the density and the temperature fluctuations on the water dielectric function. In order to describe the experimental results, we introduce a comprehensive hydrodynamic model taking into account the coupled density and temperature variables and their relevance in the definition of the spontaneous and forced dielectric variations. We use this model to describe the measured signal in transient grating experiments, including the heating and the electrostrictive sources produced by the laser excitation. The fitting procedure enables the safe extraction of several dynamic proprieties of liquid and supercooled water: the sound velocity and its damping, the thermal diffusivity, and the ratio between the dielectric thermodynamic derivatives. The measured parameters are compared to the literature data and discussed in the complex scenario of water physics.

  12. The Contribution of Constitutional Supercooling to Nucleation and Grain Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StJohn, D. H.; Prasad, A.; Easton, M. A.; Qian, M.

    2015-11-01

    The concept of constitutional supercooling (CS) including the term itself was first described and discussed qualitatively by Rutter and Chalmers in order to understand the formation of cellular structures during the solidification of tin, and then quantified by Tiller et al. On that basis, Winegard and Chalmers further considered `supercooling and dendritic freezing of alloys' where they described how CS promotes the heterogeneous nucleation of new crystals and the formation of an equiaxed zone. Since then the importance of CS in promoting the formation of equiaxed microstructures in both grain refined and unrefined alloys has been clearly revealed and quantified. This paper describes our current understanding of the role of CS in promoting nucleation and grain formation. It also highlights that CS, on the one hand, develops a nucleation-free zone surrounding each nucleated and growing grain and, on the other hand, protects this grain from readily remelting when temperature fluctuations occur due to convection. Further, due to the importance of the diffusion field that generates CS, recent analytical models are evaluated and compared with a numerical model. A comprehensive description of the mechanisms affecting nucleation and grain formation and the prediction of grain size is presented with reference to the influence of the casting conditions applied during the practical casting of an alloy.

  13. Algorithm development for deeply buried threat detection in GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichman, Daniël.; Malof, Jordan M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2016-05-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a popular remote sensing modality for buried threat detection. Many algorithms have been developed to detect buried threats using GPR data. One on-going challenge with GPR is the detection of very deeply buried targets. In this work a detection approach is proposed that improves the detection of very deeply buried targets, and interestingly, shallow targets as well. First, it is shown that the signal of a target (the target "signature") is well localized in time, and well correlated with the target's burial depth. This motivates the proposed approach, where GPR data is split into two disjoint subsets: an early and late portion corresponding to the time at which shallow and deep target signatures appear, respectively. Experiments are conducted on real GPR data using the previously published histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) prescreener: a fast supervised processing method operated on HOG features. The results show substantial improvements in detection of very deeply buried targets (4.1% to 17.2%) and in overall detection performance (81.1% to 83.9%). Further, it is shown that the performance of the proposed approach is relatively insensitive to the time at which the data is split. These results suggest that other detection methods may benefit from depth-based processing as well.

  14. Persistence of deeply sourced iron in the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Tristan J.; Williams, Helen M.; Hein, James R.; Saito, Mak A.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.; Nielsen, Sune G.

    2015-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is limited by the supply of Fe in vast regions of the global ocean. Dissolved Fe in seawater is primarily sourced from continental mineral dust, submarine hydrothermalism, and sediment dissolution along continental margins. However, the relative contributions of these three sources to the Fe budget of the open ocean remains contentious. By exploiting the Fe stable isotopic fingerprints of these sources, it is possible to trace distinct Fe pools through marine environments, and through time using sedimentary records. We present a reconstruction of deep-sea Fe isotopic compositions from a Pacific Fe−Mn crust spanning the past 76 My. We find that there have been large and systematic changes in the Fe isotopic composition of seawater over the Cenozoic that reflect the influence of several, distinct Fe sources to the central Pacific Ocean. Given that deeply sourced Fe from hydrothermalism and marginal sediment dissolution exhibit the largest Fe isotopic variations in modern oceanic settings, the record requires that these deep Fe sources have exerted a major control over the Fe inventory of the Pacific for the past 76 My. The persistence of deeply sourced Fe in the Pacific Ocean illustrates that multiple sources contribute to the total Fe budget of the ocean and highlights the importance of oceanic circulation in determining if deeply sourced Fe is ever ventilated at the surface. PMID:25605900

  15. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2011-06-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in Deeply Virtual Exclusive Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction ep {yields} ep{gamma} in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q^2 {>=} 2 GeV^2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the Deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e, e'p{gamma} ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the JLab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The {rho} and {omega} channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the {phi}-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  16. Persistence of deeply sourced iron in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Horner, Tristan J; Williams, Helen M; Hein, James R; Saito, Mak A; Burton, Kevin W; Halliday, Alex N; Nielsen, Sune G

    2015-02-01

    Biological carbon fixation is limited by the supply of Fe in vast regions of the global ocean. Dissolved Fe in seawater is primarily sourced from continental mineral dust, submarine hydrothermalism, and sediment dissolution along continental margins. However, the relative contributions of these three sources to the Fe budget of the open ocean remains contentious. By exploiting the Fe stable isotopic fingerprints of these sources, it is possible to trace distinct Fe pools through marine environments, and through time using sedimentary records. We present a reconstruction of deep-sea Fe isotopic compositions from a Pacific Fe-Mn crust spanning the past 76 My. We find that there have been large and systematic changes in the Fe isotopic composition of seawater over the Cenozoic that reflect the influence of several, distinct Fe sources to the central Pacific Ocean. Given that deeply sourced Fe from hydrothermalism and marginal sediment dissolution exhibit the largest Fe isotopic variations in modern oceanic settings, the record requires that these deep Fe sources have exerted a major control over the Fe inventory of the Pacific for the past 76 My. The persistence of deeply sourced Fe in the Pacific Ocean illustrates that multiple sources contribute to the total Fe budget of the ocean and highlights the importance of oceanic circulation in determining if deeply sourced Fe is ever ventilated at the surface.

  17. Shear-Triggered Crystallization and Light Emission of a Thermally Stable Organic Supercooled Liquid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyeongwoon; Kwon, Min Sang; Leung, Brendan M; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Jeongyong; Takayama, Shuichi; Gierschner, Johannes; Matzger, Adam J; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-05-27

    Thermodynamics drive crystalline organic molecules to be crystallized at temperatures below their melting point. Even though molecules can form supercooled liquids by rapid cooling, crystalline organic materials readily undergo a phase transformation to an energetically favorable crystalline phase upon subsequent heat treatment. Opposite to this general observation, here, we report molecular design of thermally stable supercooled liquid of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives and their intriguing shear-triggered crystallization with dramatic optical property changes. Molten DPP8, one of the DPP derivatives, remains as stable supercooled liquid without crystallization through subsequent thermal cycles. More interestingly, under shear conditions, this supercooled liquid DPP8 transforms to its crystal phase accompanied by a 25-fold increase in photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency and a color change. By systematic investigation on supercooled liquid formation of crystalline DPP derivatives and their correlation with chemical structures, we reveal that the origin of this thermally stable supercooled liquid is a subtle force balance between aromatic interactions among the core units and van der Waals interactions among the aliphatic side chains acting in opposite directions. Moreover, by applying shear force to a supercooled liquid DPP8 film at different temperatures, we demonstrated direct writing of fluorescent patterns and propagating fluorescence amplification, respectively. Shear-triggered crystallization of DPP8 is further achieved even by living cell attachment and spreading, demonstrating the high sensitivity of the shear-triggered crystallization which is about 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than typical mechanochromism observed in organic materials. PMID:27162955

  18. Shear-Triggered Crystallization and Light Emission of a Thermally Stable Organic Supercooled Liquid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamics drive crystalline organic molecules to be crystallized at temperatures below their melting point. Even though molecules can form supercooled liquids by rapid cooling, crystalline organic materials readily undergo a phase transformation to an energetically favorable crystalline phase upon subsequent heat treatment. Opposite to this general observation, here, we report molecular design of thermally stable supercooled liquid of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives and their intriguing shear-triggered crystallization with dramatic optical property changes. Molten DPP8, one of the DPP derivatives, remains as stable supercooled liquid without crystallization through subsequent thermal cycles. More interestingly, under shear conditions, this supercooled liquid DPP8 transforms to its crystal phase accompanied by a 25-fold increase in photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency and a color change. By systematic investigation on supercooled liquid formation of crystalline DPP derivatives and their correlation with chemical structures, we reveal that the origin of this thermally stable supercooled liquid is a subtle force balance between aromatic interactions among the core units and van der Waals interactions among the aliphatic side chains acting in opposite directions. Moreover, by applying shear force to a supercooled liquid DPP8 film at different temperatures, we demonstrated direct writing of fluorescent patterns and propagating fluorescence amplification, respectively. Shear-triggered crystallization of DPP8 is further achieved even by living cell attachment and spreading, demonstrating the high sensitivity of the shear-triggered crystallization which is about 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than typical mechanochromism observed in organic materials. PMID:27162955

  19. Supercooling of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions under acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2006-10-14

    The supercooling capability of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions is investigated at containerless state by using acoustic levitation method. The supercooling of water is obviously enhanced by the alkali metal ions and increases linearly with the augmentation of concentrations. Furthermore, the supercooling depends on the nature of ions and is 2-3 K larger for NaCl solution than that for KCl solution in the present concentration range: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to reveal the intrinsic correlation between supercoolability and microstructure. The translational and orientational order parameters are applied to quantitatively demonstrate the effect of ionic concentration on the hydrogen-bond network and ice melting point. The disrupted hydrogen-bond structure determines essentially the concentration dependence of supercooling. On the other hand, the introduced acoustic pressure suppresses the increase of supercooling by promoting the growth and coalescence of microbubbles, the effective nucleation catalysts, in water. However, the dissolved ions can weaken this effect, and moreover the degree varies with the ion type. This results in the different supercoolability for NaCl and KCl solutions under the acoustic levitation conditions. PMID:17042605

  20. Supercooling of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions under acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2006-10-14

    The supercooling capability of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions is investigated at containerless state by using acoustic levitation method. The supercooling of water is obviously enhanced by the alkali metal ions and increases linearly with the augmentation of concentrations. Furthermore, the supercooling depends on the nature of ions and is 2-3 K larger for NaCl solution than that for KCl solution in the present concentration range: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to reveal the intrinsic correlation between supercoolability and microstructure. The translational and orientational order parameters are applied to quantitatively demonstrate the effect of ionic concentration on the hydrogen-bond network and ice melting point. The disrupted hydrogen-bond structure determines essentially the concentration dependence of supercooling. On the other hand, the introduced acoustic pressure suppresses the increase of supercooling by promoting the growth and coalescence of microbubbles, the effective nucleation catalysts, in water. However, the dissolved ions can weaken this effect, and moreover the degree varies with the ion type. This results in the different supercoolability for NaCl and KCl solutions under the acoustic levitation conditions.

  1. Seasonal change in the capacity for supercooling by neonatal painted turtles.

    PubMed

    Packard, G C; Packard, M J; McDaniel, L L

    2001-05-01

    Hatchlings of the North American painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) typically spend their first winter of life inside the shallow, subterranean nest where they completed incubation the preceding summer. This facet of their natural history commonly causes neonates in northerly populations to be exposed in mid-winter to ice and cold, which many animals survive by remaining unfrozen and supercooled. We measured the limit of supercooling in samples of turtles taken shortly after hatching and in other samples after 2 months of acclimation (or acclimatization) to a reduced temperature in the laboratory or field. Animals initially had only a limited capacity for supercooling, but they acquired an ability to undergo deeper supercooling during the course of acclimation. The gut of most turtles was packed with particles of soil and eggshell shortly after hatching, but not after acclimation. Thus, the relatively high limit of supercooling for turtles in the days immediately after hatching may have resulted from the ingestion of soil (and associated nucleating agents) by the animals as they were freeing themselves from their eggshell, whereas the relatively low limit of supercooling attained by acclimated turtles may have resulted from their purging their gut of its contents. Parallels may, therefore, exist between the natural-history strategy expressed by hatchling painted turtles and that expressed by numerous terrestrial arthropods that withstand the cold of winter by sustaining a state of supercooling.

  2. Decoupling of rotational and translational diffusion in supercooled colloidal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Edmond, Kazem V.; Elsesser, Mark T.; Hunter, Gary L.; Pine, David J.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    We use confocal microscopy to directly observe 3D translational and rotational diffusion of tetrahedral clusters, which serve as tracers in colloidal supercooled fluids. We find that as the colloidal glass transition is approached, translational and rotational diffusion decouple from each other: Rotational diffusion remains inversely proportional to the growing viscosity whereas translational diffusion does not, decreasing by a much lesser extent. We quantify the rotational motion with two distinct methods, finding agreement between these methods, in contrast with recent simulation results. The decoupling coincides with the emergence of non-Gaussian displacement distributions for translation whereas rotational displacement distributions remain Gaussian. Ultimately, our work demonstrates that as the glass transition is approached, the sample can no longer be approximated as a continuum fluid when considering diffusion. PMID:23071311

  3. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  4. Ultraslow dielectric relaxation process in supercooled polyhydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yoshiki; Minoguchi, Ayumi; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2006-04-01

    Complex permittivity was obtained on glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol and sorbitol-xylitol mixtures in the supercooled liquid state in the frequency range between 10μHz and 500MHz at temperatures near and above the glass transition temperature. For all the materials, a dielectric relaxation process was observed in addition to the well-known structural α and Johari-Goldstein β relaxation process [G. P. Johari and M. Goldstein, J. Chem. Phys. 53, 2372 (1970)]. The relaxation time for the new process is always larger than that for the α process. The relaxation time shows non-Arrhenius temperature dependence with correlation to the behavior of the α process and it depends on the molecular size systematically. The dielectric relaxation strength for the new process shows the effect of thermal history and decreases exponentially with time at a constant temperature. It can be considered that a nonequilibrium dynamics causes the new process.

  5. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D.

    2008-03-15

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  6. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  7. Correlation between supercooled liquid relaxation and glass Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qijing; Hu, Lina; Zhou, Chao; Zheng, Haijiao; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-10-01

    We report on a correlation between the supercooled liquid (SL) relaxation and glass Poisson's ratio (v) by comparing the activation energy ratio (r) of the α and the slow β relaxations and the v values for both metallic and nonmetallic glasses. Poisson's ratio v generally increases with an increase in the ratio r and this relation can be described by the empirical function v = 0.5 - A*exp(-B*r), where A and B are constants. This correlation might imply that glass plasticity is associated with the competition between the α and the slow β relaxations in SLs. The underlying physics of this correlation lies in the heredity of the structural heterogeneity from liquid to glass. This work gives insights into both the microscopic mechanism of glass deformation through the SL dynamics and the complex structural evolution during liquid-glass transition.

  8. Exchange of deeply trapped and interstitial hydrogen in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.; Van de Walle, C.G.; Adams, J.B.

    1999-02-01

    Using {ital ab initio} density-functional calculations, we examine possible exchange mechanisms between an interstitial hydrogen atom and a deeply bound H at a silicon-hydrogen bond. We determine a low-energy pathway for exchange, which involves an intermediate, metastable {equivalent_to}SiH{sub 2} complex with both hydrogen atoms strongly bound to the silicon atom. The energy barrier for the exchange process is E{sub ex}{lt}0.2 eV, consistent with observations of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in a-Si:H(D) films. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at JLab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Voutier

    2007-04-16

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering reaction has been investigated in the Hall A of the Jefferson Laboratory by measuring longitudinally polarized (e,e'gamma) cross sections, in the valence quark region, for protons and neutrons. In the proton channel, experimental results strongly support the factorization of the cross section at Q2 as low as 2 GeV2, opening the path to systematic measurements of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In the neutron case, preliminary data show sensitivity to the angular momentum of quarks.

  10. Explosive fluid transmitted shock method for mining deeply buried coal

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, Paul B.

    1976-06-22

    A method for recovering coal from deeply buried deposits comprising drilling a hole down into a coal seam, filling the hole with water, and periodically detonating an explosive charge at the bottom of the water-filled hole. The water transmits the explosive shock wave to the face of the coal seam, thereby fracturing and dislodging the coal. The resulting suspension of loose coal in water is then pumped to the surface where the coal is recovered and the water is recycled to the mining operation.

  11. Beam Spin Asymmetry Measurements from Deeply Virtual Meson Production

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, K.; Ungaro, M.; Zhao, B.; De Masi, R.; Garcon, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Stoler, P.

    2007-06-13

    Study of deeply virtual exclusive meson production (DVMP), is being conducted in the E1-DVCS experiment with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The main motivation of the experiment is to characterize the partonic properties of the nucleon in the framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). The data were taken in the spring of 2005 using a 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target. We report on the on-going beam spin asymmetry analysis for pseudo-scalar channels and future experiments.

  12. Beam Spin Asymmetry Measurements from Deeply Virtual Meson Production

    SciTech Connect

    K. Joo; R. De Masi; M. Garcon; V. Kubarovsky; P. Stoler; M. Ungaro; B. Zhao

    2007-06-01

    Study of deeply virtual exclusive meson production (DVMP), is being conducted in the E1-DVCS experiment with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The main motivation of the experiment is to characterize the partonic properties of the nucleon in the framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). The data were taken in the spring of 2005 using a 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target. We report on the on-going beam spin asymmetry analysis for pseudo-scalar channels and future experiments.

  13. The structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. Traditionally ice was thought to exist in two well-crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. It has recently been shown, using X-ray diffraction data, that ice which crystallizes homogeneously and heterogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I (ice Isd) . This result is consistent with a number of computational studies of the crystallization of water. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder, which raises the question of whether cubic ice exists. New data will be presented which shows significant stacking disorder (or stacking faults on the order of 1 in every 100 layers of ice Ih) in droplets which froze heterogeneously as warm as 257 K. The identification of stacking-disordered ice from heterogeneous ice nucleation supports the hypothesis that the structure of ice that initially crystallises from supercooled water is stacking-disordered ice I, independent of nucleation mechanism, but this ice can relax to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. The formation and persistence of stacking disordered ice in the Earth's atmosphere will also be discussed. Funded by the European Research Council (FP7, 240449 ICE)

  14. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  15. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  16. Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  17. Freezing Behavior of a Supercooled Water Droplet Impacting on Surface Using Dual-Luminescent Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mio; Morita, Katsuaki; Yamamoto, Makoto; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    A collision of a supercooled-water droplet on an object creates ice accretion on its surface. These icing problems can be seen in any cold environments and may lead to severe damages on aircrafts, ships, power cables, trees, road signs, and architectures. To solve these problems, various studies on ice-prevention and ice-prediction techniques have been conducted. It is very important to know the detail freezing mechanism of supercooled water droplets to propose or improve those techniques. The icing mechanism of a single supercooled-water droplet impacting on object surface would give us great insights for constructing those techniques. In the present study, we use a dual-luminescent imaging technique to measure the time-resolved temperatures of a supercooled water droplet impacting with different speed. The technique we applied consists of high-speed color camera and two luminescent probes. We will report the current status of this experiment in the presentation.

  18. Effects of various degrees of supercooling and nucleation temperatures on fertility of frozen turkey spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zavos, P M; Graham, E F

    1983-10-01

    The relative roles of the degree of supercooling and nucleation temperatures on turkey sperm cell survival and fertilizing capacity during a freeze-thaw cycle were investigated. Basically, the higher the degree of supercooling, which produced lower spontaneous nucleation temperatures during the freezing process, the worse the sperm cells survived, in the present study. When induced nucleation was applied, which eliminated the high degree of supercooling, an improvement in sperm cell survival was noted. During the fertility trial, it was shown that in treatment 3 (induced nucleation) the fertility was higher (P less than 0.05) than in treatment 2 (spontaneous nucleation). In general, the degree of supercooling prior to freezing is an important variable and should be considered very seriously during the overall freezing process.

  19. Roles of cell walls and intracellular contents in supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells of boreal trees.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Endoh, Keita; Yoshiba, Megumi; Taido, Ippei; Arakawa, Keita; Uemura, Matsuo; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2013-05-01

    The supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in boreal hardwood species differs depending not only on species, but also season. In this study, the roles of cell walls and intracellular contents in supercooling capability of XPCs were examined in three boreal hardwood species, Japanese beech, katsura tree and mulberry, whose supercooling capability differs largely depending on species and season. XPCs in these species harvested in winter and summer were treated by rapid freezing and thawing (RFT samples) or by RFT with further washing (RFTW samples) to remove intracellular contents from XPCs in order to examine the roles of cell walls in supercooling. RFT samples were also treated with glucose solution (RFTG samples) to examine roles of intracellular contents in supercooling. The supercooling capabilities of these samples were examined by differential thermal analysis after ultrastructural observation of XPCs by a cryo-scanning electron microscope to confirm effects of the above treatments. XPCs in RFTW samples showed a large reduction in supercooling capability to similar temperatures regardless of species or season. On the other hand, XPCs in RFTG samples showed a large increase in supercooling capability to similar temperatures regardless of species or season. These results indicate that although cell walls have an important role in maintenance of supercooling, change in supercooling capability of XPCs is induced by change in intracellular contents, but not by change in cell wall properties. PMID:22901079

  20. Roles of cell walls and intracellular contents in supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells of boreal trees.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Endoh, Keita; Yoshiba, Megumi; Taido, Ippei; Arakawa, Keita; Uemura, Matsuo; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2013-05-01

    The supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in boreal hardwood species differs depending not only on species, but also season. In this study, the roles of cell walls and intracellular contents in supercooling capability of XPCs were examined in three boreal hardwood species, Japanese beech, katsura tree and mulberry, whose supercooling capability differs largely depending on species and season. XPCs in these species harvested in winter and summer were treated by rapid freezing and thawing (RFT samples) or by RFT with further washing (RFTW samples) to remove intracellular contents from XPCs in order to examine the roles of cell walls in supercooling. RFT samples were also treated with glucose solution (RFTG samples) to examine roles of intracellular contents in supercooling. The supercooling capabilities of these samples were examined by differential thermal analysis after ultrastructural observation of XPCs by a cryo-scanning electron microscope to confirm effects of the above treatments. XPCs in RFTW samples showed a large reduction in supercooling capability to similar temperatures regardless of species or season. On the other hand, XPCs in RFTG samples showed a large increase in supercooling capability to similar temperatures regardless of species or season. These results indicate that although cell walls have an important role in maintenance of supercooling, change in supercooling capability of XPCs is induced by change in intracellular contents, but not by change in cell wall properties.

  1. Factors contributing to deep supercooling capability and cold survival in dwarf bamboo (Sasa senanensis) leaf blades

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Oda, Asuka; Fukami, Reiko; Kuriyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wintering Sasa senanensis, dwarf bamboo, is known to employ deep supercooling as the mechanism of cold hardiness in most of its tissues from leaves to rhizomes. The breakdown of supercooling in leaf blades has been shown to proceed in a random and scattered manner with a small piece of tissue surrounded by longitudinal and transverse veins serving as the unit of freezing. The unique cold hardiness mechanism of this plant was further characterized using current year leaf blades. Cold hardiness levels (LT20: the lethal temperature at which 20% of the leaf blades are injured) seasonally increased from August (−11°C) to December (−20°C). This coincided with the increases in supercooling capability of the leaf blades as expressed by the initiation temperature of low temperature exotherms (LTE) detected in differential thermal analyses (DTA). When leaf blades were stored at −5°C for 1–14 days, there was no nucleation of the supercooled tissue units either in summer or winter. However, only summer leaf blades suffered significant injury after prolonged supercooling of the tissue units. This may be a novel type of low temperature-induced injury in supercooled state at subfreezing temperatures. When winter leaf blades were maintained at the threshold temperature (−20°C), a longer storage period (1–7 days) increased lethal freezing of the supercooled tissue units. Within a wintering shoot, the second or third leaf blade from the top was most cold hardy and leaf blades at lower positions tended to suffer more injury due to lethal freezing of the supercooled units. LTE were shifted to higher temperatures (2–5°C) after a lethal freeze-thaw cycle. The results demonstrate that the tissue unit compartmentalized with longitudinal and transverse veins serves as the unit of supercooling and temperature- and time-dependent freezing of the units is lethal both in laboratory freeze tests and in the field. To establish such supercooling in the unit, structural ice

  2. Factors contributing to deep supercooling capability and cold survival in dwarf bamboo (Sasa senanensis) leaf blades.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Oda, Asuka; Fukami, Reiko; Kuriyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Wintering Sasa senanensis, dwarf bamboo, is known to employ deep supercooling as the mechanism of cold hardiness in most of its tissues from leaves to rhizomes. The breakdown of supercooling in leaf blades has been shown to proceed in a random and scattered manner with a small piece of tissue surrounded by longitudinal and transverse veins serving as the unit of freezing. The unique cold hardiness mechanism of this plant was further characterized using current year leaf blades. Cold hardiness levels (LT20: the lethal temperature at which 20% of the leaf blades are injured) seasonally increased from August (-11°C) to December (-20°C). This coincided with the increases in supercooling capability of the leaf blades as expressed by the initiation temperature of low temperature exotherms (LTE) detected in differential thermal analyses (DTA). When leaf blades were stored at -5°C for 1-14 days, there was no nucleation of the supercooled tissue units either in summer or winter. However, only summer leaf blades suffered significant injury after prolonged supercooling of the tissue units. This may be a novel type of low temperature-induced injury in supercooled state at subfreezing temperatures. When winter leaf blades were maintained at the threshold temperature (-20°C), a longer storage period (1-7 days) increased lethal freezing of the supercooled tissue units. Within a wintering shoot, the second or third leaf blade from the top was most cold hardy and leaf blades at lower positions tended to suffer more injury due to lethal freezing of the supercooled units. LTE were shifted to higher temperatures (2-5°C) after a lethal freeze-thaw cycle. The results demonstrate that the tissue unit compartmentalized with longitudinal and transverse veins serves as the unit of supercooling and temperature- and time-dependent freezing of the units is lethal both in laboratory freeze tests and in the field. To establish such supercooling in the unit, structural ice barriers such as

  3. Gene expression associated with increased supercooling capability in xylem parenchyma cells of larch (Larix kaempferi).

    PubMed

    Takata, Naoki; Kasuga, Jun; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in larch adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling, while cortical parenchyma cells (CPCs) undergo extracellular freezing. The temperature limits of supercooling in XPCs changed seasonally from -30 degrees C during summer to -60 degrees C during winter as measured by freezing resistance. Artificial deacclimation of larch twigs collected in winter reduced the supercooling capability from -60 degrees C to -30 degrees C. As an approach to clarify the mechanisms underlying the change in supercooling capability of larch XPCs, genes expressed in association with increased supercooling capability were examined. By differential screening and differential display analysis, 30 genes were found to be expressed in association with increased supercooling capability in XPCs. These 30 genes were categorized into several groups according to their functions: signal transduction factors, metabolic enzymes, late embryogenesis abundant proteins, heat shock proteins, protein synthesis and chromatin constructed proteins, defence response proteins, membrane transporters, metal-binding proteins, and functionally unknown proteins. All of these genes were expressed most abundantly during winter, and their expression was reduced or disappeared during summer. The expression of all of the genes was significantly reduced or disappeared with deacclimation of winter twigs. Interestingly, all but one of the genes were expressed more abundantly in the xylem than in the cortex. Eleven of the 30 genes were thought to be novel cold-induced genes. The results suggest that change in the supercooling capability of XPCs is associated with expression of genes, including genes whose functions have not been identified, and also indicate that gene products that have been thought to play a role in dehydration tolerance by extracellular freezing also have a function by deep supercooling.

  4. Fragile to strong crossover at the Widom line in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, P.; Corradini, D.; Rovere, M.

    2013-11-28

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical properties of an aqueous solution of NaCl at a concentration of 0.67 mol/kg upon supercooling. In a previous study of the same ionic solution, we have located the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and determined the Widom line connected to the liquid-liquid transition. We present here the results obtained from the study of the self-intermediate scattering function in a large range of temperatures and densities approaching the LLCP. The structural relaxation is in agreement with the mode coupling theory (MCT) in the region of mild supercooling. In the deeper supercooled region the α-relaxation time as function of temperature deviates from the MCT power law prediction showing a crossover from a fragile to a strong behavior. This crossover is found upon crossing the Widom line. The same trend was found in bulk water upon supercooling and it appears almost unchanged by the interaction with ions apart from a shift in the thermodynamic plane toward lower pressures and higher temperatures. These results show that the phenomenology of supercooled water transfers from bulk to solution where the study of the supercooled region is experimentally less difficult.

  5. Ice nucleation in nature: supercooling point (SCP) measurements and the role of heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P W; Heneghan, A F; Haymet, A D J

    2003-02-01

    In biological systems, nucleation of ice from a supercooled aqueous solution is a stochastic process and always heterogeneous. The average time any solution may remain supercooled is determined only by the degree of supercooling and heterogeneous nucleation sites it encounters. Here we summarize the many and varied definitions of the so-called "supercooling point," also called the "temperature of crystallization" and the "nucleation temperature," and exhibit the natural, inherent width associated with this quantity. We describe a new method for accurate determination of the supercooling point, which takes into account the inherent statistical fluctuations of the value. We show further that many measurements on a single unchanging sample are required to make a statistically valid measure of the supercooling point. This raises an interesting difference in circumstances where such repeat measurements are inconvenient, or impossible, for example for live organism experiments. We also discuss the effect of solutes on this temperature of nucleation. Existing data appear to show that various solute species decrease the nucleation temperature somewhat more than the equivalent melting point depression. For non-ionic solutes the species appears not to be a significant factor whereas for ions the species does affect the level of decrease of the nucleation temperature.

  6. Fishbone Mode Excited by Deeply Trapped Energetic Beam Ions in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Bin; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Chundong; Zang, Qing; Ding, Siye; Li, Yingying; Wu, Xingquan; Wang, Jinfang; Shen, Biao; Zhong, Guoqiang; Li, Hao; Shi, Tonghui; EAST Team

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the fishbone mode phenomena during the injection of high-power neutral beams in EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). The features of the fishbone mode are presented. The change in frequency of the mode during a fishbone burst is from 1 kHz to 6 kHz. The nonlinear behavior of the fishbone mode is analyzed by using a prey-predator model, which is consistent with the experimental results. This model indicates that the periodic oscillations of the fishbone mode always occur near the critical value of fast ion beta. Furthermore, the neutral beam analysis for the discharge is done by using the NUBEAM module of the TRANSP code. According to the numerical simulation results and theoretical calculation, it can be concluded that the fishbone mode is driven by the deeply trapped energetic beam ions in EAST. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB101001, 2014DFG61950 and 2013GB112003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175211 and 11275233)

  7. Dark state experiments with ultracold, deeply-bound triplet molecules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Strauss, Christoph; Winkler, Klaus; Takekoshi, Tetsu; Grimm, Rudolf; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2009-01-01

    We examine dark quantum superposition states of weakly bound Rb2 Feshbach molecules and tightly bound triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state, created by subjecting a pure sample of Feshbach molecules in an optical lattice to a bichromatic Raman laser field. We analyze, both experimentally and theoretically, the creation and dynamics of these dark states. Coherent wavepacket oscillations of deeply bound molecules in lattice sites, as previously observed by Lang et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008, 101, 133005), are suppressed due to laser-induced phase locking of molecular levels. This can be understood as the appearance of a novel multilevel dark state. In addition, the experimental methods developed help to determine important properties of our coupled atom/ laser system. PMID:20151548

  8. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Beam-Spin Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod; R.A. Niyazov

    2008-01-24

    The beam spin asymmetries in the hard exclusive electroproduction of photons on the proton (ep -> epg) were measured over a wide kinematic range and with high statistical accuracy. These asymmetries result from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Over the whole kinematic range (x_B from 0.11 to 0.58, Q^2 from 1 to 4.8 GeV^2, -t from 0.09 to 1.8 GeV^2), the azimuthal dependence of the asymmetries is compatible with expectations from leading-twist dominance, A = a*sin(phi)/[1+c*cos(phi)]. This extensive set of data can thus be used to constrain significantly the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon in the valence quark sector.

  9. Mechanical annealing in the flow of supercooled metallic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Dai, Lan Hong; Liu, Lin

    2014-08-07

    Flow induced structural evolution in a supercooled metallic liquid Vit106a (Zr{sub 58.5}Cu{sub 15.6}Al{sub 10.3}Ni{sub 12.8}Nb{sub 2.8}, at. %) was investigated via uni-axial compression combined with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Compression tests at strain rates covering the transition from Newtonian flow to non-Newtonian flow and at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains were performed at the end of glass transition (T{sub g-end} = 703 K). The relaxation enthalpies measured by DSC indicate that the samples underwent non-Newtonian flow contain more free volume than the thermally annealed sample (703 K, 4 min), while the samples underwent Newtonian flow contain less, namely, the free volume of supercooled metallic liquids increases in non-Newtonian flow, while decreases in Newtonian flow. The oscillated variation of the relaxation enthalpies of the samples deformed at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains confirms that the decrease of free volume was caused by flow stress, i.e., “mechanical annealing.” Micro-hardness tests were also performed to show a similar structural evolution tendency. Based on the obtained results, the stress-temperature scaling in the glass transition of metallic glasses are supported experimentally, as stress plays a role similar to temperature in the creation and annihilation of free volume. In addition, a widening perspective angle on the glass transition of metallic glasses by exploring the 3-dimensional stress-temperature-enthalpy phase diagram is presented. The implications of the observed mechanical annealing effect on the amorphous structure and the work-hardening mechanism of metallic glasses are elucidated based on atomic level stress model.

  10. Experimental evidence for supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low temperature perchlorate glasses on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of liquid water on the cold and dry surface of Mars is possible where concentrated salt solutions lower the freezing point of water. The eutectic temperature is the maximum equilibrium freezing point depression possible for a given salt solution, which ranges from near 0°C for carbonates and sulfates, to as low as -75°C for perchlorates. Although eutectic temperatures suggest a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars, salt solutions will typically supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. We report on results investigating the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration for pure salt solutions and saturated soil solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. We measured supercooling by monitoring solution temperatures during slow cooling and warming experiments. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions typically supercool 5-15°C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the Martian summer. Remarkably, we found that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions never crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120°C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, which will induce crystallization in most salt solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are

  11. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  12. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  13. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. PMID:27440257

  14. Structures and Dynamics of Glass-Forming Colloidal Liquids under Spherical Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Recent theories predict that when a supercooled liquid approaches the glass transition, particle clusters with a special "amorphous order" nucleate within the liquid, which lead to static correlations dictating the dramatic slowdown of liquid relaxation. The prediction, however, has yet to be verified in 3D experiments. Here, we design a colloidal system, where particles are confined inside spherical cavities with an amorphous layer of particles pinned at the boundary. Using this novel system, we capture the amorphous-order particle clusters and demonstrate the development of a static correlation. Moreover, by investigating the dynamics of spherically confined samples, we reveal a profound influence of the static correlation on the relaxation of colloidal liquids. In analogy to glass-forming liquids with randomly pinned particles, we propose a simple relation for the change of the configurational entropy of confined colloidal liquids, which quantitatively explains our experimental findings and illustrates a divergent static length scale during the colloidal glass transition.

  15. PREFACE: Fourh Workshop on Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Supercooled Fluids, Glasses and Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Laura; Giordano, Marco; Leporini, Dino; Tosi, Mario

    2007-04-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents the Proceedings of the Fourh Workshop on Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Supercooled Fluids, Glasses and Amorphous Materials, held in Pisa from 17-22 September 2006. This was the fourth of a series of workshops on this theme started in 1995 as a joint initiative of the Università di Pisa and the Scuola Normale Superiore. The 2006 edition was attended by about 200 participants from Europe, Asia and the Americas. As for the earlier workshops, the main objective was to bring together scientists from different areas of science, technology and engineering, to comparatively discuss experimental facts and theoretical predictions on the dynamical processes that occur in supercooled fluids and other disordered materials in non-equilibrium states. The underlying conceptual unity of the field provides a common background for the scientific community working in its various areas. In this edition the number of sessions was increased to cover a wider range of topics of general and current interest, in a larger number of stimulating lectures. The core of the workshop was a set of general lectures followed by more specific presentations on current issues in the main areas of the field. The sessions were in sequence devoted to: non-equilibrium dynamics, aging and secondary relaxations, biomaterials, polyamorphism and water, polymer dynamics I, complex systems, pressure-temperature scaling, thin films, nanometre length-scale studies, folded states of proteins and polymer crystals, theoretical aspects and energy landscape approaches, relaxation and heterogeneous dynamics, rheology in fluids and entangled polymers, biopolymers, and polymer dynamics II. We thank the session chairmen and all speakers for the high quality of their contributions. The structure of this issue of the proceedings follows the sequence of the oral presentations in the workshop, complemented by some papers selected from the poster sessions. Two

  16. Liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Srikanth; Austen Angell, C.

    2003-11-01

    Silicon in its liquid and amorphous forms occupies a unique position among amorphous materials. Obviously important in its own right, the amorphous form is structurally close to the group of 4-4, 3-5 and 2-6 amorphous semiconductors that have been found to have interesting pressure-induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transitions. On the other hand, its liquid form has much in common, thermodynamically, with water and other `tetrahedral network' liquids that show density maxima. Proper study of the `liquid-amorphous transition', documented for non-crystalline silicon by both experimental and computer simulation studies, may therefore also shed light on phase behaviour in these related materials. Here, we provide detailed and unambiguous simulation evidence that the transition in supercooled liquid silicon, in the Stillinger-Weber potential, is thermodynamically of first order and indeed occurs between two liquid states, as originally predicted by Aptekar. In addition we present evidence to support the relevance of spinodal divergences near such a transition, and the prediction that the transition marks a change in the liquid dynamic character from that of a fragile liquid to that of a strong liquid.

  17. Surface-induced crystallization in supercooled tetrahedral liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Ghiringhelli, Luca M; Galli, Giulia

    2009-09-01

    Surfaces have long been known to have an intricate role in solid-liquid phase transformations. Whereas melting is often observed to originate at surfaces, freezing usually starts in the bulk, and only a few systems have been reported to exhibit signatures of surface-induced crystallization. These include assembly of chain-like molecules, some liquid metals and alloys and silicate glasses. Here, we report direct computational evidence of surface-induced nucleation in supercooled liquid silicon and germanium, and we illustrate the crucial role of free surfaces in the freezing process of tetrahedral liquids exhibiting a negative slope of their melting lines (dT/dP|coexist<0). Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the presence of free surfaces may enhance the nucleation rates by several orders of magnitude with respect to those found in the bulk. Our findings provide insight, at the atomistic level, into the nucleation mechanism of widely used semiconductors, and support the hypothesis of surface-induced crystallization in other tetrahedrally coordinated systems, in particular water in the atmosphere. PMID:19668207

  18. Structural evolution in the aging process of supercooled colloidal liquids.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    When a liquid is rapidly quenched to a temperature below the glass-transition point, it is driven out of equilibrium; it then slowly relaxes to a (quasi)equilibrium state. This slow relaxation process is called aging. By definition, any glasses are inevitably in the process of aging and actually slowly evolving with time. Thus the study of aging phenomena is of fundamental importance for understanding not only the nonequilibrium nature of the glass transition, but also the stability of glassy materials. Here we consider aging after a rather shallow quench, for which a system is still able to reach (metastable) equilibrium. By using polydisperse colloidal liquids as a model, we show the validity of dynamical scaling that there is only one relevant length scale not only for a quasiequilibrium supercooled state but also for a nonequilibrium process of aging, which is reminiscent of dynamical critical phenomena. Our finding indicates that the aging toward (metastable) equilibrium may be regarded as the growth process of critical-like fluctuations of static order associated with low-free-energy configurations, further suggesting that this ordering is the origin of cooperative slow dynamics in the systems studied. The generality of this statement for other glass-forming systems remains for a future study. PMID:25019784

  19. Source of Electrofreezing of Supercooled Water by Polar Crystals.

    PubMed

    Belitzky, Alik; Mishuk, Eran; Ehre, David; Lahav, Meir; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Polar crystals, which display pyroelectricity, have a propensity to elevate, in a heterogeneous nucleation, without epitaxy, the freezing temperature of supercooled water (SCW). Upon cooling, such crystals accumulate an electric charge at their surfaces, which creates weak electric fields,

  20. Numerical Simulations of Solidification in a Convecting Supercooled Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying

    2005-11-01

    We present a 2-D phase-field model with convection induced by a flow field applied to freezing into a supercooled melt of pure substance, nickle. Four-fold anisotropy is introduced to the interfacial energy. Renormalization group theory is applied to the phase-field model with convection to produce an efficient computational procedure for treating multiscales in both time and space. Numerical procedures and details of numerical parameters employed are provided, and convergence of the numerical method is demonstrated by conducting grid-function convergence tests. Dendrite structures, temperature fields, pressure fields, streamlines and velocity vector fields are presented at several different times during the dendrite growth process. Comparisons of dendrites and temperature fields with and without convection indicate that the flow field has a significant effect on the growth rate of the dendrites; in particular, it inhibits growth. In addition, the flow field influences the dendritic structural morphologies and thickness of the interface. Moreover, the dendrites behave as a solid body in the flow leading to stagnation points and other interesting flow features.

  1. Phonon interpretation of the 'boson peak' in supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Grigera, T S; Martín-Mayor, V; Parisi, G; Verrocchio, P

    2003-03-20

    Glasses are amorphous solids, in the sense that they display elastic behaviour. In crystalline solids, elasticity is associated with phonons, which are quantized vibrational excitations. Phonon-like excitations also exist in glasses at very high (terahertz; 10(12) Hz) frequencies; surprisingly, these persist in the supercooled liquids. A universal feature of such amorphous systems is the boson peak: the vibrational density of states has an excess compared to the Debye squared-frequency law. Here we investigate the origin of this feature by studying the spectra of inherent structures (local minima of the potential energy) in a realistic glass model. We claim that the peak is the signature of a phase transition in the space of the stationary points of the energy, from a minima-dominated phase (with phonons) at low energy to a saddle-point-dominated phase (without phonons). The boson peak moves to lower frequencies on approaching the phonon-saddle transition, and its height diverges at the critical point. Our numerical results agree with the predictions of euclidean random matrix theory on the existence of a sharp phase transition between an amorphous elastic phase and a phonon-free one. PMID:12646916

  2. Supercooling versus crystallization of nitric acid/water aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, R.S.; Anthony, S.E.; Tolbert, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) have been implicated in Antarctic and Arctic ozone loss. These clouds are comprised of small particles (diameter {approximately}1 {mu}m) and play two essential roles in perturbing the chemistry of ozone during winter. First, PSCs promote heterogeneous reactions which activate chlorine. Second, PSCs permanently remove nitrogen oxides from the stratosphere due to particle sedimentation. Both PSC reactivity and denitrification depend on the particle phase and composition. In my talk, I will discuss laboratory modeling of PSCs. FTIR spectroscopy was used to investigate the phase and composition of nitric acid/water aerosols at temperatures from 190 to 229 K. Static aerosol samples were generated and probed spectroscopically for time periods of up to 100 minutes. For aerosols containing a molar ratio of 1:1 and 3:1 H{sub 2}O:HNO{sub 3}, extensive supercooling was observed with no crystallization in 100 minutes. However, aerosols containing a molar ratio of 2:1 H{sub 2}O:HNO{sub 3} crystallized readily to nitric acid dehydrate (NAD). The rate of NAD crystallization was found to increase with increasing temperature and will be discussed.

  3. Structural evolution in the aging process of supercooled colloidal liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    When a liquid is rapidly quenched to a temperature below the glass-transition point, it is driven out of equilibrium; it then slowly relaxes to a (quasi)equilibrium state. This slow relaxation process is called aging. By definition, any glasses are inevitably in the process of aging and actually slowly evolving with time. Thus the study of aging phenomena is of fundamental importance for understanding not only the nonequilibrium nature of the glass transition, but also the stability of glassy materials. Here we consider aging after a rather shallow quench, for which a system is still able to reach (metastable) equilibrium. By using polydisperse colloidal liquids as a model, we show the validity of dynamical scaling that there is only one relevant length scale not only for a quasiequilibrium supercooled state but also for a nonequilibrium process of aging, which is reminiscent of dynamical critical phenomena. Our finding indicates that the aging toward (metastable) equilibrium may be regarded as the growth process of critical-like fluctuations of static order associated with low-free-energy configurations, further suggesting that this ordering is the origin of cooperative slow dynamics in the systems studied. The generality of this statement for other glass-forming systems remains for a future study.

  4. Atomic-scale confinement of resonant optical fields.

    PubMed

    Kern, Johannes; Grossmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-14

    In the presence of matter, there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding resonant intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and antisymmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultrasensing, cavity optomechanics, as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices. PMID:22984927

  5. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices.

  7. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and generalized parton distributions at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2008-11-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of real photons and mesons at high momentum transfer allows us to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The formalism of the GPDs provides a unified description of the hadronic structure in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular, the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), ep â e2p2Å , is one of the key reactions to determine the GPDs experimentally, as it is the simplest process that can be described in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS has been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. Beam-spin asymmetries, resulting from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and DVCS have been extracted over the widest kinematic range ever accessed for this reaction ( 1.2 < Q 2 < 3.7 (GeV/c 2, 0.09 < - t < 1.3 (GeV/c 2, 0.13 < x B < 0.46 . In this paper, the results obtained experimentally are shown and compared to GPD parametrizations.

  8. Hadron Optics: Diffraction Patterns in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2006-05-16

    We show that the Fourier transform of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude with respect to the skewness variable {zeta} provides a unique way to visualize the light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of the target state in the boost-invariant longitudinal coordinate space variable ({sigma} = P{sup +}y{sup -}/2). The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics in which the dependence of the amplitude on {sigma} measures the physical size of the scattering center of a one-dimensional system. If one combines this longitudinal transform with the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitude with respect to the transverse momentum transfer {Delta}{sup {perpendicular}}, one can obtain a complete three-dimensional description of hadron optics at fixed light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As a specific example, we utilize the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED to obtain the behavior of the DVCS amplitude for electron-photon scattering. We then simulate the wavefunctions for a hadron by differentiating the above LFWFs with respect to M{sup 2} and study the corresponding DVCS amplitudes in {sigma} space.

  9. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Deeply Located Trabecular Bones - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieślik, Lucyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    The analysis of ultrasonic signals scattered by soft tissues have been successfully applied for their characterization. Similarly, the trabecular bone backscattered signal contains information about the properties of the bone structure. Therefore scattering-based ultrasonic technique potentially enables the assessment of microstructure characteristics of a bone. The femoral neck fracture often occurs in the course of osteoporosis and can lead to severe complications. Therefore assessment of femoral bone microstructure and condition is important and essential for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring. As far most of the trabecular bone investigations have been performed in vitro. The only in vivo measurements were carried out in transmission and mostly concerned estimation of the attenuation in heel bone. We have built the ultrasonic scanner that could be useful in acquiring the RF (Radio Frequency) echoes backscattered by the trabecular bone in vivo. Moreover, the bone scanner provides data not only from heel bone but from deeply located bones as well (e.g. femoral bone). It can be also used for easily accessible bones like heel bone or breastbone. In this case a gel-pad is applied to assure focusing of ultrasound in trabecular bone (approximately 10 mm beneath the cortical bone). This study presents preliminary results of the attenuating properties evaluation of trabecular bone from the ultrasonic echoes backscattered by heel bone and femoral neck.

  10. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  11. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    SciTech Connect

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  12. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  13. The Siberian timberman Acanthocinus aedilis: a freeze-tolerant beetle with low supercooling points.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, E; Li, N G; Averensky, A I; Laugsand, A E; Zachariassen, K E

    2009-07-01

    Larvae of the Siberian timberman beetle Acanthocinus aedilis display a number of unique features, which may have important implications for the field of cold hardiness in general. Their supercooling points are scattered over a wide temperature range, and some individuals have supercooling points in the low range of other longhorn beetles. However, they differ from other longhorn beetles in being tolerant to freezing, and in the frozen state they tolerate cooling to below -37 degrees C. In this respect they also differ from the European timberman beetles, which have moderate supercooling capacity and die if they freeze. The combination of freezing tolerance and low supercooling points is unusual and shows that freezing at a high subzero temperature is not an absolute requirement for freezing tolerance. Like other longhorn beetles, but in contrast to other freeze-tolerant insects, the larvae of the Siberian timberman have a low cuticular water permeability and can thus stay supercooled for long periods without a great water loss. This suggests that a major function of the extracellular ice nucleators of some freeze-tolerant insects may be to prevent intolerable water loss in insects with high cuticular water permeability, rather than to create a protective extracellular freezing as has generally been assumed. The freezing tolerance of the Siberian timberman larvae is likely to be an adaptation to the extreme winter cold of Siberia.

  14. Investigating the deep supercooling ability of an Alaskan beetle, Cucujus clavipes puniceus, via high throughput proteomics.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Martin A; Buechler, Steven A; Arnold, Randy J; Sformo, Todd; Barnes, Brian M; Duman, John G

    2012-02-01

    Cucujus clavipes puniceus is a freeze avoiding beetle capable of surviving the long, extremely cold winters of the Interior of Alaska. Previous studies showed that some individuals typically supercool to mean values of approximately -40 °C, with some individuals supercooling to as low as -58 °C, but these non-deep supercooling (NDSC) individuals eventually freeze if temperatures drop below this. However, other larvae, especially if exposed to very cold temperatures, supercool even further. These deep supercooling (DSC) individuals do not freeze even if cooled to -100 °C. In addition, the body water of the DSC larvae vitrifies (turns to a glass) at glass transition temperatures of -58 to -70 °C. This study examines the proteomes of DSC and NDSC larvae to assess proteins that may contribute to or inhibit the DSC trait. Using high throughput proteomics, we identified 138 proteins and 513 Gene Ontology categories in the DSC group and 104 proteins and 573 GO categories in the NDSC group. GO categories enriched in DSC include alcohol metabolic process, cellular component morphogenesis, monosaccharide metabolic process, regulation of biological quality, extracellular region, structural molecule activity, and antioxidant activity. Proteins unique to DSC include alpha casein precursor, alpha-actinin, vimentin, tropomyosin, beta-lactoglobulin, immunoglobulins, tubulin, cuticle proteins and endothelins.

  15. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  16. Bacteria in Confined Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilking, Connie; Weitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells can display differentiation between several developmental pathways, from planktonic to matrix-producing, depending upon the colony conditions. We study the confinement of bacteria in hydrogels as well as in liquid-liquid double emulsion droplets and observe the growth and morphology of these colonies as a function of time and environment. Our results can give insight into the behavior of bacterial colonies in confined spaces that can have applications in the areas of food science, cosmetics, and medicine.

  17. Confinement of bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Mark; Chen, Chiping

    2001-05-01

    The non-relativistic motion is analyzed for a highly bunched beam propagating through a perfectly conducting cylindrical pipe confined radially by a constant magnetic field parallel to the conductor axis, using a Green's function technique and Hamiltonian dynamics analysis. It is shown that for the confinement of beams with the same charge per unit length, the maximum value of the effective self-field parameter for a highly bunched beam is significantly lower than the Brillouin density limit for an unbunched beam.

  18. An instantaneous normal mode description of relaxation in supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.; Vijayadamodar, G. V.; Zurcher, U.

    1997-03-01

    Relaxation in supercooled liquids is formulated from the instantaneous normal modes (INM) point of view. The frequency and temperature dependence of the unstable, imaginary frequency lobe of the INM density of states, <ρu(ω,T)> (for simplicity we write ω instead of iω), is investigated and characterized over a broad temperature range, 10⩾T⩾0.42, in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. INM theories of diffusion invoke Im-ω modes descriptive of barrier crossing, but not all imaginary frequency modes fall into this category. There exists a cutoff frequency ωc such that modes with ω<ωc correspond to "shoulder potentials," whereas the potential profiles include barrier-crossing double wells for ω>ωc. Given that only modes with ω>ωc contribute to diffusion, the barrier crossing rate, ωh, and the self diffusion constant D, are shown to be proportional to the density of states evaluated at the cutoff frequency, <ρu(ωc,T)>. The density of states exhibits crossover behavior in its temperature dependence such that the exponential T-dependence of D(T) crosses over from Zwanzig-Bassler exp(-E2/T2) behavior at low T to Arrhenius exp(-E/T) behavior at high T; the exponential may be too weak to be observed, in which case D(T) is a power law. Based on the properties of LJ, a general INM description of strong and fragile liquids is presented, with a physical interpretation in terms of the "landscape" of the potential energy surface.

  19. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  20. Nature of the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Yu, Y. J.; Tan, X. M.

    2015-08-01

    The first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled Si is revisited by long-time first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. As the focus of the present paper, its nature is revealed by analyzing the inherent structures of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL). Our results show that it is a transition between a sp3-hybridization LDL and a white-tin-like HDL. This uncovers the origin of the semimetal-metal transition accompanying it and also proves that HDL is the metastable extension of high temperature equilibrium liquid into the supercooled regime. The pressure-temperature diagram of supercooled Si thus can be regarded in some respects as shifted reflection of its crystalline phase diagram.

  1. Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A.

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

  2. An experimental study of freezing of supercooled water droplet on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Mendig, C.; Schulz, M.; Sinapius, M.; Prykhodko, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the freezing of immobile water droplet on an aluminum plate are presented. The process was studied with the aid of a high-speed photo camera. The freezing of supercooled water contained in the surface droplet proceeds in a few stages: (i) preliminary heating of water and nucleation of ice microcrystals, (ii) relatively fast formation of the ice-liquid system with a transition to the state of thermodynamic equilibrium near the freezing temperature, and (iii) slow process of complete freezing. The rate and duration of each stage and the time of delay between the moment of action upon the supercooled droplet and the onset of freezing are estimated. Processes of supercooled and nonsupercooled water solidification are compared.

  3. Hadron Optics in Three-Dimensional Invariant Coordinate Space from Deeply VirtualCompton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Chakrabarti, D.; Harindranath, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Vary, J.P.

    2006-11-30

    The Fourier transform of the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude (DVCS) with respect to the skewness parameter {zeta} = Q{sup 2}/2p {center_dot} q can be used to provide an image of the target hadron in the boost-invariant variable {sigma}, the coordinate conjugate to light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As an illustration, we construct a consistent covariant model of the DVCS amplitude and its associated generalized parton distributions using the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED, thus providing a representation of the light-front wave functions of a lepton in {sigma} space. A consistent model for hadronic amplitudes can then be obtained by differentiating the light-front wave functions with respect to the bound-state mass. The resulting DVCS helicity amplitudes are evaluated as a function of {sigma} and the impact parameter {rvec b}{sub {perpendicular}}, thus providing a light-front image of the target hadron in a frame-independent three-dimensional light-front coordinate space. Models for the LFWFs of hadrons in (3 + 1) dimensions displaying confinement at large distances and conformal symmetry at short distances have been obtained using the AdS/CFT method. We also compute the LFWFs in this model in invariant three dimensional coordinate space. We find that in the models studied, the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitudes exhibit diffraction patterns. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics where the distribution in ? measures the physical size of the scattering center in a one-dimensional system.

  4. How deeply cells feel: methods for thin gels

    PubMed Central

    Buxboim, Amnon; Rajagopal, Karthikan; Brown, Andre’ E.X.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue cells lack the ability to see or hear but have evolved mechanisms to feel into their surroundings and sense a collective stiffness. A cell can even sense the effective stiffness of rigid objects that are not in direct cellular contact – like the proverbial princess who feels a pea placed beneath soft mattresses. How deeply a cell feels into a matrix can be measured by assessing cell responses on a controlled series of thin and elastic gels that are affixed to a rigid substrate. Gel elasticity E is readily varied with polymer concentrations of now-standard polyacrylamide hydrogels, but to eliminate wrinkling and detachment of thin gels from an underlying glass coverslip, vinyl groups are bonded to the glass before polymerization. Gel thickness is nominally specified using micron-scale beads that act as spacers, but gels swell after polymerization as measured by z-section, confocal microscopy of fluorescent gels. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to measure E at gel surfaces, employing stresses and strains that are typically generated by cells and yielding values for E that span a broad range of tissue microenvironments. To illustrate cell sensitivities to a series of thin-to-thick gels, the adhesive spreading of mesenchymal stem cells was measured on gel mimics of a very soft tissue (eg. brain, E ~ 1 kPa). Initial results show that cells increasingly respond to the rigidity of an underlying ‘hidden’ surface starting at about 10–20 µm gel thickness with a characteristic tactile length of less than about 5 µm. PMID:20454525

  5. Initial stage of nucleation-mediated crystallization of a supercooled melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Pil'nik, A. A.; Islamov, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    The kinetic model of nucleation-mediated crystallization of a supercooled melt is presented in this work. It correctly takes into account the change in supercooling of the initial phase in the process of formation and evolution of a new phase. The model makes it possible to find the characteristic time of the process, time course of the crystal phase volume, solidified material microstructure. The distinctive feature of the model is the use of the "forbidden" zones in the volume where the formation of new nucleation centers is suppressed.

  6. Enzyme kinetics in acoustically levitated droplets of supercooled water: a novel approach to cryoenzymology.

    PubMed

    Weis, David D; Nardozzi, Jonathan D

    2005-04-15

    The rate of the alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferone phosphate was measured in acoustically levitated droplets of aqueous tris (50 mM) at pH 8.5 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C and in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. At 22 degrees C, the rate of product formation was in excellent agreement with the rate observed in bulk solution in a cuvette, indicating that the acoustic levitation process does not alter the enzyme activity. The rate of the reaction decreased 6-fold in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. The acoustic levitator apparatus is described in detail. PMID:15828793

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Internal Structure of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1951-01-01

    A Bragg X-ray spectrometer equipped with a volume-sensitive Geiger counter and Soller slits and employing filtered molybdenum Ka radiation was used to obtain a set of diffracted intensity curves as a Punction of angle for supercooled water. Diffracted intensity curves in the temperature region of 21 to -16 C were obtained. The minimum between the two main diffraction peaks deepened continuously with lowering temperature, indicating a gradual change in the internal structure of the water. No discontinuity in this trend was noted at the melting point. The internal structure of supercooled water was concluded to become progressively more ice-like as the temperature is lowered.

  8. Elastic modulus of supercooled liquid and hot solid silicon measured by inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alatas, A.; Said, A. H.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E. E.; Kodituwakku, C. N.; Reinhart, B.; Saboungi, M. -L.; Price, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the dynamical structure factors of supercooled-liquid and hot-solid silicon by inelastic X-ray scattering at the same temperature, 1620 K. Two significant changes in the averaged longitudinal sound velocities and in the longitudinal modulus are observed. We, first observe a different longitudinal modulus in the polycrystalline hot-solid silicon compared to the extrapolated value obtained from the single-crystal measurement. Furthermore, this reduction of the modulus may be a precursor of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Second, the increase in the longitudinal modulus in the liquid upon supercooling is consistent with an increase in the degree of the directional bonding.

  9. Effects of supercooling in the initial solidification of PbTe-SnTe solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Clark, I. O.; Wagner, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Deviations from compositions anticipated by the thermal equilibrium phase diagram have been observed in Bridgman-grown crystals of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te, in the first to freeze region of the boule. A set of experiments were conducted to determine the extent of thermal supercooling of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te in a Bridgman-like configuration. The results of the compositional profiles and the supercooling measurements are consistent with a diffusionless transformation occurring at the onset of solidification, and the length of uncontrolled growth is inversely related to the temperature gradient of the furnace.

  10. The vapor pressures of supercooled NHO3/H2O solutions. [in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure utilizing the Gibbs-Duhem relation is used to extrapolate vapor pressures of supercooled HNO3 mixtures to 190 K. Values of A and B from the equation logP = A - B/T are presented for solutions between 0.20 and 0.25 mole fraction HNO3. In the stratosphere, if sufficient HNO3 vapor is present because it has not come into equilibrium with the nitric acid trihydrate, supercooled nitric acid solutions could condense at temperatures up to 1.5 + or - 0.8 K above the ice point.

  11. Dielectric Properties of 4-methoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl (1 OCB) in the Supercooled Isotropic and Nematic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Stanisław; Gestblom, Bo; Pawlus, Sebastian

    2003-06-01

    Dielectric studies of 4-methoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl (1 OCB) in the supercooled isotropic and nematic phases were performed with the aid of three set-ups covering the frequency range 10 kHz - 5 GHz. In the static measurements the nematic phase could be supercooled down to 25 K below the clearing point, whereas in the dynamic studies a 12 K range was covered in a single run. The relaxation times and activation enthalpies characterising the molecular rotations around the principal inertia moment axes were determined. The predictions of theories based on the assumption of the rod-like molecules are well applicable to the dielectric data obtained.

  12. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  13. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  14. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  15. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  16. Excitation of High-Frequency Internal Kink Mode by Deeply-Trapped Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Shaojie

    2010-08-01

    Deeply trapped energetic ions can destabilize the internal kink mode with both high and low frequencies with a potato-orbit limit in the EAST-like tokamaks. The threshold beta value of the deeply trapped energetic ions, the real frequency, and the growth rate of the internal kink mode are predicted in this paper.

  17. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  18. Structure Of Ice Crystallized From Supercooled Water: Stacking Disordered Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.; Brukhno, A.; Anwar, J.; Salzmann, C.

    2012-12-01

    At atmospheric pressures ice is thought to exist in two well defined crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. A metastable form of ice is thought to form in the atmosphere [1] Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations; we show that ice that crystallizes both homogeneously and heterogeneously from supercooled water adopts neither of these two phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and consequently does not possess either cubic or hexagonal symmetry. It is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I (ice Isd ) [2]. While similar stacking disorder has been reported before, such observations have been restricted to either samples re-crystallised from high-pressure ice phases [3] or ice formation in mesopores [4]. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice previously identified as cubic ice in diffraction studies, which have used an array of methodologies to generate the ice, were most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. Our results suggest that the initial phase of ice formed when water freezes is the metastable stacking-disordered ice I which forms independent of the method of nucleation. Stacking-disordered ice may be the kinetic product, i.e. the material which forms fastest. Accordingly, we suggest that stacking-disordered ice is always the phase to crystallise when water freezes. In many situations it will relax to the stable hexagonal phase with time. Stacking-disordered ice may persist in the colder parts of the atmosphere and form irregular or rough crystals similar to many smaller quasi spherical ice crystals observed in the earth's atmosphere. [1] B. J. Murray et al., Nature, 2005, 434, 202-205 [2] T. L. Malkin et al., PNAS, 2012, 109 (4): 1041 - 1045 [3] T. C. Hansen et al., J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 2008, 20, 285105. [4] K. Morishige et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113

  19. On the role of surface charges for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Rzesanke, Daniel; Nadolny, Jens; Duft, Denis; Müller, René; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2012-07-14

    Charge induced changes in homogeneous freezing rates of water have been proposed to constitute a possible link between the global atmospheric electric circuit and cloud microphysics and thus climate. We report here on high precision measurements of the homogeneous nucleation rate of charged, electro-dynamically levitated single water droplets as a function of their surface charge. No evidence has been found that the homogeneous volume specific ice nucleation rate of supercooled microdroplets is influenced by surface charges in the range between +/-200 elementary charges per μm(2). It has also been suggested that filamentation in highly electrified liquids can induce freezing at temperatures well above the homogeneous freezing limit. We report here the observation of Coulomb instabilities of highly charged droplets that are accompanied with the formation and ejection of fine filaments from the liquid supercooled droplets. Down to temperatures of 240 K, which is close to the homogeneous freezing limit of uncharged water, no filamentation induced freezing has been detected. At even lower temperatures, the droplets froze before the instability was reached. These findings rule out that filamentation exerts an important influence on ice formation in supercooled water. Combining these findings, we conclude that the surface charges (even at their maximum possible density) have no significant effect on the homogeneous ice nucleation rate of supercooled cloud droplets. PMID:22294097

  20. Deep Supercooling in Most Tissues of Wintering Sasa senanensis and Its Mechanism in Leaf Blade Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M

    1984-05-01

    Cold hardiness of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, culms, rhizomes, and leaf buds in wintering Sasa senanensis (Fr. et Sav.) Rehder, a dwarf bamboo, was studied paying special attention to the types of resistance mechanisms which were determined with differential thermal analysis. Coincidence of LT(25) (lethal temperature at which 25% of the tissues are injured) with the initiation temperature of LTE (low temperature exotherm) suggested that all of these tissues described above owe their cold hardiness mechanism mostly to deep supercooling. Deep supercooling in leaf blades was also substantiated with microscopic observations, suggesting that the units of supercooling were minute tissues compartmentalized by longitudinal and cross veins. It was also shown that cooling rates and storage of shoots at -5 degrees C for 1 to 5 days in the ice-inoculated state did not greatly affect the supercooling ability of leaf blades. Sasa senanensis seemed to exhibit a unique strategy against prolonged subzero temperature, and its leaves would be a good system for the study on mechanisms of deep undercooling in plants.

  1. Physiological responses to supercooling and hypoxia in the hatchling painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Jones, E E; Lee, R E

    2001-05-01

    We investigated physiological responses to supercooling in hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) which remain in their natal nests over winter and therefore may become exposed to subzero temperatures. These turtles are freeze tolerant but also must rely on supercooling to survive exposure to the lower temperatures occurring in nests during winter. We compared whole-body concentrations of lactate, glucose, glycerol, and ATP in turtles chilled at 0 degrees C, -4 degrees C, or -6 degrees C for 5 days, or at 6 degrees C for 19 days. In a companion experiment, we measured metabolite concentrations in turtles exposed to a hypoxic environment for 1 day, 4 days, or 8 days. Supercooling and hypoxia exposure were both associated with an increase in concentrations of lactate and glucose and a decrease in glycerol concentrations (albeit no change in the ATP pool), suggesting that supercooling induces functional hypoxia. We conclude that hypoxia tolerance may be an important pre-adaptation for surviving exposure to subzero temperatures in hatchling C. picta.

  2. A combined experimental and theoretical study of supercooling by two-phase mist flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zhihua.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of cooling enhancement by mist flow was performed for a square channel with a smooth wall. A new method is proposed for the turbulent deposition of droplets from two-phase mist flow into the wall of the channel. The proposed analytical model shows satisfactory agreement with observations from an experimental measurement using a particle-sizing two-dimensional reference-model laser-Doppler anemometry technique. Supercooling is defined as the simultaneous attainment of high heat flux and a low temperature of a surface to be cooled. Surface cooling is by evaporation from the exposed side of the film. The film is maintained by the continuous deposition of a stream of turbulent mist. An analytical model is provided for the heat-transfer enhancement coefficient due to mist supercooling. Also, experiments were carried out to investigate cooling enhancement. A substantial supercooling by mist flow is reported. The effects on supercooling of flow rate, droplet concentration and size, and wall heat flux are also reported.

  3. Ice nucleation, propagation, and deep supercooling: the lost tribes of freezing studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to the emphasis on the molecular biology of cold acclimation, a considerable amount of research was conducted on the processes of ice nucleation and deep supercooling. In many species, these two processes are critical to surviving episodes of freezing temperatures. Over the past two decades,...

  4. 75 FR 49865 - Extension of Comment Period; Airplane and Engine Certification Requirements in Supercooled Large...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Requirements in Supercooled Large Drop, Mixed Phase, and Ice Crystal Icing Conditions'' (75 FR 37311, Docket No... for the NPRM published on June 29, 2010 (75 FR 37311) was scheduled to close on August 30, 2010, and... (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov . Docket: To read background documents...

  5. Low-temperature dielectric measurements of confined water in porous granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Prezas, Pedro; Vinagre, Ana; Graça, Manuel F.; Monteiro, Jorge H.; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Moita, Patrícia; Pinho, António; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Mendiratta, Sushil K.; Rosa, Rui N.

    2014-05-01

    Three different granitic rocks extracted from Évora (in the south of Portugal) where used to perform dielectric measurements in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz and temperatures 100 - 350 K. Thin cylindrical samples were prepared and circular electrodes were established using silver conductive paint. A clear anomaly appears, for T ~ 200 - 220 K, in the dielectric measurements of the samples studied. This anomaly occurs in different materials and coincides with a phase transition of supercooled water. Tightly bounded water confined in the pores of the rock do not crystallize at 273 K, but form a metastable liquid down to 200 - 220 K increasing water polarization. Below this temperature water molecules solidify and polarizability decreases. The rock presenting the most sizeable anomaly has a very low specific surface area, ~ 0.09 m2g-1, and connected porosity, ~ 1.10 %. In addition, geochemical analyses reveal almost inexistence of water molecules in its structure confirming the role of confined water in the anomaly. Comparison between saturated, oven dried, and vacuum dried samples is done. Finally, a logarithmic dependency of the critical temperature for the supercooled water phase transition with the measuring frequency is found. The authors acknowledge the support of FCT (Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation) through the project PTDC/GEO-FIQ/4178/2012.

  6. Endogenous and exogenous ice-nucleating agents constrain supercooling in the hatchling painted turtle.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; Baker, Patrick J; Dinkelacker, Stephen A; Lee, Richard E

    2003-02-01

    Hatchlings of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) commonly hibernate in their shallow, natal nests. Survival at temperatures below the limit of freeze tolerance (approximately -4 degrees C) apparently depends on their ability to remain supercooled, and, whereas previous studies have reported that supercooling capacity improves markedly with cold acclimation, the mechanistic basis for this change is incompletely understood. We report that the crystallization temperature (T(c)) of recently hatched (summer) turtles acclimated to 22 degrees C and reared on a substratum of vermiculite or nesting soil was approximately 5 degrees C higher than the T(c) determined for turtles acclimated to 4 degrees C and tested in winter. This increase in supercooling capacity coincided with elimination of substratum (and, in fewer cases, eggshell) that the hatchlings had ingested; however, this association was not necessarily causal because turtles reared on a paper-covered substratum did not ingest exogenous matter but nevertheless showed a similar increase in supercooling capacity. Our results for turtles reared on paper revealed that seasonal development of supercooling capacity fundamentally requires elimination of ice-nucleating agents (INA) of endogenous origin: summer turtles, but not winter turtles, produced feces (perhaps derived from residual yolk) that expressed ice-nucleating activity. Ingestion of vermiculite or eggshell, which had modest ice-nucleating activity, had no effect on the T(c), whereas ingestion of nesting soil, which contained two classes of potent INA, markedly reduced the supercooling capacity of summer turtles. This effect persisted long after the turtles had purged their guts of soil particles, because the T(c) of winter turtles reared on nesting soil (mean +/- S.E.M.=-11.6+/-1.4 degrees C) was approximately 6 degrees C higher than the T(c) of winter turtles reared on vermiculite or paper. Experiments in which winter turtles were fed INA commonly found in

  7. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  8. Non-monotonic effect of confinement on the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnik, Fathollah; Franosch, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The relaxation dynamics of glass forming liquids and their structure are influenced in the vicinity of confining walls. This effect has mostly been observed to be a monotonic function of the slit width. Recently, a qualitatively new behaviour has been uncovered by Mittal and coworkers, who reported that the single particle dynamics in a hard-sphere fluid confined in a planar slit varies in a non-monotonic way as the slit width is decreased from five to roughly two particle diametres (Mittal et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 145901). In view of the great potential of this effect for applications in those fields of science and industry, where liquids occur under strong confinement (e.g. nano-technology), the number of researchers studying various aspects and consequences of this non-monotonic behaviour has been rapidly growing. This review aims at providing an overview of the research activity in this newly emerging field. We first briefly discuss how competing mechanisms such as packing effects and short-range attraction may lead to a non-monotonic glass transition scenario in the bulk. We then analyse confinement effects on the dynamics of fluids using a thermodynamic route which relates the single particle dynamics to the excess entropy. Moreover, relating the diffusive dynamics to the Widom’s insertion probability, the oscillations of the local dynamics with density at moderate densities are fairly well described. At high densities belonging to the supercooled regime, however, this approach breaks down signaling the onset of strongly collective effects. Indeed, confinement introduces a new length scale which in the limit of high densities and small pore sizes competes with the short-range local order of the fluid. This gives rise to a non-monotonic dependence of the packing structure on confinement, with a corresponding effect on the dynamics of structural relaxation. This non-monotonic effect occurs also in the case of a cone-plate type channel, where the degree

  9. Non-monotonic effect of confinement on the glass transition.

    PubMed

    Varnik, Fathollah; Franosch, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The relaxation dynamics of glass forming liquids and their structure are influenced in the vicinity of confining walls. This effect has mostly been observed to be a monotonic function of the slit width. Recently, a qualitatively new behaviour has been uncovered by Mittal and coworkers, who reported that the single particle dynamics in a hard-sphere fluid confined in a planar slit varies in a non-monotonic way as the slit width is decreased from five to roughly two particle diametres (Mittal et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 145901). In view of the great potential of this effect for applications in those fields of science and industry, where liquids occur under strong confinement (e.g. nano-technology), the number of researchers studying various aspects and consequences of this non-monotonic behaviour has been rapidly growing. This review aims at providing an overview of the research activity in this newly emerging field. We first briefly discuss how competing mechanisms such as packing effects and short-range attraction may lead to a non-monotonic glass transition scenario in the bulk. We then analyse confinement effects on the dynamics of fluids using a thermodynamic route which relates the single particle dynamics to the excess entropy. Moreover, relating the diffusive dynamics to the Widom's insertion probability, the oscillations of the local dynamics with density at moderate densities are fairly well described. At high densities belonging to the supercooled regime, however, this approach breaks down signaling the onset of strongly collective effects. Indeed, confinement introduces a new length scale which in the limit of high densities and small pore sizes competes with the short-range local order of the fluid. This gives rise to a non-monotonic dependence of the packing structure on confinement, with a corresponding effect on the dynamics of structural relaxation. This non-monotonic effect occurs also in the case of a cone-plate type channel, where the degree

  10. Electrofreezing of confined water.

    PubMed

    Zangi, Ronen; Mark, Alan E

    2004-04-15

    We report results from molecular dynamics simulations of the freezing transition of TIP5P water molecules confined between two parallel plates under the influence of a homogeneous external electric field, with magnitude of 5 V/nm, along the lateral direction. For water confined to a thickness of a trilayer we find two different phases of ice at a temperature of T=280 K. The transformation between the two, proton-ordered, ice phases is found to be a strong first-order transition. The low-density ice phase is built from hexagonal rings parallel to the confining walls and corresponds to the structure of cubic ice. The high-density ice phase has an in-plane rhombic symmetry of the oxygen atoms and larger distortion of hydrogen bond angles. The short-range order of the two ice phases is the same as the local structure of the two bilayer phases of liquid water found recently in the absence of an electric field [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1694 (2003)]. These high- and low-density phases of water differ in local ordering at the level of the second shell of nearest neighbors. The results reported in this paper, show a close similarity between the local structure of the liquid phase and the short-range order of the corresponding solid phase. This similarity might be enhanced in water due to the deep attractive well characterizing hydrogen bond interactions. We also investigate the low-density ice phase confined to a thickness of 4, 5, and 8 molecular layers under the influence of an electric field at T=300 K. In general, we find that the degree of ordering decreases as the distance between the two confining walls increases. PMID:15267616

  11. Improved cryopreservation by diluted vitrification solution with supercooling-facilitating flavonol glycoside.

    PubMed

    Kami, Daisuke; Kasuga, Jun; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside (KF7G), one of the supercooling-facilitating flavonol glycosides which was originally found in deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells of the katsura tree and was found to exhibit the highest level of supercooling-facilitating activity among reported substances, was examined for successful cryopreservation by vitrification procedures, with the aim of determining the possibility of using diluted vitrification solution (VS) to reduce cryoprotectant toxicity and also to inhibit nucleation at practical cooling and rewarming by the effect of supplemental KF7G. Examination was performed using shoot apices of cranberry and plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2) with dilution. Vitrification procedures using the original concentration (100%) of PVS2 caused serious injury during treatment with PVS2 and resulted in no regrowth after cooling and rewarming (cryopreservation). Dilution of the concentration of PVS2 to 75% or 50% (with the same proportions of constituents) significantly reduced injury by PVS2 treatment, but regrowth was poor after cryopreservation. It is thought that dilution of PVS2 reduced injury by cryoprotectant toxicity, but such dilution caused nucleation during cooling and/or rewarming, resulting in poor survival. On the other hand, addition of 0.5mg/ml (0.05% w/v) KF7G to the diluted PVS2 resulted in significantly (p<0.05) higher regrowth rates after cryopreservation. It is thought that addition of supercooling-facilitating KF7G induced vitrification even in diluted PVS2 probably due to inhibition of ice nucleation during cooling and rewarming and consequently resulted in higher regrowth. The results of the present study indicate the possibility that concentrations of routinely used VSs can be reduced by adding supercooling-facilitating KF7G, by which more successful cryopreservation might be achieved for a wide variety of biological materials.

  12. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh S; Biddle, John W; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-14

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures ("states"). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure. PMID:27083735

  13. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Biddle, John W.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2016-04-01

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures ("states"). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure.

  14. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  15. Deeply Frozen Lakes in a Terrestrial Peri-Glacial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, P. T.; Fritsen, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the largest lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have largely been ignored during past limnological studies because they were thought to be frozen solid. However, recent investigations have revealed the presence of saline water bodies beneath up to 19 m of permanent ice in two of these so-called "ice block" lakes (Lake Vida and Lake House). Lakes throughout the dry valleys that have been studied in detail more typically have ice covers ranging between 3 and 5 m. The existence of saline lakes with extremely thick ice covers is atypical, even among lakes in this region, which are themselves unique aquatic systems. These "deeply ice-covered" lakes are aquatic systems on the edge of cold-termination, and they warrant study as analogs of lakes purported to have existed on the surface of Mars in the past. Several lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys were presumed in the past to be frozen solid based largely on attempts at drilling the lake ice covers. Lake Vida has been the most intriguing because it is one of the two largest (in terms of surface area) lakes in the dry valleys, and yet it apparently contained no year-round liquid water at depth. Recently a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out on Lake Vida and another purported ice block lake, Lake House. In a large central portion of Lake Vida, the survey showed attenuation of the radar signal at approximately 19 m, suggesting saline water at this depth. Because GPR radar signals are absorbed by saline water, the depth of the water body (i.e., distance from the ice bottom to sediments) could not be determined. In Lake House, a similar water body was inferred at about 12 m depth. Ice Coring and Physical Properties: Ice cores (to 14 and 15.8 in depth) extracted in 1996 from Lake Vida contained ice bubbles with unique morphologies that were atypical when compared to other vapor inclusions in 3-5 in ice covers. Most of the vapor inclusions at depths greater than about 6 m contained hoar frost

  16. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  17. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  18. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  19. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  20. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  1. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  2. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES ON DEEPLY EMBEDDED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.

    2006-06-26

    PAPER DISCUSSES COMPUTATIONS OF SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED AND OR BURIED STIFF STRUCTURES SUCH AS THOSE APPEARING IN THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS OF STRUCTURES FOR ADVANCED REACTORS.

  3. Inverse temperature dependence of Henry's law coefficients for volatile organic compounds in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Karsten; Starokozhev, Elena; Schmidt, Martin U; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2009-09-01

    Upon supercooling, water expels volatile organic compounds (VOC), and Henry's law coefficients are increasing concomitant with decreasing temperature. This unexpected observation was found by measuring the VOC partitioning between supercooled water and gas phase in the temperature range from -5 degrees C to -15 degrees C for benzene, toluene, ethlybenzene, m-, p-, o-xylenes (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE). Aqueous standard solutions were analyzed using a static headspace method in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Dimensionless Henry's law coefficients (K(AW)) were calculated from measurements of the concentration of the VOCs in the headspace above the standard solutions at temperatures between -25 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The results show that the well known temperature dependence of Henry's law coefficients at temperatures above 0 degrees C is inversed upon decreasing the temperature below 0 degrees C and formation of supercooled water while decreasing the temperature to -15 degrees C. Upon further decrease of the temperature to -25 degrees C freezing of the supercooled water occurs. K(AW) values increase from 0.092 (benzene), 0.099 (toluene), 0.098 (ethylbenzene), 0.117 (m/p-xylene), 0.076 (o-xylene), 0.012 (MTBE) and 0.014 (ETBE at 5 degrees C to 0.298 (benzene), 0.498 (toluene), 0.944 (ethylbenzene), 0.327 (m/p-xylene), 0.342 (o-xylene), 0.029 (MTBE) and 0.041 (ETBE) at -25 degrees C, respectively. Inversion of Henry coefficients upon cooling the aqueous solutions to temperatures below 0 degrees C is explained by the increasing formation of ice-like clusters in the water below 0 degrees C. The VOC are expelled from these clusters resulting in enhanced VOC concentrations in the gas phase upon supercooling. Formation of ice upon further cooling to -25 degrees C results in a further increase of the VOC concentrations in the gas phase above the ice. The findings have implications for the

  4. Supercooling Capacity Increases from Sea Level to Tree Line in the Hawaiian Tree Species Metrosideros polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Melcher; Cordell; Jones; Scowcroft; Niemczura; Giambelluca; Goldstein

    2000-05-01

    Population-specific differences in the freezing resistance of Metrosideros polymorpha leaves were studied along an elevational gradient from sea level to tree line (located at ca. 2500 m above sea level) on the east flank of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii. In addition, we also studied 8-yr-old saplings grown in a common garden from seeds collected from the same field populations. Leaves of low-elevation field plants exhibited damage at -2 degrees C, before the onset of ice formation, which occurred at -5.7 degrees C. Leaves of high-elevation plants exhibited damage at ca. -8.5 degrees C, concurrent with ice formation in the leaf tissue, which is typical of plants that avoid freezing in their natural environment by supercooling. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies revealed that water molecules of both extra- and intracellular leaf water fractions from high-elevation plants had restricted mobility, which is consistent with their low water content and their high levels of osmotically active solutes. Decreased mobility of water molecules may delay ice nucleation and/or ice growth and may therefore enhance the ability of plant tissues to supercool. Leaf traits that correlated with specific differences in supercooling capacity were in part genetically determined and in part environmentally induced. Evidence indicated that lower apoplastic water content and smaller intercellular spaces were associated with the larger supercooling capacity of the plant's foliage at tree line. The irreversible tissue-damage temperature decreased by ca. 7 degrees C from sea level to tree line in leaves of field populations. However, this decrease appears to be only large enough to allow M. polymorpha trees to avoid leaf tissue damage from freezing up to a level of ca. 2500 m elevation, which is also the current tree line location on the east flank of Mauna Loa. The limited freezing resistance of M. polymorpha leaves may be partially responsible for the occurrence of tree line at a relatively

  5. Supercooling Capacity Increases from Sea Level to Tree Line in the Hawaiian Tree Species Metrosideros polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Melcher; Cordell; Jones; Scowcroft; Niemczura; Giambelluca; Goldstein

    2000-05-01

    Population-specific differences in the freezing resistance of Metrosideros polymorpha leaves were studied along an elevational gradient from sea level to tree line (located at ca. 2500 m above sea level) on the east flank of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii. In addition, we also studied 8-yr-old saplings grown in a common garden from seeds collected from the same field populations. Leaves of low-elevation field plants exhibited damage at -2 degrees C, before the onset of ice formation, which occurred at -5.7 degrees C. Leaves of high-elevation plants exhibited damage at ca. -8.5 degrees C, concurrent with ice formation in the leaf tissue, which is typical of plants that avoid freezing in their natural environment by supercooling. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies revealed that water molecules of both extra- and intracellular leaf water fractions from high-elevation plants had restricted mobility, which is consistent with their low water content and their high levels of osmotically active solutes. Decreased mobility of water molecules may delay ice nucleation and/or ice growth and may therefore enhance the ability of plant tissues to supercool. Leaf traits that correlated with specific differences in supercooling capacity were in part genetically determined and in part environmentally induced. Evidence indicated that lower apoplastic water content and smaller intercellular spaces were associated with the larger supercooling capacity of the plant's foliage at tree line. The irreversible tissue-damage temperature decreased by ca. 7 degrees C from sea level to tree line in leaves of field populations. However, this decrease appears to be only large enough to allow M. polymorpha trees to avoid leaf tissue damage from freezing up to a level of ca. 2500 m elevation, which is also the current tree line location on the east flank of Mauna Loa. The limited freezing resistance of M. polymorpha leaves may be partially responsible for the occurrence of tree line at a relatively

  6. [Features of the lipid peroxidation process and antioxidant activity of white rats in extreme, multi-stage supercooling].

    PubMed

    Serebrennikova, E G; Mamaev, A T; Akhmedov, I G

    1992-01-01

    High content of polyenic fatty acids, slight increase in antioxidative activity and decrease in content of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) in rat myocardial tissues were observed in supercooling. The data obtained suggest that intensive oxidation of fatty acids occurred in the tissues, which may be essential for synthesis of biologically active substances involved in development of resistance to supercooling. Multiple supercooling caused an opposite effect in lung tissue: saturation of lipids was increased, antioxidative activity was maintained on the level similar to the control values, while content of MDA was markedly increased apparently due to destruction of metabolic products penetrating from other tissues. The dissimilar impairments of lipid metabolism were detected in liver tissue, where multiple supercooling did not alter the rate of lipid saturation, antioxidative activity was unaltered and content of MDA was as low as in the control animals.

  7. Energy and water conservation in frozen vs. supercooled larvae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis (fitch) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jason T; Lee, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Insects that tolerate severe cold during winter may either supercool or tolerate ice forming within the tissues of the body. To compare the relative advantages of freezing and supercooling, we measured rates of CO(2) production and water loss in frozen and supercooled goldenrod gall fly larvae (Eurosta solidaginis). As an important first step, we measured the time required for ice content and metabolic rate to stabilize upon freezing. Ice content stabilized after only three hours of freezing at -5 degrees C, whereas CO(2) production required 12 hours to stabilize. Subsequent experiments found that freezing greatly reduced both water loss and metabolic rate. Comparisons of supercooled and frozen larvae at -5 degrees C indicated that CO(2) production fell 47% with freezing and water loss decreased 35%. As temperature decreased to -10 and -15 degrees C, CO(2) production fell exponentially and was no longer detectable at -20 degrees C with our measurement system. Our results demonstrate that freezing significantly reduces energy consumption during the winter and may therefore improve winter survival and spring fecundity. The advantages of freezing over supercooling would drive selection toward insect freeze tolerance and also toward higher supercooling points to increase the duration of freezing each winter.

  8. Importance of supercooling points in the overwintering of the horn fly and stable fly (Diptera:Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kunz, S E

    1997-07-01

    Supercooling points were determined for eggs, 3rd instars, pupae, newly emerged unfed adults and 3-d-old engorged laboratory reared adults of Haematobia irritans (L.) and Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Wild nondiapausing and diapausing pupae of H. irritans also were tested. Mean supercooling points ranged from -28.0 degrees C for H. irritans eggs to -6.8 degrees C for H. irritans larvae. Mean supercooling points of all H. irritans developmental stages were lower than those of comparable S. calcitrans developmental stages, with the exception of larvae where the reverse was true. The mean supercooling point of diapausing H. irritans pupae (-23.5 degrees C) was significantly lower than those of nondiapausing laboratory pupae (-20.8 degrees C) or nondiapausing wild pupae (-20.2 degrees C). Developmental stages of both species were freeze intolerant, with no survival following exposures to temperatures below the supercooling points. Results are discussed with respect to the disparate overwintering strategies of these species and in relation to typical climatic minima experienced in south central Texas. The cold tolerance of H. irritans and S. calcitrans pupae was compared at 4 degrees C, a temperature below their developmental threshold of 11.5 degrees C and above their mean supercooling points. The survival of H. irritans pupae was significantly greater than the survival of S. calcitrans pupae. Cold injury was a significant mortality factor for both species.

  9. Confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards using a cleanup technology appropriate to small scale coal combustors. This to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS), which consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via vortex finder outlets, one at either end of the tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. During this quarter a comprehensive series of cleanup experiments have been made for three CVS configurations. The first CVS configuration tested gave very efficient fine particulate removal at the design air mass flow rate (1 MM BUT/hr combustor exhaust flow), but had over 20{double prime}WC pressure drop. The first CVS configuration was then re-designed to produce the same very efficient particulate collection performance at a lower pressure drop. The current CVS configuration produces 99.4 percent cleanup of ultra-fine fly ash at the design air mass flow at a pressure drop of 12 {double prime}WC with a liquid/air flow ratio of 0.31/m{sup 3}. Unlike venturi scrubbers, the collection performance of the CVS is insensitive to dust loading and to liquid/air flow ratio.

  10. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine; Hecksher, Tina; Pedersen, Ib H.; Rasmussen, Torben; Christensen, Tage; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This "Thermalization Calorimetry" technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat conduction through an insulating material, i.e., is proportional to the temperature difference between sample and surroundings. The monitored signal reflects the sample's specific heat and is sensitive to exo- and endothermic processes. The technique is useful for studying supercooled liquids and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s), as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition.

  11. Supercooling transition in phase separated manganite thin films: An electrical transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Tyagi, Pawan Kumar; Singh, H. K.

    2014-05-01

    The impact of variation in the relative fractions of the ferromagnetic metallic and antiferromagnetic/charge ordered insulator phases on the supercooling/superheating transition in strongly phase separated system, La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y ≈ 0.4), has been studied employing magnetotransport measurements. Our study clearly shows that the supercooling transition temperature is non-unique and strongly depends on the magneto-thermodynamic path through which the low temperature state is accessed. In contrast, the superheating transition temperature remains constant. The thermo-magnetic hysteresis, the separation of the two transitions and the associated resistivity, all are functions of the relative fraction of the coexisting phases.

  12. A free-energy surface exploration algorithm for supercooled liquids and amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kirk D.; Shin, Yongwoo; Lin, Xi; BU Team

    2014-03-01

    Efficient exploration of the multidimensional free-energy surfaces (FES) of supercooled liquids and amorphous solids at low temperatures is extremely challenging. The recently developed autonomous basin-climbing (ABC) algorithm (JCP 130: 224504, 2009) allows the sluggish system to self-explore the multidimensional potential energy surface (PES) and climb out of deep energy basins through a series of collective activation and relaxation events. In this work, we present a new FES exploration algorithm that enforces an explicit temperature dependence on the ABC trajectories. The explicit temperature dependence is achieved by introducing an ensemble of walkers to collectively maintain the detailed balance criteria among all the relevant energy basins. Using this new algorithm, the metabasin correlation length of a binary Lennard-Jones supercooled liquid is identified at the glass transition temperature.

  13. The water supercooled regime as described by four common water models.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, David C; Bermúdez di Lorenzo, Aleida J; Pereyra, Rodolfo G; Szleifer, Igal; Carignano, Marcelo A

    2013-07-14

    The temperature scale of simple water models in general does not coincide with the natural one. Therefore, in order to make a meaningful evaluation of different water models, a temperature rescaling is necessary. In this paper, we introduce a rescaling using the melting temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum of the heat capacity to evaluate four common water models (TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P-2005, TIP5P-Ew and Six-Sites) in the supercooled regime. Although all the models show the same general qualitative behavior, the TIP5P-Ew appears as the best representation of the supercooled regime when the rescaled temperature is used. We also analyze, using thermodynamic arguments, the critical nucleus size for ice growth. Finally, we speculate on the possible reasons why atomistic models do not usually crystalize while the coarse grained mW model do crystallize.

  14. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure.

  15. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure. PMID:27615518

  16. Supercooling transition in phase separated manganite thin films: An electrical transport study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Singh, H. K.; Tyagi, Pawan Kumar

    2014-05-26

    The impact of variation in the relative fractions of the ferromagnetic metallic and antiferromagnetic/charge ordered insulator phases on the supercooling/superheating transition in strongly phase separated system, La{sub 5/8−y}Pr{sub y}Ca{sub 3/8}MnO{sub 3} (y ≈ 0.4), has been studied employing magnetotransport measurements. Our study clearly shows that the supercooling transition temperature is non-unique and strongly depends on the magneto-thermodynamic path through which the low temperature state is accessed. In contrast, the superheating transition temperature remains constant. The thermo-magnetic hysteresis, the separation of the two transitions and the associated resistivity, all are functions of the relative fraction of the coexisting phases.

  17. Metastable Demixing of Supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe Alloys in an Oxide Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, D.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Williams, G.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study on the liquid separation in supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe alloys was performed using a melt fluxing which permits high supercooling to be achieved. Moreover, this method renders it possible to directly measure binodal temperatures and establish metastable liquid miscibility gap (LMG). All phase-separated samples at compositions ranging from 10 to 80 wt pct Co or to 83 wt pct Fe were found to exhibit droplet-shaped morphologies, in spite of various droplet distributions. Uniformly dispersed microstructures were obtained as the minority component was less than 20 vol.%; while beyond this percentage, serious coarsening was brought about. Calculations of the miscibility gap in the Cu-Co system and Stokes movement velocity of Co and Fe droplets in Cu matrix were made to analyze the experimental results.

  18. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water.

    PubMed

    Rogers, T Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-12

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure.

  19. Mechanistic understanding of the effect of rigidity percolation on structural relaxation in supercooled germanium selenide liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gjersing, E. L.; Sen, S.; Youngman, R. E.

    2010-07-01

    High-resolution {sup 77}Se nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the rotational dynamics of Se atoms in Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} supercooled liquids with 5<=x<=23. The Se atoms in Se-Se-Se linkages are found to be significantly more mobile compared to those in Ge-Se-Se/Ge linkages. The time scale of the rotational dynamics of Se-Se-Se linkages and its temperature dependence are nearly identical for liquids with x<=17 but the time scale displays an abrupt increase for the liquids with x=20 and 23, at and above the rigidity percolation threshold. Such a dynamical transition is shown to be consistent with a sudden elastic stiffening of the atomic network of Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} supercooled liquids at the percolation threshold.

  20. Observation of crystallization slowdown in supercooled parahydrogen and orthodeuterium quantum liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnel, Matthias; Fernández, José M.; Tramonto, Filippo; Tejeda, Guzmán; Moreno, Elena; Kalinin, Anton; Nava, Marco; Galli, Davide E.; Montero, Salvador; Grisenti, Robert E.

    2014-05-01

    We report a quantitative experimental study of the crystallization kinetics of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures of parahydrogen (pH2) and orthodeuterium (oD2) by high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets. We show that in a wide range of compositions the crystallization rate of the isotopic mixtures is significantly reduced with respect to that of the pure substances. To clarify this behavior we have performed path-integral simulations of the nonequilibrium pH2-oD2 liquid mixtures, revealing that differences in quantum delocalization between the two isotopic species translate into different effective particle sizes. Our results provide experimental evidence for crystallization slowdown of quantum origin, offering a benchmark for theoretical studies of quantum behavior in supercooled liquids.

  1. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water.

    PubMed

    Rogers, T Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure. PMID:27615518

  2. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  3. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  4. Universal behavior of the viscosity of supercooled fragile and polymeric glassformers in different temperature regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraca, Adriana; Goldstein, Patricia; del Castillo, Luis Felipe

    2016-11-01

    The behavior of the viscosity of supercooled liquids with temperature has been extensively studied in different regimes. We present a universal behavior for the Logarithmic Shift Factor for fragile and polymeric glassformers in two temperature regions, above and below the crossover temperature Tc, respectively. We find two different equations, one for each region, that may be represented as master plots which show universal behaviors for both cases.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of polymer crystallization in highly supercooled melt: Primary nucleation and cold crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms of crystallization at large supercooling and structure of supercooled melt are investigated in our polyethylenelike polymer through molecular dynamics simulations. Three representative crystallization processes are here considered: (1) isothermal homogeneous nucleation in the melt, (2) crystallization by rapid cooling of the melt, and (3) cold crystallization during slow heating of an amorphous state. Molecular level structures of the melt and the emerging crystallites are characterized by the use of the specific parameters, the effective segment length Lp and the radius of gyration Rg of the molecules, together with the overall crystallinity χc. In quasiequilibrium melt of moderate supercooling, the chains have random-coil conformations. However, the temperature dependence of the averaged Lp in the melt is found to show quite unexpected transition around the bulk melting temperature. At larger supercooling of 330 K, the homogeneous nucleation takes place after an induction period of about 4 ns. Characteristic conformational changes are here described by multimodal distributions of Rg, the main components of which correspond to relaxed random-coil chains in the melt and once-folded chains in the crystallites; the former chains transform continuously into the latter, having similar chain extension Rg. Rapid cooling of the melt is found to give poorly crystallized states having fringed-micellar organization. The effective segment length Lp shows considerably faster increase than Rg, resulting in peculiar conformational frustration. Nearly amorphous samples obtained by very rapid cooling show pronounced cold crystallization by slow heating over the glass transition temperature, where crystallites of random orientations form a granular texture due to steric collisions of the growing lamellae. The generated crystal texture is only metastable and readily reorganizes by annealing at high temperatures, where the chains are found to make large

  6. Solidification studies of Nb-Ge alloys at large degrees of supercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Evans, N. D.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A 32 meter evacuated drop tube has been used to investigate the solidification of Nb-Ge alloys after deep undercooling. Samples have been supercooled as much as 500 K below the liquidus by using free-fall conditions to eliminate crucible induced nucleation. Final microstructures are dependent on the quenching rates at the bottom of the drop tube with a striking extension of the beta phase solubility limit at the higher quenching rates.

  7. The relationship between gut contents and supercooling capacity in hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Packard, Gary C; Packard, Mary J

    2006-05-01

    Painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) typically spend their first winter of life in a shallow, subterranean hibernaculum (the natal nest) where they seemingly withstand exposure to ice and cold by resisting freezing and becoming supercooled. However, turtles ingest soil and fragments of eggshell as they are hatching from their eggs, and the ingestate usually contains efficient nucleating agents that cause water to freeze at high subzero temperatures. Consequently, neonatal painted turtles have only a modest ability to undergo supercooling in the period immediately after hatching. We studied the limit for supercooling (SCP) in hatchlings that were acclimating to different thermal regimes and then related SCPs of the turtles to the amount of particulate matter in their gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Turtles that were transferred directly from 26 degrees C (the incubation temperature) to 2 degrees C did not purge soil from their gut, and SCPs for these animals remained near -4 degrees C for the 60 days of the study. Animals that were held at 26 degrees C for the duration of the experiment usually cleared soil from their GI tract within 24 days, but SCPs for these turtles were only slightly lower after 60 days than they were at the outset of the experiment. Hatchlings that were acclimating slowly to 2 degrees C cleared soil from their gut within 24 days and realized a modest reduction in their SCP. However, the limit of supercooling in the slowly acclimating animals continued to decline even after all particulate material had been removed from their GI tract, thereby indicating that factors intrinsic to the nucleating agents themselves also may have been involved in the acclimation of hatchlings to low temperature. The lowest SCPs for turtles that were acclimating slowly to 2 degrees C were similar to SCPs recorded in an earlier study of animals taken from natural nests in late autumn, so the current findings affirm the importance of seasonally declining temperatures in

  8. Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice.

    PubMed

    Moore, Emily B; Molinero, Valeria

    2011-11-23

    One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature, T(H) ≈ 232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization-including the size and structure of critical nuclei-has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase on moving into the supercooled region, according to power laws that would diverge (that is, approach infinity) at ~225 K (refs 1, 2), so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below T(H). And although atomistic studies have captured water crystallization, high computational costs have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model in the supercooled regime around T(H) which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanisms of ice formation. The results of the simulations and classical nucleation theory using experimental data suggest that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below T(H) and well above its glass transition temperature, 136 K. By establishing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water and its anomalous thermodynamics and crystallization rate, our findings also provide mechanistic insight into the observed dependence of homogeneous ice nucleation rates on the thermodynamics of water.

  9. Note: Homogeneous TIP4P/2005 ice nucleation at low supercooling.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2013-09-01

    We present a partial free energy profile for the homogeneous nucleation of ice using an all-atom model of water at low supercooling, at which ice growth dynamics are reasonably accessible to simulation. We demonstrate that the free energy profile is well described by classical nucleation theory, and that the nucleation barrier is entropic in origin. We also estimate to first order the temperature dependence of the interfacial free energy.

  10. Deep convective clouds with sustained supercooled liquid water down to -37.5 degrees C

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld; Woodley

    2000-05-25

    In cirrus and orographic wave clouds, highly supercooled water has been observed in small quantities (less than 0.15 g m(-3)). This high degree of supercooling was attributed to the small droplet size and the lack of ice nuclei at the heights of these clouds. For deep convective clouds, which have much larger droplets near their tops and which take in aerosols from near the ground, no such measurements have hitherto been reported. However, satellite data suggest that highly supercooled water (down to -38 degrees C) frequently occurs in vigorous continental convective storms. Here we report in situ measurements in deep convective clouds from an aircraft, showing that most of the condensed water remains liquid down to -37.5 degrees C. The droplets reach a median volume diameter of 17 microm and amount to 1.8 gm(-3), one order of magnitude more than previously reported. At slightly colder temperatures only ice was found, suggesting homogeneous freezing. Because of the poor knowledge of mixed-phase cloud processes, the simulation of clouds using numerical models is difficult at present. Our observations will help to understand these cloud processes, such as rainfall, hail, and cloud electrification, together with their implications for the climate system.

  11. Mode coupling and fragile to strong transition in supercooled TIP4P water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2012-10-01

    We consider one of the most used model for water, the rigid four site TIP4P potential, and we study by molecular dynamics simulation the dynamical properties of the liquid upon supercooling. In the previous studies of the thermodynamics of the TIP4P model a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) located at the end of the coexistence between the low density liquid (LDL) and the high density liquid (HDL) of water was found. We present here the analysis of the self intermediate scattering functions in a large range of temperatures and densities and we show that the structural relaxation in the region of mild supercooling is in agreement with the predictions of the mode coupling theory. In the more deep supercooled region we observe that the α-relaxation time deviates from the mode coupling theory (MCT) trend and a crossover takes place from a fragile to a strong behavior upon crossing the Widom line emanating from the LLCP. The HDL and the LDL phases are associated with the fragile and the strong behavior, respectively.

  12. Supercooling and Ice Formation of Perchlorate Brines under Mars-relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primm, K.; Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Perchlorate salts, discovered in the Martian regolith at multiple landing sites, may provide pathways for liquid water stability on current Mars. It has previously been assumed that if perchlorate brines form in the Martian regolith via melting or deliquescence, they would be present only briefly because efflorescence into a crystal or freezing to ice would soon occur. Here, we used a Raman microscope to study the temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions at which magnesium perchlorate brine will form ice. Although ice is thermodynamically predicted to form whenever the saturation with respect to ice (Sice) is greater than or equal to 1, ice formation by perchlorate brines did not occur until elevated Sice values were reached: Sice= 1.17, 1.29, and 1.25 at temperatures of 218 K, 230.5 K, and 244 K, respectively. If a magnesium perchlorate particle was allowed to deliquesce completely prior to experiencing ice supersaturation, the extent of supercooling was increased even further. These high supersaturation values imply perchlorate brines can exist over a wider range of conditions than previously believed. From these experiments it has been found that magnesium perchlorate exhibits supercooling well into the previous theoretical ice region of the stability diagram and that liquid brines on Mars could potentially exist for up to two additional hours per sol. This supercooling of magnesium perchlorate will help with the exploration of Mars by the Mars 2020 spacecraft by helping to understand the phase and duration of water existing in the Martian subsurface.

  13. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-04-28

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

  14. Influence of solidification on the impact of supercooled water drops onto cold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an experimental investigation of the impact of a supercooled drop onto hydrophilic and superhydrophobic substrates. The aim is to better understand the process of airframe icing caused by supercooled large droplets, which has been recently identified as a severe hazard in aviation. The Weber number and Reynolds number of the impinging drop ranged from 200 to 300 and from 2600 to 5800, respectively. Drop impact, spreading, and rebound were observed using a high-speed video system. The maximum spreading diameter of an impacting drop on hydrophilic surfaces was measured. The temperature effect on this parameter was only minor for a wide range of the drop and substrate temperatures. However, ice/water mixtures emerged when both the drop and substrate temperatures were below 0 °C. Similarly, drop rebound on superhydrophobic substrates was significantly hindered by solidification when supercooled drop impacted onto substrates below the freezing point. The minimum receding diameter and the speed of ice accretion on the substrate were measured for various wall temperatures. Both parameters increased almost linearly with decreasing wall temperature, but eventually leveled off beyond a certain substrate temperature. The rate of ice formation on the substrate was significantly higher than the growth rate of free ice dendrites, implying that multiple nucleation sites were present.

  15. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh S; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-04-28

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments. PMID:24784283

  16. Understanding the Stokes-Einstein relation in supercooled liquids using random pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Bhowmik, Bhanu; Das, Rajsekhar; Karmakar, Smarajit

    2016-07-01

    The breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in supercooled liquids is believed to be one of the hallmarks of glass transition. The phenomenon has been studied in depth over many years in efforts to understand the microscopic mechanism, without much success. Recently it was found that the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation in supercooled liquids can be tuned by randomly pinning a set of particles in their equilibrium positions. This observation suggested a possible framework where the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in the dynamics of supercooled liquids can be studied in a systematic manner. We have performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations to understand this phenomenon by analysing the structure of appropriately defined sets of dynamically slow and fast particle clusters. The breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation is found to become predominant once the cluster formed by the slow particles percolates the entire system size. Finally we propose a possible close connection between fractal dimensions of these clusters and the exponents associated with the fractional Stokes-Einstein relation.

  17. Supercooled spin liquid state in the frustrated pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7.

    PubMed

    Kassner, Ethan R; Eyvazov, Azar B; Pichler, Benjamin; Munsie, Timothy J S; Dabkowska, Hanna A; Luke, Graeme M; Davis, J C Séamus

    2015-07-14

    A "supercooled" liquid develops when a fluid does not crystallize upon cooling below its ordering temperature. Instead, the microscopic relaxation times diverge so rapidly that, upon further cooling, equilibration eventually becomes impossible and glass formation occurs. Classic supercooled liquids exhibit specific identifiers including microscopic relaxation times diverging on a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) trajectory, a Havriliak-Negami (HN) form for the dielectric function ε(ω, T), and a general Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) form for time-domain relaxation. Recently, the pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7 has become of interest because its frustrated magnetic interactions may, in theory, lead to highly exotic magnetic fluids. However, its true magnetic state at low temperatures has proven very difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we introduce high precision, boundary-free magnetization transport techniques based upon toroidal geometries and gain an improved understanding of the time- and frequency-dependent magnetization dynamics of Dy2Ti2O7. We demonstrate a virtually universal HN form for the magnetic susceptibility χ (ω, T), a general KWW form for the realtime magnetic relaxation, and a divergence of the microscopic magnetic relaxation rates with the VTF trajectory. Low-temperature Dy2Ti2O7 therefore exhibits the characteristics of a supercooled magnetic liquid. One implication is that this translationally invariant lattice of strongly correlated spins may be evolving toward an unprecedented magnetic glass state, perhaps due to many-body localization of spin. PMID:26130810

  18. Cold Hardiness and Deep Supercooling in Xylem of Shagbark Hickory 1

    PubMed Central

    George, Milon F.; Burke, Michael J.

    1977-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and low temperature microscopy are utilized to investigate low temperature freezing points or exotherms which occur near −40 C in the xylem of cold-acclimated shagbark hickory (Carya ovata L.). Experiments using these methods demonstrate that the low temperature exotherm results from the freezing of cellular water in a manner predicted for supercooled dilute aqueous solutions. Heat release on freezing, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times, and freezing and thawing curves for hickory twigs all point to a supercooled fraction in the xylem at subfreezing temperatures. Calorimetric and low temperature microscopic analyses indicate that freezing occurs intracellularly in the xylem ray parenchyma. The supercooled fraction is found to be extremely stable, even at temperatures only slightly above the homogeneous nucleation temperature for water (−38 C). Xylem water is also observed to be resistant to dehydration when exposed to 80% relative humidity at 20 C. D2O exchange experiments find that only a weak kinetic barrier to water transport exists in the xylem rays of shagbark hickory. PMID:16659841

  19. Analysis of critical melt supercooling for heteroepitaxy of Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/Sb by GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Germogenov, V.P.; Pozolotin, V.A.

    1988-08-01

    Thermodynamic computations of the critical supercooling of a melt are performed for the case of heteroepitaxy of a solid Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/Sb solution on a GaSb substrate for which there should be no substrate etching. Three kinds of supercoolings are examined, where ..delta..T/sub cr//sup (1)/ is the supercooling for which they change in the system Gibbs energy should equal zero because of dissolution, ..delta..T/sub cr//sup (2)/ is the supercooling for which the diminution in the system Gibbs energy due to substrate dissolution equals the energy being liberated during crystallization of the Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/Sb solid solutions layer. Finally, the influence of the specific free interphasal energy of the substrate-melt interface on the result of computing the critical supercooling (the supercooling ..delta..T/sub cr//sup (3)/) is considered.

  20. The formation of supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low-temperature perchlorate glasses in aqueous solutions relevant to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-05-01

    Salt solutions on Mars can stabilize liquid water at low temperatures by lowering the freezing point of water. The maximum equilibrium freezing-point depression possible, known as the eutectic temperature, suggests a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars; however, salt solutions can supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. To investigate the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration, we performed slow cooling and warming experiments on pure salt solutions and saturated soil-solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. By monitoring solution temperatures, we identified exothermic crystallization events and determined the composition of precipitated phases from the eutectic melting temperature. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. In general, supercooling is greater in more concentrated solutions and with salts of Ca and Mg. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions investigated in this study typically supercool 5-15 °C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil-solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil-solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil-solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the martian summer. In contrast, we find that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions do not crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120 °C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are also

  1. Experimental Studies about Transient Characteristics of a Deeply Buried Grounding Electrode and a Grounding Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Shunichi; Sekioka, Shozo

    When lightning strikes the tower of a cellular phone base station or other such facilities, power and communication equipments in the vicinity of the tower may suffer extensive damages due to the lightning current flowing backward from the grounding system of the tower. The use of a deeply buried grounding electrode has been proposed recently to suppress such back flow current and a potential rise in the vicinity of the tower. The deeply buried grounding electrode is a bare conductor buried deep in the ground that is connected to a lightning rod on the ground by an insulated wire. When lightning strikes the lightning rod, the lightning current is directed to the electrode from which it diffuses to the ground. The deeply buried grounding electrodes have been installed in cellular phone base stations and other such facilities to solve such problems caused by the back flow current and the potential rise. A grounding mesh is usually laid around such base stations as a grounding system for the facilities on the ground. Therefore, it is important to understand the interactions between the deeply buried grounding electrode and the grounding mesh. In this study, experiments on the interactions between a grounding mesh and a deeply buried grounding electrode have been carried out. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the mesh grounding have researched.

  2. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M; Hu, W-F; Farutin, A; Rafaï, S; Lai, M-C; Peyla, P; Misbah, C

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses. PMID:26651631

  3. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  4. Measurements of growth rates of an ice crystal from supercooled heavy water under microgravity conditions: basal face growth rate and tip velocity of a dendrite.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Etsuro; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Shimaoka, Taro; Sone, Takehiko; Kiyota, Tatsuo; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2011-07-14

    The growth of single ice crystals from supercooled heavy water was studied under microgravity conditions in the Japanese Experiment Module ''KIBO'' of the International Space Station (ISS). The velocities of dendrite tips parallel to the a axis and the growth rates of basal faces parallel to the c axis were both analyzed under supercooling ranging from 0.03 to 2.0 K. The velocities of dendrite tips agree with the theory for larger amounts of supercooling when the growth on the basal faces are not zero. At very low supercooling there is no growth on the basal faces. With increasing supercooling the basal faces start to grow, the growth rate changing as a function of supercooling with a power law with an exponent of about 2, with the exponent approaching 1 as supercooling increases further. We interpret the growth on the basal faces as being controlled by two-dimensional nucleation under low supercooling, with a change in the growth kinetics to spiral growth with the aid of screw dislocations with increasing supercooling then to a linear growth law. We discuss the combined effect of tip velocity and basal face kinetics on pattern formation during the growth of ice.

  5. Aromatic ring-flipping in supercooled water: implications for NMR-based structural biology of proteins.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, J J; Mills, J L; Sharma, S; Szyperski, T

    2001-01-24

    We have characterized, for the first time, motional modes of a protein dissolved in supercooled water: the flipping kinetics of phenylalanyl and tyrosinyl rings of the 6 kDa protein BPTI have been investigated by NMR at temperatures between -3 and -16.5 degrees C. At T = -15 degrees C, the ring-flipping rate constants of Tyr 23, Tyr 35, and Phe 45 are smaller than 2 s(-1), i.e., flip-broadening of aromatic NMR lines is reduced beyond detection and averaging of NOEs through ring-flipping is abolished. This allows neat detection of distinct NOE sets for the individual aromatic (1)H spins. In contrast, the rings of Phe 4, Tyr 10, Tyr 21, Phe 22, and Phe 33 are flipping rapidly on the chemical shift time scale with rate constants being in the range from approximately 10(2) to 10(5) s(-1) even at T = -15 degrees C. Line width measurements in 2D [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY showed that flipping of the Phe 4 and Phe 33 rings is, however, slowed to an extent that the onset of associated line broadening in the fast exchange limit is registered. The reduced ring-flipping rate constant of Phe 45 in supercooled water allowed very precise determination of Eyring activation enthalpy and entropy from cross relaxation suppressed 2D [(1)H,(1)H]-exchange spectroscopy. This yielded DeltaH = 14 +/- 0.5 kcal.mol(-1) and DeltaS = -4 +/- 1 cal.mol(-1).K(-1), i.e., values close to those previously derived by Wagner and Wüthrich for the temperature range from 4 to 72 degrees C (DeltaH = 16 +/- 1 kcal.mol(-1) and DeltaS = 6 +/- 2 cal.mol(-1).K(-1)). The preservation of the so far uniquely low value for DeltaS indicates that the distribution of internal motional modes associated with the ring flip of Phe 45 is hardly affected by lowering T well below 0 degrees C. Hence, if a globular protein does not cold denature, aromatic flipping rates, and thus likely also the rates of other conformational and/or chemical exchange processes occurring in supercooled water, can be expected to be well estimated from

  6. Evidence for a liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water within the E3B3 model and a possible interpretation of the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled water exhibits many thermodynamic anomalies, and several scenarios have been proposed to interpret them, among which the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) hypothesis is the most commonly discussed. We investigated Widom lines and the LLCP of deeply supercooled water, by using molecular dynamics simulation with a newly reparameterized water model that explicitly includes three-body interactions. Seven isobars are studied from ambient pressure to 2.5 kbar, and Widom lines are identified by calculating maxima in the coefficient of thermal expansion and the isothermal compressibility (both with respect to temperature). From these data we estimate that the LLCP of the new water model is at 180 K and 2.1 kbar. The oxygen radial distribution function is calculated along the 2 kbar isobar. It shows a steep change in the height of its second peak between 180 and 185 K, which indicates a transition between the high-density liquid and low-density liquid phases and which is consistent with the ascribed location of the critical point. The good agreement of the height of the second peak of the radial distribution function between simulation and experiment at 1 bar, as a function of temperature, supports the validity of the model. The location of the LLCP within the model is close to the kink in the experimental homogeneous nucleation line. We use existing experimental data to argue that the experimental LLCP is at 168 K and 1.95 kbar and speculate how this LLCP and its Widom line might be responsible for the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line.

  7. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  8. Use of a Piezosurgery Technique to Remove a Deeply Impacted Supernumerary Tooth in the Anterior Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Kawakami, Kiyokazu; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Deeply impacted supernumerary teeth in the anterior maxillary cannot be generally removed by the conventional labial or palatal surgical approach because of the risk of damaging the surrounding soft tissues and the possibility of injuring the roots of adjacent permanent teeth. In piezosurgery, bony tissues are selectively cut, thereby avoiding the soft tissue damage caused by rotary cutting instruments. We report the case of a 15-year-old Japanese boy from whom a deeply impacted supernumerary tooth in the anterior maxillary was safely removed through the floor of the nasal cavity. The surgical extraction was performed without damaging the nasal mucosa or adjacent structures such as the roots of the adjacent permanent teeth. Considering that piezosurgery limits the extent of surgical invasion, this technique can be practiced as a minimally invasive and safe surgical procedure for treating suitably selected cases with a deeply impacted supernumerary tooth. PMID:26779355

  9. Dig Deeply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owings, Sharon; Merino, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Most children enjoy being in gardens. To capitalize on this interest, the authors designed a pea project in which second- and third-grade students would discover how plants grow under different conditions while also developing observation and nonfiction writing skills. As a result of this inquiry-based project, students learned how to think and…

  10. Anti-ice nucleation activity in xylem extracts from trees that contain deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-12-01

    Boreal hardwood species, including Japanese white birch (Betula platyphylla Sukat. var. japonica Hara), Japanese chestnut (Castanea crenata Sieb. et Zucc.), katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb. et Zucc.), Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata Blume), mulberry (Morus bombycis Koidz.), and Japanese rowan (Sorbus commixta Hedl.), had xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) that adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling. Crude extracts from xylem in all these trees were found to have anti-ice nucleation activity that promoted supercooling capability of water as measured by a droplet freezing assay. The magnitude of increase in supercooling capability of water droplets in the presence of ice-nucleation bacteria, Erwinia ananas, was higher in the ranges from 0.1 to 1.7 degrees C on addition of crude xylem extracts than freezing temperature of water droplets on addition of glucose in the same concentration (100 mosmol/kg). Crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum provided the highest supercooling capability of water droplets. Our additional examination showed that crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity toward water droplets containing a variety of heterogeneous ice nucleators, including ice-nucleation bacteria, not only E. ananas but also Pseudomonas syringae (NBRC3310) or Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide or airborne impurities. However, crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum did not affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperature as analyzed by emulsified micro-water droplets. The possible role of such anti-ice nucleation activity in crude xylem extracts in deep supercooling of XPCs is discussed.

  11. Effect of Some Factors on Critical Condition of Ice Formation for Flowing Supercooled Organic Water Solution in Cooled Circular Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Miyahara, Satoshi; Takeya, Kengo

    Supercooling characteristics of three kinds of organic water solutions (D-Sorbitol, Glycerol, Glucose) in a forced flow were investigated experimentally. The critical condition of ice nucleation in a cooled circular tube was examined for concentration of water solution and cooling temperature under various Reynolds numbers. It was found that the flow velocity and cooling temperature conditions in a laminar flow region. However, in a turbulent flow region, the critical degree of supercooling was influenced by the flow velocity and cooling temperature. As a result, non-dimensional correlation equations for the critical condition of ice formation were derived in the laminar and turbulent flow region as a function of some non-dimensional parameters. While the ice making efficiency of D-Sorbitol water solution was measured under various Reynolds numbers and cooling temperature conditions on the stable supercooling condition. The ice making efficiency of supercooled organic water solution was influenced by the degree of the supercooling based on the mixed organic water solution temperature at the outlet of the inner tube.

  12. Anti-ice nucleation activity in xylem extracts from trees that contain deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-12-01

    Boreal hardwood species, including Japanese white birch (Betula platyphylla Sukat. var. japonica Hara), Japanese chestnut (Castanea crenata Sieb. et Zucc.), katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb. et Zucc.), Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata Blume), mulberry (Morus bombycis Koidz.), and Japanese rowan (Sorbus commixta Hedl.), had xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) that adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling. Crude extracts from xylem in all these trees were found to have anti-ice nucleation activity that promoted supercooling capability of water as measured by a droplet freezing assay. The magnitude of increase in supercooling capability of water droplets in the presence of ice-nucleation bacteria, Erwinia ananas, was higher in the ranges from 0.1 to 1.7 degrees C on addition of crude xylem extracts than freezing temperature of water droplets on addition of glucose in the same concentration (100 mosmol/kg). Crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum provided the highest supercooling capability of water droplets. Our additional examination showed that crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity toward water droplets containing a variety of heterogeneous ice nucleators, including ice-nucleation bacteria, not only E. ananas but also Pseudomonas syringae (NBRC3310) or Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide or airborne impurities. However, crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum did not affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperature as analyzed by emulsified micro-water droplets. The possible role of such anti-ice nucleation activity in crude xylem extracts in deep supercooling of XPCs is discussed. PMID:17936742

  13. Working safely in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.; Versweyveld, J. )

    1992-08-13

    Working in confined spaces is a delicate balance of the correct equipment, hazard knowledge, proper training, and common sense. Anything less has potentially deadly consequences. The dangerous atmospheric and physical hazards often encountered in confined spaces must be recognized and accounted for. In addition, procedures and practices must conform to Occupational Safety and health Administration (OSHA) confined space regulations. Last year, three men were asphyxiated while surveying beneath a manhole in Boulder, CO. An area newspaper called the deaths the result of a freak accident. Whatever the cause, entering a manhole without first monitoring the air and posting an outside attendant is both extremely dangerous and a violation of safe entry procedures. The National Institute for Health and Occupational Safety (NIOSH) estimates that millions of workers from a wide range of occupations and industries are exposed to confined space hazards every year. Although confined space deaths are not a new phenomenon, only recently has the problem received serious study. Government regulatory agencies are becoming more involved OSHA recently proposed ruling 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces, to mandate safe entry practices and procedures. The ruling requires all employers to develop a specific action plan for confined space entry, including entry procedures, worker training, safety equipment, and emergency action. This first article defines a confined space and examines some common hazards, including toxic, combustible, and oxygen-deficient atmospheres and combustible dusts. A subsequent article will review the use of test instruments, personal protective equipment, worker training, and emergency response.

  14. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  15. Confined Selective Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse simple and composite emulsions possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy, materials science and industry. Here we present both experiments and slender-body theory regarding the generation of simple emulsions using a configuration that we have called Confined Selective Withdrawal, since it is an improved configuration of the classical Selective Withdrawal. We consider two different situations, namely, the cases when the outer flow Reynolds number is high and low, respectively. Several geometrical configurations and a wide range of viscosity ratios are analyzed so that the physics behind the phenomenon can be fully understood. In addition, we present both experiments and theory regarding the generation of composite emulsions. This phenomenon is only feasible when the outer flow Reynolds number is low enough. In this case, we propose a more complex theory which requires the simultaneous resolution of two interfaces in order to predict the shape of the jet and the sizes of the drops formed. The excellent agreement between our slender-body approximation and the experimental evidence fully validates our theories.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  17. Learning to Drink Deeply from Books: Using Experiential Assignments to Teach Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlein, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how to teach students to drink deeply from books. Drawing on the work of Peter Elbow, the article argues for incorporating experiential assignments that are structured to create a mediating realm between abstract concepts and concrete experiences. The bulk of the article explores in detail the author's use of such assignments…

  18. Monitoring the Far Infrared Variability of Deeply Embedded Protostars with SOFIA/HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug

    2015-10-01

    Low-mass stars form via gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores. The evolution of the mass accretion onto a forming protostar depends on the rate at which the interior of the core collapses, the significance of a circumstellar disk as a temporary mass reservoir, and the physics of how the gas is transported through the disk and accretes onto the central star. Despite a clear requirement for time dependency in the accretion rate onto deeply embedded protostars and a large number of theoretical mechanisms for powering variability, our understanding of both the timescale and amplitude of variability is almost entirely unconstrained. The bolometric luminosity of deeply embedded protostars is a direct proxy for the accretion luminosity, modified only by the addition of the stellar luminosity itself. For deeply embedded protostars, the spectral energy distribution peaks in the far infrared, near 100 microns, making this an ideal wavelength for long-term monitoring of accretion variability. We propose to use SOFIA/HAWC at 89 and 154 microns to monitor three star-forming fields (Cepheus, Perseus, and Serpens) as part of a long-term campaign dedicated to uncovering the observational signature of episodic accretion. These observations will aid in our understanding of how stars accumulate their final mass and are neceassry for discriminating between the various theoretical models of episodic accretion onto deeply embedded protostars.

  19. Designing a Deeply Digital Science Curriculum: Supporting Teacher Learning and Implementation with Organizing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, Heather; Severance, Samuel; Penuel, William R.; Quigley, David; Sumner, Tamara; Devaul, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of technology (e.g., Chromebooks, Google Drive) on teacher learning and student activity in the development and implementation of a deeply digital high school biology unit. Using design-based implementation research, teachers co-designed with researchers and curriculum specialists a student-centered unit aligned to…

  20. The s-wave repulsion and deeply bound pionic atoms: fact and fancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2003-06-01

    Fits to a large data set of pionic atoms show that the 'missing' s-wave repulsion is accounted for when a density dependence suggested recently by Weise is included in the isovector term of the s-wave pion optical potential. The importance of using large data sets is demonstrated and the role of deeply bound pionic atom states is discussed.

  1. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  2. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikfeldt, K. T.; Huang, C.; Nilsson, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2011-06-01

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P/2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (TW) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3495974 are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing TW, consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P/2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P/2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching TW. Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  3. Critical Radius of Supercooled Water Droplets: On the Transition toward Dendritic Freezing.

    PubMed

    Buttersack, Tillmann; Bauerecker, Sigurd

    2016-01-28

    The freezing of freely suspended supercooled water droplets with a diameter of bigger than a few micrometers splits into two rather different freezing stages. Within the first very fast dendritic freezing stage a spongy network ice with an ice portion of less than one-third forms and more than two-thirds of liquid water remain. In the present work the distribution of the ice portion in the droplet directly after the dendritic freezing phase as well as the evolution of the ice and temperature distribution has been investigated in dependence of the most relevant parameters as droplet diameter, dendritic freezing velocity (which correlates with the supercooling) and heat transfer coefficient to the surroundings (which correlates with the relative droplet velocity compared to the ambient air and with the droplet size). For this purpose on the experimental side acoustically levitated droplets in climate chambers have been investigated in combination with high-speed cameras. The obtained results have been used for finite element method (FEM) simulations of the dendritic freezing phase under consideration of the beginning second, much slower heat-transfer dominated freezing phase. A theoretical model covering 30 layers and 5 shells of the droplet has been developed which allows one to describe the evolution of both freezing phases at the same time. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental as well as with calculated results exploiting the heat balance equation. The most striking result of this work is the critical radius of the droplet which describes the transition of one-stage freezing of the supercooled water droplet toward the thermodynamically forced dendritical two-stage freezing in which the droplet cannot sufficiently get rid of the formation heat anymore. Depending on the parameters named above this critical radius was found to be in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm by FEM simulation.

  4. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  5. Evolution of a supercooled Ice Shelf Water plume with an actively growing subice platelet matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Natalie J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Stevens, Craig L.; Langhorne, Patricia J.; Haskell, Timothy G.

    2014-06-01

    We use new observations in Western McMurdo Sound, combined with longitudinal hydrographic transects of the sound, to identify a northward-flowing Ice Shelf Water (ISW) plume exiting the cavity of the McMurdo-Ross Ice Shelf. We estimate the plume's net northward transport at 0.4 ± 0.1 Sv, carving out a corridor approximately 35 km wide aligned with the Victoria Land Coast. Basal topography of the McMurdo Ice Shelf is such that the plume is delivered to the surface without mixing with overlying warmer water, and is therefore able to remain below the surface freezing temperature at the point of observation beneath first-year ice. Thus, the upper ocean was supercooled, by up to 50 mK at the surface, due to pressure relief from recent rapid ascent of the steep basal slope. The 70 m thick supercooled layer supports the growth and maintenance of a thick, semirigid, and porous matrix of platelet ice, which is trapped by buoyancy at the ice-ocean interface. Continued growth of individual platelets in supercooled water creates significant brine rejection at the top of the water column which resulted in convection over the upper 200 m thick, homogeneous layer. By examining the diffusive nature of the intermediate water between layers of ISW and High Salinity Shelf Water, we conclude that the ISW plume must have originated beneath the Ross Ice Shelf and demonstrate that it is likely to expand eastward across McMurdo Sound with the progression of winter.

  6. Surface tension of supercooled water determined by using a counterpressure capillary rise method.

    PubMed

    Vinš, Václav; Fransen, Maurice; Hykl, Jiří; Hrubý, Jan

    2015-04-30

    Measurements of the surface tension of supercooled water down to -25 °C have been reported recently (Hrubý et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2014, 5, 425-428). These experiments did not show any anomalous temperature dependence of the surface tension of supercooled water reported by some earlier measurements and molecular simulations. In the present work, this finding is confirmed using a counterpressure capillary rise method (the counterpressure method) as well as through the use of the classical capillary rise method (the height method). In the counterpressure method, the liquid meniscus inside the vertical capillary tube was kept at a fixed position with an in-house developed helium distribution setup. A preset counterpressure was applied to the liquid meniscus when its temperature changed from a reference temperature (30 °C) to the temperature of interest. The magnitude of the counterpressure was adjusted such that the meniscus remained at the same height, thus compensating the change of the surface tension. One advantage of the counterpressure method over the height method consists of avoiding the uncertainty due to a possible variation of the capillary diameter along its length. A second advantage is that the equilibration time due to the capillary flow of the highly viscous supercooled water can be shortened. For both the counterpressure method and the height method, the actual results are relative values of surface tension with respect to the surface tension of water at the reference temperature. The combined relative standard uncertainty of the relative surface tensions is less than or equal to 0.18%. The new data between -26 and +30 °C lie close to the IAPWS correlation for the surface tension of ordinary water extrapolated below 0.01 °C and do not exhibit any anomalous features.

  7. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  8. Frequency dependent complex refractive indices of supercooled liquid water and ice determined from aerosol extinction spectra.

    PubMed

    Zasetsky, A Y; Khalizov, A F; Earle, M E; Sloan, J J

    2005-03-31

    Complex refractive indices of supercooled liquid water at 240, 253, 263, and 273 K, and ice at 200, 210, and 235 K in the mid infrared from 460 to 4000 cm(-1) are reported. The results were obtained from the extinction spectra of small (micron-size) aerosol particles, recorded using the cryogenic flow tube technique. An improved iterative procedure for retrieving complex refractive indices from extinction measurements is described. The refractive indices of ice determined in the present study are in good agreement with data reported earlier. The temperature region and range of states covered in the present work are relevant to the study of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and clouds.

  9. Supercooling, ice nucleation and crystal growth: a systematic study in plant samples.

    PubMed

    Zaragotas, Dimitris; Liolios, Nikolaos T; Anastassopoulos, Elias

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an innovative technological platform which is based on infrared video recording and is used for monitoring multiple ice nucleation events and their interactions, as they happen in 96 well microplates. Thousands of freezing curves were obtained during this study and the following freezing parameters were measured: cooling rate, nucleation point, freezing point, solidus point, degree of supercooling, duration of dendritic phase and duration of crystal growth. We demonstrate the use of this platform in the detection of ice nuclei in plant samples. Future applications of this platform may include breeding for frost tolerance, cryopreservation, frozen food technology and atmospheric sciences. PMID:27056262

  10. Equation of State for Supercooled Water at Pressures up to 400 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-12-01

    An equation of state is presented for the thermodynamic properties of cold and supercooled water. It is valid for temperatures from the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature up to 300 K and for pressures up to 400 MPa, and can be extrapolated up to 1000 MPa. The equation of state is compared with experimental data for the density, expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, speed of sound, and heat capacity. Estimates for the accuracy of the equation are given. The melting curve of ice I is calculated from the phase-equilibrium condition between the proposed equation and an existing equation of state for ice I.

  11. Pulsed NMR investigation of the supercooled water-gas hydrate-gas metastable equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Zavodovsky, A. G.; Madygulov, M. Sh.; Nesterov, A. N.; Reshetnikov, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    A method is developed for determining the thermobaric conditions of phase equilibrium in a liquid water-hydrate-gas system by means of pulsed 1H NMR. The method is founded on NMR-based measurements of the amount of liquid water phase in a sample containing gas hydrate under certain values of pressure p and temperature T. The results from investigating the p, T conditions for metastable equilibrium in a supercooled water-Freon-12 hydrate-gas system are presented. The results are in good agreement with the known literature data.

  12. Heterogeneous nucleation of supercooled water, and the effect of an added catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, A. F.; Wilson, P. W.; Haymet, A. D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are measured rigorously by using a recently developed automated lag-time apparatus (ALTA). A single sample, in this case a sample of pure water both with and without an (insoluble) AgI crystal, is repeatedly cooled, nucleated, and thawed. Analysis of the data, coupled with a second kind of experiment, shows that the statistics of nucleation are consistent with a first-order kinetic mechanism over a wide range of supercooling temperatures. The limitations of classical nucleation theory are exhibited. Our analysis unifies many related experiments in biology, physics, chemistry, and chemical engineering. PMID:12114536

  13. Uniaxial crystal growth in thin film by utilizing supercooled state of mesogenic phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiderana Ramananarivo, Mihary; Higashi, Takuya; Ohmori, Masashi; Sudoh, Koichi; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    A method of uniaxial crystal growth in wet-processed thin films of the mesogenic phthalocyanine 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2) is proposed. It consists of applying geometrically linear thermal stimulation to a supercooled state of liquid crystalline C6PcH2. The thin film showed highly ordered molecular stacking structure and uniaxial alignment over a macroscopic scale. An explanation of the crystal growth mechanism is suggested by taking into account the temperature range of crystal growth and the hysteresis property of C6PcH2 in the phase transition.

  14. Connection between the glass transition temperature Tg and the Arrhenius temperature TA in supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    At high temperatures the structural relaxation time in liquids has Arrhenius temperature dependence. At lowering temperature, temperature dependence changes to a super Arrhenius at some temperature TA. This temperature is an important point for the structural relaxation dynamics in supercooled liquids because it reflects the transition to collective relaxation. Here we derive a relation between TA, the glass transition temperature Tg and fragility. We show that the ratio Tg/TA increases with increasing fragility of a liquid. The derived relation is in agreement with the experimental data in a series of molecular, hydrogen bonding and two inorganic glass-formers.

  15. Supercooling, ice nucleation and crystal growth: a systematic study in plant samples.

    PubMed

    Zaragotas, Dimitris; Liolios, Nikolaos T; Anastassopoulos, Elias

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an innovative technological platform which is based on infrared video recording and is used for monitoring multiple ice nucleation events and their interactions, as they happen in 96 well microplates. Thousands of freezing curves were obtained during this study and the following freezing parameters were measured: cooling rate, nucleation point, freezing point, solidus point, degree of supercooling, duration of dendritic phase and duration of crystal growth. We demonstrate the use of this platform in the detection of ice nuclei in plant samples. Future applications of this platform may include breeding for frost tolerance, cryopreservation, frozen food technology and atmospheric sciences.

  16. Reply to Comment on Rapid chemical and topological ordering in supercooled liquid Cu46Zr54

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Victor; Gangopadhyay, Anup; Sahu, K. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Canepari, S. M.; Rogers, J. R.; Kramer, M. J.; Kelton, K. F.; Goldman, Alan; Robinson, D.; Morris, James R; Lee, Jae W

    2012-01-01

    The criticisms of Harvey and Gheribi (HG) are directed towards supporting evidence for ordering in supercooled Cu46Zr54 liquid from specific heat measurements and molecular dynamics simulations, not on the direct evidence that came from x-ray diffraction studies. In this reply, we demonstrate that the unique features observed in the specific heat [Cp(T)] are not artifacts of any specific assumptions, as suggested by HG. We have furnished additional details of theMDsimulations and clarified related issues raised by HG. The basic conclusions, however, remain unchanged.

  17. Protein dynamics in supercooled water: the search for slow motional modes.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    The impact of studying protein dynamics in supercooled water for identifying slow motional modes on the micros time scale is demonstrated. Backbone 15N spin relaxation parameters were measured at -13 degrees C for ubiquitin, which plays a central role for signaling proteolysis, cellular trafficking and kinase activation in eukaryotic organisms. A hitherto undetected motional mode involving Val 70 was found, which may well play an important role for ubiquitin recognition. The measurement of rotating frame 15N relaxation times as a function of the spin-lock field allowed determination of the correlation time of this motional mode, which would not have been feasible above 0 degrees C.

  18. Effect of Macerase, Oxalic Acid, and EGTA on Deep Supercooling and Pit Membrane Structure of Xylem Parenchyma of Peach.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, M; Davis, G; Arora, R

    1991-08-01

    The object of this study was to determine if calcium cross-linking of pectin in the pit membrane of xylem parenchyma restricts water movement which results in deep supercooling. Current year shoots of ;Loring' peach (Prunus persica) were infiltrated with oxalic acid or EGTA solutions for 24 or 48 hours and then either prepared for ultrastructural analysis or subjected to differential thermal analysis. The effect of 0.25 to 1.0% pectinase (weight/volume) on deep supercooling was also investigated. The use of 5 to 50 millimolar oxalic acid and pectinase resulted in a significant reduction (flattening) of the low temperature exotherm and a distinct swelling and partial degradation of the pit membrane. EGTA (10 millimolar) for 24 or 48 hours shifted the low temperature exotherm to warmer temperatures and effected the outermost layer of the pit membrane. A hypothesis is presented on pectin-mediated regulation of deep supercooling of xylem parenchyma.

  19. Thermal noise in confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, T; Aluru, N R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we discuss a combined memory function equation (MFE) and generalized Langevin equation (GLE) approach (referred to as MFE/GLE formulation) to characterize thermal noise in confined fluids. Our study reveals that for fluids confined inside nanoscale geometries, the correlation time and the time decay of the autocorrelation function of the thermal noise are not significantly different across the confinement. We show that it is the strong cross-correlation of the mean force with the molecular velocity that gives rise to the spatial anisotropy in the velocity-autocorrelation function of the confined fluids. Further, we use the MFE/GLE formulation to extract the thermal force a fluid molecule experiences in a MD simulation. Noise extraction from MD simulation suggests that the frequency distribution of the thermal force is non-Gaussian. Also, the frequency distribution of the thermal force near the confining surface is found to be different in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the confinement. We also use the formulation to compute the noise correlation time of water confined inside a (6,6) carbon-nanotube (CNT). It is observed that inside the (6,6) CNT, in which water arranges itself in a highly concerted single-file arrangement, the correlation time of thermal noise is about an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk water.

  20. Density shocks in confined microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva; Biodynamics Team

    2014-11-01

    Motile microorganisms are often subject to different types of boundary confinement in their natural environment, but the effects of confinement on their dynamics are poorly understood. We consider an idealized model of confined microswimmers restricted to move in a two-dimensional Hele-Shaw cell. We then impose two different types of boundary confinement: circular and sidewalls confinement. We study how boundaries trigger the emergence of global modes. In the case of circular confinement, the microswimmers can spontaneously organize themselves into a single vortex state when the radius of the circular boundary is below a certain critical value, reminiscent to what have been observed in recent experiments of bacterial suspensions. In the case of sidewalls confinement in a rectangular channel, the microswimmers form density shock, via interaction with the sidewalls and background flow. We show that, through controlling the strength of background flow, we can manipulate the density shock to form at the back or front of the swimmer clusters or the suppression of the shock which gives rise to a uniform traveling wave of swimmers.

  1. Thermal noise in confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghi, T.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we discuss a combined memory function equation (MFE) and generalized Langevin equation (GLE) approach (referred to as MFE/GLE formulation) to characterize thermal noise in confined fluids. Our study reveals that for fluids confined inside nanoscale geometries, the correlation time and the time decay of the autocorrelation function of the thermal noise are not significantly different across the confinement. We show that it is the strong cross-correlation of the mean force with the molecular velocity that gives rise to the spatial anisotropy in the velocity-autocorrelation function of the confined fluids. Further, we use the MFE/GLE formulation to extract the thermal force a fluid molecule experiences in a MD simulation. Noise extraction from MD simulation suggests that the frequency distribution of the thermal force is non-Gaussian. Also, the frequency distribution of the thermal force near the confining surface is found to be different in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the confinement. We also use the formulation to compute the noise correlation time of water confined inside a (6,6) carbon-nanotube (CNT). It is observed that inside the (6,6) CNT, in which water arranges itself in a highly concerted single-file arrangement, the correlation time of thermal noise is about an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk water.

  2. Acoustic-televiewer and acoustic-waveform logs used to characterize deeply buried basalt flows, Hanford site, Benton County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-waveform and acoustic-televiewer logs were obtained for a 400-meter interval of deeply buried basalt flows in three boreholes, and over shorter intervals in two additional boreholes located on the U.S. Department of Energy 's Hanford site in Benton County, Washington. Borehole-wall breakouts were observed in the unaltered interiors of a large part of individual basalt flows; however, several of the flows in one of the five boreholes had almost no breakouts. The distribution of breakouts observed on the televiewer logs correlated closely with the incidence of core disking in some intervals, but the correlation was not always perfect, perhaps because of the differences in the specific fracture mechanisms involved. Borehole-wall breakouts were consistently located on the east and west sides of the boreholes. The orientation is consistent with previous estimates of the principal horizontal-stress field in south-central Washington, if breakouts are assumed to form along the azimuth of the least principal stress. The distribution of breakouts repeatedly indicated an interval of breakout-free rock at the top and bottom of flows. Because breakouts frequently terminate at major low-angle fractures, the data indicate that fracturing may have relieved some of the horizontal stresses near flow tops and bottoms. Unaltered and unfractured basalt appeared to have a uniform compressional velocity of 6.0 + or - 0.1 km/sec and a uniform shear velocity of 3.35 + or - 0.1 km/sec throughout flow interiors. Acoustics-waveform logs also indicated that borehole-wall breakouts did not affect acoustic propagation along the borehole; so fracturing associated with the formation of breakouts appeared to be confined to a thin annulus of stress concentration around the borehole. Televiewer logs obtained before and after hydraulic fracturing in these boreholes indicated the extent of induced fractures, and also indicated minor changes to pre-existing fractures that may have been inflated

  3. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Prokscha, T.; Kirch, K.; Liszkay, L.; Salman, Z.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into a vacuum from mesoporous silica reflects between two SiO2 confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection probability on the confining surfaces kept at 100 K is about 90% and the reflection process is well described by a cosine law. This technique enables new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1 S -2 S transition frequency using continuous-wave laser spectroscopy.

  4. Partial confinement photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, S.; Hong, C.-Y.; Pfaff, N.; Kimerling, L. C.; Michel, J.

    2008-12-29

    One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides with an incomplete photonic band gap are modeled and proposed for an integration application that exploits their property of partial angular confinement. Planar apodized photonic crystal structures are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by reflectivity as a function of angle and polarization, validating a partial confinement design for light at 850 nm wavelength. Partial confinement identifies an approach for tailoring waveguide properties by the exploitation of conformal film deposition over a substrate with angularly dependent topology. An application for an optoelectronic transceiver is demonstrated.

  5. Relaxation phenomena in supercooled liquid and glassy acetaminophen studied by dielectric, photon correlation and Brillouin light scattering spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2013-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena and acoustic properties of acetaminophen in the glassy and supercooled liquid phase were studied by dielectric, photon correlation and Brillouin spectroscopies. Dielectric and photon correlation studies revealed the structural relaxation process while a new relaxation process was found by dielectric measurement in a much lower frequency range. The acoustic anomalies clearly indicated a glass transition at 293 K and some remnant localized motions in the glassy phase that contributed to the acoustic damping. Partial crystallization in the supercooled liquid phase was signified at temperatures above 318 K by drastic changes in the Brillouin spectrum and decrease in the dielectric strength.

  6. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these

  7. Time-resolved study of crystallization in deeply cooled liquid parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, Matthias; Fernández, José M; Tejeda, Guzmán; Kalinin, Anton; Montero, Salvador; Grisenti, Robert E

    2011-06-17

    We present real-time measurements of the crystallization process occurring in liquid para-hydrogen (para-H(2)) quenched to ≈0.65T(m) (T(m)=13.8   K is the melting point of bulk liquid para-H(2)). The combination of high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy and liquid microjet generation allows, in situ, capturing structural changes with ∼10(-8)  s time resolution. Our results provide a crystal growth rate that rules out a thermally activated freezing process and reveal that the quenched melt freezes into a metastable polymorph, which undergoes a structural transition. The achieved temporal control offers new opportunities for exploring the elementary processes of nonequilibrium phase transformations in supercooled liquids. PMID:21770578

  8. Confined explosive joining of tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Technique uses explosive ribbon to join and seal tubes hermetically while totally confining explosive products, such as smoke, light, and sound. Only click is audible. Process yields joints of the same strengths as parent metal.

  9. Assessing confinement in coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Canu, Donata Melaku; Solidoro, Cosimo; Umgiesser, Georg; Cucco, Andrea; Ferrarin, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Measures of transport scale in aquatic systems can contribute to the formulation of definitions of indicators of the system's ecological properties. This paper addresses confinement, a specific transport scale proposed by biological scientists as a parameter that can capture and synthesize the principal properties that determine the spatial structure of biological communities in transitional environments. Currently, there is no direct experimental measure of confinement. In this study, a methodology based on the accumulation rate within a lagoon of a passive tracer of marine origin is proposed, the influences of different factors in the calculation of confinement are analyzed, and general recommendations are derived. In particular, we analyze the spatial and the temporal variability of confinement and its sensitivity to the seasonal variability of climatic forcing, the inputs from rivers and the parameterization of the tidal exchanges. The Lagoon of Venice is used as a case study.

  10. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  11. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  12. The low frequency dynamics of supercooled LiBr, 6H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, L.; Dreyfus, C.; Polian, A.; Bonello, B.; Malfanti, I.; Taschin, A.; Torre, R.; Pick, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a series of experiments performed on LiBr, 6H20 from room temperature down to 172 K ≈ 1.2Tg. These ultrasound, Brillouin and depolarized light scattering, and transient grating experiments show that, above 215 K, this solution behaves like supercooled water: its zero frequency sound velocity C0 continuously decreases with decreasing temperature, and the reorientational dynamics of the water molecules can be directly detected at some temperatures of this domain. Conversely, below 215 K, a new regime sets in, where the apparent C0 is practically temperature independent and where a β, Arrenhius like, relaxation process coexists with the usual, Vogel-Fulcher like, α relaxation process of the supercooled liquid. These results are similar to those recently obtained in LiCl, 6H2O. The onset of the new regime is possibly due to an increase of the interaction of the water molecules with a neighboring Li+ ion when lowering the temperature. We also compare our results with published dielectric data on water solutions of glass forming polyalcohols. Some of them present a low temperature splitting of their relaxation time similar to what is found in LiBr, 6H2O.

  13. Supercooled spin liquid state in the frustrated pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7

    PubMed Central

    Kassner, Ethan R.; Eyvazov, Azar B.; Pichler, Benjamin; Munsie, Timothy J. S.; Dabkowska, Hanna A.; Luke, Graeme M.; Davis, J. C. Séamus

    2015-01-01

    A “supercooled” liquid develops when a fluid does not crystallize upon cooling below its ordering temperature. Instead, the microscopic relaxation times diverge so rapidly that, upon further cooling, equilibration eventually becomes impossible and glass formation occurs. Classic supercooled liquids exhibit specific identifiers including microscopic relaxation times diverging on a Vogel–Tammann–Fulcher (VTF) trajectory, a Havriliak–Negami (HN) form for the dielectric function ε(ω,T), and a general Kohlrausch–Williams–Watts (KWW) form for time-domain relaxation. Recently, the pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7 has become of interest because its frustrated magnetic interactions may, in theory, lead to highly exotic magnetic fluids. However, its true magnetic state at low temperatures has proven very difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we introduce high-precision, boundary-free magnetization transport techniques based upon toroidal geometries and gain an improved understanding of the time- and frequency-dependent magnetization dynamics of Dy2Ti2O7. We demonstrate a virtually universal HN form for the magnetic susceptibility χ(ω,T), a general KWW form for the real-time magnetic relaxation, and a divergence of the microscopic magnetic relaxation rates with the VTF trajectory. Low-temperature Dy2Ti2O7 therefore exhibits the characteristics of a supercooled magnetic liquid. One implication is that this translationally invariant lattice of strongly correlated spins may be evolving toward an unprecedented magnetic glass state, perhaps due to many-body localization of spin. PMID:26130810

  14. Supercooling Capacity and Cold Tolerance of the Wild Silkworm, Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Qun; Zheng, Xi-Xi; Ma, Hong-Fang; Xia, Run-Xi; Li, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Qi-Rui

    2016-08-01

    While wild silkworms have served humans for several thousand years, little attention on cold hardiness has been paid to these economically important species. In the present study, supercooling capacity and low temperature tolerance of Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi (Guérin-Méneville) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), an economic insect reared both for silk production as well as human food, were examined under laboratory conditions. The supercooling points (SCPs) of pupae dropped significantly from a mean of -15.6°C in prediapause to -20.1°C in diapause, and then increased to -17.5°C during postdiapause development. Sex and voltinism influenced body mass but had no significant effect on the SCP. Our data demonstrated that cold tolerance of A. pernyi is tightly linked to life stage. Exposure of eggs to -5°C for up to 8 h had no effect on the hatching rate, whereas silkworm larvae failed to break through the chorion and hatch following a 4-8-h exposure to -10°C. Mean SCPs of intact eggs and naked larvae one day before hatching were similar, -23.3°C and -22.3°C, respectively, indicating that chorion does not significantly affect SCP. Comparison of lower lethal temperature (LLT50) and SCP means suggested that both pupae and eggs of A. pernyi are chill intolerant. These data will improve our understanding of low temperature tolerance in this commercially important species. PMID:27371710

  15. Morphology Of Diesel Soot Residuals From Supercooled Water Droplets And Ice Crystals: Implications For Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    China, Swarup; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Scarnatio, Barbara; Sharma, Noopur; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shilling, John E.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Chand, Duli; Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Laskin, Alexander; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Mazzoleni, Claudio

    2015-11-04

    Freshly emitted soot particles are fractal-like aggregates, but atmospheric processing often transforms their morphology. Morphology of soot particles plays an important role in determining their optical properties, life cycle and hence their effect on Earth’s radiative balance. However, little is known about the morphology of soot particles that participated in cold cloud processes. Here we report results from laboratory experiments that simulate cold cloud processing of diesel soot particles by allowing them to form supercooled droplets and ice crystals at -20 and -40°C, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed that soot residuals from ice crystals were more compact (roundness~0.55) than those from supercooled droplets (roundness ~0.45), while nascent soot particles were the least compact (roundness~0.41). Optical simulations using the discrete dipole approximation showed that the more compact structure enhances soot single scattering albedo by a factor up to 1.4, thereby reducing the top-of-the-atmosphere direct radiative forcing by ~63%. These results underscore that climate models should consider the morphological evolution of soot particles due to cold cloud processing to improve the estimate of direct radiative forcing of soot.

  16. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Eramo, R; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2014-08-28

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information. PMID:25173021

  17. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: The experimental and data analysis perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschin, A.; Bartolini, P.; Eramo, R.; Righini, R.; Torre, R.

    2014-08-01

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  18. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Eramo, R; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2014-08-28

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  19. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the focus of current cloud research. One current example is the European Union BACCHUS project. A major goal of BACCHUS is the analysis of the anthropogenic impact on ice nucleation. Within this project, we use the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) and the Cloudnet framework in order to get quantitative insight into the formation of ice in mixed-phase layered clouds with cloud top temperature (CTT) from -40 to 0°C. Depolarization measurements from lidar and radar show a clear dependence between particle shape and the temperature under which the particles have been formed. The special focus of this work is on the CTT range from -10 to 0°C. An algorithm is presented to decide between ice and liquid water precipitation falling from the clouds showing that between 10% and 30% of all layered clouds show ice precipitation with CTT between -5 and 0°C. For these slightly supercooled clouds an average ice-water-content between 10e-7 and 10e-8 [kg per cubic meter] is found.

  20. Inflorescences of alpine cushion plants freeze autonomously and may survive subzero temperatures by supercooling.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jürgen; Ladinig, Ursula; Wagner, Johanna; Neuner, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Freezing patterns in the high alpine cushion plants Saxifraga bryoides, Saxifraga caesia, Saxifraga moschata and Silene acaulis were studied by infrared thermography at three reproductive stages (bud, anthesis, fruit development). The single reproductive shoots of a cushion froze independently in all four species at every reproductive stage. Ice formation caused lethal damage to the respective inflorescence. After ice nucleation, which occurred mainly in the stalk or the base of the reproductive shoot, ice propagated throughout that entire shoot, but not into neighboring shoots. However, anatomical ice barriers within cushions were not detected. The naturally occurring temperature gradient within the cushion appeared to interrupt ice propagation thermally. Consequently, every reproductive shoot needed an autonomous ice nucleation event to initiate freezing. Ice nucleation was not only influenced by minimum temperatures but also by the duration of exposure. At moderate subzero exposure temperatures (-4.3 to -7.7 °C) the number of frozen inflorescences increased exponentially. Due to efficient supercooling, single reproductive shoots remained unfrozen down to -17.4 °C (cooling rate 6 K h⁻¹). Hence, the observed freezing pattern may be advantageous for frost survival of individual inflorescences and reproductive success of high alpine cushion plants, when during episodic summer frosts damage can be avoided by supercooling.

  1. Nonequilibrium effects in self-assembled mesophase materials: unexpected supercooling effects for cubosomes and hexosomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yao-Da; Tilley, Adam J; Larson, Ian; Lawrence, M Jayne; Amenitsch, Heinz; Rappolt, Michael; Hanley, Tracey; Boyd, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Polar lipids often exhibit equilibrium liquid crystalline structures in excess water, such as the bicontinuous cubic phases (Q(II)) at low temperatures and inverse hexagonal phase (H(II)) at higher temperatures. In this study, the equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase behavior of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) and phytantriol (PHYT) systems in excess water were investigated using both continuous heating and cooling cycles, and rapid temperature changes. Evolution of the phase structure was followed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). During cooling, not only was supercooling of the liquid crystalline systems by up to 25 degrees C observed, but evidence for nonequilibrium phase structures (not present on heating; such as the gyroid cubic phase only present at low water content in equilibrium) was also apparent. The nonequilibrium phases were surprisingly stable, with return to equilibrium structure for dispersed submicrometer sized particle systems taking more than 13 h in some cases. Inhibition of phase nucleation was the key to greater supercooling effects observed for the dispersed particles compared to the bulk systems. These findings highlight the need for continued study into the nonequilibrium phase structures for these types of systems, as this may influence performance in applications such as drug delivery.

  2. Morphology of diesel soot residuals from supercooled water droplets and ice crystals: implications for optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, Swarup; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Scarnato, Barbara V.; Sharma, Noopur; Pekour, Mikhail; Shilling, John E.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla; Chand, Duli; Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C.; Dubey, Manvendra; Laskin, Alexander; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Mazzoleni, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Freshly emitted soot particles are fractal-like aggregates, but atmospheric processes often transform their morphology. Morphology of soot particles plays an important role in determining their optical properties, life cycle and hence their effect on Earth’s radiative balance. However, little is known about the morphology of soot particles that participated in cold cloud processes. Here we report results from laboratory experiments that simulate cold cloud processing of diesel soot particles by allowing them to form supercooled droplets and ice crystals at -20 and -40 °C, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed that soot residuals from ice crystals were more compact (roundness ˜0.55) than those from supercooled droplets (roundness ˜0.45), while nascent soot particles were the least compact (roundness ˜0.41). Optical simulations using the discrete dipole approximation showed that the more compact structure enhances soot single scattering albedo by a factor up to 1.4, thereby reducing the top-of-the-atmosphere direct radiative forcing by ˜63%. These results underscore that climate models should consider the morphological evolution of soot particles due to cold cloud processing to improve the estimate of direct radiative forcing of soot.

  3. ETO lidar studies of cirrostratus altocumulogenitus: Another role for supercooled liquid water in cirrus cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    Cirrus clouds have traditionally been viewed as cold, wispy, or stratiform ice clouds, typically displaying optical phenomena such as haloes. A composition entirely of hexagonal ice crystals, of one habit or another could only have a transitory existence in cirrus, since the concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) measured by various techniques (at the surface or in the lower troposphere) indicate an enormous number of IN that should be active at cirrus cloud temperatures. In light of recent instrumental aircraft and polarization lidar studies of cirrus clouds, it is clear that highly supercooled cloud droplets can sometimes be a component of cirrus clouds. It remains to be determined if supercooled liquid water (SLW) is present abundantly enough in cirrus to play a significant role in earth's radiance balance, or is merely a curious, infrequent occurrence. To help evaluate this issue, the UH polarization lidar FIRE Extended Time Observation (ETO) of cirrus clouds are being utilized to compile, among other parameters, a climatological record of SLW clouds associated with and within cirrus.

  4. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  5. Communication: Synperiplanar to antiperiplanar conformation changes as underlying the mechanism of Debye process in supercooled ibuprofen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminski, K.; Dulski, M.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Bartkowiak, G.; Popenda, L.; Jurga, S.; Kujawski, J.; Kruk, J.; Bernard, M. K.; Paluch, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this Communication, we present experimental studies that put new insight into the puzzling nature of the Debye relaxation found in the supercooled liquid state of racemic ibuprofen. The appearance of D-relaxation in the loss spectra of non-hydrogen bonding methylated derivate of ibuprofen has proven that Debye relaxation is related solely with conformational changes of the carboxyl group, termed in this paper as synperiplanar-antiperiplanar. Our studies indicate that the presence of hydrogen bonding capabilities is not here the necessary condition to observe Debye process, however, their occurrence might strongly influence α- and D-relaxations dynamics. Interestingly, the activation energy of the D-process in ibuprofen methyl ester on approaching Tg was found to be perfectly consistent with that reported for ibuprofen by Affouard and Correia [J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 11397-11402 (2010)] (˜39 kJ/mol). Finally, IR measurements suggest that the equilibrium between conformers concentration depends on time and temperature, which might explain why the appearance of D-relaxation in supercooled ibuprofen depends on thermal history of the sample.

  6. Supercooling as a viable non-freezing cell preservation method of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Usta, O Berk; Kim, Yeonhee; Ozer, Sinan; Bruinsma, Bote G; Lee, Jungwoo; Demir, Esin; Berendsen, Tim A; Puts, Catheleyne F; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Uygun, Korkut; Uygun, Basak E; Yarmush, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    Supercooling preservation holds the potential to drastically extend the preservation time of organs, tissues and engineered tissue products, and fragile cell types that do not lend themselves well to cryopreservation or vitrification. Here, we investigate the effects of supercooling preservation (SCP at -4(o)C) on primary rat hepatocytes stored in cryovials and compare its success (high viability and good functional characteristics) to that of static cold storage (CS at +4(o)C) and cryopreservation. We consider two prominent preservation solutions a) Hypothermosol (HTS-FRS) and b) University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and a range of preservation temperatures (-4 to -10 (o)C). We find that there exists an optimum temperature (-4(o)C) for SCP of rat hepatocytes which yields the highest viability; at this temperature HTS-FRS significantly outperforms UW solution in terms of viability and functional characteristics (secretions and enzymatic activity in suspension and plate culture). With the HTS-FRS solution we show that the cells can be stored for up to a week with high viability (~56%); moreover we also show that the preservation can be performed in large batches (50 million cells) with equal or better viability and no loss of functionality as compared to smaller batches (1.5 million cells) performed in cryovials.

  7. Dramatically growing shear rigidity length scale in the supercooled glass former NiZr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingartner, Nicholas B.; Soklaski, Ryan; Kelton, K. F.; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-06-01

    Finding a suitably growing length scale that increases in tandem with the immense viscous slowdown of supercooled liquids is an open problem associated with the glass transition. Here, we define and demonstrate the existence of one such length scale which may be experimentally verifiable. This is the length scale over which external shear perturbations appreciably penetrate into a liquid as the glass transition is approached. We provide simulation based evidence of its existence, and its growth by at least an order of magnitude, by using molecular dynamics simulations of NiZr2, a good fragile glass former. On the probed timescale, upon approaching the glass transition temperature Tg from above, this length scale ξ is also shown to be consistent with Ising-like scaling, ξ ∝(T/-Tg Tg)-ν , with ν ≈0.7 . Furthermore, we demonstrate the possible scaling of ξ about the temperature at which super-Arrhenius growth of viscosity, and a marked growth of the penetration depth, sets in. Our simulation results suggest that upon supercooling, marked initial increase of the shear penetration depth in fluids may occur in tandem with the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation.

  8. Supercooling Capacity and Cold Tolerance of the Wild Silkworm, Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Qun; Zheng, Xi-Xi; Ma, Hong-Fang; Xia, Run-Xi; Li, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Qi-Rui

    2016-08-01

    While wild silkworms have served humans for several thousand years, little attention on cold hardiness has been paid to these economically important species. In the present study, supercooling capacity and low temperature tolerance of Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi (Guérin-Méneville) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), an economic insect reared both for silk production as well as human food, were examined under laboratory conditions. The supercooling points (SCPs) of pupae dropped significantly from a mean of -15.6°C in prediapause to -20.1°C in diapause, and then increased to -17.5°C during postdiapause development. Sex and voltinism influenced body mass but had no significant effect on the SCP. Our data demonstrated that cold tolerance of A. pernyi is tightly linked to life stage. Exposure of eggs to -5°C for up to 8 h had no effect on the hatching rate, whereas silkworm larvae failed to break through the chorion and hatch following a 4-8-h exposure to -10°C. Mean SCPs of intact eggs and naked larvae one day before hatching were similar, -23.3°C and -22.3°C, respectively, indicating that chorion does not significantly affect SCP. Comparison of lower lethal temperature (LLT50) and SCP means suggested that both pupae and eggs of A. pernyi are chill intolerant. These data will improve our understanding of low temperature tolerance in this commercially important species.

  9. Unstable modes in supercooled and normal liquids: Density of states, energy barriers, and self-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.

    1994-09-01

    The unstable mode density of states <ρu(ω;T)> is obtained from computer simulation and is analyzed, theoretically and empirically, over a broad range of supercooled and normal liquid temperatures in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. The functional form of <ρu(ω;T)> is determined and the ω, T dependence is seen to be consistent with a theory given by us previously. The parameters in the theory are determined and are related to the topological features of the potential energy surface in the configuration space; it appears that diffusion involves a low degree of cooperativity at all but the lowest temperatures. It is shown that analysis of <ρu(ω;T)> yields considerable information about the energy barriers to diffusion, namely, a characteristic ω-dependent energy and the distribution of barrier heights, gν(E). The improved description of <ρu(ω;T)> obtained in the paper is used to implement normal mode theory of the self-diffusion constant D(T) with no undetermined constants; agreement with simulation in the supercooled liquid is excellent. Use of a lower frequency cutoff on the contribution of unstable modes to diffusion, in an attempt to remove spurious contributions from anharmonicities unrelated to barrier crossing, yields the Zwanzig-Bassler temperature dependence for D(T). It is argued that the distribution of barriers plays a crucial role in determining the T dependence of the self-diffusion constant.

  10. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles: influence of the matrix composition and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel H J; Fahr, Alfred; Bunjes, Heike

    2009-10-01

    Cholesteryl nonanoate (CN), myristate (CM), palmitate (CP) and oleate (CO) alone or in combination were evaluated as matrix lipids for the preparation of supercooled smectic nanoparticles with a high stability against recrystallization during storage. The phase behavior of the cholesterol esters in the bulk was studied by polarizing light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Colloidal dispersions with pure and mixed cholesterol ester matrices were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy, laser diffraction combined with polarizing intensity differential scattering, DSC and SAXS. The morphology of selected formulations was studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. All smectic nanoparticles with a mixed cholesterol ester matrix were stable against recrystallization when stored at room temperature. Nanoparticles with a pure CN and mixed CM/CN matrix with a high fraction of CN (60% of the whole lipid matrix) could even be stored at 4 degrees C for at least 18 months without any recrystallization. As smectic nanoparticles are studied especially with regard to parenteral administration of lipophilic drugs, the cytotoxicity of selected formulations was compared with that of a clinically used colloidal fat emulsion (Lipofundin MCT) in the murine fibroblast cell line L929 using the sulforhodamine B assay. The supercooled smectic nanoparticle formulations display a good overall cell compatibility although in some cases their cytotoxicity was slightly higher than that of Lipofundin MCT.

  11. Supercooling as a Viable Non-Freezing Cell Preservation Method of Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Usta, O. Berk; Kim, Yeonhee; Ozer, Sinan; Bruinsma, Bote G.; Lee, Jungwoo; Demir, Esin; Berendsen, Tim A.; Puts, Catheleyne F.; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Uygun, Korkut; Uygun, Basak E.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Supercooling preservation holds the potential to drastically extend the preservation time of organs, tissues and engineered tissue products, and fragile cell types that do not lend themselves well to cryopreservation or vitrification. Here, we investigate the effects of supercooling preservation (SCP at -4oC) on primary rat hepatocytes stored in cryovials and compare its success (high viability and good functional characteristics) to that of static cold storage (CS at +4oC) and cryopreservation. We consider two prominent preservation solutions a) Hypothermosol (HTS-FRS) and b) University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and a range of preservation temperatures (-4 to -10 oC). We find that there exists an optimum temperature (-4oC) for SCP of rat hepatocytes which yields the highest viability; at this temperature HTS-FRS significantly outperforms UW solution in terms of viability and functional characteristics (secretions and enzymatic activity in suspension and plate culture). With the HTS-FRS solution we show that the cells can be stored for up to a week with high viability (~56%); moreover we also show that the preservation can be performed in large batches (50 million cells) with equal or better viability and no loss of functionality as compared to smaller batches (1.5 million cells) performed in cryovials. PMID:23874947

  12. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  13. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  14. A microfluidic apparatus for the study of ice nucleation in supercooled water drops.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Schneider, Grégory F; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Hashimoto, Michinao; Ibanescu, Mihai; Wiley, Benjamin J; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-21

    This paper describes a microfluidic instrument that produces drops of supercooled water suspended in a moving stream of liquid fluorocarbon, and measures the temperatures at which ice nucleates in the drops. A microfluidic chip containing a monodisperse drop generator and a straight channel with 38 embedded resistance thermometers was placed in contact with a seven-zone temperature-control plate and imaged under a microscope with a high-speed camera. This instrument can record the freezing temperatures of tens of thousands of drops within minutes, with an accuracy of 0.4 degrees C. The ice-nucleation temperatures in approximately 80-microm drops were reported for the freezing of 37 061 drops of pure water, and of 8898 drops of water seeded with silver iodide. Nucleation of ice in pure water was homogenous and occurred at temperatures between -36 and -37.8 degrees C, while water containing silver iodide froze between -10 and -19 degrees C. The instrument recorded the largest sets of individual freezing temperatures (37 061), had the fastest data acquisition rate (75 measurements/s), and the best optical (3 microm) and temporal (70 micros) resolutions among instruments designed to study nucleation of ice. The dendritic growth of ice in 150-microm drops of supercooled water at -35 degrees C was observed and imaged at a rate of 16 000 frames/s. PMID:19636459

  15. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid–liquid transition in water

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid–liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid–liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H{sub 2}O-NaCl and H{sub 2}O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid–liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of “reaction” between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  16. Confined flow of polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Tufano, C; Peters, G W M; Meijer, H E H

    2008-05-01

    The influence of confinement on the steady-state morphology of two different emulsions is investigated. The blends, made from polybutene (PB) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polybutadiene (PBD) in PDMS, are sheared between two parallel plates, mostly with a standard gap spacing of 40 microm, in the range of shear rates at which the transition from "bulk" behavior toward "confined" behavior is observed. For both cases, the influence of the concentration was systematically investigated, as well as the shear rate effects on the final steady-state morphology. By decreasing the shear rate, for each blend, the increasing droplets, i.e., increasing confinement for a fixed gap spacing, arrange themselves first into two layers, and when the degree of confinement reaches an even higher value, a single layer of droplets is formed. The ratio between the drop diameters and the gap spacing at which this transition occurs is always lower than 0.5. While decreasing the shear rate, the degree of confinement increases due to drop coalescence. Droplets arrange themselves in superstructures like ordered pearl necklaces and, at the lower shear rates, strings. The aspect ratio and the width of the droplet obtained from optical micrographs are compared to predictions of the single droplet Maffettone-Minale model (MM model(1)). It is found that the theory, meant for unconfined shear flow, is not able to predict the drop deformation when the degree of confinement is above a critical value that depends on the blends considered and the shear rate applied. A recently developed extension of the MM model is reported by Minale (M model(2)) where the effect of the confinement is included by using the Shapira-Haber correction.3 Further extending this M model, by incorporating an effective viscosity as originally proposed by Choi and Showalter,4 we arrive at the mM model that accurately describes the experiments of blends in confined flow. PMID:18348582

  17. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  18. Widths of K¯-nuclear deeply bound states in a dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2005-01-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) model is applied to a system of nucleons and a Kbar meson, interacting via scalar and vector boson fields. The model incorporates the standard RMF phenomenology for bound nucleons and, for the Kbar meson, it relates to low-energy Kbar N and K- atom phenomenology. Deeply bound Kbar nuclear states are generated dynamically across the periodic table and are exhibited for 12C and 16O over a wide range of binding energies. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for these light nuclei. Absorption modes are also included dynamically, considering explicitly both the resulting compressed nuclear density and the reduced phase space for Kbar absorption from deeply bound states. The behavior of the calculated width as function of the Kbar binding energy is studied in order to explore limits on the possible existence of narrow Kbar nuclear states.

  19. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Meson Production at Jlab/CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    This report reviews the recent experimental results from the CLAS collaboration (Hall B of Jefferson Lab, or JLab) on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) and discusses their interpretation in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The impact of the experimental data on the applicability of the GPD mechanism to these exclusive reactions is discussed. Initial results obtained from JLab 6 GeV data indicate that DVCS might already be interpretable in this framework while GPD models fail to describe the exclusive meson production (DVMP) data with the GPD parameterizations presently used. An exception is the {phi} meson production for which the GPD mechanism appears to apply. The recent global analyses aiming to extract GPDs from fitting DVCS CLAS and world data are discussed. The GPD experimental program at CLAS12, planned with the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade of JLab, is briefly presented.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in PC (pulverized coal) furnaces burning deeply cleaned coals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1990-05-01

    A three-dimensional spectral radiation transport model has been developed for assessing the impact of burning deeply cleaned coals on heat absorption patterns in pulverized coal (PC) furnaces. Spectroscopic data are used for calculating the absorption coefficients of participating gases. Mie theory is invoked for determining the extinction and scattering efficiencies of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, ash and soot are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. 8 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Effect of local structures on crystallization in deeply undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S Q; Wu, Z W; Li, M Z

    2016-04-21

    The crystallization mechanism in deeply undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquids was investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that the crystallization process is mainly controlled by the growth of crystal nuclei formed by the BCC-like atomic clusters, consistent with experimental speculations. The crystallization rate is found to relate to the number of growing crystal nuclei in the crystallization process. The crystallization rate in systems with more crystal nuclei is significantly hindered by the larger surface fractions of crystal nuclei and their different crystalline orientations. It is further revealed that in the crystallization in deeply undercooled regions, the BCC-like crystal nuclei are formed from the inside of the precursors formed by the FCC-like atomic clusters, and growing at the expense of the precursors. Meanwhile, the precursors are expanding at the expense of the outside atomic clusters. This process is consistent with the so-called Ostwald step rule. The atomic structures of metallic glasses are found to have significant impact on the subsequent crystallization process. In the Zr85Cu15 system, the stronger spatial correlation of Cu atoms could hinder the crystallization processes in deeply undercooled regions.

  2. Effect of local structures on crystallization in deeply undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. Q.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, M. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The crystallization mechanism in deeply undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquids was investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that the crystallization process is mainly controlled by the growth of crystal nuclei formed by the BCC-like atomic clusters, consistent with experimental speculations. The crystallization rate is found to relate to the number of growing crystal nuclei in the crystallization process. The crystallization rate in systems with more crystal nuclei is significantly hindered by the larger surface fractions of crystal nuclei and their different crystalline orientations. It is further revealed that in the crystallization in deeply undercooled regions, the BCC-like crystal nuclei are formed from the inside of the precursors formed by the FCC-like atomic clusters, and growing at the expense of the precursors. Meanwhile, the precursors are expanding at the expense of the outside atomic clusters. This process is consistent with the so-called Ostwald step rule. The atomic structures of metallic glasses are found to have significant impact on the subsequent crystallization process. In the Zr85Cu15 system, the stronger spatial correlation of Cu atoms could hinder the crystallization processes in deeply undercooled regions.

  3. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on the supercooling ability and mining of antifreeze proteins of the Chinese white wax scale insect.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Pu; Sun, Tao; Qi, Qian; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Ying; Liu, Bo-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, can survive at extremely low temperatures, and some overwintering individuals exhibit supercooling at temperatures below -30°C. To investigate the deep supercooling ability of E. pela, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to delineate the major gene and protein families responsible for the deep supercooling ability of overwintering females. Gene Ontology (GO) classification and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis indicated that genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and pathways associated with the biosynthesis of soluble sugars, sugar alcohols and free amino acids were dominant. Proteins responsible for low-temperature stress, such as cold acclimation proteins, glycerol biosynthesis-related enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) were identified. However, no antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were identified through sequence similarity search methods. A random forest approach identified 388 putative AFPs in the proteome. The AFP gene ep-afp was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein exhibited a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.97°C, suggesting its potential role in the deep supercooling ability of E. pela.

  4. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    PubMed

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures. PMID:25737264

  5. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    PubMed

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures.

  6. Body size, but not cooling rate, affects supercooling points in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel A; Martin, Adam R; Porter, Sanford D

    2008-10-01

    The level of an animal's stress resistance is set by multiple intrinsic physiological and extrinsic environmental parameters. Body size is a critical intrinsic parameter that affects numerous fitness-related organismal traits including fecundity, survival, mating success, and stress resistance. The rate of cooling is a critical extrinsic environmental factor that can affect thermal stress resistance. Workers of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), display considerable variation in adult body size. Therefore, developing ecologically realistic models of thermotolerance in this species requires a consideration of body size. We tested the hypothesis that body size and cooling rate would interact to set the supercooling point in fire ant workers by exposing workers of a range of body sizes to three different cooling regimens: a very fast ramp of -10 degrees C/min, an intermediate ramp of -1 degrees C/min, and an ecologically relevant slow ramp of -0.1 degrees C/min. Specifically, we asked whether large workers were more susceptible to differences in cooling rate than smaller workers. We found that body size had a considerable effect on supercooling point with the largest workers freezing at a temperature approximately 3 degrees C higher than the smallest workers. Cooling rate had a very small effect on supercooling point, and there was no interaction between the two factors. Therefore, the allometry of supercooling points across the range of worker body sizes does not change with cooling rate.

  7. Phylogenetic analyses in cornus substantiate ancestry of xylem supercooling freezing behavior and reveal lineage of desiccation related proteins.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Dale T; Xiang, Qiu-Yun; Stirm, Vicki E; Shirazi, A M; Ashworth, Edward N

    2004-07-01

    The response of woody plant tissues to freezing temperature has evolved into two distinct behaviors: an avoidance strategy, in which intracellular water supercools, and a freeze-tolerance strategy, where cells tolerate the loss of water to extracellular ice. Although both strategies involve extracellular ice formation, supercooling cells are thought to resist freeze-induced dehydration. Dehydrin proteins, which accumulate during cold acclimation in numerous herbaceous and woody plants, have been speculated to provide, among other things, protection from desiccative extracellular ice formation. Here we use Cornus as a model system to provide the first phylogenetic characterization of xylem freezing behavior and dehydrin-like proteins. Our data suggest that both freezing behavior and the accumulation of dehydrin-like proteins in Cornus are lineage related; supercooling and nonaccumulation of dehydrin-like proteins are ancestral within the genus. The nonsupercooling strategy evolved within the blue- or white-fruited subgroup where representative species exhibit high levels of freeze tolerance. Within the blue- or white-fruited lineage, a single origin of dehydrin-like proteins was documented and displayed a trend for size increase in molecular mass. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that an early divergent group of red-fruited supercooling dogwoods lack a similar protein. Dehydrin-like proteins were limited to neither nonsupercooling species nor to those that possess extreme freeze tolerance.

  8. Supercooling Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A Goddard/Philips research project resulted in a refrigeration system which works without seals, lubricants or bearings. The system, originally developed to cool satellite-based scientific instruments, has an extensive range of potential spinoffs. It is called the Stirling Cycle Cryogenic Cooler and eliminates friction by using electronically controlled linear magnetic bearings. Mechanical failure, contamination are eliminated.

  9. Supercooling capacity of Urophora affinis and U. quadrifasciata (Diptera: Tephritidae) on spotted knapweed: comparisons among plants, sites, time of season, and gall densities.

    PubMed

    Nowierski, R M.; Fitzgerald, B C.; Zeng, Z

    2001-04-01

    Larval supercooling points of Urophora affinis Frauenfeld and U. quadrifasciata (Meigen) were compared among plants, six research sites in western Montana, four fall/winter time periods, and among gall densities. These two tephritid fly species are introduced biological control agents of spotted knapweed, Centaurea maculosa Lamarck, and diffuse knapweed, Centaurea diffusa Lamarck. Few differences in larval supercooling points for U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata were found among plants, and where differences were found, they were not consistent across fall/winter time periods. Significant differences in larval supercooling points were found among sites and across fall/winter time periods. No relationship was found between larval supercooling points and site elevation. Larval supercooling points of both U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata showed no relationship with the density of Urophora galls within spotted knapweed capitula. Mean larval supercooling points of U. affinis were consistently lower than those of U. quadrifasciata across sites and fall/winter time periods. In conclusion, temporal differences in temperature over the fall/winter time periods and microclimatic differences among sites appear to be the most important abiotic factors influencing the supercooling points in U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata.

  10. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Choularton, T. W.; Westbrook, C. D.; Connolly, P. J.; Cui, Z. Q.; Crawford, I. P.; Capes, G. L.; Coe, H.; Dorsey, J. R.; Williams, P. I.; Illingworth, A. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Blyth, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude) at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s-1) was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus. The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m), horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km) and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm) stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than -12.2 °C and less than -10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively). No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei. Precipitation from the mid-level stratus evaporated before reaching the surface, whereas rates of up to 1 mm h-1 were observed below the convective feature. There is strong evidence for the Hallett-Mossop (HM) process of secondary ice particle production leading to the formation of the precipitation observed. This includes (1) Ice concentrations in the convective feature were more than an order of magnitude greater than the concentration of primary ice in the overlaying stratus, (2) Large concentrations of small pristine columns were observed at the ~-5 °C level together with liquid water droplets and a few

  11. Mobile Microwave Radiometer Observations: Spatial Characteristics of Supercooled Cloud Water and Cloud Seeding Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Arlen W.

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies of the spatial distribution of supercooled liquid water in winter storms over mountainous terrain were performed primarily with instrumented aircraft and to a lesser extent with scans from a stationary microwave radiometer. The present work describes a new technique of mobile radiometer operation that was successfully used during numerous winter storms that occurred over the Wasatch Plateau of central Utah to determine the integrated depth of cloud liquid water relative to horizontal position on the mountain barrier. The technique had the advantage of being able to measure total liquid from the terrain upward, without the usual terrain avoidance problems that research aircraft face in cloudy conditions. The radiometer also collected data during several storms in which a research aircraft could not be operated because of severe turbulence and icing conditions.Repeated radiometer transects of specific regions of the plateau showed significant variability in liquid water depth over 30 60-min time periods, but also revealed that the profile of orographically generated cloud liquid was consistent, regardless of the absolute quantities. Radiometer liquid depth generally increased across the windward slope of the plateau to a peak near the western edge of the plateau top and then decreased across the relatively flat top of the plateau. These observations were consistent with regions where maximum and minimum vertical velocities were expected, and with depiction of cloud liquid by accretional ice particle growth across the mountain barrier. A comparison of data from the mobile radiometer and a stationary radiometer verified the general decrease in liquid depth from the windward slope to the top of the plateau and also showed that many liquid water regions were transient mesoscale features that moved across the plateau.Implications of the results, relative to the seeding of orographic clouds, were that seeding aerosols released from valley-based generators

  12. Thermodynamics of confined gallium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrachud, Prachi

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of Ga13 and Ga17 clusters confined inside carbon nanotubes with different diameters. The cluster-tube interaction is simulated by the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. We discuss the geometries, the nature of the bonding and the thermodynamics under confinement. The geometries as well as the isomer spectra of both the clusters are significantly affected. The degree of confinement decides the dimensionality of the clusters. We observe that a number of low-energy isomers appear under moderate confinement while some isomers seen in the free space disappear. Our finite-temperature simulations bring out interesting aspects, namely that the heat capacity curve is flat, even though the ground state is symmetric. Such a flat nature indicates that the phase change is continuous. This effect is due to the restricted phase space available to the system. These observations are supported by the mean square displacement of individual atoms, which are significantly smaller than in free space. The nature of the bonding is found to be approximately jellium-like. Finally we note the relevance of the work to the problem of single file diffusion for the case of the highest confinement.

  13. Semiflexible chains in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-01-01

    We develop an analytical method for studying the properties of a noninteracting wormlike chain (WLC) in confined geometries. The mean-field-like theory replaces the rigid constraints of confinement with average constraints, thus allowing us to develop a tractable method for treating a WLC wrapped on the surface of a sphere, and fully encapsulated within it. The efficacy of the theory is established by reproducing the exact correlation functions for a WLC confined to the surface of a sphere. In addition, the coefficients in the free energy are exactly calculated. We also describe the behavior of a surface-confined chain under external tension that is relevant for single molecule experiments on histone-DNA complexes. The force-extension curves display spatial oscillations, and the extension of the chain, whose maximum value is bounded by the sphere diameter, scales as f-1 at large forces, in contrast to the unconfined chain that approaches the contour length as f-1/2 . A WLC encapsulated in a sphere, that is relevant for the study of the viral encapsulation of DNA, can also be treated using the mean-field approach. The predictions of the theory for various correlation functions are in excellent agreement with Langevin simulations. We find that strongly confined chains are highly structured by examining the correlations using a local winding axis. The predicted pressure of the system is in excellent agreement with simulations but, as is known, is significantly lower than the pressures seen for DNA packaged in viral capsids.

  14. Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells of katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) contain flavonol glycosides exhibiting high anti-ice nucleation activity.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Atsushi; Yoshiba, Megumi; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2008-09-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) of boreal hardwood species adapt to sub-freezing temperatures by deep supercooling to maintain a liquid state of intracellular water near -40 degrees C. Our previous study found that crude xylem extracts from such tree species exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity to promote supercooling of water. In the present study, thus, we attempted to identify the causative substances of supercooling. Crude xylem extracts from katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), of which XPCs exhibited deep supercooling to -40 degrees C, were prepared by methanol extraction. The crude extracts were purified by liquid-liquid extraction and then by silica gel column chromatography. Although all the fractions obtained after each purification step exhibited some levels of anti-ice nucleation activity, only the most active fraction was retained to proceed to the subsequent level of purification. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of a fraction with the highest level of activity revealed four peaks with high levels of anti-ice nucleation activity in the range of 2.8-9.0 degrees C. Ultraviolet (UV), mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra revealed that these four peaks corresponded to quercetin-3-O-beta-glucoside (Q3G), kaempferol-7-O-beta-glucoside (K7G), 8-methoxykaempferol-3-O-beta-glucoside (8MK3G) and kaempferol-3-O-beta-glucoside (K3G). Microscopic observations confirmed the presence of flavonoids in cytoplasms of XPCs. These results suggest that diverse kinds of anti-ice nucleation substances, including flavonol glycosides, may have important roles in deep supercooling of XPCs. PMID:18518920

  15. Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells of katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) contain flavonol glycosides exhibiting high anti-ice nucleation activity.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Atsushi; Yoshiba, Megumi; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2008-09-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) of boreal hardwood species adapt to sub-freezing temperatures by deep supercooling to maintain a liquid state of intracellular water near -40 degrees C. Our previous study found that crude xylem extracts from such tree species exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity to promote supercooling of water. In the present study, thus, we attempted to identify the causative substances of supercooling. Crude xylem extracts from katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), of which XPCs exhibited deep supercooling to -40 degrees C, were prepared by methanol extraction. The crude extracts were purified by liquid-liquid extraction and then by silica gel column chromatography. Although all the fractions obtained after each purification step exhibited some levels of anti-ice nucleation activity, only the most active fraction was retained to proceed to the subsequent level of purification. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of a fraction with the highest level of activity revealed four peaks with high levels of anti-ice nucleation activity in the range of 2.8-9.0 degrees C. Ultraviolet (UV), mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra revealed that these four peaks corresponded to quercetin-3-O-beta-glucoside (Q3G), kaempferol-7-O-beta-glucoside (K7G), 8-methoxykaempferol-3-O-beta-glucoside (8MK3G) and kaempferol-3-O-beta-glucoside (K3G). Microscopic observations confirmed the presence of flavonoids in cytoplasms of XPCs. These results suggest that diverse kinds of anti-ice nucleation substances, including flavonol glycosides, may have important roles in deep supercooling of XPCs.

  16. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  17. Method for calculating the sizes of nucleation centers upon homogeneous crystallization from a supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. D.; Pokyntelytsia, O. A.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative approach to calculating critical sizes l k of nucleation centers and work A k of their formation upon crystallization from a supercooled melt by analyzing the variation in the Gibbs energy during the phase transformation is considered. Unlike the classical variant, it is proposed that the transformation entropy be associated not with melting temperature T L but with temperature T < T L at which the nucleation of crystals occurs. New equations for l k and A k are derived. Based on the results from calculating these quantities for a series of compounds, it is shown that this approach is unbiased and it is possible to eliminate known conflicts in analyzing these parameters in the classical interpretation.

  18. Metastable state dynamics and power law relaxation in a supercooled liquid.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Das, S P

    2001-01-01

    We consider glassy relaxation by using a model for supercooled liquid where the usual set of hydrodynamic variables is extended to include the presence of very slowly decaying defect densities. The long time limit of the density correlation function, the nonergodicity parameter, is studied in the vicinity of the dynamic transition point, and scaling exponents with respect to the distance from the critical point are obtained. In addition to the usual square root cusp, we also see a linear dependence on distance from transition with respect to the metastability parameters. We analyze the power law relaxation of the density correlation function at the initial stage of the dynamics, and obtain an exponent dependent on temperature. Results are compared with data obtained from light scattering experiments.

  19. Dielectric relaxation processes in solid and supercooled liquid solutions of acetaminophen and nifedipine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, Tarek; Böhmer, Roland

    2007-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to study supercooled liquid and glassy mixtures of acetaminophen and nifedipine. The glass transition temperature Tg was found to vary continuously as a function of the acetaminophen concentration x, indicating complete miscibility of these drugs. The steepness index m characterizing the α-relaxation as well as the dispersion width of this process were almost independent of x. A weak Johari Goldstein β-relaxation was identified by its typical decoupling from the α-process. A well-resolved low-temperature γ-relaxation was found and ascribed to a side group motion, predominantly of the nifedipine molecule. The energy barriers hindering this motion exhibit a wide distribution, with a mean value of typically about 3500 K.

  20. Local atomic structure in equilibrium and supercooled liquid Zr(75.5)Pd(24.5).

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Fu, W; Bendert, J C; Cheng, Y Q; Ma, E; Kelton, K F

    2012-07-28

    Atomic structures were obtained in equilibrium and supercooled eutectic Zr(75.5)Pd(24.5) liquids by in situ high-energy synchrotron diffraction measurements using the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) technique, which provides a high-vacuum, containerless, environment. Reverse Monte Carlo fits to the x-ray static structure factors, constrained using partial pair correlation functions obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, indicate the presence of medium-range order (MRO) in the form of a strong tendency for Pd-Pd (solute-solute) avoidance. This order persists over the entire temperature range studied, from 170 °C above the equilibrium liquidus temperature to 263 °C below it. Further, a quantitative analysis of the atomic structures obtained indicates a modest degree of icosahedral-like local order around Pd atoms, with the clusters showing an increased tendency for face-sharing to form more extended structures with decreasing temperature. PMID:22852625

  1. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Rang-su; Tian, Ze-an; Liu, Hai-rong; Hou, Zhao-yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90–150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule. PMID:27526660

  2. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90-150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule. PMID:27526660

  3. Discrimination of micrometre-sized ice and super-cooled droplets in mixed-phase cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Greenaway, R. S.; Field, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    Preliminary experimental results are presented from an aircraft-mounted probe designed to provide in situ data on cloud particle shape, size, and number concentration. In particular, the probe has been designed to facilitate discrimination between super-cooled water droplets and ice crystals of 1-25 μm size within mixed-phase clouds and to provide information on cloud interstitial aerosols. The probe acquires spatial light scattering data from individual particles at throughput rates of several thousand particles per second. These data are logged at 100 ms intervals to allow the distribution and number concentration of each particle type to be determined with 10 m spatial resolution at a typical airspeed of 100 m s -1. Preliminary results from flight data recorded in altocumulus castellanus, showing liquid water phase, mixed phase, and ice phase are presented to illustrate the probe's particle discrimination capabilities.

  4. Local structure of equilibrium and supercooled Ti-Zr-Ni liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Hyers, R.; Rathz, T.; Rogers, J.; Robinson, D.; Goldman, A.; Kelton, K.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, we reported the results of experimental in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction studies of electrostatically levitated equilibrium and supercooled metallic elements and alloy liquids, showing evidence for icosahedral short-range ordering (ISRO). In this paper, these studies are extended to binary Ti-Zr and ternary Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. From a cluster-based analysis of the x-ray structure factors, it is concluded that ISRO in the binary alloys becomes progressively more dominant, and the coherence length of the order becomes longer, with the addition of Ni, especially near the concentration of 21 at. % Ni. The effect of chemical interactions among Ti/Zr-Ni and the atomic size on the stabilization of the ISRO is discussed.

  5. Ideal probe single-molecule experiments reveal the intrinsic dynamic heterogeneity of a supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Keewook; Park, Heungman; Hoang, Dat Tien; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of dynamic heterogeneity and the picture of the supercooled liquid as a mosaic of environments with distinct dynamics that interchange in time have been invoked to explain the nonexponential relaxations measured in these systems. The spatial extent and temporal persistence of these regions of distinct dynamics have remained challenging to identify. Here, single-molecule fluorescence measurements using a probe similar in size and mobility to the host o-terphenyl unambiguously reveal exponential relaxations distributed in time and space and directly demonstrate ergodicity of the system down to the glass transition temperature. In the temperature range probed, at least 200 times the structural relaxation time of the host is required to recover ensemble-averaged relaxation at every spatial region in the system. PMID:25825739

  6. Stable Glass Transformation to Supercooled Liquid via Surface-Initiated Growth Front

    SciTech Connect

    Swallen, Stephen F.; Traynor, Katherine; McMahon, Robert J.; Ediger, M. D.; Mates, Thomas E.

    2009-02-13

    Highly stable glasses of tris-naphthylbenzene transform into a liquid when annealed above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}. In contrast to the predictions of standard models, the observed transformation is spatially inhomogeneous. Secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments on isotopically labeled multilayer films show that the liquid grows into the stable glass with sharp growth fronts initiated at the free surface and at the interface with the substrate. For the free surface, the growth velocity is constant in time and has the same temperature dependence as self-diffusion in the equilibrium supercooled liquid. These stable glasses are packed so efficiently that surfaces and interfaces are required to initiate the transformation to the liquid even well above T{sub g}.

  7. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  8. Vibrating-Wire, Supercooled Liquid Water Content Sensor Calibration and Characterization Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bognar, John A.; Guest, Daniel; Bunt, Fred

    2016-01-01

    NASA conducted a winter 2015 field campaign using weather balloons at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate a validation database for the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System. The weather balloons carried a specialized, disposable, vibrating-wire sensor to determine supercooled liquid water content aloft. Significant progress has been made to calibrate and characterize these sensors. Calibration testing of the vibrating-wire sensors was carried out in a specially developed, low-speed, icing wind tunnel, and the results were analyzed. The sensor ice accretion behavior was also documented and analyzed. Finally, post-campaign evaluation of the balloon soundings revealed a gradual drift in the sensor data with increasing altitude. This behavior was analyzed and a method to correct for the drift in the data was developed.

  9. Molecular motions in supercooled and glassy ibuprofen: deuteron magnetic resonance and high-resolution rheology study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S; Storek, M; Gainaru, C; Zimmermann, H; Böhmer, R

    2015-04-16

    Using deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance, the molecular motions of specifically isotope-labeled ibuprofen were probed at the carboxylic group and at the methin group next to it. Spin relaxometry revealed slight differences between the molecular motions of the two isotopomers that are rationalized with reference to the hydrogen bonding of the COOH moiety. In the glassy state, a small-angle jump process among about four sites, related to the so-called γ-process, was identified using stimulated-echo spectroscopy. Indications for a Debye-like process, previously found to leave a weak signature in the dielectric loss, could not unambiguously be detected in magnetic resonance or shear mechanical experiments carried out for supercooled liquid ibuprofen.

  10. Nanoscale domains with nematic order in supercooled vitamin-A acetate: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Hawelek, L.; Wrzalik, R.; Zioło, J.; Wygledowska-Kania, M.; Bergler-Czop, B.; Brzezinska-Wcislo, L.; Bujak, P.

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin-A acetate is one of the most versatile vitamins. It is applied in medicine because of its antioxidative properties, in tumor therapy because of its cytostatic activity, and in cosmetics because of its nutritional additives. Herein, using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, the molecular dynamics of supercooled and glassy vitamin-A acetate was investigated. It was shown that dielectric measurements carried out at ambient and elevated pressures reveal a number of relaxation processes associated with different types of molecular motions: α, δ, and ν processes—observed above the glass transition temperature and the next two modes: β and γ identified in the glassy state. The occurrence of the δ mode in the dielectric spectrum may imply the existence of nanoscale domains with nematic order. This hypothesis is further checked by atomic force microscopy measurements. Finally, we have determined the value of the glass transition temperature (Tg) as well as the steepness index (mP) at various T-P conditions.

  11. A locally preferred structure characterises all dynamical regimes of a supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soklaski, Ryan; Tran, Vy; Nussinov, Zohar; Kelton, K. F.; Yang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental results suggest that metallic liquids universally exhibit a high-temperature dynamical crossover, which is correlated with the glass transition temperature (?). We demonstrate, using molecular dynamics results for ?, that this temperature, ?, is linked with cooperative atomic rearrangements that produce domains of connected icosahedra. Supercooling to a new characteristic temperature, ?, is shown to produce higher order cooperative rearrangements amongst connected icosahedra, which manifests as the formation of large Zr-rich connected domains that possess macroscopic proportions of the liquid's icosahedra. This coincides with the decoupling of atomic diffusivities, large-scale domain fluctuations and the onset of glassy dynamics in the liquid. These extensive domains then abruptly stabilise above ? and eventually percolate before the glass is formed. All characteristic temperatures (?, ? and ?) are thus connected by successive manifestations of the structural cooperativity that begins at ?.

  12. Isotropic rotation vs. shear relaxation in supercooled liquids with globular cage molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaseman, Derrick C.; Gulbiten, Ozgur; Aitken, Bruce G.; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the rotational dynamics of P4Se3 molecules in the glass-forming molecular liquid P5Se3 is studied using two-dimensional 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Unlike typical molecular glass-forming liquids, the constituent molecules in the P5Se3 liquid perform rapid isotropic rotation without significant translational diffusion in the supercooled regime and this rotational process shows a decoupling in time scale from shear relaxation by nearly six orders of magnitude at the glass transition. This dynamical behavior of liquid-like rotation and localized translation appears to be universal to glass-forming liquids with high-symmetry globular molecules that are characterized by an underlying thermodynamically stable plastic crystal phase.

  13. Supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions at normal and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, K; Hayakawa, S; Kajiwara, K; Kanno, H

    2012-10-01

    The supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions was studied at high pressures. Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures (T(H)) were obtained for aqueous glycerol solutions of R=50, 30, 20, 12, and 10 (R: moles of water/moles of glycerol) up to 300MPa. The R=20 glycerol solution formed a glass above 200MPa at a cooling rate of 200°C/min, indicating that pressure enhances glass-formation of aqueous glycerol solutions. The (dT(g)/dP) values were obtained for vitrified aqueous glycerol solutions of R=3, 5, 10, and 20. These data can be used for the development of cryo-preservation liquids for living cells at high pressures.

  14. Dynamics of molecules in a supercooled water nanoparticle during the ice accretion on the aircraft surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelyushkin, I. A.; Stasenko, A. L.

    2015-06-01

    The principal aim of this work is to elaborate a robust physical model and the corresponding numerical code for prediction of the icing startup due to numerous water nanoparticles in the supercooled humid air. For this purpose, a scientified approach was used which is based not on the quantum-mechanics considerations but on the information about intermolecular potentials (especially, Lennard-Jones (LJ), etc.) tightly connected with the state equations of the corresponding specie (e. g., van der Waals for air and water and Mie-Grünaisen for circumfluent body). u In other words, the principal idea of this work is to adequately ascribe certain macroscopic characteristics of a water nanoparticle which may significantly differ from those indicated in physical reference books for bulk materials.

  15. Raman Measurements of Pure Hydrogen Clathrate Formation from a Supercooled Hydrogen-Water Solution.

    PubMed

    del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The nucleation and growth of a solid clathrate hydrate from the liquid phase is a process that is even less understood and more difficult to study than the nucleation of a solid phase from a pure liquid. We have employed in situ Raman spectroscopy to study the hydrogen-water supercooled solution undergoing clathrate formation at a pressure of about 2 kbar and temperature of 263 K. Raman light scattering detects unambiguously the H2 molecules inside of clathrate crystallites, which change stoichiometry during growth. The spectral intensity of the hydrogen vibrational band shows the time evolution of the population of the large and small cages, demonstrating that, in the initial stages of clathrate formation, the occupation of the large cages is quite lower than its equilibrium value. From the measurement of the growth rate of the crystallites, we demonstrate that the growth of the clathrate in the liquid is a diffusion-limited process. PMID:26538046

  16. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90–150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule.

  17. Surface Tension of Supercooled Water: No Inflection Point down to -25 °C.

    PubMed

    Hrubý, Jan; Vinš, Václav; Mareš, Radim; Hykl, Jiří; Kalová, Jana

    2014-02-01

    A dramatic increase in the surface tension of water with decreasing temperature in the supercooled liquid region has appeared as one of the many anomalies of water. This claimed anomaly characterized by the second inflection point at about +1.5 °C was observed in older surface tension data and was partially supported by some molecular simulations and theoretical considerations. In this study, two independent sets of experimental data for the surface tension of water in the temperature range between +33 and -25 °C are reported. The two data sets are mutually consistent, and they lie on a line smoothly extrapolating from the stable region. No second inflection point and no other anomalies in the course of the surface tension were observed. The new data lies very close to the extrapolated IAPWS correlation for the surface tension of ordinary water, which hence can be recommended for use, e.g., in atmospheric modeling.

  18. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids. PMID:26280634

  19. The double-pyramid structure of dendritic ice growing from supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braslavsky, I.; Lipson, S. G.

    1999-03-01

    It is known that ice growing freely from supercooled water has a morphological transition at T=-2.7°C, from a flat dendritic structure at higher temperatures to a twelve-sided double-pyramid structure at lower temperatures. The double-pyramid structure, which can be described as two hollow six-sided pyramids joined at their apices, is built from dendrites growing in well-defined growth directions which are noncrystallographic in the planes normal to the basal plane while their projections on the basal plane retain the hexagonal symmetry. Similar structures have been reported in other hexagonal materials. In order to understand the growth mechanism better, we measured the temperature field in the water around the growing crystals by using the temperature dependence of its refractive index. Since this dependence happens to be zero at the freezing point for regular water (H 2O), we use heavy water (D 2O), and achieve considerably greater sensitivity. The free growth experiments performed with heavy ice reveal that their morphological behavior is similar to regular ice, as well as their velocities and the angle between the pyramids as a function of supercooling. The temperature measurements showed that the interaction between the two sides of the pyramid via the temperature field is weak. This leads to the conclusion that the solution for the growth mode of the dendrites should be found in the single dendrite level. Explanations of this phenomenon are discussed in the light of recent advances in dendritic growth theory - in particular the concept of microscopic solvability - combined with the behavior of the surface tension and the kinetic effect as a function of crystallographic orientation. It can be shown that growth in a low symmetry direction leads to an asymmetrically growing crystal and to asymmetry in the observed temperature field.

  20. Phase behaviors of supercooled water: Reconciling a critical point of amorphous ices with spinodal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hideki

    1996-09-01

    The anomalies of supercooled water in thermodynamic response functions at atmospheric pressure, the phase transition between low and high density amorphous ices (LDA and HDA), and a predicted fragile-strong transition are accounted for in a unified manner by reconciling an idea due to Stanley and co-workers introducing a second critical point separating LDA and HDA ices with a conjecture proposed by Speedy that LDA is a different phase from a normal water, called water II. The reconciliation is made on the basis of results from extensive molecular dynamics simulations at constant pressure and temperature. It is found that there exist large gaps around temperature 213 K in thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic properties at atmospheric pressure, suggesting liquid-liquid phase transition. This transition is identified with an extension of the experimentally observed LDA-HDA transition in high pressure to atmospheric pressure. Thus, we propose a new phase diagram where the locus of the second critical point is moved into negative pressure region. With this simple modification, it becomes possible to account for the divergence of the thermodynamic response functions at atmospheric pressure in terms of the critical point and the spinodal-like instability of HDA. The unstable HDA undergoes a transition to LDA phase in lower temperature. The transition is also observed in high pressure region such as 200 MPa while it disappears at negative pressure, -200 MPa. This reinforces our proposed phase diagram in which there is no continuous path from a supercooled state to LDA at atmospheric pressure. It is argued that the HDA-LDA transition is accompanied by a fragile-strong transition. A possible mechanism of avoiding crystallization of aqueous solutions is also discussed in terms of a difference in hydrogen bond number distribution between LDA and HDA.

  1. Supercooled spin liquid state in the frustrated pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGES

    Kassner, Ethan R.; Eyvazov, Azar B.; Pichler, Benjamin; Munsie, Timothy J. S.; Dabkowska, Hanna A.; Luke, Graeme M.; Davis, J. C. Seamus

    2015-06-30

    A “supercooled” liquid develops when a fluid does not crystallize upon cooling below its ordering temperature. Instead, the microscopic relaxation times diverge so rapidly that, upon further cooling, equilibration eventually becomes impossible and glass formation occurs. Classic supercooled liquids exhibit specific identifiers including microscopic relaxation times diverging on a Vogel–Tammann–Fulcher (VTF) trajectory, a Havriliak–Negami (HN) form for the dielectric function ε(ω,T), and a general Kohlrausch–Williams–Watts (KWW) form for time-domain relaxation. Recently, the pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7 has become of interest because its frustrated magnetic interactions may, in theory, lead to highly exotic magnetic fluids. However, its true magnetic state at low temperaturesmore » has proven very difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we introduce high-precision, boundary-free magnetization transport techniques based upon toroidal geometries and gain an improved understanding of the time- and frequency-dependent magnetization dynamics of Dy2Ti2O7. We demonstrate a virtually universal HN form for the magnetic susceptibility χ(ω,T), a general KWW form for the real-time magnetic relaxation, and a divergence of the microscopic magnetic relaxation rates with the VTF trajectory. Low-temperature Dy2Ti2O7 therefore exhibits the characteristics of a supercooled magnetic liquid. Lastly, one implication is that this translationally invariant lattice of strongly correlated spins may be evolving toward an unprecedented magnetic glass state, perhaps due to many-body localization of spin.« less

  2. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-28

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision (17)O and (2)H NMR relaxation data for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τ(R) is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ∼48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τ(R) D(T) at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ(R) to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure. PMID:22667569

  3. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics and string-like correlated motion in supercooled liquids and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila

    Dense liquids above their glass transition exhibit spatially heterogeneous dynamics (SHD) in which regions within the liquid exhibit enhanced or diminished mobility relative to the average on some time scale. The spatially heterogeneous nature of local dynamics in supercooled liquids is fairly well established both experimentally and computationally. However, many questions remain concerning why and how this complex dynamics arises. Here we address these questions and present results of a detailed investigation of SHD in models of a one-component supercooled liquid and a low-molecular-weight polymer melt, via molecular dynamics simulation. We find that particles or chain segments (monomers) with high mobility exhibit a correlated motion in which they move in a quasi-one dimensional "string-like" paths that aggregate into larger, ramified clusters. These dynamical clusters grow in size with decreasing temperature. The mean string and cluster sizes show a transient nature, with peaks at the late-beta/early-alpha relaxation time of the mode-coupling theory (MCT). The size distribution of the strings shows an exponential behavior, while that of the clusters approaches a power law near TMCT. We further investigate the microscopic details of local particle dynamics in order to understand the mechanisms by which particles move along string-like correlated paths. We find that the degree of coherence, i.e., the simulataneous motion by consecutive particles along a string, depends on the length of the string. We also explore the thermodynamic behavior of the one-component liquid via the inherent structure formalism to study the connection between the dynamical strings and clusters we have investigated and the "cooperatively rearranging region (CRR)" of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) theory. We find that the average cluster size is linearly related to the inverse of the configurational entropy Sconf, as observed in simulated water. However, we also find a similar linear relationship

  4. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Peppin, Stephen S L; Cocks, Alan C F; Wettlaufer, J S

    2011-10-01

    We present a physically intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil, a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good agreement with experiments, in particular explaining ice-lens pattern formation and surges in heave rate associated with the growth of new lenses. Importantly for systems with no frozen fringe, ice-lens formation and frost heave can be predicted given only the unfrozen properties of the soil. We use our theory to estimate ice-lens growth temperatures obtaining quantitative agreement with the limited experimental data that are currently available. Finally we suggest experiments that might be performed in order to verify this theory in more detail. The theory is generalizable to complex natural-soil scenarios and should therefore be useful in the prediction of macroscopic frost-heave rates.

  5. Inelastic x-ray scattering study of supercooled liquid and solid silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Alatas, A.; Said, A.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E.E.; Kodituwakku, C.N.; Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; X-Ray Science Division; Western Michigan Univ.; Purdue Univ.; CRMD-CNRS; CRMHT-CNRS

    2006-01-01

    Momentum-resolved inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique is one of the powerful methods for the study of dynamical properties of a given system even in extreme conditions like high temperature and high pressure. At the same time, experimental studies of physical and structural properties of liquids have multiplied in recent years with the advent of containerless techniques. These methods reduce the possibility of contamination of specimens and remove external nucleation sites. Therefore, by combining the IXS method with the levitation method, the dynamical properties of stable liquids up to 3000 K and supercooled phase of liquids can be studied. Silicon is a basic material in the semiconductor industry and has been the subject of a large amount of experimental and theoretical studies over a long time. In the crystalline phase at ambient conditions, silicon is a diamond-structured semiconductor, but upon melting it undergoes a semiconductor-to-metal transition accompanied by significant changes in the structure and density. The coordination number increases from 4 in the solid to about 6.5 in the liquid, and liquid density is increased by about 10%. The principal purpose of the present study was to determine silicon's elastic modulus from the measurement of averaged sound speed determined from IXS. The experiments were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 3-ID with a high-resolution monochromator consisting of two nested channel-cut crystals and four backscattering analyzer setups in the horizontal scattering plane 6 m from the sample. The requirements for very high energy resolution and the basic principles of such instrumentation are discussed elsewhere as referenced. The levitation apparatus was enclosed in a bell jar specially designed for backscattering geometry with a separation of 10 cm between the sample and the detector. Silicon spheres of 2 to 3 mm in diameter were suspended in an argon gas jet and heated with a 270 W CO{sub 2

  6. Nanodiamonds + bacteriochlorin as an infrared photosensitizer for deep-lying tumor diagnostics and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharova, A. S.; Maklygina, YU S.; Lisichkin, G. V.; Mingalev, P. G.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    The spectroscopic properties of potentially perspective nanostructure: diamond nanoparticles with a surface layer of IR-photosensitizer, bacteriochlorin, were experimentally investigated in this study. Such specific structure of the object encourages enhancement of the drug tropism to the tumor, as well as increasing of photodynamic penetration depth. The size distribution spectra of diamond nanoparticles; diamond nanoparticles, artificially covered with bacteriochlorin molecules layer, in aqueous solution, were obtained during the study. Based on the absorption and fluorescence spectra analysis, the benefits of functional nanostructure as a drug for deep-lying tumor diagnostics and therapy were reviewed.

  7. Limits on deeply penetrating particles in the 10(17) eV cosmic ray flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, J. W.; Loh, P. R.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    Deeply penetrating particles in the 10 to the 17th power eV cosmic ray flux were investigated. No such events were found in 8.2 x 10 to the 6th power sec of running time. Limits were set on the following: quark-matter in the primary cosmic ray flux; long-lived, weakly interacting particles produced in p-air collisions; the astrophysical neutrino flux. In particular, the neutrino flux limit at 10 to the 17th power eV implies that z, the red shift of maximum activity is 10 in the model of Hill and Schramm.

  8. Fabrication of deeply undercut GaN-based microdisk structures on silicon platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicknesh, S.; Tripathy, S.; Lin, Vivian K. X.; Wang, L. S.; Chua, S. J.

    2007-02-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of a dry releasing technique to achieve deeply undercut GaN-based microdisk structures supported by silicon platforms. Varying dimensions of microdisk structures on silicon posts with large air gaps are fabricated by a XeF2-based dry etching of the underlying silicon material. The residual stress variation in these microdisks is studied by high spectral resolution micro-Raman mapping. Such a fabrication technique may effectively improve the light extraction efficiency from GaN-based microdisk light emitting diodes on silicon substrates.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron: Measurements with CLAS and CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Daria

    Measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) give access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs) which provide a 3D image of the nucleon and carry information on the composition of its spin. Data from both proton and neutron targets is highly desirable for an extraction of all GPDs and to allow their flavour-decomposition. Although a number of measurements have been made on proton targets, data on the neutron is almost non-existent. We present preliminary results in the extraction of beam-spin asymmetry in neutron DVCS from CLAS and the proposed experimental programme with CLAS12 at Jefferson Laboratory.

  10. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the Neutron: JLab Experiment E08-025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, Meriem; Mazouz, Malek; Fonvieille, Helene

    2016-03-01

    This paper gives the preliminary results of the experimental cross section for deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron (en → enγ). The E08-025 experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab Hall A. We measured the (D(e; eX - H(e; e'γ)X) unpolarized cross section and we extracted, for the first time, a non-zero contribution of (neutron-DVCS + coherent-deuteron-DVCS) at Q2 = 1.75 GeV2 and xB = 0.36.

  11. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

    1996-03-01

    During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

  13. Limiting Spectra from Confining Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Simmons, L. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The author explains that, for confining potentials and large quantum numbers, the bound-state energies rise more rapidly as a function of n the more rapidly the potential rises with distance. However, the spectrum can rise no faster than n squared in the nonrelativistic case, or n in the relativistic case. (Author/GA)

  14. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-05-01

    A plausible interpretation of the experimental evidence is that energy confinement in tokamaks is governed by two separate considerations: (1) the need for resistive MHD kink-stability, which limits the permissible range of current profiles - and therefore normally also the range of temperature profiles; and (2) the presence of strongly anomalous microscopic energy transport near the plasma edge, which calibrates the amplitude of the global temperature profile, thus determining the energy confinement time tau/sub E/. Correspondingly, there are two main paths towards the enhancement of tokamak confinement: (1) Configurational optimization, to increase the MHD-stable energy content of the plasma core, can evidently be pursued by varying the cross-sectional shape of the plasma and/or finding stable radial profiles with central q-values substantially below unity - but crossing from ''first'' to ''second'' stability within the peak-pressure region would have the greatest ultimate potential. (2) Suppression of edge turbulence, so as to improve the heat insulation in the outer plasma shell, can be pursued by various local stabilizing techniques, such as use of a poloidal divertor. The present confinement model and initial TFTR pellet-injection results suggest that the introduction of a super-high-density region within the plasma core should be particularly valuable for enhancing ntau/subE/. In D-T operation, a centrally peaked plasma pressure profile could possibly lend itself to alpha-particle-driven entry into the second-stability regime.

  15. Momentum Confinement at Low Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Burrell, K H; deGrassie, J S; Budny, R; Groebner, R J; Heidbrink, W W; Kinsey, J E; Kramer, G J; Makowski, M A; Mikkelsen, D; Nazikian, R; Petty, C C; Politzer, P A; Scott, S D; Van Zeeland, M A; Zarnstorff, M C

    2007-06-26

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized {beta}{sub N}, by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co-neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q{sub min} show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. The relative importance of E x B shearing between the two is modeled using GLF23 and may suggest a possible explanation.

  16. Diffusion of benzene confined in the oriented nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, E.; Kumzerov, Yu.A.; Vakhrushev, S.B.

    2005-11-01

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of benzene that completely fills the nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers with a characteristic diameter of about 5 nm. The macroscopical alignment of the nanochannels in fibers provided an interesting opportunity to study anisotropy of the dynamics of confined benzene by means of collecting the data with the scattering vector either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers axes. The translational diffusive motion of benzene molecules was found to be isotropic. While bulk benzene freezes at 278.5 K, we observed the translational dynamics of the supercooled confined benzene on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds even below 200 K, until at about 160 K its dynamics becomes too slow for the {mu}eV resolution of the neutron backscattering spectrometer. The residence time between jumps for the benzene molecules measured in the temperature range of 260 K to 320 K demonstrated low activation energy of 2.8 kJ/mol.

  17. The deeply virtual structure of nuclei from inclusive to exclusive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuti, Simonetta; Brodsky, Stanley; Miller, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    We discuss several new advancements in our understanding of the deeply virtual structure of nuclei as obtained from both inclusive and exclusive lepton nucleus scattering processes. The latter involve nuclear Generalized Parton Distributions. At low Bjorken x, gluon exchange between the outgoing partons and the target spectators affects the structure functions at the leading twist level. The modification of the nuclear structure function with respect to the free nucleon ones observed in experiments is therefore not related to the wave function of the nucleus, but it is due to partonic final state interactions. At larger values of x, in the so-called EMC effect region, rescattering can still affect the structure functions although to a lesser extent, as nucleon off-shellness effects become more important. As a result of leading twist partonic reinteractions, the traditional baryon number, momentum, and angular momentum sum rules are expected to be violated in the deep inelastic processes on nuclei which have been measured so far. Additional new information on all of these questions can be obtained through deeply virtual exclusive processes which allow us to access, in particular, transverse spatial configurations of patrons in nuclei.

  18. Genomic Analysis of Deeply-Branching Bacteria and Archaea from IODP Leg 347: Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. T.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse inhabitants of the marine subsurface are "deeply-branching" bacteria and archaea, whose recent evolutionary ancestors have eluded isolation and characterization by traditional culture-based methods. By using single-cell genomics, we were able to target members of common deeply-branching mircorganisms found in a sediment core acquired during IODP Leg 347. Cells were separated from sediment layers (37 and 84 meters below the seafloor) deposited at site 60, hole B, near Anholt Island tens to hundreds of thousands of years ago. Ten single amplified genomes from 4 bacterial and 1 archaeal lineages were chosen from the 60 successfully sorted cells. The lineages include: Desulfobacterium sp., OPB41, OP8, NT-B2, Marine Group II archaea. Two lineages have not been genomically sampled before, while all 5 are frequently found in a variety of marine sediment habitats. The genome assemblies range in completeness from 45 - 85% and contain a number of phylogenetically relevant genes that has helped to anchor their position in the tree of life. The metabolic strategies, including putative sulfate reduction and carbon degradation pathways, employed by these cells have allowed them to survive in an environment with diminishing sources of labile carbon substrates.

  19. REVIEW OF PRACTICE FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED/BURIED NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SEISMIC LOADINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.GRAVES,H.

    2004-03-24

    Motivated by many design considerations, several conceptual designs for advanced reactors have proposed that the entire reactor building and a significant portion of the steam generator building will be either partially or completely embedded below grade. For the analysis of seismic events, the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect and passive earth pressure for these types of deeply embedded structures will have a significant influence on the predicted seismic response. Sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a research program to assess the significance of these proposed design features for advanced reactors, and to evaluate the existing analytical methods to determine their applicability and adequacy in capturing the seismic behavior of the proposed designs. This paper summarizes a literature review performed by BNL to determine the state of knowledge and practice for seismic analyses of deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear containment type structures. Included in the paper is BNL's review of the open literature of existing standards, tests, and practices that have been used in the design and analysis of DEB structures. The paper also provides BNL's evaluation of available codes and guidelines with respect to seismic design practice of DEB structures. Based on BNL's review, a discussion is provided to highlight the applicability of the existing technologies for seismic analyses of DEB structures and to identify gaps that may exist in knowledge and potential issues that may require better understanding and further research.

  20. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-10-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. PMID:23770541

  1. Petroleum and aqueous inclusions from deeply buried reservoirs: Experimental simulations and consequences for overpressure estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pironon, Jacques; Bourdet, Julien

    2008-10-01

    Synthetic hydrocarbon and aqueous inclusions have been created in the laboratory batch reactors in order to mimic inclusion formation or re-equilibration in deeply buried reservoirs. Inclusions were synthesized in quartz and calcite using pure water and Mexican dead oil, or n-tetradecane (C 14H 30), at a temperature and pressure of 150 °C and 1 kbar. One-phase hydrocarbon inclusions are frequently observed at standard laboratory conditions leading to homogenization temperatures between 0 and 60 °C. UV epifluorescence of Mexican oil inclusions is not uniform; blue and green-yellow colored inclusions coexist; however, no clear evidence of variations in fluid chemistry were observed. Homogenization temperatures were recorded and the maxima of Th plotted on histograms are in good agreement with expected Th in a range of 6 °C. Broad histograms were reconstructed showing non-symmetrical Th distributions over a 20 °C temperature range centered on the expected Th. This histogram broadening is due to the fragility of the fluid inclusions that were created by re-filling of pre-existing microcavities. Such Th histograms are similar to Th histograms recorded on natural samples from deeply buried carbonate reservoirs. Th values lower than those expected were measured for hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz and calcite, and for aqueous inclusions in calcite. However, the results confirm the ability of fluid inclusions containing two immiscible fluids to lead to PT reconstructions, even in overpressured environments.

  2. A Generalized Hydrodynamic-Impact Theory for the Loads and Motions of Deeply Immersed Prismatic Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markey, Melvin F.

    1959-01-01

    A theory is derived for determining the loads and motions of a deeply immersed prismatic body. The method makes use of a two-dimensional water-mass variation and an aspect-ratio correction for three-dimensional flow. The equations of motion are generalized by using a mean value of the aspect-ratio correction and by assuming a variation of the two-dimensional water mass for the deeply immersed body. These equations lead to impact coefficients that depend on an approach parameter which, in turn, depends upon the initial trim and flight-path angles. Comparison of experiment with theory is shown at maximum load and maximum penetration for the flat-bottom (0 deg dead-rise angle) model with bean-loading coefficients from 36.5 to 133.7 over a wide range of initial conditions. A dead-rise angle correction is applied and maximum-load data are compared with theory for the case of a model with 300 dead-rise angle and beam-loading coefficients from 208 to 530.

  3. On the ergodicity of supercooled molecular glass-forming liquids at the dynamical arrest: the o-terphenyl case

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Leone, Nancy; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of supercooled ortho-terphenyl has been studied using photon-correlation spectroscopy (PCS) in the depolarized scattering geometry. The obtained relaxation curves are analyzed according to the mode-coupling theory (MCT) for supercooled liquids. The main results are: i) the observation of the secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation (β) that has its onset just at the dynamical crossover temperature TB (TM > TB > Tg); ii) the confirmation, of the suggestion of a recent statistical mechanical study, that such a molecular system remains ergodic also below the calorimetric glass-transition temperature Tg. Our experimental data give evidence that the time scales of the primary (α) and this secondary relaxations are correlated. Finally a comparison with recent PCS experiments in a colloidal system confirms the primary role of the dynamical crossover in the physics of the dynamical arrest. PMID:24434872

  4. On the ergodicity of supercooled molecular glass-forming liquids at the dynamical arrest: the o-terphenyl case.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Leone, Nancy; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-01-17

    The dynamics of supercooled ortho-terphenyl has been studied using photon-correlation spectroscopy (PCS) in the depolarized scattering geometry. The obtained relaxation curves are analyzed according to the mode-coupling theory (MCT) for supercooled liquids. The main results are: i) the observation of the secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation (β) that has its onset just at the dynamical crossover temperature TB (TM > TB > Tg); ii) the confirmation, of the suggestion of a recent statistical mechanical study, that such a molecular system remains ergodic also below the calorimetric glass-transition temperature Tg. Our experimental data give evidence that the time scales of the primary (α) and this secondary relaxations are correlated. Finally a comparison with recent PCS experiments in a colloidal system confirms the primary role of the dynamical crossover in the physics of the dynamical arrest.

  5. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercooled under-ice ocean boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Stevens, Craig L.; Smith, Inga J.; Robinson, Natalie J.

    2016-04-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercooled seawater. The data show that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. Platelet growth in supercooled water under thick ice appears to be rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the underside of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  6. ¹H NMR diffusion studies of water self-diffusion in supercooled aqueous sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Piotr; Price, William S

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions have been studied theoretically, but so far no experimental diffusion data have been obtained under supercooled conditions. Here the results of (1)H NMR translational diffusion measurements of water in sodium chloride solutions in the temperature range 230 to 300 K and sodium chloride concentrations up to 4.2 mol/kg are presented. It was found that the diffusion data were well-described by the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher relationship with concentration-dependent parameters D0, B, and T0. The results indicate that under supercooled conditions the influence of sodium chloride on water diffusion is much smaller than predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Free energy of formation of small ice nuclei near the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Buhariwalla, Connor R C; Bowles, Richard K; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    The ST2 interaction potential has been used in a large number of simulation studies to explore the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in supercooled water. Using umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations of ST2 water, we evaluate the free energy of formation of small ice nuclei in the supercooled liquid in the vicinity of the Widom line, the region above the critical temperature of the LLPT where a number of thermodynamic anomalies occur. Our results show that in this region there is a substantial free-energy cost for the formation of small ice nuclei, demonstrating that the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the Widom line in ST2 water occur in a well-defined metastable liquid phase. On passing through the Widom line, we identify changes in the free energy to form small ice nuclei that illustrate how the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the LLPT may influence the ice nucleation process. PMID:25985943

  8. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercool under-ice ocean boundary-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, M. G.; Stevens, C. L.; Smith, I. J.; Robinson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercool seawater. The data suggest that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. We hypothesize that platelet growth in supercool water under thick ice is rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the under-side of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  9. Structural study of low concentration LiCl aqueous solutions in the liquid, supercooled, and hyperquenched glassy states.

    PubMed

    Winkel, K; Seidl, M; Loerting, T; Bove, L E; Imberti, S; Molinero, V; Bruni, F; Mancinelli, R; Ricci, M A

    2011-01-14

    Neutron diffraction experiments on a solution of LiCl in water (R = 40) at ambient conditions and in the supercooled and hyperquenched states are reported and analyzed within the empirical potential structure refinement framework. Evidence for the modifications of the microscopic structure of the solvent in the presence of such a small amount of salt is found at all investigated thermodynamic states. On the other hand, it is evident that the structure of the hyperquenched salty sample is similar to that of pure low density amorphous water, although all the peaks of the radial distribution functions are broader in the present case. Changes upon supercooling or hyperquenching of the ion's hydration shells and contacts are of limited size and evidence for segregation phenomena at these states does not clearly show up, although the presence of water separated contacts between ion of the same sign is intriguing. PMID:21241128

  10. Detection of supercooled liquid water-topped mixed-phase clouds >from shortwave-infrared satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NOH, Y. J.; Miller, S. D.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the utility of multispectral information from satellite passive radiometers for detecting and retrieving the properties of cloud globally, which conventionally utilizes shortwave- and thermal-infrared bands. However, the satellite-derived cloud information comes mainly from cloud top or represents a vertically integrated property. This can produce a large bias in determining cloud phase characteristics, in particular for mixed-phase clouds which are often observed to have supercooled liquid water at cloud top but a predominantly ice phase residing below. The current satellite retrieval algorithms may report these clouds simply as supercooled liquid without any further information regarding the presence of a sub-cloud-top ice phase. More accurate characterization of these clouds is very important for climate models and aviation applications. In this study, we present a physical basis and preliminary results for the algorithm development of supercooled liquid-topped mixed-phase cloud detection using satellite radiometer observations. The detection algorithm is based on differential absorption properties between liquid and ice particles in the shortwave-infrared bands. Solar reflectance data in narrow bands at 1.6 μm and 2.25 μm are used to optically probe below clouds for distinction between supercooled liquid-topped clouds with and without an underlying mixed phase component. Varying solar/sensor geometry and cloud optical properties are also considered. The spectral band combination utilized for the algorithm is currently available on Suomi NPP Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), and the future GOES-R Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). When tested on simulated cloud fields from WRF model and synthetic ABI data, favorable results were shown with reasonable threat scores (0.6-0.8) and false alarm rates (0.1-0.2). An ARM/NSA case study applied to VIIRS data also indicated promising

  11. Cryopreservation of Escherichia coli K12TG1: protection from the damaging effects of supercooling by freezing.

    PubMed

    Simonin, H; Bergaoui, I M; Perrier-Cornet, J M; Gervais, P

    2015-04-01

    Injuries in living cells caused by water freezing during a freeze-thaw process have been extensively reported. In particular, intracellular water freezing has long been incriminated in cell death caused by a high cooling rate, but this supposition could not always be demonstrated. This work aims to discriminate the role of water freezing, dehydration and cold-induced injuries in cellular damage occuring during cryopreservation. For this purpose, Escherichia coli K12TG1 suspensions were maintained in a supercooled or frozen state at -20°C for times ranging from 10 min to 5 h. The supercooled state was maintained for a long period at -20°C by applying a non-injurious isostatic pressure (P<40 MPa). Next, viability and membrane damage were determined by agar plating and fluorescence staining with propidium iodide and bis-oxonol. It was clear that keeping the cell suspensions in the supercooled state had a detrimental effect on both viability and plasma membrane permeability. Conversely, when cells were subjected to cold stress by freezing, the survival rate remained high throughout the experiment, and the cell membranes suffered little damage. Moreover, cells subjected to 5h of osmotic treatments at -20°C, conditions that mimic cryoconcentration upon freezing, and subsequently diluted and thawed suffered little damage. Dehydration due to cryoconcentration upon freezing protects the cells against the deleterious effects of supercooling, especially in the plasma membranes. The decrease in membrane leakage upon dehydration at low temperatures could be linked to differences in the gel state of the membrane revealed by a higher Laurdan general polarization (GP) value.

  12. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  13. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Choularton, T. W.; Westbrook, C. D.; Connolly, P. J.; Cui, Z. Q.; Crawford, I. P.; Capes, G. L.; Coe, H.; Dorsey, J. R.; Williams, P. I.; Illingworth, A. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Blyth, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude) at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s-1) was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus. The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m), horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km) and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm) stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than -12.2 °C and less than -10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively). No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei. Particle number concentrations (in the size range 0.1

  14. Dynamic Nucleation of Supercooled Melts and Measurement of the Surface Tension and Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of acoustic pressure-induced nucleation by using a novel approach involving the large amplitude resonant radial oscillations and collapse of a single bubble intentionally injected into a supercooled liquid. Using a combination of previously developed and proven techniques, the bubble is suspended in a fluid host by an ultrasonic field which supplies both the levitation capability as well as the forcing of the radial oscillations. We observe the effects of an increase in pressure (due to bubble collapse) in a region no larger than 100 microns within the supercooled melt to rigorously probe the hypothesis of pressure-induced nucleation of the solid phase. The use of single bubbles operating in narrow temporal and spatial scales will allow the direct and unambiguous correlation between the origin and location of the generation of the disturbance and the location and timing of the nucleation event. In a companion research effort, we are developing novel techniques for the non-contact measurements of the surface tension and viscosity of highly viscous supercooled liquids. Currently used non-invasive methods of surface tension measurement for the case of undercooled liquids generally rely of the quantitative determination of the resonance frequencies of drop shape oscillations, of the dynamics of surface capillary waves, or of the velocity of streaming flows. These methods become quickly ineffective when the liquid viscosity rises to a significant value. An alternate and accurate method which would be applicable to liquids of significant viscosity is therefore needed. We plan to develop such a capability by measuring the equilibrium shape of levitated undercooled melt droplets as they undergo solid-body rotation. The experimental measurement of the characteristic point of transition (bifurcation point) between axisymmetric and two-lobed shapes will be used to calculate the surface tension of the liquid. Such an approach has already been

  15. Detection and Analysis of High Ice Concentration Events and Supercooled Drizzle from IAGOS Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Martin; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lloyd, Gary; Beswick, Karl; Freer, Matt; Durant, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous encounters with high ice concentrations that lead to temperature and airspeed sensor measurement errors, as well as engine rollback and flameout, continue to pose serious problems for flight operations of commercial air carriers. Supercooled liquid droplets (SLD) are an additional hazard, especially for smaller commuter aircraft that do not have sufficient power to fly out of heavy icing conditions or heat to remove the ice. New regulations issued by the United States and European regulatory agencies are being implemented that will require aircraft below a certain weight class to carry sensors that will detect and warn of these types of icing conditions. Commercial aircraft do not currently carry standard sensors to detect the presence of ice crystals in high concentrations because they are typical found in sizes that are below the detection range of aircraft weather radar. Likewise, the sensors that are currently used to detect supercooled water do not respond well to drizzle-sized drops. Hence, there is a need for a sensor that can fill this measurement void. In addition, the forecast models that are used to predict regions of icing rely on pilot observations as the only means to validate the model products and currently there are no forecasts for the prevalence of high altitude ice crystals. Backscatter Cloud Probes (BCP) have been flying since 2011 under the IAGOS project on six Airbus commercial airliners operated by Lufthansa, Air France, China Air, Iberia and Cathay Pacific, and measure cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles larger than 5 μm. The BCP can detect these particles and measures an optical equivalent diameter (OED) but is not able to distinguish the type of particle, i.e. whether they are droplets, ice crystals, dust or ash. However, some qualification can be done based on measured temperature to discriminate between liquid water and ice. The next generation BCP (BCPD, Backscatter Cloud Probe with polarization detection) is

  16. Feynman amplitudes with confinement included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2009-07-01

    Amplitudes for any multipoint Feynman diagram are written taking into account vacuum background confining field. Higher order gluon exchanges are treated within background perturbation theory. For amplitudes with hadrons in initial or final states vertices are shown to be expressed by the corresponding wave function with the renormalized z factors. Examples of two-point functions, three-point functions (form factors), and decay amplitudes are explicitly considered.

  17. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  18. Holographic confinement in inhomogeneous backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Wien, Jason

    2016-08-01

    As noted by Witten, compactifying a d-dimensional holographic CFT on an S 1 gives a class of ( d - 1)-dimensional confining theories with gravity duals. The proto-typical bulk solution dual to the ground state is a double Wick rotation of the AdS d+1 Schwarzschild black hole known as the AdS soliton. We generalize such examples by allowing slow variations in the size of the S 1, and thus in the confinement scale. Coefficients governing the second order response of the system are computed for 3 ≤ d ≤ 8 using a derivative expansion closely related to the fluid-gravity correspondence. The primary physical results are that i) gauge-theory flux tubes tend to align orthogonal to gradients and along the eigenvector of the Hessian with the lowest eigenvalue, ii) flux tubes aligned orthogonal to gradients are attracted to gradients for d ≤ 6 but repelled by gradients for d ≥ 7, iii) flux tubes are repelled by regions where the second derivative along the tube is large and positive but are attracted to regions where the eigenvalues of the Hessian are large and positive in directions orthogonal to the tube, and iv) for d > 3, inhomogeneities act to raise the total energy of the confining vacuum above its zeroth order value.

  19. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  20. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.