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Sample records for deficiency impairs pericyte

  1. N-cadherin deficiency impairs pericyte recruitment, and not endothelial differentiation or sprouting, in embryonic stem cell-derived angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tillet, Emmanuelle . E-mail: emmanuelle.tillet@cea.fr; Vittet, Daniel; Feraud, Olivier; Moore, Robert; Kemler, Rolf; Huber, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    Endothelial cells express two classical cadherins, VE-cadherin and N-cadherin. VE-cadherin is absolutely required for vascular morphogenesis, but N-cadherin is thought to participate in vessel stabilization by interacting with periendothelial cells during vessel formation. However, recent data suggest a more critical role for N-cadherin in endothelium that would regulate angiogenesis, in part by controlling VE-cadherin expression. In this study, we have assessed N-cadherin function in vascular development using an in vitro model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. We show that pluripotent ES cells genetically null for N-cadherin can differentiate normally into endothelial cells. In addition, sprouting angiogenesis was unaltered, suggesting that N-cadherin is not essential for the early events of angiogenesis. However, the lack of N-cadherin led to an impairment in pericyte covering of endothelial outgrowths. We conclude that N-cadherin is necessary neither for vasculogenesis nor proliferation and migration of endothelial cells but is required for the subsequent maturation of endothelial sprouts by interacting with pericytes.

  2. Combined deficiency of Notch1 and Notch3 causes pericyte dysfunction, models CADASIL, and results in arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Natalie M.; Cuervo, Henar; Uh, Minji K.; Murtomäki, Aino; Kitajewski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes regulate vessel stability and pericyte dysfunction contributes to retinopathies, stroke, and cancer. Here we define Notch as a key regulator of pericyte function during angiogenesis. In Notch1+/−; Notch3−/− mice, combined deficiency of Notch1 and Notch3 altered pericyte interaction with the endothelium and reduced pericyte coverage of the retinal vasculature. Notch1 and Notch3 were shown to cooperate to promote proper vascular basement membrane formation and contribute to endothelial cell quiescence. Accordingly, loss of pericyte function due to Notch deficiency exacerbates endothelial cell activation caused by Notch1 haploinsufficiency. Mice mutant for Notch1 and Notch3 develop arteriovenous malformations and display hallmarks of the ischemic stroke disease CADASIL. Thus, Notch deficiency compromises pericyte function and contributes to vascular pathologies. PMID:26563570

  3. Pericytes control key neurovascular functions and neuronal phenotype in the adult brain and during brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Robert D.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Sagare, Abhay P.; Singh, Itender; LaRue, Barb; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Pericytes play a key role in the development of cerebral microcirculation. The exact role of pericytes in the neurovascular unit in the adult brain and during brain aging remains, however, elusive. Using adult viable pericyte-deficient mice, we show that pericyte loss leads to brain vascular damage by two parallel pathways: (1) reduction in brain microcirculation causing diminished brain capillary perfusion, cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood flow responses to brain activation which ultimately mediates chronic perfusion stress and hypoxia, and (2) blood-brain barrier breakdown associated with brain accumulation of serum proteins and several vasculotoxic and/or neurotoxic macromolecules ultimately leading to secondary neuronal degenerative changes. We show that age-dependent vascular damage in pericyte-deficient mice precedes neuronal degenerative changes, learning and memory impairment and the neuroinflammatory response. Thus, pericytes control key neurovascular functions that are necessary for proper neuronal structure and function, and pericytes loss results in a progressive age-dependent vascular-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21040844

  4. Role of pericytes in skeletal muscle regeneration and fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-08-15

    Stem cells ensure tissue regeneration, while overgrowth of adipogenic cells may compromise organ recovery and impair function. In myopathies and muscle atrophy associated with aging, fat accumulation increases dysfunction, and after chronic injury, the process of fatty degeneration, in which muscle is replaced by white adipocytes, further compromises tissue function and environment. Some studies suggest that pericytes may contribute to muscle regeneration as well as fat formation. This work reports the presence of two pericyte subpopulations in the skeletal muscle and characterizes their specific roles. Skeletal muscle from Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice show two types of pericytes, Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ (type-1) and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ (type-2), in close proximity to endothelial cells. We also found that both Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ cells colocalize with staining of two pericyte markers, PDGFRβ and CD146, but only type-1 pericyte express the adipogenic progenitor marker PDGFRα. Type-2 pericytes participate in muscle regeneration, while type-1 contribute to fat accumulation. Transplantation studies indicate that type-1 pericytes do not form muscle in vivo, but contribute to fat deposition in the skeletal muscle, while type-2 pericytes contribute only to the new muscle formation after injury, but not to the fat accumulation. Our results suggest that type-1 and type-2 pericytes contribute to successful muscle regeneration which results from a balance of myogenic and nonmyogenic cells activation.

  5. Pericytes in sarcomas of bone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Nguyen, Vi; Nguyen, Alan; Scott, Michelle A; James, Aaron W

    2015-07-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells that closely enwrap small blood vessels, lying in intimate association with the endothelium. Pericytes have recently gained attention as an important mediator of vascular biology and angiogenesis in cancer. Although better studied in carcinoma, pericytes have known interaction with sarcomas of bone, including Ewing's sarcoma, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Best studied is Ewing's sarcoma (ES), which displays a prominent perivascular growth pattern. Signaling pathways of known importance in intratumoral pericytes in ES include Notch, PDGF/PDGFR-β, and VEGF signaling. In summary, pericytes serve important functions in the tumor microenvironment. Improved understanding of pericyte biology may hold significant implications for the development of new therapies in sarcoma.

  6. Brain and Retinal Pericytes: Origin, Function and Role

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Andrea; Lange, Simona; Schroedl, Falk; Bruckner, Daniela; Motloch, Karolina A.; Bogner, Barbara; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Strohmaier, Clemens; Runge, Christian; Aigner, Ludwig; Rivera, Francisco J.; Reitsamer, Herbert A.

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are specialized mural cells located at the abluminal surface of capillary blood vessels, embedded within the basement membrane. In the vascular network these multifunctional cells fulfil diverse functions, which are indispensable for proper homoeostasis. They serve as microvascular stabilizers, are potential regulators of microvascular blood flow and have a central role in angiogenesis, as they for example regulate endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, pericytes, as part of the neurovascular unit, are a major component of the blood-retina/brain barrier. CNS pericytes are a heterogenic cell population derived from mesodermal and neuro-ectodermal germ layers acting as modulators of stromal and niche environmental properties. In addition, they display multipotent differentiation potential making them an intriguing target for regenerative therapies. Pericyte-deficiencies can be cause or consequence of many kinds of diseases. In diabetes, for instance, pericyte-loss is a severe pathological process in diabetic retinopathy (DR) with detrimental consequences for eye sight in millions of patients. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of CNS pericyte origin and function, with a special focus on the retina in the healthy and diseased. Finally, we highlight the role of pericytes in de- and regenerative processes. PMID:26869887

  7. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    PubMed Central

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  8. Role of Pericytes in Skeletal Muscle Regeneration and Fat Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Mintz, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells ensure tissue regeneration, while overgrowth of adipogenic cells may compromise organ recovery and impair function. In myopathies and muscle atrophy associated with aging, fat accumulation increases dysfunction, and after chronic injury, the process of fatty degeneration, in which muscle is replaced by white adipocytes, further compromises tissue function and environment. Some studies suggest that pericytes may contribute to muscle regeneration as well as fat formation. This work reports the presence of two pericyte subpopulations in the skeletal muscle and characterizes their specific roles. Skeletal muscle from Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice show two types of pericytes, Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ (type-1) and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ (type-2), in close proximity to endothelial cells. We also found that both Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+ and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ cells colocalize with staining of two pericyte markers, PDGFRβ and CD146, but only type-1 pericyte express the adipogenic progenitor marker PDGFRα. Type-2 pericytes participate in muscle regeneration, while type-1 contribute to fat accumulation. Transplantation studies indicate that type-1 pericytes do not form muscle in vivo, but contribute to fat deposition in the skeletal muscle, while type-2 pericytes contribute only to the new muscle formation after injury, but not to the fat accumulation. Our results suggest that type-1 and type-2 pericytes contribute to successful muscle regeneration which results from a balance of myogenic and nonmyogenic cells activation. PMID:23517218

  9. Reduced mural cell coverage and impaired vessel integrity after angiogenic stimulation in the Alk1-deficient brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Guo, Yi; Walker, Espen J.; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; Oh, S. Paul; Degos, Vincent; Lawton, Michael T.; Tihan, Tarik; Davalos, Dimitrios; Akassoglou, Katerina; Nelson, Jeffrey; Pile-Spellman, John; Su, Hua; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vessels in brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) are prone to rupture. The underlying pathogenesis is not clear. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2 (HHT2) patients with activin receptor-like kinase 1 (Alk1) mutation have a higher incidence of bAVM than the general population. We tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) impairs vascular integrity in the Alk1-deficient brain through reduction of mural cell-coverage. Methods and Results Adult Alk11f/2f mice (loxP sites flanking exons 4-6) and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with 2×107 PFU Ad-Cre and 2×109 genome copies of AAV-VEGF to induce focal homozygous Alk1 deletion (in Alk11f/2f mice) and angiogenesis. Brain vessels were analyzed eight weeks later. Compared to WT mice, the Alk1-deficient brain had more fibrin (99±30×103 pixels/mm2 vs. 40±13×103, P=0.001), iron deposition (508±506 pixels/mm2 vs. 6 ±49, P=0.04), and Iba1+ microglia/macrophage infiltration (888±420 Iba1+ cells/mm2 vs. 240±104 Iba1+, P=0.001) after VEGF stimulation. In the angiogenic foci, the Alk1-deficient brain had more α-SMA- vessels (52±9% vs. 12±7%, P<0.001), fewer vascular associated pericytes (503±179/mm2 vs. 931±115, P<0.001), and reduced PDGFR-β expression (26±9%, P<0.001). Conclusion Reduction of mural cell coverage in response to VEGF stimulation is a potential mechanism for the impairment of vessel wall integrity in HHT2-associated bAVM. PMID:23241407

  10. Impaired energy metabolism of the taurine‑deficient heart.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2016-02-01

    Taurine is a β-amino acid found in high concentrations in excitable tissues, including the heart. A significant reduction in myocardial taurine content leads to the development of a unique dilated, atrophic cardiomyopathy. One of the major functions of taurine in the heart is the regulation of the respiratory chain. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that taurine deficiency-mediated defects in respiratory chain function lead to impaired energy metabolism and reduced ATP generation. We found that while the rate of glycolysis was significantly enhanced in the taurine-deficient heart, glucose oxidation was diminished. The major site of reduced glucose oxidation was pyruvate dehydrogenase, an enzyme whose activity is reduced by the increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and by decreased availability of pyruvate for oxidation to acetyl CoA and changes in [Mg2+]i. Also diminished in the taurine-deficient heart was the oxidation of two other precursors of acetyl CoA, endogenous fatty acids and exogenous acetate. In the taurine-deficient heart, impaired citric acid cycle activity decreased both acetate oxidation and endogenous fatty acid oxidation, but reductions in the activity of the mitochondrial transporter, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, appeared to also contribute to the reduction in fatty acid oxidation. These changes diminished the rate of ATP production, causing a decline in the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio, a sign of reduced energy status. The findings support the hypothesis that the taurine-deficient heart is energy starved primarily because of impaired respiratory chain function, an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and diminished long chain fatty acid uptake by the mitochondria. The results suggest that improved energy metabolism contributes to the beneficial effect of taurine therapy in patients suffering from heart failure.

  11. RASGRP1 deficiency causes immunodeficiency with impaired cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Cagdas, Deniz; Hons, Miroslav; Mace, Emily M; Garncarz, Wojciech; Petronczki, Özlem Yüce; Platzer, René; Pfajfer, Laurène; Bilic, Ivan; Ban, Sol A; Willmann, Katharina L; Mukherjee, Malini; Supper, Verena; Hsu, Hsiang Ting; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Sinha, Papiya; McClanahan, Fabienne; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Pickl, Winfried F; Gribben, John G; Stockinger, Hannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Huppa, Johannes B; Dupré, Loïc; Sanal, Özden; Jäger, Ulrich; Sixt, Michael; Tezcan, Ilhan; Orange, Jordan S; Boztug, Kaan

    2016-12-01

    RASGRP1 is an important guanine nucleotide exchange factor and activator of the RAS-MAPK pathway following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. The consequences of RASGRP1 mutations in humans are unknown. In a patient with recurrent bacterial and viral infections, born to healthy consanguineous parents, we used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify a biallelic stop-gain variant in RASGRP1. This variant segregated perfectly with the disease and has not been reported in genetic databases. RASGRP1 deficiency was associated in T cells and B cells with decreased phosphorylation of the extracellular-signal-regulated serine kinase ERK, which was restored following expression of wild-type RASGRP1. RASGRP1 deficiency also resulted in defective proliferation, activation and motility of T cells and B cells. RASGRP1-deficient natural killer (NK) cells exhibited impaired cytotoxicity with defective granule convergence and actin accumulation. Interaction proteomics identified the dynein light chain DYNLL1 as interacting with RASGRP1, which links RASGRP1 to cytoskeletal dynamics. RASGRP1-deficient cells showed decreased activation of the GTPase RhoA. Treatment with lenalidomide increased RhoA activity and reversed the migration and activation defects of RASGRP1-deficient lymphocytes.

  12. Pericytes at the intersection between tissue regeneration and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular multipotent cells, pericytes, contribute to the generation and repair of various tissues in response to injury. They are heterogeneous in their morphology, distribution, origin and markers, and elucidating their molecular and cellular differences may inform novel treatments for disorders in which tissue regeneration is either impaired or excessive. Moreover, these discoveries offer novel cellular targets for therapeutic approaches to many diseases. This review discusses recent studies that support the concept that pericyte subtypes play a distinctive role in myogenesis, neurogenesis, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis and angiogenesis. PMID:25236972

  13. Pericytes at the intersection between tissue regeneration and pathology.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular multipotent cells, pericytes, contribute to the generation and repair of various tissues in response to injury. They are heterogeneous in their morphology, distribution, origin and markers, and elucidating their molecular and cellular differences may inform novel treatments for disorders in which tissue regeneration is either impaired or excessive. Moreover, these discoveries offer novel cellular targets for therapeutic approaches to many diseases. This review discusses recent studies that support the concept that pericyte subtypes play a distinctive role in myogenesis, neurogenesis, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis and angiogenesis.

  14. Tissue Myeloid Progenitors Differentiate into Pericytes through TGF-β Signaling in Developing Skin Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Nalbandian, Ani; Uchida, Yutaka; Li, Wenling; Arnold, Thomas D; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Seiji; Ema, Masatsugu; Mukouyama, Yoh-Suke

    2017-03-21

    Mural cells (pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells) are essential for the regulation of vascular networks and maintenance of vascular integrity, but their origins are diverse in different tissues and not known in the organs that arise from the ectoderm, such as skin. Here, we show that tissue-localized myeloid progenitors contribute to pericyte development in embryonic skin vasculature. A series of in vivo fate-mapping experiments indicates that tissue myeloid progenitors differentiate into pericytes. Furthermore, depletion of tissue myeloid cells and their progenitors in PU.1 (also known as Spi1) mutants results in defective pericyte development. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-isolated myeloid cells and their progenitors from embryonic skin differentiate into pericytes in culture. At the molecular level, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces pericyte differentiation in culture. Furthermore, type 2 TGF-β receptor (Tgfbr2) mutants exhibit deficient pericyte development in skin vasculature. Combined, these data suggest that pericytes differentiate from tissue myeloid progenitors in the skin vasculature through TGF-β signaling.

  15. Pericyte Antigens in Perivascular Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Asatrian, Greg; Mravic, Marco; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Dry, Sarah M.; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear line of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from pericytes or modified perivascular cells. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor (previously termed hemangiopericytoma) was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation. Methods Here, we systematically examine pericyte immunohistochemical markers among glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, angioleiomyoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. Immunohistochemical staining and semiquantification was performed using well-defined pericyte antigens, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Results Glomus tumor and myopericytoma demonstrate diffuse staining for all pericyte markers, including immunohistochemical reactivity for αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Malignant glomus tumors all showed some degree of pericyte marker immunoreactivity, although it was significantly reduced. Angioleiomyoma shared a similar αSMA + CD146 + PDGFRβ+ immunophenotype; however, this was predominantly seen in the areas of perivascular tumor growth. Solitary fibrous tumors showed patchy PDGFRβ immunoreactivity only. Discussion In summary, pericyte marker expression is a ubiquitous finding in glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Malignant glomus tumor shows a comparative reduction in pericyte marker expression, which may represent partial loss of pericytic differentiation. Pericyte markers are essentially not seen in solitary fibrous tumor. The combination of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ immunohistochemical stainings may be of utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26085647

  16. Ferroportin deficiency impairs manganese metabolism in flatiron mice

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    We examined the physiologic role of ferroportin (Fpn) in manganese (Mn) export using flatiron (ffe/+) mice, a genetic model of Fpn deficiency. Blood (0.0123 vs. 0.0107 mg/kg; P = 0.0003), hepatic (1.06 vs. 0.96 mg/kg; P = 0.0125), and bile Mn levels (79 vs. 38 mg/kg; P = 0.0204) were reduced in ffe/+ mice compared to +/+ controls. Erythrocyte Mn–superoxide dismutase was also reduced at 6 (0.154 vs. 0.096, P = 0.0101), 9 (0.131 vs. 0.089, P = 0.0162), and 16 weeks of age (0.170 vs. 0.090 units/mg protein/min; P < 0.0001). 54Mn uptake after intragastric gavage was markedly reduced in ffe/+ mice (0.0187 vs. 0.0066% dose; P = 0.0243), while clearance of injected isotope was similar in ffe/+ and +/+ mice. These values were compared to intestinal absorption of 59Fe, which was significantly reduced in ffe/+ mice (8.751 vs. 3.978% dose; P = 0.0458). The influence of the ffe mutation was examined in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and human embryonic HEK293T cells. While expression of wild-type Fpn reversed Mn-induced cytotoxicity, ffe mutant H32R failed to confer protection. These combined results demonstrate that Fpn plays a central role in Mn transport and that flatiron mice provide an excellent genetic model to explore the role of this exporter in Mn homeostasis.—Seo, Y. A., Wessling-Resnick, M. Ferroportin deficiency impairs manganese metabolism in flatiron mice. PMID:25782988

  17. Crybb2 deficiency impairs fertility in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Xiang, Fen-Fen; Gao, Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Tao, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jie

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Crybb2 deletion impaired female fertility. • Crybb2 deletion dramatically affected the production of reproduction-related hormones and hormone response. • Crybb2 deletion impaired follicular development and inhibited the proliferation of granulosa cells. • Crybb2 deletion promoted follicular atresia and apoptosis in granulosa cells. - Abstract: Beta-B2-crystallin (CRYBB2), encoded by Crybb2 gene, is a major protein in the mammalian eye lens that plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the ocular lens. However, CRYBB2 also plays important roles in many extra-lenticular tissues and organs such as the retina, brain and testis. Our previous studies demonstrated that male Crybb2 deficient (Crybb2{sup −/−}) mice have reduced fertility compared with wild-type (WT) mice, while female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited reduced ovary weights and shorter estrous cycle percentages. Here we specifically investigated the role of CRYBB2 in the female reproductive system. Our studies revealed that ovaries from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited significantly reduced numbers of primordial, secondary and pre-ovulatory follicles when compared with WT mice, while the rate of atretic follicles was also increased. Additionally, fewer eggs were collected from the oviduct of Crybb2{sup −/−} female mice after superovulation. Estrogen levels were higher in the metestrus and diestrus cycles of female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, while progesterone levels were lower in diestrus cycles. Furthermore, the expression of survival and cell cycle genes, Bcl-2, Cdk4 and Ccnd2, were significantly decreased in granulosa cells isolated from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, consistent with the predominant expression of CRYBB2 in ovarian granulosa cells. Our results reveal a critical role for CRYBB2 in female fertility and specific effects on the proliferation and survival status of ovarian granulosa cells.

  18. Nrf2 deficiency impairs fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lippross, Sebastian; Beckmann, Rainer; Streubesand, Nadine; Ayub, Ferda; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Campbell, Graeme; Kan, Yuet Wai; Horst, Fischer; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Varoga, Deike; Lichte, Philipp; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas; Wruck, Christoph Jan

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in wound healing but data relating oxidative stress to fracture healing are scarce. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the major transcription factor that controls the cellular defence essential to combat oxidative stress by regulating the expression of antioxidative enzymes. This study examined the impact of Nrf2 on fracture healing using a standard closed femoral shaft fracture model in wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO)-mice. Healing was evaluated by histology, real-time RT-PCR, µCT and biomechanical measurements. We showed that Nrf2 expression is activated during fracture healing. Bone healing and remodelling were retarded in the Nrf2-KO compared to the WT-mice. Nrf2-KO-mice developed significantly less callus tissue compared to WT-mice. In addition, biomechanical testing demonstrated lower strength against shear stress in the Nrf2-KO-group compared to WT. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and osteocalcin is reduced during fracture healing in Nrf2-KO-mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Nrf2 deficiency in mice results in impaired fracture healing suggesting that Nrf2 plays an essential role in bone regeneration. Pharmacological activation of Nrf2 may have therapeutic potential for the enhancement of fracture healing.

  19. Impaired pancreatic development in Hif2-alpha deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiping; Houshmand, Golbahar; Mishra, Sanjay; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gittes, George K; Esni, Farzad

    2010-08-27

    Accumulating data suggest the existence of a link between hypoxia and maintenance of the undifferentiated cell state, but little is known about the cellular signaling mechanisms underlying this process. Recent reports reveal a direct link between components of the hypoxia signaling pathway and Notch pathway in maintaining precursor cells in an undifferentiated state. Here, we report that in the developing mouse pancreas, Hif2-alpha is expressed in pancreatic progenitor cells, but its expression is lost in committed endocrine progenitors as well as in differentiated endocrine and exocrine cells. In an attempt to analyze the function of HIF2-alpha in the developing pancreas, we studied Hif2-alpha(-/-) pancreas. Our analyses revealed that in addition to the decreased size and branching, the Hif2-alpha deficient pancreas also displayed impaired notch signaling and cell differentiation. Finally, we found that HIF2-alpha binds directly to Notch-IC and that the responsible site for this interaction is within the RAM domain of Notch protein. These results suggest that HIF2-alpha is required for normal mouse pancreatic development.

  20. Dysfunction of brain pericytes in chronic neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Persidsky, Yuri; Hill, Jeremy; Zhang, Ming; Dykstra, Holly; Winfield, Malika; Reichenbach, Nancy L; Potula, Raghava; Mukherjee, Abir; Ramirez, Servio H; Rom, Slava

    2016-04-01

    Brain pericytes are uniquely positioned within the neurovascular unit to provide support to blood brain barrier (BBB) maintenance. Neurologic conditions, such as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder, are associated with BBB compromise due to chronic inflammation. Little is known about pericyte dysfunction during HIV-1 infection. We found decreased expression of pericyte markers in human brains from HIV-1-infected patients (even those on antiretroviral therapy). Using primary human brain pericytes, we assessed expression of pericyte markers (α1-integrin, α-smooth muscle actin, platelet-derived growth factor-B receptor β, CX-43) and found their downregulation after treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) or interleukin-1 β (IL-1β). Pericyte exposure to virus or cytokines resulted in decreased secretion of factors promoting BBB formation (angiopoietin-1, transforming growth factor-β1) and mRNA for basement membrane components. TNFα and IL-1β enhanced expression of adhesion molecules in pericytes paralleling increased monocyte adhesion to pericytes. Monocyte migration across BBB models composed of human brain endothelial cells and pericytes demonstrated a diminished rate in baseline migration compared to constructs composed only of brain endothelial cells. However, exposure to the relevant chemokine, CCL2, enhanced the magnitude of monocyte migration when compared to BBB models composed of brain endothelial cells only. These data suggest an important role of pericytes in BBB regulation in neuroinflammation.

  1. IGF-1 deficiency impairs neurovascular coupling in mice: implications for cerebromicrovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Ashpole, Nicole M; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Milne, Ginger L; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Menyhart, Akos; Farkas, Eszter; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with marked deficiency in circulating IGF-1, which has been shown to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of age-related cognitive impairment. To establish the link between IGF-1 deficiency and cerebromicrovascular impairment, neurovascular coupling mechanisms were studied in a novel mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency (Igf1(f/f) -TBG-Cre-AAV8) and accelerated vascular aging. We found that IGF-1-deficient mice exhibit neurovascular uncoupling and show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory test, mimicking the aging phenotype. IGF-1 deficiency significantly impaired cerebromicrovascular endothelial function decreasing NO mediation of neurovascular coupling. IGF-1 deficiency also impaired glutamate-mediated CBF responses, likely due to dysregulation of astrocytic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors and impairing mediation of CBF responses by eicosanoid gliotransmitters. Collectively, we demonstrate that IGF-1 deficiency promotes cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and neurovascular uncoupling mimicking the aging phenotype, which are likely to contribute to cognitive impairment.

  2. Glioblastoma: A Pathogenic Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Garcia, Carolina; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Cancers likely originate in progenitor zones containing stem cells and perivascular stromal cells. Much evidence suggests stromal cells play a central role in tumor initiation and progression. Brain perivascular cells (pericytes) are contractile and function normally to regulate vessel tone and morphology, have stem cell properties, are interconvertible with macrophages and are involved in new vessel formation during angiogenesis. Nevertheless, how pericytes contribute to brain tumor infiltration is not known. In this study we have investigated the underlying mechanism by which the most lethal brain cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) interacts with pre-existing blood vessels (co-option) to promote tumor initiation and progression. Here, using mouse xenografts and laminin-coated silicone substrates, we show that GBM malignancy proceeds via specific and previously unknown interactions of tumor cells with brain pericytes. Two-photon and confocal live imaging revealed that GBM cells employ novel, Cdc42-dependent and actin-based cytoplasmic extensions, that we call flectopodia, to modify the normal contractile activity of pericytes. This results in the co-option of modified pre-existing blood vessels that support the expansion of the tumor margin. Furthermore, our data provide evidence for GBM cell/pericyte fusion-hybrids, some of which are located on abnormally constricted vessels ahead of the tumor and linked to tumor-promoting hypoxia. Remarkably, inhibiting Cdc42 function impairs vessel co-option and converts pericytes to a phagocytic/macrophage-like phenotype, thus favoring an innate immune response against the tumor. Our work, therefore, identifies for the first time a key GBM contact-dependent interaction that switches pericyte function from tumor-suppressor to tumor-promoter, indicating that GBM may harbor the seeds of its own destruction. These data support the development of therapeutic strategies directed against co-option (preventing incorporation and

  3. Sirtuin-6 deficiency exacerbates diabetes induced impairment of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Babu, Sahana Suresh; Jeyabal, Prince; Verma, Suresh K; Mackie, Alexander R; Khan, Mohsin; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kishore, Raj; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major complications in diabetes and is characterized by chronic proinflammatory response, and abnormalities in angiogenesis and collagen deposition. Sirtuin family proteins regulate numerous pathophysiological processes, including those involved in promotion of longevity, DNA repair, glycolysis and inflammation. However the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a NAD+-dependent nuclear deacetylase, in wound healing specifically under diabetic condition remains unclear. To analyze the role of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound healing, paired 6 mm stented wound were created in diabetic db/db mice and injected siRNA against SIRT6 in the wound margins (transfection agent alone and non-sensed siRNA served as controls). Wound time to closure was assessed by digital planimetry, and wounds were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. SIRT6-siRNA treated diabetic wound showed impaired healing, which was associated with reduced capillary density (CD31 staining vessels) when compared to control treatment. Interestingly, SIRT6 deficiency decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and proliferation markers in the wounds. Furthermore, SIRT6 ablation in diabetic wound promotes nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activation resulting in increased expression of proinflammatory markers (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) and increased oxidative stress. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that loss of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound aggravates proinflammatory response by increasing NF-kB activation, oxidative stress and decrease in angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Based on these findings, we speculate that activation of SIRT6 signaling might be a potential therapeutic approach for promoting wound healing in diabetics. PMID:26010430

  4. Notch Signaling Functions in Retinal Pericyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F.; Primo, Vincent; Graham, Mark; James, Alexandra; Manent, Jan; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pericytes, the vascular cells that constitute the outer layer of capillaries, have been shown to have a crucial role in vascular development and stability. Loss of pericytes precedes endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular degeneration in small-vessel diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Despite their clinical relevance, the cellular pathways controlling survival of retinal pericytes remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, we investigated the role of Notch signaling, a master regulator of cell fate decisions, in retinal pericyte survival. Methods. A coculture system of ligand-dependent Notch signaling was developed using primary cultured retinal pericytes and a mesenchymal cell line derived from an inducible mouse model expressing the Delta-like 1 Notch ligand. This model was used to examine the effect of Notch activity on pericyte survival using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a light-induced cell death assay. The effect of Notch gain- and loss-of-function was analyzed in monocultures of retinal pericytes using antibody arrays to interrogate the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Results. Primary cultured retinal pericytes differentially expressed key molecules of the Notch pathway and displayed strong expression of canonical Notch/RBPJK (recombination signal-binding protein 1 for J-kappa) downstream targets. A gene expression screen using gain- and loss-of-function approaches identified genes relevant to cell survival as downstream targets of Notch activity in retinal pericytes. Ligand-mediated Notch activity protected retinal pericytes from light-induced cell death. Conclusions. Our results have identified signature genes downstream of Notch activity in retinal pericytes and suggest that tight regulation of Notch signaling is crucial for pericyte survival. PMID:25015359

  5. Impaired synaptic vesicle recycling contributes to presynaptic dysfunction in lipoprotein lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhang, B; Yang, H; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Huang, A; Liu, T; Tian, X; Tong, Y; Zhou, T; Zhang, T; Xing, G; Xiao, W; Guo, X; Fan, D; Han, X; Liu, G; Zhou, Z; Chui, D

    2014-11-07

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is expressed at high levels in hippocampal neurons, although its function is unclear. We previously reported that LPL-deficient mice have learning and memory impairment and fewer synaptic vesicles in hippocampal neurons, but properties of synaptic activity in LPL-deficient neurons remain unexplored. In this study, we found reduced frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and readily releasable pool (RRP) size in LPL-deficient neurons, which led to presynaptic dysfunction and plasticity impairment without altering postsynaptic activity. We demonstrated that synaptic vesicle recycling, which is known to play an important role in maintaining the RRP size in active synapses, is impaired in LPL-deficient neurons. Moreover, lipid assay revealed deficient docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in the hippocampus of LPL-deficient mice; exogenous DHA or AA supplement partially restored synaptic vesicle recycling capability. These results suggest that impaired synaptic vesicle recycling results from deficient DHA and AA and contributes to the presynaptic dysfunction and plasticity impairment in LPL-deficient neurons.

  6. Pericytes in the myovascular niche promote post-natal myofiber growth and satellite cell quiescence.

    PubMed

    Kostallari, Enis; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Ngoh, Pamela; Relaix, Frederic; Lafuste, Peggy; Gherardi, Romain K

    2015-04-01

    The satellite cells, which serve as adult muscle stem cells, are both located beneath myofiber basement membranes and closely associated with capillary endothelial cells. We observed that 90% of capillaries were associated with pericytes in adult mouse and human muscle. During post-natal growth, newly formed vessels with their neuroglial 2 proteoglycan (NG2)-positive pericytes became progressively associated with the post-natal muscle stem cells, as myofibers increased in size and satellite cells entered into quiescence. In vitro, human muscle-derived pericytes promoted myogenic cell differentiation through insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and myogenic cell quiescence through angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1). Diphtheria toxin-induced ablation of muscle pericytes in growing mice led both to myofiber hypotrophy and to impaired establishment of stem cells quiescence. Similar effects were observed following conditional in vivo deletion of pericyte Igf1 and Angpt1 genes, respectively. Our data therefore demonstrate that, by promoting post-natal myogenesis and stem cell quiescence, pericytes play a key role in the microvascular niche of satellite cells.

  7. Wfs1-deficient mice display impaired behavioural adaptation in stressful environment.

    PubMed

    Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Raud, Sirli; Innos, Jürgen; Sütt, Silva; Lasner, Helena; Abramov, Urho; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2009-03-17

    Wfs1-deficient mice were generated by disrupting the 8th exon of Wfs1 gene. Reproduction rates of homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice were slightly below the expected values, they displayed intolerance to glucose and overall lower body weight. The present behavioural study was performed in female Wfs1-deficient mice due to their milder metabolic disturbances. Non-fasting blood glucose levels did not differ between homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice and wild-type littermates. While there was no difference in baseline plasma corticosterone, exposure to stress induced a nearly three-fold elevation of corticosterone in Wfs1-deficient mice in relation to wild-type littermates. Wfs1-deficient mice did not display obvious shortcomings in sensory and motor functioning as exemplified by intact responses in conditioned learning paradigms and rota-rod test. Locomotor activity of Wfs1-deficient mice was significantly lower only in brightly lit environment. Short-term isolation had a significant anxiogenic-like effect on the behaviour of Wfs1-deficient mice in dark/light exploration test. Lower exploratory activity of Wfs1-deficient mice in the plus-maze was antagonised by pre-treatment with diazepam (1 mg/kg), a GABA(A) receptor agonist. Wfs1-deficient mice displayed increased anxiety-like behaviour in hyponeophagia test. The locomotor stimulatory effects of amphetamine (2.5-7.5 mg/kg) and apomorphine (3 mg/kg) were significantly attenuated and facilitated, respectively, in Wfs1-deficient mice. There were no differences between Wfs1-deficient mice and wild-types in forced swimming behaviour and conditioned fear responses. Subtle impairments in reversal learning were apparent in Wfs1-deficient mice in the Morris water maze. Altogether, the present study demonstrates impaired behavioural adaptation of Wfs1-deficient mice in stress-inducing situations. It is likely that Wfs1 protein plays a major role in the behavioural adaptation mechanisms to novel and stressful environments.

  8. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Induction of Oral Tolerance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Akiko; Shuto, Emi; Tsutsumi, Rie; Nakamoto, Mariko; Nii, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Oral tolerance is a phenomenon of induction of systemic unresponsiveness to antigens ingested by the oral route and loss of immune response. Studies have shown the importance of vitamin A in oral tolerance in vitro but not in an in vivo experimental model. Therefore, we carried out experiments to determine how vitamin A deficiency affects tolerance induction and the ability of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) CD11c(+) cells to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). Immunological tolerance was induced by oral ovalbumin (OVA) administration in vitamin A-sufficient mice. OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were significantly reduced. On the other hand, in vitamin A-deficient mice, both OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were not suppressed by oral OVA administration. Regarding induction of Tregs, the conversion rate of Foxp3(+) cells from naïve CD4(+) cell by CD11c(+) cells was decreased in vitamin A-deficient mice. Our study indicates that vitamin A deficiency causes the breakdown of oral tolerance in vivo.

  9. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring.

  10. Impaired function of Fanconi anemia type C-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ballman, Kimberly; Li, Deqiang; Khan, Shehnaz; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Shou, Weinian; Haneline, Laura S

    2012-02-01

    FA is a genetic disorder characterized by BM failure, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that FA patients exhibit alterations in immunologic function. However, it is unclear whether the defects are immune cell-autonomous or secondary to leukopenia from evolving BM failure. Given the central role that macrophages have in the innate immune response, inflammation resolution, and antigen presentation for acquired immunity, we examined whether macrophages from Fancc-/- mice exhibit impaired function. Peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS or sodium periodate resulted in reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in Fancc-/- mice compared with WT controls. Fancc-/- mice also had decreased inflammatory monocytes mobilized into the peripheral blood after LPS treatment compared with controls. Furthermore, Fancc-/- peritoneal macrophages displayed cell-autonomous defects in function, including impaired adhesion to FN or endothelial cells, reduced chemoattractant-mediated migration, and decreased phagocytosis. Moreover, dysregulated F-actin rearrangement was detected in Fancc-/- macrophages after adhesion to FN, which was consistent with an observed reduction in RhoA-GTP levels. Importantly, these data suggest that impaired cytoskeletal rearrangements in Fancc-/- macrophages may be the common mechanism responsible for cell-autonomous defects detected in vitro, as well as altered monocyte/macrophage trafficking in vivo.

  11. Brain Pericytes As Mediators of Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Jansson, Deidre; Smyth, Leon C; Dragunow, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Brain pericytes are perivascular cells that regulate capillary function, and this localization puts them in a pivotal position for the regulation of central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory responses at the neurovascular unit. Neuroinflammation, driven by microglia and astrocytes or resulting from peripheral leukocyte infiltration, has both homeostatic and detrimental consequences for brain function and is present in nearly every neurological disorder. More recently, brain pericytes have been shown to have many properties of immune regulating cells, including responding to and expressing a plethora of inflammatory molecules, presenting antigen, and displaying phagocytic ability. In this review we highlight the emerging role of pericytes in neuroinflammation and discuss pericyte-mediated neuroinflammation as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of a range of devastating brain disorders.

  12. Impaired behavioral sensitization to cocaine in vasopressin deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Post, R M; Contel, N R; Gold, P

    1982-12-13

    Behavioral sensitization to cocaine involves progressive and long-lasting increases in hyperactivity and stereotypy in response to the same daily dose. In order to test whether vasopressin, a neuro-hormone implicated in drug tolerance and in other models of learning and memory, affected behavioral sensitization, cocaine was administered daily to animals with hereditary absence of vasopressin. Brattleboro homozygotes which lack vasopressin show deficient onset and persistence of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization compared to heterozygote, litter-mate controls. These data extend previous reports of vasopressin's role in memory and long-term coding of behavior to the model of pharmacologically-induced behavioral sensitization.

  13. Pericytes: brain-immune interface modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Cabañas-Morales, Adrian M.; Gómez-Gónzalez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The premise that the central nervous system is immune-privileged arose from the fact that direct contact between immune and nervous cells is hindered by the blood–brain barrier. However, the blood–brain barrier also comprises the interface between the immune and nervous systems by secreting chemo-attractant molecules and by modulating immune cell entry into the brain. The majority of published studies on the blood–brain barrier focus on endothelial cells (ECs), which are a critical component, but not the only one; other cellular components include astroglia, microglia, and pericytes. Pericytes are poorly studied in comparison with astrocytes or ECs; they are mesenchymal cells that can modify their ultrastructure and gene expression in response to changes in the central nervous system microenvironment. Pericytes have a unique synergistic relationship with brain ECs in the regulation of capillary permeability through secretion of cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide, matrix metalloproteinases, and by means of capillary contraction. Those pericyte manifestations are related to changes in blood–brain barrier permeability by an increase in endocytosis-mediated transport and by tight junction disruption. In addition, recent reports demonstrate that pericytes control the migration of leukocytes in response to inflammatory mediators by up-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules and releasing chemo-attractants; however, under physiological conditions they appear to be immune-suppressors. Better understanding of the immune properties of pericytes and their participation in the effects of brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and sleep loss will be achieved by analyzing pericyte ultrastructure, capillary coverage, and protein expression. That knowledge may provide a mechanism by which pericytes participate in the maintenance of the proper function of the brain-immune interface. PMID:24454281

  14. Smooth Muscle Hgs Deficiency Leads to Impaired Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jicheng; Hou, Ning; Zhang, Chong; Teng, Yan; Cheng, Xuan; Li, Zhenhua; Ren, Jie; Zeng, Jian; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiao; Lan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    As a master component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport proteins, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hgs) participates multiple cellular behaviors. However, the physiological role of Hgs in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is by far unknown. Here we explored the in vivo function of Hgs in SMCs by using a conditional gene knockout strategy. Hgs deficiency in SMCs uniquely led to a progressive dilatation of esophagus with a remarkable thinning muscle layer. Of note, the mutant esophagus showed a decreased contractile responsiveness to potassium chloride and acetylcholine stimulation. Furthermore, an increase in the inhibitory neurites along with an intense infiltration of T lymphocytes in the mucosa and muscle layer were observed. Consistently, Hgs deficiency in SMCs resulted in a disturbed expression of a set of genes involved in neurotrophin and inflammation, suggesting that defective SMC might be a novel source for excessive production of cytokines and chemokines which may trigger the neuronal dysplasia and ultimately contribute to the compromised esophageal motility. The data suggest potential implications in the pathogenesis of related diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:26078721

  15. Impairment of the peripheral lymphoid compartment in iron-deficient piglets.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Drabek, J; Krejci, J; Rehakova, Z; Faldyna, M

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neonatal iron deficiency on immune functions in young piglets. While control piglets were not given any iron preparation until the age of 21 days, another group of piglets was given 200 mg of Fe(3+)-dextran i.m. on day 3. Red blood cell parameters in the former, iron-deficient group were characteristic of hypochromic anaemia. In addition, the total leucocyte count (P < 0.01), relative and absolute neutrophil count (P < 0.01) and absolute lymphocyte count (P < 0.05) in peripheral blood were found significantly lower in iron-deficient piglets than in their iron-supplemented counterparts. Lymphocyte activity as measured by in vitro lymphocyte transformation test was impaired in iron-deficient piglets. A statistically significant decrease in circulating B-lymphocyte numbers was found in non-supplemented animals. Iron deficiency apparently negatively influenced the immunocompetence in piglets.

  16. Rcan1 deficiency impairs neuronal migration and causes periventricular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Yang; Li, Dan; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2015-01-14

    Periventricular heterotopia (PH) is a cortical malformation characterized by aggregation of neurons lining the lateral ventricles due to abnormal neuronal migration. The molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PH is unclear. Here we show that Regulators of calcineurin 1 (Rcan1), a Down syndrome-related gene, plays an important role in radial migration of rat cortical neurons. Downregulation of Rcan1 by expressing shRNA impaired neural progenitor proliferation and led to defects in radial migration and PH. Two isoforms of Rcan1 (Rcan1-1 and Rcan1-4) are expressed in the rat brain. Migration defects due to downregulation of Rcan1 could be prevented by shRNA-resistant expression of Rcan1-1 but not Rcan1-4. Furthermore, we found that Rcan1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression level of Flna, an F-actin cross-linking protein essential for cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell migration, mutation of which causes the most common form of bilateral PH in humans. Finally, overexpression of FLNA in Rcan1 knockdown neurons prevented migration abnormalities. Together, these findings demonstrate that Rcan1 acts upstream from Flna in regulating radial migration and suggest that impairment of Rcan1-Flna pathway may underlie PH pathogenesis.

  17. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition confers pericyte properties on cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Anitha K.; Jin, Yue; Luo, Huacheng; Pampo, Christine; Shao, Rong; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Heldermon, Coy D.; Law, Brian K.; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma cells can acquire increased motility and invasiveness through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the significance of EMT in cancer metastasis has been controversial, and the exact fates and functions of EMT cancer cells in vivo remain inadequately understood. Here, we tracked epithelial cancer cells that underwent inducible or spontaneous EMT in various tumor transplantation models. Unlike epithelial cells, the majority of EMT cancer cells were specifically located in the perivascular space and closely associated with blood vessels. EMT markedly activated multiple pericyte markers in carcinoma cells, in particular PDGFR-β and N-cadherin, which enabled EMT cells to be chemoattracted towards and physically interact with endothelium. In tumor xenografts generated from carcinoma cells that were prone to spontaneous EMT, a substantial fraction of the pericytes associated with tumor vasculature were derived from EMT cancer cells. Depletion of such EMT cells in transplanted tumors diminished pericyte coverage, impaired vascular integrity, and attenuated tumor growth. These findings suggest that EMT confers key pericyte attributes on cancer cells. The resulting EMT cells phenotypically and functionally resemble pericytes and are indispensable for vascular stabilization and sustained tumor growth. This study thus proposes a previously unrecognized role for EMT in cancer. PMID:27721239

  18. Aminoguanidine prevents impaired healing and deficient angiogenesis in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A S; Caliari, M V; Rocha, O A; Machado, R D; Andrade, S P

    1999-12-01

    The diabetic organism is unable to produce normal amount of granulation tissue which results in delayed wound healing, a significant clinical problem. In the present study, the effect of oral administration of aminoguanidine (AG), in the diabetes-induced inhibition of angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation was tested. Subcutaneous implantation of sponge discs in nondiabetic rats induced a wound repair response as determined by the amount of hemoglobin (vascular index) and granulation tissue formation (morphometric analysis) of the implants. In the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats the predominant response indicative of healing was inhibitory. Aminoguanidine was effective in preventing in 50% the diabetes-induced inhibition of fibrovascular tissue growth in the implants, as indicated by the values of hemoglobin content and vascular growth areas of the implants. These results indicate that AG holds potential therapeutic value in the management of healing impairment of the diabetic condition.

  19. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency and mitochondrial impairment in experimental Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Noelker, Carmen; Lu, Lixia; Höllerhage, Matthias; Vulinovic, Franca; Sturn, Annekathrin; Roscher, René; Höglinger, Günter U; Hirsch, Etienne C; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Andreas, Hartmann

    2015-09-15

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disease, caused by a lack or functional deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Recently, mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and GBA mutations are now considered the most important genetic vulnerability factor for PD. In this study, we have investigated (i) in vivo whether inhibition of the enzyme glucosylceramide synthase by miglustat may protect C57Bl/6 mice against subchronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication and (ii) in vitro whether a decrease of GCase activity may render dopaminergic neurons susceptible to MPP(+) (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) or alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) toxicity and amenable to miglustat treatment. We could demonstrate that reduction of glucocerebroside by inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase partially protects mice against MPTP-induced toxicity. Conversely, we could show that inhibition of GCase activity with conduritol-B-epoxide (CBE) enhances both α-Syn and MPP(+) induced toxicity in vitro. However, only CBE-induced enhancement of MPP(+) toxicity could be reversed by miglustat. Moreover, we were unable to reveal any alterations of complex I activity or cell respiration upon treatment with either CBE or miglustat. Our findings suggest that the reduction of GCase activity rather than an accumulation of glucocerebroside increases aSyn toxicity.

  20. Impaired theta-gamma coupling in APP-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhong, Wewei; Brankačk, Jurij; Weyer, Sascha W.; Müller, Ulrike C.; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is critically involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease, but its physiological functions remain elusive. Importantly, APP knockout (APP-KO) mice exhibit cognitive deficits, suggesting that APP plays a role at the neuronal network level. To investigate this possibility, we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the posterior parietal cortex, dorsal hippocampus and lateral prefrontal cortex of freely moving APP-KO mice. Spectral analyses showed that network oscillations within the theta- and gamma-frequency bands were not different between APP-KO and wild-type mice. Surprisingly, however, while gamma amplitude coupled to theta phase in all recorded regions of wild-type animals, in APP-KO mice theta-gamma coupling was strongly diminished in recordings from the parietal cortex and hippocampus, but not in LFPs recorded from the prefrontal cortex. Thus, lack of APP reduces oscillatory coupling in LFP recordings from specific brain regions, despite not affecting the amplitude of the oscillations. Together, our findings reveal reduced cross-frequency coupling as a functional marker of APP deficiency at the network level. PMID:26905287

  1. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  2. Impaired mechanical stability, migration and contractile capacity in vimentin-deficient fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckes, B.; Dogic, D.; Colucci-Guyon, E.; Wang, N.; Maniotis, A.; Ingber, D.; Merckling, A.; Langa, F.; Aumailley, M.; Delouvee, A.; Koteliansky, V.; Babinet, C.; Krieg, T.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of a vimentin network due to gene disruption created viable mice that did not differ overtly from wild-type littermates. Here, primary fibroblasts derived from vimentin-deficient (-/-) and wild-type (+/+) mouse embryos were cultured, and biological functions were studied in in vitro systems resembling stress situations. Stiffness of -/- fibroblasts was reduced by 40% in comparison to wild-type cells. Vimentin-deficient cells also displayed reduced mechanical stability, motility and directional migration towards different chemo-attractive stimuli. Reorganization of collagen fibrils and contraction of collagen lattices were severely impaired. The spatial organization of focal contact proteins, as well as actin microfilament organization was disturbed. Thus, absence of a vimentin filament network does not impair basic cellular functions needed for growth in culture, but cells are mechanically less stable, and we propose that therefore they are impaired in all functions depending upon mechanical stability.

  3. Pericyte antigens in angiomyolipoma and PEComa family tumors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Asatrian, Greg; Barnhill, Raymond; Lugassy, Claire; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2015-08-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are an uncommon family of soft tissue tumors with dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. Although PEComa family tumors commonly demonstrate a perivascular growth pattern, pericyte antigen expression has not yet been examined among this unique tumor group. Previously, we demonstrated that a subset of perivascular soft tissue tumors exhibit a striking pericytic immunophenotype, with diffuse expression of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Here, we describe the presence of pericyte antigens across a diverse group of PEComa family tumors (n = 19 specimens). Results showed that pericyte antigens differed extensively by histological appearance. Typical angiomyolipoma (AML) specimens showed variable expression of pericyte antigens among both perivascular and myoid-appearing cells. In contrast, AML specimens with a predominant spindled morphology showed diffuse expression of pericyte markers, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. AML samples with predominant epithelioid morphology showed a marked reduction in or the absence of immunoreactivity for pericyte markers. Lymphangiomyoma samples showed more variable and partial pericyte marker expression. In summary, pericyte antigen expression is variable among PEComa family tumors and largely varies by tumor morphology. Pericytic marker expression in PEComa may represent a true pericytic cell of origin, or alternatively aberrant pericyte marker adoption. Markers of pericytic differentiation may be of future diagnostic utility for the evaluation of mesenchymal tumors, or identify actionable signaling pathways for future therapeutic intervention.

  4. Impaired IL-13-mediated functions of macrophages in STAT6-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Kamanaka, M; Tanaka, T; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1996-10-15

    IL-13 shares many biologic responses with IL-4. In contrast to well-characterized IL-4 signaling pathways, which utilize STAT6 and 4PS/IRS2, IL-13 signaling pathways are poorly understood. Recent studies performed with STAT6-deficient mice have demonstrated that STAT6 plays an essential role in IL-4 signaling. In this study, the functions of peritoneal macrophages of STAT6-deficient mice in response to IL-13 were analyzed. In STAT6-deficient mice, neither morphologic changes nor augmentation of MHC class II expression in response to IL-13 was observed. In addition, IL-13 did not decrease the nitric oxide production by activated macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that the macrophage functions in response to IL-13 were impaired in STAT6-deficient mice, indicating that IL-13 and IL-4 share the signaling pathway via STAT6.

  5. Impaired brain development and reduced cognitive function in phospholipase D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Ute; Stegner, David; Hattingen, Elke; Beyer, Sandra; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Klein, Jochen

    2014-06-20

    The phospholipases D (PLD1 and 2) are signaling enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid, a lipid second messenger involved in cell proliferation, and choline, a precursor of acetylcholine (ACh). In the present study, we investigated development and cognitive function in mice that were deficient for PLD1, or PLD2, or both. We found that PLD-deficient mice had reduced brain growth at 14-27 days post partum when compared to wild-type mice. In adult PLD-deficient mice, cognitive function was impaired in social and object recognition tasks. Using brain microdialysis, we found that wild-type mice responded with a 4-fold increase of hippocampal ACh release upon behavioral stimulation in the open field, while PLD-deficient mice released significantly less ACh. These results may be relevant for cognitive dysfunctions observed in fetal alcohol syndrome and in Alzheimer' disease.

  6. Impairment of pachytene spermatogenesis in Dmrt7 deficient mice, possibly causing meiotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Date, Shiori; Nozawa, Osamu; Inoue, Hiroaki; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Although Dmrt7 has been reported to be essential for male spermatogenesis, the molecular mechanism underlying pachytene spermatogenesis by Dmrt7 is not known. In the present study, by detailed analysis of Dmrt7 protein distribution in spermatocytes in the first wave of spermatogenesis, we clarified the profile of Dmrt7 expression and localization in pachytene spermatogenesis. Dmrt7-deficient spermatocytes were arrested in the pachytene stage, followed by apoptosis. We analyzed to determine whether every event in the spermatogenesis at the Dmrt7-deficient mice progressed normally, because in several gene knockout mice with spermatogenic arrest described in the previous reports impairments of these events often appeared. Mutant mice showed normal synapsis and XY body formation, while impairment of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), decreased expression of backup genes, and increased expression of retrotransposons indicated incomplete meiotic recombination.

  7. Zinc deficiency with reduced mastication impairs spatial memory in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kumiko; Tsuji, Tadataka; Tanaka, Susumu; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-12-01

    Sufficient oral microelements such as zinc and fully chewing of foods are required to maintain cognitive function despite aging. No knowledge exists about the combination of factors such as zinc deficiency and reduced mastication on learning and memory. Here we show that tooth extraction only in 8-week-old mice did not change the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein-labeled astrocytes in the hippocampus or spatial memory parameters. However, tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation strongly impaired spatial memory and led to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. The impaired spatial performance in the zinc-deficient only (ZD) mice also coincided well with the increase in the astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. After switching both zinc-deficient groups to a normal diet with sufficient zinc, spatial memory recovered, and more time was spent in the quadrant with the goal in the probe test in the mice with tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation (EZD) compared to the ZD mice. Interestingly, we found no differences in astrocytic density in the CA1 region among all groups at 22 weeks of age. Furthermore, the escape latency in a visible probe test at all times was longer in zinc-deficient groups than the others and demonstrated a negative correlation with body weight. No significant differences in escape latency were observed in the visible probe test among the ZD, EZD, and normal-fed control at 4 weeks (CT4w) groups in which body weight was standardized to that of the EZD group, or in the daily reduction in latency between the normal-fed control and CT4w groups. Our data showed that zinc-deficient feeding during a young age impairs spatial memory performance and leads to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region and that zinc-sufficient feeding is followed by recovery of the impaired spatial memory along with changes in astrocytic density. The combination of the two factors, zinc deficiency

  8. 5-Lipoxygenase deficiency impairs innate and adaptive immune responses during fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Secatto, Adriana; Rodrigues, Lilian Cataldi; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Medeiros, Alexandra I

    2012-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase-derived products have been implicated in both the inhibition and promotion of chronic infection. Here, we sought to investigate the roles of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase products and exogenous leukotrienes during Histoplasma capsulatum infection in vivo and in vitro. 5-LO deficiency led to increased lung CFU, decreased nitric oxide production and a deficient primary immune response during active fungal infection. Moreover, H. capsulatum-infected 5-LO(-/-) mice showed an intense influx of neutrophils and an impaired ability to generate and recruit effector T cells to the lung. The fungal susceptibility of 5-LO(-/-) mice correlated with a lower rate of macrophage ingestion of IgG-H. capsulatum relative to WT macrophages. Conversely, exogenous LTB4 and LTC4 restored macrophage phagocytosis in 5-LO deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that leukotrienes are required to control chronic fungal infection by amplifying both the innate and adaptive immune response during histoplasmosis.

  9. Deficiency in the LIM-only protein Fhl2 impairs skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wixler, Viktor; Hirner, Stephanie; Müller, Judith M; Gullotti, Lucia; Will, Carola; Kirfel, Jutta; Günther, Thomas; Schneider, Holm; Bosserhoff, Anja; Schorle, Hubert; Park, Jung; Schüle, Roland; Buettner, Reinhard

    2007-04-09

    After skin wounding, the repair process is initiated by the release of growth factors, cytokines, and bioactive lipids from injured vessels and coagulated platelets. These signal molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix, as well as fibroblast invasion into and contraction of the wounded area. We previously showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of the LIM-only protein Fhl2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase (Muller, J.M., U. Isele, E. Metzger, A. Rempel, M. Moser, A. Pscherer, T. Breyer, C. Holubarsch, R. Buettner, and R. Schule. 2000. EMBO J. 19:359-369; Muller, J.M., E. Metzger, H. Greschik, A.K. Bosserhoff, L. Mercep, R. Buettner, and R. Schule. 2002. EMBO J. 21:736-748.). We demonstrate impaired cutaneous wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice rescued by transgenic expression of Fhl2. Furthermore, collagen contraction and cell migration are severely impaired in Fhl2-deficient cells. Consequently, we show that the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, which is regulated by Fhl2, is reduced and delayed in wounds of Fhl2-deficient mice and that the expression of p130Cas, which is essential for cell migration, is reduced in Fhl2-deficient cells. In summary, our data demonstrate a function of Fhl2 as a lipid-triggered signaling molecule in mesenchymal cells regulating their migration and contraction during cutaneous wound healing.

  10. Iodine deficiency in the U.K.: an overlooked cause of impaired neurodevelopment?

    PubMed

    Bath, Sarah C; Rayman, Margaret P

    2013-05-01

    This review describes historical iodine deficiency in the U.K., gives current information on dietary sources of iodine and summarises recent evidence of iodine deficiency and its association with child neurodevelopment. Iodine is required for the production of thyroid hormones that are needed for brain development, particularly during pregnancy. Iodine deficiency is a leading cause of preventable brain damage worldwide and is associated with impaired cognitive function. Despite a global focus on the elimination of iodine deficiency, iodine is a largely overlooked nutrient in the U.K., a situation we have endeavoured to address through a series of studies. Although the U.K. has been considered iodine-sufficient for many years, there is now concern that iodine deficiency may be prevalent, particularly in pregnant women and women of childbearing age; indeed we found mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency in pregnant women in Surrey. As the major dietary source of iodine in the U.K. is milk and dairy produce, it is relevant to note that we have found the iodine concentration of organic milk to be over 40% lower than that of conventional milk. In contrast to many countries, iodised table salt is unlikely to contribute to U.K. iodine intake as we have shown that its availability is low in grocery stores. This situation is of concern as the level of U.K. iodine deficiency is such that it is associated with adverse effects on offspring neurological development; we demonstrated a higher risk of low IQ and poorer reading-accuracy scores in U.K. children born to mothers who were iodine-deficient during pregnancy. Given our findings and those of others, iodine status in the U.K. population should be monitored, particularly in vulnerable subgroups such as pregnant women and children.

  11. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME. PMID:26000022

  12. Combined effects of pericytes in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  13. PDGFR Inhibition Results in Pericyte Depletion and Hemorrhage into the Corpus Luteum of the Rat Ovary.

    PubMed

    Hall, Anthony P; Ashton, Susan; Horner, Judith; Wilson, Zena; Reens, Jaimini; Richmond, Graham H P; Barry, Simon T; Wedge, Steve R

    2016-01-01

    The growth plate, ovary, adrenal gland, and rodent incisor tooth are sentinel organs for antiangiogenic effects since they respond reliably, quantitatively, and sensitively to inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). Here we report that treatment of rats with platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) inhibitors that target pericytes results in severe ovarian hemorrhage with degeneration and eventual rupture of the corpus luteum. Evaluation of the growth plate, adrenal gland, and incisor tooth that are typical target organs for antiangiogenic treatment in the rodent revealed no abnormalities. Histologically, the changes in the ovary were characterized by sinusoidal dilatation, increased vessel fragility, and hemorrhage into the corpus luteum. Immunocytochemical staining of vessels with alpha smooth muscle actin and CD31 that recognize pericytes and vascular endothelium, respectively, demonstrated that this effect was due to selective pericyte deficiency within corpora lutea. Further experiments in which rats were treated concurrently with both PDGFRβ and VEGFR inhibitors ablated the hemorrhagic response, resulting instead in corpus luteum necrosis. These changes are consistent with the notion that selective pericyte loss in the primitive capillary network resulted in increased vessel fragility and hemorrhage, whereas concomitant VEGFR inhibition resulted in vessel regression and reduced vascular perfusion that restricted development of the hemorrhagic vessels. These results also highlight the utility of the rodent ovary to respond differentially to VEGFR and PDGFR inhibitors, which may provide useful information during routine safety assessment for determining target organ toxicity.

  14. Pericytes: A Newly Recognized Player in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J; Satish, Latha; Yates, Cecelia C; Wells, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes have generally been considered in the context of stabilizing vessels, ensuring the blood barriers, and regulating the flow through capillaries. However, new reports suggest that pericytes may function at critical times to either drive healing with minimal scarring or, perversely, contribute to fibrosis and ongoing scar formation. Beneficially, pericytes likely drive much of the vascular involution that occurs during the transition from the regenerative to the resolution phases of healing. Pathologically, pericytes can assume a fibrotic phenotype and promote scarring. This perspective will discuss pericyte involvement in wound repair and the relationship pericytes form with the parenchymal cells of the skin. We will further evaluate the role pericytes may have in disease progression in relation to chronic wounds and fibrosis. PMID:26969517

  15. Skeletal and cardiac muscle pericytes: Functions and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; Baily, James E; Chen, William C W; Dar, Ayelet; Gonzalez, Zaniah N; Jensen, Andrew R; Petrigliano, Frank A; Deb, Arjun; Henderson, Neil C

    2017-03-01

    Pericytes are periendothelial mesenchymal cells residing within the microvasculature. Skeletal muscle and cardiac pericytes are now recognized to fulfill an increasing number of functions in normal tissue homeostasis, including contributing to microvascular function by maintaining vessel stability and regulating capillary flow. In the setting of muscle injury, pericytes contribute to a regenerative microenvironment through release of trophic factors and by modulating local immune responses. In skeletal muscle, pericytes also directly enhance tissue healing by differentiating into myofibers. Conversely, pericytes have also been implicated in the development of disease states, including fibrosis, heterotopic ossication and calcification, atherosclerosis, and tumor angiogenesis. Despite increased recognition of pericyte heterogeneity, it is not yet clear whether specific subsets of pericytes are responsible for individual functions in skeletal and cardiac muscle homeostasis and disease.

  16. Impaired mast cell maturation and degranulation and attenuated allergic responses in Ndrg1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sunaga, Kohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Arata, Satoru; Okuda, Tomohiko; Moon, Tae-Chul; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is an early inducible protein during the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) toward a connective tissue mast cell-like phenotype. To clarify the function of NDRG1 in mast cells and allergic responses, we herein analyzed mast cell-associated phenotypes of mice lacking the Ndrg1 gene. Allergic responses including IgE-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were markedly attenuated in Ndrg1-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. In Ndrg1-deficient mice, dermal and peritoneal mast cells were decreased in number and morphologically abnormal with impaired degranulating ability. Ex vivo, Ndrg1-deficient BMMCs cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor, a condition that facilitates the maturation of BMMCs toward a CTMC-like phenotype, displayed less exocytosis than replicate wild-type cells after the cross-linking of FcepsilonRI or stimulation with compound 48/80, even though the exocytotic response of IL-3-maintained, immature BMMCs from both genotypes was comparable. Unlike degranulation, the production of leukotriene and cytokines by cocultured BMMCs was unaffected by NDRG1 deficiency. Taken together, the altered phenotypes of Ndrg1-deficient mast cells both in vivo and ex vivo suggest that NDRG1 has roles in the terminal maturation and effector function (degranulation) of mast cells.

  17. IDH1 deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis in mouse liver by impairing amino acid utilization

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing; Gu, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Li, Wanda Y.; Wakeham, Andrew; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Although the enzymatic activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was defined decades ago, its functions in vivo are not yet fully understood. Cytosolic IDH1 converts isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a key metabolite regulating nitrogen homeostasis in catabolic pathways. It was thought that IDH1 might enhance lipid biosynthesis in liver or adipose tissue by generating NADPH, but we show here that lipid contents are relatively unchanged in both IDH1-null mouse liver and IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells generated using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Instead, we found that IDH1 is critical for liver amino acid (AA) utilization. Body weights of IDH1-null mice fed a high-protein diet (HPD) were abnormally low. After prolonged fasting, IDH1-null mice exhibited decreased blood glucose but elevated blood alanine and glycine compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, in IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells, glucose consumption was increased, but alanine utilization and levels of intracellular α-KG and glutamate were reduced. In IDH1-deficient primary hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis as well as production of ammonia and urea were decreased. In IDH1-deficient whole livers, expression levels of genes involved in AA metabolism were reduced, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis were up-regulated. Thus, IDH1 is critical for AA utilization in vivo and its deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis primarily by impairing α-KG–dependent transamination of glucogenic AAs such as alanine. PMID:28011762

  18. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  19. CCR2 deficiency prevents neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairments induced by cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Karim; Jopson, Timothy; Arellano, Carla; Fike, John R; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-02-01

    Cranial irradiation can lead to long-lasting cognitive impairments in patients receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Recent studies have suggested inflammation as a major contributor to these deficits; we determined if the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) was a mediator of cognitive impairments induced by irradiation. Two-month-old male Ccr2 knockout (-/-) and wild-type mice received 10 Gy cranial irradiation or sham-treatment. One month after irradiation, bromodeoxyuridine was injected intraperitoneally for seven consecutive days to label newly generated cells. At two months postirradiation, cognitive function was assessed by novel object recognition and Morris water maze. Our results show that CCR2 deficiency prevented hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory impairments induced by cranial irradiation. Hippocampal gene expression analysis showed that irradiation induced CCR2 ligands such as CCL8 and CCR2 deficiency reduced this induction. Irradiation reduced the number of adult-born neurons in both wild-type and Ccr2(-/-) mice, but the distribution pattern of the adult-born neurons through the granule cell layer was only altered in wild-type mice. Importantly, CCR2 deficiency normalized the fraction of pyramidal neurons expressing the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc. These data offer new insight into the mechanism(s) of radiation-injury and suggest that CCR2 is a critical mediator of hippocampal neuronal dysfunction and hippocampal cognitive impairments after irradiation. Targeting CCR2 signaling could conceivably provide an effective approach to reduce or prevent the incidence and severity of this serious side effect of ionizing irradiation.

  20. CCR2 deficiency prevents neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairments induced by cranial irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Belarbi, Karim; Jopson, Timothy; Arellano, Carla; Fike, John R.; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Cranial irradiation can lead to long-lasting cognitive impairments in patients receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Recent studies have suggested inflammation as a major contributor to these deficits; we determined if the chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) was a mediator of cognitive impairments induced by irradiation. Two-month-old male Ccr2 knockout (−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice received 10 Gy cranial irradiation or sham-treatment. One month after irradiation, bromodeoxyuridine was injected intraperitoneally for seven consecutive days to label newly generated cells. At two months post-irradiation, cognitive function was assessed by novel object recognition and Morris water maze. Our results demonstrate that CCR2 deficiency prevented hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory impairments induced by cranial irradiation. Hippocampal gene expression analysis showed that irradiation induced CCR2 ligands such as CCL8, and CCR2 deficiency reduced this induction. Irradiation reduced the number of adult-born neurons in both WT and Ccr2−/− mice, but the distribution pattern of the adult-born neurons through the granule cell layer was only altered in WT mice. Importantly, CCR2 deficiency normalized the fraction of pyramidal neurons expressing the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc. These data offer new insight into the mechanism(s) of radiation-injury and suggest that CCR2 is a critical mediator hippocampal neuronal dysfunction and hippocampal cognitive impairments after irradiation. Targeting CCR2 signaling could conceivably provide an effective approach to reduce or prevent the incidence and severity of this serious side effect of ionizing irradiation. PMID:23243025

  1. TMEM175 deficiency impairs lysosomal and mitochondrial function and increases α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Jinn, Sarah; Drolet, Robert E.; Cramer, Paige E.; Wong, Andus Hon-Kit; Toolan, Dawn M.; Gretzula, Cheryl A.; Voleti, Bhavya; Vassileva, Galya; Disa, Jyoti; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Stone, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss and the postmortem presence of Lewy bodies, depositions of insoluble α-synuclein, and other proteins that likely contribute to cellular toxicity and death during the disease. Genetic and biochemical studies have implicated impaired lysosomal and mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of PD. Transmembrane protein 175 (TMEM175), the lysosomal K+ channel, is centered under a major genome-wide association studies peak for PD, making it a potential candidate risk factor for the disease. To address the possibility that variation in TMEM175 could play a role in PD pathogenesis, TMEM175 function was investigated in a neuronal model system. Studies confirmed that TMEM175 deficiency results in unstable lysosomal pH, which led to decreased lysosomal catalytic activity, decreased glucocerebrosidase activity, impaired autophagosome clearance by the lysosome, and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, TMEM175 deficiency in rat primary neurons resulted in increased susceptibility to exogenous α-synuclein fibrils. Following α-synuclein fibril treatment, neurons deficient in TMEM175 were found to have increased phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble α-synuclein deposits. Taken together, data from these studies suggest that TMEM175 plays a direct and critical role in lysosomal and mitochondrial function and PD pathogenesis and highlight this ion channel as a potential therapeutic target for treating PD. PMID:28193887

  2. Impaired responsiveness of platelets to epinephrine due to α2A adrenoreceptor deficiency in Male Chinese.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsun-Mei; Lin, Jih-Shyan; Tseng, Jen-Yu; Wu, Shang-Yin; Chen, Tsai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Epinephrine is known as a weak, but important, agonist for platelet activation. It has been reported that the responsiveness of platelets to epinephrine was markedly impaired in 6% of Caucasians and in 16% of Japanese. The purpose of this study was to screen and characterize this abnormality in healthy Taiwanese Chinese volunteers. We used aggregometry, flow cytometry and platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 system to assess in 50 healthy male volunteers the responsiveness of platelets to epinephrine stimulation. Using α2A adrenoceptor antagonist BRL44408 maleate competition and a [(3)H]yohimbin binding assay, we evaluated α2A adrenoceptors on platelets. The aggregation of platelets after stimulation with 10 μM of epinephrine indicated two distinct groups of study participants: 24 (48.0%) good- and 26 (52.0%) impaired-responders to epinephrine. Flow cytometric analysis of platelets after stimulated with 1 μM epinephrine showed that glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa and P-selectin expression of epinephrine good- and impaired-responders were 27.1 ± 11.0% vs. 9.9 ± 5.4% (p = 0.003) and 12.2 ± 6.2% vs. 3.6 ± 3.5% (p < 0.001), respectively. The PFA-100 system showed that epinephrine-impaired-responders had a longer collagen-epinephrine induced closure time. Good-responder platelets incubated with BRL44408 maleate had an impaired response to epinephrine stimulation. [(3)H]yohimbine binding studies showed fewer α2A adrenoreceptors on the platelets of epinephrine-impaired-responders than on those of good-responders. The prevalence of impaired responsiveness to epinephrine was high and probably due to α2A adrenoreceptor deficiency in male Taiwanese Chinese.

  3. Cognitive impairment in folate-deficient rats corresponds to depleted brain phosphatidylcholine and is prevented by methionine without lowering homocysteine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poor folate status is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in older adults. Although impaired brain methylation activity and homocysteine toxicity are widely believed to account for this association, how folate deficiency impairs cognition is uncertain. To better define the role of folate ...

  4. Deficiency in prohormone convertase PC1 impairs prohormone processing in Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Lisa C.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Sulsona, Carlos R.; Paull, Daniel; Rausch, Richard; Eddiry, Sanaa; Carli, Jayne F. Martin; Morabito, Michael V.; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Hubner, Gabriela; Zimmer, Matthew; Wang, Liheng; Day, Robert; Levy, Brynn; Dubern, Beatrice; Poitou, Christine; Clement, Karine; Rosenbaum, Michael; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maithe; Egli, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by a loss of paternally expressed genes in an imprinted region of chromosome 15q. Among the canonical PWS phenotypes are hyperphagic obesity, central hypogonadism, and low growth hormone (GH). Rare microdeletions in PWS patients define a 91-kb minimum critical deletion region encompassing 3 genes, including the noncoding RNA gene SNORD116. Here, we found that protein and transcript levels of nescient helix loop helix 2 (NHLH2) and the prohormone convertase PC1 (encoded by PCSK1) were reduced in PWS patient induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPSC-derived) neurons. Moreover, Nhlh2 and Pcsk1 expression were reduced in hypothalami of fasted Snord116 paternal knockout (Snord116p–/m+) mice. Hypothalamic Agrp and Npy remained elevated following refeeding in association with relative hyperphagia in Snord116p–/m+ mice. Nhlh2-deficient mice display growth deficiencies as adolescents and hypogonadism, hyperphagia, and obesity as adults. Nhlh2 has also been shown to promote Pcsk1 expression. Humans and mice deficient in PC1 display hyperphagic obesity, hypogonadism, decreased GH, and hypoinsulinemic diabetes due to impaired prohormone processing. Here, we found that Snord116p–/m+ mice displayed in vivo functional defects in prohormone processing of proinsulin, pro-GH–releasing hormone, and proghrelin in association with reductions in islet, hypothalamic, and stomach PC1 content. Our findings suggest that the major neuroendocrine features of PWS are due to PC1 deficiency. PMID:27941249

  5. The asymmetry defect of hippocampal circuitry impairs working memory in β2-microglobulin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Ito, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Left-right (L-R) asymmetry is a fundamental feature of brain function, but the mechanisms underlying functional asymmetry remain largely unknown. We previously identified structural and functional asymmetries in the circuitry of the mouse hippocampus that result from the asymmetrical distribution of NMDA receptor GluR ε2 (NR2B) subunits. By examining the synaptic distribution of ε2 subunits, we found that β2-microglobulin (β2m)-deficient mice that are defective in the stable cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) lack this circuit asymmetry. To investigate the effect of hippocampal asymmetry defect on brain function, we examined working memory of β2m-deficient mice in a delayed nonmatching-to-position (DNMTP) task. Mice were trained to nosepoke either a left or right key of a sample, to retain the position of the key during a delay interval, and then to choose the key opposite from the sample. During training sessions in which no programmed delay interval was imposed, the β2m-deficient mice acquired the task as fast as control mice, suggesting that the discrimination of left and right positions is not impaired by the total loss of hippocampal asymmetry. In contrast, the β2m-deficient mice made fewer correct responses than control mice when variable delay was imposed, suggesting that the asymmetry of hippocampal circuitry plays an important role in working memory.

  6. Impaired fatty acid oxidation in a Drosophila model of mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kishita, Yoshihito; Tsuda, Manabu; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2012-03-09

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP), which consists of the MTPα and MTPβ subunits, catalyzes long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. MTP deficiency in humans results in Reye-like syndrome. Here, we generated Drosophila models of MTP deficiency by targeting two genes encoding Drosophila homologs of human MTPα and MTPβ, respectively. Both Mtpα(KO) and Mtpβ(KO) flies were viable, but demonstrated reduced lifespan, defective locomotor activity, and reduced fecundity represented by the number of eggs laid by the females. The phenotypes of Mtpα(KO) flies were generally more striking than those of Mtpβ(KO) flies. Mtpα(KO) flies were hypersensitive to fasting, and retained lipid droplets in their fat body cells as in non-fasting conditions. The amount of triglyceride was also unchanged upon fasting in Mtpα(KO) flies, suggesting that lipid mobilization was disrupted. Finally, we showed that both Mtpα(KO) and Mtpβ(KO) flies accumulated acylcarnitine and hydroxyacylcarnitine, diagnostic markers of MTP deficiencies in humans. Our results indicated that both Mtpα(KO) and Mtpβ(KO) flies were impaired in long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. These flies should be useful as a model system to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of MTP deficiency.

  7. B-vitamin deficiency causes hyperhomocysteinemia and vascular cognitive impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Troen, Aron M; Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Smith, Donald E; Selhub, Jacob; Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2008-08-26

    In older adults, mildly elevated plasma total homocysteine (hyperhomocysteinemia) is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease, but it is uncertain whether this is due to underlying metabolic, neurotoxic, or vascular processes. We report here that feeding male C57BL6/J mice a B-vitamin-deficient diet for 10 weeks induced hyperhomocysteinemia, significantly impaired spatial learning and memory, and caused a significant rarefaction of hippocampal microvasculature without concomitant gliosis and neurodegeneration. Total hippocampal capillary length was inversely correlated with Morris water maze escape latencies (r = -0.757, P < 0.001), and with plasma total homocysteine (r = -0.631, P = 0.007). Feeding mice a methionine-rich diet produced similar but less pronounced effects. Our findings suggest that cerebral microvascular rarefaction can cause cognitive dysfunction in the absence of or preceding neurodegeneration. Similar microvascular changes may mediate the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with human age-related cognitive decline.

  8. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  9. p75(NTR)-dependent activation of NF-κB regulates microRNA-503 transcription and pericyte-endothelial crosstalk in diabetes after limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Andrea; Meloni, Marco; Nailor, Audrey; Mitić, Tijana; Shantikumar, Saran; Riu, Federica; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Rose, Lorraine; Besnier, Marie; Katare, Rajesh; Voellenkle, Christine; Verkade, Paul; Martelli, Fabio; Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-08-13

    The communication between vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes in the microvasculature is fundamental for vascular growth and homeostasis; however, these processes are disrupted by diabetes. Here we show that modulation of p75(NTR) expression in ECs exposed to high glucose activates transcription of miR-503, which negatively affects pericyte function. p75(NTR) activates NF-κB to bind the miR-503 promoter and upregulate miR-503 expression in ECs. NF-κB further induces activation of Rho kinase and shedding of endothelial microparticles carrying miR-503, which transfer miR-503 from ECs to vascular pericytes. The integrin-mediated uptake of miR-503 in the recipient pericytes reduces expression of EFNB2 and VEGFA, resulting in impaired migration and proliferation. We confirm operation of the above mechanisms in mouse models of diabetes, in which EC-derived miR-503 reduces pericyte coverage of capillaries, increased permeability and impaired post-ischaemic angiogenesis in limb muscles. Collectively, our data demonstrate that miR-503 regulates pericyte-endothelial crosstalk in microvascular diabetic complications.

  10. Deficiency of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase impairs lysosomal metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Glebov, Konstantin; Richter, Josefine; Fell, Lisa H; Grimm, Marcus O; Haupenthal, Viola J; Hartmann, Tobias; Gräler, Markus H; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Walter, Jochen

    2014-06-13

    Progressive accumulation of the amyloid β protein in extracellular plaques is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Amyloid β is generated during sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. In addition to the proteolytic processing by secretases, APP is also metabolized by lysosomal proteases. Here, we show that accumulation of intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) impairs the metabolism of APP. Cells lacking functional S1P-lyase, which degrades intracellular S1P, strongly accumulate full-length APP and its potentially amyloidogenic C-terminal fragments (CTFs) as compared with cells expressing the functional enzyme. By cell biological and biochemical methods, we demonstrate that intracellular inhibition of S1P-lyase impairs the degradation of APP and CTFs in lysosomal compartments and also decreases the activity of γ-secretase. Interestingly, the strong accumulation of APP and CTFs in S1P-lyase-deficient cells was reversed by selective mobilization of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. Intracellular accumulation of S1P also impairs maturation of cathepsin D and degradation of Lamp-2, indicating a general impairment of lysosomal activity. Together, these data demonstrate that S1P-lyase plays a critical role in the regulation of lysosomal activity and the metabolism of APP.

  11. Ferritin Mutants of Escherichia coli Are Iron Deficient and Growth Impaired, and fur Mutants are Iron Deficient

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Tehrani, Hossein; Hudson, Aaron J.; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Timms, Andrew R.; Hawkins, Chris; Williams, John M.; Harrison, Pauline M.; Guest, John R.; Andrews, Simon C.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains at least two iron storage proteins, a ferritin (FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Bfr). To investigate their specific functions, the corresponding genes (ftnA and bfr) were inactivated by replacing the chromosomal ftnA and bfr genes with disrupted derivatives containing antibiotic resistance cassettes in place of internal segments of the corresponding coding regions. Single mutants (ftnA::spc and bfr::kan) and a double mutant (ftnA::spc bfr::kan) were generated and confirmed by Western and Southern blot analyses. The iron contents of the parental strain (W3110) and the bfr mutant increased by 1.5- to 2-fold during the transition from logarithmic to stationary phase in iron-rich media, whereas the iron contents of the ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants remained unchanged. The ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants were growth impaired in iron-deficient media, but this was apparent only after the mutant and parental strains had been precultured in iron-rich media. Surprisingly, ferric iron uptake regulation (fur) mutants also had very low iron contents (2.5-fold less iron than Fur+ strains) despite constitutive expression of the iron acquisition systems. The iron deficiencies of the ftnA and fur mutants were confirmed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, which further showed that the low iron contents of ftnA mutants are due to a lack of magnetically ordered ferric iron clusters likely to correspond to FtnA iron cores. In combination with the fur mutation, ftnA and bfr mutations produced an enhanced sensitivity to hydroperoxides, presumably due to an increase in production of “reactive ferrous iron.” It is concluded that FtnA acts as an iron store accommodating up to 50% of the cellular iron during postexponential growth in iron-rich media and providing a source of iron that partially compensates for iron deficiency during iron-restricted growth. In addition to repressing the iron acquisition systems, Fur appears to regulate the demand for iron, probably by controlling

  12. Pancreas Recovery Following Caerulein-induced Pancreatitis is Impaired in Plasminogen Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lugea, Aurelia; Nan, Li; French, Samuel W.; Bezerra, Jorge A.; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims: The plasminogen (plg) system participates in tissue repair in several organs, but its role in pancreas repair remains poorly characterized. To better understand the role of plg in pancreas recovery following injury, we examined the course of caerulein-induced pancreatitis in plg deficient and sufficient mice. Methods: Pancreatitis was induced by caerulein administration (50 μg/kg, 7 ip injections). Mice were sacrificed either at the acute phase (7 hours after the first caerulein injection) or during recovery (at 2, 4 and 7 days). In pancreatic sections we examined: pancreatic morphology, trypsin activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, acinar cell death, cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, activation of stellate cells (PSCs), and components of the plg and metalloproteinase systems. Results: In plg sufficient mice, pancreatic plg levels and plasmin activity increased during the acute phase and remained elevated during recovery. Pancreatitis resolved in plg sufficient mice within 7 days. Pancreas recovery involved reorganization of the parenchyma structure, removal of necrotic debris, cell proliferation, transient activation of PSCs and moderate deposition of ECM proteins. Acute pancreatitis (7-h) was indistinguishable between plg deficient and sufficient mice. In contrast, pancreas recovery was impaired in plg deficient mice. Plg deficiency led to disorganized parenchyma, extensive acinar cell loss, poor removal of necrotic debris, reduced cell proliferation and fibrosis. Fibrosis was characterized by deposition of collagens and fibronectin, persistent activation of PSCs and upregulation of pancreatic TGF-β1. Conclusions: Plg/plasmin deficiency leads to features similar to those found in chronic pancreatitis such as parenchymal atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:16952557

  13. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jing, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit.

  14. Impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirfel, Jutta Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kabba, Mustapha; Kahl, Philip; Roeper, Anke; Kalff, Joerg C.; Buettner, Reinhard

    2008-12-10

    Four and one half LIM domain protein FHL2 participates in many cellular processes involved in tissue repair such as regulation of gene expression, cytoarchitecture, cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. The repair process after wounding is initiated by the release of peptides and bioactive lipids. These molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix. We showed previously that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of FHL2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase. Our present study shows that FHL2 is an important signal transducer influencing the outcome of intestinal anastomotic healing. Early wound healing is accompanied by reconstitution and remodelling of the extracellular matrix and collagen is primarily responsible for wound strength. Our results show that impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen III metabolism. Impaired collagen III synthesis reduced the mechanical stability of the anastomoses and led to lower bursting pressure in Fhl2-deficient mice after surgery. Our data confirm that FHL2 is an important factor regulating collagen expression in the early phase of wound healing, and thereby is critically involved in the physiologic process of anastomosis healing after bowel surgery and thus may represent a new therapeutic target.

  15. microRNA-155 deficiency impairs dendritic cell function in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Iwanowycz, Stephen; Yu, Fang; Jia, Xuemei; Leng, Shuilong; Wang, Yuzhen; Li, Wei; Huang, Shiang; Ai, Walden; Fan, Daping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In antitumor immunity, dendritic cells (DCs) capture, process, and present tumor antigens to T cells, initiating a tumoricidal response. However, DCs are often dysfunctional due to their exposure to the tumor microenvironment (TME), leading to tumor escape from immune surveillance. Here, a vital role of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in regulating the function of DCs in breast cancer is reported. Host miR-155 deficiency enhanced breast cancer growth in mice, accompanied by reduced DCs in the tumors and draining lymph nodes. miR-155 deficiency in DCs impaired their maturation, migration ability, cytokine production, and the ability to activate T cells. We demonstrate that miR-155 regulates DC migration through epigenetic modulation of CCR7 expression. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-10, two cytokines abundant in the TME, are found to impair DC maturation by suppressing miR-155 expression. Furthermore, animal studies show that a lack of miR-155 diminishes the effectiveness of DC-based immunotherapy for breast cancer. In conclusion, these findings suggest that miR-155 is a master regulator of DC function in breast cancer, including maturation, cytokine secretion, migration toward lymph nodes, and activation of T-cells. These results suggest that boosting the expression of a single microRNA, miR-155, may significantly improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapies for breast cancer. PMID:27999745

  16. Type-2 pericytes participate in normal and tumoral angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Olson, John D; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-07-01

    Tissue growth and function depend on vascularization, and vascular insufficiency or excess exacerbates many human diseases. Identification of the biological processes involved in angiogenesis will dictate strategies to modulate reduced or excessive vessel formation. We examine the essential role of pericytes. Their heterogeneous morphology, distribution, origins, and physiology have been described. Using double-transgenic Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice, we identified two pericyte subsets. We found that Nestin-GFP(-)/NG2-DsRed(+) (type-1) and Nestin-GFP(+)/NG2-DsRed(+) (type-2) pericytes attach to the walls of small and large blood vessels in vivo; in vitro, type-2, but not type-1, pericytes spark endothelial cells to form new vessels. Matrigel assay showed that only type-2 pericytes participate in normal angiogenesis. Moreover, when cancer cells were transplanted into Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice, type-1 pericytes did not penetrate the tumor, while type-2 pericytes were recruited during its angiogenesis. As inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising strategy in cancer therapy, type-2 pericytes may provide a cellular target susceptible to signaling and pharmacological manipulation in treating malignancy. This work also reports the potential of type-2 pericytes to improve blood perfusion in ischemic hindlimbs, indicating their potential for treating ischemic illnesses.

  17. Type-2 pericytes participate in normal and tumoral angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Olson, John D.; Mintz, Akiva

    2014-01-01

    Tissue growth and function depend on vascularization, and vascular insufficiency or excess exacerbates many human diseases. Identification of the biological processes involved in angiogenesis will dictate strategies to modulate reduced or excessive vessel formation. We examine the essential role of pericytes. Their heterogeneous morphology, distribution, origins, and physiology have been described. Using double-transgenic Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice, we identified two pericyte subsets. We found that Nestin-GFP−/NG2-DsRed+ (type-1) and Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+ (type-2) pericytes attach to the walls of small and large blood vessels in vivo; in vitro, type-2, but not type-1, pericytes spark endothelial cells to form new vessels. Matrigel assay showed that only type-2 pericytes participate in normal angiogenesis. Moreover, when cancer cells were transplanted into Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mice, type-1 pericytes did not penetrate the tumor, while type-2 pericytes were recruited during its angiogenesis. As inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising strategy in cancer therapy, type-2 pericytes may provide a cellular target susceptible to signaling and pharmacological manipulation in treating malignancy. This work also reports the potential of type-2 pericytes to improve blood perfusion in ischemic hindlimbs, indicating their potential for treating ischemic illnesses. PMID:24788248

  18. Pericytes as a new target for pathological processes in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Dziewulska, Dorota; Lewandowska, Eliza

    2012-10-01

    CADASIL is a generalized angiopathy caused by mutations in NOTCH 3 gene leading to degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in small arteries and arterioles. Since the receptor protein encoded by NOTCH 3 gene is expressed not only on VSMC but also on pericytes, pericytes and capillary vessels can be damaged by CADASIL. To check this hypothesis we examined microvessels in autopsy brains and skin-muscle biopsies of CADASIL patients. We found degeneration and loss of pericytes in capillary vessels. Pericytes were shrunken and their cytoplasm contained numerous vacuoles, big vesicular structures and complexes of enlarged pathological mitochondria. Degenerative changes were also observed within endothelial-pericytic connections, especially within peg-and-socket junctions. Nearby pericyte cell membranes or inside infoldings, deposits of granular osmiophilic material (GOM) were usually seen. In the affected capillaries endothelial cells revealed features of degeneration, selective death or swelling, leading to narrowing or occlusion of the capillary lumen. Our findings indicate that in CADASIL not only VSMC but also pericytes are severely damaged. Pericyte involvement in CADASIL can result in increased permeability of capillary vessels and disturbances in cerebral microcirculation, leading to white matter injury. Since in capillaries pericytes regulate vessel contractility, their degeneration can also cause defective vasomotor reactivity, the phenomenon observed very early in CADASIL, before development of histopathological changes in vessel walls.

  19. Foxc1 is required by pericytes during fetal brain angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Choe, Youngshik; Patterson, Katelin P; Hsieh, Ivy; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Daneman, Richard; Kume, Tsutomu; Huang, Eric J; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2013-07-15

    Brain pericytes play a critical role in blood vessel stability and blood-brain barrier maturation. Despite this, how brain pericytes function in these different capacities is only beginning to be understood. Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor Foxc1 is expressed by brain pericytes during development and is critical for pericyte regulation of vascular development in the fetal brain. Conditional deletion of Foxc1 from pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells leads to late-gestation cerebral micro-hemorrhages as well as pericyte and endothelial cell hyperplasia due to increased proliferation of both cell types. Conditional Foxc1 mutants do not have widespread defects in BBB maturation, though focal breakdown of BBB integrity is observed in large, dysplastic vessels. qPCR profiling of brain microvessels isolated from conditional mutants showed alterations in pericyte-expressed proteoglycans while other genes previously implicated in pericyte-endothelial cell interactions were unchanged. Collectively these data point towards an important role for Foxc1 in certain brain pericyte functions (e.g. vessel morphogenesis) but not others (e.g. barriergenesis).

  20. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    PubMed

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    and IL-10 were lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 insufficient and deficient subjects. In the placenta tissue of women with 25(OH)D3 deficiency, the regulatory T cell transcription factor FOXP3, vitamin D receptor (VDR) and retinoic acid receptor (RXR) expressions were downregulated. In contrast, CD23, CD21 and VDBP expressions were upregulated in 25(OH)D3 deficient and insufficient women. Vitamin D regulating enzymes (CYP24A1, CYP2R1 and CYP27B1) expression were also altered in women with 25(OH)D3 deficiency. The current study shows that impaired maternal 25(OH)D3 during pregnancy influences the spectrum of immune cells such as regulatory T cells and B cells with IgE receptors and this in turn may be linked to allergy and asthma in neonates.

  1. Dectin-3 Deficiency Promotes Colitis Development due to Impaired Antifungal Innate Immune Responses in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Pan, Deng; Zhou, Zhicheng; You, Yun; Jiang, Changying; Zhao, Xueqiang; Lin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between commensal fungi and gut immune system are critical for establishing colonic homeostasis. Here we found that mice deficient in Dectin-3 (Clec4d-/-), a C-type lectin receptor that senses fungal infection, were more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis compared with wild-type mice. The specific fungal burden of Candida (C.) tropicalis was markedly increased in the gut after DSS treatment in Clec4d-/- mice, and supplementation with C. tropicalis aggravated colitis only in Clec4d-/- mice, but not in wild-type controls. Mechanistically, Dectin-3 deficiency impairs phagocytic and fungicidal abilities of macrophages, and C. tropicalis-induced NF-κB activation and cytokine production. The conditioned media derived from Dectin-3-deficient macrophages were defective in promoting tissue repairing in colonic epithelial cells. Finally, anti-fungal therapy was effective in treating colitis in Clec4d-/- mice. These studies identified the role of Dectin-3 and its functional interaction with commensal fungi in intestinal immune system and regulation of colonic homeostasis. PMID:27280399

  2. Subclinical zinc deficiency impairs pancreatic digestive enzyme activity and digestive capacity of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term subclinical Zn deficiency on exocrine pancreatic activity and changes in digestive capacity. A total of forty-eight weaned piglets were fed ad libitum a basal diet (maize and soyabean meal) with adequate Zn supply (88 mg Zn/kg diet) during a 2-week acclimatisation phase. Animals were then assigned to eight dietary treatment groups (n 6) according to a complete randomised block design considering litter, live weight and sex. All pigs were fed restrictively (450 g diet/d) the basal diet but with varying ZnSO4.7H2O additions, resulting in 28·1, 33·6, 38·8, 42·7, 47·5, 58·2, 67·8 and 88·0 mg Zn/kg diet for a total experimental period of 8 d. Pancreatic Zn concentrations and pancreatic activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and α-amylase exhibited a broken-line response to stepwise reduction in dietary Zn by declining beneath thresholds of 39·0, 58·0, 58·0, 41·2, 47·5, 57·7 and 58·0 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. Furthermore, carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase activities were significantly lower in samples with reduced pancreatic Zn contents. Coefficients of faecal digestibility of DM, crude protein, total lipids and crude ash responded similarly to pancreatic enzyme activities by declining below dietary thresholds of 54·7, 45·0, 46·9 and 58·2 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. In conclusion, (1) subclinical Zn deficiency impaired pancreatic exocrine enzymes, (2) this response was connected to pancreatic Zn metabolism and (3) the decline in catalytic activity impaired faecal digestibility already after 1 week of insufficient alimentary Zn supply and very early before clinical deficiency symptoms arise.

  3. Phosphatidylethanolamine deficiency in Mammalian mitochondria impairs oxidative phosphorylation and alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Tasseva, Guergana; Bai, Helin Daniel; Davidescu, Magdalena; Haromy, Alois; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vance, Jean E

    2013-02-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, but the role of phospholipids, particularly the nonbilayer-forming lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), in mitochondrial function is poorly understood. Elimination of mitochondrial PE (mtPE) synthesis via phosphatidylserine decarboxylase in mice profoundly alters mitochondrial morphology and is embryonic lethal (Steenbergen, R., Nanowski, T. S., Beigneux, A., Kulinski, A., Young, S. G., and Vance, J. E. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 40032-40040). We now report that moderate <30% depletion of mtPE alters mitochondrial morphology and function and impairs cell growth. Acute reduction of mtPE by RNAi silencing of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase and chronic reduction of mtPE in PSB-2 cells that have only 5% of normal phosphatidylserine synthesis decreased respiratory capacity, ATP production, and activities of electron transport chain complexes (C) I and CIV but not CV. Blue native-PAGE analysis revealed defects in the organization of CI and CIV into supercomplexes in PE-deficient mitochondria, correlated with reduced amounts of CI and CIV proteins. Thus, mtPE deficiency impairs formation and/or membrane integration of respiratory supercomplexes. Despite normal or increased levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins in mtPE-deficient cells, and no reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondria were extensively fragmented, and mitochondrial ultrastructure was grossly aberrant. In general, chronic reduction of mtPE caused more pronounced mitochondrial defects than did acute mtPE depletion. The functional and morphological changes in PSB-2 cells were largely reversed by normalization of mtPE content by supplementation with lyso-PE, a mtPE precursor. These studies demonstrate that even a modest reduction of mtPE in mammalian cells profoundly alters mitochondrial functions.

  4. ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Min; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Huang, Wei-Chao; Shen, Chia-Rui; Mao, Wan-Yu; Shen, Chia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the interfollicular epidermis and mediates the side-population phenotype in skin cells. However, the role of ABCG2 in skin is unclear. Increased expression levels of ABCG2 were found at the basal layer of transitional epidermis adjacent to cutaneous wounds in human patients, indicating that ABCG2 may be involved in regulating the wound healing process. To investigate the role of ABCG2 in cutaneous wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were created in ABCG2 knockout (ABCG2-KO) and wild-type mice. The healing process was analysed and revealed that ABCG2 deficiency in skin results in delays in wound closure and impairments in re-epithelialization, as evidenced by reductions in both suprabasal differentiation and in p63-expressing keratinocytes migrating from transitional epidermis to epithelial tongues. The reduction in p63-expressing cells may be due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in ABCG2-KO epidermis, which can cause DNA damage and lead to proliferation arrest. To determine whether ABCG2 deficiency affects the potency of epidermal stem/progenitor cells (EPCs), transplantation studies were carried out, which demonstrated that ABCG2-KO EPCs display higher levels of γH2AX and lose the capacity to differentiate into suprabasal keratinocytes. A competitive repopulation assay confirmed that ABCG2 expression is critical for the proper expansion and differentiation of EPCs in cutaneous wounds. As EPCs are known to contribute to the healing of larger wounds, the current findings imply a functional role for ABCG2 in the expansion and differentiation of p63-expressing EPCs. Thus, ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency results in severe oxidative stress, leading to memory retention impairment in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Misaki, Taihei; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various human diseases and conditions, such as a neurodegeneration, which is the major symptom of vitamin B12 deficiency, although the underlying disease mechanisms associated with vitamin B12 deficiency are poorly understood. Vitamin B12 deficiency was found to significantly increase cellular H2O2 and NO content in Caenorhabditis elegans and significantly decrease low molecular antioxidant [reduced glutathione (GSH) and L-ascorbic acid] levels and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities, indicating that vitamin B12 deficiency induces severe oxidative stress leading to oxidative damage of various cellular components in worms. An NaCl chemotaxis associative learning assay indicated that vitamin B12 deficiency did not affect learning ability but impaired memory retention ability, which decreased to approximately 58% of the control value. When worms were treated with 1mmol/L GSH, L-ascorbic acid, or vitamin E for three generations during vitamin B12 deficiency, cellular malondialdehyde content as an index of oxidative stress decreased to the control level, but the impairment of memory retention ability was not completely reversed (up to approximately 50%). These results suggest that memory retention impairment formed during vitamin B12 deficiency is partially attributable to oxidative stress.

  6. Impairment of survival signaling and efferocytosis in TRPC3-deficient macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Smedlund, Kathryn; Lee, Robert; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the role of TRPC3 channel in macrophage survival, apoptosis and efferocytic properties. {yields} TRPC3-deficient macrophages exhibit impaired survival signaling, increased apoptosis and impaired efferocytosis. {yields} These findings suggest that macrophage TRPC3 is an essential component for macrophage survival and clearance of apoptotic cells. -- Abstract: We have recently shown that in macrophages proper operation of the survival pathways phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) has an obligatory requirement for constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx. In the present work we examined if Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 3 (TRPC3), a member of the TRPC family of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cation channels, contributes to the constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx that supports macrophage survival. We used bone marrow-derived macrophages obtained from TRPC3{sup -/-} mice to determine the activation status of survival signaling pathways, apoptosis and their efferocytic properties. Treatment of TRPC3{sup +/+} macrophages with the pro-apoptotic cytokine TNF{alpha} induced time-dependent phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and BAD, and this was drastically reduced in TRPC3{sup -/-} macrophages. Compared to TRPC3{sup +/+} cells TRPC3{sup -/-} macrophages exhibited reduced constitutive cation influx, increased apoptosis and impaired efferocytosis. The present findings suggest that macrophage TRPC3, presumably through its constitutive function, contributes to survival signaling and efferocytic properties.

  7. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous Treg deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B.; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H.; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D.; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD) immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially-fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. To test whether Treg-deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV-infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3KO) mice, which completely lack FoxP3+ Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8+ effector T cells and interferon-γ producing CD8+ T cells than controls, had higher viral loads and exhibited abnormal Th2 polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4KO FoxP3KO bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3KO mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared to controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II interferons and IL-12, were reduced whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a non-cutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV. PMID:20548030

  8. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous regulatory T cell deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J; Chatila, Talal A; Oettgen, Hans C

    2010-07-15

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To test whether Treg deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3(KO)) mice, which completely lack FoxP3(+) Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8(+) effector T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells than controls, had higher viral loads, and exhibited abnormal Th2-polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4(KO) FoxP3(KO) bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3(KO) mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared with controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II IFNs and IL-12, were reduced, whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-beta, and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a noncutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV.

  9. Role of thrombin-PAR1-PKCθ/δ axis in brain pericytes in thrombin-induced MMP-9 production and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Machida, Takashi; Dohgu, Shinya; Takata, Fuyuko; Matsumoto, Junichi; Kimura, Ikuya; Koga, Mariko; Nakamoto, Keiko; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2017-03-24

    Thrombin, an essential component in the coagulation cascade, participates in the pathogenesis of brain diseases, such as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease through blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. It is thought that the thrombin-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 axis is an important process in the pathogenesis of neurovascular disease, such as BBB dysfunction. We recently reported that brain pericytes are the most MMP-9-releasing cells in response to thrombin stimulation among the BBB-constituting cells. This thrombin-induced MMP-9 release is partially due to protease-activated receptor (PAR1), one of the specific thrombin receptors. Then, we evaluated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in MMP-9 release and the contribution of thrombin-reactive brain pericytes to BBB dysfunction. PKC activator evoked MMP-9 release from brain pericytes. The thrombin-induced MMP-9 release was inhibited by U0126, LY294002, Go6976, and Go6983. However, Go6976 decreased phosphorylation levels of PKCθ and Akt, and Go6983 decreased phosphorylation levels of PKCδ and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Additionally, treatment of pericytes with thrombin or PAR1-activating peptide stimulated PKCδ/θ signaling. These substances impaired brain endothelial barrier function in the presence of brain pericytes. Brain pericytes function through two independent downstream signaling pathways via PAR1 activation to release MMP-9 in response to thrombin - the PKCθ-Akt pathway and the PKCδ-ERK1/2 pathway. These pathways participate in PAR1-mediated MMP-9 release from pericytes, which leads to BBB dysfunction. Brain pericytes and their specific signaling pathways could provide novel therapeutic targets for thrombin-induced neurovascular diseases.

  10. Modeling neurodegenerative disease pathophysiology in thiamine deficiency: consequences of impaired oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Shivraj S; Hazell, Alan S

    2011-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that thiamine deficiency (TD), the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, produces alterations in brain function and structural damage that closely model a number of maladies in which neurodegeneration is a characteristic feature, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, along with alcoholic brain disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Impaired oxidative metabolism in TD due to decreased activity of thiamine-dependent enzymes leads to a multifactorial cascade of events in the brain that include focal decreases in energy status, oxidative stress, lactic acidosis, blood-brain barrier disruption, astrocyte dysfunction, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, amyloid deposition, decreased glucose utilization, immediate-early gene induction, and inflammation. This review describes our current understanding of the basis of these abnormal processes in TD, their interrelationships, and why this disorder can be useful for our understanding of how decreased cerebral energy metabolism can give rise to cell death in different neurodegenerative disease states.

  11. Impaired clot retraction in factor XIII A subunit-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kohji; Souri, Masayoshi; Kaneda, Mizuho; Miki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Ichinose, Akitada

    2010-02-11

    Factor XIII (FXIII) is a plasma transglutaminase that cross-links fibrin monomers, alpha(2)-plasmin inhibitor, and so forth. Congenital FXIII deficiency causes lifelong bleeding symptoms. To understand the molecular pathology of FXIII deficiency in vivo, its knockout mice have been functionally analyzed. Because prolonged bleeding times, a sign of defective/abnormal primary hemostasis, were commonly observed in 2 separate lines of FXIII A subunit (FXIII-A) knockout mice, a possible role or roles of FXIII in platelet-related function was investigated in the present study. Although platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate or collagen was normal, clot retraction (CR) was lost in the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) of FXIII-A knockout mice. In contrast, there was no CR impairment in the PRP of tissue transglutaminase-knockout mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, a transglutaminase inhibitor, cystamine, halted CR in the PRP of wild-type mice. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of FXIII is necessary for CR, at least in mice.

  12. Cyclophilin D deficiency rescues Aβ-impaired PKA/CREB signaling and alleviates synaptic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Wu, Xiaoping; Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-12-01

    The coexistence of neuronal mitochondrial pathology and synaptic dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cyclophilin D (CypD), an integral part of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), is involved in amyloid beta (Aβ)-instigated mitochondrial dysfunction. Blockade of CypD prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial malfunction and the consequent cognitive impairments. Here, we showed the elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by antioxidants probucol or superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase blocks Aβ-mediated inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP regulatory-element-binding (CREB) signal transduction pathway and loss of synapse, suggesting the detrimental effects of oxidative stress on neuronal PKA/CREB activity. Notably, neurons lacking CypD significantly attenuate Aβ-induced ROS. Consequently, CypD-deficient neurons are resistant to Aβ-disrupted PKA/CREB signaling by increased PKA activity, phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKA C), and CREB. In parallel, lack of CypD protects neurons from Aβ-induced loss of synapses and synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, compared to the mAPP mice, CypD-deficient mAPP mice reveal less inactivation of PKA-CREB activity and increased synaptic density, attenuate abnormalities in dendritic spine maturation, and improve spontaneous synaptic activity. These findings provide new insights into a mechanism in the crosstalk between the CypD-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress and signaling cascade, leading to synaptic injury, functioning through the PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway.

  13. Deficiency in ubiquitin-like protein Ubl4A impairs migration of fibroblasts and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Affonso, Carlos; Bonomo, Raiza; Mañas, Adriana; Xiang, Jialing

    2017-01-29

    Ubiquitin-like protein Ubl4A is a small, multi-functional protein with no ubiquitination activity. We have previously demonstrated that Ubl4A directly interacts with actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) and promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin branching, thereby accelerating plasma membrane translocation of protein kinase Akt upon insulin stimulation. Here, we show that Ubl4A is critical for plasma membrane protrusion and cell migration. Ubl4A, F-actin and Arp2/3 are co-localized at the cell leading edges during wound closure. Knockout of Ubl4A significantly reduces actin-mediated membrane protrusion and delays wound healing by primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Consistently, the ability of fibroblasts to migrate out of corneal tissue ex vivo is also impaired in Ubl4A-deficient mice. Furthermore, cell motility, but not phagocytosis, is significantly decreased in Ubl4A-deficient macrophages compared with wild-type controls. These results imply an important role for Ubl4A in cell migration-associated pathophysiological processes.

  14. Msh2 deficiency leads to dysmyelination of the corpus callosum, impaired locomotion, and altered sensory function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Devaraju, Prakash; Janke, Laura J.; Fan, Yiping; Frase, Sharon; Eddins, Donnie; Peters, Jennifer L.; Kim, Jieun; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Evans, William E.

    2016-01-01

    A feature in patients with constitutional DNA-mismatch repair deficiency is agenesis of the corpus callosum, the cause of which has not been established. Here we report a previously unrecognized consequence of deficiency in MSH2, a protein known primarily for its function in correcting nucleotide mismatches or insertions and deletions in duplex DNA caused by errors in DNA replication or recombination. We documented that Msh2 deficiency causes dysmyelination of the axonal projections in the corpus callosum. Evoked action potentials in the myelinated corpus callosum projections of Msh2-null mice were smaller than wild-type mice, whereas unmyelinated axons showed no difference. Msh2-null mice were also impaired in locomotive activity and had an abnormal response to heat. These findings reveal a novel pathogenic consequence of MSH2 deficiency, providing a new mechanistic hint to previously recognized neurological disorders in patients with inherited DNA-mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:27476972

  15. Early growth and development impairments in patients with ganglioside GM3 synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, A; Wang, D; Bright, A; Sency, V; Zhou, A; Xin, B

    2016-05-01

    Ganglioside GM3 synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gangliosides. GM3 synthase deficiency (GSD) causes a complete absence of GM3 and all downstream biosynthetic derivatives. The individuals affected by this disorder manifest severe irritability, intractable seizures and profound intellectual disability. However, we have found that most newborns seem symptom-free for a period of time after birth. In order to further understand the onset of the disease, we investigated the early growth and development of patients with this condition through this study. We compared 37 affected individuals with their normal siblings and revealed that all children with GSD had relatively normal intrauterine growth and development, as their weight, length and head circumference were similar to their normal siblings at birth. However, the disease progresses quickly after birth and causes significant constitutional impairments of growth and development by 6 months of age. Neither breastfeeding nor gastrostomy tube placement made significant difference on growth and development as all groups of patients showed the similar pattern. We conclude that GSD causes significant postnatal growth and developmental impairments and the amount of gangliosides in breast milk and general nutritional intervention do not seem to alter these outcomes.

  16. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M.; Santos, Robson Augusto S.; Bader, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2−/y) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2−/y mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2−/y mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2−/y mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2−/y mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2−/y mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis. PMID:28101297

  17. SHANK3 Deficiency Impairs Heat Hyperalgesia and TRPV1 Signaling in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingjian; Kim, Yong Ho; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Bey, Alexandra L; Lay, Mark; Chang, Wonseok; Berta, Temugin; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-12-21

    Abnormal pain sensitivity is commonly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and affects the life quality of ASD individuals. SHANK3 deficiency was implicated in ASD and pain dysregulation. Here, we report functional expression of SHANK3 in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons and spinal cord presynaptic terminals. Homozygous and heterozygous Shank3 complete knockout (Δe4-22) results in impaired heat hyperalgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Specific deletion of Shank3 in Nav1.8-expressing sensory neurons also impairs heat hyperalgesia in homozygous and heterozygous mice. SHANK3 interacts with transient receptor potential subtype V1 (TRPV1) via Proline-rich region and regulates TRPV1 surface expression. Furthermore, capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, inward currents in DRG neurons, and synaptic currents in spinal cord neurons are all reduced after Shank3 haploinsufficiency. Finally, partial knockdown of SHANK3 expression in human DRG neurons abrogates TRPV1 function. Our findings reveal a peripheral mechanism of SHANK3, which may underlie pain deficits in SHANK3-related ASDs.

  18. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Alenina, Natalia; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M; Santos, Robson Augusto S; Bader, Michael; Rabelo, Luiza A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2(-/y) mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2(-/y) mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2(-/y) mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2(-/y) mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2(-/y) mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis.

  19. Impairment of dendritic cell functions in patients with adaptor protein-3 complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prandini, Alberto; Salvi, Valentina; Colombo, Francesca; Moratto, Daniele; Lorenzi, Luisa; Vermi, William; De Francesco, Maria Antonia; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Porta, Fulvio; Plebani, Alessandro; Facchetti, Fabio; Sozzani, Silvano; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-06-30

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) is a primary immunodeficiency due to adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex deficiency. HPS2 patients present neutropenia, partial albinism, and impaired lysosomal vesicles formation in hematopoietic cells. Given the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the immune response, we studied monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in two HPS2 siblings. Mature HPS2 moDCs showed impaired expression of CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP), low levels of MIP1-β/CCL4, MIG/CXCL9, and severe defect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) secretion. DCs in lymph-node biopsies from the same patients showed a diffuse cytoplasm reactivity in a large fraction of DC-LAMP(+) cells, instead of the classical dot-like stain. In addition, analysis of pDC-related functions of blood-circulating mononuclear cells revealed reduced interferon-α secretion in response to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), whereas granzyme-B induction upon IL-3/IL-10 stimulation was normal. Finally, T-cell costimulatory activity, as measured by mixed lymphocyte reaction assay, was lower in patients, suggesting that function and maturation of DCs is abnormal in patients with HPS2.

  20. Impaired fertilizing ability of superoxide dismutase 1-deficient mouse sperm during in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Satoshi; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Kimura, Naoko; Fujii, Junichi

    2012-11-01

    The oxidative modification of gametes by a reactive oxygen species is a major deleterious factor that decreases the successful rate of in vitro fertilization. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) plays a pivotal role in antioxidation by scavenging the superoxide anion, and its deficiency causes infertility in female mice, but the significance of the enzyme in male mice remains unclear. In the present study, we characterized Sod1(-/-) (Sod1-KO) male reproductive organs and compiled the first report of the impaired fertilizing ability of Sod1-KO sperm in in vitro fertilization. Insemination of wild-type oocytes with Sod1-KO sperm exhibited lower rates of fertility compared with insemination by wild-type sperm. The low fertilizing ability found for Sod1-KO sperm was partially rescued by reductant 2-mercaptoethanol, which suggested the oxidative modification of sperm components. The numbers of motile and progressive sperm decreased during the in vitro fertilization process, and a decline in ATP content and elevation in lipid peroxidation occurred in the Sod1-KO sperm in an incubation time-dependent manner. Tyrosine phosphorylation, which is a hallmark for sperm capacitation, was also impaired in the Sod1-KO sperm. These results collectively suggest that machinery involved in sperm capacitation and motility are vulnerable to oxidative damage during the in vitro fertilization process, which could increase the rate of inefficient fertilization.

  1. PICK1 Deficiency Impairs Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis and Leads to Growth Retardation and Decreased Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K.; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  2. CX3CR1 deficiency leads to impairment of hippocampal cognitive function and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Justin, T. Rogers; Josh, M. Morganti; Adam, D. Bachstetter; Charles, E. Hudson; Melinda, M. Peters; Bethany, A. Grimmig; Edwin, J. Weeber; Paula, C. Bickford; Gemma, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    The protective/neurotoxic role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling in neurodegenerative disease is an intricate and highly debated research topic and it is becoming even more complicated as new studies reveal discordant results. It appears that the CX3CL1/CX3CR1 axis plays a direct role in neurodegeneration and/or neuroprotection depending upon the CNS insult. However, all the above studies focused on the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in pathological conditions, ignoring the relevance of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling under physiological conditions. No approach to date has been taken to decipher the significance of defects in CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in physiological condition. In the present study we used CX3CR1−/−, CX3CR1+/− and wild-type mice to investigate the physiological role of CX3CR1 receptor in cognition and synaptic plasticity. Our results demonstrated for the first time that mice lacking CX3CR1 receptor show contextual fear conditioning and Morris water maze deficits. CX3CR1 deficiency also affects motor learning. Importantly, mice lacking the receptor have a significant impairment in long term potentiation (LTP). Infusion with IL-1β receptor antagonist significantly reversed the deficit in cognitive function and impairment in LTP. Our results reveal that under physiological conditions, disruption in CX3CL1 signaling will lead to impairment in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity via increased action of IL-1β. PMID:22072675

  3. Elevated levels of plasma homocysteine, deficiencies in dietary folic acid and uracil-DNA glycosylase impair learning in a mouse model of vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, Nafisa M; Farr, Tracy D; Lips, Janet; Khalil, Ahmed A; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Foddis, Marco; Harms, Christoph; Füchtemeier, Martina; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2015-04-15

    Dietary deficiencies in folic acid result in elevated levels of plasma homocysteine, which has been associated with the development of dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we have shown that elevated levels of plasma homocysteine in mice deficient for a DNA repair enzyme, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), result in neurodegeneration. The goal of this study was to evaluate how deficiencies in folic acid and UNG along with elevated levels of homocysteine affect vascular cognitive impairment, via chronic hypoperfursion in an animal model. Ung(+/+) and Ung(-/-) mice were placed on either control (CD) or folic acid deficient (FADD) diets. Six weeks later, the mice either underwent implantation of microcoils around both common carotid arteries. Post-operatively, behavioral tests began at 3-weeks, angiography was measured after 5-weeks using MRI to assess vasculature and at completion of study plasma and brain tissue was collected for analysis. Learning impairments in the Morris water maze (MWM) were observed only in hypoperfused Ung(-/-) FADD mice and these mice had significantly higher plasma homocysteine concentrations. Interestingly, Ung(+/+) FADD produced significant remodeling of the basilar artery and arterial vasculature. Increased expression of GFAP was observed in the dentate gyrus of Ung(-/-) hypoperfused and FADD sham mice. Chronic hypoperfusion resulted in increased cortical MMP-9 protein levels of FADD hypoperfused mice regardless of genotypes. These results suggest that elevated levels of homocysteine only, as a result of dietary folic acid deficiency, don't lead to memory impairments and neurobiochemical changes. Rather a combination of either chronic hypoperfusion or UNG deficiency is required.

  4. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  5. TLR4 Deficiency Impairs Oligodendrocyte Formation in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jamie S.; Kigerl, Kristina A.; Lerch, Jessica K.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute oligodendrocyte (OL) death after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is followed by robust neuron–glial antigen 2 (NG2)-positive OL progenitor proliferation and differentiation into new OLs. Inflammatory mediators are prevalent during both phases and can influence the fate of NG2 cells and OLs. Specifically, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling induces OL genesis in the naive spinal cord, and lack of TLR4 signaling impairs white matter sparing and functional recovery after SCI. Therefore, we hypothesized that TLR4 signaling may regulate oligodendrogenesis after SCI. C3H/HeJ (TLR4-deficient) and control (C3H/HeOuJ) mice received a moderate midthoracic spinal contusion. TLR4-deficient mice showed worse functional recovery and reduced OL numbers compared with controls at 24 h after injury through chronic time points. Acute OL loss was accompanied by reduced ferritin expression, which is regulated by TLR4 and needed for effective iron storage. TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords also displayed features consistent with reduced OL genesis, including reduced NG2 expression, fewer BrdU-positive OLs, altered BMP4 signaling and inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) expression, and delayed myelin phagocytosis. Expression of several factors, including IGF-1, FGF2, IL-1β, and PDGF-A, was altered in TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords compared with wild types. Together, these data show that TLR4 signaling after SCI is important for OL lineage cell sparing and replacement, as well as in regulating cytokine and growth factor expression. These results highlight new roles for TLR4 in endogenous SCI repair and emphasize that altering the function of a single immune-related receptor can dramatically change the reparative responses of multiple cellular constituents in the injured CNS milieu. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelinating cells of the CNS [oligodendrocytes (OLs)] are killed for several weeks after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), but they are replaced by resident

  6. Phospholipid transfer protein deficiency in mice impairs macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanhong; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhai, Lei; Zhou, Guanghai; Yu, Ailing; Cao, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    phospholipid transfer protein KO mice compared with WT mice. These data reveal that systemic phospholipid transfer protein deficiency in mice impairs macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. PMID:27037277

  7. CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Essential for Pericyte Adhesion and Endothelial Basement Membrane Formation during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bau-Lin; van Handel, Ben; Hofmann, Jennifer J.; Chen, Tom T.; Choi, Aaron; Ong, Jessica R.; Benya, Paul D.; Mikkola, Hanna; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Lyons, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that regulates cell adhesion, migration, and survival. CCN2 is best known for its ability to promote fibrosis by mediating the ability of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) to induce excess extracellular matrix production. In addition to its role in pathological processes, CCN2 is required for chondrogenesis. CCN2 is also highly expressed during development in endothelial cells, suggesting a role in angiogenesis. The potential role of CCN2 in angiogenesis is unclear, however, as both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects have been reported. Here, through analysis of Ccn2-deficient mice, we show that CCN2 is required for stable association and retention of pericytes by endothelial cells. PDGF signaling and the establishment of the endothelial basement membrane are required for pericytes recruitment and retention. CCN2 induced PDGF-B expression in endothelial cells, and potentiated PDGF-B-mediated Akt signaling in mural (vascular smooth muscle/pericyte) cells. In addition, CCN2 induced the production of endothelial basement membrane components in vitro, and was required for their expression in vivo. Overall, these results highlight CCN2 as an essential mediator of vascular remodeling by regulating endothelial-pericyte interactions. Although most studies of CCN2 function have focused on effects of CCN2 overexpression on the interstitial extracellular matrix, the results presented here show that CCN2 is required for the normal production of vascular basement membranes. PMID:22363445

  8. Descending vasa recta endothelial cells and pericytes form mural syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong; Lin, Hai; Cao, Chunhua; Payne, Kristie

    2013-01-01

    Using patch clamp, we induced depolarization of descending vasa recta (DVR) pericytes or endothelia and tested whether it was conducted to distant cells. Membrane potential was measured with the fluorescent voltage dye di-8-ANEPPS or with a second patch-clamp electrode. Depolarization of an endothelial cell induced responses in other endothelia within a millisecond and was slowed by gap junction blockade with heptanol. Endothelial response to pericyte depolarization was poor, implying high-resistance myo-endothelial coupling. In contrast, dual patch clamp of neighboring pericytes revealed syncytial coupling. At high sampling rate, the spread of depolarization between pericytes and endothelia occurred in 9 ± 2 or 12 ± 2 μs, respectively. Heptanol (2 mM) increased the overall input resistance of the pericyte layer to current flow and prevented transmission of depolarization between neighboring cells. The fluorescent tracer Lucifer yellow (LY), when introduced through ruptured patches, spread between neighboring endothelia in 1 to 7 s, depending on location of the flanking cell. LY diffused to endothelial cells on the ipsilateral but not contralateral side of the DVR wall and minimally between pericytes. We conclude that both DVR pericytes and endothelia are part of individual syncytia. The rate of conduction of membrane potential exceeds that for diffusion of hydrophilic molecules by orders of magnitude. Gap junction coupling of adjacent endothelial cells may be spatially oriented to favor longitudinal transmission along the DVR axis. PMID:24381184

  9. Aspects of pericytes and their potential therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Różycka, Justyna; Brzóska, Edyta; Skirecki, Tomasz

    2017-03-13

    Pericytes, which are multi-potential stem cells, co-create the walls of the microvessels: capillaries, terminal arterioles and postcapillary venules. These cells are localized under the basement membrane, tightly encircling the endothelium. The most frequently mentioned molecular markers of pericytes include NG2 (neural-glial antigen 2), β-type platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRβ), smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA), regulator of G protein signalling 5 (RGS5), the adhesion protein CD146 and nestin. Different functions in physiological processes are assigned to pericytes such as maintaining the integrity and senescence of endothelial cells, transregulation of vascular tone or the potential to differentiate into other cells. Probably they are also involved in pathological processes such as tissues fibrosis. In this review, we focus on the participation of pericytes in the process of blood vessel formation, the regeneration of skeletal muscle tissue and fibrosis. Strong evidence for pericytes' participation in endothelial homeostasis, as well as in pathological conditions such as fibrosis, reveals a broad potential for the therapeutic use of these cells. Targeted pharmacological modulation of pericytes, leading to blocking signalling pathways responsible for the differentiation of pericytes into myofibroblasts, seems to be a promising strategy for the treatment of fibrosis in the early stages.

  10. The pericyte antigen RGS5 in perivascular soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear lineage of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from or differentiate to pericytes or a modified perivascular cell. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation--although little bona fide evidence of pericytic differentiation exists. Likewise the perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) family shares a perivascular growth pattern, but with distinctive dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. RGS5, regulator of G-protein signaling 5, is a novel pericyte antigen with increasing use in animal models. Here, we describe the immunohistochemical expression patterns of RGS5 across perivascular soft tissue tumors, including glomus tumor (n = 6), malignant glomus tumor (n = 4), myopericytoma (n = 3), angioleiomyoma (n = 9), myofibroma (n = 4), solitary fibrous tumor (n = 10), and PEComa (n = 19). Immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantification was performed, and compared to αSMA (smooth muscle actin) expression. Results showed that glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma shared a similar diffuse immunoreactivity for RGS5 and αSMA across all tumors examined. In contrast, myofibroma, solitary fibrous tumor and PEComa showed predominantly focal to absent RGS5 immunoreactivity. These findings further support a common pericytic lineage of differentiation in glomus tumors, myopericytoma and angioleiomyoma. The pericyte marker RGS5 may be of future clinical utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors.

  11. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  12. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment.

  13. Sociocommunicative and Sensorimotor Impairments in Male P2X4-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Letisha R; Godar, Sean C; Khoja, Sheraz; Jakowec, Michael W; Alkana, Ronald L; Bortolato, Marco; Davies, Daryl L

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic P2X receptors are a family of ligand-gated ion channels gated by extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). Of the seven P2X subtypes, P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) are richly expressed in the brain, yet their role in behavioral organization remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the behavioral responses of P2X4R heterozygous (HZ) and knockout (KO) mice in a variety of testing paradigms designed to assess complementary aspects of sensory functions, emotional reactivity, and cognitive organization. P2X4R deficiency did not induce significant alterations of locomotor activity and anxiety-related indices in the novel open field and elevated plus-maze tests. Conversely, P2X4R KO mice displayed marked deficits in acoustic startle reflex amplitude, as well as significant sensorimotor gating impairments, as assessed by the prepulse inhibition of the startle. In addition, P2X4R KO mice displayed enhanced tactile sensitivity, as signified by a lower latency in the sticky-tape removal test. Moreover, both P2X4R HZ and KO mice showed significant reductions in social interaction and maternal separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in pups. Notably, brain regions of P2X4R KO mice exhibited significant brain-regional alterations in the subunit composition of glutamate ionotropic receptors. These results collectively document that P2X4-deficient mice exhibit a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities partially akin to those observed in other murine models of autism-spectrum disorder. In conclusion, our findings highlight a putative role of P2X4Rs in the regulation of perceptual and sociocommunicative functions and point to these receptors as putative targets for disturbances associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23604007

  14. Association between Decreased Klotho Blood Levels and Organic Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children with Growth Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ami, Michal; Levy-Shraga, Yael; Mazor-Aronovitch, Kineret; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Yeshayahu, Yonatan; Hemi, Rina; Kanety, Hannah; Rubinek, Tami; Modan-Moses, Dalit

    2014-01-01

    Objective Klotho is an aging-modulating protein expressed mainly in the kidneys and choroid plexus, which can also be shed, released into the circulation and act as a hormone. Klotho deficient mice are smaller compared to their wild-type counterparts and their somatotropes show marked atrophy and reduced number of secretory granules. Recent data also indicated an association between klotho levels and growth hormone (GH) levels in acromegaly. We aimed to study the association between klotho levels and GH deficiency (GHD) in children with growth impairment. Design Prospective study comprising 99 children and adolescents (aged 9.0±3.7 years, 49 male) undergoing GH stimulation tests for short stature (height-SDS = −2.1±0.6). Klotho serum levels were measured using an α-klotho ELISA kit. Results Klotho levels were significantly lower (p<0.001) among children with organic GHD (n = 11, 727±273 pg/ml) compared to both GH sufficient participants (n = 59, 1497±754 pg/ml) and those with idiopathic GHD (n = 29, 1645±778 pg/ml). The difference between GHS children and children with idiopathic GHD was not significant. Klotho levels positively correlated with IGF-1- standard deviation scores (SDS) (R = 0.45, p<0.001), but were not associated with gender, pubertal status, age or anthropometric measurements. Conclusions We have shown, for the first time, an association between low serum klotho levels and organic GHD. If validated by additional studies, serum klotho may serve as novel biomarker of organic GHD. PMID:25198618

  15. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    PubMed

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  16. Partial genetic deficiency in tissue kallikrein impairs adaptation to high potassium intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana S; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Chambrey, Régine; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Inactivation of the tissue kallikrein gene in mice impairs renal handling of potassium due to enhanced H, K-ATPase activity, and induces hyperkalemia. We investigated whether the R53H loss-of-function polymorphism of the human tissue kallikrein gene affects renal potassium handling. In a crossover study, 30 R53R homozygous and 10 R53H heterozygous healthy males were randomly assigned to a low-sodium/high-potassium or a high-sodium/low-potassium diet to modulate tissue kallikrein synthesis. On the seventh day of each diet, participants were studied before and during a 2-h infusion of furosemide to stimulate distal potassium secretion. Urinary kallikrein activity was significantly lower in R53H than in R53R subjects on the low-sodium/high-potassium diet and was similarly reduced in both genotypes on high-sodium/low-potassium. Plasma potassium and renal potassium reabsorption were similar in both genotypes on an ad libitum sodium/potassium diet or after 7 days of a high-sodium/low-potassium diet. However, the median plasma potassium was significantly higher after 7 days of low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H than in R53R individuals. Urine potassium excretion and plasma aldosterone concentrations were similar. On the low-sodium/high-potassium diet, furosemide-induced decrease in plasma potassium was significantly larger in R53H than in R53R subjects. Thus, impaired tissue kallikrein stimulation by a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H subjects with partial tissue kallikrein deficiency highlights an inappropriate renal adaptation to potassium load, consistent with experimental data in mice.

  17. Human TLR1 Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Mycobacterial Signaling and Protection from Leprosy Reversal Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Macdonald, Murdo; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Wells, Richard D.; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of the innate immune response to pathogens, including Mycobacterium leprae, which is recognized by TLR1/2 heterodimers. We previously identified a transmembrane domain polymorphism, TLR1_T1805G, that encodes an isoleucine to serine substitution and is associated with impaired signaling. We hypothesized that this TLR1 SNP regulates the innate immune response and susceptibility to leprosy. In HEK293 cells transfected with the 1805T or 1805G variant and stimulated with extracts of M. leprae, NF-κB activity was impaired in cells with the 1805G polymorphism. We next stimulated PBMCs from individuals with different genotypes for this SNP and found that 1805GG individuals had significantly reduced cytokine responses to both whole irradiated M. leprae and cell wall extracts. To investigate whether TLR1 variation is associated with clinical presentations of leprosy or leprosy immune reactions, we examined 933 Nepalese leprosy patients, including 238 with reversal reaction (RR), an immune reaction characterized by a Th1 T cell cytokine response. We found that the 1805G allele was associated with protection from RR with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.51 (95% CI 0.29–0.87, p = 0.01). Individuals with 1805 genotypes GG or TG also had a reduced risk of RR in comparison to genotype TT with an OR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97, p = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the first association of TLR1 with a Th1-mediated immune response. Our findings suggest that TLR1 deficiency influences adaptive immunity during leprosy infection to affect clinical manifestations such as nerve damage and disability. PMID:18461142

  18. Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Characterized by Deficient Brainstem and Cortical Representations of Speech.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Lowther, Jill E; Tak, Sunghee H; Alain, Claude

    2017-03-29

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is recognized as a transitional phase in the progression toward more severe forms of dementia and is an early precursor to Alzheimer's disease. Previous neuroimaging studies reveal that MCI is associated with aberrant sensory-perceptual processing in cortical brain regions subserving auditory and language function. However, whether the pathophysiology of MCI extends to speech processing before conscious awareness (brainstem) is unknown. Using a novel electrophysiological approach, we recorded both brainstem and cortical speech-evoked brain event-related potentials (ERPs) in older, hearing-matched human listeners who did and did not present with subtle cognitive impairment revealed through behavioral neuropsychological testing. We found that MCI was associated with changes in neural speech processing characterized as hypersensitivity (larger) brainstem and cortical speech encoding in MCI compared with controls in the absence of any perceptual speech deficits. Group differences also interacted with age differentially across the auditory pathway; brainstem responses became larger and cortical ERPs smaller with advancing age. Multivariate classification revealed that dual brainstem-cortical speech activity correctly identified MCI listeners with 80% accuracy, suggesting its application as a biomarker of early cognitive decline. Brainstem responses were also a more robust predictor of individuals' MCI severity than cortical activity. Our findings suggest that MCI is associated with poorer encoding and transfer of speech signals between functional levels of the auditory system and advance the pathophysiological understanding of cognitive aging by identifying subcortical deficits in auditory sensory processing mere milliseconds (<10 ms) after sound onset and before the emergence of perceptual speech deficits.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a precursor to dementia marked by declines in communication skills. Whether

  19. Arginine Starvation Impairs Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in ASS1-Deficient Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyong; Chu, Cheng-Ying; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Xu, Jinghong; Gaur, Shikha; Forman, Henry Jay; Zhang, Hang; Zheng, Shu; Yen, Yun; Huang, Jian; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic response to nutrient starvation and is necessary to clear dysfunctional or damaged organelles, but excessive autophagy can be cytotoxic or cytostatic and contributes to cell death. Depending on the abundance of enzymes involved in molecule biosynthesis, cells can be dependent on uptake of exogenous nutrients to provide these molecules. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and its abundance is reduced in many solid tumors, making them sensitive to external arginine depletion. We demonstrated that prolonged arginine starvation by exposure to ADI-PEG20 (pegylated arginine deiminase) induced autophagy-dependent death of ASS1-deficient breast cancer cells, because these cells are arginine auxotrophs (dependent on uptake of extracellular arginine). Indeed, these breast cancer cells died in culture when exposed to ADI-PEG20 or cultured in the absence of arginine. Arginine starvation induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, which impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity. Furthermore, arginine starvation killed breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro only if they were autophagy-competent. Thus, a key mechanism underlying the lethality induced by prolonged arginine starvation was the cytotoxic autophagy that occurred in response to mitochondrial damage. Last, ASS1 was either low in abundance or absent in more than 60% of 149 random breast cancer bio-samples, suggesting that patients with such tumors could be candidates for arginine starvation therapy. PMID:24692592

  20. Secretin deficiency causes impairment in survival of neural progenitor cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Jukkola, Peter I; Rogers, Justin T; Kaspar, Brian K; Weeber, Edwin J; Nishijima, Ichiko

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is the lifelong production of new neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), and affects many physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including neurobehavioral disorders. The early postnatal stage is the most prominent neurogenesis period; however, the functional role of neurogenesis in this developing stage has not been well characterized. To understand the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in the postnatal developing period, we analyzed secretin, a neuropeptide, which is expressed significantly higher in the development stage. Secretin is a pleiotropic neuropeptide hormone that belongs to the secretin/VIP/glucagon peptide family. Although secretin was originally isolated in the gastrointestinal system, it has been found that secretin itself acts as a neuropeptide in the CNS. Here, we report a new function of secretin as a survival factor for neural progenitor cells in the hippocampus. We found that secretin-deficient mice exhibit decreased numbers of BrdU-labeled new neurons and dramatically increased apoptosis of doublecortin-positive neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) during the early postnatal period. Furthermore, we found that reduced survival of neural progenitor cells leads to decreased volume of DG, reduced long-term potentiation and impaired spatial learning ability in adults. Our studies demonstrate that secretin has important implications for neurogenesis in postnatal development, and affects neurobehavioral function in the adult mouse.

  1. CALHM1 deficiency impairs cerebral neuron activity and memory flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Chang, Eric H.; Frattini, Stephen A.; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Adrien, Leslie; Strohl, Joshua J.; Gibson, Elizabeth L.; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Huerta, Patricio T.; Marambaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    CALHM1 is a cell surface calcium channel expressed in cerebral neurons. CALHM1 function in the brain remains unknown, but recent results showed that neuronal CALHM1 controls intracellular calcium signaling and cell excitability, two mechanisms required for synaptic function. Here, we describe the generation of Calhm1 knockout (Calhm1−/−) mice and investigate CALHM1 role in neuronal and cognitive functions. Structural analysis revealed that Calhm1−/− brains had normal regional and cellular architecture, and showed no evidence of neuronal or synaptic loss, indicating that CALHM1 deficiency does not affect brain development or brain integrity in adulthood. However, Calhm1−/− mice showed a severe impairment in memory flexibility, assessed in the Morris water maze, and a significant disruption of long-term potentiation without alteration of long-term depression, measured in ex vivo hippocampal slices. Importantly, in primary neurons and hippocampal slices, CALHM1 activation facilitated the phosphorylation of NMDA and AMPA receptors by protein kinase A. Furthermore, neuronal CALHM1 activation potentiated the effect of glutamate on the expression of c-Fos and C/EBPβ, two immediate-early gene markers of neuronal activity. Thus, CALHM1 controls synaptic activity in cerebral neurons and is required for the flexible processing of memory in mice. These results shed light on CALHM1 physiology in the mammalian brain. PMID:27066908

  2. Intranasal siRNA administration reveals IGF2 deficiency contributes to impaired cognition in Fragile X syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Magistri, Marco; Martinez, Ana; Faghihi, Mohammad A.; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eleonore

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory remain imprecisely understood, and restorative interventions are lacking. We report that intranasal administration of siRNAs can be used to identify targets important in cognitive processes and to improve genetically impaired learning and memory. In mice modeling the intellectual deficiency of Fragile X syndrome, intranasally administered siRNA targeting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), HDAC2, or HDAC3 diminished cognitive impairments. In WT mice, intranasally administered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) siRNA or HDAC4 siRNA impaired learning and memory, which was partially due to reduced insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) levels because the BDNF siRNA– or HDAC4 siRNA–induced cognitive impairments were ameliorated by intranasal IGF2 administration. In Fmr1–/– mice, hippocampal IGF2 was deficient, and learning and memory impairments were ameliorated by IGF2 intranasal administration. Therefore intranasal siRNA administration is an effective means to identify mechanisms regulating cognition and to modulate therapeutic targets. PMID:28352664

  3. Human Myocardial Pericytes: Multipotent Mesodermal Precursors Exhibiting Cardiac Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C.W.; Baily, James E.; Corselli, Mirko; Diaz, Mary; Sun, Bin; Xiang, Guosheng; Gray, Gillian A.; Huard, Johnny; Péault, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular mesenchymal precursor cells (i.e. pericytes) reside in skeletal muscle where they contribute to myofiber regeneration; however, the existence of similar microvessel-associated regenerative precursor cells in cardiac muscle has not yet been documented. We tested whether microvascular pericytes within human myocardium exhibit phenotypes and multipotency similar to their anatomically and developmentally distinct counterparts. Fetal and adult human heart pericytes (hHPs) express canonical pericyte markers in situ, including CD146, NG2, PDGFRβ, PDGFRα, αSMA, and SM-MHC, but not CD117, CD133 and desmin, nor endothelial cell (EC) markers. hHPs were prospectively purified to homogeneity from ventricular myocardium by flow cytometry, based on a combination of positive- (CD146) and negative-selection (CD34, CD45, CD56, and CD117) cell lineage markers. Purified hHPs expanded in vitro were phenotypically similar to human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes (hSkMPs). hHPs express MSC markers in situ and exhibited osteo- chondro-, and adipogenic potentials but, importantly, no ability for skeletal myogenesis, diverging from pericytes of all other origins. hHPs supported network formation with/without ECs in Matrigel cultures; hHPs further stimulated angiogenic responses under hypoxia, markedly different from hSkMPs. The cardiomyogenic potential of hHPs was examined following 5-azacytidine treatment and neonatal cardiomyocyte co-culture in vitro, and intramyocardial transplantation in vivo. Results indicated cardiomyocytic differentiation in a small fraction of hHPs. In conclusion, human myocardial pericytes share certain phenotypic and developmental similarities with their skeletal muscle homologs, yet exhibit different antigenic, myogenic, and angiogenic properties. This is the first example of an anatomical restriction in the developmental potential of pericytes as native mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25336400

  4. High frequency of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Western brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Santana, Marli S; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Costa, Mônica R F; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Brito, Marcelo A M; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Alecrim, Maria G C

    2014-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

  5. Cutting edge: DNAX accessory molecule 1-deficient CD8+ T cells display immunological synapse defects that impair antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Hawkins, Edwin D; Shimoni, Raz; McGrath, Mairi; Chan, Christopher J; Russell, Sarah M; Smyth, Mark J; Oliaro, Jane

    2014-01-15

    DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1) is expressed on all CD8(+) T cells and promotes their activation and effector function. DNAM-1 interacts with LFA-1, a critical molecule for immunological synapse formation between T cells and APCs, and for cytotoxic killing of target cells. Mice that lack DNAM-1 display abnormal T cell responses and antitumor activity; however, the mechanism involved is unclear. In this article, we show that DNAM-1 deficiency results in reduced proliferation of CD8(+) T cells after Ag presentation and impaired cytotoxic activity. We also demonstrate that DNAM-1-deficient T cells show reduced conjugations with tumor cells and decreased recruitment of both LFA-1 and lipid rafts to the immunological synapse, which correlates with reduced tumor cell killing in vitro. This synapse defect may explain why DNAM-1-deficient mice cannot clear tumors in vivo, and highlights the importance of DNAM-1 and the immunological synapse in T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

  6. Nxf7 deficiency impairs social exploration and spatio-cognitive abilities as well as hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice.

    PubMed

    Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Ahmed, Tariq; Vermaercke, Ben; Marynen, Peter; Balschun, Detlef; Froyen, Guy; D'Hooge, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear RNA export factors (NXF) are conserved in all metazoans and are deemed essential for shuttling RNA across the nuclear envelope and other post-transcriptional processes (such as mRNA metabolism, storage and stability). Disruption of human NXF5 has been implicated in intellectual and psychosocial disabilities. In the present report, we use recently described Nxf7 knockout (KO) mice as an experimental model to analyze in detail the behavioral consequences of clinical NXF5 deficiency. We examined male Nxf7 KO mice using an extended cognitive and behavioral test battery, and recorded extracellular field potentials in the hippocampal CA1 region. We observed various cognitive and behavioral changes including alterations in social exploration, impaired spatial learning and spatio-cognitive abilities. We also defined a new experimental paradigm to discriminate search strategies in Morris water maze and showed significant differences between Nxf7 KO and control animals. Furthermore, while we observed no difference in a nose poke suppression in an conditioned emotional response (CER) protocol, Nxf7 KO mice were impaired in discriminating between differentially reinforced cues in an auditory fear conditioning protocol. This distinct neurocognitive phenotype was accompanied by impaired hippocampal Long-term potentiation (LTP), while long-term depression (LTD) was not affected by Nxf7 deficiency. Our data demonstrate that disruption of murine Nxf7 leads to behavioral phenotypes that may relate to the intellectual and social deficits in patients with NXF5 deficiency.

  7. A case of isolated ACTH deficiency who developed autoimmune-mediated hypothyroidism and impaired water diuresis during glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Y

    2000-12-01

    A case of isolated ACTH deficiency who developed autoimmune-mediated hypothyroidism and still showed impaired water diuresis during glucocorticoid replacement therapy is reported. A 45-year-old woman was initially admitted for nausea, vomiting, and general malaise. Her serum sodium and plasma osmolality, ACTH and cortisol values were low, but her urine osmolality was high. Other pituitary hormone levels, thyroid hormone levels, and a computed tomogram of the pituitary gland were normal. The patient was treated with hydrocortisone and followed in the outpatient clinic; however, she was lost to follow up 18 months after admission. Three years later she presented with hypoglycemia and hyponatremia. Her serum or plasma ACTH, FT3, FT4, cortisol levels were low and her serum TSH level was high. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH to CRH and an exaggerated response of TSH to TRH. Plasma ADH was inappropriately high, and a water-loading test revealed impaired water diuresis and poor suppression of ADH. Although ADH was suppressed, impaired water diuresis was observed in the water loading test after hydrocortisone supplementation. Thyroxine supplementation completely normalized the water diuresis. Her outpatient clinic medical records revealed a gradual increase in TSH levels during follow up, indicating that she had developed hypothyroidism during glucocorticoid replacement therapy. The hyponatremia on the first admission was due to glucocorticoid deficiency, whereas the hyponatremia on the second admission was due to combined deficiencies of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones.

  8. Impairment of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling in Caveolin-1-deficient Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M.; Llorente Izquierdo, Cristina; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Boscá, Lisardo; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is the main structural protein of caveolae and plays an important role in various cellular processes such as vesicular transport, cholesterol homeostasis, and signal transduction pathways. The expression and functional role of Cav-1 have been reported in liver and in hepatocyte cell lines, in human cirrhotic liver, and in hepatocellular carcinomas. Previous studies demonstrated that Cav-1 was dispensable for liver regeneration, because Cav-1−/− animals survived and fully regenerated liver function and size after partial hepatectomy. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which the lack of Cav-1 accelerates liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. The data show that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling is impaired in regenerating liver of Cav-1−/− mice and in hepatocytes derived from these animals. TGF-β receptors I and II do not colocalize in the same membrane fraction in the hepatocytes derived from Cav-1−/− mice, as Smad2/3 signaling decreased in the absence of Cav-1 at the time that the transcriptional corepressor SnoN accumulates. Accordingly, the expression of TGF-β target genes, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, is decreased due to the presence of the high levels of SnoN. Moreover, hepatocyte growth factor inhibited TGF-β signaling in the absence of Cav-1 by increasing SnoN expression. Taken together, these data might help to unravel why Cav-1-deficient mice exhibit an accelerated liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy and add new insights on the molecular mechanisms controlling the initial commitment to hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:19966340

  9. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E.; Dudley, Elizabeth A.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1−/− female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1−/− females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1−/− females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1−/− females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1−/− females. Olfm1−/− females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1−/− females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1−/− females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction. PMID:26107991

  10. RNA sequencing of creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficient fibroblasts reveals impairment of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Nota, Benjamin; Ndika, Joseph D T; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Kanhai, Warsha A; van Dooren, Silvy J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Pals, Gerard; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency is the most common cause of cerebral creatine syndromes, and is characterized by depletion of creatine in the brain. Manifestations of this X-linked disorder include intellectual disability, speech/language impairment, behavior abnormalities, and seizures. At the moment, no effective treatment is available. In order to investigate the molecular pathophysiology of this disorder, we performed RNA sequencing on fibroblasts derived from patients. The transcriptomes of fibroblast cells from eight unrelated individuals with SLC6A8 deficiency and three wild-type controls were sequenced. SLC6A8 mutations with different effects on the protein product resulted in different gene expression profiles. Differential gene expression analysis followed by gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that especially the expression of genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton are altered in SLC6A8 deficiency, such as collagens, keratins, integrins, and cadherins. This suggests an important novel role for creatine in the structural development and maintenance of cells. It is likely that the (extracellular) structure of brain cells is also impaired in SLC6A8-deficient patients, and future studies are necessary to confirm this and to reveal the true functions of creatine in the brain.

  11. CIA2 deficiency results in impaired oxidative stress response and enhanced intracellular basal UPR activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Hua-Zhen; Niu, Yu-Jie; Yuan, Yuan; Fang, Bing-Xiong; Liu, Yi-Na; Cai, Lu-Hui; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Xin-Guang

    2015-03-01

    Yeast Cia2p is a component of the cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly (CIA) machinery. Initial studies of the CIA machinery were performed in yeast, but the precise role of Cia2p in this eukaryote is still unknown. We report that CIA2 deficiency results in impaired oxidative stress response, as evidenced by increased sensitivity to the oxidant cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), impaired activities of superoxide dismutases and aconitase and decreased replicative lifespan in the mutants. Moreover, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were significantly increased in CIA2-deficient cells after treatment with CHP. We also show that CIA2-deficient cells display an increased resistance to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as evidenced by the upregulated splicing of the mRNA of HAC1, which encodes a functional transcription factor that regulates the transcription of unfolded protein response (UPR) target genes, suggesting enhanced intracellular UPR activity. Furthermore, the transcription of several canonical UPR target genes is strongly induced in CIA2-deficient cells as compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of Cia2p in oxidative and ER stress responses in yeast.

  12. Impaired nitric oxide production in coronary endothelial cells of the spontaneously diabetic BB rat is due to tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, C J; Marinos, R S; Hatakeyama, K; Martinez-Zaguilan, R; Rojas, J D; Kelly, K A; Wu, G

    2000-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) from diabetic BioBreeding (BB) rats have an impaired ability to produce NO. This deficiency is not due to a defect in the constitutive isoform of NO synthase in EC (ecNOS) or alterations in intracellular calcium, calmodulin, NADPH or arginine levels. Instead, ecNOS cannot produce sufficient NO because of a deficiency in tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), a cofactor necessary for enzyme activity. EC from diabetic rats exhibited only 12% of the BH(4) levels found in EC from normal animals or diabetes-prone animals which did not develop disease. As a result, NO synthesis by EC of diabetic rats was only 18% of that for normal animals. Increasing BH(4) levels with sepiapterin increased NO production, suggesting that BH(4) deficiency is a metabolic basis for impaired endothelial NO synthesis in diabetic BB rats. This deficiency is due to decreased activity of GTP-cyclohydrolase I, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of BH(4). GTP-cyclohydrolase activity was low because of a decreased expression of the protein in the diabetic cells. PMID:10861247

  13. Ultrastructural pathology of cortical capillary pericytes in human traumatic brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2011-01-01

    In human traumatic brain oedema pericytes exhibit remarkable oedematous changes, increased vacuolar and vesicular transport, transient transpericytal channels, and tubular structures demonstrating pericyte brain barrier dysfunction. They show nuclear invaginations, actin and myosin-like filaments, and coupled interaction with endothelial cells through the macula occludens. Some pericytes display hypertrophic and necrotic changes, and phagocytic capacity. Hypertrophic pericytes induce basement membrane splitting. Degenerated pericytes exhibit lacunar enlargement of endoplasmic reticulum, dense osmiophilic bodies, glycogen granules, vacuolization, oedematous Golgi apparatus, and pleomorphic mitochondria. Certain micropinocytotic vesicles are orientated to the Golgi complex and multivesicular bodies, suggesting that pericytes play some role in oedema resolution.

  14. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Daley, George Q; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2012-11-29

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE). We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non-haematopoietic CNS-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and/or IFN-λ1 in response to stimulation by the dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-λ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele showed that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was rescued further by treatment with exogenous IFN-α or IFN-β ( IFN-α/β) but not IFN-λ1. Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3-pathway deficiencies.

  15. Skeletal muscle pericyte subtypes differ in their differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells have been proposed as a therapy for central nervous system disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and trauma injuries, however their accessibility is a major limitation. We recently isolated Tuj1+ cells from skeletal muscle culture of Nestin-GFP transgenic mice however whether they form functional neurons in the brain is not yet known. Additionally, their isolation from nontransgenic species and identification of their ancestors is unknown. This gap of knowledge precludes us from studying their role as a valuable alternative to neural progenitors. Here, we identified two pericyte subtypes, type-1 and type-2, using a double transgenic Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mouse and demonstrated that Nestin-GFP+/Tuj1+ cells derive from type-2 Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+/CD146+ pericytes located in the skeletal muscle interstitium. These cells are bipotential as they generate either Tuj1+ cells when cultured with muscle cells or become "classical" α-SMA+pericytes when cultured alone. In contrast, type-1 Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+/CD146+ pericytes generate α-SMA+pericytes but not Tuj1+ cells. Interestingly, type-2 pericyte derived Tuj1+ cells retain some pericytic markers (CD146+/PDGFRβ+/NG2+). Given the potential application of Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+/Tuj1+ cells for cell therapy, we found a surface marker, the nerve growth factor receptor, which is expressed exclusively in these cells and can be used to identify and isolate them from mixed cell populations in nontransgenic species for clinical purposes.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Pericyte Subtypes Differ in their Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells have been proposed as a therapy for central nervous system disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and trauma injuries, however their accessibility is a major limitation. We recently isolated Tuj1+ cells from skeletal muscle culture of Nestin-GFP transgenic mice however whether they form functional neurons in the brain is not yet known. Additionally, their isolation from nontransgenic species and identification of their ancestors is unknown. This gap of knowledge precludes us from studying their role as a valuable alternative to neural progenitors. Here, we identified two pericyte subtypes, type-1 and type-2, using a double transgenic Nestin-GFP/NG2-DsRed mouse and demonstrated that Nestin-GFP+/Tuj1+ cells derive from type-2 Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+/CD146+ pericytes located in the skeletal muscle interstitium. These cells are bipotential as they generate either Tuj1+ cells when cultured with muscle cells or become “classical” α-SMA+ pericytes when cultured alone. In contrast, type-1 Nestin-GFP-/NG2-DsRed+/CD146+ pericytes generate α-SMA+ pericytes but not Tuj1+ cells. Interestingly, type-2 pericyte derived Tuj1+ cells retain some pericytic markers (CD146+/PDGFRβ+/NG2+). Given the potential application of Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+/Tuj1+ cells for cell therapy, we found a surface marker, the nerve growth factor receptor, which is expressed exclusively in these cells and can be used to identify and isolate them from mixed cell populations in nontransgenic species for clinical purposes. PMID:23128780

  17. Immunoevasive Pericytes From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Preferentially Modulate Induction of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127−, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25− T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for

  18. Marginal copper deficiency impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation responses across two generations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The generational effects of marginal copper (Cu) deficiency on vascular function have not been characterized.In this study, the vascular consequences of marginal Cu deficiency were determined by relaxation responses in mesenteric arteries of dams and two generations of offspring. Pups from dams (fir...

  19. Pericytes, integral components of adult hematopoietic stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Sá da Bandeira, D; Casamitjana, J; Crisan, M

    2017-03-01

    The interest in perivascular cells as a niche for adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is significantly growing. In the adult bone marrow (BM), perivascular cells and HSCs cohabit. Among perivascular cells, pericytes are precursors of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. In situ, pericytes are recognised by their localisation to the abluminal side of the blood vessel wall and closely associated with endothelial cells, in combination with the expression of markers such as CD146, neural glial 2 (NG2), platelet derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), nestin (Nes) and/or leptin receptor (LepR). However, not all pericytes share a common phenotype: different immunophenotypes can be associated with distinct mesenchymal features, including hematopoietic support. In adult BM, arteriolar and sinusoidal pericytes control HSC behaviour, maintenance, quiescence and trafficking through paracrine effects. Different groups identified and characterized hematopoietic supportive pericyte subpopulations using various markers and mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent work performed by others to understand the role of the perivascular niche in the biology of HSCs in adults, as well as their importance in the development of therapies.

  20. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis.

    PubMed

    Chew, Thean S; O'Shea, Nuala R; Sewell, Gavin W; Oehlers, Stefan H; Mulvey, Claire M; Crosier, Philip S; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L; Smith, Andrew M; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD.

  1. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Thean S.; O'Shea, Nuala R.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Mulvey, Claire M.; Crosier, Philip S.; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L.; Smith, Andrew M.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD. PMID:26044960

  2. Phonological abilities in literacy-impaired children: Brain potentials reveal deficient phoneme discrimination, but intact prosodic processing.

    PubMed

    Männel, Claudia; Schaadt, Gesa; Illner, Franziska K; van der Meer, Elke; Friederici, Angela D

    2017-02-01

    Intact phonological processing is crucial for successful literacy acquisition. While individuals with difficulties in reading and spelling (i.e., developmental dyslexia) are known to experience deficient phoneme discrimination (i.e., segmental phonology), findings concerning their prosodic processing (i.e., suprasegmental phonology) are controversial. Because there are no behavior-independent studies on the underlying neural correlates of prosodic processing in dyslexia, these controversial findings might be explained by different task demands. To provide an objective behavior-independent picture of segmental and suprasegmental phonological processing in impaired literacy acquisition, we investigated event-related brain potentials during passive listening in typically and poor-spelling German school children. For segmental phonology, we analyzed the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) during vowel length discrimination, capturing automatic auditory deviancy detection in repetitive contexts. For suprasegmental phonology, we analyzed the Closure Positive Shift (CPS) that automatically occurs in response to prosodic boundaries. Our results revealed spelling group differences for the MMN, but not for the CPS, indicating deficient segmental, but intact suprasegmental phonological processing in poor spellers. The present findings point towards a differential role of segmental and suprasegmental phonology in literacy disorders and call for interventions that invigorate impaired literacy by utilizing intact prosody in addition to training deficient phonemic awareness.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency impairs skeletal muscle function in a smoking mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Cielen, Nele; Heulens, Nele; Maes, Karen; Carmeliet, Geert; Mathieu, Chantal; Janssens, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with skeletal muscle dysfunction. Vitamin D plays an important role in muscle strength and performance in healthy individuals. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in COPD, but its role in skeletal muscle dysfunction remains unclear. We examined the time-course effect of vitamin D deficiency on limb muscle function in mice with normal or deficient vitamin D serum levels exposed to air or cigarette smoke for 6, 12 or 18 weeks. The synergy of smoking and vitamin D deficiency increased lung inflammation and lung compliance from 6 weeks on with highest emphysema scores observed at 18 weeks. Smoking reduced body and muscle mass of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), but did not affect contractility, despite type II atrophy. Vitamin D deficiency did not alter muscle mass but reduced muscle force over time, downregulated vitamin D receptor expression, and increased muscle lipid peroxidation but did not alter actin and myosin expression, fiber dimensions or twitch relaxation time. The combined effect of smoking and vitamin D deficiency did not further deteriorate muscle function but worsened soleus mass loss and EDL fiber atrophy at 18 weeks. We conclude that the synergy of smoking and vitamin D deficiency in contrast to its effect on lung disease, had different, independent but important noxious effects on skeletal muscles in a mouse model of mild COPD. PMID:26906744

  4. Effects of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid on Human Pericytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Tomas; Dencker, Lennart; Sundberg, Christian; Scholz, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Microvascular pericytes are of key importance in neoformation of blood vessels, in stabilization of newly formed vessels as well as maintenance of angiostasis in resting tissues. Furthermore, pericytes are capable of differentiating into pro-fibrotic collagen type I producing fibroblasts. The present study investigates the effects of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on pericyte proliferation, cell viability, migration and differentiation. The results show that HDAC inhibition through exposure of pericytes to VPA in vitro causes the inhibition of pericyte proliferation and migration with no effect on cell viability. Pericyte exposure to the potent HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A caused similar effects on pericyte proliferation, migration and cell viability. HDAC inhibition also inhibited pericyte differentiation into collagen type I producing fibroblasts. Given the importance of pericytes in blood vessel biology a qPCR array focusing on the expression of mRNAs coding for proteins that regulate angiogenesis was performed. The results showed that HDAC inhibition promoted transcription of genes involved in vessel stabilization/maturation in human microvascular pericytes. The present in vitro study demonstrates that VPA influences several aspects of microvascular pericyte biology and suggests an alternative mechanism by which HDAC inhibition affects blood vessels. The results raise the possibility that HDAC inhibition inhibits angiogenesis partly through promoting a pericyte phenotype associated with stabilization/maturation of blood vessels. PMID:21966390

  5. Folic acid deficiency induces premature hearing loss through mechanisms involving cochlear oxidative stress and impairment of homocysteine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Garrido, Francisco; Partearroyo, Teresa; Cediel, Rafael; Zeisel, Steven H; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A

    2015-02-01

    Nutritional imbalance is emerging as a causative factor of hearing loss. Epidemiologic studies have linked hearing loss to elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and folate deficiency, and have shown that folate supplementation lowers tHcy levels potentially ameliorating age-related hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to address the impact of folate deficiency on hearing loss and to examine the underlying mechanisms. For this purpose, 2-mo-old C57BL/6J mice (Animalia Chordata Mus musculus) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 65 each) that were fed folate-deficient (FD) or standard diets for 8 wk. HPLC analysis demonstrated a 7-fold decline in serum folate and a 3-fold increase in tHcy levels. FD mice exhibited severe hearing loss measured by auditory brainstem recordings and TUNEL-positive-apoptotic cochlear cells. RT-quantitative PCR and Western blotting showed reduced levels of enzymes catalyzing homocysteine (Hcy) production and recycling, together with a 30% increase in protein homocysteinylation. Redox stress was demonstrated by decreased expression of catalase, glutathione peroxidase 4, and glutathione synthetase genes, increased levels of manganese superoxide dismutase, and NADPH oxidase-complex adaptor cytochrome b-245, α-polypeptide (p22phox) proteins, and elevated concentrations of glutathione species. Altogether, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia induced by folate deficiency and premature hearing loss involves impairment of cochlear Hcy metabolism and associated oxidative stress.

  6. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  7. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency.

  8. Non-anemic Iron Deficiency from Birth to Weaning Does Not Impair Growth or Memory in Piglets.

    PubMed

    Antonides, Alexandra; van Laarhoven, Serana; van der Staay, Franz J; Nordquist, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Early iron deficiency is associated with impaired (cognitive) development, the severity of which depends on the timing and duration of the under-supply of iron. To design effective treatment and prevention strategies for iron deficiency in humans, suited animal models are needed. In an earlier study (Antonides et al., 2015b) we separated 10 pairs of piglets from their mothers within a few days after birth and reared one sibling with artificial iron-deficient (ID) and the other with balanced control milk until weaning. ID piglets grew slower and showed poorer reference memory (RM) performance than their controls in a spatial holeboard task, even weeks after iron repletion. One putative intervening factor in that study was pre-weaning maternal deprivation. In an attempt to refine the piglet iron-deficiency model, we assessed whether piglets reared by sows, but withheld iron supplementation, can serve as animal model of iron deficiency. As sow milk is inherently ID, piglets normally receive a prophylactic iron injection. Ten pairs of piglets were housed with foster sows until weaning (4 weeks). One sibling per pair was randomly assigned to the control group (receiving iron dextran injections: 40 mg iron per kilogram body mass on days 3 and 10), the other to the ID group. From weaning, all pigs were fed a balanced commercial diet. Blood samples were taken in week 1, 3.5, 6, and 12. Pre-weaning blood iron values of ID piglets were lower than those of controls, but recovered to normal values after weaning. Hemoglobin of ID piglets did not reach anemic values. Hematocrit and hemoglobin of ID animals did not decrease, and serum iron even increased pre-weaning, suggesting that the piglets had access to an external source of iron, e.g., spilled feed or feces of the foster sows. Growth, and spatial memory assessed in the holeboard from 10 to 16 weeks of age, was unaffected in ID pigs. We conclude that sow-raised piglets are not a suitable model for iron-deficiency induced

  9. Non-anemic Iron Deficiency from Birth to Weaning Does Not Impair Growth or Memory in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Antonides, Alexandra; van Laarhoven, Serana; van der Staay, Franz J.; Nordquist, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Early iron deficiency is associated with impaired (cognitive) development, the severity of which depends on the timing and duration of the under-supply of iron. To design effective treatment and prevention strategies for iron deficiency in humans, suited animal models are needed. In an earlier study (Antonides et al., 2015b) we separated 10 pairs of piglets from their mothers within a few days after birth and reared one sibling with artificial iron-deficient (ID) and the other with balanced control milk until weaning. ID piglets grew slower and showed poorer reference memory (RM) performance than their controls in a spatial holeboard task, even weeks after iron repletion. One putative intervening factor in that study was pre-weaning maternal deprivation. In an attempt to refine the piglet iron-deficiency model, we assessed whether piglets reared by sows, but withheld iron supplementation, can serve as animal model of iron deficiency. As sow milk is inherently ID, piglets normally receive a prophylactic iron injection. Ten pairs of piglets were housed with foster sows until weaning (4 weeks). One sibling per pair was randomly assigned to the control group (receiving iron dextran injections: 40 mg iron per kilogram body mass on days 3 and 10), the other to the ID group. From weaning, all pigs were fed a balanced commercial diet. Blood samples were taken in week 1, 3.5, 6, and 12. Pre-weaning blood iron values of ID piglets were lower than those of controls, but recovered to normal values after weaning. Hemoglobin of ID piglets did not reach anemic values. Hematocrit and hemoglobin of ID animals did not decrease, and serum iron even increased pre-weaning, suggesting that the piglets had access to an external source of iron, e.g., spilled feed or feces of the foster sows. Growth, and spatial memory assessed in the holeboard from 10 to 16 weeks of age, was unaffected in ID pigs. We conclude that sow-raised piglets are not a suitable model for iron-deficiency induced

  10. Benefits of targeting both pericytes and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bergers, Gabriele; Song, Steven; Meyer-Morse, Nicole; Bergsland, Emily; Hanahan, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Functions of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in angiogenesis were pharmacologically impaired in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cancer. An inhibitor targeting VEGFRs in endothelial cells (SU5416) is effective against early-stage angiogenic lesions, but not large, well-vascularized tumors. In contrast, a kinase inhibitor incorporating selectivity for PDGFRs (SU6668) is shown to block further growth of end-stage tumors, eliciting detachment of pericytes and disruption of tumor vascularity. Importantly, PDGFRs were expressed only in perivascular cells of this tumor type, suggesting that PDGFR+ pericytes in tumors present a complimentary target to endothelial cells for efficacious antiangiogenic therapy. Therapeutic regimes combining the two kinase inhibitors (SU5416 and SU6668) were more efficacious against all stages of islet carcinogenesis than either single agent. Combination of the VEGFR inhibitor with another distinctive kinase inhibitor targeting PDGFR activity (Gleevec) was also able to regress late-stage tumors. Thus, combinatorial targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases shows promise for treating multiple stages in tumorigenesis, most notably the often-intractable late-stage solid tumor. PMID:12727920

  11. Exaggerated inflammation, impaired host defense, and neuropathology in progranulin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fangfang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Thomas, Bobby; Zhou, Ping; Qian, Liping; Jia, Ting; Ma, Xiaojing; Ma, Yao; Iadecola, Costantino; Beal, M Flint; Nathan, Carl; Ding, Aihao

    2010-01-18

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a widely expressed protein involved in diverse biological processes. Haploinsufficiency of PGRN in the human causes tau-negative, ubiquitin-positive frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the mechanisms are unknown. To explore the role of PGRN in vivo, we generated PGRN-deficient mice. Macrophages from these mice released less interleukin-10 and more inflammatory cytokines than wild type (WT) when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. PGRN-deficient mice failed to clear Listeria monocytogenes infection as quickly as WT and allowed bacteria to proliferate in the brain, with correspondingly greater inflammation than in WT. PGRN-deficient macrophages and microglia were cytotoxic to hippocampal cells in vitro, and PGRN-deficient hippocampal slices were hypersusceptible to deprivation of oxygen and glucose. With age, brains of PGRN-deficient mice displayed greater activation of microglia and astrocytes than WT, and their hippocampal and thalamic neurons accumulated cytosolic phosphorylated transactivation response element DNA binding protein-43. Thus, PGRN is a key regulator of inflammation and plays critical roles in both host defense and neuronal integrity. FTD associated with PGRN insufficiency may result from many years of reduced neutrotrophic support together with cumulative damage in association with dysregulated inflammation.

  12. Extracellular superoxide dismutase deficiency impairs wound healing in advanced age by reducing neovascularization and fibroblast function

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Duscher, Dominik; Rustad, Kristine C.; Kosaraju, Revanth; Rodrigues, Melanie; Whittam, Alexander J.; Januszyk, Michael; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is characterized by impairments in wound healing, and evidence is accumulating that this may be due in part to a concomitant increase in oxidative stress. Extended exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to lead to cellular dysfunction and organismal death via the destructive oxidation of intra-cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD/SOD3) is a prime antioxidant enzyme in the extracellular space that eliminates ROS. Here, we demonstrate that reduced SOD3 levels contribute to healing impairments in aged mice. These impairments include delayed wound closure, reduced neovascularization, impaired fibroblast proliferation and increased neutrophil recruitment. We further establish that SOD3 KO and aged fibroblasts both display reduced production of TGF-β1, leading to decreased differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that wound healing impairments in ageing are associated with increased levels of ROS, decreased SOD3 expression and impaired extracellular oxidative stress regulation. Our results identify SOD3 as a possible target to correct age-related cellular dysfunction in wound healing. PMID:26663425

  13. Quality of life in adolescents with hearing deficiencies and visual impairments

    PubMed Central

    Marques Freire Torres, Vanthauze; Lidianne Alencar Marinho, Christielle; Gabriela Gomes de Oliveira, Carolina; Conceição Maria Vieira, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The term quality of life (in Portuguese, Qualidade de Vida; QV) has been expanded and modified over the years and has come to signify social development in terms of education, health, and leisure as well as economic issues. Objective: To analyze the perception of QV in adolescents with hearing and visual impairments and the effects of socio-demographic characteristics on the domains of QV. Method: This descriptive series study comprised 42 adolescents aged 10 to 19 years who were students at Recife's state schools. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-Abbreviated questionnaire was used to evaluate QV. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: The global perception of QV was higher among adolescents with visual impairments than among those with hearing impairments. Among the individual components of QV, the environment domain garnered the lowest scores independent of the type of impairment. The subjects with visual impairments reported higher scores for social relationships, while the psychological domain scored higher among those with hearing impairments. The students integrated into normal classrooms perceived better QV in the psychological and social relationships domains than did those who sat in special classrooms. Conclusion: The environmental domain was the worst component of the QV of handicapped adolescents, suggesting a need for greater investments in policies to improve the QV of this population. PMID:26029272

  14. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (mucosulfatidosis): impaired degradation of labeled sulfated compounds in cultured skin fibroblasts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eto, Y; Numaguchi, S; Tahara, T; Rennert, O M

    1980-10-01

    Skin fibroblasts from a Japanese patient with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) (Mucosulfatidosis) were studied with regard to metabolism of various sulfated compounds in vivo. Several sulfatase activities (arylsulfatases A, B and C, cholesterol sulfatase, heparin N-sulfatase) were deficient in skin fibroblasts grown in F-10 CO2 medium. The accumulation and degradation of 35S-sulfatide, 35S-mucopolysaccharides, 14C-cholesterol sulfate by MSD cells were also studied, comparing them to control, Hunter and metachromatic leukodystrophy cells. MSD fibroblasts accumulated and failed to degrade these compounds in vivo. Cholesterol sulfate was also incorporated into the control and pathological cells, and MSD cells were unable to hydrolyze cholesterol sulfate, though cholesterol sulfate is known to be hydrolyzed in the non-lysosomal subfraction. From these data it is clear that multiple enzyme deficiencies in MSD fibroblasts can be demonstrated in vivo.

  15. Pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency impairs spatial learning and memory in the cognitive holeboard task in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Antonides, Alexandra; Schoonderwoerd, Anne C.; Scholz, Gabi; Berg, Brian M.; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in humans, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Early-life iron deficiency can lead to irreversible deficits in learning and memory. The pig represents a promising model animal for studying such deficits, because of its similarities to humans during early development. We investigated the effects of pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency in piglets on growth, blood parameters, cognitive performance, and brain histology later in life. Four to six days after birth, 10 male sibling pairs of piglets were taken from 10 different sows. One piglet of each pair was given a 200 mg iron dextran injection and fed a control milk diet for 28 days (88 mg Fe/kg), whereas the other sibling was given a saline injection and fed an iron deficient (ID) milk diet (21 mg Fe/kg). Due to severely retarded growth of two of the ID piglets, only eight ID piglets were tested behaviorally. After dietary treatment, all piglets were fed a balanced commercial pig diet (190–240 mg Fe/kg). Starting at 7.5 weeks of age, piglets were tested in a spatial cognitive holeboard task. In this task, 4 of 16 holes contain a hidden food reward, allowing measurement of working (short-term) memory and reference (long-term) memory (RM) simultaneously. All piglets received 40–60 acquisition trials, followed by a 16-trial reversal phase. ID piglets showed permanently retarded growth and a strong decrease in blood iron parameters during dietary treatment. After treatment, ID piglets' blood iron values restored to normal levels. In the holeboard task, ID piglets showed impaired RM learning during acquisition and reversal. Iron staining at necropsy at 12 weeks of age showed that ID piglets had fewer iron-containing cells in hippocampal regions CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG). The number of iron-containing cells in CA3 correlated positively with the average RM score during acquisition across all animals. Our results support the hypothesis that early

  16. Pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency impairs spatial learning and memory in the cognitive holeboard task in piglets.

    PubMed

    Antonides, Alexandra; Schoonderwoerd, Anne C; Scholz, Gabi; Berg, Brian M; Nordquist, Rebecca E; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in humans, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Early-life iron deficiency can lead to irreversible deficits in learning and memory. The pig represents a promising model animal for studying such deficits, because of its similarities to humans during early development. We investigated the effects of pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency in piglets on growth, blood parameters, cognitive performance, and brain histology later in life. Four to six days after birth, 10 male sibling pairs of piglets were taken from 10 different sows. One piglet of each pair was given a 200 mg iron dextran injection and fed a control milk diet for 28 days (88 mg Fe/kg), whereas the other sibling was given a saline injection and fed an iron deficient (ID) milk diet (21 mg Fe/kg). Due to severely retarded growth of two of the ID piglets, only eight ID piglets were tested behaviorally. After dietary treatment, all piglets were fed a balanced commercial pig diet (190-240 mg Fe/kg). Starting at 7.5 weeks of age, piglets were tested in a spatial cognitive holeboard task. In this task, 4 of 16 holes contain a hidden food reward, allowing measurement of working (short-term) memory and reference (long-term) memory (RM) simultaneously. All piglets received 40-60 acquisition trials, followed by a 16-trial reversal phase. ID piglets showed permanently retarded growth and a strong decrease in blood iron parameters during dietary treatment. After treatment, ID piglets' blood iron values restored to normal levels. In the holeboard task, ID piglets showed impaired RM learning during acquisition and reversal. Iron staining at necropsy at 12 weeks of age showed that ID piglets had fewer iron-containing cells in hippocampal regions CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG). The number of iron-containing cells in CA3 correlated positively with the average RM score during acquisition across all animals. Our results support the hypothesis that early

  17. Rat meningeal and brain microvasculature pericytes co-express the vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Brian N; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2008-04-18

    Pericytes are small cells that are apposed to brain and meningeal microvasculature and control capillary contraction, thereby regulating local cerebral perfusion. Pericytes respond to exogenously applied glutamate in vitro and express metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, it is unclear if pericytes have the capacity to release glutamate. We therefore determined whether pericytes express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), which are considered to be unambiguous markers of cells that use glutamate as an intercellular signaling molecule. Leptomeningeal and brain microvasculature-associated pericytes of the adult rat, as defined by the presence of NG2 proteoglycan, expressed both VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivity, but did not express VGLUT1. Consistent with the hypothesis that pericytes release glutamate, VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivities appeared to be localized to secretory vesicles. These results suggest that glutamate is released from pericytes of the leptomeninges and brain microvasculature, and demonstrate for the first time the co-localization of VGLUT2 and VGLUT3.

  18. Cellular Model of Atherogenesis Based on Pluripotent Vascular Wall Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are pluripotent cells that can be found in the vascular wall of both microvessels and large arteries and veins. They have distinct morphology with long branching processes and form numerous contacts with each other and with endothelial cells, organizing the vascular wall cells into a three-dimensional network. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that pericytes may play a key role in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis. Macrovascular pericytes are able to accumulate lipids and contribute to growth and vascularization of the atherosclerotic plaque. Moreover, they participate in the local inflammatory process and thrombosis, which can lead to fatal consequences. At the same time, pericytes can represent a useful model for studying the atherosclerotic process and for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. In particular, they are suitable for testing various substances' potential for decreasing lipid accumulation induced by the incubation of cells with atherogenic low-density lipoprotein. In this review we will discuss the application of cellular models for studying atherosclerosis and provide several examples of successful application of these models to drug research. PMID:26880986

  19. Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S; Jacobs, Andrew H; Chen, Heidi I; Poduri, Aruna; McKay, Andrew S; Riordan, Daniel P; Kofler, Natalie; Kitajewski, Jan; Weissman, Irving; Red-Horse, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial cells on the heart’s surface give rise to coronary artery smooth muscle cells (caSMCs) located deep in the myocardium. However, the differentiation steps between epicardial cells and caSMCs are unknown as are the final maturation signals at coronary arteries. Here, we use clonal analysis and lineage tracing to show that caSMCs derive from pericytes, mural cells associated with microvessels, and that these cells are present in adults. During development following the onset of blood flow, pericytes at arterial remodeling sites upregulate Notch3 while endothelial cells express Jagged-1. Deletion of Notch3 disrupts caSMC differentiation. Our data support a model wherein epicardial-derived pericytes populate the entire coronary microvasculature, but differentiate into caSMCs at arterial remodeling zones in response to Notch signaling. Our data are the first demonstration that pericytes are progenitors for smooth muscle, and their presence in adult hearts reveals a new potential cell type for targeting during cardiovascular disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10036.001 PMID:26479710

  20. Autoimmune destruction of pericytes as the cause of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Duncan D

    2008-06-01

    In diabetic retinopathy, collapse of the retinal vasculature is associated with loss of the pericytes. These are contractile cells that together with endothelial cells form the terminal arterioles of the retina. The cause of the loss of pericytes is not known. Recently, it has been discovered that type 1 diabetes is caused by forbidden clones of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which destroy the insulin-making cells with exquisite specificity. In the light of this, I postulate that an antigenically-related forbidden clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes selectively destroys the pericytes and that this is the cause of the vascular collapse of diabetic retinopathy. If this is so, the therapeutic implications are immense, involving a switch from ineffectual tight glycemic control to immunotherapy. This is already used as immunosuppression to prevent organ transplant rejection, and as the immune ablation and autologous bone marrow cell reconstitution that has saved the lives of patients with lethally-severe scleroderma. Once the pericyte surface auto-antigen for the T lymphocytes has been isolated, selective destruction of the pathogenic T lymphocytes would be possible by manufacture and use of cytotoxic auto-antigen complexes, which arrests progression of the retinopathy.

  1. RAGE Deficiency Impairs Bacterial Clearance in Murine Staphylococcal Sepsis, but Has No Significant Impact on Staphylococcal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Majd; Na, Manli; Welin, Amanda; Svensson, Mattias N. D.; Ali, Abukar; Jin, Tao; Pullerits, Rille

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis is a serious joint disease often caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) has an important role in several infections. We sought to investigate the role of RAGE in staphylococcal septic arthritis and sepsis in mice. Methods Wild-type (WT) and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were intra-articularly or intravenously inoculated with an arthritic or septic dose of S. aureus LS-1 strain. Clinical arthritis, weight development and mortality were monitored for 14 days. Serum levels of cytokines, kidney bacterial loads as well as micro-CT and histopathology of the joints were assessed. Results RAGE-/- mice with septic arthritis had significantly lower IL-17A and higher bone mineral density (BMD) compared to the control group. However, no significant differences between the groups were observed regarding the weight loss, the severity and frequency of arthritis, and bacterial loads in the kidneys. In mice with sepsis, the overall mortality rate was similar in RAGE-/- (39%) and in WT mice (45%). However, RAGE-/- mice with sepsis had significantly higher bacterial load in their kidneys compared to the WT controls. In line with data from hematogenous S. aureus arthritis, RAGE deficiency had no impact on arthritis severity in local joint infection. Conclusions Our results indicate that lack of RAGE has no significant impact on septic arthritis. However, RAGE-/- mice had significantly higher BMD compared to WT mice, which coincided with lower IL-17A in RAGE-/- mice. In sepsis, RAGE deficiency impairs bacterial kidney clearance. PMID:27907047

  2. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-03-16

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients.

  3. Elevated Slit2 Activity Impairs VEGF-induced Angiogenesis and Tumor Neovascularization in EphA2-deficient Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Victoria; Wang, Shan; Song, Wenqiang; Walter, Debra; Hwang, Yoonha; Chen, Jin; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenic remodeling during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis is orchestrated by cooperative signaling between several distinct molecular pathways, which are often exploited by tumors. Indeed, tumors upregulate pro-angiogenic molecules while simultaneously suppressing angiostatic pathways in order to recruit blood vessels for growth, survival, and metastatic spread. Understanding how cancers exploit pro- and anti-angiogenic signals is a key step in developing new, molecularly targeted anti-angiogenic therapies. While EphA2, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is required for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis, the mechanism through which these pathways intersect remains unclear. Slit2 expression is elevated in EphA2-deficient endothelium, and here it is reported that inhibiting Slit activity rescues VEGF-induced angiogenesis in cell culture and in vivo, as well as VEGF-dependent tumor angiogenesis, in EphA2-deficient endothelial cells and animals. Moreover, blocking Slit activity or Slit2 expression in EphA2-deficient endothelial cells restores VEGF-induced activation of Src and Rac, both of which are required for VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. These data suggest that EphA2 suppression of Slit2 expression and Slit angiostatic activity enables VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, providing a plausible mechanism for impaired endothelial responses to VEGF in the absence of EphA2 function. PMID:25504371

  4. Deficiency of Parkinson's disease-related gene Fbxo7 is associated with impaired mitochondrial metabolism by PARP activation

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Camprubi, Marta; Esteras, Noemi; Soutar, Marc PM; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2017-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease (PD)-related protein F-box only protein 7 (Fbxo7) is the substrate-recognition component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We have recently shown that PD-associated mutations in Fbxo7 disrupt mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), suggesting a role for Fbxo7 in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we report that Fbxo7 deficiency is associated with reduced cellular NAD+ levels, which results in increased mitochondrial NADH redox index and impaired activity of complex I in the electron transport chain. Under these conditions of compromised respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP contents are reduced, and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased. ROS activates poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity in Fbxo7-deficient cells. PARP inhibitor restores cellular NAD+ content and redox index and ATP pool, suggesting that PARP overactivation is cause of decreased complex I-driven respiration. These findings bring new insight into the mechanism of Fbxo7 deficiency, emphasising the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27689878

  5. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N.; Grossfeld, Paul D.; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients. PMID:26979507

  6. Glutaredoxin 5 deficiency causes sideroblastic anemia by specifically impairing heme biosynthesis and depleting cytosolic iron in human erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hong; Jeong, Suh Young; Ghosh, Manik C.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Silvestri, Laura; Ortillo, Danilo; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John; Camaschella, Clara; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) deficiency has previously been identified as a cause of anemia in a zebrafish model and of sideroblastic anemia in a human patient. Here we report that GLRX5 is essential for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and the maintenance of normal mitochondrial and cytosolic iron homeostasis in human cells. GLRX5, a mitochondrial protein that is highly expressed in erythroid cells, can homodimerize and assemble [2Fe-2S] in vitro. In GLRX5-deficient cells, [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis was impaired, the iron-responsive element–binding (IRE-binding) activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was activated, and increased IRP2 levels, indicative of relative cytosolic iron depletion, were observed together with mitochondrial iron overload. Rescue of patient fibroblasts with the WT GLRX5 gene by transfection or viral transduction reversed a slow growth phenotype, reversed the mitochondrial iron overload, and increased aconitase activity. Decreased aminolevulinate δ, synthase 2 (ALAS2) levels attributable to IRP-mediated translational repression were observed in erythroid cells in which GLRX5 expression had been downregulated using siRNA along with marked reduction in ferrochelatase levels and increased ferroportin expression. Erythroblasts express both IRP-repressible ALAS2 and non-IRP–repressible ferroportin 1b. The unique combination of IRP targets likely accounts for the tissue-specific phenotype of human GLRX5 deficiency. PMID:20364084

  7. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R.; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B.; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)+IgD+CD27+ B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM+IgD+CD27+ B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM+CD27+ B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM+IgD+CD27+ B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans. PMID:25320238

  8. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-12-04

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM(+)CD27(+) B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans.

  9. A role for human brain pericytes in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain inflammation plays a key role in neurological disease. Although much research has been conducted investigating inflammatory events in animal models, potential differences in human brain versus rodent models makes it imperative that we also study these phenomena in human cells and tissue. Methods Primary human brain cell cultures were generated from biopsy tissue of patients undergoing surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy. Cells were treated with pro-inflammatory compounds IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β, and LPS, and chemokines IP-10 and MCP-1 were measured by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and qRT-PCR. Microarray analysis was also performed on late passage cultures treated with vehicle or IFNγ and IL-1β. Results Early passage human brain cell cultures were a mixture of microglia, astrocytes, fibroblasts and pericytes. Later passage cultures contained proliferating fibroblasts and pericytes only. Under basal culture conditions all cell types showed cytoplasmic NFκB indicating that they were in a non-activated state. Expression of IP-10 and MCP-1 were significantly increased in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. The two chemokines were expressed in mixed cultures as well as cultures of fibroblasts and pericytes only. The expression of IP-10 and MCP-1 were regulated at the mRNA and protein level, and both were secreted into cell culture media. NFκB nuclear translocation was also detected in response to pro-inflammatory cues (except IFNγ) in all cell types. Microarray analysis of brain pericytes also revealed widespread changes in gene expression in response to the combination of IFNγ and IL-1β treatment including interleukins, chemokines, cellular adhesion molecules and much more. Conclusions Adult human brain cells are sensitive to cytokine challenge. As expected ‘classical’ brain immune cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, responded to cytokine challenge but of even more interest, brain pericytes also responded to such challenge with a

  10. Connexin 30 deficiency impairs renal tubular ATP release and pressure natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L; Toma, Ildikó; Hanner, Fiona; Willecke, Klaus; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2009-08-01

    In the renal tubule, ATP is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption, but the mechanism of ATP release is unknown. Several connexin (Cx) isoforms form mechanosensitive, ATP-permeable hemichannels. We localized Cx30 to the nonjunctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron and tested whether Cx30 participates in physiologically important release of ATP. We dissected, partially split open, and microperfused cortical collecting ducts from wild-type and Cx30-deficient mice in vitro. We used PC12 cells as ATP biosensors by loading them with Fluo-4/Fura Red to measure cytosolic calcium and positioning them in direct contact with the apical surface of either intercalated or principal cells. ATP biosensor responses, triggered by increased tubular flow or by bath hypotonicity, were approximately three-fold greater when positioned next to intercalated cells than next to principal cells. In addition, these responses did not occur in preparations from Cx30-deficient mice or with purinergic receptor blockade. After inducing step increases in mean arterial pressure by ligating the distal aorta followed by the mesenteric and celiac arteries, urine output increased 4.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.6-fold in Cx30-deficient mice, and urinary Na(+) excretion increased 5.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.8-fold in Cx30-deficient mice. Furthermore, Cx30-deficient mice developed endothelial sodium channel-dependent, salt-sensitive elevations in mean arterial pressure. Taken together, we suggest that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels have an integral role in pressure natriuresis by releasing ATP into the tubular fluid, which inhibits salt and water reabsorption.

  11. Connexin 30 Deficiency Impairs Renal Tubular ATP Release and Pressure Natriuresis

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L.; Toma, Ildikó; Hanner, Fiona; Willecke, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    In the renal tubule, ATP is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption, but the mechanism of ATP release is unknown. Several connexin (Cx) isoforms form mechanosensitive, ATP-permeable hemichannels. We localized Cx30 to the nonjunctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron and tested whether Cx30 participates in physiologically important release of ATP. We dissected, partially split open, and microperfused cortical collecting ducts from wild-type and Cx30-deficient mice in vitro. We used PC12 cells as ATP biosensors by loading them with Fluo-4/Fura Red to measure cytosolic calcium and positioning them in direct contact with the apical surface of either intercalated or principal cells. ATP biosensor responses, triggered by increased tubular flow or by bath hypotonicity, were approximately three-fold greater when positioned next to intercalated cells than next to principal cells. In addition, these responses did not occur in preparations from Cx30-deficient mice or with purinergic receptor blockade. After inducing step increases in mean arterial pressure by ligating the distal aorta followed by the mesenteric and celiac arteries, urine output increased 4.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.6-fold in Cx30-deficient mice, and urinary Na+ excretion increased 5.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.8-fold in Cx30-deficient mice. Furthermore, Cx30-deficient mice developed endothelial sodium channel–dependent, salt-sensitive elevations in mean arterial pressure. Taken together, we suggest that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels have an integral role in pressure natriuresis by releasing ATP into the tubular fluid, which inhibits salt and water reabsorption. PMID:19478095

  12. Brain catecholamine depletion and motor impairment in a Th knock-in mouse with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Noain, Daniela; Ying, Ming; Hole, Magnus; Flydal, Marte I; Scherer, Tanja; Allegri, Gabriella; Rassi, Anahita; Fingerhut, Ralph; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Pillai, Samyuktha; Wueest, Stephan; Konrad, Daniel; Lauber-Biason, Anna; Baumann, Christian R; Bindoff, Laurence A; Martinez, Aurora; Thöny, Beat

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyses the hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to l-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines. Mutations in the TH gene encoding tyrosine hydroxylase are associated with the autosomal recessive disorder tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency, which manifests phenotypes varying from infantile parkinsonism and DOPA-responsive dystonia, also termed type A, to complex encephalopathy with perinatal onset, termed type B. We generated homozygous Th knock-in mice with the mutation Th-p.R203H, equivalent to the most recurrent human mutation associated with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (TH-p.R233H), often unresponsive to l-DOPA treatment. The Th knock-in mice showed normal survival and food intake, but hypotension, hypokinesia, reduced motor coordination, wide-based gate and catalepsy. This phenotype was associated with a gradual loss of central catecholamines and the serious manifestations of motor impairment presented diurnal fluctuation but did not improve with standard l-DOPA treatment. The mutant tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme was unstable and exhibited deficient stabilization by catecholamines, leading to decline of brain tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity in the Th knock-in mice. In fact the substantia nigra presented an almost normal level of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase protein but distinct absence of the enzyme was observed in the striatum, indicating a mutation-associated mislocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nigrostriatal pathway. This hypomorphic mouse model thus provides understanding on pathomechanisms in type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and a platform for the evaluation of novel therapeutics for movement disorders with loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum.

  13. Grammatical Difficulties in Children with Specific Language Impairment: Is Learning Deficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical accounts of grammatical limitations in specific language impairment (SLI) have been polarized between those that postulate problems with domain-specific grammatical knowledge, and those that regard grammatical deficits as downstream consequences of perceptual or memory limitations. Here we consider an alternative view that grammatical…

  14. Grasping Motor Impairments in Autism: Not Action Planning but Movement Execution Is Deficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoit, Astrid M. B.; van Schie, Hein T.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine I. E.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    Different views on the origin of deficits in action chaining in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been posited, ranging from functional impairments in action planning to internal models supporting motor control. Thirty-one children and adolescents with ASD and twenty-nine matched controls participated in a two-choice reach-to-grasp paradigm…

  15. B-vitamin deficiency causes hyperhomocysteinemia and vascular cognitive impairment in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults, mildly elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hyperhomocysteinemia) is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease, but it is uncertain whether this is due to underlying metabolic, neurotoxic or vascular processes. We report h...

  16. ARID1A Deficiency Impairs the DNA Damage Checkpoint and Sensitizes Cells to PARP Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianfeng; Peng, Yang; Wei, Leizhen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Lin; Lan, Li; Kapoor, Prabodh; Ju, Zhenlin; Mo, Qianxing; Shih, Ie-Ming; Uray, Ivan P.; Wu, Xiangwei; Brown, Powel H.; Shen, Xuetong; Mills, Gordon B.; Peng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    ARID1A, a chromatin remodeler of the SWI/SNF family, is a recently identified tumor suppressor that is mutated in a broad spectrum of human cancers. Thus, it is of fundamental clinical importance to understand its molecular functions and determine whether ARID1A deficiency can be exploited therapeutically. In this manuscript, we report a key function of ARID1A in regulating the DNA damage checkpoint. ARID1A is recruited to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) via its interaction with the upstream DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATR. At the molecular level, ARID1A facilitates efficient processing of DSB to single strand ends, and sustains DNA damage signaling. Importantly, ARID1A deficiency sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibitors in vitro and in vivo providing a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with ARID1A-mutant tumors. PMID:26069190

  17. Impaired self-awareness in human addiction: Deficient attribution of personal relevance

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2014-01-01

    Compromised self-awareness of illness-related deficits and behaviors in psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia) has been associated with deficient functioning of cortical midline regions including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), implicated in personal relevance. Here, we review and critically analyze recent evidence to suggest that vmPFC abnormalities could similarly underlie deficient tagging of personal relevance in drug addiction, evidenced by a constellation of behaviors encompassing drug-biased attention, negative outcome insensitivity, self-report/behavior dissociation, and social inappropriateness. This novel framework might clarify, for example, why drug-addicted individuals often ruin long-standing relationships or forego important job opportunities while continuing to engage in uncontrolled drug-taking. Therapeutic interventions targeting personal relevance and associated vmPFC functioning could enhance self-awareness and facilitate more adaptive behavior in this chronically relapsing psychopathology. PMID:25278368

  18. Impaired self-awareness in human addiction: deficient attribution of personal relevance.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Scott J; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2014-12-01

    Compromised self-awareness of illness-related deficits and behaviors in psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia) has been associated with deficient functioning of cortical midline regions including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), implicated in personal relevance. Here, we review and critically analyze recent evidence to suggest that vmPFC abnormalities could similarly underlie deficient tagging of personal relevance in drug addiction, evidenced by a constellation of behaviors encompassing drug-biased attention, negative outcome insensitivity, self-report/behavior dissociation, and social inappropriateness. This novel framework might clarify, for example, why drug-addicted individuals often ruin long-standing relationships or forego important job opportunities while continuing to engage in uncontrolled drug-taking. Therapeutic interventions targeting personal relevance and associated vmPFC functioning could enhance self-awareness and facilitate more adaptive behavior in this chronically relapsing psychopathology.

  19. Adrenergic deficiency leads to impaired electrical conduction and increased arrhythmic potential in the embryonic mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice; Taylor, David G; Osuala, Kingsley; Natarajan, Anupama; Molnar, Peter J; Hickman, James; Alam, Sabikha; Moscato, Brittany; Weinshenker, David; Ebert, Steven N

    2012-07-06

    To determine if adrenergic hormones play a critical role in the functional development of the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system, we employed a mouse model where adrenergic hormone production was blocked due to targeted disruption of the dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Immunofluorescent histochemical evaluation of the major gap junction protein, connexin 43, revealed that its expression was substantially decreased in adrenergic-deficient (Dbh-/-) relative to adrenergic-competent (Dbh+/+ and Dbh+/-) mouse hearts at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5), whereas pacemaker and structural protein staining appeared similar. To evaluate cardiac electrical conduction in these hearts, we cultured them on microelectrode arrays (8×8, 200 μm apart). Our results show a significant slowing of atrioventricular conduction in adrenergic-deficient hearts compared to controls (31.4±6.4 vs. 15.4±1.7 ms, respectively, p<0.05). To determine if the absence of adrenergic hormones affected heart rate and rhythm, mouse hearts from adrenergic-competent and deficient embryos were cultured ex vivo at E10.5, and heart rates were measured before and after challenge with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 μM). On average, all hearts showed increased heart rate responses following isoproterenol challenge, but a significant (p<0.05) 225% increase in the arrhythmic index (AI) was observed only in adrenergic-deficient hearts. These results show that adrenergic hormones may influence heart development by stimulating connexin 43 expression, facilitating atrioventricular conduction, and helping to maintain cardiac rhythm during a critical phase of embryonic development.

  20. Bif-1 deficiency impairs lipid homeostasis and causes obesity accompanied by insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Desai, Neelam; Zhang, Jun; Serfass, Jacob M; Shi, Yu-Guang; Lynch, Christopher J; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-02-09

    Bif-1 is a membrane-curvature inducing protein that is implicated in the regulation of autophagy and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that Bif-1 plays a critical role in regulating lipid catabolism to control the size of lipid droplets and prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance upon aging or dietary challenge. Our data show that Bif-1 deficiency promotes the expansion of adipose tissue mass without altering food intake or physical activities. While Bif-1 is dispensable for adipose tissue development, its deficiency reduces the basal rate of adipose tissue lipolysis and results in adipocyte hypertrophy upon aging. The importance of Bif-1 in lipid turnover is not limited to adipose tissue since fasting and refeeding-induced lipid droplet clearance is also attenuated by Bif-1 loss in the liver. Interestingly, obesity induced by a high fat-diet or Bif-1 deficiency downregulates the expression of proteins involved in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, including Atg9a and Lamp1 in the adipose tissue. These findings thus identify Bif-1 as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis to prevent the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated metabolic complications.

  1. Maintenance of vascular integrity by pericytes is essential for normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Dario R; Marsh, Graham; Huang, Angela; Campanholle, Gabriela; Aburatani, Takahide; Dang, Lan; Gomez, Ivan; Fisher, Ken; Ligresti, Giovanni; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2016-12-01

    Pericytes are tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitor cells anatomically associated with the vasculature that have been shown to participate in tissue regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that kidney pericytes, derived from FoxD1(+) mesodermal progenitors during embryogenesis, are necessary for postnatal kidney homeostasis. Diphtheria toxin delivery to FoxD1Cre::RsDTR transgenic mice resulted in selective ablation of >90% of kidney pericytes but not other cell lineages. Abrupt increases in plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and albuminuria within 96 h indicated acute kidney injury in pericyte-ablated mice. Loss of pericytes led to a rapid accumulation of neutral lipid vacuoles, swollen mitochondria, and apoptosis in tubular epithelial cells. Pericyte ablation led to endothelial cell swelling, reduced expression of vascular homeostasis markers, and peritubular capillary loss. Despite the observed injury, no signs of the acute inflammatory response were observed. Pathway enrichment analysis of genes expressed in kidney pericytes in vivo identified basement membrane proteins, angiogenic factors, and factors regulating vascular tone as major regulators of vascular function. Using novel microphysiological devices, we recapitulated human kidney peritubular capillaries coated with pericytes and showed that pericytes regulate permeability, basement membrane deposition, and microvascular tone. These findings suggest that through the active support of the microvasculature, pericytes are essential to adult kidney homeostasis.

  2. Deficiency of sphingomyelin synthase-1 but not sphingomyelin synthase-2 causes hearing impairments in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei-Hong; Takemoto, Makoto; Watanabe, Ken; Luo, Huan; Nishimura, Masataka; Yano, Masato; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi; Song, Wen-Jie

    2012-08-15

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a sphingolipid reported to function as a structural component of plasma membranes and to participate in signal transduction. The role of SM metabolism in the process of hearing remains controversial. Here, we examined the role of SM synthase (SMS), which is subcategorized into the family members SMS1 and SMS2, in auditory function. Measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) revealed hearing impairment in SMS1−/− mice in a low frequency range (4–16 kHz). As a possible mechanism of this impairment, we found that the stria vascularis (SV) in these mice exhibited atrophy and disorganized marginal cells. Consequently, SMS1−/− mice exhibited significantly smaller endocochlear potentials (EPs). As a possible mechanism for EP reduction, we found altered expression patterns and a reduced level of KCNQ1 channel protein in the SV of SMS1−/− mice. These mice also exhibited reduced levels of distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Quantitative comparison of the SV atrophy, KCNQ1 expression, and outer hair cell density at the cochlear apical and basal turns revealed no location dependence, but more macrophage invasion into the SV was observed in the apical region than the basal region, suggesting a role of cochlear location-dependent oxidative stress in producing the frequency dependence of hearing loss in SMS1−/− mice. Elevated ABR thresholds, decreased EPs, and abnormal KCNQ1 expression patterns in SMS1−/− mice were all found to be progressive with age. Mice lacking SMS2, however, exhibited neither detectable hearing loss nor changes in their EPs. Taken together, our results suggest that hearing impairments occur in SMS1−/− but not SMS2−/− mice. Defects in the SV with subsequent reductions in EPs together with hair cell dysfunction may account, at least partially, for hearing impairments in SMS1−/− mice.

  3. Childhood encephalomyopathy with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, ataxia, muscle wasting, and mental impairment.

    PubMed

    Angelini, C; Bresolin, N; Pegolo, G; Bet, L; Rinaldo, P; Trevisan, C; Vergani, L

    1986-08-01

    The son of third cousins was normal until age 2 when he had difficulty walking. At age 8 there was limb weakness, ataxia, loss of tendon reflexes, dislalia, and he was mildly retarded. During fasting, urinary organic acid excretion was abnormally high. Cytochrome c oxidase activity in muscle was 7% of the normal mean. The enzyme in platelets was 16% of controls with a decreased cytochrome aa3 peak. These data suggest an autosomal recessive transmission of this variant of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  4. Parental origin impairment of synaptic functions and behaviors in cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein 1 (Cyfip1) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Leeyup; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Li; Towers, Aaron J; Cao, Xinyu; Kim, Il Hwan; Jiang, Yong-hui

    2015-12-10

    CYFIP1 maps to the interval between proximal breakpoint 1 (BP1) and breakpoint 2 (BP2) of chromosomal 15q11-q13 deletions that are implicated in the Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). There is only one breakpoint (BP3) at the distal end of deletion. CYFIP1 is deleted in AS patients with the larger class I deletion (BP1 to BP3) and the neurological presentations in these patients are more severe than that of patients with class II (BP2 to BP3) deletion. The haploinsufficiency of CYFIP1 is hypothesized to contribute to more severe clinical presentations in class I AS patients. The expression of CYFIP1 is suggested to be bi-allelic in literature but the possibility of parental origin of expression is not completely excluded. We generated and characterized Cyfip1 mutant mice. Homozygous Cyfip1 mice were early embryonic lethal. However, there was a parental origin specific effect between paternal Cyfip1 deficiency (m+/p-) and maternal deficiency (m-/p+) on both synaptic transmissions and behaviors in hippocampal CA1 synapses despite no evidence supporting the parental origin difference for the expression. Both m-/p+ and m+/p- showed the impaired input-output response and paired-pulse facilitation. While the long term-potentiation and group I mGluR mediated long term depression induced by DHPG was not different between Cyfip1 m-/p+ and m+/p- mice, the initial DHPG induced response was significantly enhanced in m-/p+ but not in m+/p- mice. m+/p- but not m-/p+ mice displayed increased freezing in cued fear conditioning and abnormal transitions in zero-maze test. The impaired synaptic transmission and behaviors in haploinsufficiency of Cyfip1 mice provide the evidence supporting the role of CYFIP1 modifying the clinical presentation of class I AS patients and in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Impaired redox status and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica

    PubMed Central

    Chariot, P; Chevalier, X; Yerroum, M; Drogou, I; Authier, F; Gherardi, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate redox status and muscular mitochondrial abnormalities in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR).
METHODS—Prospective evaluation of deltoid muscle biopsy in 15 patients with PMR. Fifteen subjects matched for age and sex, with histologically normal muscle and without clinical evidence of myopathy, were used as controls. Cryostat sections of muscle were processed for conventional dyes, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), usual histochemical reactions, and Sudan black. A total of 300-800 fibres was examined in each case. Blood lactate, pyruvate, and lactate/pyruvate ratio were determined in all patients.
RESULTS—Ragged red fibres were found in eight patients with PMR and accounted for 0-0.5% of fibres. Focal COX deficiency was found in 14 (93%) of 15 patients and in nine (60%) of 15 controls. COX deficient fibres were more common in patients with PMR (range 0-2.5%; mean 0.9%) than in controls (range 0-1.2%; mean 0.3%) (paired t test, p=0.001). Seven (47%) of 15 patients had high blood lactate levels (1.50-2.60 mmol/l) or high blood lactate/pyruvate ratios (22-25).
CONCLUSIONS—PMR is associated with mitochondrial abnormalities not solely related to the aging process.

 PMID:11602471

  6. MEC-17 deficiency leads to reduced α-tubulin acetylation and impaired migration of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wei, Dan; Wang, Qiong; Pan, Jing; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2012-09-12

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental process during the development of the cerebral cortex and is regulated by cytoskeletal components. Microtubule dynamics can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to tubulin subunits. Acetylation of α-tubulin at lysine 40 is important in regulating microtubule properties, and this process is controlled by acetyltransferase and deacetylase. MEC-17 is a newly discovered α-tubulin acetyltransferase that has been found to play a major role in the acetylation of α-tubulin in different species in vivo. However, the physiological function of MEC-17 during neural development is largely unknown. Here, we report that MEC-17 is critical for the migration of cortical neurons in the rat. MEC-17 was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex during development. MEC-17 deficiency caused migratory defects in the cortical projection neurons and interneurons, and perturbed the transition of projection neurons from the multipolar stage to the unipolar/bipolar stage in the intermediate zone of the cortex. Furthermore, knockdown of α-tubulin deacetylase HDAC6 or overexpression of tubulin(K40Q) to mimic acetylated α-tubulin could reduce the migratory and morphological defects caused by MEC-17 deficiency in cortical projection neurons. Thus, MEC-17, which regulates the acetylation of α-tubulin, appears to control the migration and morphological transition of cortical neurons. This finding reveals the importance of MEC-17 and α-tubulin acetylation in cortical development.

  7. Gpr177 deficiency impairs mammary development and prohibits Wnt-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Eri Ohfuchi; Yu, H-M Ivy; Jiang, Ming; Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of the Wnt pathway, essential for various developmental processes, is tightly linked to human breast cancers. By hijacking this evolutionary conserved signaling pathway, cancer cells acquire sustaining proliferation ability, leading to modification of physiologic properties necessary for tumor initiation and progression. An enormous wealth of knowledge on the importance of Wnt signaling in breast development and cancer has been obtained, but the cell types responsible for production of this proliferative signal operating within normal and malignant tissues remains poorly understood. Here we report that Wnt production mediated by Gpr177 is essential for mammary morphogenesis. The loss of Gpr177 interferes with mammary stem cells, leading to deficiencies in cell proliferation and differentiation. Genetic analysis further demonstrates an indispensable role of Gpr177 in Wnt-induced tumorigenesis. The Gpr177-deficiency mice are resistant to malignant transformation. This study not only demonstrates the necessity of Wnt in mammary organogenesis but also provides a proof-of-principle for targeting of Gpr177 as a potential new treatment for human diseases with aberrant Wnt stimulation.

  8. Characterization of connexin31.1-deficient mice reveals impaired placental development.

    PubMed

    Zheng-Fischhöfer, Qingyi; Kibschull, Mark; Schnichels, Marc; Kretz, Markus; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Strotmann, Jörg; Reucher, Harald; Lynn, Bruce D; Nagy, James I; Lye, Stephen J; Winterhager, Elke; Willecke, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    The gap junction gene Connexin31.1 has been reported to be expressed predominantly in the epidermis of murine skin. To study the function of this gene, we generated mice in which the coding DNA of the Connexin31.1 gene was replaced by lacZ reporter coding DNA. Using beta-galactosidase staining, we have shown that lacZ/Connexin31.1 was expressed in the spinous and granular layers of the epidermis, in cells of olfactory epithelium and in the vomeronasal organ. During embryogenesis, Connexin31.1 was co-expressed with another isoform, Connexin31, in the post-implantation trophoblast cell lineage and, later in gestation, in placental glycogen cells. Although homozygous Connexin31.1-deficient mice were fertile and showed no morphological or functional defects in adult organs expressing this gene, 30% of the offspring expected according to Mendelian inheritance were lost between embryonic days 11.5 and 14.5 and surviving embryos were significantly reduced in weight near the end of pregnancy. Placentas of Connexin31.1-deficient embryos were reduced in weight and showed altered morphology of the spongiotrophoblast and labyrinth layer. The spongiotrophoblast formed a compact barrier at the decidual border that might restrict the maternal blood supply. We conclude that Connexin31.1 is critical for normal placental development but appears to be functionally compensated by other connexin isoforms in the embryo proper and adult mouse.

  9. Impaired replication elongation in Tetrahymena mutants deficient in histone H3 Lys 27 monomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Xiong, Jie; Zhang, Chunchao; Berquist, Brian R.; Yang, Rendong; Zhao, Meng; Molascon, Anthony J.; Kwiatkowski, Shaina Y.; Yuan, Dongxia; Qin, Zhaohui; Wen, Jianfan; Kapler, Geoffrey M.; Andrews, Philip C.; Miao, Wei; Liu, Yifan

    2013-01-01

    Replication of nuclear DNA occurs in the context of chromatin and is influenced by histone modifications. In the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, we identified TXR1, encoding a histone methyltransferase. TXR1 deletion resulted in severe DNA replication stress, manifested by the accumulation of ssDNA, production of aberrant replication intermediates, and activation of robust DNA damage responses. Paired-end Illumina sequencing of ssDNA revealed intergenic regions, including replication origins, as hot spots for replication stress in ΔTXR1 cells. ΔTXR1 cells showed a deficiency in histone H3 Lys 27 monomethylation (H3K27me1), while ΔEZL2 cells, deleting a Drosophila E(z) homolog, were deficient in H3K27 di- and trimethylation, with no detectable replication stress. A point mutation in histone H3 at Lys 27 (H3 K27Q) mirrored the phenotype of ΔTXR1, corroborating H3K27me1 as a key player in DNA replication. Additionally, we demonstrated interactions between TXR1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). These findings support a conserved pathway through which H3K27me1 facilitates replication elongation. PMID:23884606

  10. Enhanced perisomatic inhibition and impaired long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of juvenile CHL1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nikonenko, Alexander G; Sun, Mu; Lepsveridze, Eka; Apostolova, Ivayla; Petrova, Iveta; Irintchev, Andrey; Dityatev, Alexander; Schachner, Melitta

    2006-04-01

    The cell adhesion molecule, CHL1, like its close homologue L1, is important for normal brain development and function. In this study, we analysed the functional role of CHL1 in synaptic transmission in the CA1 region of the hippocampus using juvenile CHL1-deficient (CHL1-/-) and wild-type (CHL1+/+) mice. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked in pyramidal cells by minimal stimulation of perisomatically projecting interneurons were increased in CHL1-/- mice compared with wild-type littermates. Also, long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses was reduced under physiological conditions in CHL1-/- mice. This abnormality was abolished by application of a GABAA receptor antagonist, suggesting that enhanced inhibition is the cause of LTP impairment. Quantitative ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed aberrations possibly related to the abnormally high inhibition observed in CHL1-/- mice. The length and linear density of active zones in symmetric synapses on pyramidal cell bodies, as well as number of perisomatic puncta containing inhibitory axonal markers were increased. Density and total number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons was also abnormally high. These observations and the finding that CA1 interneurons express CHL1 protein indicate that CHL1 is important for regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission and interneuron populations in the postnatal brain. The observed enhancement of inhibitory transmission in CHL1-/- mice is in contrast to the previous finding of reduced inhibition in L1 deficient mice and indicates different functions of these two closely related molecules.

  11. A novel animal model of impaired glucose tolerance induced by the interaction of vitamin E deficiency and (60)Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yue; Cheng, Yan; Yin, Ying; Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Weng, Yan; Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), known as the prediabetes stage, is usually induced by habits of life or environmental factors. Established IGT animal models are mostly conducted with chemical compounds such as streptozocin or genetic modification. However, the occasion of exposure to these factors in daily life is seldom. The objective of this study was to establish a new animal model of IGT induced by VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation. SD rats were treated individually or in combination of these two factors. In the combination group, the calculated insulin sensitivity index decreased; then HOMA-β value increased. Oxidative damage and IGT were observed. Insulin secretion level in perfusate from pancreas response to glucose was characterized by a rapid but reduced first phase and an obviously defective second phase upon pancreas perfusion. Histopathological images demonstrated the pathological changes. Western blotting analysis showed that the insulin signaling pathway was downregulated. The interaction of VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation could break the equilibrium of oxidation and antioxidation and result in IGT. More importantly, a new IGT model was successfully established which may be conducive to further research into development of drugs against human IGT.

  12. Impairment of skin wound healing in beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase-deficient mice with reduced leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kondo, Toshikazu; Nishie, Toshikazu; Ohshima, Tohru; Asano, Masahide

    2004-04-01

    Cell-surface carbohydrate chains are known to contribute to cell migration, interactions, and proliferation, but their roles in skin wound healing have not been evaluated. We examined the biological roles of beta4-galactosylated carbohydrate chains in skin wound healing using mutant mice that lack beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase-I (beta4GalT-I), which is responsible for the biosynthesis of the type 2 chain in N-glycans and the core 2 branch in O-glycans. beta4GalT-I-deficient mice showed significantly delayed wound healing with reduced re-epithelialization, collagen synthesis, and angiogenesis, compared with control mice. Neutrophil and macrophage recruitment at wound sites was also impaired in these mice probably because of selectin-ligand deficiency. In accordance with the reduced leukocyte infiltration, the expression levels of macrophage-derived chemokines, transforming growth factor-beta1, and vascular endothelial growth factor were all reduced in beta4GalT-I(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that beta4-galactosylated carbohydrate chains play a critical role in skin wound healing by mediating leukocyte infiltration and epidermal cell growth, which affects the production of chemokines and growth factors. This study introduces a suitable mouse model for investigating the molecular mechanisms of skin wound healing and is the first report showing that carbohydrate chains have a strong influence on skin wound healing.

  13. A Novel Animal Model of Impaired Glucose Tolerance Induced by the Interaction of Vitamin E Deficiency and 60Co Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Cheng, Yan; Yin, Ying; Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Weng, Yan; Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), known as the prediabetes stage, is usually induced by habits of life or environmental factors. Established IGT animal models are mostly conducted with chemical compounds such as streptozocin or genetic modification. However, the occasion of exposure to these factors in daily life is seldom. The objective of this study was to establish a new animal model of IGT induced by VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation. SD rats were treated individually or in combination of these two factors. In the combination group, the calculated insulin sensitivity index decreased; then HOMA-β value increased. Oxidative damage and IGT were observed. Insulin secretion level in perfusate from pancreas response to glucose was characterized by a rapid but reduced first phase and an obviously defective second phase upon pancreas perfusion. Histopathological images demonstrated the pathological changes. Western blotting analysis showed that the insulin signaling pathway was downregulated. The interaction of VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation could break the equilibrium of oxidation and antioxidation and result in IGT. More importantly, a new IGT model was successfully established which may be conducive to further research into development of drugs against human IGT. PMID:25954750

  14. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  16. Grammatical Difficulties in Children with Specific Language Impairment: Is Learning Deficient?

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical accounts of grammatical limitations in specific language impairment (SLI) have been polarized between those that postulate problems with domain-specific grammatical knowledge, and those that regard grammatical deficits as downstream consequences of perceptual or memory limitations. Here we consider an alternative view that grammatical deficits arise when the learning system is biased towards memorization of exemplars, and is poor at extracting statistical dependencies from the input. We examine evidence that SLI involves deficits in extracting nonadjacent dependencies from input, leading to reliance on rote learning, and consider how far this may be part of a limitation of procedural learning, or a secondary consequence of memory limitations.

  17. Macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ deficiency delays skin wound healing through impairing apoptotic cell clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Shi, R; Luo, B; Yang, X; Qiu, L; Xiong, J; Jiang, M; Liu, Y; Zhang, Z; Wu, Y

    2015-01-15

    Skin wound macrophages are key regulators of skin repair and their dysfunction causes chronic, non-healing skin wounds. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) regulates pleiotropic functions of macrophages, but its contribution in skin wound healing is poorly defined. We observed that macrophage PPARγ expression was upregulated during skin wound healing. Furthermore, macrophage PPARγ deficiency (PPARγ-knock out (KO)) mice exhibited impaired skin wound healing with reduced collagen deposition, angiogenesis and granulation formation. The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression in wounds of PPARγ-KO mice was significantly increased and local restoration of TNF-α reversed the healing deficit in PPARγ-KO mice. Wound macrophages produced higher levels of TNF-α in PPARγ-KO mice compared with control. In vitro, the higher production of TNF-α by PPARγ-KO macrophages was associated with impaired apoptotic cell clearance. Correspondingly, increased apoptotic cell accumulation was found in skin wound of PPARγ-KO mice. Mechanically, peritoneal and skin wound macrophages expressed lower levels of various phagocytosis-related molecules. In addition, PPARγ agonist accelerated wound healing and reduced local TNF-α expression and wound apoptotic cells accumulation in wild type but not PPARγ-KO mice. Therefore, PPARγ has a pivotal role in controlling wound macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells to ensure efficient skin wound healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic target for skin wound healing.

  18. Axonal degeneration in paraplegin-deficient mice is associated with abnormal mitochondria and impairment of axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Ferreirinha, Fatima; Quattrini, Angelo; Pirozzi, Marinella; Valsecchi, Valentina; Dina, Giorgia; Broccoli, Vania; Auricchio, Alberto; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Gaeta, Laura; Casari, Giorgio; Ballabio, Andrea; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2004-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, axonal degeneration occurs before neuronal death and contributes significantly to patients’ disability. Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by selective degeneration of axons of the corticospinal tracts and fasciculus gracilis. HSP may therefore be considered an exemplary disease to study the local programs mediating axonal degeneration. We have developed a mouse model for autosomal recessive HSP due to mutations in the SPG7 gene encoding the mitochondrial ATPase paraplegin. Paraplegin-deficient mice are affected by a distal axonopathy of spinal and peripheral axons, characterized by axonal swelling and degeneration. We found that mitochondrial morphological abnormalities occurred in synaptic terminals and in distal regions of axons long before the first signs of swelling and degeneration and correlated with onset of motor impairment during a rotarod test. Axonal swellings occur through massive accumulation of organelles and neurofilaments, suggesting impairment of anterograde axonal transport. Retrograde axonal transport is delayed in symptomatic mice. We speculate that local failure of mitochondrial function may affect axonal transport and cause axonal degeneration. Our data suggest that a timely therapeutic intervention may prevent the loss of axons. PMID:14722615

  19. Prostacyclin Prevents Pericyte Loss and Demyelination Induced by Lysophosphatidylcholine in the Central Nervous System*

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Rieko; Kuroda, Mariko; Matoba, Ken; Lin, Hsiaoyun; Takahashi, Chisato; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes play pivotal roles in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the central nervous system. As pericytes prevent vascular leakage, they can halt neuronal damage stemming from a compromised blood-brain barrier. Therefore, pericytes may be a good target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, although evidence is lacking. In this study, we show that prostacyclin attenuates lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-mediated vascular dysfunction through pericyte protection in the adult mouse spinal cord. LPC decreased the number of pericytes in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model, and this decrease was prevented by iloprost treatment, a prostacyclin analog. Intrathecal administration of iloprost attenuated vascular barrier disruption after LPC injection in the mouse spinal cord. Furthermore, iloprost treatment diminished demyelination and motor function deficits in mice injected with LPC. These results support the notion that prostacyclin acts on pericytes to maintain vascular barrier integrity. PMID:25795781

  20. TLR3 deficiency impairs spinal cord synaptic transmission, central sensitization, and pruritus in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Berta, Temugin; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Zhang, Ling; Lü, Ning; Liu, Qin; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yong-Jing; Liu, Yen-Chin; Ma, Qiufu; Dong, Xinzhong; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2012-06-01

    Itch, also known as pruritus, is a common, intractable symptom of several skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and xerosis. TLRs mediate innate immunity and regulate neuropathic pain, but their roles in pruritus are elusive. Here, we report that scratching behaviors induced by histamine-dependent and -independent pruritogens are markedly reduced in mice lacking the Tlr3 gene. TLR3 is expressed mainly by small-sized primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) that coexpress the itch signaling pathway components transient receptor potential subtype V1 and gastrin-releasing peptide. Notably, we found that treatment with a TLR3 agonist induces inward currents and action potentials in DRG neurons and elicited scratching in WT mice but not Tlr3(-/-) mice. Furthermore, excitatory synaptic transmission in spinal cord slices and long-term potentiation in the intact spinal cord were impaired in Tlr3(-/-) mice but not Tlr7(-/-) mice. Consequently, central sensitization-driven pain hypersensitivity, but not acute pain, was impaired in Tlr3(-/-) mice. In addition, TLR3 knockdown in DRGs also attenuated pruritus in WT mice. Finally, chronic itch in a dry skin condition was substantially reduced in Tlr3(-/-) mice. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of TLR3 in regulating sensory neuronal excitability, spinal cord synaptic transmission, and central sensitization. TLR3 may serve as a new target for developing anti-itch treatment.

  1. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  2. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis.

  3. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  4. Impaired dental cytodifferentiation in glial cell-line derived growth factor (GDNF) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, J C; Cabo, R; Ciriaco, E; Laurà, R; Naves, F J; Silos-Santiago, I; Vega, J A

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes the survival of multiple neuron types in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, it plays a key role in the development of the enteric nervous system and in the kidney organogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors are expressed in the developing tooth as well as in the trigeminal ganglion. However, the precise role of this growth factor in tooth morphogenesis and cell differentiation, or in the development of trigeminal ganglion cells, is still elusive. Using structural and ultrastructural techniques we analyzed in detail the first molar tooth germ of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor deficient mice as well as the neuronal density in trigeminal ganglion. The length and width of first molar tooth germ in knockout deficient animals showed no differences in the knockout animals in comparison with age-matched heterozygous or wild-type littermates. Nevertheless, in mice lacking glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, both ameloblasts and odontoblasts failed to fully develop and differentiate, and the enamel matrix and predentin layers were absent. On the other hand, the number of trigeminal sensory neurons and the structure of the nerves supplying first molar tooth germ were largely normal. Present results suggest a new non-neuronal role for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in tooth development. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor seems not to be involved in tooth initiation and morphogenesis, whereas it seems essential for cytodifferentiation. Conversely, neither development of trigeminal neuron nor nerve fibers supplying teeth are directly dependent on glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor.

  5. Moderate zinc deficiency reduces testicular Zip6 and Zip10 abundance and impairs spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Croxford, Thomas P; McCormick, Nicholas H; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2011-03-01

    Male infertility accounts for ~40% of cases of failure to conceive. Testes have a strict zinc (Zn) requirement and severe Zn deficiency compromises spermatogenesis, sperm viability, and motility, compromising fertility in men. Despite the high prevalence of marginal Zn deficiency in humans, less emphasis has been placed on understanding the consequences on male reproduction. Swiss Webster mice were used to visualize Zip protein expression during spermatogenesis using immunohistochemistry. Data suggest Zip5 imports Zn into Sertoli cells and spermatocytes, augmented by Zip10 (primary spermatocytes) and Zip8 (secondary spermatocytes). Zip6, 8, and 10 expression was retained in round spermatids, although Zip8 and Zip10 expression disappears during spermatid maturation. Zip1 and Zip6 expression was detected in mature, elongated spermatids. Zip14 was detected in undifferentiated spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Mice fed diets (n = 10/group) reduced in Zn concentration [marginal-Zn diet (MZD), 10 mg Zn/kg; low-Zn diet (ZD), 7 mg Zn/kg] for 30 d had >35% lower liver Zn concentrations than mice fed the control diet (C; 30 mg Zn/kg) (P < 0.05). Plasma Zn and testosterone concentrations and the testes Zn concentration and weight were not significantly lower than in controls. Plasma Zn was greater in the ZD group than in the C and MZD groups. Mice fed ZD had a reduced number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells (~50%; P < 0.05), compromised seminiferous tubule structure, and reduced Zip10 and Zip6 abundance (>50%; P < 0.5) compared with mice fed C. Our data provide compelling evidence that reduced Zn intake may be associated with infertility in men, perhaps independent of decreased levels of circulating Zn or testosterone, which warrants further investigation in human populations.

  6. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuttke, M.; Sahin, E.; Pisoni, J.; Percig, S.; Vogel, A.; Kraemmer, D.; Hanzl, L.; Brunner, J. S.; Paar, H.; Soukup, K.; Halfmann, A.; Dohnal, A. M.; Steiner, C. W.; Blüml, S.; Basilio, J.; Hochreiter, B.; Salzmann, M.; Hoesel, B.; Lametschwandtner, G.; Eferl, R.; Schmid, J. A.; Schabbauer, G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor–host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α+ DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  7. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  8. Actin- and myosin-like filaments in rat brain pericytes.

    PubMed

    Le Beux, Y J; Willemot, J

    1978-04-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) labeling was used to identify the nature of the filaments which form bundles in the cytoplasm of the pericytes in brain tissue. Rat brain tissue pieces were incubated in glycerol solutions at 4 degrees and then transferred into buffer (pH 7.0), (1) without HMM, (2) with HMM, (3) with HMM + 5 mM ATP, and (4) with HMM + 2.5 mM Na+ pyrophosphate. In pericytes from untreated tissue, smooth-surfaced microfilaments, averaging 6 nm in diameter, appear to branch and anastomose and to anchor on the plasma membrane. After exposure to HMM, the number and the density of the microfilaments are strikingly increased. These tightly-packed microfilaments are now heavily coated with exogeneous HMM thus increasing in width to 18-20 mm. They intertwine in closely-woven networks. After incubation in HMM solutions containing ATP or Na+ phosphate, they are no longer coated with thick sidearms. It can thus be concluded that these microfilaments are of actin-like nature. In addition, after incubation in ATP, they are intermingled with, and converge onto the surfaces of, thick, tapered filaments, which we have tentatively identified as of myosin-like nature. Thus, it appears that certain of the major elements necessary for contraction are present in brain pericytes.

  9. Impaired splenic function and tuftsin deficiency in patients with intestinal failure on long term intravenous nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zoli, G; Corazza, G; Wood, S; Bartoli, R; Gasbarrini, G; Farthing, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Reticuloendothelial system function is impaired in humans receiving lipid regimens. 
Aims—To evaluate the effects of long term administration of long chain triglyceride emulsions on reticuloendothelial system function. 
Methods—Splenic function and tuftsin activity were measured in 20 patients on intravenous nutrition for intestinal failure, 20 patients with Crohn's disease who were not receiving intravenous nutrition, and 50 healthy controls. 
Results—Pitted red cells counts in patients on intravenous nutrition (8.0%) were significantly higher (p<0.001) than in healthy controls (0.6%) and in patients with Crohn's disease (0.9%). No difference was found between healthy controls and patients with Crohn's disease. There was a correlation (r=0.50; p<0.03) between percentage of pitted red cells and duration of intravenous nutrition. Tuftsin activity was significantly reduced in the intravenous nutrition patient group (6%) compared with both disease controls (16.5%, p<0.01) and healthy volunteers (17.8%, p<0.001) . An inverse correlation between tuftsin activity and pitted red cell percentage was found in the patients on intravenous nutrition (rs =−0.44, p<0.05). No relation was found in the patients on intravenous nutrition between pitted red cell percentage or tuftsin activity and type of disease, percentage of ideal body weight, residual length of small intestine, or administration (quantity and frequency) of lipid emulsion. Eight patients on intravenous nutrition had serious infections within the previous 12months. 
Conclusions—Patients with a short bowel treated with long term intravenous nutrition have impaired splenic function, reduced tuftsin activity, and an increased risk of infection. 

 Keywords: splenic function; hyposplenism; tuftsin; home parenteral nutrition; short bowel syndrome PMID:9824601

  10. Pericytes from Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a model for the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohe; Brookes, Oliver; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain-barrier (BBB) in vitro models have been widely reported in studies of the BBB phenotype. However, established co-culture systems involve brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, neurons and pericytes, and therefore are often consuming and technically challenging. Here we use mesenchymal system cells (MSC) as a potential substitute for pericytes in a BBB model. Both MSC and pericyte markers in 2D culture environment were evaluated on different extracellular matrix compositions. Further experiments indicated that MSC contributed in a similar manner to pericytes in a co-cultured 3D model on increasing trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and decreasing permeability against macromolecules. PMID:28098158

  11. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor Deficiency Leads to Impaired Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Mantelmacher, Fernanda Dana; Fishman, Sigal; Cohen, Keren; Pasmanik Chor, Metsada; Yamada, Yuichiro; Zvibel, Isabel; Varol, Chen

    2017-04-15

    The bone marrow (BM) contains controlled specialized microenvironments, or niches, that regulate the quiescence, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut-derived incretin hormone that mediates postprandial insulin secretion and has anabolic effects on adipose tissue. Previous studies demonstrated altered bone microarchitecture in mice deficient for GIP receptor (Gipr(-/-) ), as well as the expression of high-affinity GIP receptor by distinct cells constructing the BM HSPC niche. Nevertheless, the involvement of GIP in the process of BM hematopoiesis remains elusive. In this article, we show significantly reduced representation and proliferation of HSPC and myeloid progenitors in the BM of Gipr(-/-) mice. This was further manifested by reduced levels of BM and circulating differentiated immune cells in young and old adult mice. Moreover, GIP signaling was required for the establishment of supportive BM HSPC niches during HSPC repopulation in radioablated BM chimera mice. Finally, molecular profiling of various factors involved in retention, survival, and expansion of HSPC revealed significantly lower expression of the Notch-receptor ligands Jagged 1 and Jagged 2 in osteoblast-enriched bone extracts from Gipr(-/-) mice, which are important for HSPC expansion. In addition, there was increased expression of CXCL12, a factor important for HSPC retention and quiescence, in whole-BM extracts from Gipr(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data suggest that the metabolic hormone GIP plays an important role in BM hematopoiesis.

  12. Collagenase-2 deficiency or inhibition impairs experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Folgueras, Alicia R; Fueyo, Antonio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Cox, Jennifer; Astudillo, Aurora; Tortorella, Paolo; Campestre, Cristina; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Fanjul-Fernández, Miriam; Pennington, Caroline J; Edwards, Dylan R; Overall, Christopher M; López-Otín, Carlos

    2008-04-04

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in a variety of human diseases, including neuroimmunological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. However, the recent finding that some MMPs play paradoxical protective roles in these diseases has made necessary the detailed study of the specific function of each family member in their pathogenesis. To determine the relevance of collagenase-2 (MMP-8) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, we have performed two different analyses involving genetic and biochemical approaches. First, we have analyzed the development of EAE in mutant mouse deficient in MMP-8, with the finding that the absence of this proteolytic enzyme is associated with a marked reduction in the clinical symptoms of EAE. We have also found that MMP-8(-/-) mice exhibit a marked reduction in central nervous system-infiltrating cells and demyelinating lesions. As a second approach, we have carried out a pharmacological inhibition of MMP-8 with a selective inhibitor against this protease (IC(50) = 0.4 nM). These studies have revealed that the administration of the MMP-8 selective inhibitor to mice with EAE also reduces the severity of the disease. Based on these findings, we conclude that MMP-8 plays an important role in EAE development and propose that this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic target in human neuro-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  13. Impaired conditioned fear response and startle reactivity in epinephrine-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Toth, Mate; Ziegler, Michael; Sun, Ping; Gresack, Jodi; Risbrough, Victoria

    2013-02-01

    Norepinephrine and epinephrine signaling is thought to facilitate cognitive processes related to emotional events and heightened arousal; however, the specific role of epinephrine in these processes is less known. To investigate the selective impact of epinephrine on arousal and fear-related memory retrieval, mice unable to synthesize epinephrine (phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase knockout, PNMT-KO) were tested for contextual and cued-fear conditioning. To assess the role of epinephrine in other cognitive and arousal-based behaviors these mice were also tested for acoustic startle, prepulse inhibition, novel object recognition, and open-field activity. Our results show that compared with wild-type mice, PNMT-KO mice showed reduced contextual fear but normal cued fear. Mice exhibited normal memory performance in the short-term version of the novel object recognition task, suggesting that PNMT mice exhibit more selective memory effects on highly emotional and/or long-term memories. Similarly, open-field activity was unaffected by epinephrine deficiency, suggesting that differences in freezing are not related to changes in overall anxiety or exploratory drive. Startle reactivity to acoustic pulses was reduced in PNMT-KO mice, whereas prepulse inhibition was increased. These findings provide further evidence for a selective role of epinephrine in contextual-fear learning and support its potential role in acoustic startle.

  14. Slitrk5 deficiency impairs corticostriatal circuitry and leads to obsessive-compulsive–like behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shmelkov, Sergey V; Hormigo, Adília; Jing, Deqiang; Proenca, Catia C; Bath, Kevin G; Milde, Till; Shmelkov, Evgeny; Kushner, Jared S; Baljevic, Muhamed; Dincheva, Iva; Murphy, Andrew J; Valenzuela, David M; Gale, Nicholas W; Yancopoulos, George D; Ninan, Ipe; Lee, Francis S; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common psychiatric disorder defined by the presence of obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsive actions, and it often encompasses anxiety and depressive symptoms1,2. Recently, the corticostriatal circuitry has been implicated in the pathogenesis of OCD3,4. However, the etiology, pathophysiology and molecular basis of OCD remain unknown. Several studies indicate that the pathogenesis of OCD has a genetic component5–8. Here we demonstrate that loss of a neuron-specific transmembrane protein, SLIT and NTRK-like protein-5 (Slitrk5), leads to OCD-like behaviors in mice, which manifests as excessive self-grooming and increased anxiety-like behaviors, and is alleviated by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Slitrk5−/− mice show selective overactivation of the orbitofrontal cortex, abnormalities in striatal anatomy and cell morphology and alterations in glutamate receptor composition, which contribute to deficient corticostriatal neurotransmission. Thus, our studies identify Slitrk5 as an essential molecule at corticostriatal synapses and provide a new mouse model of OCD-like behaviors. PMID:20418887

  15. Folate- and vitamin B12-deficient diet during gestation and lactation alters cerebellar synapsin expression via impaired influence of estrogen nuclear receptor α.

    PubMed

    Pourié, Grégory; Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Akchiche, Nassila; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Geoffroy, Andréa; Jeannesson, Elise; El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Mimoun, Khalid; Brachet, Patrick; Koziel, Violette; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Helle, Deborah; Debard, Renée; Leininger, Brigitte; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Deficiency in the methyl donors vitamin B12 and folate during pregnancy and postnatal life impairs proper brain development. We studied the consequences of this combined deficiency on cerebellum plasticity in offspring from rat mothers subjected to deficient diet during gestation and lactation and in rat neuroprogenitor cells expressing cerebellum markers. The major proteomic change in cerebellum of 21-d-old deprived females was a 2.2-fold lower expression of synapsins, which was confirmed in neuroprogenitors cultivated in the deficient condition. A pathway analysis suggested that these proteomic changes were related to estrogen receptor α (ER-α)/Src tyrosine kinase. The influence of impaired ER-α pathway was confirmed by abnormal negative geotaxis test at d 19-20 and decreased phsophorylation of synapsins in deprived females treated by ER-α antagonist 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole dihydrochloride (MPP). This effect was consistent with 2-fold decreased expression and methylation of ER-α and subsequent decreased ER-α/PPAR-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) interaction in deficiency condition. The impaired ER-α pathway led to decreased expression of synapsins through 2-fold decreased EGR-1/Zif-268 transcription factor and to 1.7-fold reduced Src-dependent phosphorylation of synapsins. The treatment of neuroprogenitors with either MPP or PP1 (4-(4'-phenoxyanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, 6,7-dimethoxy-N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-4-quinazolinamine, SKI-1, Src-l1) Src inhibitor produced similar effects. In conclusion, the deficiency during pregnancy and lactation impairs the expression of synapsins through a deregulation of ER-α pathway.

  16. Inhibition of GSK-3β rescues the impairments in bone formation and mechanical properties associated with fracture healing in osteoblast selective connexin 43 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Lloyd, Shane A J; Paul, Emmanuel M; Lewis, Gregory S; Donahue, Henry J

    2013-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most abundant gap junction protein in bone and is required for osteoblastic differentiation and bone homeostasis. During fracture healing, Cx43 is abundantly expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while Cx43 deficiency impairs bone formation and healing. In the present study we selectively deleted Cx43 in the osteoblastic lineage from immature osteoblasts through osteocytes and tested the hypothesis that Cx43 deficiency results in delayed osteoblastic differentiation and impaired restoration of biomechanical properties due to attenuated β-catenin expression relative to wild type littermates. Here we show that Cx43 deficiency results in alterations in the mineralization and remodeling phases of healing. In Cx43 deficient fractures the mineralization phase is marked by delayed expression of osteogenic genes. Additionally, the decrease in the RankL/Opg ratio, osteoclast number and osteoclast size suggest decreased osteoclast bone resorption and remodeling. These changes in healing result in functional deficits as shown by a decrease in ultimate torque at failure. Consistent with these impairments in healing, β-catenin expression is attenuated in Cx43 deficient fractures at 14 and 21 days, while Sclerostin (Sost) expression, a negative regulator of bone formation is increased in Cx43cKO fractures at 21 days, as is GSK-3β, a key component of the β-catenin proteasomal degradation complex. Furthermore, we show that alterations in healing in Cx43 deficient fractures can be rescued by inhibiting GSK-3β activity using Lithium Chloride (LiCl). Treatment of Cx43 deficient mice with LiCl restores both normal bone formation and mechanical properties relative to LiCl treated WT fractures. This study suggests that Cx43 is a potential therapeutic target to enhance fracture healing and identifies a previously unknown role for Cx43 in regulating β-catenin expression and thus bone formation during fracture repair.

  17. Deficiency of Mkrn2 causes abnormal spermiogenesis and spermiation, and impairs male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xu; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Bo; Shi, Zhu-Mei; Ge, Xin; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Qian, Ying-Chen; Li, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Shen, Hua; Wang, Min; Guo, Xue-Jiang; He, Jun; Lin, Marie; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Sha, Jia-Hao; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies have shed insights on some of the potential causes of male infertility, new underlining molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Makorin-2 (Mkrn2) is an evolutionarily conserved gene whose biological functions are not fully known. We developed an Mrkn2 knockout mouse model to study the role of this gene, and found that deletion of Mkrn2 in mice led to male infertility. Mkrn2 knockout mice produced abnormal sperms characterized by low number, poor motility, and aberrant morphology. Disruption of Mkrn2 also caused failure of sperm release (spermiation failure) and misarrangement of ectoplasmic specialization (ES) in testes, thus impairing spermiogenesis and spermiation. To understand the molecular mechanism, we found that expression of Odf2, a vital protein in spermatogenesis, was significantly decreased. In addition, we found that expression levels of Odf2 were decreased in Mkrn2 knockout mice. We also found that MKRN2 was prominently expressed in the sperm of normal men, but was significantly reduced in infertile men. This result indicates that our finding is clinically relevant. The results of our study provided insights into a new mechanism of male infertility caused by the MKRN2 downregulation. PMID:28008940

  18. Hematopoietic not systemic impairment of Roquin expression accounts for intestinal inflammation in Roquin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Nakra, Niyati; Schaefer, Jeremy S.; Klein, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Roquin, an E3 ligase, is involved in curtailing autoimmune pathology as seen from studies using mice with mutated (Rc3h1san/san) or disrupted (Rc3h1gt/gt) Rc3h1 gene. The extent to which intestinal immunopathology is caused by insufficient Roquin expression in the immune system, or by Roquin impairment in non-hematopoietic cells, has not been determined. Using bone marrow cells from Rc3h1gt/gt mice transferred into irradiated normal mice (Rc3h1gt/gt → NL chimeras), we show that inflammation developed in the small intestine, kidney, lung, liver, and spleen. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). Inflammation in the liver was accompanied by areas of hepatocyte apoptosis. Lung inflammation consisted of an influx of both T cells and B cells. Small intestinal LPLs had increased numbers of CD44hi, CD62Llo, KLRG1+, ICOS+ short-lived effector cells, indicating an influx of activated T cells. Following oral infection with L. monocytogenes, Rc3h1gt/gt → NL chimeras had more liver pathology and greater numbers of bacteria in the Peyer's patches than NL → NL chimeras. These findings demonstrate that small intestinal inflammation in Rc3h1san/san and Rc3h1gt/gt mice is due to a failure of Roquin expression in the immune system and not to insufficient systemic Roquin expression. PMID:24815331

  19. 3BP2-deficient mice are osteoporotic with impaired osteoblast and osteoclast functions

    PubMed Central

    Levaot, Noam; Simoncic, Paul D.; Dimitriou, Ioannis D.; Scotter, Andrew; La Rose, Jose; Ng, Adeline H.M.; Willett, Thomas L.; Wang, Chiachien J.; Janmohamed, Salima; Grynpas, Marc; Reichenberger, Ernst; Rottapel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A fine balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts maintains bone homeostasis. In patients with cherubism, gain-of-function mutations in 3BP2, which is encoded by SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2), cause cystic lesions with activated osteoclasts that lead to craniofacial abnormalities. However, little is known about the function of wild-type 3BP2 in regulating bone homeostasis. Here we have shown that 3BP2 is required for the normal function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Initial analysis showed that Sh3bp2–/–mice developed osteoporosis as a result of reduced bone formation despite the fact that bone resorption was impaired. We demonstrated using reciprocal bone marrow chimeras, a cell-intrinsic defect of the osteoblast and osteoclast compartments in vivo. Further, Sh3bp2–/– osteoblasts failed to mature and form mineralized nodules in vitro, while Sh3bp2–/– osteoclasts spread poorly and were unable to effectively degrade dentine matrix in vitro. Finally, we showed that 3BP2 was required for Abl activation in osteoblasts and Src activation in osteoclasts, and demonstrated that the in vitro defect of each cell type was restored by the respective expression of activated forms of these kinases. These findings reveal an unanticipated role for the 3BP2 adapter protein in osteoblast function and in coordinating bone homeostatic signals in both osteoclast and osteoblast lineages. PMID:21765218

  20. Impaired novelty acquisition and synaptic plasticity in congenital hyperammonemia caused by hepatic glutamine synthetase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chepkova, Aisa N.; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Görg, Boris; Haas, Helmut L.; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Häussinger, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Genetic defects in ammonia metabolism can produce irreversible damage of the developing CNS causing an impairment of cognitive and motor functions. We investigated alterations in behavior, synaptic plasticity and gene expression in the hippocampus and dorsal striatum of transgenic mice with systemic hyperammonemia resulting from conditional knockout of hepatic glutamine synthetase (LGS-ko). These mice showed reduced exploratory activity and delayed habituation to a novel environment. Field potential recordings from LGS-ko brain slices revealed significantly reduced magnitude of electrically-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in both CA3-CA1 hippocampal and corticostriatal synaptic transmission. Corticostriatal but not hippocampal slices from LGS-ko brains demonstrated also significant alterations in long-lasting effects evoked by pharmacological activation of glutamate receptors. Real-time RT-PCR revealed distinct patterns of dysregulated gene expression in the hippocampus and striatum of LGS-ko mice: LGS-ko hippocampus showed significantly modified expression of mRNAs for mGluR1, GluN2B subunit of NMDAR, and A1 adenosine receptors while altered expression of mRNAs for D1 dopamine receptors, the M1 cholinoreceptor and the acetylcholine-synthetizing enzyme choline-acetyltransferase was observed in LGS-ko striatum. Thus, inborn systemic hyperammonemia resulted in significant deficits in novelty acquisition and disturbed synaptic plasticity in corticostriatal and hippocampal pathways involved in learning and goal-directed behavior. PMID:28067279

  1. Impaired ovarian development and reduced fertility in female mice deficient in Skp2

    PubMed Central

    Fotovati, Abbas; Abu-Ali, Samah; Nakayama, Keiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2011-01-01

    p27 is a major negative regulator of somatic cellular proliferation, and its down-regulation has been shown to be associated with cancer development. Targeted disruption ofp27 results in complete loss of fertility in female mice, suggesting that it plays a significant role in the development of female gametes and the surrounding environment. We have now investigated the effect of loss of Skp2, an F-box protein that mediates ubiquitin-dependent degradation of p27, on female gamete production. The female Skp2-deficient mice showed accumulation of p27 in the ovary and severely compromised gamete development from the embryonic stage to follicular growth in the adult ovary, eventually leading to a decreased functional gamete reserve. Additional deletion of p27 resulted in relatively normal ovarian folliculogenesis, suggesting that accumulating p27 is primarily responsible for the compromised ovarian development. Embryonic ovaries of Skp2−/− mice manifested massive apoptosis as evidenced by cleavage of pro-caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. This in turn resulted in a significant decrease in the remaining pool of functional gametes in Skp2−/− mice shortly after sexual maturity and premature ovarian failure. The increased apoptosis seemed to be attributable to the polyploidy of granulosa cells. These results suggest that proper progression of the cell cycle, regulated by the p27-Skp2 axis, is pivotal for the maintenance of fertility, and that defects in this system may underlie the pathogenesis of abnormal gamete production and premature ovarian failure during the reproductive life of women. PMID:21450015

  2. Immunoglobulin Class Switch Recombination Is Impaired in Atm-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Joanne M.; McCarty, Thomas; Petiniot, Lisa K.; Shen, Rhuna; Barlow, Carrolee; Wynn, Thomas A.; Morse, Herbert C.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Max, Edward E.; Hodes, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (Ig CSR) involves DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) at recombining switch regions and repair of these breaks by nonhomologous end-joining. Because the protein kinase ataxia telengiectasia (AT) mutated (ATM) plays a critical role in DSB repair and AT patients show abnormalities of Ig isotype expression, we assessed the role of ATM in CSR by examining ATM-deficient mice. In response to T cell–dependent antigen (Ag), Atm−/− mice secreted substantially less Ag-specific IgA, IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3, and less total IgE than Atm+/+ controls. To determine whether Atm−/− B cells have an intrinsic defect in their ability to undergo CSR, we analyzed in vitro responses of purified B cells. Atm−/− cells secreted substantially less IgA, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3, and IgE than wild-type (WT) controls in response to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, CD40 ligand, or anti-IgD plus appropriate cytokines. Molecular analysis of in vitro responses indicated that WT and Atm−/− B cells produced equivalent amounts of germline IgG1 and IgE transcripts, whereas Atm−/− B cells produced markedly reduced productive IgG1 and IgE transcripts. The reduction in isotype switching by Atm−/− B cells occurs at the level of genomic DNA recombination as measured by digestion–circularization PCR. Analysis of sequences at CSR sites indicated that there is greater microhomology at the μ–γ1 switch junctions in ATM B cells than in wild-type B cells, suggesting that ATM function affects the need or preference for sequence homology in the CSR process. These findings suggest a role of ATM in DNA DSB recognition and/or repair during CSR. PMID:15504820

  3. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  4. Long term potentiation is impaired in membrane glycoprotein CD200-deficient mice: a role for Toll-like receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Costello, Derek A; Lyons, Anthony; Denieffe, Stephanie; Browne, Tara C; Cox, F Fionnuala; Lynch, Marina A

    2011-10-07

    The membrane glycoprotein CD200 is expressed on several cell types, including neurons, whereas expression of its receptor, CD200R, is restricted principally to cells of the myeloid lineage, including microglia. The interaction between CD200 and CD200R maintains microglia and macrophages in a quiescent state; therefore, CD200-deficient mice express an inflammatory phenotype exhibiting increased macrophage or microglial activation in models of arthritis, encephalitis, and uveoretinitis. Here, we report that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pam(3)CysSerLys(4) exerted more profound effects on release of the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), in glia prepared from CD200(-/-) mice compared with wild type mice. This effect is explained by the loss of CD200 on astrocytes, which modulates microglial activation. Expression of Toll-like receptors 4 and 2 (TLR4 and -2) was increased in glia prepared from CD200(-/-) mice, and the evidence indicates that microglial activation, assessed by the increased numbers of CD11b(+) cells that stained positively for both MHCII and CD40, was enhanced in CD200(-/-) mice compared with wild type mice. These neuroinflammatory changes were associated with impaired long term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 of hippocampal slices prepared from CD200(-/-) mice. One possible explanation for this is the increase in TNFα in hippocampal tissue prepared from CD200(-/-) mice because TNFα application inhibited LTP in CA1. Significantly, LPS and Pam(3)CysSerLys(4), at concentrations that did not affect LTP in wild type mice, inhibited LTP in slices prepared from CD200(-/-) mice, probably due to the accompanying increase in TLR2 and TLR4. Thus, the neuroinflammatory changes that result from CD200 deficiency have a negative impact on synaptic plasticity.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 Deficiency Does Not Impair the Osteoanabolic Action of Parathyroid Hormone on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yangli; Yi, Lingxian; Weng, Tujun; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Jiang, Wanling; Xian, Cory J; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: PTH stimulates bone formation in Fgfr3 knockout mice through promotion of proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. Introduction: Previous studies showed that endogenous fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is required for parathyroid hormone (PTH)-stimulated bone anabolic effects, however, the exact mechanisms by which PTH stimulate bone formation and the function of FGF receptors in mediating these actions are not fully defined. FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) has been characterized as an important regulator of bone metabolism and is confirmed to cross-talk with PTH/PTHrP signal in cartilage and bone development. Methods: Fgfr3 knockout and wild-type mice at 2-month-old and 4-month-old were intraperitoneally injected with PTH intermittently for 4 weeks and then the skeletal responses to PTH were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and bone histomorphometry. Results: Intermittent PTH treatment improved bone mineral density (BMD) and femoral mechanical properties in both Fgfr3-/- and wild-type mice. Histomorphometric analysis showed that bone formation and bone resorption were increased in both genotypes following PTH treatment. PTH treatment increased trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) in WT and Fgfr3-deficient mice. The anabolic response in Fgfr3-deficient and wild-type bone is characterized by an increase of both bone formation and resorption-related genes following PTH treatment. In addition, we found that Fgfr3 null osteoblasts (compared to wild-type controls) maintained normal abilities to response to PTH-stimulated increase of proliferation, differentiation, expression of osteoblastic marker genes (Cbfa1, Osteopontin and Osteocalcin), and phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Conclusions: Bone anabolic effects of PTH were not impaired by the absence of FGFR3, suggesting that the FGFR3 signaling may not be required for osteoanabolic effects of PTH activities. PMID:27489502

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency impairs microglial phagocytosis of degenerating axons.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, Labchan; Tegenge, Million Adane; Shrestha, Shiva; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Malik, Adeel; Mithal, Aditya; Hosmane, Suneil; Venkatesan, Arun

    2014-12-01

    Microglia are rapidly activated in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of injuries, including inflammation, trauma, and stroke. In addition to modulation of the innate immune response, a key function of microglia is the phagocytosis of dying cells and cellular debris, which can facilitate recovery. Despite emerging evidence that axonal debris can pose a barrier to regeneration of new axons in the CNS, little is known of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie clearance of degenerating CNS axons. We utilize a custom micropatterned microfluidic system that enables robust microglial-axon co-culture to explore the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in microglial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. We find that pharmacologic and genetic disruption of TLR4 blocks induction of the Type-1 interferon response and inhibits phagocytosis of axon debris in vitro. Moreover, TLR4-dependent microglial clearance of unmyelinated axon debris facilitates axon outgrowth. In vivo, microglial phagocytosis of CNS axons undergoing Wallerian degeneration in a dorsal root axotomy model is impaired in adult mice in which TLR4 has been deleted. Since purinergic receptors can influence TLR4-mediated signaling, we also explored a role for the microglia P2 receptors and found that the P2X7R contributes to microglial clearance of degenerating axons. Overall, we identify TLR4 as a key player in axonal debris clearance by microglia, thus creating a more permissive environment for axonal outgrowth. Our findings have significant implications for the development of protective and regenerative strategies for the many inflammatory, traumatic, and neurodegenerative conditions characterized by CNS axon degeneration.

  7. Impairments of hepatic gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in PPARα-deficient neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; Ercal, Baris; d'Avignon, D André; Dietzen, Dennis J; Crawford, Peter A

    2014-07-15

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a master transcriptional regulator of hepatic metabolism and mediates the adaptive response to fasting. Here, we demonstrate the roles for PPARα in hepatic metabolic adaptations to birth. Like fasting, nutrient supply is abruptly altered at birth when a transplacental source of carbohydrates is replaced by a high-fat, low-carbohydrate milk diet. PPARα-knockout (KO) neonatal mice exhibit relative hypoglycemia due to impaired conversion of glycerol to glucose. Although hepatic expression of fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenases is imparied in PPARα neonates, these animals exhibit normal blood acylcarnitine profiles. Furthermore, quantitative metabolic fate mapping of the medium-chain fatty acid [(13)C]octanoate in neonatal mouse livers revealed normal contribution of this fatty acid to the hepatic TCA cycle. Interestingly, octanoate-derived carbon labeled glucose uniquely in livers of PPARα-KO neonates. Relative hypoketonemia in newborn PPARα-KO animals could be mechanistically linked to a 50% decrease in de novo hepatic ketogenesis from labeled octanoate. Decreased ketogenesis was associated with diminished mRNA and protein abundance of the fate-committing ketogenic enzyme mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS2) and decreased protein abundance of the ketogenic enzyme β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 (BDH1). Finally, hepatic triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations were increased 6.9- and 2.7-fold, respectively, in suckling PPARα-KO neonates. Together, these findings indicate a primary defect of gluconeogenesis from glycerol and an important role for PPARα-dependent ketogenesis in the disposal of hepatic fatty acids during the neonatal period.

  8. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-18

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages.

  9. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-12-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP(-)/NG2-DsRed(+)) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP(+)/NG2-DsRed(+)), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation.

  10. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP−/NG2-DsRed+) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation. PMID:24067916

  11. NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN-DEPENDENT CONTRIBUTIONS OF PERICYTES AND MACROPHAGES TO BRAIN TUMOR VASCULARIZATION AND PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Stallcup, William B.; You, Weon-Kyoo; Kucharova, Karolina; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Yotsumoto, Fusanori

    2015-01-01

    The NG2 proteoglycan promotes tumor growth as a component of both tumor and stromal cells. Using intracranial, NG2-negative B16F10 melanomas, we have investigated the importance of pericyte and macrophage NG2 in brain tumor progression. Reduced melanoma growth in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) and pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice demonstrates the importance of NG2 in both stromal compartments. In each genotype, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction diminishes formation of endothelial junctions and assembly of the basal lamina. Tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have smaller diameters, reduced patency, and increased leakiness compared to PC-NG2ko mice, thus decreasing tumor blood supply and increasing hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice results from loss of pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice results from 90% reduced macrophage recruitment. The absence of macrophage-derived signals in Mac-NG2ko mice causes loss of pericyte association with endothelial cells. Reduced macrophage recruitment may be due to diminished activation of integrins in the absence of NG2, causing decreased macrophage interaction with endothelial adhesion molecules that are needed for extravasation. These results reflect the complex interplay that occurs between macrophages, pericytes, and endothelial cells during tumor vascularization. PMID:26465118

  12. Engineering of a Biomimetic Pericyte-Covered 3D Microvascular Network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaerim; Chung, Minhwan; Kim, Sudong; Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes enveloping the endothelium play an important role in the physiology and pathology of microvessels, especially in vessel maturation and stabilization. However, our understanding of fundamental pericyte biology is limited by the lack of a robust in vitro model system that allows researchers to evaluate the interactions among multiple cell types in perfusable blood vessels. The present work describes a microfluidic platform that can be used to investigate interactions between pericytes and endothelial cells (ECs) during the sprouting, growth, and maturation steps of neovessel formation. A mixture of ECs and pericytes was attached to the side of a pre-patterned three dimensional fibrin matrix and allowed to sprout across the matrix. The effects of intact coverage and EC maturation by the pericytes on the perfused EC network were confirmed using a confocal microscope. Compared with EC monoculture conditions, EC-pericyte co-cultured vessels showed a significant reduction in diameter, increased numbers of junctions and branches and decreased permeability. In response to biochemical factors, ECs and pericytes in the platform showed the similar features with previous reports from in vivo experiments, thus reflect various pathophysiological conditions of in vivo microvessels. Taken together, these results support the physiological relevancy of our three-dimensional microfluidic culture system but also that the system can be used to screen drug effect on EC-pericyte biology.

  13. Pericytic mimicry in well-differentiated liposarcoma/atypical lipomatous tumor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Rao, P Nagesh; Asatrian, Greg; Scott, Michelle A; Nguyen, Vi; Giacomelli, Paulina; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Eilber, Fritz C; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2016-08-01

    Pericytes are modified smooth muscle cells that closely enwrap small blood vessels, regulating and supporting the microvasculature through direct endothelial contact. Pericytes demonstrate a distinct immunohistochemical profile, including expression of smooth muscle actin, CD146, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, and regulator of G-protein signaling 5. Previously, pericyte-related antigens have been observed to be present among a group of soft tissue tumors with a perivascular growth pattern, including glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Similarly, malignant tumor cells have been shown to have a pericyte-like immunoprofile when present in a perivascular location, seen in malignant melanoma, glioblastoma, and adenocarcinoma. Here, we examine well-differentiated liposarcoma specimens, which showed some element of perivascular areas with the appearance of smooth muscle (n = 7 tumors). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for pericyte antigens, including smooth muscle actin, CD146, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, and regulator of G-protein signaling 5. Results showed consistent pericytic marker expression among liposarcoma tumor cells within a perivascular distribution. MDM2 immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization for MDM2 revealed that these perivascular cells were of tumor origin (7/7 tumors), whereas double immunohistochemical detection for CD31/CD146 ruled out an endothelial cell contribution. These findings further support the concept of pericytic mimicry, already established in diverse malignancies, and its presence in well-differentiated liposarcoma. The extent to which pericytic mimicry has prognostic significance in liposarcoma is as yet unknown.

  14. Blood-brain barrier impairment in MPS III patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of a specific enzyme leading to heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation within cells and to eventual progressive cerebral and systemic organ abnormalities. Different enzyme deficiencies comprise the MPS III subcategories (A, B, C, D). Since neuropathological manifestations are common to all MPS III types, determining blood-brain barrier (BBB) condition may be critical to understand potential additional disease mechanisms. Methods We investigated BBB integrity in various brain structures of post-mortem tissues from an eleven year old Caucasian female with MPS III A and from a twenty four year old Caucasian female with MPS III D. Control tissues were obtained post-mortem from three Caucasians without neurological deficits: a twelve year old male, a twenty four year old female, and a twenty seven year old female. BBB capillary ultrastructure (electron microscopy) and capillary functional integrity (IgG leakage, tight junction proteins, and lysosomal accumulation within endothelium) were examined. Results Compromised BBB integrity was found in both MPS III cases. Major study findings were: (1) capillary endothelial and pericyte cell damage; (2) mucopolysaccharide bodies in a majority of endothelial cells and pericytes rupturing cell membranes; (3) severe extracellular edema; (4) IgG microvascular leakage and reductions of occludin and claudin-5 with variations between MPS III types; (5) extensive lysosomal accumulation in capillary endothelium. Conclusions These new findings of BBB structural and functional impairment, although from only two cases, MPS III A and III D, may have implications for disease pathogenesis and should be considered in treatment development for MPS III. PMID:24225396

  15. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  16. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation. PMID:27576603

  17. Possible involvement of basic FGF in the upregulation of PDGFRβ in pericytes after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kuniyuki; Arimura, Koichi; Nishimura, Ataru; Tachibana, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Yoji; Makihara, Noriko; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Kitazono, Takanari; Ago, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) pericytes have been recognized as an indispensable component of the neurovascular unit. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is markedly increased in CNS pericytes after brain ischemia. It has been elucidated that PDGFRβ, expressed in pericytes and pericyte-derived fibroblast-like cells, plays important roles in the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in the repair process in infarct areas. The aim of this study was to uncover how the PDGFRβ expression is regulated in pericytes after brain ischemia. We found that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), but neither hypoxia at 1% O2 nor acidification at pH 6.5, significantly upregulated the PDGFRβ expression in human cultured CNS pericytes. SU5402, an inhibitor of FGF receptor (FGFR), and inhibitors of its downstream effectors Akt and Erk abolished the bFGF-induced upregulation of PDGFRβ. On the other hand, acidification significantly upregulated the expression of bFGF, while hypoxia upregulated the expression of FGFR1 in the pericytes. The expression of bFGF and FGFR1 was markedly induced in the ischemic hemisphere after ischemic insult in a middle cerebral artery occlusion stroke model. Immunofluorescent double labeling demonstrated that the expression of bFGF and FGFR1 was co-localized with PDGFRβ-positive cells in peri-infarct areas. Moreover, treatment with bFGF enhanced cell growth and the PDGF-BB-induced migratory activity of cultured pericytes, which were significantly suppressed by SU5402 or Sunitinib, an inhibitor of PDGFR. These data suggested that increased bFGF upregulates the expression of PDGFRβ and may enhance PDGFRβ-mediated pericyte functions after brain ischemia.

  18. Pericyte contractility controls endothelial cell cycle progression and sprouting: insights into angiogenic switch mechanics.

    PubMed

    Durham, Jennifer T; Surks, Howard K; Dulmovits, Brian M; Herman, Ira M

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular stability and regulation of capillary tonus are regulated by pericytes and their interactions with endothelial cells (EC). While the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway has been implicated in modulation of pericyte contractility, in part via regulation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), the mechanisms linking Rho GTPase activity with actomyosin-based contraction and the cytoskeleton are equivocal. Recently, the myosin phosphatase-RhoA-interacting protein (MRIP) was shown to mediate the RhoA/ROCK-directed MLCP inactivation in vascular smooth muscle. Here we report that MRIP directly interacts with the β-actin-specific capping protein βcap73. Furthermore, manipulation of MRIP expression influences pericyte contractility, with MRIP silencing inducing cytoskeletal remodeling and cellular hypertrophy. MRIP knockdown induces a repositioning of βcap73 from the leading edge to stress fibers; thus MRIP-silenced pericytes increase F-actin-driven cell spreading twofold. These hypertrophied and cytoskeleton-enriched pericytes demonstrate a 2.2-fold increase in contractility upon MRIP knockdown when cells are plated on a deformable substrate. In turn, silencing pericyte MRIP significantly affects EC cycle progression and angiogenic activation. When MRIP-silenced pericytes are cocultured with capillary EC, there is a 2.0-fold increase in EC cycle entry. Furthermore, in three-dimensional models of injury and repair, silencing pericyte MRIP results in a 1.6-fold elevation of total tube area due to EC network formation and increased angiogenic sprouting. The pivotal role of MRIP expression in governing pericyte contractile phenotype and endothelial growth should lend important new insights into how chemomechanical signaling pathways control the "angiogenic switch" and pathological angiogenic induction.

  19. Sustained inflammation after pericyte depletion induces irreversible blood-retina barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Shuntaro; Kurata, Kaori; Hattori, Yuki; Takase, Hiroshi; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Inwon; Ikeda, Wataru; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Fukushima, Yoko; Nara, Hiromi; Sakai, Hideto; Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsushita, Jun; Ema, Masatsugu; Hirashima, Masanori; Minami, Takashi; Shibuya, Masabumi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Kim, Pilhan; Miyata, Takaki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Uemura, Akiyoshi

    2017-02-09

    In the central nervous system, endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) of blood vessel walls cooperatively form a physical and chemical barrier to maintain neural homeostasis. However, in diabetic retinopathy (DR), the loss of PCs from vessel walls is assumed to cause breakdown of the blood-retina barrier (BRB) and subsequent vision-threatening vascular dysfunctions. Nonetheless, the lack of adequate DR animal models has precluded disease understanding and drug discovery. Here, by using an anti-PDGFRβ antibody, we show that transient inhibition of the PC recruitment to developing retinal vessels sustained EC-PC dissociations and BRB breakdown in adult mouse retinas, reproducing characteristic features of DR such as hyperpermeability, hypoperfusion, and neoangiogenesis. Notably, PC depletion directly induced inflammatory responses in ECs and perivascular infiltration of macrophages, whereby macrophage-derived VEGF and placental growth factor (PlGF) activated VEGFR1 in macrophages and VEGFR2 in ECs. Moreover, angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) upregulation and Tie1 downregulation activated FOXO1 in PC-free ECs locally at the leaky aneurysms. This cycle of vessel damage was shut down by simultaneously blocking VEGF, PlGF, and Angpt2, thus restoring the BRB integrity. Together, our model provides new opportunities for identifying the sequential events triggered by PC deficiency, not only in DR, but also in various neurological disorders.

  20. Sustained inflammation after pericyte depletion induces irreversible blood-retina barrier breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Shuntaro; Kurata, Kaori; Hattori, Yuki; Takase, Hiroshi; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Soyeon; Ikeda, Wataru; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Fukushima, Yoko; Nara, Hiromi; Sakai, Hideto; Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsushita, Jun; Ema, Masatsugu; Hirashima, Masanori; Shibuya, Masabumi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Kim, Pilhan; Miyata, Takaki; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    In the central nervous system, endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) of blood vessel walls cooperatively form a physical and chemical barrier to maintain neural homeostasis. However, in diabetic retinopathy (DR), the loss of PCs from vessel walls is assumed to cause breakdown of the blood-retina barrier (BRB) and subsequent vision-threatening vascular dysfunctions. Nonetheless, the lack of adequate DR animal models has precluded disease understanding and drug discovery. Here, by using an anti-PDGFRβ antibody, we show that transient inhibition of the PC recruitment to developing retinal vessels sustained EC-PC dissociations and BRB breakdown in adult mouse retinas, reproducing characteristic features of DR such as hyperpermeability, hypoperfusion, and neoangiogenesis. Notably, PC depletion directly induced inflammatory responses in ECs and perivascular infiltration of macrophages, whereby macrophage-derived VEGF and placental growth factor (PlGF) activated VEGFR1 in macrophages and VEGFR2 in ECs. Moreover, angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) upregulation and Tie1 downregulation activated FOXO1 in PC-free ECs locally at the leaky aneurysms. This cycle of vessel damage was shut down by simultaneously blocking VEGF, PlGF, and Angpt2, thus restoring the BRB integrity. Together, our model provides new opportunities for identifying the sequential events triggered by PC deficiency, not only in DR, but also in various neurological disorders. PMID:28194443

  1. D-galactose induces a mitochondrial complex I deficiency in mouse skeletal muscle: potential benefits of nutrient combination in ameliorating muscle impairment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liao; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jing; Li, Hua; Yang, Yanshen; Liu, Jia; Guo, Zihao; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Jiankang; Zhao-Wilson, Xi; Long, Jiangang

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating research has shown that chronic D-galactose (D-gal) exposure induces symptoms similar to natural aging in animals. Therefore, rodents chronically exposed to D-gal are increasingly used as a model for aging and delay-of-aging pharmacological research. Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a vital role in aging and age-related diseases; however, whether mitochondrial dysfunction plays a significant role in mice exposed to D-gal remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated cognitive dysfunction, locomotor activity, and mitochondrial dysfunction involved in D-gal exposure in mice. We found that D-gal exposure (125 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) resulted in a serious impairment in grip strength in mice, whereas spatial memory and locomotor coordination remained intact. Interestingly, muscular mitochondrial complex I deficiency occurred in the skeletal muscle of mice exposed to D-gal. Mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormality was implicated as a contributing factor in D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Moreover, three combinations (A, B, and C) of nutrients applied in this study effectively reversed D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Nutrient formulas B and C were especially effective in reversing complex I dysfunction in both skeletal muscle and heart muscle. These findings suggest the following: (1) chronic exposure to D-gal first results in specific muscular impairment in mice, rather than causing general, premature aging; (2) poor skeletal muscle strength induced by D-gal might be due to the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by complex I deficiency; and (3) the nutrient complexes applied in the study attenuated the skeletal muscle impairment, most likely by improving mitochondrial function.

  2. Activation, Impaired Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production, and Deficiency of Circulating Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Patients with Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Cho, Young-Nan; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kee, Hae Jin; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Uh Jin; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Kee, Seung-Jung; Park, Yong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells contribute to protection against certain microorganism infections. However, little is known about the role of MAIT cells in Orientia tsutsugamushi infection. Hence, the aims of this study were to examine the level and function of MAIT cells in patients with scrub typhus and to evaluate the clinical relevance of MAIT cell levels. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty-eight patients with scrub typhus and 53 health control subjects were enrolled in the study. The patients were further divided into subgroups according to disease severity. MAIT cell level and function in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Circulating MAIT cell levels were found to be significantly reduced in scrub typhus patients. MAIT cell deficiency reflects a variety of clinical conditions. In particular, MAT cell levels reflect disease severity. MAIT cells in scrub typhus patients displayed impaired tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, which was restored during the remission phase. In addition, the impaired production of TNF-α by MAIT cells was associated with elevated CD69 expression. Conclusions This study shows that circulating MAIT cells are activated, numerically deficient, and functionally impaired in TNF-α production in patients with scrub typhus. These abnormalities possibly contribute to immune system dysregulation in scrub typhus infection. PMID:27463223

  3. Pericytes promote endothelial cell survival through induction of autocrine VEGF-A signaling and Bcl-w expression

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Marcela; Roswall, Pernilla; Cortez, Eliane; Hanahan, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) in blood vessels under formation are stabilized by the recruitment of pericytes, both in normal tissues and during angiogenesis in pathologic situations, including neoplasia. In the tumor vasculature, besides supporting the functionality of blood flow, pericytes protect ECs from antiangiogenic therapies, and have thus been implicated in clinical resistance to vascular targeting drugs. However, the molecular nature of the crosstalk between pericytes and ECs is largely unchartered. Herein, we identified pericyte-induced survival signals in ECs by isolation of vascular fragments derived from tumors that had been genetically or pharmacologically engineered to be either pericyte-rich or pericyte-poor. Pericytes induced the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-w in tumor ECs both in vivo and in vitro, thereby conveying protection from cytotoxic damage. The pericyte-dependent survival signaling in ECs was consequential to enforcement of an autocrine loop involving VEGF-A expression in ECs. Through molecular and functional studies, we delineated a signal transduction pathway in ECs downstream of integrin αv involving activation of NF-κB as the initiating event of the protective crosstalk from pericytes. Our elucidation of pericyte-derived pro-survival signaling in tumor ECs has potentially important implications for clinical development of antiangiogenic drugs, and suggests new therapeutic targets for rational multitargeting of cancer. PMID:21778339

  4. Induced Susceptibility of Host Is Associated with an Impaired Antioxidant System Following Infection with Cryptosporidium parvum in Se-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengmin; Wu, Yanyun; Qin, Jianhua; Sun, Haoxue; He, Hongxuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Susceptibility or resistance to infection with Cryptosporidium parvum (C.parvum) correlates with Selenium (Se) deficiency in response to infection. Both adult Se-adequate and Se-deficient mouse models of cryptosporidiosis were used to study the cell-mediated immune response during the course of C. parvum infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples from mouse models were used for Se status. The concentration of MDA, SOD, GPx and CAT in blood has revealed that lower Se level exist in Se-deficient mice. Mesenteric lymph node (MLN) lymphocytes from both mouse models were proliferated after ex vivo re-stimulation with C. parvum sporozoite antigen. The study of the cytokine profiles from the supernatant of proliferated MLN cells revealed that Se-adequate mice produced higher levels of Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) and moderate amounts of Th2 (IL-4) cytokines throughout the course of infection. Whereas, MLN cells from Se-deficient mice produced lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 cytokines. The counts of total white cell and CD3, CD4, CD8 cell in Se-adequate were higher than that in Se-deficient mice. Significance These results suggest that Cell immunity is affected by Se status after infection with C.parvum from kinetic changes of different white cells and cytokine. In conclusion, induced susceptibility of host is associated with an impaired antioxidant system following infection with C.parvum in C57BL/6 Selenium deficient mice. PMID:19247447

  5. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  6. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor deficiency is associated with impaired killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and increased susceptibility to Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thierry; Delaloye, Julie; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Giddey, Marlyse; Le Roy, Didier; Calandra, Thierry

    2013-01-15

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important component of the early proinflammatory response of the innate immune system. However, the antimicrobial defense mechanisms mediated by MIF remain fairly mysterious. In the present study, we examined whether MIF controls bacterial uptake and clearance by professional phagocytes, using wild-type and MIF-deficient macrophages. MIF deficiency did not affect bacterial phagocytosis, but it strongly impaired the killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and host defenses against gram-negative bacterial infection, as shown by increased mortality in a Klebsiella pneumonia model. Consistent with MIF's regulatory role of Toll-like 4 expression in macrophages, MIF-deficient cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or Escherichia coli exhibited reduced nuclear factor κB activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. Addition of recombinant MIF or TNF corrected the killing defect of MIF-deficient macrophages. Together, these data show that MIF is a key mediator of host responses against gram-negative bacteria, acting in part via a modulation of bacterial killing by macrophages.

  7. High dietary folate in pregnant mice leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency and altered methyl metabolism, with embryonic growth delay and short-term memory impairment in offspring.

    PubMed

    Bahous, Renata H; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Deng, Liyuan; Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Lu, Jessica; Malysheva, Olga; Leung, Kit-Yi; Ho, Ming-Kai; Pallàs, Mercè; Kaliman, Perla; Greene, Nicholas DE; Bedell, Barry J; Caudill, Marie A; Rozen, Rima

    2017-01-09

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) generates methyltetrahydrofolate for methylation reactions. Severe MTHFR deficiency results in homocystinuria and neurologic impairment. Mild MTHFR deficiency (677C>T polymorphism) increases risk for complex traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. Although low dietary folate impacts brain development, recent concerns have focused on high folate intake following food fortification and increased vitamin use. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate during pregnancy affects brain development in murine offspring. Female mice were placed on control diet (CD) or folic acid-supplemented diet (FASD) throughout mating, pregnancy and lactation. Three-week-old male pups were evaluated for motor and cognitive function. Tissues from E17.5 embryos, pups and dams were collected for choline/methyl metabolite measurements, immunoblotting or gene expression of relevant enzymes. Brains were examined for morphology of hippocampus and cortex.Pups of FASD mothers displayed short-term memory impairment, decreased hippocampal size and decreased thickness of the dentate gyrus. MTHFR protein levels were reduced in FASD pup livers, with lower concentrations of phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine in liver and hippocampus, respectively. FASD pup brains showed evidence of altered acetylcholine availability and Dnmt3a mRNA was reduced in cortex and hippocampus. E17.5 embryos and placentas from FASD dams were smaller. MTHFR protein and mRNA were reduced in embryonic liver, with lower concentrations of choline, betaine and phosphocholine. Embryonic brain displayed altered development of cortical layers. In summary, high folate intake during pregnancy leads to pseudo-MTHFR 3 deficiency, disturbed choline/methyl metabolism, embryonic growth delay and memory impairment in offspring. These findings highlight the unintended negative consequences of supplemental folic acid.

  8. Complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in mice is associated with impaired retinal function and variable mortality, hematological profiles, and reproductive outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Andrea K; Racine, Julie; Deng, Liyuan; Wang, Xiaoling; Lachapelle, Pierre; Rozen, Rima

    2011-02-01

    Severe deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with homocystinuria can result in early demise or later-onset neurological impairment, including developmental delay, motor dysfunction, and seizures. We previously characterized BALB/c Mthfr (-/-)mice as a model for this disorder and have recently backcrossed the disrupted allele onto the C57Bl/6 background to examine the variable phenotypes in MTHFR deficiency. Compared with BALB/c Mthfr (-/-)mice, C57Bl/6 Mthfr (-/-)mice have enhanced survival rates (81% vs 26.5%). Four-day-old BALB/c mutant pups had lower body, brain, and spleen weights relative to their wild-type counterparts compared with C57Bl/6 mutants. Pregnant BALB/c Mthfr (+/-)mice had increased resorptions and embryonic delays compared with wild-type littermates, whereas these outcomes in C57Bl/6 c Mthfr (+/-)mice were similar to those of wild-type C57Bl/6 mice. BALB/c-mutant pups had altered hematological profiles (higher hematocrit, hemoglobin, and white blood cell counts, with lower platelet counts) compared with C57Bl/6 mutants. Mutants of both strains had similar degrees of hepatic steatosis, hepatic activity of betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase, and altered cerebellar histology. Electroretinograms (ERG) in C57Bl/6 Mthfr (-/-)mice revealed decreased amplitude of scotopic and photopic waves in 6-week-old mice, with normalized ERGs at 13 weeks. Plasma homocysteine was modestly higher in C57Bl/6 compared with BALB/c mice. Our results emphasize the variable presentation of MTHFR deficiency in different genetic backgrounds and suggest that plasma homocysteine is not a predictor of severity. In addition, our novel findings of decreased spleen weights, thrombocytopenia, and impaired retinal function warrant investigation in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency or other forms of homocystinuria.

  9. The effect of antioxidants on glycated albumin-induced cytotoxicity in bovine retinal pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaetaek; Kim, Kwang-seok; Shinn, Jong-wook; Oh, Yeon-sahng; Kim, Heung-tae; Jo, Inho; Shinn, Soon-hyun

    2002-04-12

    Loss of retinal pericytes is the initial deficit in the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. Glycated albumin (GA) forms under hyperglycemic conditions and exists in the retinal blood vessels of diabetic patients with retinopathy. In this study, using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction test, we investigated whether GA induces cytotoxicity in cultured bovine retinal pericytes, and whether the antioxidants, l-ascorbic acid, Trolox, and probucol, provide any protection from GA-mediated cytotoxicity. GA induced pericyte death in a dose-dependent manner. With increasing time, GA-induced cytotoxicity also increased despite no strict time dependence. Furthermore, this cell death was found to be mediated both by apoptosis, which was confirmed by apoptosis-specific fluorescent staining of nuclei and cell membranes, and mitochondrial damage, as elucidated by electron microscopy. All three antioxidants used in this study partially protected against GA-induced pericyte death, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in GA-induced pericyte death. The results indicate that GA induces cell death in cultured bovine retinal pericytes, and that certain antioxidants may reduce this cytotoxicity.

  10. Dual effects of carbon monoxide on pericytes and neurogenesis in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Maki, Takakuni; Mandeville, Emiri T; Koh, Seong-Ho; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Arai, Ken; Kim, Young-Myeong; Whalen, Michael J; Xing, Changhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Kim, Kyu-Won; Lo, Eng H

    2016-11-01

    At low levels, carbon monoxide (CO) has physiological roles as a second messenger and neuromodulator. Here we assess the effects of CO in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Treatment with CO-releasing molecule (CORM)-3 reduced pericyte death and ameliorated the progression of neurological deficits. In contrast, although treatment with the radical scavenger N-tert-butyl-a-phenylnitrone (PBN) also reduced pericyte death, neurological outcomes were not rescued. As compared to vehicle-treated control and PBN-treated mice, CORM-3-treated mice showed higher levels of phosphorylated neural nitric oxide synthase within neural stem cells (NSCs). Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase diminished the CORM-3-mediated increase in the number of cells that stained positive for both the neuronal marker NeuN and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; a marker for proliferating cells) in vivo, consequently interfering with neurological recovery after TBI. Because NSCs seemed to be in close proximity to pericytes, we asked whether cross-talk between pericytes and NSCs was induced by CORM-3, thereby promoting neurogenesis. In pericyte cultures that were undergoing oxygen and glucose deprivation, conditioned cell culture medium collected after CORM-3 treatment enhanced the in vitro differentiation of NSCs into mature neurons. Taken together, these findings suggest that CO treatment may provide a therapeutic approach for TBI by preventing pericyte death, rescuing cross-talk with NSCs and promoting neurogenesis.

  11. Pericytes of Multiple Organs Do Not Behave as Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Cattaneo, Paola; Sun, Yunfu; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Gu, Yusu; Dalton, Nancy D; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer; Peterson, Kirk L; Stallcup, William B; Chen, Ju; Evans, Sylvia M

    2017-03-02

    Pericytes are widely believed to function as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotent tissue-resident progenitors with great potential for regenerative medicine. Cultured pericytes isolated from distinct tissues can differentiate into multiple cell types in vitro or following transplantation in vivo. However, the cell fate plasticity of endogenous pericytes in vivo remains unclear. Here, we show that the transcription factor Tbx18 selectively marks pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in multiple organs of adult mouse. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified Tbx18-expressing cells behaved as MSCs in vitro. However, lineage-tracing experiments using an inducible Tbx18-CreERT2 line revealed that pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells maintained their identity in aging and diverse pathological settings and did not significantly contribute to other cell lineages. These results challenge the current view of endogenous pericytes as multipotent tissue-resident progenitors and suggest that the plasticity observed in vitro or following transplantation in vivo arises from artificial cell manipulations ex vivo.

  12. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location.

  13. Impaired natural killer cell self-education and “missing-self” responses in Ly49-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Simon; Tu, Megan M.; Rahim, Mir Munir Ahmed; Mahmoud, Ahmad B.; Patel, Rajen; Tai, Lee-Hwa; Troke, Angela D.; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Landry, Josette-Renée; Zhu, Qinzhang; Tung, Kenneth S.; Raulet, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Ly49-mediated recognition of MHC-I molecules on host cells is considered vital for natural killer (NK)–cell regulation and education; however, gene-deficient animal models are lacking because of the difficulty in deleting this large multigene family. Here, we describe NK gene complex knockdown (NKCKD) mice that lack expression of Ly49 and related MHC-I receptors on most NK cells. NKCKD NK cells exhibit defective killing of MHC-I–deficient, but otherwise normal, target cells, resulting in defective rejection by NKCKD mice of transplants from various types of MHC-I–deficient mice. Self–MHC-I immunosurveillance by NK cells in NKCKD mice can be rescued by self–MHC-I–specific Ly49 transgenes. Although NKCKD mice display defective recognition of MHC-I–deficient tumor cells, resulting in decreased in vivo tumor cell clearance, NKG2D- or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity–induced tumor cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production induced by activation receptors was efficient in Ly49-deficient NK cells, suggesting MHC-I education of NK cells is a single facet regulating their total potential. These results provide direct genetic evidence that Ly49 expression is necessary for NK-cell education to self–MHC-I molecules and that the absence of these receptors leads to loss of MHC-I–dependent “missing-self” immunosurveillance by NK cells. PMID:22661698

  14. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2016-03-31

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. Also, the present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface.

  15. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; ...

    2016-03-31

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches tomore » demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. Also, the present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface.« less

  16. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; Levitan, Edwin S.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface. PMID:27031109

  17. Impaired mucosal antibody response to cholera toxin in vitamin A-deficient rats immunized with oral cholera vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, U; Hanson, L A; Holmgren, J; Kahu, H; Dahlgren, U I

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the importance of vitamin A in the ability to respond to oral antigen administration, rats were fed a vitamin A-free diet. The animals were immunized perorally three times with a mixture of cholera toxin (CT) and a commercial cholera vaccine. The total immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration as well as the specific IgA anti-CT antibody levels in serum and bile was significantly lower in the vitamin A-deficient animals than in the paired fed controls (animals that were fed a normal commercial diet in an amount equal to the amount the deficient animals consumed), while the levels of total and specific anti-CT IgG were not affected to the same extent by the vitamin A deficiency. The number of IgA anti-CT antibody-producing cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes after immunization was also significantly lower in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the control rats. Supplementation of the diet with retinyl palmitate restored the ability to mount an IgA antibody response to the antigen, since the level of specific IgA anti-CT antibodies in relation to the total IgA concentration was as high in the vitamin A-supplemented group as in the paired fed control group. Restricted diet intake by itself did not affect the ability to respond adequately to the antigen since there was no difference in IgA anti-CT antibody level between paired fed rats and those being fed ad libitum. Assessment of transforming growth factor beta in cell cultures revealed no difference between vitamin A-deficient and paired fed animals. In summary, vitamin A deficiency resulted in a decreased number of IgA-producing cells, decreased IgA production, and a reduced ability to respond with IgA antibodies to the oral cholera vaccine. PMID:8359917

  18. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways.

  19. Micronutrient deficiencies are associated with impaired immune response and higher burden of respiratory infections in elderly Ecuadorians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of the population in Latin America above the age of 60 is expected to rise substantially. To better define the prevalence of infectious diseases and micronutrient deficiencies, to assess immunological status, and to evaluate associations between nutritional status and infection, we pe...

  20. Folate–vitamin B-12 interaction in relation to cognitive impairment, anemia, and biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports on pernicious anemia treatment suggested that high folic acid intake adversely influences the natural history of vitamin B-12 deficiency, which affects many elderly individuals. However, experimental investigation of this hypothesis is unethical, and the few existing observational d...

  1. Immune Regulation by Pericytes: Modulating Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rocío; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Sanz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been credited with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, an accumulating body of evidence suggests that PC also display immune properties. They can respond to a series of pro-inflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger due to their expression of functional pattern-recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines but also overexpress adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, PC are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, which is attributed, at least in part, to the expression of PD-L1. As components of the tumor microenvironment, PC can also modulate the antitumor immune response. However, their role is complex, and further studies will be required to better understand the crosstalk of PC with immune cells in order to consider them as potential therapeutic targets. In any case, PC will be looked at with new eyes by immunologists from now on. PMID:27867386

  2. Transendothelial migration enables subsequent transmigration of neutrophils through underlying pericytes.

    PubMed

    Ayres-Sander, Chantal E; Lauridsen, Holly; Maier, Cheryl L; Sava, Parid; Pober, Jordan S; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, neutrophil recruitment into extravascular tissue requires neutrophil tethering and rolling on cytokine-activated endothelial cells (ECs), tight adhesion, crawling towards EC junctions and transendothelial migration (TEM). Following TEM, neutrophils must still traverse the subendothelial basement membrane and network of pericytes (PCs). Until recently, the contribution of the PC layer to neutrophil recruitment was largely ignored. Here we analyze human neutrophil interactions with interleukin (IL)-1β-activated human EC monolayers, PC monolayers and EC/PC bilayers in vitro. Compared to EC, PC support much lower levels of neutrophil binding (54.6% vs. 7.1%, respectively) and transmigration (63.7 vs. 8.8%, respectively) despite comparable levels of IL-8 (CXCL8) synthesis and display. Remarkably, EC/PC bilayers support intermediate levels of transmigration (37.7%). Neutrophil adhesion to both cell types is Mac-1-dependent and while ICAM-1 transduction of PCs increases neutrophil adhesion to (41.4%), it does not increase transmigration through PC monolayers. TEM, which increases neutrophil Mac-1 surface expression, concomitantly increases the ability of neutrophils to traverse PCs (19.2%). These data indicate that contributions from both PCs and ECs must be considered in evaluation of microvasculature function in acute inflammation.

  3. MTHFR deficiency or reduced intake of folate or choline in pregnant mice results in impaired short-term memory and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus of wild-type offspring.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, N M; Deng, L; Malysheva, O; Caudill, M A; Rozen, R

    2015-08-06

    Genetic or nutritional disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, with associated hyperhomocysteinemia, can result in complex disorders including pregnancy complications and neuropsychiatric diseases. In earlier work, we showed that mice with a complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, had cognitive impairment with disturbances in choline metabolism. Maternal demands for folate and choline are increased during pregnancy and deficiencies of these nutrients result in several negative outcomes including increased resorption and delayed development. The goal of this study was to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological impact of a maternal genetic deficiency in MTHFR or maternal nutritional deficiency of folate or choline during pregnancy on 3-week-old Mthfr(+/+) offspring. Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) females were placed on control diets (CD); and Mthfr(+/+) females were placed on folate-deficient diets (FD) or choline-deficient diets (ChDD) throughout pregnancy and lactation until their offspring were 3weeks of age. Short-term memory was assessed in offspring, and hippocampal tissue was evaluated for morphological changes, apoptosis, proliferation and choline metabolism. Maternal MTHFR deficiency resulted in short-term memory impairment in offspring. These dams had elevated levels of plasma homocysteine when compared with wild-type dams. There were no differences in plasma homocysteine in offspring. Increased apoptosis and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus of offspring from Mthfr(+/-) mothers. In the maternal FD and ChDD study, offspring also showed short-term memory impairment with increased apoptosis in the hippocampus; increased neurogenesis was observed in ChDD offspring. Choline acetyltransferase protein was increased in the offspring hippocampus of both dietary groups and betaine was decreased in the hippocampus of FD offspring. Our results reveal short-term memory

  4. The role of pericytic laminin in blood brain barrier integrity maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Jyoti; Zhang, Xuanming; Yao, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Laminin, a major component of the basement membrane, plays an important role in blood brain barrier regulation. At the neurovascular unit, brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes synthesize and deposit different laminin isoforms into the basement membrane. It has been shown that laminin α4 (endothelial laminin) regulates vascular integrity at embryonic/neonatal stage, while astrocytic laminin maintains vascular integrity in adulthood. Here, we investigate the function of pericyte-derived laminin in vascular integrity. Using a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that loss of pericytic laminin leads to hydrocephalus and BBB breakdown in a small percentage (10.7%) of the mutants. Interestingly, BBB disruption always goes hand-in-hand with hydrocephalus in these mutants, and neither symptom is observed in the rest 89.3% of the mutants. Further mechanistic studies show that reduced tight junction proteins, diminished AQP4 expression, and decreased pericyte coverage are responsible for the BBB disruption. Together, these data suggest that pericyte-derived laminin is involved in the maintenance of BBB integrity and regulation of ventricular size/development. PMID:27808256

  5. Bovine retinal pericytes are resistant to glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Agardh, Carl-David; Hultberg, Björn; Nayak, Ramesh C; Farthing-Nayak, Pamela; Agardh, Elisabet

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes, and loss of pericytes represents early signs of its development. We tested the hypothesis that high glucose levels may induce signs of oxidative stress in cultured bovine retinal pericytes. Pericytes were exposed to either normal (5.5 mM) or high (22 mM) glucose levels for 1, 3, and 5 days. Signs of oxidative stress were measured by expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase using real-time RTPCR. To elucidate the role of oxidative stress, we also measured glutathione (GSH) concentration in the cells and investigated the impact of thiol-reactive metal ions and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on intracellular GSH. Despite the stimulation with high glucose, thiol-reactive metal ions, or H(2)O(2), there was no clear increased expression of antioxidant enzymes or influence of GSH levels. Lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde level) was increased in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells, but not in bovine retinal pericytes. The data indicate that pericytes do not develop oxidative stress in response to hyperglycemia. However, it is not definitively excluded that oxidative stress may occur after longer time periods of glucose stimulation.

  6. Severe Ankyrin-R deficiency results in impaired surface retention and lysosomal degradation of RhAG in human erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Satchwell, Timothy J.; Bell, Amanda J.; Hawley, Bethan R.; Pellegrin, Stephanie; Mordue, Kathryn E.; van Deursen, Cees Th. B. M.; Braak, Nicole Heitink-ter; Huls, Gerwin; Leers, Mathie P.G; Overwater, Eline; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; van der Zwaag, Bert; Fermo, Elisa; Bianchi, Paola; van Wijk, Richard; Toye, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin-R provides a key link between band 3 and the spectrin cytoskeleton that helps to maintain the highly specialized erythrocyte biconcave shape. Ankyrin deficiency results in fragile spherocytic erythrocytes with reduced band 3 and protein 4.2 expression. We use in vitro differentiation of erythroblasts transduced with shRNAs targeting ANK1 to generate erythroblasts and reticulocytes with a novel ankyrin-R ‘near null’ human phenotype with less than 5% of normal ankyrin expression. Using this model, we demonstrate that absence of ankyrin negatively impacts the reticulocyte expression of a variety of proteins, including band 3, glycophorin A, spectrin, adducin and, more strikingly, protein 4.2, CD44, CD47 and Rh/RhAG. Loss of band 3, which fails to form tetrameric complexes in the absence of ankyrin, alongside GPA, occurs due to reduced retention within the reticulocyte membrane during erythroblast enucleation. However, loss of RhAG is temporally and mechanistically distinct, occurring predominantly as a result of instability at the plasma membrane and lysosomal degradation prior to enucleation. Loss of Rh/RhAG was identified as common to erythrocytes with naturally occurring ankyrin deficiency and demonstrated to occur prior to enucleation in cultures of erythroblasts from a hereditary spherocytosis patient with severe ankyrin deficiency but not in those exhibiting milder reductions in expression. The identification of prominently reduced surface expression of Rh/RhAG in combination with direct evaluation of ankyrin expression using flow cytometry provides an efficient and rapid approach for the categorization of hereditary spherocytosis arising from ankyrin deficiency. PMID:27247322

  7. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L.; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S.; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D.; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D’Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency. PMID:28074903

  8. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-11

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency.

  9. Mutation in PNPT1, which encodes a polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase, impairs RNA import into mitochondria and causes respiratory-chain deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vedrenne, Vanessa; Gowher, Ali; De Lonlay, Pascale; Nitschke, Patrick; Serre, Valérie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Altuzarra, Cecilia; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Chretien, Florence; Entelis, Nina; Munnich, Arnold; Tarassov, Ivan; Rötig, Agnès

    2012-11-02

    Multiple-respiratory-chain deficiency represents an important cause of mitochondrial disorders. Hitherto, however, mutations in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance and translation machinery only account for a fraction of cases. Exome sequencing in two siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with severe encephalomyopathy, choreoathetotic movements, and combined respiratory-chain defects allowed us to identify a homozygous PNPT1 missense mutation (c.1160A>G) that encodes the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that no PNPase complex could be detected in subject fibroblasts, confirming that the substitution encoded by c.1160A>G disrupts the trimerization of the protein. PNPase is predominantly localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is implicated in RNA targeting to human mitochondria. Mammalian mitochondria import several small noncoding nuclear RNAs (5S rRNA, MRP RNA, some tRNAs, and miRNAs). By RNA hybridization experiments, we observed a significant decrease in 5S rRNA and MRP-related RNA import into mitochondria in fibroblasts of affected subject 1. Moreover, we found a reproducible decrease in the rate of mitochondrial translation in her fibroblasts. Finally, overexpression of the wild-type PNPT1 cDNA in fibroblasts of subject 1 induced an increase in 5S rRNA import in mitochondria and rescued the mitochondrial-translation deficiency. In conclusion, we report here abnormal RNA import into mitochondria as a cause of respiratory-chain deficiency.

  10. Impaired haematopoietic stem cell differentiation and enhanced skewing towards myeloid progenitors in aged caspase-2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Swati; Shahrin, Nur Hezrin; Sladojevic, Nikolina; D'Andrea, Richard J; Dorstyn, Loretta; Hiwase, Devendra K; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The apoptotic cysteine protease caspase-2 has been shown to suppress tumourigenesis in mice and its reduced expression correlates with poor prognosis in some human malignancies. Caspase-2-deficient mice develop normally but show ageing-related traits and, when challenged by oncogenic stimuli or certain stress, show enhanced tumour development, often accompanied by extensive aneuploidy. As stem cells are susceptible to acquiring age-related functional defects because of their self-renewal and proliferative capacity, we examined whether loss of caspase-2 promotes such defects with age. Using young and aged Casp2−/− mice, we demonstrate that deficiency of caspase-2 results in enhanced aneuploidy and DNA damage in bone marrow (BM) cells with ageing. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that caspase-2 loss results in significant increase in immunophenotypically defined short-term haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors fractions in BM with a skewed differentiation towards myeloid progenitors with ageing. Caspase-2 deficiency leads to enhanced granulocyte macrophage and erythroid progenitors in aged mice. Colony-forming assays and long-term culture-initiating assay further recapitulated these results. Our results provide the first evidence of caspase-2 in regulating HSC and progenitor differentiation, as well as aneuploidy, in vivo. PMID:27906175

  11. Astrocytic laminin regulates pericyte differentiation and maintains blood brain barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Zu-Lin; Norris, Erin H.; Strickland, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is not only a consequence of but also contributes to many neurological disorders, including stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. How the basement membrane (BM) contributes to the normal functioning of the BBB remains elusive. Here we use conditional knockout mice and an acute adenovirus-mediated knockdown model to show that lack of astrocytic laminin, a brain-specific BM component, induces BBB breakdown. Using functional blocking antibody and RNAi, we further demonstrate that astrocytic laminin, by binding to integrin α2 receptor, prevents pericyte differentiation from the BBB-stabilizing resting stage to the BBB-disrupting contractile stage, and thus maintains the integrity of BBB. Additionally, loss of astrocytic laminin decreases aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction protein expression. Altogether, we report a critical role for astrocytic laminin in BBB regulation and pericyte differentiation. These results indicate that astrocytic laminin maintains the integrity of BBB through, at least in part, regulation of pericyte differentiation.

  12. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms.

  13. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms. PMID:26779219

  14. Impaired removal of Vβ8(+) lymphocytes aggravates colitis in mice deficient for B cell lymphoma-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim).

    PubMed

    Leucht, K; Caj, M; Fried, M; Rogler, G; Hausmann, M

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the role of B cell lymphoma (BCL)-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) for lymphocyte homeostasis in intestinal mucosa. Lymphocytes lacking Bim are refractory to apoptosis. Chronic colitis was induced in Bim-deficient mice (Bim(-/-) ) with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Weight loss and colonoscopic score were increased significantly in Bim(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. As Bim is induced for the killing of autoreactive cells we determined the role of Bim in the regulation of lymphocyte survival at mucosal sites. Upon chronic dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, Bim(-/-) animals exhibited an increased infiltrate of lymphocytes into the mucosa compared to wild-type mice. The number of autoreactive T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ8(+) lymphocytes was significantly higher in Bim(-/-) mice compared to wild-type controls. Impaired removal of autoreactive lymphocytes in Bim(-/-) mice upon chronic DSS-induced colitis may therefore contribute to aggravated mucosal inflammation.

  15. Impaired tumor growth in colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-deficient, macrophage-deficient op/op mouse: evidence for a role of CSF-1-dependent macrophages in formation of tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Szenajch, J; Ostrowska, G; Wojtowicz, A; Wojtowicz, K; Kruszewski, A A; Maruszynski, M; Aukerman, S L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W

    1996-01-03

    Macrophages have been suggested to play a major role in the immune response to cancer. They have also been suggested to stimulate the formation of tumor stroma and to promote tumor vascularization. The availability of the op/op mouse, which has no endogenous colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) and which possesses a profound macrophage deficiency, provides a new model to verify these notions. Subcutaneous growth of transplantable Lewis lung cancer (LLC) is markedly impaired in the op/op mice compared with normal littermates. Treatment of tumor-bearing op/op mice with human recombinant CSF-1 corrects this impairment. Histological analysis of tumors grown in op/op and normal mice revealed marked differences. Tumors grown in op/op mice display a decreased mitotic index and pronounced necrosis, particularly hemorrhagic. Moreover, particularly in the op/op tumors, peculiar sinusoid-like abortive vessels (not filled with blood) have been observed. These tumors, in contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, are almost deprived of regular arteries and veins. In contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, they exhibit almost no Sirius red-stained collagenous fibers and Gomori silver-stained reticular fibers. Our data suggest that the CSF-1-dependent macrophage subpopulation missing in op/op mice plays a primary role in supporting tumor stroma formation and tumor vascularization in murine LLC tumors.

  16. Testosterone deficiency induced by progressive stages of diabetes mellitus impairs glucose metabolism and favors glycogenesis in mature rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rato, Luís; Alves, Marco G; Duarte, Ana I; Santos, Maria S; Moreira, Paula I; Cavaco, José E; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its prodromal stage, pre-diabetes, is rapidly increasing among young men, leading to disturbances in testosterone synthesis. However, the impact of testosterone deficiency induced by these progressive stages of diabetes on the metabolic behavior of Sertoli cells remains unknown. We evaluated the effects of testosterone deficiency associated with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes on Sertoli cells metabolism, by measuring (1) the expression and/or activities of glycolysis and glycogen metabolism-related proteins and (2) the metabolite secretion/consumption in Sertoli cells obtained from rat models of different development stages of the disease, to unveil the mechanisms by which testosterone deregulation may affect spermatogenesis. Glucose and pyruvate uptake were decreased in cells exposed to the testosterone concentration found in pre-diabetic rats (600nM), whereas the decreased testosterone concentrations found in type 2 diabetic rats (7nM) reversed this profile. Lactate production was not altered, although the expression and/or activity of lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter 4 were affected by progressive testosterone-deficiency. Sertoli cells exposed to type 2 diabetic conditions exhibited intracellular glycogen accumulation. These results illustrate that gradually reduced levels of testosterone, induced by progressive stages of diabetes mellitus, favor a metabolic reprogramming toward glycogen synthesis. Our data highlights a pivotal role for testosterone in the regulation of spermatogenesis metabolic support by Sertoli cells, particularly in individuals suffering from metabolic diseases. Such alterations may be in the basis of male subfertility/infertility associated with the progression of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L.; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting. PMID:25278877

  18. Decreased Npas4 and Arc mRNA Levels in the Hippocampus of Aged Memory-Impaired Wild-Type But Not Memory Preserved 11β-HSD1 Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Dunbar, D R; Noble, J; Cairns, C; Carter, R; Kelly, V; Chapman, K E; Seckl, J R; Yau, J L W

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in the glucocorticoid-regenerating enzyme 11β-HSD1 resist age-related spatial memory impairment. To investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved, we used microarrays to identify differentially expressed hippocampal genes that associate with cognitive ageing and 11β-HSD1. Aged wild-type mice were separated into memory-impaired and unimpaired relative to young controls according to their performance in the Y-maze. All individual aged 11β-HSD1-deficient mice showed intact spatial memory. The majority of differentially expressed hippocampal genes were increased with ageing (e.g. immune/inflammatory response genes) with no genotype differences. However, the neuronal-specific transcription factor, Npas4, and immediate early gene, Arc, were reduced (relative to young) in the hippocampus of memory-impaired but not unimpaired aged wild-type or aged 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. A quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridisation confirmed reduced Npas4 and Arc mRNA expression in memory-impaired aged wild-type mice. These findings suggest that 11β-HSD1 may contribute to the decline in Npas4 and Arc mRNA levels associated with memory impairment during ageing, and that decreased activity of synaptic plasticity pathways involving Npas4 and Arc may, in part, underlie the memory deficits seen in cognitively-impaired aged wild-type mice.

  19. Histamine deficiency exacerbates myocardial injury in acute myocardial infarction through impaired macrophage infiltration and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Long; Hong, Tao; Lin, Jinyi; Ding, Suling; Huang, Zheyong; Chen, Jinmiao; Jia, Jianguo; Zou, Yunzeng; Wang, Timothy C; Yang, Xiangdong; Ge, Junbo

    2015-08-17

    Histamine is a biogenic amine that is widely distributed and has multiple functions, but the role it plays in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the origin and contribution of endogenous histamine to AMI. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) is the unique enzyme responsible for histamine generation. Using HDC-EGFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice in which EGFP expression is controlled by the HDC promoter, we identified HDC expression primarily in CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells (IMCs) that markedly increase in the early stages of AMI. Deficiency of histamine in HDC knockout mice (HDC(-/-)) reduced cardiac function and exacerbated the injury of infarcted heart. Furthermore, administering either an H1 receptor antagonist (pyrilamine) or an H2 receptor antagonist (cimetidine) demonstrated a protective effect of histamine against myocardial injury. The results of in vivo and in vitro assays showed that histamine deficiency promotes the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and inhibits macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) IMCs are the predominant HDC-expressing sites in AMI, and histamine plays a protective role in the process of AMI through inhibition of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and facilitation of macrophage infiltration.

  20. Impaired physiological responses to chronic hypoxia in mice partially deficient for hypoxia-inducible factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Aimee Y.; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Iyer, Narayan V.; Huso, David L.; Sun, Xing; McWilliams, Rita; Beaty, Terri; Sham, James S.K.; Wiener, Charles M.; Sylvester, J.T.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and weight loss. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activates transcription of genes encoding proteins that mediate adaptive responses to hypoxia, including erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glycolytic enzymes. Expression of the HIF-1α subunit increases exponentially as O2 concentration is decreased. Hif1a–/– mouse embryos with complete deficiency of HIF-1α due to homozygosity for a null allele at the Hif1a locus die at midgestation, with multiple cardiovascular malformations and mesenchymal cell death. Hif1a+/– heterozygotes develop normally and are indistinguishable from Hif1a+/+ wild-type littermates when maintained under normoxic conditions. In this study, the physiological responses of Hif1a+/– and Hif1a+/+ mice exposed to 10% O2 for one to six weeks were analyzed. Hif1a+/– mice demonstrated significantly delayed development of polycythemia, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary vascular remodeling and significantly greater weight loss compared with wild-type littermates. These results indicate that partial HIF-1α deficiency has significant effects on multiple systemic responses to chronic hypoxia. J. Clin. Invest. 103:691–696 (1999) PMID:10074486

  1. Isolation, bulk cultivation, and characterization of coronary microvascular pericytes: the second most frequent myocardial cell type in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nees, Stephan; Weiss, Dominik R; Senftl, Anton; Knott, Maria; Förch, Stefan; Schnurr, Maximilian; Weyrich, Peter; Juchem, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Densely arranged pericytes engird the endothelial tube of all coronary microvessels. Since the experimental access to these abundant cells in situ is difficult, a prerequisite for broader investigation is the availability of sufficient numbers of fully differentiated pericytes in homogenous culture. To reach this goal, we applied strictly standardized cell isolation techniques, optimized culture methods and specific histological staining. Approximately 1,000-fold enriched pericytes were proteolytically detached from highly purified coronary microvascular networks (density gradient centrifugation) of eight mammalian species including human. Addition of species-autologous fetal or neonatal serum (10-20% vol/vol) was a precondition for longer term survival of homogenous pericyte cultures. This ensured optimal growth (doubling time <14 h) and full expression of pericyte-specific markers. In 3-mo, 10(10) pericytes (15 g) could be cultivated from 1 bovine heart. Pericytes could be stored in liquid N(2), recultured, and passaged repeatedly without loss of typical features. In cocultures with EC or vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes transferred fluorescent calcein to each other and to EC via their antler-like extensions, organized angiogenetic sprouting of vessels, and rapidly activated coagulation factors X and II via tissue factor and prothrombinase. The interconnected pericytes of the coronary system are functionally closely correlated with the vascular endothelium and may play key roles in the adjustment of local blood flow, the regulation of angiogenic processes, and the induction of procoagulatory processes. Their successful bulk cultivation enables direct experimental access under defined in vitro conditions and the isolation of pericyte specific antigens for the production of specific antibodies.

  2. ACE2 deficiency reduces β-cell mass and impairs β-cell proliferation in obese C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Thatcher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decrease the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Pancreatic islets express RAS components, including angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which cleaves angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin-(1–7) [Ang-(1–7)]. Overexpression of ACE2 in pancreas of diabetic mice improved glucose homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine if deficiency of endogenous ACE2 contributes to islet dysfunction and T2D. We hypothesized that ACE2 deficiency potentiates the decline in β-cell function and augments the development of diet-induced T2D. Male Ace2+/y or Ace2−/y mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for 1 or 4 mo. A subset of 1-mo HF-fed mice were infused with Sal (Sal), losartan (Los), or Ang-(1–7). At 4 mo, while both genotypes of HF-fed mice developed a similar level of insulin resistance, adaptive hyperinsulinemia was reduced in Ace2−/y vs. Ace2+/y mice. Similarly, in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was reduced in 1-mo HF-fed Ace2−/y compared with Ace2+/y mice, resulting in augmented hyperglycemia. The average islet area was significantly smaller in both LF- and HF-fed Ace2−/y vs. Ace2+/y mice. Additionally, β-cell mass and proliferation were reduced significantly in HF-fed Ace2−/y vs. Ace2+/y mice. Neither infusion of Los nor Ang-(1–7) was able to correct impaired in vivo GSIS of HF-fed ACE2-deficient mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for endogenous ACE2 in the adaptive β-cell hyperinsulinemic response to HF feeding through regulation of β-cell proliferation and growth. PMID:26389599

  3. Mice with Deficient BK Channel Function Show Impaired Prepulse Inhibition and Spatial Learning, but Normal Working and Spatial Reference Memory

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Erin; Ruettiger, Lukas; Ruth, Peter; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels) have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection. PMID:24303038

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency in macrophages leads to defective p110γ PI3K signaling and impairs cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Osma-García, Inés C; Iñiguez, Miguel A; Fresno, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 dependent PGs modulate several functions in many pathophysiological processes, including migration of immune cells. In this study, we addressed the role of Cox-2 in macrophage migration by using in vivo and in vitro models. Upon thioglycolate challenge, CD11b(+) F4/80(+) macrophages showed a diminished ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity in cox-2(-/-) mice. In vivo migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages from the peritoneal cavity to lymph nodes, as well as cell adhesion to the mesothelium, was reduced in response to LPS. In vitro migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages toward MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-1β, as well as cell adhesion to ICAM-1 or fibronectin, was impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to changes in chemokine receptor expression. Remarkably, cox-2(-/-) macrophages showed a deficiency in focal adhesion formation, with reduced phosphorylation of paxillin (Tyr(188)). Interestingly, expression of the p110γ catalytic subunit of PI3K was severely reduced in the absence of Cox-2, leading to defective Akt phosphorylation, as well as cdc42 and Rac-1 activation. Our results indicate that the paxillin/p110γ-PI3K/Cdc42/Rac1 axis is defective in cox-2(-/-) macrophages, which results in impaired cell adhesion and migration.

  5. Medium-chain triglycerides impair lipid metabolism and induce hepatic steatosis in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Primassin, Sonja; Ter Veld, Frank; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2010-09-01

    A medium-chain-triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is mainstay of treatment in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), a long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation defect. Beneficial effects have been reported with an MCT-bolus prior to exercise. Little is known about the impact of a long-term MCT diet on hepatic lipid metabolism. Here we investigate the effects of MCT-supplementation on liver and blood lipids in the murine model of VLCADD. Wild-type (WT) and VLCAD-knock-out (KO) mice were fed (1) a long-chain triglyceride (LCT)-diet over 5weeks, (2) an MCT diet over 5 weeks and (3) an LCT diet plus MCT-bolus. Blood and liver lipid content were determined. Expression of genes regulating lipogenesis was analyzed by RT-PCR. Under the LCT diet, VLCAD-KO mice accumulated significantly higher blood cholesterol concentrations compared to WT mice. The MCT-diet induced severe hepatic steatosis, significantly higher serum free fatty acids and impaired hepatic lipid mobilization in VLCAD-KO mice. Expression at mRNA level of hepatic lipogenic genes was up-regulated. The long-term MCT diet stimulates lipogenesis and impairs hepatic lipid metabolism in VLCAD-KO mice. These results suggest a critical reconsideration of a long-term MCT-modified diet in human VLCADD. In contrast, MCT in situations of increased energy demand appears to be a safer treatment alternative.

  6. Liver-Specific PGC-1beta Deficiency Leads to Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Lipogenic Response to Fasting-Refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Kari T.; Chen, Zhouji; Crawford, Peter A.; Fu, Xiaorong; Burgess, Shawn C.; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Finck, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    PGC-1β plays pleiotropic roles in regulating intermediary metabolism and has been shown to regulate both catabolic and anabolic processes in liver. We sought to evaluate the effects of PGC-1β on liver energy metabolism by generating mice with postnatal, liver-specific deletion of PGC-1β (LS-PGC-1β−/− mice). LS-PGC-1β−/− mice were outwardly normal, but exhibited a significant increase in hepatic triglyceride content at 6 weeks of age. Hepatic steatosis was due, at least in part, to impaired capacity for fatty acid oxidation and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA content and the expression of genes encoding multiple steps in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation pathways were significantly diminished in LS-PGC-1β−/− mice. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based analyses also revealed that acetylcarnitine and butyrylcarnitine levels were depleted whereas palmitoylcarnitine content was increased in LS-PGC-1β−/− liver, which is consistent with attenuated rates of fatty acid oxidation. Interestingly, loss of PGC-1β also significantly impaired inducible expression of glycolytic and lipogenic enzymes that occurs with high carbohydrate diet refeeding after a prolonged fast. These results suggest that PGC-1β plays dual roles in regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism by controlling the expression of programs of genes involved in both fatty acid oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis. PMID:23285128

  7. N-acetylcysteine reverses existing cognitive impairment and increased oxidative stress in glutamate transporter type 3 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2012-09-18

    Oxidative stress contributes significantly to brain aging. Animals lacking glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3) have a decreased level of glutathione, the major intracellular anti-oxidant, in neurons, and present with early onset of brain aging including brain atrophy and cognitive impairment at 11 months of age. Here, 12-month-old male EAAT3 knockout mice received intraperitoneal injection of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 150 mg/kg once every day for 4 weeks. NAC is a membrane permeable cysteine precursor that can work as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. EAAT3 knockout mice that received saline injection or did not receive any injection were also included in the study. EAAT3 knockout mice had significantly less freezing behavior than age- and gender-matched wild-type mice in context- and tone-related fear conditioning tests. The knockout mice also had decreased levels of glutathione and increased levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and proteins containing nitrotyrosine, indicators of oxidative stress, in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. NAC but not saline injection attenuated these behavioral and biochemical changes in the EAAT3 knockout mice. These results suggest that improvement of anti-oxidative capacity in neurons reverses the existing cognitive impairment in aging brains, implying a potential role of glutathione replacement in cognitive improvement of aging population.

  8. Impaired vascular remodeling after endothelial progenitor cell transplantation in MMP9-deficient mice suffering cortical cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Anna; Ma, Feifei; Barceló, Verónica; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Rosell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are being investigated for advanced therapies, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) has an important role in stroke recovery. Our aim was to determine whether tissue MMP9 influences the EPC-induced angiogenesis after ischemia. Wild-type (WT) and MMP9-deficient mice (MMP9/KO) were subjected to cerebral ischemia and treated with vehicle or outgrowth EPCs. After 3 weeks, we observed an increase in the peri-infarct vessel density in WT animals but not in MMP9/KO mice; no differences were found in the vehicle-treated groups. Our data suggest that tissue MMP9 has a crucial role in EPC-induced vascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:26219597

  9. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Mucin Expression and Suppresses the Mucosal Immune Function of the Respiratory Tract in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanhua; Zhao, Jingpeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Zhigang; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The chicken immune system is immature at the time of hatching. The development of the respiratory immune system after hatching is vital to young chicks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin A supplement levels on respiratory mucin and IgA production in chicks. In this study, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of three replicates of 10 broilers and subjected to dietary vitamin A supplement levels of 0, 1,500, 6,000, or 12,000 IU/kg for seven days. Compared with control birds, vitamin A supplementation significantly increased the mucin and IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the IgA level in serum. In the lungs, vitamin A supplementation downregulated TNF-α and EGFR mRNA expression. The TGF-β and MUC5AC mRNA expression levels were upregulated by vitamin A supplementation at a dose of 6,000 IU/kg, and the IL-13 mRNA expression level was increased at the 12,000 IU/kg supplement level. Vitamin A deficiency (control) significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of MUC2, IgA, EGFR, IL-13 and TGF-β in trachea tissue. Histological section analysis revealed that the number of goblet cells in the tracheal epithelium was less in the 0 and 12,000 IU/kg vitamin A supplement groups than in the other groups. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency suppressed the immunity of the airway by decreasing the IgA and mucin concentrations in neonatal chicks. This study suggested that a suitable level of vitamin A is essential for the secretion of IgA and mucin in the respiratory tract by regulating the gene expression of cytokines and epithelial growth factors. PMID:26422233

  10. Epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vanderpump, Mark P

    2017-04-01

    Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) produced by the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency impairs thyroid hormone production and has adverse effects throughout life, particularly early in life as it impairs cognition and growth. Iodine deficiency remains a significant problem despite major national and international efforts to increase iodine intake, primarily through the voluntary or mandatory iodization of salt. Recent epidemiological data suggest that iodine deficiency is an emerging issue in industrialized countries, previously thought of as iodine-sufficient. International efforts to control iodine deficiency are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges.

  11. CHD7 deficiency in "Looper", a new mouse model of CHARGE syndrome, results in ossicle malformation, otosclerosis and hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Ogier, Jacqueline M; Carpinelli, Marina R; Arhatari, Benedicta D; Symons, R C Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T; Burt, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment.

  12. Epsin deficiency impairs endocytosis by stalling the actin-dependent invagination of endocytic clathrin-coated pits

    PubMed Central

    Messa, Mirko; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén; Sun, Elizabeth Wen; Chen, Hong; Czapla, Heather; Wrasman, Kristie; Wu, Yumei; Ko, Genevieve; Ross, Theodora; Wendland, Beverly; De Camilli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Epsin is an evolutionarily conserved endocytic clathrin adaptor whose most critical function(s) in clathrin coat dynamics remain(s) elusive. To elucidate such function(s), we generated embryonic fibroblasts from conditional epsin triple KO mice. Triple KO cells displayed a dramatic cell division defect. Additionally, a robust impairment in clathrin-mediated endocytosis was observed, with an accumulation of early and U-shaped pits. This defect correlated with a perturbation of the coupling between the clathrin coat and the actin cytoskeleton, which we confirmed in a cell-free assay of endocytosis. Our results indicate that a key evolutionary conserved function of epsin, in addition to other roles that include, as we show here, a low affinity interaction with SNAREs, is to help generate the force that leads to invagination and then fission of clathrin-coated pits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03311.001 PMID:25122462

  13. Immortalized CNS pericytes are quiescent smooth muscle actin-negative and pluripotent

    PubMed Central

    Dore-Duffy, Paula; Mehedi, Afroza; Wang, Xueqian; Bradley, Michael; Trotter, Richard; Gow, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Despite their identification more than 100 years ago by the French scientist Charles-Marie Benjamin Rouget, microvascular pericytes have proven difficult to functionally characterize, due in part to their relatively low numbers and the lack of specific cell markers. However, recent progress is beginning to shed light on the diverse biological functions of these cells. Pericytes are thought to be involved in regulating vascular homeostasis and hemostasis as well as serving as a local source of adult stem cells. To further define the properties of these intriguing cells, we have isolated pericytes from transgenic mice (Immortomouse®) harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of the SV40 virus target T-gene. This Immortopericyte (IMP) conditional cell line is stable for long periods of time and, at 33°C in the presence of interferon gamma, does not differentiate. Under these conditions IMPs are alpha muscle actin-negative and exhibit a pluripotent phenotype, but can be induced to differentiate along both mesenchymal and neuronal lineages at 37°C. Alternatively, differentiation of wild type pericytes and IMPs can be induced directly from capillaries in culture. Finally, the addition of endothelial cells to purified IMP cultures augments their rate of self-renewal and differentiation, possibly in a cell-to-cell contact dependent manner. PMID:21515289

  14. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Müller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPPalpha, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPPalpha has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  15. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Mueller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker . E-mail: Herzog@uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPP{alpha}) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPP{alpha}, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPP{alpha} has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  16. Deficiency of β-arrestin1 ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis with impaired TH17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wei, Bin; Guo, Ao; Liu, Chang; Huang, Shichao; Du, Fang; Fan, Wei; Bao, Chunde; Pei, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease in which interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper 17 (TH17) cells have been critically involved. We show that in patients with RA, the expression of a multifunctional regulator β-arrestin1 was significantly up-regulated in peripheral and synovial CD4+ T cells, which correlated well with active phases of RA. In collagen-induced arthritis, deficiency of β-arrestin1 ameliorated disease with decreased TH17 cell differentiation, proinflammatory cytokine production, synovitis, and cartilage and bone destruction. Further mechanistic study reveals that β-arrestin1 promoted signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation required for TH17 cell differentiation through scaffolding the interaction of Janus kinase 1 and STAT3. These findings indicate a critical role for β-arrestin1 in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis and TH17 cell differentiation and suggest β-arrestin1 as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for RA. PMID:23589893

  17. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  18. Impaired wound healing with defective expression of chemokines and recruitment of myeloid cells in TLR3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Fang, Dan; Fang, Jiazhu; Ren, Xiangrong; Yang, Xiaoping; Wen, Feng; Su, Shao Bo

    2011-03-15

    Skin injury evokes both innate and adaptive immune responses to restore tissue integrity. TLRs play a critical role in host responses to injurious insults. Previous studies demonstrated that RNAs released from damaged tissues served as endogenous ligands for TLR3. In this study, we investigated the involvement of TLR3 in skin restoration after injury. Full excisional wounds were created on the skin of mice with TLR3 deficiency. We found that skin wound closure in TLR3(-/-) mice was significantly delayed compared with control littermates. Wound healing parameters, including re-epithelialization, granulation formation, and neovascularization, were decreased in TLR3(-/-) mice. Further studies revealed that the absence of TLR3 led to defective recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages, in association with decreased expression of the chemokines, MIP-2/CXCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, and MCP-1/CCL2, in the wound. Moreover, in wild type mice, the mRNA level and protein content of TLR3 was significantly upregulated in wounded skins and silencing of TLR3 signal adaptor Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β with small interfering RNA retarded wound closure. These results indicate an essential role for TLR3 and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β in wound healing by regulating chemokine production and recruitment of myeloid cells to wound for tissue repair.

  19. Impaired regenerative capacity and lower revertant fibre expansion in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles on DBA/2 background

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Maruyama, Rika; Lim, Kenji Rowel Q.; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, one of the most common lethal genetic disorders, is caused by mutations in the DMD gene and a lack of dystrophin protein. In most DMD patients and animal models, sporadic dystrophin-positive muscle fibres, called revertant fibres (RFs), are observed in otherwise dystrophin-negative backgrounds. RFs are thought to arise from skeletal muscle precursor cells and clonally expand with age due to the frequent regeneration of necrotic fibres. Here we examined the effects of genetic background on muscle regeneration and RF expansion by comparing dystrophin-deficient mdx mice on the C57BL/6 background (mdx-B6) with those on the DBA/2 background (mdx-DBA), which have a more severe phenotype. Interestingly, mdx-DBA muscles had significantly lower RF expansion than mdx-B6 in all age groups, including 2, 6, 12, and 18 months. The percentage of centrally nucleated fibres was also significantly lower in mdx-DBA mice compared to mdx-B6, indicating that less muscle regeneration occurs in mdx-DBA. Our study aligns with the model that RF expansion reflects the activity of precursor cells in skeletal muscles, and it serves as an index of muscle regeneration capacity. PMID:27924830

  20. Gonadotropin and kisspeptin gene expression, but not GnRH, are impaired in cFOS deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Changchuan; Jonak, Carrie R.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2015-01-01

    cFOS is a pleiotropic transcription factor, which binds to the AP1 site in the promoter of target genes. In the pituitary gonadotropes, cFOS mediates induction of FSHβ and GnRH receptor genes. Herein, we analyzed reproductive function in the cFOS-deficient mice to determine its role in vivo. In the pituitary cFOS is necessary for gonadotropin subunit expression, while TSHβ is unaffected. Additionally, cFOS null animals have the same sex-steroid levels, although gametogenesis is impeded. In the brain, cFOS is not necessary for GnRH neuronal migration, axon targeting, cell number, or mRNA levels. Conversely, cFOS nulls, particularly females, have decreased Kiss1 neuron numbers and lower Kiss1 mRNA levels. Collectively, our novel findings suggest that cFOS plays a cell-specific role at multiple levels of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, affecting gonadotropes but not thyrotropes in the pituitary, and kisspeptin neurons but not GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus, thereby contributing to the overall control of reproduction. PMID:25958044

  1. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L.; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking

  2. Pericyte response to contraction mode-specific resistance exercise training in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; De Lisio, Michael; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Bjerre, Jonas; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Boppart, Marni D; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-11-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are important for muscle repair and hypertrophy in response mechanical stimuli. Neuron-glial antigen 2-positive (NG2(+)) and alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)) pericytes may provide an alternative source of myogenic progenitors and/or secrete paracrine factors to induce Pax7(+) SC proliferation and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate NG2(+) and ALP(+) cell quantity, as well as SC content and activation, in human skeletal muscle following prolonged concentric (Conc) or eccentric (Ecc) resistance training. Male subjects engaged in unilateral resistance training utilizing isolated Ecc or Conc contractions. After 12 wk, muscle biopsies were analyzed for NG2(+) and ALP(+) pericytes, total Pax7(+) SCs, activated SCs (Pax7(+)MyoD(+)), and differentiating myogenic cells (Pax7(-) MyoD(+)). NG2(+) cells localized to CD31(+) vessels and the majority coexpressed ALP. NG2(+) pericyte quantity decreased following both Conc and Ecc training (P < 0.05). ALP(+) pericyte quantity declined following Conc (P < 0.05) but not Ecc training. Conversely, total Pax7(+) SC content was elevated following Conc only (P < 0.001), while Pax7(+)MyoD(+) SC content was increased following Conc and Ecc (P < 0.001). Follow up analyses demonstrated that CD90(+) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα)(+) mononuclear cell proliferation was also increased in response to both Conc and Ecc training (P < 0.01). In summary, resistance training results in a decline in pericyte quantity and an increase in mesenchymal progenitor cell proliferation, and these events likely influence SC pool expansion and increased activation observed posttraining.

  3. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  4. Vitamin C deficiency in the brain impairs cognition, increases amyloid accumulation and deposition, and oxidative stress in APP/PSEN1 and normally aging mice.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shilpy; Bernardo, Alexandra; Walker, Jennifer Michelle; Kennard, John Andrew; Kim, Grace Youngeun; Kessler, Eric Sean; Harrison, Fiona Edith

    2015-04-15

    Subclinical vitamin C deficiency is widespread in many populations, but its role in both Alzheimer's disease and normal aging is understudied. In the present study, we decreased brain vitamin C in the APPSWE/PSEN1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by crossing APP/PSEN1(+) bigenic mice with SVCT2(+/-) heterozygous knockout mice, which have lower numbers of the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter required for neuronal vitamin C transport. SVCT2(+/-) mice performed less well on the rotarod task at both 5 and 12 months of age compared to littermates. SVCT2(+/-) and APP/PSEN1(+) mice and the combination genotype SVCT2(+/-)APP/PSEN1(+) were also impaired on multiple tests of cognitive ability (olfactory memory task, Y-maze alternation, conditioned fear, Morris water maze). In younger mice, both low vitamin C (SVCT2(+/-)) and APP/PSEN1 mutations increased brain cortex oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyls, F2-isoprostanes) and decreased total glutathione compared to wild-type controls. SVCT2(+/-) mice also had increased amounts of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 and a higher Aβ1-42/1-40 ratio. By 14 months of age, oxidative stress levels were similar among groups, but there were more amyloid-β plaque deposits in both hippocampus and cortex of SVCT2(+/-)APP/PSEN1(+) mice compared to APP/PSEN1(+) mice with normal brain vitamin C. These data suggest that even moderate intracellular vitamin C deficiency plays an important role in accelerating amyloid pathogenesis, particularly during early stages of disease development, and that these effects are likely modulated by oxidative stress pathways.

  5. Aberrant Location of Inhibitory Synaptic Marker Proteins in the Hippocampus of Dystrophin-Deficient Mice: Implications for Cognitive Impairment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Krasowska, Elżbieta; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Górecki, Dariusz C.; Swinny, Jerome D.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease that arises from mutations in the dystrophin-encoding gene. Apart from muscle pathology, cognitive impairment, primarily of developmental origin, is also a significant component of the disorder. Convergent lines of evidence point to an important role for dystrophin in regulating the molecular machinery of central synapses. The clustering of neurotransmitter receptors at inhibitory synapses, thus impacting on synaptic transmission, is of particular significance. However, less is known about the role of dystrophin in influencing the precise expression patterns of proteins located within the pre- and postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses. To this end, we exploited molecular markers of inhibitory synapses, interneurons and dystrophin-deficient mouse models to explore the role of dystrophin in determining the stereotypical patterning of inhibitory connectivity within the cellular networks of the hippocampus CA1 region. In tissue from wild-type (WT) mice, immunoreactivity of neuroligin2 (NL2), an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively in postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses, and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), a marker of GABAergic presynaptic elements, were predictably enriched in strata pyramidale and lacunosum moleculare. In acute contrast, NL2 and VGAT immunoreactivity was relatively evenly distributed across all CA1 layers in dystrophin-deficient mice. Similar changes were evident with the cannabinoid receptor 1, vesicular glutamate transporter 3, parvalbumin, somatostatin and the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit. The data show that in the absence of dystrophin, there is a rearrangement of the molecular machinery, which underlies the precise spatio-temporal pattern of GABAergic synaptic transmission within the CA1 sub-field of the hippocampus. PMID:25260053

  6. Retrieval Deficiency in Brain Activity of Working Memory in Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients: A Brain Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin-Yin; Tang, Hui-Dong; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    In the early stage of Alzheimer disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), working memory (WM) deficiency is prominent and could be attributed to failure in encoding, maintenance or retrieval of information. However, evidence for a retention or retrieval deficit remains equivocal. It is also unclear what cognitive mechanism in WM is impaired in MCI or early AD. We enrolled 46 subjects from our Memory Clinics and community, with 24 amnesic MCI patients and 22 normal subjects. After neurological and cognitive assessments, they performed a classic delayed match to sample (DMS) task with simultaneous event-related potential (ERP) recorded. The ERPs in encoding and retrieval epoch during WM were analyzed separately. The latency and amplitude of every ERP component were compared between two groups, and then analyzed to explore their relationship with neuropsychological performance. Finally, the locations of maximal difference in cortex were calculated by standard low-resolution tomographic analysis. A total of five components were found: P1, N1, P2, N2, and P300. The amplitude of P2 and P300 was larger in normal subjects than in MCI patients only during retrieval, not encoding epoch, while the latency did not show statistical difference. The latency and amplitude of P1 and N1 were similar in two groups. P2 amplitude in the retrieval epoch positively correlated with memory test (auditory verbal learning test) and visual spatial score of Chinese Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), while P300 amplitude correlated with ACE-R. The activation difference in P2 time range was maximal at medial frontal gyrus. However, the difference in cortex activation during P300 time range did not show significance. The amplitude of P2 indicated deficiency in memory retrieval process, potentially due to dysfunction of central executive in WM model. Regarding the location of P2 during WM task, medial frontal plays important role in memory retrieval. The findings in the

  7. Retrieval Deficiency in Brain Activity of Working Memory in Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients: A Brain Event-Related Potentials Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin-Yin; Tang, Hui-Dong; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    In the early stage of Alzheimer disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), working memory (WM) deficiency is prominent and could be attributed to failure in encoding, maintenance or retrieval of information. However, evidence for a retention or retrieval deficit remains equivocal. It is also unclear what cognitive mechanism in WM is impaired in MCI or early AD. We enrolled 46 subjects from our Memory Clinics and community, with 24 amnesic MCI patients and 22 normal subjects. After neurological and cognitive assessments, they performed a classic delayed match to sample (DMS) task with simultaneous event-related potential (ERP) recorded. The ERPs in encoding and retrieval epoch during WM were analyzed separately. The latency and amplitude of every ERP component were compared between two groups, and then analyzed to explore their relationship with neuropsychological performance. Finally, the locations of maximal difference in cortex were calculated by standard low-resolution tomographic analysis. A total of five components were found: P1, N1, P2, N2, and P300. The amplitude of P2 and P300 was larger in normal subjects than in MCI patients only during retrieval, not encoding epoch, while the latency did not show statistical difference. The latency and amplitude of P1 and N1 were similar in two groups. P2 amplitude in the retrieval epoch positively correlated with memory test (auditory verbal learning test) and visual spatial score of Chinese Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), while P300 amplitude correlated with ACE-R. The activation difference in P2 time range was maximal at medial frontal gyrus. However, the difference in cortex activation during P300 time range did not show significance. The amplitude of P2 indicated deficiency in memory retrieval process, potentially due to dysfunction of central executive in WM model. Regarding the location of P2 during WM task, medial frontal plays important role in memory retrieval. The findings in the

  8. Hyperglycemia Induced by Glucokinase Deficiency Accelerates Atherosclerosis Development and Impairs Lesion Regression in Combined Heterozygous Glucokinase and the Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adingupu, Damilola D.; Andréasson, Anne-Christine; Ahnmark, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Models combining diabetes and atherosclerosis are important in evaluating the cardiovascular (CV) effects and safety of antidiabetes drugs in the development of treatments targeting CV complications. Our aim was to evaluate if crossing the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse (GK+/−) and hyperlipidemic mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−) will generate a disease model exhibiting a diabetic and macrovascular phenotype. Methods. The effects of defective glucokinase on the glucose metabolism and on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis on high-fat diets were studied in both genders of GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice. Coronary vascular function of the female GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice was also investigated. Results. GK+/−ApoE−/− mice show a stable hyperglycemia which was increased on Western diet. In oral glucose tolerance test, GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed significant glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Plasma lipids were comparable with ApoE−/− mice; nevertheless the GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed slightly increased atherosclerosis development. Conclusions. The GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed a stable and reproducible hyperglycemia, accelerated atherosclerotic lesion progression, and no lesion regression after lipid lowering. This novel model provides a promising tool for drug discovery, enabling the evaluation of compound effects against both diabetic and cardiovascular endpoints simultaneously in one animal model. PMID:27774459

  9. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca2+ homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca2+ channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  10. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue.

  11. A Bilayer Construct Controls Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Differentiation into Endothelial Cells and Pericytes without Growth Factor Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    cells and pericytes. Gene expression analysis revealed strong upregulation of endothelial markers, CD31, and von Willebrand factor, up to day 11 in...phenotype, but a subset of the ASC expressed pericyte markers. The NG2 gene was upregulated over 11 days with corresponding evidence for the cell...surface marker. Platelet- derived growth factor receptor beta gene expression decreased as the multipotent ASC differentiated up to day 7. Increased

  12. NG2 proteoglycan-dependent recruitment of tumor macrophages promotes pericyte-endothelial cell interactions required for brain tumor vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Yotsumoto, Fusanori; You, Weon-Kyoo; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Kucharova, Karolina; Sakimura, Kenji; Stallcup, William B

    2015-01-01

    Early stage growth of intracranial B16F10 tumors is reduced by 87% in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) mice and by 77% in pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice, demonstrating the importance of the NG2 proteoglycan in each of these stromal compartments. In both genotypes, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction results in numerous structural defects in tumor blood vessels, including decreased formation of endothelial cell junctions and decreased assembly of the vascular basal lamina. All vascular deficits are larger in Mac-NG2ko mice than in PC-NG2ko mice, correlating with the greater decrease in pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko animals. Accordingly, tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have a smaller diameter, lower degree of patency, and higher degree of leakiness than tumor vessels in PC-NG2ko mice, leading to less efficient tumor blood flow and to increased intratumoral hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice is caused by loss of NG2-dependent pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice is due to a 90% reduction in NG2-dependent macrophage recruitment to tumors. The absence of a macrophage-derived signal(s) in Mac-NG2ko mice results in the loss of pericyte ability to associate with endothelial cells, possibly due to reduced expression of N-cadherin by both pericytes and endothelial cells. PMID:26137396

  13. Pyruvate and cilostazol protect cultured rat cortical pericytes against tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2015-12-02

    Since even a brief ischemia can cause permanent brain damage, rapid restoration of blood flow is critical to limiting damage. Although intravenous tPA during the acute stage is the treatment of choice for achieving reperfusion, this treatment is sometimes associated with brain hemorrhage. Agents that reduce tPA-related bleeding risk may help expand its therapeutic window. This study assessed whether zinc dyshomeostasis underlies the toxic effect of tPA on brain vascular pericytes; whether pyruvate, an inhibitor of zinc toxicity, protects pericytes against tPA-induced cell death; and whether cilostazol, which protects pericytes against tPA-induced cell death, affects zinc dyshomeostasis associated with tPA toxicity. Cultured pericytes from newborn rat brains were treated with 10-200 μg/ml tPA for 24 h, inducing cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. tPA-induced cell death was preceded by increases in intracellular free zinc levels, and was substantially attenuated by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) or TPEN. Pyruvate completely blocked direct zinc toxicity and tPA-induced pericyte cell death. Both cAMP and cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor that attenuates tPA-induced pericyte cell death in vitro and tPA-induced brain hemorrhage in vivo, reduced zinc- and tPA-induced pericyte cell death, suggesting that zinc dyshomeostasis may be targeted by cilostazol in tPA toxicity. These findings show that tPA-induced pericyte cell death may involve zinc dyshomeostasis, and that pyruvate and cilostazol attenuate tPA-induced cell death by reducing the toxic cascade triggered by zinc dyshomeostasis. Since pyruvate is an endogenous metabolite and cilostazol is an FDA-approved drug, in vivo testing of both as protectors against tPA-induced brain hemorrhage may be warranted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  14. The acute response of pericytes to muscle-damaging eccentric contraction and protein supplementation in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    De Lisio, Michael; Farup, Jean; Sukiennik, Richard A; Clevenger, Nicole; Nallabelli, Julian; Nelson, Brett; Ryan, Kelly; Rahbek, Stine K; de Paoli, Frank; Vissing, Kristian; Boppart, Marni D

    2015-10-15

    Skeletal muscle pericytes increase in quantity following eccentric exercise (ECC) and contribute to myofiber repair and adaptation in mice. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pericyte quantity in response to muscle-damaging ECC and protein supplementation in human skeletal muscle. Male subjects were divided into protein supplement (WHY; n = 12) or isocaloric placebo (CHO; n = 12) groups and completed ECC using an isokinetic dynamometer. Supplements were consumed 3 times/day throughout the experimental time course. Biopsies were collected prior to (PRE) and 3, 24, 48, and 168 h following ECC. Reflective of the damaging protocol, integrin subunits, including α7, β1A, and β1D, increased (3.8-fold, 3.6-fold and 3.9-fold, respectively, P < 0.01) 24 h post-ECC with no difference between supplements. Pericyte quantity did not change post-ECC. WHY resulted in a small, but significant, decrease in ALP(+) pericytes when expressed as a percentage of myonuclei (CHO 6.8 ± 0.3% vs. WHY 5.8 ± 0.3%, P < 0.05) or per myofiber (CHO 0.119 ± 0.01 vs. WHY 0.098 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). The quantity of myonuclei expressing serum response factor and the number of pericytes expressing serum response factor, did not differ as a function of time post-ECC or supplement. These data demonstrate that acute muscle-damaging ECC increases α7β1 integrin content in human muscle, yet pericyte quantity is largely unaltered. Future studies should focus on the capacity for ECC to influence pericyte function, specifically paracrine factor release as a mechanism toward pericyte contribution to repair and adaptation postexercise.

  15. Pericyte structure and distribution in the cerebral cortex revealed by high-resolution imaging of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, David A.; Underly, Robert G.; Grant, Roger I.; Watson, Ashley N.; Lindner, Volkhard; Shih, Andy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Pericytes are essential for normal brain function, but many aspects of their physiology remain enigmatic due to a lack of tools to genetically target this cell population. Here, we characterize brain pericytes using two existing Cre-recombinase driver mouse lines that can serve distinct purposes in cerebrovascular research. One line expresses an inducible version of Cre under the NG2 proteoglycan promoter, which provides the sparse labeling necessary to define the morphology of single cells. These mice reveal structural differences between pericytes adjacent to arterioles versus those broadly distributed in the capillary bed that may underlie differential roles in control of vessel caliber. A second line expresses Cre constitutively under the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β promoter and provides continuous, highly specific and near-complete labeling of pericytes and myocytes along the entire cerebrovasculature. This line provides a three-dimensional view of pericyte distribution along the cortical angioarchitecture following optical clearing of brain tissue. In combination with recent reporter lines for expression of optogenetic actuators and activity-sensitive probes, these mice may be key tools for studying pericyte biology in the intact brain. PMID:26158016

  16. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  17. Ascorbic Acid Efflux from Human Brain Microvascular Pericytes: Role of Re-uptake

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular pericytes take up ascorbic acid on the ascorbate transporter SVCT2. Intracellular ascorbate then protects the cells against apoptosis induced by culture at diabetic glucose concentrations. To investigate whether pericytes might also provide ascorbate to the underlying endothelial cells, we studied ascorbate efflux from human pericytes. When loaded with ascorbate to intracellular concentrations of 0.8–1.0 mM, almost two-thirds of intracellular ascorbate effluxed from the cells over 2 h. This efflux was opposed by ascorbate re-uptake from the medium, since preventing re-uptake by destroying extracellular ascorbate with ascorbate oxidase increased ascorbate loss even further. Ascorbate re-uptake occurred on the SVCT2, since its blockade by replacing medium sodium with choline, by the SVCT2 inhibitor sulfinpyrazone, or by extracellular ascorbate accelerated ascorbate loss from the cells. This was supported by finding that net efflux of radiolabeled ascorbate was increased by unlabeled extracellular ascorbate with a half-maximal effect in the range of the high affinity Km of the SVCT2. Intracellular ascorbate did not inhibit its efflux. To assess the mechanism of ascorbate efflux, known inhibitors of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) were tested. These potently inhibited ascorbate transport into cells on the SVCT2, but not its efflux. An exception was the anion transport inhibitor DIDS, which, despite inhibition of ascorbate uptake, also inhibited net efflux at 25–50 µM. These results suggest that ascorbate efflux from vascular pericytes occurs on a DIDS-inhibitable transporter or channel different from VRACs. Further, ascorbate efflux is opposed by re-uptake of ascorbate on the SVCT2, providing a potential regulatory mechanism. PMID:26340060

  18. High Glucose-induced Retinal Pericyte Apoptosis Depends on Association of GAPDH and Siah1.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sandra; McCollum, Gary W; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S

    2015-11-20

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, and its prevalence is growing. Current therapies for DR address only the later stages of the disease, are invasive, and have limited effectiveness. Retinal pericyte death is an early pathologic feature of DR. Although it has been observed in diabetic patients and in animal models of DR, the cause of pericyte death remains unknown. A novel pro-apoptotic pathway initiated by the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the E3 ubiquitin ligase, seven in absentia homolog 1 (Siah1), was recently identified in ocular tissues. In this article we examined the involvement of the GAPDH/Siah1 interaction in human retinal pericyte (hRP) apoptosis. HRP were cultured in 5 mm normal glucose, 25 mm l- or d-glucose for 48 h (osmotic control and high glucose treatments, respectively). Siah1 siRNA was used to down-regulate Siah1 expression. TAT-FLAG GAPDH and/or Siah1-directed peptides were used to block GAPDH and Siah1 interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were conducted to analyze the effect of high glucose on the association of GAPDH and Siah1. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin V staining and caspase-3 enzymatic activity assay. High glucose increased Siah1 total protein levels, induced the association between GAPDH and Siah1, and led to GAPDH nuclear translocation. Our findings demonstrate that dissociation of the GAPDH/Siah1 pro-apoptotic complex can block high glucose-induced pericyte apoptosis, widely considered a hallmark feature of DR. Thus, the work presented in this article can provide a foundation to identify novel targets for early treatment of DR.

  19. Pericyte abundance affects sucrose permeability in cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Hacking, Cindy

    2005-07-05

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and metabolic barrier that restricts diffusion of blood-borne substances into brain. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are used to characterize this structure, examine mechanisms of damage and repair and measure permeability of test substances. The core component of in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier is brain microvascular endothelial cells. We cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMEC) from isolated rat cortex microvessels. After 2-14 days in vitro (DIV), immunohistochemistry of these cells showed strong labeling for zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein expressed in endothelial cells. Pericytes were also present in these cultures, as determined by expression of alpha-actin. The present study was performed to test different cell isolation methods and to compare the resulting cell cultures for abundance of pericytes and for blood-brain barrier function, as assessed by 14C-sucrose flux. Two purification strategies were used. First, microvessels were preabsorbed onto uncoated plastic for 4 h, then unattached microvessels were transferred to coated culture ware. Second, microvessels were incubated with an antibody to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) precoupled to magnetic beads, and a magnetic separation procedure was performed. Our results indicate that immunopurification, but not preadsorption, was an effective method to purify microvessels and reduce pericyte abundance in the resulting cultures. This purification significantly reduced 14C-sucrose fluxes across cell monolayers. These data indicate that pericytes can interfere with the development of blood-brain barrier properties in in vitro models that utilize primary cultures of RBMECs.

  20. Prenatal vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive immune responses to pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq®) in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Saif, Linda J

    2014-02-07

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is associated with increased childhood mortality and morbidity in impoverished Asian and African countries, but the impact of VAD on rotavirus (RV) vaccine or infection is poorly understood. We assessed effects of gestational and dietary induced pre- and post-natal VAD and vitamin A supplementation on immune responses to a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq(®) in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Vaccine efficacy was assessed against virulent G1P[8] human rotavirus (HRV) challenge. VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) piglets were derived from dietary VAD and VAS sows, respectively. VAD piglets had significantly lower levels of hepatic vitamin A compared to that of VAS piglets. RotaTeq(®)-vaccinated VAD piglets had 350-fold higher fecal virus shedding titers compared to vaccinated VAS piglets post-challenge. Only 25% of vaccinated non-vitamin A supplemented VAD piglets were protected against diarrhea compared with 100% protection rate in vaccinated non-supplemented VAS piglets post-challenge. Intestinal HRV specific immune responses were compromised in VAD piglets. Vaccinated VAD piglets had significantly lower ileal HRV IgG antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses (pre-challenge) and duodenal HRV IgA ASC responses (post-challenge) compared to vaccinated VAS piglets. Also, intestinal HRV IgA antibody titers were 11-fold lower in vaccinated VAD compared to vaccinated VAS piglets post-challenge. Persistently elevated levels of IL-8, a pro-inflammatory mediator, and lower IL-10 responses (anti-inflammatory) in vaccinated VAD compared to VAS piglets suggest more severe inflammatory responses in VAD piglets post-challenge. Moreover higher IFN-γ responses pre-challenge were observed in VAD compared to VAS piglets. The impaired vaccine-specific intestinal antibody responses and decreased immunoregulatory cytokine responses coincided with reduced protective efficacy of the RV vaccine against virulent HRV challenge in VAD piglets. In

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Pericytes: To What Extent Are They Related?

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Malta, Tathiane Maistro; Kashima Haddad, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2016-12-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were initially identified as progenitors of skeletal tissues within mammalian bone marrow and cells with similar properties were also obtained from other tissues such as adipose and dental pulp. Although MSCs have been extensively investigated, their native behavior and in vivo identity remain poorly defined. Uncovering the in vivo identity of MSCs has been challenging due to the lack of exclusive cell markers, cellular alterations caused by culture methods, and extensive focus on in vitro properties for characterization. Although MSC site of origin influences their functional properties, these mesenchymal progenitors can be found in the perivascular space in virtually all organs from where they were obtained. However, the precise identity of MSCs within the vascular wall is highly controversial. The recurrent concept that MSCs correspond to pericytes in vivo has been supported mainly by their perivascular localization and expression of some molecular markers. However, this view has been a subject of controversy, in part, due to the application of loose criteria to define pericytes and due to the lack of a marker able to unequivocally identify these cells. Furthermore, recent evidences indicate that subpopulations of MSCs can be found at extravascular sites such as the endosteum. In this opinion review, we bring together the advances and pitfalls on the search for the in vivo identity of MSCs and highlight the recent evidences that suggest that perivascular MSCs are adventitial cells, acting as precursors of pericytes and other stromal cells during tissue homeostasis.

  2. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription.

  3. Biomimetic, ultrathin and elastic hydrogels regulate human neutrophil extravasation across endothelial-pericyte bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Holly M.

    2017-01-01

    The vascular basement membrane—a thin, elastic layer of extracellular matrix separating and encasing vascular cells—provides biological and mechanical cues to endothelial cells, pericytes, and migrating leukocytes. In contrast, experimental scaffolds typically used to replicate basement membranes are stiff and bio-inert. Here, we present thin, porated polyethylene glycol hydrogels to replicate human vascular basement membranes. Like commercial transwells, our hydrogels are approximately 10μm thick, but like basement membranes, the hydrogels presented here are elastic (E: 50-80kPa) and contain a dense network of small pores. Moreover, the inclusion of bioactive domains introduces receptor-mediated biochemical signaling. We compare elastic hydrogels to common culture substrates (E: >2GPa) for human endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers to replicate postcapillary venules in vitro. Our data demonstrate that substrate elasticity facilitates differences in vascular phenotype, supporting expression of vascular markers that are increasingly replicative of venules. Endothelial cells differentially express vascular markers, like EphB4, and leukocyte adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1, with decreased mechanical stiffness. With porated PEG hydrogels we demonstrate the ability to evaluate and observe leukocyte recruitment across endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers, reporting that basement membrane scaffolds can significantly alter the rate of vascular migration in experimental systems. Overall, this study demonstrates the creation and utility of a new and accessible method to recapture the mechanical and biological complexity of human basement membranes in vitro. PMID:28234918

  4. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients.

  5. Deficiency of protein kinase Calpha in mice results in impairment of epidermal hyperplasia and enhancement of tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Saito, Yuriko; Hirai, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Chida, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-15

    We generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and evaluated the significance of the enzyme in epithelial hyperplasia and tumor formation. PKCalpha-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. Tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCalpha suppresses tumor promotion. However, the severity of epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was markedly reduced. In mutant mice, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled epidermal basal keratinocytes increased 16 to 24 hours after topical TPA treatment as in the case of wild-type mice, but significantly decreased at 36 and 48 hours. Furthermore, the regenerating epithelium induced by skin wound significantly decreased in thickness but was not structurally impaired. The enhanced tumor formation may not be associated with epidermal hyperplasia. The induction levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligands, tumor growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, in the skin of mutant mice by TPA treatment were significantly lower than those in the skin of wild-type mice. PKCalpha may regulate the supply of these EGF receptor ligands in basal keratinocytes, resulting in a reduced epidermal hyperplasia severity in the mutant mice. We propose that PKCalpha positively regulates epidermal hyperplasia but negatively regulates tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

  6. Deficiency in a very-long-chain fatty acid β-ketoacyl-coenzyme a synthase of tomato impairs microgametogenesis and causes floral organ fusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Leide, Jana; Riederer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that β-ketoacyl-coenzyme A synthase ECERIFERUM6 (CER6) is necessary for the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids with chain lengths beyond C₂₈ in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits and C₂₆ in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and the pollen coat. CER6 loss of function in Arabidopsis resulted in conditional male sterility, since pollen coat lipids are responsible for contact-mediated pollen hydration. In tomato, on the contrary, pollen hydration does not rely on pollen coat lipids. Nevertheless, mutation in SlCER6 impairs fertility and floral morphology. Here, the contribution of SlCER6 to the sexual reproduction and flower development of tomato was addressed. Cytological analysis and cross-pollination experiments revealed that the slcer6 mutant has male sterility caused by (1) hampered pollen dispersal and (2) abnormal tapetum development. SlCER6 loss of function provokes a decrease of n- and iso-alkanes with chain lengths of C₂₇ or greater and of anteiso-alkanes with chain lengths of C₂₈ or greater in flower cuticular waxes, but it has no impact on flower cuticle ultrastructure and cutin content. Expression analysis confirmed high transcription levels of SlCER6 in the anther and the petal, preferentially in sites subject to epidermal fusion. Hence, wax deficiency was proposed to be the primary reason for the flower fusion phenomenon in tomato. The SlCER6 substrate specificity was revisited. It might be involved in elongation of not only linear but also branched very-long-chain fatty acids, leading to production of the corresponding alkanes. SlCER6 implements a function in the sexual reproduction of tomato that is different from the one in Arabidopsis: SlCER6 is essential for the regulation of timely tapetum degradation and, consequently, microgametogenesis.

  7. Murine vasa recta pericyte chloride conductance is controlled by calcium, depolarization, and kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hai; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    We used the whole cell patch-clamp technique to investigate the regulation of descending vasa recta (DVR) pericyte Ca2+-dependent Cl− currents (CaCC) by cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]CYT), voltage, and kinase activity. Murine CaCC increased with voltage and electrode Ca2+ concentration. The current saturated at [Ca]CYT of ∼1,000 nM and exhibited an EC50 for Ca2+ of ∼500 nM, independent of depolarization potential. Activation time constants were between 100 and 200 ms, independent of electrode Ca2+. Repolarization-related tail currents elicited by stepping from +100 mV to varying test potentials exhibited deactivation time constants of 50–200 ms that increased with voltage when electrode [Ca]CYT was 1,000 nM. The calmodulin inhibitor N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7, 30 μM) blocked CaCC. The myosin light chain kinase blockers 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7, 1–50 μM) and 1-(5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-9, 10 μM) were similarly effective. Resting pericytes were hyperpolarized by ML-7. Pericytes exposed to ANG II (10 nM) depolarized from a baseline of −50 ± 6 to −29 ± 3 mV and were repolarized to −63 ± 7 mV by exposure to 50 μM ML-7. The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor KN-93 reduced pericyte CaCC only when it was present in the electrode and extracellular buffer from the time of membrane break-in. We conclude that murine DVR pericytes are modulated by [Ca]CYT, membrane potential, and phosphorylation events, suggesting that Ca2+-dependent Cl− conductance may be a target for regulation of vasoactivity and medullary blood flow in vivo. PMID:20686172

  8. Fibromodulin Expression in Folliculostellate Cells and Pericytes Is Promoted by TGFβ Signaling in Rat Anterior Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Syaidah, Rahimi; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Fibromodulin belongs to the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), an active component of extracellular matrix. It directly binds collagens to promote fibrillogenesis and also binds transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) to antagonize its actions. Our previous studies of rat anterior pituitary gland revealed that fibromodulin is expressed in folliculostellate cells and pericytes. Although our recent study showed that TGFβ2 secreted from folliculostellate cells induces collagen synthesis in pericytes, the involvement of fibromodulin in TGFβ2-mediated collagen regulation has not been studied. The present study examined the effect of TGFβ2 on fibromodulin synthesis in rat anterior pituitary gland. In situ hybridization for TGFβ receptor II and immunohistological techniques revealed the presence of TGFβ receptor II in folliculostellate cells and pericytes. To confirm canonical TGFβ intracellular signaling, Smad2 immunocytochemistry was performed. Nuclear translocation of Smad2 was observed in folliculostellate cells and pericytes after TGFβ2 treatment. TGFβ2 strongly enhanced fibromodulin mRNA and protein expressions, and TGFβ2-induced mRNA expression was completely blocked by TGFβ receptor I inhibitor (SB431542). These results suggest that folliculostellate cells and pericytes exhibit canonical TGFβ2 signaling, which is associated with fibromodulin production. Thus, this is the first report to show that TGFβ signaling regulates the endogenous TGFβ antagonist fibromodulin in the gland. PMID:28127105

  9. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D-glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF-κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose-treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF-κB were also increased in the high glucose-treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF-κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF-κB. PMID:27599553

  10. Fibromodulin Expression in Folliculostellate Cells and Pericytes Is Promoted by TGFβ Signaling in Rat Anterior Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Syaidah, Rahimi; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-12-28

    Fibromodulin belongs to the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), an active component of extracellular matrix. It directly binds collagens to promote fibrillogenesis and also binds transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) to antagonize its actions. Our previous studies of rat anterior pituitary gland revealed that fibromodulin is expressed in folliculostellate cells and pericytes. Although our recent study showed that TGFβ2 secreted from folliculostellate cells induces collagen synthesis in pericytes, the involvement of fibromodulin in TGFβ2-mediated collagen regulation has not been studied. The present study examined the effect of TGFβ2 on fibromodulin synthesis in rat anterior pituitary gland. In situ hybridization for TGFβ receptor II and immunohistological techniques revealed the presence of TGFβ receptor II in folliculostellate cells and pericytes. To confirm canonical TGFβ intracellular signaling, Smad2 immunocytochemistry was performed. Nuclear translocation of Smad2 was observed in folliculostellate cells and pericytes after TGFβ2 treatment. TGFβ2 strongly enhanced fibromodulin mRNA and protein expressions, and TGFβ2-induced mRNA expression was completely blocked by TGFβ receptor I inhibitor (SB431542). These results suggest that folliculostellate cells and pericytes exhibit canonical TGFβ2 signaling, which is associated with fibromodulin production. Thus, this is the first report to show that TGFβ signaling regulates the endogenous TGFβ antagonist fibromodulin in the gland.

  11. Accelerated pericyte degeneration and blood–brain barrier breakdown in apolipoprotein E4 carriers with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Matthew R; Rege, Sanket V; Ma, Qingyi; Zhao, Zhen; Miller, Carol A; Winkler, Ethan A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the entry of neurotoxic blood-derived products and cells into the brain that is required for normal neuronal functioning and information processing. Pericytes maintain the integrity of the BBB and degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The BBB is damaged in AD, particularly in individuals carrying apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) gene, which is a major genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. The mechanisms underlying the BBB breakdown in AD remain, however, elusive. Here, we show accelerated pericyte degeneration in AD APOE4 carriers >AD APOE3 carriers >non-AD controls, which correlates with the magnitude of BBB breakdown to immunoglobulin G and fibrin. We also show accumulation of the proinflammatory cytokine cyclophilin A (CypA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in pericytes and endothelial cells in AD (APOE4 >APOE3), previously shown to lead to BBB breakdown in transgenic APOE4 mice. The levels of the apoE lipoprotein receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), were similarly reduced in AD APOE4 and APOE3 carriers. Our data suggest that APOE4 leads to accelerated pericyte loss and enhanced activation of LRP1-dependent CypA–MMP-9 BBB-degrading pathway in pericytes and endothelial cells, which can mediate a greater BBB damage in AD APOE4 compared with AD APOE3 carriers. PMID:25757756

  12. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Attenuates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Retinal Pericyte Loss in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeong A.; Koh, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Loss of pericytes, an early hallmark of diabetic retinopathy (DR), results in breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may be involved in this process. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a known ameliorator of ER stress, on pericyte loss in DR of streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic mice. To assess the extent of DR, the integrity of retinal vessels and density of retinal capillaries in STZ-induced diabetic mice were evaluated. Additionally, induction of ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) were assessed in diabetic mice and human retinal pericytes exposed to advanced glycation end products (AGE) or modified low-density lipoprotein (mLDL). Fluorescein dye leakage during angiography and retinal capillary density were improved in UDCA-treated diabetic mice, compared to the nontreated diabetic group. Among the UPR markers, those involved in the protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) pathway were increased, while UDCA attenuated UPR in STZ-induced diabetic mice as well as AGE- or mLDL-exposed retinal pericytes in culture. Consequently, vascular integrity was improved and pericyte loss reduced in the retina of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our findings suggest that UDCA might be effective in protecting against DR. PMID:28127564

  13. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects.

  14. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  15. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy study of the characteristics and morphology of pericytes and novel desmin-immunopositive perivascular cells before and after castration in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Jindatip, Depicha; Fujiwara, Ken; Kouki, Tom; Yashiro, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells associated with microcirculation. Typically, they are localized close to the capillary wall, underneath the basement membrane, and have sparse cytoplasm and poorly developed cell organelles. However, the specific properties of pericytes vary by organ and the conditions within organs. We recently demonstrated that pericytes in rat anterior pituitary gland produce type I and III collagens. The present study attempted to determine the morphological characteristics of these pituitary pericytes. Castrated rats were used as a model of hormonal and vascular changes in the gland. Pericytes, as determined by desmin immunohistochemistry, were more numerous and stained more intensely in castrated rats. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that pituitary pericytes displayed the typical characteristics of pericytes. In pituitary sections from castrated rats, the Golgi apparatus of pericytes was well developed and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was elongated. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy revealed four pericyte shapes: oval, elongate, triangular, and multiangular. As compared with normal rats, the proportion of oval pericytes was lower, and the proportions of the other three shapes were higher, in castrated rats. These results suggest that pericytes change their fine structure and cell shape in response to hormonal and vascular changes in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, a novel type of perivascular cell was found by desmin immunoelectron microscopy. The morphological properties of these cells were dissimilar to those of pericytes. The cells were localized in the perivascular space, had no basement membrane, and contained dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum. This new cell type will require further study of its origin and characteristics.

  16. Immature mesenchymal stem cell-like pericytes as mediators of immunosuppression in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Katharina; Sahm, Felix; Opitz, Christiane A; Lanz, Tobias V; Oezen, Iris; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2013-12-15

    Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumors characterized by profound local immunosuppression. While the remarkable plasticity of perivascular cells - resembling mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) - in malignant gliomas and their contribution to angiogenesis is increasingly recognized, their role as potential mediators of immunosuppression is unknown. Here we demonstrate that FACS-sorted malignant glioma-derived pericytes (HMGP) were characterized by the expression of CD90, CD248, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β). HMGP shared this expression profile with human brain vascular pericytes (HBVP) and human MSC (HMSC) but not human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (HCMEC). CD90+PDGFR-β+perivascular cells distinct from CD31+ endothelial cells accumulated in human gliomas with increasing degree of malignancy and negatively correlated with the presence of blood vessel-associated leukocytes and CD8+ T cells. Cultured CD90+PDGFR-β+HBVP were equally capable of suppressing allogeneic or mitogen-activated T cell responses as human MSC. HMGP, HBVP and HMSC expressed prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). These factors but not indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated conversion of tryptophan to kynurenine functionally contributed to immunosuppression of immature pericytes. Our data provide evidence that human cerebral CD90+ perivascular cells possess T cell inhibitory capability comparable to human MSC and suggest that these cells, besides their critical role in tumor vascularization, also promote local immunosuppression in malignant gliomas and possibly other brain diseases.

  17. Folic acid deficiency impairs the gill health status associated with the NF-κB, MLCK and Nrf2 signaling pathways in the gills of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-11-01

    deficiency impaired fish gill health status via regulating gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, MLCK and Nrf2. Based on percent weight gain, LZ activity and MDA content in the gills, the dietary folic acid requirements for young grass carp were 1.60, 2.07 and 2.08 mg kg(-1), respectively.

  18. Development of spontaneous neuropathy in NF-κBp50-deficient mice by calcineurin-signal involving impaired NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura-Yanagidaira, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yasuko; Sano, Kenji; Murata, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family are involved in neuronal cell death and survival. Previously, we reported that NF-κBp50-deficient (p50-deficient) mice exhibit many features resembling human normal tension glaucoma (NTG). The developmental mechanism of human NTG is not clearly understood, and a radical curative treatment has yet to be established. Our aim is to elucidate the signal cascade which mediates the spontaneous optic neuropathy in p50-deficient mice as a model of NTG. Methods To demonstrate the expression and activation of pro-apoptotic factors, which mediate the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in p50-deficient mice, western blot (WB) and luciferase reporter assays with retinas from p50-deficient and wild type mice, and cultured RGC-5 cells were performed. Furthermore, we tested the neuroprotective effects of chemical reagents (memantine, lomerizine, and tacrolimus) against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-susceptible RGC damage according to in vitro experiments with RGC-5 cells. To elucidate the NF-κB-mediated death signaling, the effects of chemical reagents on spontaneous optic neuropathy were examined by histopathological studies. Results WB experiments and luciferase reporter assays showed that NF-κB-inducible BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) and a pro-apoptotic factor, activated caspase 3 were expressed in the retina of p50-deficient mice as well as NMDA-treated RGC-5 cells. Further, the constitutivelyactivecleaved forms of calcineurin (CaN), which havebeen reported to lead to apoptosis, were detected in the retina of p50-deficient mice as well as NMDA-treated RGC-5 cells. Pre-treatment with tacrolimus markedlyprotected RGC-5 cells from NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, and then both spontaneous RGC death and degenerative changes to the optic nerve in p50-deficient mice were significantlyreduced by the chronic administration of tacrolimus. The experiments with cultured RGC-5 cells supported the results

  19. Regional Blood Flow in the Normal and Ischemic Brain Is Controlled by Arteriolar Smooth Muscle Cell Contractility and Not by Capillary Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert A; Tong, Lei; Yuan, Peng; Murikinati, Sasidhar; Gupta, Shobhana; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The precise regulation of cerebral blood flow is critical for normal brain function, and its disruption underlies many neuropathologies. The extent to which smooth muscle-covered arterioles or pericyte-covered capillaries control vasomotion during neurovascular coupling remains controversial. We found that capillary pericytes in mice and humans do not express smooth muscle actin and are morphologically and functionally distinct from adjacent precapillary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Using optical imaging we investigated blood flow regulation at various sites on the vascular tree in living mice. Optogenetic, whisker stimulation, or cortical spreading depolarization caused microvascular diameter or flow changes in SMC but not pericyte-covered microvessels. During early stages of brain ischemia, transient SMC but not pericyte constrictions were a major cause of hypoperfusion leading to thrombosis and distal microvascular occlusions. Thus, capillary pericytes are not contractile, and regulation of cerebral blood flow in physiological and pathological conditions is mediated by arteriolar SMCs.

  20. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  1. Delayed control of herpes simplex virus infection and impaired CD4(+) T-cell migration to the skin in mouse models of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Inge E A; Randall, Katrina L; Hollett, Natasha A; Di Law, Hsei; Miosge, Lisa A; Sontani, Yovina; Goodnow, Christopher C; Tscharke, David C

    2015-07-01

    DOCK8 deficiency in humans and mice leads to multiple defects in immune cell numbers and function. Patients with this immunodeficiency have a high morbidity and mortality, and are distinguished by chronic cutaneous viral infections, including those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The underlying mechanism of the specific susceptibility to these chronic cutaneous viral infections is currently unknown, largely because the effect of DOCK8 deficiency has not been studied in suitable models. A better understanding of these mechanisms is required to underpin the development of more specific therapies. Here we show that DOCK8-deficient mice have poor control of primary cutaneous herpes simplex lesions and this is associated with increased virus loads. Furthermore, DOCK8-deficient mice showed a lack of CD4(+) T-cell infiltration into HSV-infected skin.

  2. Reduced cathepsins B and D cause impaired autophagic degradation that can be almost completely restored by overexpression of these two proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Massimo; Motta, Marialetizia; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Scarpa, Susanna; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Cecconi, Francesco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2012-12-01

    Saposin (Sap) C deficiency, a rare variant form of Gaucher disease, is due to mutations in the Sap C coding region of the prosaposin (PSAP) gene. Sap C is required as an activator of the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase), which catalyzes glucosylceramide (GC) degradation. Deficit of either GCase or Sap C leads to the accumulation of undegraded GC and other lipids in lysosomes of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Recently, we reported that Sap C mutations affecting a cysteine residue result in increased autophagy. Here, we characterized the basis for the autophagic dysfunction. We analyzed Sap C-deficient and GCase-deficient fibroblasts and observed that autophagic disturbance was only associated with lack of Sap C. By a combined fluorescence microscopy and biochemical studies, we demonstrated that the accumulation of autophagosomes in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts is not due to enhanced autophagosome formation but to delayed degradation of autolysosomes caused, in part, to decreased amount and reduced enzymatic activity of cathepsins B and D. On the contrary, in GCase-deficient fibroblasts, the protein level and enzymatic activity of cathepsin D were comparable with control fibroblasts, whereas those of cathepsin B were almost doubled. Moreover, the enhanced expression of both these lysosomal proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts resulted in close to functional autophagic degradation. Our data provide a novel example of altered autophagy as secondary event resulting from insufficient lysosomal function.

  3. Descending vasa recta pericytes express voltage operated Na+ conductance in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong; Cao, Chunhua; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Pallone, Thomas L

    2005-01-01

    We studied the properties of a voltage-operated Na+ conductance in descending vasa recta (DVR) pericytes isolated from the renal outer medulla. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed a depolarization-induced, rapidly activating and rapidly inactivating inward current that was abolished by removal of Na+ but not Ca+ from the extracellular buffer. The Na+ current (INa) is highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX, Kd = 2.2 nm). At high concentrations, mibefradil (10 μm) and Ni+ (1 mm) blocked INa. INa was insensitive to nifedipine (10 μm). The L-type Ca+ channel activator FPL-64176 induced a slowly activating/inactivating inward current that was abolished by nifedipine. Depolarization to membrane potentials between 0 and 30 mV induced inactivation with a time constant of ∼1 ms. Repolarization to membrane potentials between −90 and −120 mV induced recovery from inactivation with a time constant of ∼11 ms. Half-maximal activation and inactivation occurred at −23.9 and −66.1 mV, respectively, with slope factors of 4.8 and 9.5 mV, respectively. The Na+ channel activator, veratridine (100 μm), reduced peak inward INa and prevented inactivation. We conclude that a TTX-sensitive voltage-operated Na+ conductance, with properties similar to that in other smooth muscle cells, is expressed by DVR pericytes. PMID:15975976

  4. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  5. Foxf2 Is Required for Brain Pericyte Differentiation and Development and Maintenance of the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Reyahi, Azadeh; Nik, Ali M; Ghiami, Mozhgan; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Pontén, Fredrik; Johansson, Bengt R; Carlsson, Peter

    2015-07-06

    Pericytes are critical for cerebrovascular maturation and development of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but their role in maintenance of the adult BBB, and how CNS pericytes differ from those of other tissues, is less well understood. We show that the forkhead transcription factor Foxf2 is specifically expressed in pericytes of the brain and that Foxf2(-/-) embryos develop intracranial hemorrhage, perivascular edema, thinning of the vascular basal lamina, an increase of luminal endothelial caveolae, and a leaky BBB. Foxf2(-/-) brain pericytes were more numerous, proliferated faster, and expressed significantly less Pdgfrβ. Tgfβ-Smad2/3 signaling was attenuated, whereas phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and p38 were enhanced. Tgfβ pathway components, including Tgfβ2, Tgfβr2, Alk5, and integrins αVβ8, were reduced. Foxf2 inactivation in adults resulted in BBB breakdown, endothelial thickening, and increased trans-endothelial vesicular transport. On the basis of these results, FOXF2 emerges as an interesting candidate locus for stroke susceptibility in humans.

  6. Newly developed rat brain pericyte cell line, TR-PCT1, responds to transforming growth factor-beta1 and beta-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Asashima, Tomoko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Tetsuka, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Masatsugu; Obinata, Masuo; Nakashima, Emi

    2002-03-01

    Brain pericytes form an incomplete envelope around endothelial cells and within the microvascular basement membrane of capillaries and postcapillary venules. Recently, it has been reported that brain pericytes exhibit pluripotency, regulation of endothelial cell activity, and macrophage activity. However, many molecular and cellular aspects of brain pericytes remain unclear. In this study, we have tried to establish a conditionally immortalized brain pericyte cell line (TR-PCT) derived from the brain capillary of a transgenic rat harboring a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 T antigen gene. One of the clones was named TR-PCT1, and we established 6 clones of pericyte-like cells from a 16 week-old tsA58 transgenic rat. For comparison, primary pericytes from a Wistar rat were also studied. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta, angiopoietin-1, osteopontin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in TR-PCT1 was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Transforming growth factor-beta1 enhanced a-smooth muscle actin expression in TR-PCT1, but this expression was reduced by subsequent treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor. When TR-PCT1 was seeded on type I collagen plates and treated with beta-glycerophosphate, nodules developed in the cells and these nodules reacted positively to von Kossa stain used as a marker of calcification. We believe that TR-PCT1 will help us gain a better understanding of the physiological and/or pathophysiological role of pericytes.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that impairs the body's ability ...

  8. Pericytes support neutrophil transmigration via interleukin-8 across a porcine co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Christian; Pieloch, Paulina; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-02

    Transmigration of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to an inflamed brain tissue is an important process during neuronal inflammation. The process of neutrophil activation as well as their way of rolling along the endothelium and their transmigration is quite well understood. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the fate of neutrophils after they have transmigrated through the endothelium. The role of the other cells of the neurovascular unit in this process is also poorly understood. Here we studied the potential of pericytes to chemo-attract neutrophils under inflammatory conditions. Quantitative real time PCR, western blot analysis, and a chemotaxis assay showed that pericytes are able to chemo-attract neutrophils by interleukin-8 (IL-8) after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Then, a co-culture model consisting of primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCECs) and primary porcine brain capillary pericytes (PBCPs) was used to analyze neutrophil transmigration across the BBB. As a model for inflammation, LPS was used and the effects of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were analyzed. In general, all stimulants apart from IFN-γ were able to increase transendothelial neutrophil migration. This effect was significantly reduced by a specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9. MMP-2/-9 secretion is expected to decrease adhesion to pericytes and thus support the transmigration of neutrophils. Additionally, in an adhesion experiment, we showed that MMP-2/-9 inhibition significantly enhances the adhesion of neutrophils to pericytes.

  9. Iodine deficiency: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Niwattisaiwong, Soamsiri; Burman, Kenneth D; Li-Ng, Melissa

    2017-03-01

    Iodine is crucial for thyroid hormone synthesis and fetal neurodevelopment. Major dietary sources of iodine in the United States are dairy products and iodized salt. Potential consequences of iodine deficiency are goiter, hypothyroidism, cretinism, and impaired cognitive development. Although iodine status in the United States is considered sufficient at the population level, intake varies widely across the population, and the percentage of women of childbearing age with iodine deficiency is increasing. Physicians should be aware of the risks of iodine deficiency and the indications for iodine supplementation, especially in women who are pregnant or lactating.

  10. Highly enhanced compatibility of human brain vascular pericyte cells on monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2017-01-02

    We introduce a method for increasing the compatibility of human brain vascular pericyte (HBVP) cells on a glass substrate, based on wet transferred monolayer graphene without any treatment. As a novel material, graphene has key properties for incubating cells, such as chemical stability, transparency, appropriate roughness, hydrophobicity and high electrical conductivity. These outstanding properties of graphene were examined by Raman spectroscopy, water contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. The performance of this graphene-based implant was investigated by a cell compatibility test, comparing the growth rate of cells on the graphene surface and that on a bare glass substrate. After an incubation period of 72 h, the number of live HBVP cells on a graphene surface with an area of 1×1 mm(2) was 1.83 times greater than that on the glass substrate.

  11. Flooding impairs Fe uptake and distribution in Citrus due to the strong down-regulation of genes involved in Strategy I responses to Fe deficiency in roots.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Quiñones, Ana; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions--21 days--on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe) deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S) and in both the presence (+Fe) and absence of Fe (-Fe) in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65%) of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R), respectively, in -FeS plants when compared with -Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively). Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and -Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively) and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively). This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils.

  12. The proliferation impairment induced by AQP3 deficiency is the result of glycerol uptake and metabolism inhibition in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Bowen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Guangli; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Jiwei; Zhi, Xiaofei; Wang, Linjun; Xu, Zekuan; Xu, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is a big threat to human health. Effective therapeutic cancer target remains to be discovered. Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) belongs to a family of transmembrane channels that are important in transporting water, glycerol, and other small molecules across the cell membrane. Glycerol that is transported by AQP3 is necessary for cell energy generation and lipid synthesis which fulfill the cell biological processes. Previous studies have shown that AQP3 is implicated in disease progression in several cancer types. However, whether AQP3-regulated glycerol uptake and metabolism were involved in cancer progression remains to be further studied. Our study demonstrated that the expression of AQP3 was positively correlated with glycerol level in human gastric cancer tissues. AQP3 inhibition induced proliferation impairment in gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. AQP3 inhibition that induced glycerol uptake reduction and glycerol administration would rehabilitate the cell proliferation. The energy and lipid production decreased when AQP3 was knocked down since the cellular glycerol level and several lipogenesis enzymes were downregulated. PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which was involved in the impaired lipid and ATP production, was also inhibited after AQP3 knockdown. Our study indicated that the energy and lipid production inhibition, which were responsible for gastric cancer cell proliferation impairment, were induced by glycerol uptake reduction after AQP3 knockdown.

  13. LPS causes pericyte loss and microvascular dysfunction via disruption of Sirt3/angiopoietins/Tie-2 and HIF-2α/Notch3 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Heng; He, Xiaochen; Tuo, Qin-hui; Liao, Duan-fang; Zhang, Guo-qiang; Chen, Jian-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies reveal a crucial role of pericyte loss in sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) mediates histone protein post-translational modification related to aging and ischemic disease. This study investigated the involvement of SIRT3 in LPS-induced pericyte loss and microvascular dysfunction. Mice were exposed to LPS, expression of Sirt3, HIF-2α, Notch3 and angiopoietins/Tie-2, pericyte/endothelial (EC) coverage and vascular permeability were assessed. Mice treated with LPS significantly reduced the expression of SIRT3, HIF-2α and Notch3 in the lung. Furthermore, exposure to LPS increased Ang-2 while inhibited Ang-1/Tie-2 expression with a reduced pericyte/EC coverage. Intriguingly, knockout of Sirt3 upregulated Ang-2, but downregulated Tie-2 and HIF-2α/Notch3 expression which resulted in a dramatic reduction of pericyte/EC coverage and exacerbation of LPS-induced vascular leakage. Conversely, overexpression of Sirt3 reduced Ang-2 expression and increased Ang-1/Tie-2 and HIF-2α/Notch3 expression in the LPS treated mice. Overexpression of Sirt3 further prevented LPS-induced pericyte loss and vascular leakage. This was accompanied by a significant reduction of the mortality rate. Specific knockout of prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) increased HIF-2α/Notch3 expression, improved pericyte/EC coverage and reduced the mortality rate in the LPS-treated mice. Our study demonstrates the importance of SIRT3 in preserving vascular integrity by targeting pericytes in the setting of LPS-induced sepsis. PMID:26868537

  14. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Adaptive B and T Cell Responses to a Prototype Monovalent Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Challenge in a Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD) gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα) cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12) and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented) pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2) and IFNγ (PID6) compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more severe

  15. Flooding Impairs Fe Uptake and Distribution in Citrus Due to the Strong Down-Regulation of Genes Involved in Strategy I Responses to Fe Deficiency in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Quiñones, Ana; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M. Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions—21 days—on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe) deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S) and in both the presence (+Fe) and absence of Fe (-Fe) in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65%) of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R), respectively, in –FeS plants when compared with –Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively). Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and –Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively) and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively). This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils. PMID:25897804

  16. Insulin analogues may accelerate progression of diabetic retinopathy after impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Abdullah; Kar, Taner; Aksoy, Yakup; Özalper, Veysel; Başbuğ, Barbaros

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy regresses after spontaneous infarction or surgical ablation of pituitary gland. Growth hormone deficiency seems to be a protective factor for development of diabetic retinopathy in dwarfs. Despite the same glycemic control, development of diabetic retinopathy is significantly higher in pubertal subjects than pre-pubertal subjects. These evidences indicate a strong relationship between growth hormone and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the most important mediator of effects of growth hormone (GH). It stimulates IGF-1 receptor. Insulin analogues also stimulate IGF-1 receptor. Therefore insulin analogues may show similar effects like growth hormone and deteriorate diabetic retinopathy. However we suggest that impairment degree of inner blood-retinal barrier should be considered for this claim. We hypothesize that insulin analogues have dual effects (beneficial and worsening) depending on stage of impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier. Insulin analogues protect pericytes and blood-retinal barrier by decreasing blood glucose level. Analogues may pass into the retinal tissue in very low amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier is intact. Therefore, insulin analogues may not deteriorate diabetic retinopathy but also have beneficial effect by protecting blood-retinal barrier at this stage. However, they may pass into the retinal tissue in much more amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier impairs. Analogues may deteriorate cellular composition of retina through stimulation of IGF-1 receptors. A number of different cell types, including glia, retinal pigment epithelial cells and fibroblast-like cells have been identified in diabetic epiretinal tissues. Insulin analogues may cause proliferation in these cells. A type of glial cell named Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG) cell was identified to be stimulated and proliferate by IGF-1. IGF has been reported to generate traction force in retinal

  17. Autoimmune Kidney Disease and Impaired Engulfment of Apoptotic Cells in Mice with Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ or Retinoid X Receptor α Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás; Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Lefterova, Martina I.; Alameda, Daniel; Núñez, Vanessa; Lazar, Mitchell A.; Fischer, Thierry; Ricote, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune glomerulonephritis is a common manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we show that mice lacking macrophage expression of the heterodimeric nuclear receptors PPARγ or RXRα develop glomerulonephritis and autoantibodies to nuclear Ags, resembling the nephritis seen in SLE. These mice show deficiencies in phagocytosis and clearance of apoptotic cells, and they are unable to acquire an anti-inflammatory phenotype upon feeding of apoptotic cells, which is critical for the maintenance of self-tolerance. These results demonstrate that stimulation of PPARγ and RXRα in macrophages facilitates apoptotic cell engulfment, and they provide a potential strategy to avoid autoimmunity against dying cells and to attenuate SLE. PMID:21135166

  18. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia.

  19. Severe ulceration with impaired induction of growth factors and cytokines in keratinocytes after trichloroacetic acid application on TRPV1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-jin; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Kimura, Ayako; Kaminaka, Chikako; Yonei, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a highly polymodal TRP channel activated by various stimuli, including capsaicin, heat and acids. TRPV1 expression can be detected widely but is highest in sensory neurons and its activation alerts the body to noxious signals via neurogenic pain. Although TRPV1 is reportedly localized in the epidermis, it remains unclear how TRPV1 is involved in the chemical peeling processes with cytotoxic acids. Therefore, in this study, the role of TRPV1 on the effects of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peeling was assessed using TRPV1-deficient mice. Following the confirmation of TRPV1 expression in murine keratinocytes with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, the effects of TCA on TRPV1-deficient mouse skin were compared with those on wild-type mouse skin. Our results indicated that TRPV1 expression was not required for TCA-induced DNA damage, as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling, but was indispensable for the TCA-induced production of distinct growth factors and cytokines by keratinocytes. Ulceration after TCA peeling was actually more severe in the absence of TRPV1, suggesting that the TRPV1-mediated epidermal production of growth factors and cytokines affected the damaging and healing processes of TCA-peeled skin to induce rejuvenation.

  20. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Impair Gene Expression of PPARα, PPARγ, and Mitochondrial Enoyl-CoA Delta Isomerase in the Liver of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and mitochondrial Δ3Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver. Weanling rats were assigned to five groups (eight animals each) and fed semi-synthetic, low-carbohydrate diets containing 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (low-Zn (LZ) or high-Zn (HZ)) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower (SF) oil for four weeks. One group each was fed the LZ-CB, LZ-SF, or HZ-SF diet free choice, and one group each was fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in restricted amounts according to intake of the respective LZ diets. The LZ diets markedly lowered growth and zinc concentrations in plasma and femur. Hepatic mRNA levels of PPARα, PPARγ, and ECI were not reduced by the moderate zinc deficiency. Overall, ECI-mRNA abundance was marginally higher in the SF-fed than in the CB-fed animals. PMID:24855375

  1. Partial deficiency of isoleucine impairs root development and alters transcript levels of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid and glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Zhang, Fengxia; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yule; Liu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isoleucine is one of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) that are essential substrates for protein synthesis in all organisms. Although the metabolic pathway for isoleucine has been well characterized in higher plants, it is not known whether it plays a specific role in plant development. In this study, an Arabidopsis mutant, lib (low isoleucine biosynthesis), that has defects in both cell proliferation and cell expansion processes during root development, was characterized. The lib mutant carries a T-DNA insertion in the last exon of the OMR1 gene that encodes a threonine deaminase/dehydratase (TD). TD catalyses the deamination and dehydration of threonine, which is the first and also the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. This T-DNA insertion results in a partial deficiency of isoleucine in lib root tissues but it does not affect its total protein content. Application of exogenous isoleucine or introduction of a wild-type OMR1 gene into the lib mutant can completely rescue the mutant phenotypes. These results reveal an important role for isoleucine in plant development. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that the partial deficiency of isoleucine in the lib mutant triggers a decrease in transcript levels of the genes encoding the major enzymes involved in the BCAA degradation pathway; the analysis also indicated that many genes involved in the biosynthesis of methionine-derived glucosinolates are up-regulated.

  2. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  3. Impaired Mobilization of Vascular Reparative Bone Marrow Cells in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes but not in Leptin Receptor-Deficient db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Vasam, Goutham; Joshi, Shrinidh; Jarajapu, Yagna P R

    2016-05-18

    Diabetes is associated with impaired mobilization of bone marrow stem/progenitor cells that accelerate vascularization of ischemic areas. This study characterized mobilization of vascular reparative bone marrow progenitor cells in mouse models of diabetes. Age-matched control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic, and db/db mice with lean-controls were studied. Mobilization induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 or ischemia was evaluated by flow cytometric enumeration of circulating Lin(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(+) (LSK) cells, and by colony forming unit (CFU) assay. The circulating WBCs and LSKs, and CFUs were reduced in both models with a shorter duration (10-12 weeks) of diabetes compared to their respective controls. Longer duration of STZ-diabetes (≥20 weeks) induced impairment of G-CSF- or AMD3100-mobilization (P < 0.01, n = 8). In db/db mice, mobilization by G-CSF or AMD3100 was either increased or unaffected (P < 0.05, n = 6 to 8). Proliferation, migration, and ischemia-induced mobilization, of LSK cells were impaired in both models. Leptin receptor antagonist, PESLAN-1, increased G-CSF- or AMD3100-mobilization of WBCs and LSKs, compared to the untreated. Leptin increased basal WBCs, decreased basal and AMD3100-mobilized LSK cells, and had no effect on G-CSF. These results suggest that mobilopathy is apparent in STZ-diabetes but not in db/db mice. Leptin receptor antagonism would be a promising approach for reversing diabetic bone marrow mobilopathy.

  4. Combinatorial Targeting of Prostate Carcinoma Cells and Tumor Associated Pericytes with Antibody-Based Immunotherapy and Metronomic Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    4 ( CSPG4 ). This antigen has a restricted distribution in normal tissues, but has high expression in malignant lesions with limited inter-and intra...mesothelioma, melanoma and sarcoma. Relevant to this proposal AN-2 and CSPG4 are expressed in mouse and human prostate cancer cell lines, respectively...Fig. 1). Furthermore AN-2 and CSPG4 expression is upregulated on activated pericytes in the tumor microenvironment (Fig.2). As to the function of

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency impairs muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone regeneration via cellular autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Lu, Aiping; Kozemchak, Adam; Tang, Ying; Poddar, Minakshi; Sun, Xuying; Cummins, James H; Huard, Johnny

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC)-mediated bone regeneration utilizing a critical size calvarial defect model. We found that BMP4/green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transduced MDSCs formed significantly less bone in COX-2 knock-out (Cox-2KO) than in COX-2 wild-type (WT) mice. BMP4/GFP-transduced Cox-2KO MDSCs also formed significantly less bone than transduced WT MDSCs when transplanted into calvarial defects created in CD-1 nude mice. The impaired bone regeneration in the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group is associated with downregulation of BMP4-pSMAD1/5 signaling, decreased osteogenic differentiation and lowered proliferation capacity after transplantation, compared with WT MDSCBMP4/GFP cells. The Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group demonstrated a reduction in cell survival and direct osteogenic differentiation in vitro These effects were mediated in part by the downregulation of Igf1 and Igf2. In addition, the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP cells recruited fewer macrophages than the WT MDSC/BMP4/GFP cells in the early phase after injury. We concluded that the bone regeneration capacity of Cox-2KO MDSCs was impaired because of a reduction in cell proliferation and survival capacities, reduction in osteogenic differentiation and a decrease in the ability of the cells to recruit host cells to the injury site.

  6. Mild Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia Induces Hearing Impairment Associated with Reduction of Ribbon Synapse Density and Dysregulation of VGLUT3, Myosin VIIa, and Prestin Expression in Young Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Wenyue; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia (IDA) adversely affects the development of cochlear hair cells of the young offspring, but the mechanisms underlying the association are incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mild maternal IDA in guinea pigs could interrupt inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapse density and outer hair cell motility of the offspring. Here, we established a dietary restriction model that allows us to study quantitative changes in the number of IHC ribbon synapses and hearing impairment in response to mild maternal IDA in young guinea pig. The offspring were weaned on postnatal day (PND) 9 and then were given the iron-sufficient diet. On PND 24, pups were examined the hearing function by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) measurements. Then, the cochleae were harvested for assessment of the number of IHC ribbon synapses by immunofluorescence, the morphology of cochlear hair cells, and spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) by scanning electron microscope and hematoxylin-eosin staining, the location, and expression of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 3, myosin VIIa, and prestin by immunofluorescence and blotting. Here, we show that mild maternal IDA in guinea pigs induced elevated ABR threshold shifts, declined DPOAE level shifts, and reduced the number of ribbon synapses, impaired the morphology of cochlear hair cells and SGCs in offsprings. In addition, downregulation of VGLUT3 and myosin VIIa, and upregulation of prestin were observed in the cochlea of offsprings from mild maternal IDA in guinea pigs. These data indicate that mild maternal IDA in guinea pigs induced hearing impairment in offsprings, and this deficit may be attributed to the reduction of ribbon synapse density and dysregulation of VGLUT3, myosin VIIa, and prestin.

  7. Sourcing of an alternative pericyte-like cell type from peripheral blood in clinically relevant numbers for therapeutic angiogenic applications.

    PubMed

    Blocki, Anna; Wang, Yingting; Koch, Maria; Goralczyk, Anna; Beyer, Sebastian; Agarwal, Nikita; Lee, Michelle; Moonshi, Shehzahdi; Dewavrin, Jean-Yves; Peh, Priscilla; Schwarz, Herbert; Bhakoo, Kishore; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Autologous cells hold great potential for personalized cell therapy, reducing immunological and risk of infections. However, low cell counts at harvest with subsequently long expansion times with associated cell function loss currently impede the advancement of autologous cell therapy approaches. Here, we aimed to source clinically relevant numbers of proangiogenic cells from an easy accessible cell source, namely peripheral blood. Using macromolecular crowding (MMC) as a biotechnological platform, we derived a novel cell type from peripheral blood that is generated within 5 days in large numbers (10-40 million cells per 100 ml of blood). This blood-derived angiogenic cell (BDAC) type is of monocytic origin, but exhibits pericyte markers PDGFR-β and NG2 and demonstrates strong angiogenic activity, hitherto ascribed only to MSC-like pericytes. Our findings suggest that BDACs represent an alternative pericyte-like cell population of hematopoietic origin that is involved in promoting early stages of microvasculature formation. As a proof of principle of BDAC efficacy in an ischemic disease model, BDAC injection rescued affected tissues in a murine hind limb ischemia model by accelerating and enhancing revascularization. Derived from a renewable tissue that is easy to collect, BDACs overcome current short-comings of autologous cell therapy, in particular for tissue repair strategies.

  8. Expression of VEGF-related proteins in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes after exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The localization of neuropathological lesions along deep sulci and fissures is one of the characteristics of a cerebrum damaged by methylmercury. Edematous changes in white matter have been proposed as the cause of the localization of lesions; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying methylmercury-induced edema remain unclear. Since the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system regulates vascular permeability and can be involved in the progression of edematous changes, we examined the effect of methylmercury on the expression of VEGF-related proteins in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes. After methylmercury exposure, mRNA and protein levels of VEGF-A in pericytes and placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGF-receptor-1/-2 in endothelial cells were elevated. The induction of pericyte VEGF-A expression was independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-α and hypoxia-response element signaling. Taken together, these results suggest that methylmercury activates the VEGF system in brain microvessels in a paracrine fashion. When the activation occurs in narrow areas such as along the deep sulci in the cerebrum, hyperpermeability and subsequent edematous changes would cause a circulatory disturbance and result in neural cell damage. We propose this as a reason for the localization of the neuropathological lesions along the deep sulci and fissures in the cerebral cortex, such as the calcarine fissure, in patients with Minamata disease.

  9. Mesenchymal Tumors Can Derive from Ng2/Cspg4-Expressing Pericytes with β-Catenin Modulating the Neoplastic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Wei, Qingxia; Hirata, Makoto; Weng, Angela; Han, Ilkyu; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puvindran; Kirsch, David G; Wunder, Jay S; Alman, Benjamin A

    2016-07-26

    The cell of origin for most mesenchymal tumors is unclear. One cell type that contributes to this lineages is the pericyte, a cell expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that bone and soft tissue sarcomas driven by the deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor, or desmoid tumors driven by a mutation in Apc, can derive from cells expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor gene in these cells resulted in the bone and soft tissue sarcomas that closely resemble human sarcomas, while stabilizing β-catenin in this same cell type caused desmoid tumors. Comparing expression between Ng2/Cspg4-expressing pericytes lacking Trp53 and sarcomas that arose from deletion of Trp53 showed inhibition of β-catenin signaling in the sarcomas. Activation of β-catenin inhibited the formation and growth of sarcomas. Thus, pericytes can be a cell of origin for mesenchymal tumors, and β-catenin dysregulation plays an important role in the neoplastic phenotype.

  10. Effect of hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride on the expression of extracellular-superoxide dismutase in retinal pericytes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Aida, Kazunari; Nishihara, Hiroko; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The initial clinical stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is characterized by the development of intraretinal microvascular abnormalities. The increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to be a key event in the pathogenesis of DR. Extracellular-superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an anti-inflammatory enzyme that is distributed mainly in vascular cells and protects cells from ROS by scavenging superoxide anion. Treatment with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) decreased the expression of EC-SOD but not other SOD isozymes in pericytes accompanied with an increase of intracellular ROS production. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly suppressed the ROS production and down-regulation of EC-SOD. We observed the activation of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation as signs of apoptotic process by CoCl(2) treatment. In addition, these phenomena were significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with NAC. EC-SOD enhancer 4-phenyl butyric acid also suppressed the caspase-3 activation. It is known that the presence of a high level of EC-SOD throughout the vessel walls might have an important protective role against superoxide in the vascular system. The decrease in EC-SOD expression accompanied with elevation of ROS level in pericytes under hypoxia might induce and/or promote the ROS-triggered apoptosis of pericytes and the development of pathogenesis in DR.

  11. Impaired B cell responses to orally administered antigens in lamina propria but not Peyer's patches of Gαi2-deficient mice prior to colitis

    PubMed Central

    Öhman, Lena; Åström, Rolf-Göran; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2005-01-01

    Despite numerous studies on the intestinal immune system in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and animal models of IBD, very little is known about the immune reactivity of mucosal lymphocytes following oral immunizations under these circumstances. The reactivity of Peyer's patch (PP) and lamina propria (LP) T and B lymphocytes in inhibitory G-protein α2 subunit-deficient (Gαi2–/–) mice developing an IBD resembling ulcerative colitis was investigated following repeated oral immunizations with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), together with the adjuvant cholera toxin, prior to colitis. The antigen-specific B-cell response in the LP of both the small and the large intestines was significantly reduced in Gαi2–/– as compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, the frequency of KLH-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells in the PP did not differ between Gαi2–/– and wild-type mice, whereas the total frequency of Ig-producing cells as well as the frequency of enteric flora-specific Ig-producing cells in the PP was significantly increased in Gαi2–/– as compared to wild-type mice. Analysis of T cell responses following restimulation ex vivo with KLH revealed a dramatic increase in the production of interferon-γ in mesenteric lymph node, PP and LP lymphocytes from Gαi2-deficient as compared to wild-type mice, together with decreased production of interleukin-10 in all locations except the PP. PMID:15885134

  12. Age-Related Impairment of Bones' Adaptive Response to Loading in Mice Is Associated With Sex-Related Deficiencies in Osteoblasts but No Change in Osteocytes†

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Lee B; Galea, Gabriel L; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2014-01-01

    Bones adjust their mass and architecture to be sufficiently robust to withstand functional loading by adapting to their strain environment. This mechanism appears less effective with age, resulting in low bone mass. In male and female young adult (17-week-old) and old (19-month-old) mice, we investigated the effect of age in vivo on bones' adaptive response to loading and in vitro in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells derived from bone cortices. Right tibias were axially loaded on alternate days for 2 weeks. Left tibias were non-loaded controls. In a separate group, the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes and the number of periosteal osteoblasts were analyzed 24 hours after a single loading episode. The responses to strain of the primary osteoblast-like cells derived from these mice were assessed by EGR2 expression, change in cell number and Ki67 immunofluorescence. In young male and female mice, loading increased trabecular thickness and the number of trabecular connections. Increase in the number of trabecular connections was impaired with age but trabecular thickness was not. In old mice, the loading-related increase in periosteal apposition of the cortex was less than in young ones. Age was associated with a lesser loading-related increase in osteoblast number on the periosteal surface but had no effect on loading-related reduction in the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes. In vitro, strain-related proliferation of osteoblast-like cells was lower in cells from old than young mice. Cells from aged female mice demonstrated normal entry into the cell cycle but subsequently arrested in G2 phase, reducing strain-related increases in cell number. Thus, in both male and female mice, loading-related adaptive responses are impaired with age. This impairment is different in females and males. The deficit appears to occur in osteoblasts' proliferative responses to strain rather than earlier strain-related responses in the osteocytes. © 2014 The Authors

  13. Deficiency of dietary niacin impaired gill immunity and antioxidant capacity, and changes its tight junction proteins via regulating NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2 and MLCK signaling pathways in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Quan; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary niacin on gill immunity, tight junction proteins, antioxidant system and related signaling molecules mRNA expression, young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed six diets containing graded levels of niacin (3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that niacin deficiency decreased lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, and complement 3 content, and caused oxidative damage that might be partly due to the decreased copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and reduced glutathione content in fish gills (P < 0.05). Moreover, the relative mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides (liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and Hepcidin), anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1), tight junction proteins (Occludin, zonula occludens 1, Claudin-15 and -3), signaling molecules (inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), target of rapamycin (TOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)) and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in niacin-deficient diet group. Conversely, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase α, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in fish gills fed niacin-deficient diet. Interestingly, the varying niacin levels of 3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet had no effect on the mRNA level of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a, Claudin-c and -12 in fish gills (P > 0.05). In conclusion, niacin deficiency decreased gill immunity, impaired gill antioxidant system, as well as regulated mRNA expression of gill tight junction proteins and related signaling

  14. CHD7 Deficiency in “Looper”, a New Mouse Model of CHARGE Syndrome, Results in Ossicle Malformation, Otosclerosis and Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Jacqueline M.; Carpinelli, Marina R.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Symons, R. C. Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T.; Burt, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment. PMID:24840056

  15. Deficiency of the Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Impairs mRNA Localization and Local Translation in the Growth Cone of Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fallini, Claudia; Donlin-Asp, Paul G.; Rouanet, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting spinal motor neurons. It is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays an essential role in the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in all tissues. The etiology of the specific defects in the motor circuitry in SMA is still unclear, but SMN has also been implicated in mediating the axonal localization of mRNA-protein complexes, which may contribute to the axonal degeneration observed in SMA. Here, we report that SMN deficiency severely disrupts local protein synthesis within neuronal growth cones. We also identify the cytoskeleton-associated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) mRNA as a new target of SMN and show that motor neurons from SMA mouse models have reduced levels of GAP43 mRNA and protein in axons and growth cones. Importantly, overexpression of two mRNA-binding proteins, HuD and IMP1, restores GAP43 mRNA and protein levels in growth cones and rescues axon outgrowth defects in SMA neurons. These findings demonstrate that SMN plays an important role in the localization and local translation of mRNAs with important axonal functions and suggest that disruption of this function may contribute to the axonal defects observed in SMA. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays a key role in assembling RNA/protein complexes that are essential for mRNA splicing. It remains unclear whether defects in this well characterized housekeeping function cause the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons observed in SMA. Here, we describe an additional role of SMN in regulating the axonal localization and local translation of the mRNA encoding growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). This study supports a model whereby SMN deficiency impedes transport and local translation of mRNAs important for neurite

  16. Direct evidence in vivo of impaired macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Rotllan, Noemi; Palomer, Xavier; Ribas, Vicent; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2005-12-30

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key regulator of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. There is strong evidence that ABCA1 is a key regulator of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). However, this could not be proved in vivo since hepatobiliary cholesterol transport was unchanged in ABCA1-deficient mice (ABCA1-/-). We used ABCA1-/- mice to test the hypothesis that ABCA1 is a critical determinant of macrophage-specific RCT. Although this cell-specific RCT only accounts for a tiny part of total RCT, it is widely accepted that it may have a major impact on atherosclerosis susceptibility. [(3)H]cholesterol-labeled endogenous macrophages were injected intraperitoneally into wild-type ABCA1+/+, ABCA1+/- and ABCA1-/- mice maintained on a chow diet. A direct relationship was observed between ABCA1 gene dose and plasma [(3)H]cholesterol at 24 and 48 h after the injection of tracer into the mice. Forty-eight hours after this injection, ABCA1-/- mice had significantly reduced [(3)H]cholesterol in liver (2.8-fold), small intestine enterocytes (1.7-fold) and feces (2-fold). To our knowledge, this is the first direct in vivo quantitative evidence that ABCA1 is a critical determinant of macrophage-specific RCT.

  17. Characterization and genetic mapping of eceriferum-ym (cer-ym), a cutin deficient barley mutant with impaired leaf water retention capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Cheng; Ma, Xiaoying; Wang, Aidong; Duan, Ruijun; Nawrath, Christiane; Komatsuda, Takao; Chen, Guoxiong

    2015-09-01

    The cuticle covers the aerial parts of land plants, where it serves many important functions, including water retention. Here, a recessive cuticle mutant, eceriferum-ym (cer-ym), of Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) showed abnormally glossy spikes, sheaths, and leaves. The cer-ym mutant plant detached from its root system was hypersensitive to desiccation treatment compared with wild type plants, and detached leaves of mutant lost 41.8% of their initial weight after 1 h of dehydration under laboratory conditions, while that of the wild type plants lost only 7.1%. Stomata function was not affected by the mutation, but the mutant leaves showed increased cuticular permeability to water, suggesting a defective leaf cuticle, which was confirmed by toluidine blue staining. The mutant leaves showed a substantial reduction in the amounts of the major cutin monomers and a slight increase in the main wax component, suggesting that the enhanced cuticle permeability was a consequence of cutin deficiency. cer-ym was mapped within a 0.8 cM interval between EST marker AK370363 and AK251484, a pericentromeric region on chromosome 4H. The results indicate that the desiccation sensitivity of cer-ym is caused by a defect in leaf cutin, and that cer-ym is located in a chromosome 4H pericentromeric region.

  18. Phenotypic changes and possible angiogenic roles of pericytes during wound healing in the mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Shunichi; Ezaki, Taichi

    2011-08-01

    Pericytes (PCs) are attracting increasing attention as a crucial target for anti-angiogenic therapy. In this study, we sought to determine the functional significance of PCs during angiogenesis by using a skin wound healing model in which different angiogenic stages are identifiable. Angiogenesis was first observed on Day 3 after wounding and increased greatly on Day 5. On Day 5, the leading edge of the regenerating vessels (vascular advancing front; VAF) appeared to be composed of immature vessels, and was further divided into "tip" and "following" regions according to maturational differences. PCs distributed in regenerating vessels showed phenotypic differences according to different regions. PCs that expressed PDGFR-β alone and lacked vascular basement membrane (BM) were predominant in the tip region of the VAF, while PCs that expressed both PDGFR-β and NG2 with their BM coating were numerous in the following regions toward the rear of the VAF. Moreover, PCs in the VAF expressed VEGF-A and associated with most proliferating endothelial cells (ECs). VEGF-A expression of PCs and the proliferating ECs totally disappeared in the region toward the rear of the VAF. We conclude that PCs can differ in their phenotype according to the stage of angiogenesis during wound healing. They may promote angiogenesis at the initial stage but might in turn stabilize the newly formed vessels at the later stage.

  19. PDGF, pericytes and the pathogenesis of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC).

    PubMed

    Betsholtz, Christer; Keller, Annika

    2014-07-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are important mitogens for various types of mesenchymal cells, and as such, they exert critical functions during organogenesis in mammalian embryonic and early postnatal development. Increased or ectopic PDGF activity may also cause or contribute to diseases such as cancer and tissue fibrosis. Until recently, no loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in PDGF or PDGF receptor genes were reported as causally linked to a human disease. This changed in 2013 when reports appeared on presumed LOF mutations in the genes encoding PDGF-B and its receptor PDGF receptor-beta (PDGF-Rβ) in familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC), a brain disease characterized by anatomically localized calcifications in or near the blood microvessels. Here, we review PDGF-B and PDGF-Rβ biology with special reference to their functions in brain-blood vessel development, pericyte recruitment and the regulation of the blood-brain barrier. We also discuss various scenarios for IBGC pathogenesis suggested by observations in patients and genetically engineered animal models of the disease.

  20. Cultured Human Adipose Tissue Pericytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display a Very Similar Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Tathiane Maistro; de Deus Wagatsuma, Virgínia Mara; Palma, Patrícia Viana Bonini; Araújo, Amélia Goes; Ribeiro Malmegrim, Kelen Cristina; Morato de Oliveira, Fábio; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Silva, Wilson Araújo; Kashima Haddad, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are cultured cells that can give rise to mature mesenchymal cells under appropriate conditions and secrete a number of biologically relevant molecules that may play an important role in regenerative medicine. Evidence indicates that pericytes (PCs) correspond to mesenchymal stem cells in vivo and can give rise to MSCs when cultured, but a comparison between the gene expression profiles of cultured PCs (cPCs) and MSCs is lacking. We have devised a novel methodology to isolate PCs from human adipose tissue and compared cPCs to MSCs obtained through traditional methods. Freshly isolated PCs expressed CD34, CD140b, and CD271 on their surface, but not CD146. Both MSCs and cPCs were able to differentiate along mesenchymal pathways in vitro, displayed an essentially identical surface immunophenotype, and exhibited the ability to suppress CD3+ lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Microarray expression data of cPCs and MSCs formed a single cluster among other cell types. Further analyses showed that the gene expression profiles of cPCs and MSCs are extremely similar, although MSCs differentially expressed endothelial cell (EC)-specific transcripts. These results confirm, using the power of transcriptomic analysis, that PCs give rise to MSCs and suggest that low levels of ECs may persist in MSC cultures established using traditional protocols. PMID:26192741

  1. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  2. GATA1-Deficient Dendritic Cells Display Impaired CCL21-Dependent Migration toward Lymph Nodes Due to Reduced Levels of Polysialic Acid.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Maaike R; De Cuyper, Iris M; Branco-Madeira, Filipe; de Bleser, Pieter; Kool, Mirjam; Meinders, Marjolein; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Mul, Erik; Wolkers, Monika C; Salerno, Fiamma; Nota, Benjamin; Saeys, Yvan; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Hammad, Hamida; Philipsen, Sjaak; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W; Lambrecht, Bart N; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the regulation of the immune response. DC development and activation is finely orchestrated through transcriptional programs. GATA1 transcription factor is required for murine DC development, and data suggest that it might be involved in the fine-tuning of the life span and function of activated DCs. We generated DC-specific Gata1 knockout mice (Gata1-KO(DC)), which presented a 20% reduction of splenic DCs, partially explained by enhanced apoptosis. RNA sequencing analysis revealed a number of deregulated genes involved in cell survival, migration, and function. DC migration toward peripheral lymph nodes was impaired in Gata1-KO(DC) mice. Migration assays performed in vitro showed that this defect was selective for CCL21, but not CCL19. Interestingly, we show that Gata1-KO(DC) DCs have reduced polysialic acid levels on their surface, which is a known determinant for the proper migration of DCs toward CCL21.

  3. Impaired fetal muscle development and JAK-STAT activation mark disease onset and progression in a mouse model for merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Andreia M; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Sarathy, Apurva; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Deries, Marianne; Burkin, Dean J; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig

    2017-03-07

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a dramatic neuromuscular disease in which crippling muscle weakness is evident from birth. Here we use the dyW mouse model for human MDC1A to trace the onset of the disease during development in utero. We find that myotomal and primary myogenesis proceed normally in homozygous dyW-/-embryos. Fetal dyW-/-muscles display the same number of myofibers as wildtype muscles, but by E18.5 dyW-/-muscles are significantly smaller and muscle size is not recovered post-natally. These results suggest that fetal dyW-/-myofibers fail to grow at the same rate as wildtype myofibers. Consistent with this hypothesis between E17.5 and E18.5 dyW-/-muscles display a dramatic drop in the number of Pax7- and Myogenin-positive cells relative to wildtype muscles, suggesting that dyW-/-muscles fail to generate enough muscle cells to sustain fetal myofiber growth. Gene expression analysis of dyW-/-E17.5 muscles identified a significant increase in the expression of the JAK-STAT target gene Pim1 and muscles from 2-day and 3-week old dyW-/-mice demonstrate a dramatic increase in pSTAT3 relative to wildtype muscles. Interestingly, myotubes lacking integrin α7β1, a laminin-receptor, also show a significant increase in pSTAT3 levels compared to wildtype myotubes, indicating that α7β1 can act as a negative regulator of STAT3 activity. Our data reveal for the first time that dyW-/-mice exhibit a myogenesis defect already in utero. We propose that overactivation of JAK-STAT signaling is part of the mechanism underlying disease onset and progression in dyW-/-mice.

  4. Glycosylation-deficient mutations in tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase impair its structure and function and are linked to infantile hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Keiichi; Satou, Yasuhito; Al-Shawafi, Hiba A; Numa-Kinjoh, Natsuko; Sohda, Miwa; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) is a membrane glycoprotein with a proposed role in bone mineralization. Indeed, mutations in TNSALP have been identified in patients with hypophosphatasia (HPP), a genetic disease characterized by hypomineralization of bone and teeth and a deficiency in serum ALP activity. TNSALP has five potential N-glycosylation sites at N140, N230, N271, N303 and N430 by standard nomenclature. A mutation at one of these sites, N430, was recently detected in a patient with infantile HPP. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that TNSALP has five N-glycans in transfected COS-1 cells and that individual single N-glycan deletion mutants of TNSALP retain the dimeric structure required for ALP activity, excluding the possibility that any single N-glycan plays a vital role in the structure and function of TNSALP. However, we found that TNSALP (N430Q) and TNSALP (N430E) mutants, but not a TNSALP (N430D) mutant, failed to form dimers. The TNSALP (N430S) mutant linked to infantile HPP was glycosylation-defective and unable to dimerise, similar to TNSALP (N430Q) and TNSALP (N430E) mutants; therefore, TNSALP (N430S) was established as a severe allele without strong ALP activity. By contrast to individual single N-glycan deletion mutants, TNSALP devoid of all five N-glycans was present to a much lesser extent than wild-type TNSALP in transfected cells, possibly reflecting its instability. A comprehensive analysis of a series of multiple N-glycan depletion mutants in TNSALP revealed that three N-glycans on N230, N271 and N303 were the minimal requirement for the structure and function of TNSALP and a prerequisite for its stable expression in a cell.

  5. Ifit2 Deficiency Results in Uncontrolled Neurotropic Coronavirus Replication and Enhanced Encephalitis via Impaired Alpha/Beta Interferon Induction in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Butchi, Niranjan B.; Hinton, David R.; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Kapil, Parul; Fensterl, Volker; Sen, Ganes C.

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) limit viral dissemination prior to the emergence of adaptive immune responses through the concerted action of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Although IFN-α/β induction by coronaviruses is modest, it effectively limits viral spread within the central nervous system (CNS) and protects against mortality. The protective roles of specific ISGs against the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) members of the coronaviruses are largely unknown. This study demonstrates a protective role of the ISG Ifit2 in encephalitis induced by the dual hepato- and neurotropic MHV-A59. Contrasting the mild encephalitis and 100% survival of MHV-A59-infected wild-type (wt) mice, nearly 60% of infected Ifit2−/− mice exhibited severe encephalitis and succumbed between 6 and 8 days postinfection. Increased clinical disease in Ifit2−/− mice coincided with higher viral loads and enhanced viral spread throughout the CNS parenchyma. Ifit2−/− mice also expressed significantly reduced IFN-α/β and downstream ISG mRNAs Ifit1, Isg15, and Pkr, while expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was only modestly affected in the CNS. Impaired IFN-α/β induction in the absence of Ifit2 was confirmed by ex vivo mRNA analysis of microglia and macrophages, the prominent cell types producing IFN-α/β following MHV CNS infection. Furthermore, both IFN-α/β mRNA and protein production were significantly reduced in MHV-infected Ifit2−/− relative to wt bone marrow-derived macrophages. Collectively, the data implicate Ifit2 as a positive regulator of IFN-α/β expression, rather than direct antiviral mediator, during MHV-induced encephalitis. PMID:24198415

  6. Patients with T⁺/low NK⁺ IL-2 receptor γ chain deficiency have differentially-impaired cytokine signaling resulting in severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Erlacher, Miriam; Vraetz, Thomas; Hartjes, Lara; Janda, Ales; Rizzi, Marta; Lorenz, Myriam R; Gilmour, Kimberly; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Roifman, Chaim M; Cheuk, Steven; Gennery, Andrew; Thrasher, Adrian J; Fuchs, Ilka; Schwarz, Klaus; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) leads to a T(-) NK(-) B(+) immunophenotype and is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the IL-2 receptor γ-chain (IL2RG). IL2RG(R222C) leads to atypical SCID with a severe early onset phenotype despite largely normal NK- and T-cell numbers. To address this discrepancy, we performed a detailed analysis of T, B, and NK cells, including quantitative STAT phosphorylation and functional responses to the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-15, and IL-21 in a patient with the IL2RG(R222C) mutation. Moreover, we identified nine additional unpublished patients with the same mutations, all with a full SCID phenotype, and confirmed selected immunological observations. T-cell development was variably affected, but led to borderline T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) levels and a normal repertoire. T cells showed moderately reduced proliferation, failing enhancement by IL-2. While NK-cell development was normal, IL-2 enhancement of NK-cell degranulation and IL-15-induced cytokine production were absent. IL-2 or IL-21 failed to enhance B-cell proliferation and plasmablast differentiation. These functional alterations were reflected by a differential impact of IL2RG(R222C) on cytokine signal transduction, with a gradient IL-4impairment of T-cell immunity or TREC analysis.

  7. Induction of initial steps of angiogenic differentiation and maturation of endothelial cells by pericytes in vitro and the role of collagen IV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigang; Pausch, Friederike; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Brachvogel, Bent; Pöschl, Ernst

    2016-05-01

    Activation of endothelial cells and recruitment of mural cells define critical steps during the formation of stable vascular elements. Both events are reflected by cocultures of endothelial cells and isolated murine pericyte-like cells and define a versatile platform for the analysis of distinct steps during the angiogenic process in vitro. Isolated pericyte-like cells promote the survival of endothelial cells, induce the assembly of endothelial cells as well as establish direct contacts with forming endothelial alignments. More importantly, they also induce characteristic steps of maturation including the assembly of stable cell-cell junctions, deposition of basement membrane-like matrices and local formation of a central lumen. The presence of pericyte-like cells induces the secretion of extracellular matrices enriched in collagen IV by endothelial cells, which improves endothelial tube formation and provides the adhesive substrate for mural cell recruitment. Collagen-binding integrins contribute differentially to the process, with α1β1 involved in the adhesion of pericyte-like cells to collagen IV and α2β1 mainly involved in endothelial cord formation. These data indicate that pericyte-like cells are essential for the survival of endothelial cells, the efficient formation of endothelial alignments as well as initial steps of maturation of capillary-like structures.

  8. Changes in fine structure of pericytes and novel desmin-immunopositive perivascular cells during postnatal development in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Jindatip, Depicha; Fujiwara, Ken; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kouki, Tom; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells associated with capillaries. We previously demonstrated that pericytes, identified by desmin immunohistochemistry, produce type I and III collagens in the anterior pituitary gland of adult rats. In addition, we recently used desmin immunoelectron microscopy to characterize a novel type of perivascular cell, dubbed a desmin-immunopositive perivascular cell, in the anterior pituitary. These two types of perivascular cells differ in fine structure. The present study attempted to characterize the morphological features of pituitary pericytes and novel desmin-immunopositive perivascular cells during postnatal development, in particular their role in collagen synthesis. Desmin immunostaining revealed numerous perivascular cells at postnatal day 5 (P5) and P10. Transmission electron microscopy showed differences in the fine structure of the two cell types, starting at P5. Pericytes had well-developed rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus at P5 and P10. The novel desmin-immunopositive perivascular cells exhibited dilated cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum at P5-P30. In addition, during early postnatal development in the gland, a number of type I and III collagen-expressing cells were observed, as were high expression levels of these collagen mRNAs. We conclude that pituitary pericytes and novel desmin-immunopositive perivascular cells contain well-developed cell organelles and that they actively synthesize collagens during the early postnatal period.

  9. Flesh Quality Loss in Response to Dietary Isoleucine Deficiency and Excess in Fish: A Link to Impaired Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Defense in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Tang, Ling; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the impact of dietary isoleucine (Ile) on fish growth and flesh quality and revealed a possible role of muscle antioxidant defense in flesh quality in relation to dietary Ile. Grass carp (weighing 256.8±3.5 g) were fed diets containing six graded levels of Ile (3.8, 6.6, 9.3, 12.5, 15.2 and 18.5 g/kg) for eight weeks. The results indicated that compared with Ile deficiency (3.8 g/kg diets) and excess (18.5 g/kg diets) groups, 9.3–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations promoted fish growth and muscle fat deposition, whereas 6.6–15.2 g Ile/kg diets supplementation enhanced muscle nutrients (protein and total EAAs) deposition. Furthermore, muscle shear force, pH value, and hydroxyproline concentration were improved by 9.3–12.5, 9.3 and 9.3 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. However, muscle cooking loss, lactate content, and activities of cathepsin B and L were decreased by 6.6–15.2, 9.3–12.5, 9.3–12.5 and 9.3–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. Additionally, 6.6–15.2 and 6.6–12.5 g Ile/kg diet supplementations attenuated malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents, respectively. The activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione content were enhanced by 6.6–9.3, 6.6–12.5 and 6.6–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. Moreover, the relative mRNA expressions of antioxidant enzymes, including Cu/Zn-SOD (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets) and GPx (12.5 g/kg diets), as well as antioxidant-related signaling molecules, including NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), target of rapamycin (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (9.3–12.5 g/kg diets) and casein kinase 2 (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), were up-regulated when Ile diet supplementations were administered at these levels, respectively, whereas the relative mRNA expression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 was down-regulated with 9.3 g Ile/kg diet

  10. An experimental approach to evaluate the impact of impaired transport function on hepatobiliary drug disposition using Mrp2-deficient TR- rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in combination with Bcrp knockdown.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyunghee; Pfeifer, Nathan D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Yue, Wei; Stewart, Paul W; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-03-03

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes that mediate biliary excretion of many drugs and endogenous compounds. BCRP and MRP2 have overlapping substrate profiles. Predicting drug disposition in the setting of altered transport function has important clinical significance. This investigation was designed to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate the impact of impaired Mrp2 and Bcrp function on hepatobiliary drug disposition. To achieve Bcrp knockdown by RNA interference (RNAi), sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) from Mrp2-deficient (TR(-)) and wild-type (WT) rats were infected with adenoviral vectors to express shRNA targeting Bcrp (Ad-siBcrp) at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1-10. MOI of 5 was identified as optimal. At MOI of 5, viral infection as well as WT or TR(-) status was statistically significant predictors of the rosuvastatin (RSV) biliary excretion index (BEI), consistent with the known role of Bcrp and Mrp2 in the biliary excretion of RSV in vivo in rats. Relative to WT rat SCH, marginal mean BEI (%) of RSV in TR(-) rat SCH decreased by 28.6 (95% CI: 5.8-51.3). Ad-siBcrp decreased marginal mean BEI (%) of RSV by 13.3 (7.5-9.1) relative to SCH infected with adenoviral vectors expressing a nontargeting shRNA (Ad-siNT). The BEI of RSV was almost ablated in TR(-) rat SCH with Bcrp knockdown (5.9 ± 3.0%) compared to Ad-siNT-infected WT rat SCH (45.4 ± 6.6%). These results demonstrated the feasibility of Bcrp knockdown in TR(-) rat SCH as an in vitro system to assess the impact of impaired Bcrp and Mrp2 function. At MOI of 5, viral infection had minimal effects on RSV total accumulation, but significantly decreased marginal mean taurocholate total accumulation (pmol/mg of protein) and BEI (%) by 9.9 (7.0-12.8) and 7.5 (3.7-11.3), respectively, relative to noninfected SCH. These

  11. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M.; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  12. Loss of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 in vascular endothelium increases pericyte coverage and promotes pulmonary arterial remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xue-Jiao; Tao, Yong-Kang; He, Xiaochen; Roman, Richard J.; Aschner, Judy L.; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a leading cause of heart failure. Although pulmonary endothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role in the progression of the PAH, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The HIF-α hydroxylase system is a key player in the regulation of vascular remodeling. Knockout of HIF-2α has been reported to cause pulmonary hypertension. The present study examined the role of endothelial cell specific prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) in the development of PAH and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The PHD2f/f mouse was crossbred with VE-Cadherin-Cre promoter mouse to generate an endothelial specific PHD2 knockout (Cdh5-Cre-PHD2ECKO) mouse. Pulmonary arterial pressure and the size of the right ventricle was significantly elevated in the PHD2ECKO mice relative to the PHD2f/f controls. Knockout of PHD2 in EC was associated with vascular remodeling, as evidenced by an increase in pulmonary arterial media to lumen ratio and number of muscularized arterioles. The pericyte coverage and vascular smooth muscle cells were also significantly increased in the PA. The increase in vascular pericytes was associated with elevated expression of fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1). Moreover, perivascular interstitial fibrosis of pulmonary arteries was significantly increased in the PHD2ECKO mice. Mechanistically, knockout of PHD2 in EC increased the expression of Notch3 and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the lung tissue. We conclude that the expression of PHD2 in endothelial cells plays a critical role in preventing pulmonary arterial remodeling in mice. Increased Notch3/TGF-β signaling and excessive pericyte coverage may be contributing to the development of PAH following deletion of endothelial PHD2. PMID:27613846

  13. Human adipose tissue derived pericytes increase life span in Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice.

    PubMed

    Valadares, M C; Gomes, J P; Castello, G; Assoni, A; Pellati, M; Bueno, C; Corselli, M; Silva, H; Bartolini, P; Vainzof, M; Margarido, P F; Baracat, E; Péault, B; Zatz, M

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is still an untreatable lethal X-linked disorder, which affects 1 in 3500 male births. It is caused by the absence of muscle dystrophin due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. The potential regenerative capacity as well as immune privileged properties of mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has been under investigation for many years in an attempt to treat DMD. One of the questions to be addressed is whether stem cells from distinct sources have comparable clinical effects when injected in murine or canine muscular dystrophy animal models. Many studies comparing different stem cells from various sources were reported but these cells were obtained from different donors and thus with different genetic backgrounds. Here we investigated whether human pericytes obtained from 4 different tissues (muscle, adipose tissue, fallopian tube and endometrium) from the same donor have a similar clinical impact when injected in double mutant Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice, a clinically relevant model for DMD. After a weekly regimen of intraperitoneal injections of 10(6) cells per 8 weeks we evaluated the motor ability as well as the life span of the treated mice as compared to controls. Our experiment showed that only adipose tissue derived pericytes are able to increase significantly (39 days on average) the life span of affected mice. Microarray analysis showed an inhibition of the interferon pathway by adipose derived pericytes. Our results suggest that the clinical benefit associated with intraperitoneal injections of these adult stem cells is related to immune modulation rather than tissue regeneration.

  14. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Dallatomasina, Alice; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Wälchli, Thomas; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Frei, Karl; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG) recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM) components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS, discriminating

  15. Ultrastructural Characterization of Hyperactive Endothelial Cells, Pericytes and Fibroblasts in Hypertrophic and Nodular Port Wine Stain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gao, L; Yin, R; Wang, H; Guo, W; Song, W; Nelson, J S; Tan, W; Wang, G

    2017-02-09

    Port wine stain (PWS) is a congenital vascular malformation of human skin involving the superficial vascular plexus,(1-4) but the molecular pathogenesis of these lesions remains incompletely understood.(5-8) We herein performed a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study to determine the main pathological characteristics and ultrastructure of various cell types, including endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes, fibroblasts and keratinocytes, in hypertrophic and nodular PWS. The study was approved by the Investigational Review Board at the Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, China. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  17. Immunolocalization of platelet‐derived growth factor receptor‐β (PDGFR‐β) and pericytes in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Richard; Oakley, Arthur E.; Ihara, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is identified by aggregates of NOTCH3 extracellular domain (N3ECD) along capillaries and the deposition of granular osmiophilic material (GOM). We assessed the pattern of distribution of pericytes in relation to N3ECD deposits in cerebral microvessels of CADASIL subjects. Methods We assessed post mortem brains from (n = 50) subjects with CADASIL, cerebral small vessel disease, and similar‐age cognitively normal and older controls. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining methods were used to study the distribution and quantify immunoreactivities of the platelet‐derived growth factor receptor‐β (PDGFR‐β) (for pericytes) and microvascular markers in the frontal cortex and white matter. Results PDGFR‐β antibody stained cells typical of pericytes in capillaries and small arterioles in both the grey and white matter. PDGFR‐β reactive pericytes adopted ‘crescent’ morphology wrapped closely around capillary walls readily evident in cross‐sections. We noted considerable overlap between PDGFR‐β and N3ECD imunoreactivities in capillaries. Quantitative analysis of PDGFR‐β immunoreactivity revealed significant differences in PDGFR‐β %A in CADASIL compared with young controls (P < 0.05). PDGFR‐β %A was further positively correlated with the basement membrane marker collagen IV (r = 0.529, P = 0.009), but was not associated with GLUT‐1, the marker for endothelial cells. Conclusions Our results suggest increased expression of PDGFR‐β immunoreactive pericytes in cerebral microvessels in CADASIL compared with similar age controls. While we cannot confirm whether PDGFR‐β‐expressing pericytes produce N3ECD and hence GOM, our findings demonstrate that up‐regulation of pericyte‐like cells is associated with microvascular changes, including loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in CADASIL. PMID:25303037

  18. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H.; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia. PMID:27698742

  19. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  20. Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual ...

  1. Basement membrane reduplication and pericyte degeneration precede development of diabetic polyneuropathy and are associated with its severity.

    PubMed

    Giannini, C; Dyck, P J

    1995-04-01

    In a recent paper, we showed that the number of endoneurial microvessels per square millimeter and the average luminal area and size distribution of these microvessels are not significantly different in sural nerves of patients with diabetes mellitus as compared to control subjects. Mural area, especially the component due to basement membrane reduplication and cellular debris, was unequivocally increased in diabetes mellitus. Because these latter changes are associated with a decrease in periendothelial cell area, we hypothesized that cellular degeneration, especially of pericytes, may account for basement membrane reduplication and increased frequency of cellular debris. In the present study, we showed that endoneurial microvessels undergo a statistically significant increase in basement membrane area, mural area, and frequency of cellular debris in diabetics without polyneuropathy and an even greater increase in diabetics with polyneuropathy. We also found that duration of diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with area occupied by reduplicated basement membrane and cellular debris, but not with mural and periendothelial area. None of the examined measurements was associated with age. Since the microvessel abnormalities we describe are already present before the development of polyneuropathy and increase with severity of polyneuropathy, it is likely that they reflect functional derangements of pericytes and microvessel function which precede and might be implicated in fiber degeneration.

  2. α-synuclein transfer through tunneling nanotubes occurs in SH-SY5Y cells and primary brain pericytes from Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Dieriks, Birger Victor; Park, Thomas I-H.; Fourie, Chantelle; Faull, Richard L. M.; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of inclusions known as Lewy bodies, which mainly consist of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates. There is growing evidence that α-syn self-propagates in non-neuronal cells, thereby contributing to the progression and spread of PD pathology in the brain. Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are long, thin, F-actin-based membranous channels that connect cells and have been proposed to act as conduits for α-syn transfer between cells. SH-SY5Y cells and primary human brain pericytes, derived from postmortem PD brains, frequently form TNTs that allow α-syn transfer and long-distance electrical coupling between cells. Pericytes in situ contain α-syn precipitates like those seen in neurons. Exchange through TNTs was rapid, but dependent on the size of the protein. Proteins were able to spread throughout a network of cells connected by TNTs. Transfer through TNTs was not restricted to α-syn; fluorescent control proteins and labeled membrane were also exchanged through TNTs. Most importantly the formation of TNTs and transfer continued during mitosis. Together, our results provide a detailed description of TNTs in SH-SY5Y cells and human brain PD pericytes, demonstrating their role in α-syn transfer and further emphasize the importance that non-neuronal cells, such as pericytes play in disease progression. PMID:28230073

  3. Mast cell deficiency exacerbates inflammatory bowel symptoms in interleukin-10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanying; Xue, Yansong; Wang, Hui; Huang, Yan; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test the role of mast cells in gut inflammation and colitis using interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice as an experimental model. METHODS: Mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice were crossbred with IL-10-deficient mice to obtain double knockout (DKO) mice. The growth, mucosal damage and colitis status of DKO mice were compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates. RESULTS: DKO mice exhibited exacerbated colitis compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates, as shown by increased pathological score, higher myeloperoxidase content, enhanced Th1 type pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory signaling, elevated oxidative stress, as well as pronounced goblet cell loss. In addition, deficiency in mast cells resulted in enhanced mucosal damage, increased gut permeability, and impaired epithelial tight junctions. Mast cell deficiency was also linked to systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by higher serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ in DKO mice than that in IL-10-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Mast cell deficiency in IL-10-deficient mice resulted in systematic and gut inflammation, impaired gut barrier function, and severer Th1-mediated colitis when compared to mice with only IL-10-deficiency. Inflammation and impaired gut epithelial barrier function likely form a vicious cycle to worsen colitis in the DKO mice. PMID:25083083

  4. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    PubMed

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  5. ABCG2pos lung mesenchymal stem cells are a novel pericyte subpopulation that contributes to fibrotic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin S; Gaskill, Christa; Menon, Swapna; Carrier, Erica J; Williams, Janice; Talati, Megha; Helm, Karen; Alford, Catherine E; Kropski, Jonathan A; Loyd, James; Wheeler, Lisa; Johnson, Joyce; Austin, Eric; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Meyrick, Barbara; West, James D; Klemm, Dwight J; Majka, Susan M

    2014-10-15

    Genesis of myofibroblasts is obligatory for the development of pathology in many adult lung diseases. Adult lung tissue contains a population of perivascular ABCG2(pos) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that are precursors of myofibroblasts and distinct from NG2 pericytes. We hypothesized that these MSC participate in deleterious remodeling associated with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and associated hypertension (PH). To test this hypothesis, resident lung MSC were quantified in lung samples from control subjects and PF patients. ABCG2(pos) cell numbers were decreased in human PF and interstitial lung disease compared with control samples. Genetic labeling of lung MSC in mice enabled determination of terminal lineage and localization of ABCG2 cells following intratracheal administration of bleomycin to elicit fibrotic lung injury. Fourteen days following bleomycin injury enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled lung MSC-derived cells were increased in number and localized to interstitial areas of fibrotic and microvessel remodeling. Finally, gene expression analysis was evaluated to define the response of MSC to bleomycin injury in vivo using ABCG2(pos) MSC isolated during the inflammatory phase postinjury and in vitro bleomycin or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated cells. MSC responded to bleomycin treatment in vivo with a profibrotic gene program that was not recapitulated in vitro with bleomycin treatment. However, TGF-β1 treatment induced the appearance of a profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype in vitro. Additionally, when exposed to the profibrotic stimulus, TGF-β1, ABCG2, and NG2 pericytes demonstrated distinct responses. Our data highlight ABCG2(pos) lung MSC as a novel cell population that contributes to detrimental myofibroblast-mediated remodeling during PF.

  6. [The pericytes, endothelium monolayer, collagen and elastin chains as the elements of areolar tissue and the substrates of chemical reaction of glyserization].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Shiriaeva, Iu K

    2011-07-01

    The microangiopathy under hyperglycemia and diabetes develops only in the microcirculation component of circulatory system. In this area considerable amount of pericytes is concentrated. These cells contain myofibrils and in circulatory mode envelop capillaries being situated on the outside of basilemma. It is possible that in a phylogenetic sense this is the earliest functional unity of endothelium monolayer as a pacemaker and pericytes as contractile elements which are the earliest "propeller" because of implementing the function of advancement of lymph, hemolymph and blood in capillaries. Probably, endothelium and pericytes formed the first variation of peristaltic "pump" for the purpose of blood advancement longwise of capillaries. Most probably, the state of distal part of arterial race (muscular type arterioles) impact the parameters of proximal part of arterial race (elastic type arterioles) and myocardium itself in the same extent as the state of "pump" in capillaries, endothelium and pericytes function impact the function of local peristaltic pumps (muscular type arterioles) in paracrine cenosis. It is supposed that the pericytes are the regulators of physical, hydraulic factor of activation of biologic reaction of transcitosis--excretion of nutrients and humoral mediators from capillaries to the pool of intercellular medium to perform the biologic function of homeostasis. Hyperglycemia, glycotoxins formation, bivalent substances (glyoxal, methilglyoxal, malonic dialdehyde) reacting simultaneously by both ends of molecule result in formation within collagen of areolar tissue of short transversal cross-links (glycosylation end product) which significantly increase rigidity (hardness) of capillary wall. In these conditions, myofibrils of pericytes no longer form directed deformation of capillary wall to effect peristalsis and advancement of hemolymph (blood later on) along capillaries according the synthesis of monolayer endothelium NO as a dilatation factor

  7. High glucose-induced mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species in mouse cerebral pericytes is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases: Implications for cerebral microvascular disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gul N; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A; Price, Tulin O

    2013-10-18

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration.

  8. Augmented endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3-deficiency contributes to the progression of cerebral cavernous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenwen; Ji, Weidong; He, Yun; Liang, Xiaoling; Wang, Zongren; Yuan, Qianying; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Toomre, Derek; Fuh, Germaine; Yan, Minghong; Kluger, Martin S.; Wu, Dianqing; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCM arises from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 (PDCD10). CCM3 mutations in human often result in a more severe form of the disease, and CCM3 knockout mice show severe phenotypes with yet-to-be defined mechanisms. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates UNC13 family-mediated exocytosis. Here we investigate endothelial cells (EC) exocytosis in CCM disease progression. We find that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B/VAMP3-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 ablation in EC augments exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, correlating with destabilized EC junctions, enlarged lumen formation, and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociations. UNC13B deficiency that blunts ANGPT2 secretion from EC or an ANGPT2 neutralization antibody normalizes the defects caused by CCM3 deficiency. More importantly, ANGPT2 neutralization antibody treatment or UNC13B deficiency blunts the CCM lesion phenotypes, including disruption of EC junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation, in the brains and retinas caused by endothelial cell-specific CCM3 inactivation. Our study reveals that enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of the CCM disease, providing a novel therapeutic approach to treat this devastating pathology. PMID:27548575

  9. Genes involved in pericyte-driven tumor maturation predict treatment benefit of first-line FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Volz, N B; Stintzing, S; Zhang, W; Yang, D; Ning, Y; Wakatsuki, T; El-Khoueiry, R E; Li, J E; Kardosh, A; Loupakis, F; Cremolini, C; Falcone, A; Scherer, S J; Lenz, H-J

    2015-02-01

    Pericytes are crucial for angiogenesis. The impact of pericyte function to bevacizumab efficacy in mCRC treatment has not been comprehensively examined. This retrospective study investigated germline polymorphisms in genes related to early pericyte maturation to predict bevacizumab efficacy in 424 patients of two clinical trials treated first line with FOLFIRI+bevacizumab. Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for potential biomarker value: RGS5 (regulator of G-protein signaling 5; rs1056515, rs2661280), PDGFR-β (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β; rs2229562, rs2302273), CSPG4 (chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan NG2; rs8023621, rs1127648) and RALBP1 (RalA binding protein 1; rs10989, rs329007). For progression-free survival (PFS), PDGFR-β (rs2302273) was able to define significantly different patient cohorts in uni- and multivariate testing. RALPB1 (rs329007) showed predictive value for tumor response. The C allele in RGS5 (rs2661280) predicted longer overall survival and CSPG4 rs1127648 was associated with differences in PFS, but for both value was lost when multivariate analysis was applied. A comprehensive statistical analysis revealed that the biomarker value of the SNPs was dependent on primary tumor location. This is the first study to identify pericyte germline polymorphisms associated with clinical outcome in mCRC patients treated first line with FOLFIRI+bevacizumab. The differences seen with regard to primary tumor location may lead to further research to understand the clinical outcome differences seen in right- and left-sided colon cancer.

  10. Involvement of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Amyloid-β 1–42–Induced Shedding of the Pericyte Proteoglycan NG2

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Nina; Nielsen, Henrietta M.; Minthon, Lennart; Wennström, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) 1–42, the major component of senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer disease, affects brain microvascular integrity and causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased angiogenesis, and pericyte degeneration. To understand the cellular events underlying Aβ1–42 effects on microvascular alterations, we investigated whether different aggregation forms of Aβ1–42 affect shedding of the pericyte proteoglycan NG2 and whether they affect proteolytic cleavage mediated by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. We found decreased levels of soluble NG2, total MMP-9, and MMP-9 activity in pericyte culture supernatants in response to fibril-enriched preparations of Aβ1–42. Conversely, oligomer-enriched preparations of Aβ1–42 increased soluble NG2 levels in the supernatants. This increase was ablated by the MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor SB-3CT. There was also a trend toward increased MMP-9 activity observed after oligomeric Aβ1–42 exposure. Our results, demonstrating an Aβ1–42 aggregation-dependent effect on levels of NG2 and MMP-9, support previous studies showing an impact of Aβ1–42 on vascular integrity and thereby add to our understanding of mechanisms behind the microvascular changes commonly found in patients with Alzheimer disease. PMID:24918635

  11. Differing associations between Aβ accumulation, hypoperfusion, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and loss of PDGFRB pericyte marker in the precuneus and parietal white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Miners, J Scott; Schulz, Isabel; Love, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies implicate loss of pericytes in hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we have measured levels of the pericyte marker, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRB), and fibrinogen (to assess blood-brain barrier leakage), and analyzed their relationship to indicators of microvessel density (von Willebrand factor level), ante-mortem oxygenation (myelin-associated glycoprotein:proteolipid protein-1 ratio and vascular endothelial growth factor level), Aβ level and plaque load, in precuneus and underlying white matter from 49 AD to 37 control brains. There was reduction in PDGFRB and increased fibrinogen in the precuneus in AD. These changes correlated with reduction in oxygenation and with plaque load. In the underlying white matter, increased fibrinogen correlated with reduced oxygenation, but PDGFRB level was unchanged. The level of platelet-derived growth factor-ββ (PDGF-BB), important for pericyte maintenance, was increased in AD but mainly in the insoluble tissue fraction, correlating with insoluble Aβ level. Loss of the PDGFRB within the precuneus in AD is associated with fibrinogen leakage and reduced oxygenation, and related to fibrillar Aβ accumulation. In contrast, fibrinogen leakage and reduced oxygenation of underlying white matter occur independently of loss of PDGFRB, perhaps secondary to reduced transcortical perfusion.

  12. Brain vascular pericytes following ischemia have multipotential stem cell activity to differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Kubo, Shuji; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Lu, Shan; Narita, Aya; Kawahara, Maiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2015-06-01

    Brain vascular pericytes (PCs) are a key component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit, along with neural and endothelial cells. Besides their crucial role in maintaining the BBB, increasing evidence shows that PCs have multipotential stem cell activity. However, their multipotency has not been considered in the pathological brain, such as after an ischemic stroke. Here, we examined whether brain vascular PCs following ischemia (iPCs) have multipotential stem cell activity and differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells to reconstruct the BBB/neurovascular unit. Using PCs extracted from ischemic regions (iPCs) from mouse brains and human brain PCs cultured under oxygen/glucose deprivation, we show that PCs developed stemness presumably through reprogramming. The iPCs revealed a complex phenotype of angioblasts, in addition to their original mesenchymal properties, and multidifferentiated into cells from both a neural and vascular lineage. These data indicate that under ischemic/hypoxic conditions, PCs can acquire multipotential stem cell activity and can differentiate into major components of the BBB/neurovascular unit. Thus, these findings support the novel concept that iPCs can contribute to both neurogenesis and vasculogenesis at the site of brain injuries.

  13. Stromal progenitor cells from endogenous adipose tissue contribute to pericytes and adipocytes that populate the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Daquinag, Alexes C; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Sirin, Olga; Tseng, Chieh; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiologic studies associate cancer with obesity, but the pathophysiologic connections remain obscure. In this study, we show that obesity facilitates tumor growth in mice irrespective of concurrent diet, suggesting a direct effect of excess white adipose tissue (WAT). When transplanted into mice, adipose stromal cells (ASC) can serve as perivascular adipocyte progenitors that promote tumor growth, perhaps helping explain the obesity-cancer link. In developing this hypothesis, we showed that ASCs are expanded in obesity and that they traffic from endogenous WAT to tumors in several mouse models of cancer. Strikingly, a comparison of circulating and tumor-infiltrating cell populations in lean, and obese mice revealed that cancer induces a six-fold increase of ASC frequency in the systemic circulation. We obtained evidence that ASCs mobilized in this way can be recruited into tumors, where they can be incorporated into blood vessels as pericytes and they can differentiate into adipocytes in an obesity-dependent manner. Extending this evidence, we found that increased tumor vascularization (reflected by changes in tumor vascular morphology and a two-fold increase in vascular density) was associated with intratumoral adipocytes and elevated proliferation of neighboring malignant cells. Taken together, our results suggest that ASCs recruited from endogenous adipose tissue can be recruited by tumors to potentiate the supportive properties of the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celkan, Tiraje

    2017-01-01

    Plasminogen plays an important role in fibrinolysis as well as wound healing, cell migration, tissue modeling and angiogenesis. Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that leads to the development of thick, wood-like pseudomembranes on mucosal surfaces, mostly seen in conjunctivas named as ''ligneous conjunctivitis''. Local conjunctival use of fresh frozen plazma (FFP) in combination with other eye medications such as cyclosporin and artificial tear drops may relieve the symptoms. Topical treatment with plasminogen eye drops is the most promising treatment that is not yet available in Turkey.

  15. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  16. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  17. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  18. Taste - impaired

    MedlinePlus

    ... longer. Causes of impaired taste include: Bell's palsy Common cold Flu and other viral infections Nasal infection, nasal ... your diet. For taste problems due to the common cold or flu, normal taste should return when the ...

  19. Changes in integrity of the gill during histidine deficiency or excess due to depression of cellular anti-oxidative ability, induction of apoptosis, inflammation and impair of cell-cell tight junctions related to Nrf2, TOR and NF-κB signaling in fish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Feng, Lin; Qu, Biao; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    This study firstly explored the possible effects of dietary histidine on structural integrity and the related signaling factor gene expression in the gills of fish. Young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed with six diets containing gradual levels of histidine for 8 weeks. The results firstly demonstrated that histidine deficiency caused increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, and severe oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) in the gills of fish, which was partially due to the decreased glutathione (GSH) content and antioxidant enzyme activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR)]. Further investigations indicated that histidine deficiency caused depressions of those antioxidant enzyme activities are related to the down-regulation of corresponding antioxidant enzyme genes and the related signaling factor Nrf2 mRNA levels. Meanwhile, histidine deficiency induced DNA fragmentation via up-regulation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 expressions that referring to the down-regulation of TOR and S6K mRNA levels. Furthermore, His deficiency down-regulated claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-3, claudin-12, claudin-15, occludin and ZO-1 transcription in fish gills. These effects were partially related to the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and related signaling factor nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) mRNA levels, and the down-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and related signaling factor IκBα mRNA levels. Excessive histidine exhibited negative effects that were similar to histidine deficiency, whereas the optimal histidine levels reversed those negative effects. Taken together, our results showed that histidine deficiency or excess impaired the structural

  20. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P < 0.05). In addition, valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05), down-regulated mRNA levels of interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β1, IκBα and target of rapamycin (TOR) (P < 0.05), and up-regulated tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8 and nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P < 0.05), and improved Claudin 15 expression in the fish intestine (P < 0.05). However, valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively.

  1. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied.

  2. Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhang, Haifeng; Tang, Wenwen; Ji, Weidong; He, Yun; Liang, Xiaoling; Wang, Zongren; Yuan, Qianying; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Toomre, Derek; Fuh, Germaine; Yan, Minghong; Kluger, Martin S; Wu, Dianqing; Min, Wang

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins. Here, in investigating the role of endothelial cell exocytosis in CCM disease progression, we found that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B- and vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3)-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 deficiency in endothelial cells augments the exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, which is associated with destabilized endothelial cell junctions, enlarged lumen formation and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociation. UNC13B deficiency, which blunts ANGPT2 secretion from endothelial cells, or treatment with an ANGPT2-neutralizing antibody normalizes the defects in the brain and retina caused by endothelial-cell-specific CCM3 deficiency, including the disruption of endothelial cell junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation. Thus, enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of CCM disease, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating this devastating pathology.

  3. A new nonenzymatic method and device to obtain a fat tissue derivative highly enriched in pericyte-like elements by mild mechanical forces from human lipoaspirates.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Francesca; Maioli, Margherita; Leonardi, Erika; Olivi, Elena; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Valente, Sabrina; Mendez, Armando J; Ricordi, Camillo; Raffaini, Mirco; Tremolada, Carlo; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue contains multipotent elements with phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and pericytes. The chance of clinical translation of the multilineage potential of these cells is delayed by the poor/negligible cell survival within cryopreserved lipoaspirates, the difficulty of ex vivo expansion, and the complexity of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) requirements for expanded cells. Hence, availability of a minimally manipulated, autologous, hMSC/pericyte-enriched fat product would have remarkable biomedical and clinical relevance. Here, we present an innovative system, named Lipogems, providing a nonexpanded, ready-to-use fat product. The system uses mild mechanical forces in a completely closed system, avoiding enzymes, additives, and other manipulations. Differently from unprocessed lipoaspirate, the nonexpanded Lipogems product encompasses a remarkably preserved vascular stroma with slit-like capillaries wedged between adipocytes and stromal stalks containing vascular channels with evident lumina. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Lipogems stromal vascular tissue included abundant cells with pericyte/hMSC identity. Flow cytometry analysis of nonexpanded, collagenase-treated Lipogems product showed that it was comprised with a significantly higher percentage of mature pericytes and hMSCs, and lower amount of hematopoietic elements, than enzymatically digested lipoaspirates. Differently from the lipoaspirate, the distinctive traits of freshly isolated Lipogems product were not altered by cryopreservation. Noteworthy, the features of fresh product were retained in the Lipogems product obtained from human cadavers, paving the way to an off-the-shelf strategy for reconstructive procedures and regenerative medicine. When placed in tissue culture medium, the Lipogems product yielded a highly homogeneous adipose tissue-derived hMSC population, exhibiting features of hMSCs isolated from other sources

  4. Physical Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trewin, Shari

    Many health conditions can lead to physical impairments that impact computer and Web access. Musculoskeletal conditions such as arthritis and cumulative trauma disorders can make movement stiff and painful. Movement disorders such as tremor, Parkinsonism and dystonia affect the ability to control movement, or to prevent unwanted movements. Often, the same underlying health condition also has sensory or cognitive effects. People with dexterity impairments may use a standard keyboard and mouse, or any of a wide range of alternative input mechanisms. Examples are given of the diverse ways that specific dexterity impairments and input mechanisms affect the fundamental actions of Web browsing. As the Web becomes increasingly sophisticated, and physically demanding, new access features at the Web browser and page level will be necessary.

  5. Squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma and Burkitt's lymphoma are consequences of impaired immune surveillance of ubiquitous viruses in acquired immune deficiency syndrome, allograft recipients and tropical African patients.

    PubMed

    Purtilo, D T; Manolov, G; Manolova, Y; Harada, S; Lipscomb, H

    1984-01-01

    The immune system has evolved under Darwinian pressures as a defence against ubiquitous viruses. Immune surveillance against viral antigens protects the normal host. Individuals with inherited or acquired immune-deficiency disorders can become vulnerable to ubiquitous viruses and neoplasms can ensue, such as B-cell lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, and carcinoma of the penis and uterine cervix. Immunodeficiency permits Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus, papillomavirus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus to induce sustained target-cell proliferation. Each virus selects specific cellular targets bearing viral receptors and the infection leads to proliferation of the target cells rather than lysis. Various co-factors, including nutrition, exposure to tumour-promoting agents, parasitic infection, and ultraviolet light, may promote carcinogenesis. Depending on the type and severity of the immune deficiency, gradual proliferation may lead to evolution of a malignant clone. Conversion of polyclonal virally infected proliferating cells to give monoclonal malignancy is probably due to specific cytogenetic rearrangements which allow oncogene activation and endow an altered tumour cell with selective growth advantages over normal diploid cells. Prevention of viral oncogenesis may be possible by treatment of immune-deficient individuals with premalignant disorders. Immunotherapy and antiviral therapy may prevent progression of viral-induced proliferation to malignancy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of immune deficiency and viruses in the induction of malignancies commonly occurring in Africans residing in sub-Saharan Africa (Purtilo, 1976). The types of malignancies commonly occurring in this region are believed to be due to ubiquitous viruses. A failure of immune surveillance mechanisms to recognize viral antigens and abrogate proliferation of infected target cells predisposes to

  6. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red blood ... normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin ...

  7. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT deficiency, is a condition that raises your risk ... and other diseases. Some people who have severe AAT deficiency develop emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma)—often ...

  8. All Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is defined as the ... Ethnicity 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Vision Impairment by Age and Race/Ethnicity Table for ...

  9. Gabrb3 gene deficient mice exhibit impaired social and exploratory behaviors, deficits in non-selective attention and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermal lobules: a potential model of autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    DeLorey, Timothy M.; Sahbaie, Peyman; Hashemi, Ezzat; Homanics, Gregg E.; Clark, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Objective GABAA receptors play an important regulatory role in the developmental events leading to the formation of complex neuronal networks and to the behaviors they govern. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether gabrb3 gene deficient (gabrb3-/-) mice exhibit abnormal social behavior, a core deficit associated with autism spectrum disorder. Methods Social and exploratory behaviors along with non-selective attention were assessed in gabrb3-/-, littermates (gabrb3+/+) and progenitor strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ. In addition, semi-quantitative assessments of the size of cerebellar vermal lobules were performed on gabrb3+/+ and gabrb3-/- mice. Results Relative to controls, gabrb3-/- mice exhibited significant deficits in activities related to social behavior including sociability, social novelty and nesting. In addition, gabrb3-/- mice also exhibited differences in exploratory behavior compared to controls, as well as reductions in the frequency and duration of rearing episodes, suggested as being an index of non-selective attention. Gabrb3-/- mice also displayed significant hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis compared to gabrb3+/+ mice. Conclusions The observed behavioral deficits, especially regarding social behaviors, strengthens the face validity of the gabrb3 gene deficient mouse as being a model of autism spectrum disorder. PMID:17983671

  10. Iodine Deficiency in Australia: Be Alarmed. Opinions & Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Aidan; Beange, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Iodine deficiency, the leading preventable cause of intellectual impairment in the world (World Health Organization, 1999), has reappeared in Australia. Recently, we identified the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in Sydney (Gunton, Hams, Fiegert & McElduff, 1999). This has been confirmed locally (Li, Ma, Boyages & Eastman, 2001) and…

  11. Chronic zinc deficiency alters chick gut microbiota composition and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under co...

  12. In situ hybridization reveals that type I and III collagens are produced by pericytes in the anterior pituitary gland of rats.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ken; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Type I and III collagens widely occur in the rat anterior pituitary gland and are the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although ECM components possibly play an important role in the function of the anterior pituitary gland, little is known about collagen-producing cells. Type I collagen is a heterotrimer of two α1(I) chains (the product of the col1a1 gene) and one α2(I) chain (the product of the col1a2 gene). Type III collagen is a homotrimer of α1(III) chains (the product of the col3a1 gene). We used in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes to examine the expression of col1a1, col1a2, and col3a1 mRNAs in the pituitary gland of adult rats. mRNA expression for these collagen genes was clearly observed, and cells expressing col1a1, col1a2, and col3a1 mRNA were located around capillaries in the gland. We also investigated the possible double-staining of collagen mRNA and pituitary hormones, S-100 protein (a marker of folliculo-stellate cells), or desmin (a marker of pericytes). Col1a1 and col3a1 mRNA were identified in desmin-immunopositive cells. Thus, only pericytes produce type I and III collagens in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

  13. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  14. Iodine deficiency disorders in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, F.; Bürgi, H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data on iodine excretion in the urine of adults, adolescents and newborns and on the iodine content of breast milk indicate a high prevalence of iodine deficiency (moderate in many cases and severe in a few) in many European countries. These cases may manifest as subclinical hypothyroidism in neonates and as goitre in adolescents and adults. Lack of iodine causes not only goitre, but also mental deficiency, hearing loss and other neurological impairments, and short stature due to thyroid insufficiency during fetal development and childhood. Although iodinated salt is available theoretically in most countries where it is needed, its quality and share of the market are often unsatisfactory. In many countries where only household salt is iodinated the iodine content has been set too low owing to an overestimation of household salt consumption. Governments are therefore urged to pass legislation and provide means for efficient iodination of salt wherever this is necessary. PMID:2670299

  15. Functional Significance of Iron Deficiency. Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Iron deficiency anemia impairs cognitive performance, physical capacity, and thermoregulation. Recent evidence suggests that these functional impairments are also evident in subclinical nonanemic iron deficiency. Very little is known about the relevance of the latter to the health of blacks, who have been shown to have the highest prevalence of…

  16. Impaired mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in C5-deficient mice supports the pivotal involvement of innate immunity in this process and reveals novel promobilization effects of granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, H M; Wu, W; Wysoczynski, M; Liu, R; Zuba-Surma, E K; Kucia, M; Ratajczak, J; Ratajczak, M Z

    2009-11-01

    We reported that complement cascade (CC) becomes activated in bone marrow (BM) during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and showed that, although third CC component (C3)-deficient mice are easy mobilizers, fifth CC component (C5)-deficient mice mobilize very poorly. To explain this, we postulated that activation/cleavage of CC releases C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins that differently regulate mobilization. Accordingly, C3a, by enhancing responsiveness of HSPCs to decreasing concentrations of stromal-derived growth factor-1 (SDF-1) in BM, prevents mobilization and promotes their BM retention. Therefore, in this study, we focused on the mobilization-enhancing role of C5a. We found that C5a receptor (C5aR) is not expressed on the surface of HSPCs, and that C5a-mediated promobilization effects are mediated by stimulation of granulocytes. Overall, our data support the following model. First C5aR(+) granulocytes are chemoattracted by plasma C5 cleavage fragments, being the first wave of cells leaving BM. This facilitates a subsequent egress of HSPCs. In the next step, after leaving BM, granulocytes undergo degranulation in response to plasma C5a and secrete some cationic peptides (cathelicidin, beta-defensin) that, as shown here for the first time, highly enhance the responsiveness of HSPCs to plasma SDF-1 gradient. In conclusion, our data reveal the underappreciated central role of innate immunity in mobilization, in which C5 cleavage fragments through granulocytes orchestrate this process.

  17. cis-4-Decenoic and decanoic acids impair mitochondrial energy, redox and Ca(2+) homeostasis and induce mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in rat brain and liver: Possible implications for the pathogenesis of MCAD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of octanoic (OA), decanoic (DA) and cis-4-decenoic (cDA) acids, as well as by their carnitine by-products. Untreated patients present episodic encephalopathic crises and biochemical liver alterations, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. We investigated the effects of OA, DA, cDA, octanoylcarnitine (OC) and decanoylcarnitine (DC) on critical mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver. DA and cDA increased resting respiration and diminished ADP- and CCCP-stimulated respiration and complexes II-III and IV activities in both tissues. The data indicate that these compounds behave as uncouplers and metabolic inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Noteworthy, metabolic inhibition was more evident in brain as compared to liver. DA and cDA also markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, NAD(P)H content and Ca(2+) retention capacity in Ca(2+)-loaded brain and liver mitochondria. The reduction of Ca(2+) retention capacity was more pronounced in liver and totally prevented by cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, demonstrating the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and Ca(2+). Furthermore, cDA induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver mitochondria and increased hydrogen peroxide formation in brain, suggesting the participation of oxidative damage in cDA-induced alterations. Interestingly, OA, OC and DC did not alter the evaluated parameters, implying lower toxicity for these compounds. Our results suggest that DA and cDA, in contrast to OA and medium-chain acylcarnitines, disturb important mitochondrial functions in brain and liver by multiple mechanisms that are possibly involved in the neuropathology and liver alterations observed in MCAD deficiency.

  18. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  19. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme wa