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Sample records for deficiency syndrome aids

  1. DNA image cytometry in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Auffermann, W; Krueger, G R; Böcking, A

    1986-03-01

    In nine cases with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), including four stage I cases, three stage II cases and two stage III cases, DNA image cytometry was performed on Feulgen-stained lymph node imprint smears. Diploidy was found in three cases, tetraploidy in three cases and octoploidy in two cases. Aneuploid DNA distribution patterns were not seen. The lymphoid cells showed an enormously increased proliferation rate. Two cases in stage I revealed characteristic intranuclear DNA inclusions in lymphoid cells. These results indicate that DNA image cytometry may be useful as an adjunct to surgical pathology in certain cases to assist in the differential diagnosis between AIDS and benign conditions of the lymphoid system as well as between AIDS and malignant lymphomas, which usually have aneuploid DNA patterns.

  2. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HIV. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena. Health Education Bureau.

    This volume consists of updated information to be inserted into a Montana AIDS Project manual on providing services to persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS/HIV), originally published in December 1985. The updates are mainly statistics and terminology, along with the addition of several new sections.…

  3. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HTLV-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.

    This manual presents information about the disease, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and guidelines for service delivery to Montana residents who have been diagnosed with AIDS or related disorders. The first section describes the disease's causes, symptoms, and transmission; risk factors; high-risk populations; prevention suggestions;…

  4. Teaching AIDS. A Resource Guide on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Sargent, Pamela

    The first edition of this resource guide for educators on how to teach students about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was published in 1986. Since then, basic facts about the transmission and prevention of the AIDS virus have not changed substantially. The terminologies about the disease, however, have changed and the changing…

  5. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS: A Selected Bibliography of Federal Government Publications. Research Guide 90 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Margaret

    This research guide presents a selected bibliography of federal government publications about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These documents are listed in five categories: (1) Bibliographies (7); (2) Congressional Publications (69 hearings and reports); (3) Executive Branch Publications (43 reports); (4) Federal Government…

  6. Semantic Differential Responses to Educational Posters on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Christopher; Stewin, Leonard L.

    1992-01-01

    Undergraduate students (n=131) responded to eight educational posters dealing with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) using a nine-item semantic differential scale. Two posters were consistently rated as more informative, reassuring, effective, decent, and better than the others. The first utilized an objective and informative…

  7. An ongoing tragedy: the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Desai, B T

    1989-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has, to date, had only a minimal impact in India; however, given the low health status of the population and the lack of adequate health care facilities, the emergence of AIDS on a wider scale would be devastating. India's human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity rate now stands at about 2-3/1000 people tested. In what is suspected to be a racially motivated move, the Government of India has embarked on testing all foreign students (most of whom are from Africa) for HIV and is returning all those who test seropositive to their countries of origin. Of concern is the steady increase in HIV infection in professional blood donors (1.5/1000 in late 1988). Mandatory screening of donated blood is prohibitively expensive in India, and none of the 9 companies that manufacture blood products in India test their donors for HIV infection. Another concern is the finding that 1 of every 6 prostitutes in Bombay is infected with HIV. The response of the Indian Government to the AIDS threat has tended to be punitive toward AIDS victims rather than based on a sound preventive strategy. For example, the 1989 AIDS Prevention Bill forces individuals who are infected with HIV to reveal their past sexual partners, empowers authorities to hospitalize AIDS victims and drug addicts, and contains no provisions to protect the human and civil rights of AIDS victims. The mass media have treated AIDS in a sensationalized manner rather than presenting scientific information about the prevention and transmission of the disease. It is essential that the Government of India--and all world governments--realize that punitive measures will do little to reduce the spread of AIDS. Needed, instead, is a global prevention and control effort based on generosity and compassion.

  8. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  9. Gallium scans of the thorax in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS): Description and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Le, G.; Chen, D.C.P.; Siegel, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of distribution of gallium uptake in the thorax was investigated in patients (pts) with AIDS. Eleven pts (ages 18-53), all active homosexual males suspected of having acute pulmonary infection were studied. Ga lung scans were performed at 24-48 and/or 72 hrs. post injection. The diagnosis of AIDS was based on appropriate clinical and laboratory findings. The Ga activity in the lung was graded from zero = background to 4+ which is > liver activity. Eight of eleven pts have positive Ga scan while seven of eleven pts had positive CXR. Six pts had both positive CXR and Ga scan. One pt had a positive Ga scan with negative CXR, and one with positive CXR and negative Ga scan. The positive Ga scans included 3 pts with 4+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 2+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 1+ diffuse uptake, and two with hilar node uptake. Three pts have focal increased uptake superimposed on diffuse uptake. Two pts with 4+ diffuse uptake had mild abnormality on their CXR. One pt with 4+ uptake in the initial scan shows decreased activity on follow-up with clinical improvement after therapy. Thus, all but two pts with positive Ga scans had diffuse lung uptake. These two patients alone had B cell immunoblastic sarcoma and oral candidiasis. The pattern of Ga lung uptake in pts with AIDS reveal that a majority of positive scans are diffuse (6/8) and the intensity may suggest more active disease than CXR (2 normal) and, thus, the study may be useful in detecting changes from atypical pulmonary infection in this population.

  10. Induction of antibody to asialo GM1 by spermatozoa and its occurrence in the sera of homosexual men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Sonnabend, J; Richards, J M; Purtilo, D T

    1983-01-01

    Compared to healthy homosexual and heterosexual men, homosexual men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) possessed significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to the neutral glycolipid asialo GM1 (ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide) (P less than 0.01). Of 31 homosexuals with AIDS, 36% possessed levels of this antibody that were at least two standard deviations above the mean of the healthy men. Furthermore, asialo GM1 antibody could be removed from serum by adsorption with spermatozoa. Weekly rectal insemination of male rabbits with rabbit semen also led to the appearance of antibody to asialo GM1 by 15 weeks. These results suggest that asialo GM1 is a component of ejaculated spermatozoa and demonstrate that rectal insemination by itself can lead to the production of antibodies to this glycolipid in the rabbit. In addition, asialo GM1 antibodies may be of value as a serological marker for the early detection of individuals with AIDS. PMID:6652964

  11. A Case of Mycobacterium riyadhense in an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Patient with a Suspected Paradoxical Response to Antituberculosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Samar Assem

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old male patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) presented with clinical picture suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was commenced on antituberculosis therapy (ATT) with signs of improvement. Then he developed cervical lymph node abscess which was drained. Steroid was started for presumed paradoxical response to ATT which results in clinical regression. The culture result revealed Mycobacterium riyadhense. This report addresses the rarity of this bacteria in medical literature. It reviews clinical presentations and medical treatment particularly in the setting of coinfections. PMID:27703819

  12. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Veterans' Administration. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Hospitals and Health Care of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the role of the Veterans' Administration (VA) in combating AIDS. Opening statements are included from Representatives G. V. Montgomery, J. Roy Rowland, Joseph P. Kennedy, II,…

  13. AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987. Hearings on S. 1575: To Amend the Public Health Service Act To Establish a Grant Program To Provide for Counseling and Testing Services Relating to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and To Establish Certain Prohibitions for the Purpose of Protecting Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or Related Conditions. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document presents the text from two Senate hearings on the AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987 which concerns voluntary testing for AIDS virus, education and counseling to stop the spread of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), and confidentiality and discrimination against AIDS victims. In the first hearing, opening statements are…

  14. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  15. Expression of Ley antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human T cell lines and in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Ley determinant (Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta 1----4[Fuc alpha 1---- 3]GlcNAc beta 1----R) defined by mAb BM-1 is highly expressed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell lines and in CD3+ peripheral mature T cells of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS-related complex (ARC). Ley expression increased greatly in the CD3+ population in the advanced stage of AIDS when the CD4+ population decreased greatly. Six other carbohydrate antigens tested by their respective mAbs were not detected in these same cells. None of the carbohydrate antigens tested by the seven mAbs used in this study were found in noninfected T cell lines and in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:3258005

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Content in Introduction to Exceptionalities Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulk, David; Gessner, Linda J.; Koorland, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined textbooks used in introductory courses for teachers preparing to work with students with disabilities, determining the extent of HIV/AIDS content in five categories (e.g., individualized education plans and program planning, prevention and transmission of HIV/AIDS, drug abuse prevention, and prevalence and background information about…

  17. Sensationalism or sensitivity: use of words in stories on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) by Associated Press Videotext.

    PubMed

    Drushel, B E

    1991-01-01

    Although it appeared initially reluctant to cover the story at all, the mainstream press in the United States has supplied almost daily reports on AIDS since the mid-1980s. The author examined four weeks of stories on the Associated Press Videotext service in early 1986 in an effort to evaluate the validity of critics' charges that journalists were over-emphasizing the role of homosexuals in the progress of the disease, and that their stories were laden with negative or sensationalistic terms. The author found little evidence from the words used in the stories of distortion in telling the AIDS story, but speculated that such distortion might be found in selection, editing, and presentation decisions made by gatekeepers. PMID:1856471

  18. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6540476

  19. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  20. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  1. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. PMID:26433309

  2. Monocyte function in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Defective chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P D; Ohura, K; Masur, H; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S; Wahl, S M

    1984-01-01

    The ineffective immune response in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) contributes to severe and widespread infections and unrestricted growth by certain tumors. To determine whether monocyte dysfunction contributes to this immunosuppressed condition, we investigated monocyte chemotaxis in patients with AIDS. Using three different chemotactic stimuli, N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine, lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor, and C5a des Arg, we studied the chemotactic responses of monocytes from seven homosexual men with AIDS, three homosexuals with lymphadenopathy and an abnormal immunological profile, seven healthy homosexual men, and 23 heterosexual control individuals. Monocytes from each of the AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and/or opportunistic infection exhibited a marked reduction in chemotaxis to all stimuli compared with the healthy control subjects. The reduced chemotactic responses were observed over a wide range of concentrations for each stimulus. Monocytes from AIDS patients who had clinically apparent opportunistic infection(s) exhibited a greater reduction in monocyte migration to all three stimuli than monocytes from the AIDS patient with only Kaposi's sarcoma. Monocytes from each of three homosexuals with lymphadenopathy and an abnormal immunological profile exhibited decreased chemotactic responses that were intermediate between those of the AIDS patients and the healthy heterosexual control subjects. In contrast to these findings, monocytes from each of seven healthy homosexuals exhibited normal chemotactic responses to the same stimuli. In addition, monocytes from AIDS patients exhibited reduced chemotaxis to soluble products of Giardia lamblia, one of several protozoan parasites prevalent in AIDS patients. Thus the immune abnormality in AIDS, previously thought to involve only the T-, B-, and natural killer lymphocytes, extends to the monocyte-macrophage. Defective monocyte migratory function may contribute to

  3. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  4. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ashley G.; Zhao, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of androgen deficiency in MetS is multifactorial, and consists of inflammatory, enzymatic, and endocrine derangements. Many options for the concomitant treatment of both disorders exist. Direct treatment of MetS, whether by diet, exercise, or surgery, may improve T levels. Conversely, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to improve MetS parameters in multiple randomized controlled trials (RTCs). PMID:26816752

  5. Immune impairments and antibodies to HTLVIII/LAV in asymptomatic male homosexuals in Israel: relevance to the risk of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Bentwich, Z; Saxinger, C; Ben-Ishay, Z; Burstein, R; Berner, Y; Pecht, M; Trainin, N; Levin, S; Handzel, Z T

    1987-09-01

    We have studied 288 Israeli asymptomatic male homosexuals (MHS) to determine the prevalence of antibodies to HTLVI and HTLVIII and their correlation with impairments of the immune system and serum interferon (IFN). Seropositivity for HTLVI, HTLVIII, or both was found in 1.4, 8.3, and 0%, respectively. Significant decreases in the total peripheral T cells, TH cells, and TH/TS ratio as well as elevated alpha IFN serum levels were found in the MHS group in comparison with normal controls. Although no difference in the prevalence of either immune derangements or elevated serum IFN was observed between HTLVIII/LAV-seropositive and HTLVIII/LAV-seronegative MHS, the decreases in total T cells, TH cells, and TH/TS ratios were significantly greater in the seropositive MHS. These results indicate that (a) immune impairments and IFN system activation occur commonly in homosexuals, precede their exposure to HTLVIII/LAV, and probably reflect this group's increased risk for AIDS and (b) HTLVIII/LAV infection of MHS aggravates further their preexisting immune impairments.

  6. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E; Tipler, B M

    1987-06-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder.

  7. Pathogens in children with severe combined immune deficiency disease or AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, D; Delage, G; Brochu, P; Michaud, J; Jasmin, G; Joncas, J H; Lapointe, N

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency and severity of illnesses caused by various microbial pathogens in 15 children with severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID) and 8 with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). There were 35 viral, 23 bacterial, 19 mycotic and 13 parasitic infections. Nineteen of the 23 patients died of infection; Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, giant-cell pneumonia due to paramyxoviruses and various disseminated viral infections were responsible for most deaths in both groups. The emerging role of paramyxoviruses was illustrated by the fact that they were responsible for giant-cell pneumonia in seven patients. Viral enteric infections were frequent in both groups. The variety of infectious microorganisms and the severity of resulting illnesses in the patients with AIDS were similar to those in the patients with SCID. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3719484

  8. Select Personality Characteristic Differences between Caregivers for Persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and Caregivers for Other Types of Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Daniel Scott; Heritage, Jeannette

    The purpose of this study was to analyze select personality characteristics of individuals working within the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) population in comparison to non-AIDS caregivers by using two personality assessment instruments. Subjects were from two health care provider populations. Two hundred research packets were…

  9. Differences in acquired immune deficiency syndrome treatment and evaluation strategies between Chinese and Western Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Li, Xia; Yang, Jiping; Xu, Liran; Guo, Huijun

    2015-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine, including Chinese medicine (CM), has been used to treat acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) foralmost 30 years. We aimed to compare the main differences between AIDS treatment and evaluation strategies between CM and Western Medicine (WM), and analyze advantages and disadvantages. The characteristics of integrative medicine (IM), based on CM and WM, include a patient-centered mode of medicine based on evidence. IM focuses on complex intervention and management with systemic and individual treatment. The evaluation indexes of IM might consist of objective indicators and subjective indexes. IM might be a more valuable method for treating AIDS in the future instead of WM or CM alone.

  10. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15–18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10–12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise

  11. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, A.; West, T.E.; Gupta, M.; Loghmanee, F.

    1987-12-01

    A 34-year-old male prisoner with a history of intravenous drug abuse presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss, and recent onset of congestive heart failure. Serologic testing was positive for antibodies to human immune deficiency virus. There was intense myocardial uptake of gallium. Autopsy showed a primary immunoblastic lymphoma involving only the myocardium. While primary cardiac lymphoma is an extremely rare condition, the incidence may be higher in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and should be suspected in cases with atypical cardiomyopathy.

  12. [Changes in the thoracic roentgen image in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pölzleitner, D; Herold, C; Tscholakoff, D; Imhof, H

    1990-01-19

    Since the earliest reports of what was later termed the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) appeared in 1980/81, with the recognition of opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men and i.v. drug abusers, more than 60% of AIDS patients develop pulmonary manifestations at some time in the course of their disease. Radiographic evaluation of the chest plays an important role in diagnosis. In fact, radiological changes are unspecific and either bacteriological proof or histological verification needs to be confirmed.

  13. AIDS Training in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Jusanne M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Management training regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) begins with three needs assessment tools--instruments measuring fear of AIDS, knowledge of AIDS, and beliefs about the business consequences of the disease. (SK)

  14. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  15. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  16. Clinical Presentations of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome which has been associated with 5 major clinical phenotypes: (1) encephalomyopathy, (2) severe infantile multisystemic disease, (3) nephropathy, (4) cerebellar ataxia, and (5) isolated myopathy. Of these phenotypes, cerebellar ataxia and syndromic or isolated nephrotic syndrome are the most common. CoQ10 deficiency predominantly presents in childhood. To date, causative mutations have been identified in a small proportion of patients, making it difficult to identify a phenotype-genotype correlation. Identification of CoQ10 deficiency is important because the disease, in particular muscle symptoms and nephropathy, frequently responds to CoQ10 supplementation. PMID:25126046

  17. Students with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadwell, Cathy Allen; Strope, John L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Addresses the law as it pertains to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in public elementary and secondary schools. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 has been used successfully in the majority of the AIDS cases discussed. (MLF)

  18. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  19. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm3. The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  20. Neutrophil adhesion in leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M L; Schwartz, B R; Etzioni, A; Bayer, R; Ochs, H D; Paulson, J C; Harlan, J M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously reported a newly discovered congenital disorder of neutrophil adhesion, leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2 (LAD II). The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are similar to those seen in the classic leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, now designated type 1 (LAD I), but the two syndromes differ in the molecular basis of their adhesion defects. LAD I is caused by a deficiency in the CD18 integrin adhesion molecules while LAD II patients are deficient in expression of sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX), a carbohydrate ligand for selectins. In this report we demonstrate that neutrophils from a LAD II patient bind minimally or not at all to recombinant E-selectin, purified platelet P-selectin, or P-selectin expressed on histamine-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but have normal levels of L-selectin and CD11b/CD18 integrin, and adhere to and migrate across endothelium when CD11b/CD18 is activated. We compare LAD I and LAD II patient neutrophil function in vitro, demonstrating that integrin and selectin adhesion molecules have distinct but interdependent roles in neutrophil adhesion during an inflammatory response. Images PMID:8675661

  1. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology. PMID:26884697

  2. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in a patient with HDR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou-Athanassiou, Ifigenia; Stefanopoulos, Dimitrios; Karfi, Areti; Athanassiou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    The case of a patient with clinical symptoms, laboratory and imaging findings of hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia HDR, or Barakat syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, deafness, renal dysplasia), and vitamin D deficiency, is presented. A Caucasian man aged 51 years with a history of chronic hypocalcaemia since childhood, was admitted with hypertonia of the body and extremities, and loss of consciousness. On admission, he was found to have severe hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphataemia, severe hypoparathyroidism, low serum magnesium and mild renal insufficiency. Calcium gluconate was administered intravenously supplemented with magnesium, and the patient recovered consciousness while clinical and laboratory findings improved. Evaluation revealed left renal aplasia and sensorineural deafness affecting both ears. Vitamin D deficiency was also present. He was given calcium and vitamin D supplements orally, and the hypocalcaemia was corrected. This case is described as it is an extremely rare case of HDR syndrome with concurrent vitamin D deficiency.

  4. [Copper deficiency anemia morphologically mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Taku; Mori, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Mitsuhasi, Takayuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 64-year-old man underwent kidney transplantation for progressive chronic renal failure which had developed 8 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Because of post-operative complications, he had been placed on intravenous hyperalimentation. Three months after the transplantation, anemia rapidly progressed (hemoglobin, 7.9 g/dl). The proportion of reticulocytes was 0.2%, but white blood cell and platelet counts remained within normal ranges. Serum iron, vitamin B12, and folate levels were normal. Bone marrow examination showed the presence of ringed sideroblasts and cytoplasmic vacuoles in a fraction of erythroid cells. Megakaryocytes were adequate in number with normal morphology. Although the findings were consistent with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts according to the WHO classification, cytoplasmic vacuolations were also observed in myeloid cells, suggesting copper deficiency. Indeed, serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were found to be low (33 μg/dl and 11 mg/dl, respectively), and oral copper supplementation at a daily dose of 1 mg was initiated. There was a prompt increase in reticulocytes, and the hemoglobin level was normalized within one month, in response to this regimen. In progressive anemia cases with ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, copper deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis.

  6. The keys of oxidative stress in acquired immune deficiency syndrome apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Romero-Alvira, D; Roche, E

    1998-08-01

    Apoptosis is the main cause of CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Various agents appear to be able to trigger apoptosis in CD4+ T cells, including viral proteins (i.e. gp120, Tat), inappropriate secretion of inflammatory cytokines by activated macrophages (i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha) and toxins produced by opportunistic micro-organisms. Since oxidative stress can also induce apoptosis, it can be hypothesized that such a mechanism could participate in CD4+ T-cell apoptosis observed in AIDS. This correlates strongly with the observation that AIDS patients present low levels of antioxidants (i.e. superoxide dismutase-Mn, vitamin E, selenium and glutathion) most likely due to inappropriate nutrition (i.e. diets poor in antioxidants), alcohol and drug consumption, and digestive problems associated with the disease. Furthermore, the coadministration of the antiviral drug zidovudine with antioxidants increases its therapeutic potential. Finally, the following additional observations support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in cell apoptosis in AIDS: (1) The depletion of the anti-apoptotic/antioxidant protein Bcl-2 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CD4+ cells; (2) a decrease of apoptosis in HIV-infected cells treated with antioxidants and; (3) the presence of the pro-apoptotic/pro-oxidant cytokines secreted by activated macrophages in AIDS patients. Therefore, anti-apoptotic/antioxidant strategies should be considered, alongside antiviral strategies, in order to design a more efficient therapy for AIDS in the near future.

  7. Effectiveness and safety of traditional Chinese medicine in treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Ji-Ping; Xu, Li-Ran

    2015-12-23

    Substantial progress has been made in China in using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our objective was to review the latest developments in TCM treatment of AIDS in China between 2004 and 2014. We reviewed the content of original articles investigating the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS published in Chinese and English language journals. Relevant references from 2004 to 2014 were found using PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database. We found that TCM has been widely used for treating AIDS and its complications in China. The number of TCM studies has increased, which indicates efficacy and safety. Measures of efficacy in the reviewed articles included the alleviation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related signs and symptoms, improvements in quality of life, improvements in long-term survival, counteraction of the adverse side effects of antiviral drugs, promotion of immune reconstitution, and improvement of laboratory results. In sum, the literature indicates that TCM is safe. TCM plays an important role in the treatment of AIDS. Some studies have attempted to measure the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS, but more evidence is needed. Therefore, more research on this topic is required in the future.

  8. Growth hormone deficiency in 18q deletion syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ghidoni, P.D.; Cody, J.; Danney, J.

    1994-09-01

    The 18q- syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal deletion syndromes. Clinical characteristics are variable but may include: hypotonia, cleft palate, mental retardation and hearing impairment. Growth failure (GF) (<3% weight/height) is present in 80% of affected individuals. We evaluated growth hormone (GH) sufficiency in 15 patients with 18q- syndrome. Of these 15 patients, 10 have growth failure (<3% weight/height); of the remaining 5, 3 had normal growth parameters and 2 had growth along the 5%. Twelve patients failed to produce adequate GH following standard stimulation testing. Of these 12 patients with inadequate GH production, 2 had normal growth (above 3%). Of the 15, only 1 has normal GH production and normal growth parameters. Bone age was obtained on 1 patient with both GH deficiency and GF, and revealed significant delays. GH levels in response to GH releasing factor were normal in 3 out of 4 patients. MRI studies of GH-deficient patients indicated normal midline structures. Myelination in the few studied GH-deficient patients appeared delayed. The gene for myelin basic protein (MBP) is known to be located on the terminal portion of the long arm of chromosome 18. Neither the gene for GH, GH releasing factor nor GH releasing factor receptor is on chromosome 18. These genes are located on chromosomes 17, chromosome 20 and chromosome 7, respectively. Findings to date suggest that GH deficiency is common in individuals with 18q- syndrome. The etiology of this finding is unknown. We postulate that a gene(s) on chromosome 18q is involved in GH expression.

  9. Refeeding syndrome in a young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuy, M; Chen, G-F; Masonek, J M; Scharschmidt, B F

    2015-09-01

    A severely chronically protein and calorie restricted young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency developed transient refeeding syndrome (RFS) and hyperammonemia after modest diet liberalization following initiation of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB). The patient required IV supportive care and supplementation with potassium, magnesium and calcium. She is now doing well on GPB and an appropriate maintenance diet. Susceptibility to RFS should be considered in chronically nutritionally restricted patients with metabolic disorders after liberalization of diet.

  10. Exceptional Association Between Klinefelter Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doubi, Sana; Amrani, Zoubida; Ouahabi, Hanan El; Boujraf, Saïd; Ajdi, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized in adults by the combination of a tall stature, small testes, gynecomastia, and azoospermia. This case is described in a North African population of the Mediterranean region of North Africa. We report the case of a male 16 years old, of Arab ethnic origin, and diagnosed with this syndrome, who had a small height in relation to a growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a history of absence seizures (generalized myoclonic epilepsy). The patient's size was <−2.8 standard deviation (SD) with weight <−3 SD. GH deficiency was isolated and confirmed by two dynamic tests (insulin — hypoglycemia tolerance test and clonidine) with normal hypothalamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). GH supplementation using recombinant GH was advocated, while gonadotropin treatment was deferred. Small size in children or adolescents should not eliminate the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome — on the contrary, the presence of any associated sign (brain maturation, delay in puberty, aggressiveness) should encourage one to request a karyotype for the diagnosis and appropriate care of any case of KS that can be associated with GH deficiency, or which is in a variant form (isochromosome Xq, 49,XXXXY). PMID:27330737

  11. [Vitamin D deficiency rickets complicating Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Barraud, C; Cano, A; Boulay, C; Milh, M; Bollini, G; Chabrol, B

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency rickets remains a public health issue in many parts of the world. In France, this diagnosis has almost disappeared since 1992 with routine vitamin D supplementation for children. Therefore, it is more difficult for doctors to identify risk factors and early signs of this disease. In this article, we report a rickets diagnosis acquired by vitamin D deficiency in a child who presented with the onset of a genu valgum and difficulty walking at the age of 9½ years. This patient was a Comorian child followed up from his birth for Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome is a rare disease, with about 80 cases reported in the literature. It belongs to the group of neutral lipid storage diseases (NLSD) characterized especially on the skin by ichthyosis. This child presented risk factors for vitamin D deficiency (dark skin color, prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding, premature end of supplementation, and particularly severe ichthyosis) that should have alerted us to the risk of vitamin D deficiency and the need for supplementation. This case highlights the importance of vitamin D, especially if there are risk factors such as ichthyosis, and the need to remain watchful in monitoring all chronic diseases.

  12. The science base underlying research on acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taube, S; Goldberg, M

    1983-01-01

    In order to define the clinical syndrome of AIDS and begin to deal with it effectively, scientists needed to understand how the immune system works. Fortunately, considerable knowledge was available: research in immunology over the last two decades had provided the technological advances and basic information about cell-mediated immunity that were necessary for identification of the syndrome. Without this knowledge base, immune suppression would not have been recognized as the common link among AIDS patients manifesting a variety of infections and unusual neoplasms. Similarly, research on infectious diseases, and in particular on the role of viruses as etiologic agents, has had an important bearing on understanding of AIDS. The epidemiologic data to date indicate that an infectious agent most likely is involved and that transmission of the disease requires intimate contact and perhaps some passage of blood. Among the candidates for viral agents are Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and human T-cell leukemia virus. All have been isolated from the cells of AIDS victims, but whether they are etiologic agents or opportunistic pathogens remains unresolved. Knowledge gained from the study of any of these viruses will contribute to understanding of AIDS, and vice versa. In this paper, we have attempted to show the integral relationship between specific research on AIDS and the ongoing research effort in related disciplines. It is important to recognize that effective research is the result of careful consideration of which questions can and should be addressed and the development of innovative approaches to gain answers to those questions. Research on AIDS is proceeding as rapidly as it is only because of the solid foundations that have been developed in the areas of immunology and virology. It is this base of research that ultimately will provide the rationale and the tools for solving new problems.

  13. [The frequency and development of tissue iron deficiency in 6 iron deficiency anemia patients with plummer-vinson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Matsuno, M; Ide, M; Kawachi, Y

    1998-11-01

    The physical signs of tissue iron deficiency include smooth and red tongue, angular stomatitis, koilonychia, and pica. The incidence of these conditions is unknown in Japan. We evaluated the frequency and development of tissue iron deficiency in 353 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The frequency of tissue iron deficiency was 6.8%; papillary atrophy of the tongue, 5.4%; abnormal nails, 5.4%; angular stomatitis, 1.1%; Plummer-Vinson syndrome, 1.7%; and pica, 0.06%. These findings were compared with the date collected by Wintrobe and Beveridge. The development and incidence of tissue iron deficiency correlated significantly with the severity of iron deficiency anemia.

  14. Social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, S K; Nedjat, S; Jabbari, H; Saiepour, N; Heris, M J

    2015-12-13

    This study investigated the social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the associated factors. In a cross-sectional study the Integrated Social Capital Questionnaire was filled by a sequential sample of 300 patients visiting a referral counselling centre in Tehran. The patients' social capital scores were around 50% in the trust, social cohesion, collective action and cooperation and political empowerment domains. The groups and networks membership domain scored the lowest (27.1%). In regression analysis, employment status was significantly associated with groups and networks membership; age, marital status and financial status were associated with collective action and cooperation; period of disease awareness and marital status affected social cohesion and inclusion; and having risky behaviour affected empowerment and political action. Efforts are needed to enhance the social capital of those patients living with AIDS who are younger, unemployed, divorced/widowed, with risky behaviours and shorter disease awareness.

  15. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  16. Can Science Aid In Remediating State Assessment Reading Deficiencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esler, William K.; Anderson, Betty

    1981-01-01

    An experiment in science instruction designed to help third- and fifth-grade students overcome reading deficiencies is detailed. The results of the study indicate that the activities may be a valuable supplement to the more common activities for teaching communication skills. (MP)

  17. An Overlapping Syndrome of Allergy and Immune Deficiency in Children

    PubMed Central

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent airway inflammations in children are an important clinical problem in pediatric practice. An essential challenge is differentiation between allergic background and immune deficiency, which is a difficult task taking into consideration individual predisposition to atopy, immune system maturation in the early childhood, as well as exposition to environmental allergens and microbial antigens. In this paper relationship between selected elements of innate and adaptive immunity, such as pattern-recognition receptors, complement components, dendritic cells, as well as immunoglobulins, and regulatory T lymph cells has been discussed. Particular attention has been paid to these mechanisms of the immune response which, depending on settings and timing of activation, predispose to allergy or contribute to tolerogenic phenotype. In the context of multifactorial conditioning of the innate and adaptive immunity governing the ultimate response and associations between allergy and immune deficiencies, these phenomena should be considered as pathogenetically not precluding, but as an overlapping syndrome. PMID:21918651

  18. AIDS in the Workplace: What Can Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Dale A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the legal ramifications for employers concerning acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Suggests that employers should have in place an AIDS policy that addresses such issues as AIDS testing, employee assistance programs, and health insurance coverage. (CH)

  19. [Comment on the intervention of Traditional Chinese Medicine on survival rates of patients living with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Jiping; Guo, Huijun; Xu, Liran

    2016-06-01

    Despite many differences between Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and conventional medicine, the use of TCM in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is increasingly recognized and accepted by patients. Recent research findings on the benefits of Chinese herbal medicine on long-term survival in patients with HIV/AIDS are encouraging and hopeful, but inconclusive. More research is needed.

  20. Across sectional study: the knowledge, attitude, perception, misconception and views (KAPMV) of adult family members of people living with human immune virus-HIV acquired immune deficiency syndrome-AIDS (PLWHA).

    PubMed

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Bandari, Deepak Kumar; Elnour, Asim Ahmad; Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Baraka, Mohamed; Hamad, Farah; Shehab, Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    We intended to assess knowledge, attitude, perception, misconception and views (KAP-MV) of family members of PLWHA. A cross-sectional retrospective study conducted in Anti-retroviral centre of Mahatma Gandhi Memorial-MGM hospital, Warangal, Telangana, South-India from July to September 2014. A questionnaire containing 41 items was distributed among adult family members accompanying patients living with HIV/AIDS-PLWHA. Level of KAP-MV was categorized into poor (0-28), average (29-55) and good (56-82). Analysis was performed by Pearson's Chi square, analysis of variance and Spearman's correlation test on 41 variables using SPSS version 21 and p < 0.01. 538 questionnaires were distributed, response rate was (96 %). On knowledge scale, respondents had a mean score of 8.0 ± 1.7, attitude 5.8 ± 3.4, perception 23.4 ± 4.1, misconceptions 8.0 ± 2.1 and views 8.0 ± 3.9. The respondents mean score was 53.2 ± 9.1 (64.9 %). Overall, level of education, marital status, religious beliefs, and employment status has significant (p < 0.001) associations with KAP-MV. Knowledge was significantly correlated with respondents' attitude (r = -0.15, p < 0.001), perception (0.39; p < 0.001), and views (0.381; p < 0.001). Family members of PLWHA with less knowledge score had more negative attitude, perception and views. Level of education, marital status, religious beliefs and employment status were identified as key barriers. Interventions targeting family members of PLWHA are warranted. Practice implications are as follows: Encourage role of family members.Deploy interventions.Minimize barriers.Change misconceptions.

  1. Recent trends in the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bum Sik; Ahn, Tai Young

    2007-11-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS) is defined as a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age and is characterized by typical symptoms and deficiency in serum testosterone levels. TDS is a result of the interaction of hypothalamo-pituitary and testicular factors. Now, treatment of TDS with testosterone is still controversial due to a lack of large, controlled clinical trials on efficacy. The risks of treatment with testosterone appear to be minimal, although long-term studies on the safety of testosterone therapy are lacking. The aim of the therapy is to establish a physiological concentration of serum testosterone in order to correct the androgen deficiency, relieve its symptoms and prevent long-term sequelae. All of the available products, despite their varying pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles, are able to reach this goal. Newer testosterone patches seem not to cause severe skin irritation. Testosterone gels minimize the skin irritation while providing flexibility in dosing and a low discontinuation rate. Oral testosterone undecanoate (TU) is free of liver toxicity. Recent formulation of oral TU markedly increased shelf-live, a major drawback in the older preparation. Producing swings in testosterone levels rising rapidly to the supraphysiological range is not the case with the new injectable long-acting preparation of TU. To be able to rapidly react and stop treatment in cases where side-effects and contraindications are detected, the short-acting transdermal and oral delivery modes have certain advantages. However, there is no evidence that the use of an injectable long-acting TU in men with TDS has limitations in clinical application for this reason. The use of dehydroepiandrosterone is still controversial because of a lack of well designed long-term trials, although some recent studies suggest positive effects on various body systems. Only a few studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of hCG (human

  2. Across sectional study: the knowledge, attitude, perception, misconception and views (KAPMV) of adult family members of people living with human immune virus-HIV acquired immune deficiency syndrome-AIDS (PLWHA).

    PubMed

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Bandari, Deepak Kumar; Elnour, Asim Ahmad; Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Baraka, Mohamed; Hamad, Farah; Shehab, Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    We intended to assess knowledge, attitude, perception, misconception and views (KAP-MV) of family members of PLWHA. A cross-sectional retrospective study conducted in Anti-retroviral centre of Mahatma Gandhi Memorial-MGM hospital, Warangal, Telangana, South-India from July to September 2014. A questionnaire containing 41 items was distributed among adult family members accompanying patients living with HIV/AIDS-PLWHA. Level of KAP-MV was categorized into poor (0-28), average (29-55) and good (56-82). Analysis was performed by Pearson's Chi square, analysis of variance and Spearman's correlation test on 41 variables using SPSS version 21 and p < 0.01. 538 questionnaires were distributed, response rate was (96 %). On knowledge scale, respondents had a mean score of 8.0 ± 1.7, attitude 5.8 ± 3.4, perception 23.4 ± 4.1, misconceptions 8.0 ± 2.1 and views 8.0 ± 3.9. The respondents mean score was 53.2 ± 9.1 (64.9 %). Overall, level of education, marital status, religious beliefs, and employment status has significant (p < 0.001) associations with KAP-MV. Knowledge was significantly correlated with respondents' attitude (r = -0.15, p < 0.001), perception (0.39; p < 0.001), and views (0.381; p < 0.001). Family members of PLWHA with less knowledge score had more negative attitude, perception and views. Level of education, marital status, religious beliefs and employment status were identified as key barriers. Interventions targeting family members of PLWHA are warranted. Practice implications are as follows: Encourage role of family members.Deploy interventions.Minimize barriers.Change misconceptions. PMID:26688783

  3. Resource utilization patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Okello, D O

    1994-12-01

    A survey in 1991 of resource use patterns and factors affecting the cost of care for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, revealed that drugs constitute 97% of the mean cost of care of affected individuals in the outpatient and 37% in hospitalized patients. The cost of drugs per treatment episode was Ug.Sh.5785.00 in the outpatient and Ug.Sh.8309.00 for inpatients. (The exchange rate for 1991 was US$ = Ug.Sh.910.00). Analysis of an attempt to provide essential drugs for the growing number of AIDS subjects shows that drugs alone could consume the entire health budget of the Ministry of Health in Uganda. There is therefore need to critically consider options to control the high cost for drugs in AIDS care.

  4. Resource utilization patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Okello, D O

    1994-12-01

    A survey in 1991 of resource use patterns and factors affecting the cost of care for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, revealed that drugs constitute 97% of the mean cost of care of affected individuals in the outpatient and 37% in hospitalized patients. The cost of drugs per treatment episode was Ug.Sh.5785.00 in the outpatient and Ug.Sh.8309.00 for inpatients. (The exchange rate for 1991 was US$ = Ug.Sh.910.00). Analysis of an attempt to provide essential drugs for the growing number of AIDS subjects shows that drugs alone could consume the entire health budget of the Ministry of Health in Uganda. There is therefore need to critically consider options to control the high cost for drugs in AIDS care. PMID:7705257

  5. Nephrotic syndrome caused by immune-mediated acquired LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Hiromura, Keiju; Tsukida, Mayuko; Ohishi, Yuko; Hamatani, Hiroko; Sakurai, Noriyuki; Sakairi, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hidekazu; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Maeshima, Akito; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Yokoo, Hideaki; Aoki, Takeo; Nagata, Michio; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is an enzyme involved in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis. In familial LCAT deficiency (FLD), abnormal lipid deposition causes renal injury and nephrotic syndrome, frequently progressing to ESRD. Here, we describe a 63-year-old Japanese woman with no family history of renal disease who presented with nephrotic syndrome. The laboratory data revealed an extremely low level of serum HDL and undetectable serum LCAT activity. Renal biopsy showed glomerular lipid deposition with prominent accumulation of foam cells, similar to the histologic findings of FLD. In addition, she had subepithelial electron-dense deposits compatible with membranous nephropathy, which are not typical of FLD. A mixing test and coimmunoprecipitation study demonstrated the presence of an inhibitory anti-LCAT antibody in the patient's serum. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence detected LCAT along parts of the glomerular capillary walls, suggesting that LCAT was an antigen responsible for the membranous nephropathy. Treatment with steroids resulted in complete remission of the nephrotic syndrome, normalization of serum LCAT activity and HDL level, and disappearance of foam cell accumulation in renal tissue. In summary, inhibitory anti-LCAT antibody can lead to glomerular lesions similar to those observed in FLD. PMID:23620397

  6. Moyamoya syndrome associated with severe iron deficiency anemia in a young child.

    PubMed

    Meena, Shyam S; Ramkumar, Teliki V; Sharma, Suvasini; Aneja, Satinder; Kumar, Atin

    2012-05-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with recurrent strokes and pallor. Hematological investigations revealed severe iron deficiency anemia without thrombocytosis. The magnetic resonance angiogragraphy findings were suggestive of moyamoya syndrome. The association of moyamoya syndrome with severe iron deficiency anemia has not been reported earlier. The likely pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  7. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horry County Board of Education, Conway, SC.

    This curriculum guide was developed, based on sound principles of human growth and development, to present the most recently available information on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The curriculum presents information on the known facts about AIDS and the AIDS virus infection. It also addresses the potential for adolescents and adults…

  8. AIDS, the Schools, and Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the discovery of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and describes the biology of the disease. The problem of AIDS among children is discussed and implications for school policy decisions are cited. (Author/MT)

  9. Health related quality of life: is it another comprehensive evaluation indicator of Chinese medicine on acquired immune deficiency syndrome treatment?

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Jiping

    2015-10-01

    Health related quality of life (HRQOL) can better reflect changes in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and inform economic evaluation of AIDS treatment services, and the assessment of HRQOL can help us to detect problems that may influence the progression of the disease, hence HRQOL has become a particularly important assessment indictor for HIV comprehensive interventions. Being a multi-angle, multi-level, and diversified complex intervention, roles of Chinese medicine (CM) in AIDS treatment have been recognized and accepted by more and more patients, and HRQOL has been widely used to evaluate the comprehensive management effects of CM on AIDS. In this article, the authors analyze the definition and measurement of HRQOL, measurement of HRQOL of HIV/AIDS patients and effects of CM on AIDS, and give some reasonable advices for the usage of the scale of HRQOL. The authors hold that some new HRQOL instruments specific for CM treatment of AIDS should be developed and further prospective studies should be carried out to demonstrate the practicality, reliability and validity of HRQOL as an evaluation indictor for CM treatment of AIDS.

  10. Answering Your Questions about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.

    This book focuses on AIDS education and answers 350 commonly asked questions about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) taken from questions addressed to two major urban AIDS hotlines (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Houston, Texas). Chapter 1, "HIV - The Virus That Causes AIDS," discusses: the HIV virus; the…

  11. Association of Turner Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Review.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jorge Sales; Aires, Sónia

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is an important cause of short stature in girls. Patients with TS most often do not have growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Testing GH secretion is not indicated despite the presence of short stature. In the last 20 years only three cases were reported with this association in Pubmed. We describe a case of an 11 year old girl with short stature and karyotype confirmed TS: 45,X(16)46,X,i(X)(ql0)(13). Because her growth velocity was low (-3 SD), we evaluated the GH response with stimulating tests and the results were under the normal range. These findings were compatible with GHD. It is important to check for GHD in patients with TS whenever the growth velocity is low for age and sex.

  12. Deficient DNA repair in the human progeroid disorder, Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-09-01

    The study of how DNA repair mechanisms change with aging is central to our understanding of the aging process. Here, I review the molecular functions of a key aging protein, Werner protein (WRN), which is deficient in the premature aging disorder, Werner syndrome (WS). This protein plays a significant role in DNA repair, particularly in base excision repair and in recombination. WRN may be a key regulatory factor in these processes and may also play a role in coordinating them. WRN belongs to the RecQ helicase family of proteins, often referred to as the guardians of the genome. These proteins appear to integrate with the more classic DNA repair pathways and proteins.

  13. Attitudes towards and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Andrew; Hiday, Virginia Aldige'

    Most research on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been medical and most social science research on AIDS has been concerned with social factors in its spread and with social-psychological effects of contracting AIDS. This study was conducted to examine public attitudes toward, and public knowledge about AIDS. Knowledge about AIDS was…

  14. Attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder and reward deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Amanda Lih-Chuan; Braverman, Eric R; Comings, David E; Chen, Thomas JH; Arcuri, Vanessa; Blum, Seth H; Downs, Bernard W; Waite, Roger L; Notaro, Alison; Lubar, Joel; Williams, Lonna; Prihoda, Thomas J; Palomo, Tomas; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes that may mediate susceptibility to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A consensus of the literature suggests that when there is a dysfunction in the “brain reward cascade,” especially in the dopamine system, causing a low or hypo-dopaminergic trait, the brain may require dopamine for individuals to avoid unpleasant feelings. This high-risk genetic trait leads to multiple drug-seeking behaviors, because the drugs activate release of dopamine, which can diminish abnormal cravings. Moreover, this genetic trait is due in part to a form of a gene (DRD2 A1 allele) that prevents the expression of the normal laying down of dopamine receptors in brain reward sites. This gene, and others involved in neurophysiological processing of specific neurotransmitters, have been associated with deficient functions and predispose individuals to have a high risk for addictive, impulsive, and compulsive behavioral propensities. It has been proposed that genetic variants of dopaminergic genes and other “reward genes” are important common determinants of reward deficiency syndrome (RDS), which we hypothesize includes ADHD as a behavioral subtype. We further hypothesize that early diagnosis through genetic polymorphic identification in combination with DNA-based customized nutraceutical administration to young children may attenuate behavioral symptoms associated with ADHD. Moreover, it is concluded that dopamine and serotonin releasers might be useful therapeutic adjuncts for the treatment of other RDS behavioral subtypes, including addictions. PMID:19183781

  15. The Brain in AIDS: Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection and AIDS Dementia Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the complicated infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in its late stages of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex. Explains the syndrome's development of abnormalities in cognition, motor performance, and behavior. (TW)

  16. Polymorphous hemangioendothelioma in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephan R; Hurford, Matthew T; Miettinen, Markku M; Aronoff, Stephen C; Delvecchio, Michael; Grewal, Harsh; Tuluc, Madalina

    2008-03-01

    Polymorphous hemangioendotheliomas (PH) are rare and borderline malignant tumors that are among the wide range of vascular tumors. We report here a 13-year-old male presenting with a history of weight loss, opportunistic infections, and lymphadenopathy. He was determined to be HIV positive and to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A biopsy of a femoral node was diagnostic of PH. His systemic lymphadenopathy appeared to resolve with anti-retroviral therapy. This tumor should be considered within the differential diagnoses of pediatric and immunocompromised patients.

  17. Free-thiamine is a potential biomarker of thiamine transporter-2 deficiency: a treatable cause of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza-Escobar, Juan Darío; Molero-Luis, Marta; Arias, Angela; Oyarzabal, Alfonso; Darín, Niklas; Serrano, Mercedes; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Tondo, Mireia; Hernández, María; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Casado, Mercedes; Gort, Laura; Mayr, Johannes A; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Ribes, Antonia; Artuch, Rafael; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency is caused by mutations in the SLC19A3 gene. As opposed to other causes of Leigh syndrome, early administration of thiamine and biotin has a dramatic and immediate clinical effect. New biochemical markers are needed to aid in early diagnosis and timely therapeutic intervention. Thiamine derivatives were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography in 106 whole blood and 38 cerebrospinal fluid samples from paediatric controls, 16 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with Leigh syndrome, six of whom harboured mutations in the SLC19A3 gene, and 49 patients with other neurological disorders. Free-thiamine was remarkably reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid of five SLC19A3 patients before treatment. In contrast, free-thiamine was slightly decreased in 15.2% of patients with other neurological conditions, and above the reference range in one SLC19A3 patient on thiamine supplementation. We also observed a severe deficiency of free-thiamine and low levels of thiamine diphosphate in fibroblasts from SLC19A3 patients. Surprisingly, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial substrate oxidation rates were within the control range. Thiamine derivatives normalized after the addition of thiamine to the culture medium. In conclusion, we found a profound deficiency of free-thiamine in the CSF and fibroblasts of patients with thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. Thiamine supplementation led to clinical improvement in patients early treated and restored thiamine values in fibroblasts and cerebrospinal fluid.

  18. Proceedings of the Joint AADS-AADR Symposium: Dentistry's Response to AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presentation topics on dentistry's response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) include: AIDS-related changes in dental education, public programs, and dental practice and the impact of AIDS on dental practice. (MSE)

  19. A lactogenic-immune-deficiency-syndrome in cows: unexplained phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Brenner, J; Neria, A; Askenazy, G; Paz, R; Meirom, R; Ungar-Waron, H; Trainin, Z

    1992-05-01

    The majority of adult cows in a certain dairy herd, were found to have very low levels of immunoglobulins (Igs) in their colostrum. This phenomenon was defined by us as Lactogenic-Immune-Deficiency-Syndrome (LIDS). The mean IgG levels were 44.5 and 57.2 mg ml-1 respectively (on two different occasions) as compared to that of a control group which was 103.4 mg ml-1. The levels of Igs in the colostra of heifers from the same herd were found to be higher than those of adult cows. The degree of LIDS was found to be closely related to the age of cows in the herd. The low levels of Igs in the colostra were not directly linked to their concentrations in the sera of the affected cows. The relatively low amount of IgA in the affected colostra suggests that the local production in the lymph tissue associated with the mammary glands is impaired as well. In order to investigate the etiology of the phenomenon, tests were carried out to reveal whether bovine leucosis virus (BLV) infection or immune complexes were involved in the pathogenesis of LIDS. The results were negative. The etiology of LIDS remains for the time being unknown. PMID:1632067

  20. Selective IgA deficiency mimicking Churg-Strauss syndrome and hypereosinophilic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Kondo, Takeshi; Fukuta, Mamiko; Takemoto, Ayumu; Takami, Yuichiro; Sato, Motoki; Ando, Takafumi; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Suzuki, Tomio; Sato, Juichi; Yamamura, Masahiro; Ban, Nobutaro

    2013-02-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common type of primary immunoglobulin deficiency. Most individuals with SIgAD are asymptomatic. However, some patients are associated with allergic and autoimmune disease. SIgAD is included in the list of differential diagnoses of eosinophilia. We experienced a patient who initially presented with abdominal pain and eosinophilia. A >1-year follow-up revealed SIgAD, and we had difficulty differentiating it from Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) or hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). A 66-year-old Japanese male presented with a history of recurrent abdominal pain. A diagnostic work-up revealed eosinophilia, eosinophilic gastritis, eosinophilic pneumonia, and SIgAD over 1 year of clinical observation. He also suffered from asthma and sinusitis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was negative and vasculitis was not detected in the obtained tissue specimens of stomach, lung, nose and skin. The patient showed no evidence of drug ingestion, parasitic infections, or malignant neoplasms. Although we cannot rule out prevasculitic CSS and idiopathic HES, the whole clinical picture in this patient can be explained most consistently by SIgAD. PMID:23544278

  1. HIV/AIDS and Pediatric AIDS. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Jo Anne T.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize what is known about HIV/AIDS (Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and pediatric AIDS and applies this information to children in school settings. Questions and answers address the following topics: what the AIDS disease and HIV infection are; estimates…

  2. Physicians' obligations to patients infected with Ebola: echoes of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Howard; Ecker, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Physicians across the United States are engaged in training in the identification, isolation, and initial care of patients with Ebola. Some will be asked to do more. The issue this viewpoint will address is the moral obligation of physicians to participate in these activities. In order to do so the implicit contract between society and its physicians will be considered, as will many of the arguments that are redolent of those that were litigated 30 years ago when acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was raising public fears to similar levels, and some physicians were publically proclaiming their unwillingness to render care to those individuals. We will build the case that if steps are taken to reduce risks-optimal personal protective equipment and training-to what is essentially the lowest possible level then rendering care should be seen as obligatory. If not, as in the AIDS era there will be an unfair distribution of risk, with those who take their obligations seriously having to go beyond their fair measure of exposure. It would also potentially undermine patients' faith in the altruism of physicians and thereby degrade the esteem in which our profession is held and the trust that underpins the therapeutic relationship. Finally there is an implicit contract with society. Society gives tremendously to us; we encumber a debt from all society does and offers, a debt for which recompense is rarely sought. The mosaic of moral, historical, and professional imperatives to render care to the infected all echoes the words of medicine's moral leaders in the AIDS epidemic. Arnold Relman perhaps put it most succinctly, "the risk of contracting the patient's disease is one of the risks that is inherent in the profession of medicine. Physicians who are not willing to accept that risk…ought not be in the practice of medicine." PMID:25530596

  3. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  4. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival.

  5. Dopamine and glucose, obesity, and reward deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Panayotis K; Gold, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity as a result of overeating as well as a number of well described eating disorders has been accurately considered to be a world-wide epidemic. Recently a number of theories backed by a plethora of scientifically sound neurochemical and genetic studies provide strong evidence that food addiction is similar to psychoactive drug addiction. Our laboratory has published on the concept known as Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) which is a genetic and epigenetic phenomena leading to impairment of the brain reward circuitry resulting in a hypo-dopaminergic function. RDS involves the interactions of powerful neurotransmitters and results in abnormal craving behavior. A number of important facts which could help translate to potential therapeutic targets espoused in this focused review include: (1) consumption of alcohol in large quantities or carbohydrates binging stimulates the brain's production of and utilization of dopamine; (2) in the meso-limbic system the enkephalinergic neurons are in close proximity, to glucose receptors; (3) highly concentrated glucose activates the calcium channel to stimulate dopamine release from P12 cells; (4) a significant correlation between blood glucose and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid the dopamine metabolite; (5) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), the glucose analog, in pharmacological doses is associated with enhanced dopamine turnover and causes acute glucoprivation. Evidence from animal studies and fMRI in humans support the hypothesis that multiple, but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug dependence and for the most part, implicate the involvement of DA-modulated reward circuits in pathologic eating behaviors. Based on a consensus of neuroscience research treatment of both glucose and drug like cocaine, opiates should incorporate dopamine agonist therapy in contrast to current theories and practices that utilizes dopamine antagonistic therapy. Considering that up until now clinical utilization

  6. Dopamine and glucose, obesity, and reward deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity as a result of overeating as well as a number of well described eating disorders has been accurately considered to be a world-wide epidemic. Recently a number of theories backed by a plethora of scientifically sound neurochemical and genetic studies provide strong evidence that food addiction is similar to psychoactive drug addiction. Our laboratory has published on the concept known as Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) which is a genetic and epigenetic phenomena leading to impairment of the brain reward circuitry resulting in a hypo-dopaminergic function. RDS involves the interactions of powerful neurotransmitters and results in abnormal craving behavior. A number of important facts which could help translate to potential therapeutic targets espoused in this focused review include: (1) consumption of alcohol in large quantities or carbohydrates binging stimulates the brain’s production of and utilization of dopamine; (2) in the meso-limbic system the enkephalinergic neurons are in close proximity, to glucose receptors; (3) highly concentrated glucose activates the calcium channel to stimulate dopamine release from P12 cells; (4) a significant correlation between blood glucose and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid the dopamine metabolite; (5) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), the glucose analog, in pharmacological doses is associated with enhanced dopamine turnover and causes acute glucoprivation. Evidence from animal studies and fMRI in humans support the hypothesis that multiple, but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug dependence and for the most part, implicate the involvement of DA-modulated reward circuits in pathologic eating behaviors. Based on a consensus of neuroscience research treatment of both glucose and drug like cocaine, opiates should incorporate dopamine agonist therapy in contrast to current theories and practices that utilizes dopamine antagonistic therapy. Considering that up until now clinical utilization

  7. Growth hormone deficiency and premature thelarche in a female infant with kabuki makeup syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, K; Lemli, L; Craen, M; de Zegher, F

    1995-01-01

    We report on a girl with the kabuki makeup syndrome, including short stature, premature thelarche and partial growth hormone deficiency of hypothalamic origin, without stalk interruption. Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone resulted in an increase of annualized growth velocity from 3.6 to 11.2 cm. The kabuki makeup syndrome may be associated with hypothalamopituitary dysfunction.

  8. Attitudes of Dental Faculty toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Leonard A.; Grace, Edward G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of one dental school's faculty concerning attitudes toward homosexual or heterosexual patients with either Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia found significant negative biases both toward individuals with AIDS and toward homosexuals. (MSE)

  9. Human Subjects Issues in AIDS Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ronald, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six articles are presented on the use of human subjects in research on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Topics include the ethics of human experimentation, female and pediatric AIDS patients, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS among correctional inmates, community-based AIDS research, and clinical trials of HIV…

  10. Alaska's State Aid to Public Schools Formula: Deficiencies, Suggestions, and the Effects of House Bill 212. A Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Tom H.

    Because of its diversity of land and people, the challenge of constructing an equitable state aid formula is probably greater for the state of Alaska than for any state in the union. Alaska's present state-aid formula is deficient in at least eight distinct areas: (1) The labels of the formula variables are not relevant to the quantities they…

  11. What about AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfuss, Katharine R.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Suggests ways in which camp directors can establish procedures for making appropriate decisions about accepting campers/staff workers with AIDS. Reviews aspects of environmental sanitation, physical health, confidentiality, camper/staff drug use and sexual behavior, medical…

  12. Teachers with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strope, John L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the application of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as a legal theory available to an employee of a public school system who faces isolation, transfer, suspension, or termination because of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Addresses AIDS in the workplace and the law. (MLF)

  13. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  14. Preventing AIDS via Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Reese M.; Walker, Catherine M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic to past epidemics, including social and political responses. Identifies populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Discusses current social and economic factors affecting AIDS education programs. Makes recommendations and identifies resources for starting…

  15. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  16. The AIDS Challenge: Prevention Education for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia, Ed.; And Others

    This book on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education was developed by national and international experts to aid educators, professionals, parents, and youth leaders in developing and implementing AIDS education programs. Included are: (1) "Living with AIDS" (Jack Martin Balcer); (2) "The AIDS Epidemic: Problems in Limiting Its Impact"…

  17. Reward deficiency syndrome: genetic aspects of behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Blum, K

    2000-01-01

    The dopaminergic and opioidergic reward pathways of the brain are critical for survival since they provide the pleasure drives for eating, love and reproduction; these are called 'natural rewards' and involve the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and frontal lobes. However, the same release of dopamine and production of sensations of pleasure can be produced by 'unnatural rewards' such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, nicotine, marijuana, and other drugs, and by compulsive activities such as gambling, eating, and sex, and by risk taking behaviors. Since only a minority of individuals become addicted to these compounds or behaviors, it is reasonable to ask what factors distinguish those who do become addicted from those who do not. It has usually been assumed that these behaviors are entirely voluntary and that environmental factors play the major role; however, since all of these behaviors have a significant genetic component, the presence of one or more variant genes presumably act as risk factors for these behaviors. Since the primary neurotransmitter of the reward pathway is dopamine, genes for dopamine synthesis, degradation, receptors, and transporters are reasonable candidates. However, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA, opioid, and cannabinoid neurons all modify dopamine metabolism and dopamine neurons. We have proposed that defects in various combinations of the genes for these neurotransmitters result in a Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and that such individuals are at risk for abuse of the unnatural rewards. Because of its importance, the gene for the [figure: see text] dopamine D2 receptor was a major candidate gene. Studies in the past decade have shown that in various subject groups the Taq I A1 allele of the DRD2 gene is associated with alcoholism, drug abuse, smoking, obesity, compulsive gambling, and several personality traits. A range of other dopamine, opioid, cannabinoid, norepinephrine, and related genes have since been

  18. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  19. Computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and dynamic brain mapping in AIDS and HIV related syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Ferracuti, S; Freedman, A M; Sherer, C; Mehta, P; Itil, K Z

    1990-07-01

    In a group of HIV positive young male patients without any significant neuropsychiatric signs, computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and Dynamic Brain Mapping evaluations were conducted. These patients, who only had micro-neuropsychiatric symptoms, demonstrated CEEG profiles that more closely resemble those of patients diagnosed as suffering from mild dementia than age-related normals from our CEEG data base. The CEEGs of patients diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), compared to patients with HIV positive, showed greater similarity in CEEG patterns to severely demented patients than to normal control groups. The findings of this pilot study suggest that CEEG may be useful for early determination of the Central Nervous System's (CNS) involvement with the AIDS virus and monitoring the progress of the illness. PMID:2364555

  20. Computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and dynamic brain mapping in AIDS and HIV related syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Ferracuti, S; Freedman, A M; Sherer, C; Mehta, P; Itil, K Z

    1990-07-01

    In a group of HIV positive young male patients without any significant neuropsychiatric signs, computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and Dynamic Brain Mapping evaluations were conducted. These patients, who only had micro-neuropsychiatric symptoms, demonstrated CEEG profiles that more closely resemble those of patients diagnosed as suffering from mild dementia than age-related normals from our CEEG data base. The CEEGs of patients diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), compared to patients with HIV positive, showed greater similarity in CEEG patterns to severely demented patients than to normal control groups. The findings of this pilot study suggest that CEEG may be useful for early determination of the Central Nervous System's (CNS) involvement with the AIDS virus and monitoring the progress of the illness.

  1. [Severe deglutition disorders and iron deficiency; Plummer-Vinson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Geerlings, S E; Statius van Eps, L W

    1991-11-01

    At oesophagogastroscopy a web was seen in the upper oesophagus in a female of 73 years with dysphagia. Because she also had a smooth tongue, a low serum iron level and anaemia, the syndrome of Plummer-Vinson was diagnosed. After treatment with ferrous fumarate the dysphagia, the web and the anaemia disappeared and the serum iron rose. The symptomatology of this syndrome is discussed. Remarkably, the pathogenesis is not completely known. There are indications that this uncommon syndrome is a premalignant disorder.

  2. Computer aided morphometry of the neonatal fetal alcohol syndrome face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, Lawrence; Sokol, Robert J.; Martier, Susan S.

    1993-09-01

    Facial dysmorphology related to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) has been studied from neonatal snapshots with computer-aided imaging tools by looking at facial landmarks and silhouettes. Statistical methods were used to characterize FAS-related midfacial hypoplasia by using standardized landmark coordinates of frontal and profile snapshots. Additional analyses were performed by tracing a segment of the facial silhouettes from the profile snapshots. In spite of inherent distortions due to the coordinate standardization procedure, controlled for race, three significant facial landmark coordinates accounted for 30.6% of the explained variance of FAS. Residualized for race, eight points along the silhouettes were shown to be significant in explaining 45.8% of the outcome variance. Combining the landmark coordinates and silhouettes points, 57% of the outcome variance was explained. Finally, including birthweight with landmark coordinates and silhouettes, 63% of the outcome variance was explained, with a jackknifed sensitivity of 95% (19/20) and a specificity of 92.9% (52/56).

  3. Small intestinal lymphoma in three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Bridges, N; Feiner, H D; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of small bowel lymphoma in young homosexual men are presented. All three had acquired immune deficiency syndrome as demonstrated by demography, sexual history, cachexia, opportunistic infections by Cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis carinii, atypical Mycobacterium, Candida, and/or evidence of immune deficiency, such as skin test anergy, lymphopenia, inversion of T-helper/T-suppressor ratio, and diminished lymphocyte response to either phytohemmaglutinin or pokeweed mitogen. All had peripheral and/or abdominal lymphadenopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms, e.g., diarrhea, spasms, constipation, and oral candidiasis. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made at laparotomy in all cases. All three had complete removal of localized tumor (stage Ie or IIe), yet died within 6 months of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Thus gastrointestinal complaints may not always be related to "gay bowel" syndrome, or other infectious diseases in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Small intestinal lymphoma should be added to the list of neoplasms to which this group is susceptible.

  4. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome: a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sumant; Jha, Sneh Kumar; Pandey, Suchit; Shukla, Rakesh

    2015-10-16

    We report a case of bilateral useless hand syndrome, a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A 38-year-old man, a strict vegetarian and a teacher by occupation, presented with acute onset clumsiness of both hands while performing fine movements. Detailed history-taking, examination of the patient and relevant investigations (complete blood count, serum vitamin B12 and MRI of the cervical spinal cord) were carried out. Laboratory analysis was suggestive of vitamin B12 deficiency and MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the posterior columns of the cervical cord. The patient was diagnosed as a case of non-compressive cervical myelopathy predominantly involving the posterior column due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome can be a rare presenting feature of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  5. Taurine deficiency and MELAS are closely related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Jong, Chian Ju; Warner, Danielle; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease caused by one or more mutations of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). These mutations reduce both the aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and a posttranslational modification in the wobble position of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). Both changes result in reduced transcription of mitochondria-encoded proteins; however, reduced aminoacylation affects the decoding of both UUG and UUA while the wobble defect specifically diminishes UUG decoding. Because 12 out of the 13 mitochondria-encoded proteins are more dependent on UUA decoding than UUG decoding, the aminoacylation defect should have a more profound effect on protein synthesis than the wobble defect, which more specifically alters the expression of one mitochondria-encoded protein, ND6. Taurine serves as a substrate in the formation of 5-taurinomethyluridine-tRNA(Leu(UUR)); therefore, taurine deficiency should mimic 5-taurinomethyluridine-tRNA(Leu(UUR)) deficiency. Hence, the wobble hypothesis predicts that the symptoms of MELAS mimic those of taurine deficiency, provided that the dominant defect in MELAS is wobble modification deficiency. On the other hand, if the aminoacylation defect dominates, significant differences should exist between taurine deficiency and MELAS. The present review tests this hypothesis by comparing the symptoms of MELAS and taurine deficiency.

  6. Charles Bonnet syndrome and vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Valérie; Desbordes, Marie; Follet, Mathieu; Haouzir, Sadeq; Guillin, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition associated with complex visual hallucinations occurring in the elderly in patients with visual impairment and normal mental health. Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old woman who has a limited visual acuity with a CBS that we postulated to be in relationship to a vitamin B12 deficiency. This case is the first report of vitamin B12 deficiency-associated CBS.

  7. Severe chronic iron deficiency anaemia secondary to Trichuris dysentery syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Azira N, M S; Zeehaida, M

    2012-12-01

    Trichuris dysentery syndrome is caused by Trichuris trichiura which contributes to one of the most common helminthic infections in the world. It is associated with heavy colonic infection that manifests as mucoid diarrhoea, rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse, iron deficiency anaemia, and finger clubbing. Here, we report a case of trichuris dysentery syndrome complicated with severe chronic iron deficiency anaemia in a 4-year-old girl who required blood transfusion. The nematode was visualized on stool microscopic and colonoscopic examination. A longer duration of anti-helminthic treatment is required to achieve effective and better outcome.

  8. Sweet's syndrome in human immune deficiency virus-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Adarsh; Zacharia, George Sarin; Zacharia, Sue Ann; George, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is an uncommon dermatosis and can be associated with a wide variety of illnesses including infections and malignancies. Sweet's syndrome as a dermatological manifestation in human immunedeficiency virus (HIV) infection is rarely reported. Furthermore, called acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is characterized by fever and skin lesions, which are often erythematous papules and pseudovesicles. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and histology. The gold standard for treatment is systemic steroids although many other medications have been tried with variable success. We here report a case of Sweet's syndrome in an HIV-infected patient. PMID:26396453

  9. [The role of inositol deficiency in the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome disorders].

    PubMed

    Jakimiuk, Artur J; Szamatowicz, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Inositol acts as a second messenger in insulin signaling pathway Literature data suggest inositol deficiency in insulin-resistant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. Supplementation of myo-inisitol decreases insulin resistance as it works as an insulin sensitizing agent. The positive role of myo-inositol in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome has been of increased evidence recently The present review presents the effects of myo-inositol on the ovarian, hormonal and metabolic parameters in women with PCOS.

  10. Facial morphometry of Ecuadorian patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency/Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G B; Rosenbloom, A L; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Campbell, E A; Ullrich, F; Patil, K; Frias, J L

    1994-01-01

    Facial morphometry using computerised image analysis was performed on patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) from an inbred population of southern Ecuador. Morphometrics were compared for 49 patients, 70 unaffected relatives, and 14 unrelated persons. Patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency showed significant decreases in measures of vertical facial growth as compared to unaffected relatives and unrelated persons with short stature from other causes. This report validates and quantifies the clinical impression of foreshortened facies in growth hormone receptor deficiency. Images PMID:7815422

  11. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Severine; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J; De Schepper, Jean

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  12. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J.; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  13. Hypogammaglobulinemia factitia- Munchausen syndrome masquerading as common variable immune deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We describe the first case of a patient with factitious disorder who closely simulated a primary immune deficiency disorder – Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID), by surreptitiously ingesting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Case description He was treated with several expensive and potentially dangerous drugs before the diagnosis was established through collateral information. In retrospect he did not meet the proposed new criteria for CVID. These criteria may prove useful in distinguishing cases of CVID from secondary hypogammaglobulinemia. Conclusion It is imperative clinicians recognise patients with factitious disorder at the earliest opportunity to prevent iatrogenic morbidity and mortality. PMID:24341706

  14. Neuroimaging evidence of deficient axon myelination in Wolfram syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Heather M.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Marshall, Bess A.; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Urano, Fumihiko; Bischoff, Allison N.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Hershey, Tamara; Austin, P.; Beato, B.; Bihun, E.; Doty, T.; Earhart, G.; Eisenstein, S.; Hoekel, J.; Karzon, R.; Licis, A.; Manwaring, L.; Paciorkowski, A. R.; Pepino de Gruev, Y.; Permutt, A.; Pickett, K.; Ranck, S.; Reiersen, A.; Tychsen, L.; Viehoever, A.; Wasson, J.; White, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by insulin dependent diabetes and vision, hearing and brain abnormalities which generally emerge in childhood. Mutations in the WFS1 gene predispose cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis and may induce myelin degradation in neuronal cell models. However, in vivo evidence of this phenomenon in humans is lacking. White matter microstructure and regional volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with Wolfram syndrome (n = 21) and healthy and diabetic controls (n = 50). Wolfram patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in major white matter tracts and lower volume in the basilar (ventral) pons, cerebellar white matter and visual cortex. Correlations were found between key brain findings and overall neurological symptoms. This pattern of findings suggests that reduction in myelin is a primary neuropathological feature of Wolfram syndrome. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-related dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome may interact with the development of myelin or promote degeneration of myelin during the progression of the disease. These measures may provide objective indices of Wolfram syndrome pathophysiology that will be useful in unraveling the underlying mechanisms and in testing the impact of treatments on the brain. PMID:26888576

  15. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors. PMID:25711864

  16. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in girls and women with rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and identify the relation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels and the consumption of dietary sources of vitamin D or exposure to anticonvulsants in girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT). Retrospective review of...

  18. Multiple endocrinopathies (growth hormone deficiency, autoimmune hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus) in Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berio, A; Piazzi, A

    2013-01-01

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome is characterized by onset before 20 years, chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration, and ataxia (and/or hearth block, and/or high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid) in the presence of mtDNA rearrangements. Multiple endocrine dysfunction associated with this syndrome was rarely reported. In this paper, the Authors report on a female patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome with large heteroplasmic mtDNA deletion, absence of cytochrome c oxidase in many muscle fibers, partial GH deficiency, hypothyroidism and subsequently insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Anti-thyroid peroxidase and antithyreoglobulin antibodies were present in high titer in serum while anti-islet cell antibodies were absent. The patient developed thyroiditis with Hashimoto encephalopathy. The presence of GH deficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis with hypothyroidism and IDDM distinguishes this case from others and confirms the association of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with multiple endocrine dysfunction. Hashimoto encephalopathy and anti-thyroideal antibodies suggest that in this patient, predisposed by a genetic factor (a mitochondrial deletion) anti-thyroideal antibodies may have contributed to the hypothyroidism and, by interfering with cerebral mitochondrial function, may have caused the encephalopathy. GH deficiency and IDDM can be attributed to oxidative phosphorylation deficiency but the autoimmunity may also have played a role in the production of glandular insufficiencies. It seems important to search for endocrine autoimmunity in every case of KSS. PMID:23947115

  19. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  20. A Milk-Free Diet Downregulates Folate Receptor Autoimmunity in Cerebral Folate Deficiency Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaekers, Vincent T.; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Blau, Nenad; Quadros, Edward V.

    2008-01-01

    In cerebral folate deficiency syndrome, the presence of autoantibodies against the folate receptor (FR) explains decreased folate transport to the central nervous system and the clinical response to folinic acid. Autoantibody crossreactivity with milk FR from different species prompted us to test the effect of a milk-free diet. Intervention with a…

  1. HIV-2 and its role in conglutinated approach towards Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Batul; Saxena, Rupali; Tiwari, Archana

    2013-12-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the most critically acclaimed endemic diseases, caused by two lentiviruses HIV-1 and 2. HIV-2 displays intimate serological and antigenic resemblance to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) along with less pathogenicity, lower infectivity and appreciable cross reactivity with HIV-1 antigens. The present era is confronted with the challenge to fabricate a vaccine effective against all clades of both the species of HIV. But vaccine development against HIV-1 has proven highly intricate, moreover the laborious and deficient conventional approaches has slackened the pace regarding the development of new vaccines. These concerns may be tackled with the development of HIV-2 vaccine as a natural control of HIV-1 that has been found in ancestors of HIV-2 i.e. African monkeys, mangabeys and macaques. Thereby, suggesting the notion of cross protection among HIV-2 and HIV-1. Assistance of bioinformatics along with vaccinomics strategy can bring about a quantum leap in this direction for surpassing the bottleneck in conventional approaches. These specifics together can add to our conception that HIV-2 vaccine design by in silico strategy will surely be a constructive approach for HIV-1 targeting.

  2. Living with HIV/AIDS in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter article is concerned with understanding what schools can and must do to sustain life in the age of human immunodeficiency virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The article looks at the incidence of AIDS and reviews legislation related to AIDS infection and school attendance. School policy as it relates to…

  3. Mass Media Use and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroman, Carolyn A.; Seltzer, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Examines the associations between media use and knowledge of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Explores how media consumption is related to attitudes toward AIDS and policy issues pertaining to AIDS. Finds newspaper users better informed than television viewers. Finds television news users more likely to be misinformed than frequent…

  4. Superintendents' Views on AIDS: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Katherine E.; Seaton, George

    1988-01-01

    Presents results from a survey of selected school superintendents about how to deal with the disease Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the schools. They are in agreement that AIDS education should be part of the regular school curriculum. There is no general agreement on how schools should deal with other aspects of the AIDS disease.…

  5. AIDS: Preparing Your School and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association of Principals, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Assistance to school principals in preparing their schools to respond to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) issue is provided in this booklet. The first section offers background information on the following: facts about AIDS/HIV; youth risk factors; knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Canadian youth; the content of AIDS education…

  6. Moya moya syndrome in a child with pyruvate kinase deficiency and combined prothrombotic factors.

    PubMed

    Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Voudris, Konstantinos A; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Vagiakou, Eleni; Magoufis, George; Koukoutsakis, Peter

    2007-04-01

    A 13-year-old Greek girl with pyruvate kinase deficiency and moya moya angiographic pattern is reported. She also had raised serum lipoprotein (a) concentration and was homozygous for the C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene. She presented with neonatal onset of anemia, hemolytic and aplastic crises, especially during infections, stroke, and also progressive motor and mental deterioration. A digital cranial angiography at 13 years revealed the typical angiographic findings of moya moya angiopathy. This is likely the first patient with pyruvate kinase deficiency and moya moya syndrome and also the combination of elevated serum lipoprotein (a) concentration and the C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene to be reported. In patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency and moya moya syndrome, a search for raised serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations and the C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene should be considered.

  7. Counseling Roles and AIDS. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas C.

    This fact sheet considers the counselor's role in dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Three counselor roles are examined: (1) direct counseling for those affected by AIDS; (2) coordination of support systems for victims of AIDS; and (3) education. Seven recommendations for health professionals dealing with AIDS patients are…

  8. AIDS and Ethics: The Agenda for Social Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses critical ethical issues for social workers concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS): (1) mandatory testing for AIDS; (2) the confidentiality of information related to AIDS; and (3) the delivery of services to persons with AIDS, their families, and their partners. (ABL)

  9. Isolated Vitamin D Deficiency Is Not Associated with Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome, but with Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sayki Arslan, Muyesser; Topaloglu, Oya; Ucan, Bekir; Karakose, Melia; Karbek, Basak; Tutal, Esra; Caliskan, Mustafa; Ginis, Zeynep; Cakal, Erman; Sahin, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to compare thyroid functions, thyroid autoantibodies, and the existence of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) according to vitamin D level. Materials and Methods. The study included age- and BMI-matched healthy volunteers with and without vitamin D deficiency. In addition, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome status was evaluated. Results. Anti-TPO positivity was significantly more common in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency, as compared to those with a normal 25(OH)D level. Furthermore, TSH levels were significantly lower in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency than in those with a normal 25(OH)D level. In addition, there was a significant weak inverse correlation between anti-TPO positivity and the 25(OH)D level and a positive correlation between the TSH level and 25(OH)D level. Only 1 thyroid function test result was compatible with NTIS among the participants with moderate vitamin D deficiency; therefore the difference was not significant. Conclusions. The prevalence of thyroid autoantibody positivity was higher in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency than in those with a normal 25(OH)D level. Additional large-scale studies must be conducted to determine if vitamin D deficiency plays a causal role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and NTIS. PMID:25654127

  10. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Santucci, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment. PMID:24891901

  11. Refractory and/or Relapsing Cryptococcosis Associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Clinical Features, Genotype, and Virulence Factors of Cryptococcus spp. Isolates.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Erika; Vitali, Lucia H; Tonani, Ludmilla; Kress, Marcia R Von Zeska; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Martinez, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Refractory and relapsing crytocococcosis in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients have a poor prognosis. The risk factors for this complicated infection course were evaluated by comparing refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in human immunodeficiency virus-coinfected patients (cohort 1) with another group of AIDS patients who adequately responded to antifungals (cohort 2). Except for one isolate of Cryptococcus gattii from a cohort 2 case, all other isolates were identified as Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, sex type α, genotype VNI, including Cryptococcus reisolated from the relapse or in the refractory state. No differences were observed with respect to Cryptococcus capsule size and in the melanin and phospholipase production. The cohort 1 patients presented higher prevalence of cryptococcemia, cerebral dissemination, chronic liver disease, and leucopenia, and have increased death rate. Apparently, the refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in the AIDS patients were more related to the host and the extent of the infection than to the fungal characteristics. PMID:26928832

  12. AIDS Resource Manual for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sara A., Ed.; And Others

    This manual presents, for educators, known facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), how it is transmitted, and how it can be prevented. Answers to common questions about AIDS are listed and a summary sheet is provided. A resource list is included that contains names, addresses, and phone numbers of organizations that produce or…

  13. Adolescents' Thoughts and Feelings about AIDS in Relation to Cognitive Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.; Murphy, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    Studied adolescents' (N=163) formal operational reasoning in relation to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) knowledge, AIDS fear, sexual knowledge, and reactions to AIDS victims. Found that advanced reasoning predicted better AIDS knowledge and general sexual knowledge. Advanced reasoning and AIDS knowledge were also linked with heightened…

  14. AIDS: What You Should Know. Student and Teacher Editions. The Merrill Wellness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Linda; Heit, Philip

    This two-document set includes a teacher guide and a student workbook designed to present factual information concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Topics discussed include; the immune system, history of AIDS, transmission of AIDS, detection of AIDS, risky behaviors, and current treatment and research of AIDS. The booklets…

  15. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide. Grades 7-10. Bulletin 1827, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    This curriculum guide on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was developed for students at the junior high school level. There are five major sections: (1) introduction, an overview of AIDS; (2) an overview of the history of AIDS; (3) basic immunology; (4) the effects of AIDS on the host; and (5) prevention of AIDS. The appendices include…

  16. Morquio syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IV B) associated with beta-galactosidase deficiency. Report of two cases.

    PubMed Central

    Groebe, H; Krins, M; Schmidberger, H; von Figura, K; Harzer, K; Kresse, H; Paschke, E; Sewell, A; Ullrich, K

    1980-01-01

    Two male patients, aged 6 and 25, both with normal intelligence and absence of neurological abnormalities, exhibited dysostosis multiplex, dwarfism, odontoid anomalies, cloudy corneas, exessive excretion of keratan sulfate, and abnormal urinary oligosaccharides. Leukocytes and fibroblasts of both patients were deficient in acid beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) and normal in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, the deficient enzyme in classical Morquio syndrome. The beta-gal deficiency was not due to an endogenous inhibitor, and the parents exhibited intermediate activities. Deficient beta-gal activity was observed toward p-nitrophenyl-beta-galactoside, 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-galactoside (4 MU-beta-gal), lactose, GM1 ganglioside, keratan sulfate, and asialofetuin (ASF). Under standard assay conditions, the residual activity was similar for all substrates tested. Toward p-nitrophenyl-beta-glactoside, the mutant enzyme behaved as a Km variant. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6446239

  17. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes--think in and outside the gut.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Samantha L; Kurian, Divya; Elliott, Mark S; Han, Zhiyong

    2015-11-01

    There is a very high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, which is defined by a serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] of lower than 20 ng/mL, in all populations of the world. Unfortunately, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes, including cystic fibrosis (CF), celiac disease (CD), short bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is higher than that in the general population, indicating the presence of disease-specific causative factors. In this review, we aimed to present clinical findings to highlight the roles of insufficient exposure to sunlight and inflammation in the development of vitamin D deficiency in patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes. Furthermore, we aimed to present experimental evidence that supported a role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of IBD. Finally, we reviewed clinical intervention strategies aiming to normalize vitamin D status in and even to improve the conditions of patients and to discuss certain issues that needed to be addressed in future research.

  18. [Urine osmotic pressure and deficiency-excess syndrome of renal disease: analysis of 428 cases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S

    1990-05-01

    By means of TCM differentiation of symptom-complexes, the authors tested and analysed the urine osmotic pressure (UOP) and the urine and plasma osmotic ratio (UPOR) for 428 cases of renal disease, with the conclusion that the UOP and the UPOR were within the normal value range for not only the 36 cases lack of clinical symptoms so as to be unable to have TCM classification identified, but also for 24 cases of Wind edema excess syndrome mainly caused by pathogenic Wind's invasion to the Lung. But for 74 cases of damp-heat Kidney impairment and 294 cases with the main symptom being Kidney deficiency [including weakness of Qi of Kidney, Yang deficiency of Spleen and Kidney, Yin deficiency of Liver and Kidney], the value of their UOP and the UPOR had the tendency of reduction (P less than 0.01), among which the value of the patients of Kidney Yang deficiency reduced most obviously. The further observation showed that, for the nocturia patients caused by renal disease, the value of UOP and the UPOR reduced more obviously than usual. Therefore the authors assert that the test on UOP and UPOR will offer an objective index to patients' nocturia and Kidney-Qi weakness. 60 cases with renal disease of Kidney deficiency syndrome and 27 cases of damp-heat Kidney impairment syndrome under the diagnosis and treatment based on an overall analysis of symptoms and signs leads to the following conclusion: With the elimination of pathogenic factors and recovery of kidney, the damp-heat Kidney impairment patients' UOP will be increased. The low UOP of patients caused simply by Kidney deficiency, however, will recover slower.

  19. Experimental oral polio vaccines and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hooper, E

    2001-06-29

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) of the common chimpanzee is widely acknowledged as the direct ancestor of HIV-1. There is increasing historical evidence that during the late 1950s, kidneys were routinely excised from central African chimpanzees by scientists who were collaborating with the polio vaccine research of Dr Hilary Koprowski, and sent - inter alia - to vaccine-making laboratories in the USA and Africa, and to unspecified destinations in Belgium. While there is no direct evidence that cells from these kidneys were used as a substrate for growing Dr Koprowski's oral polio vaccines, there is a startling coincidence between places in Africa where his CHAT vaccine was fed, and the first appearances in the world of HIV-1 group M and group-M-related AIDS. Because of the enormous implications of the hypothesis that AIDS may be an unintended iatrogenic (physician-caused) disease, it is almost inevitable that this theory will engender heated opposition from many of those in the scientific establishment, and those with vested interests.

  20. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome effectively treated with modified Atkins diet.

    PubMed

    Haberlandt, Edda; Karall, Daniela; Jud, Veronika; Baumgartner, Sara Sigl; Zotter, Sibylle; Rostasy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    This is a report on the successful treatment of a 6-year-old girl with genetically proven glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) with modified Atkins diet (MAD). GLUT1-DS is an inborn disorder of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, which leads to energy deficiency of the brain with a broad spectrum of neurological symptoms including therapy-resistant epilepsy. Usually classical ketogenic diet (KD) is the standard treatment for patients with GLUT1-DS. Treatment with MAD, a variant of KD, for an observation period of 17 months resulted in improvement of seizures, alertness, cognitive abilities, and electroencephalography in this patient.

  1. Immune reconstitution syndrome presenting as probable AIDS-related lymphoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report an unusual case of HIV-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, presenting as suspected AIDS-related lymphoma. Symptoms, initial investigations including fine-needle biopsy and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan were highly compatible with high grade AIDS-related lymphoma, however subsequently IRIS was diagnosed. We discuss pitfalls in the interpretation of diagnostic results in ARL versus IRIS. PMID:21955517

  2. Delayed diagnosis of congenital factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) in a girl with Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, G; Monagle, P; Barnes, C

    2006-10-01

    Patients with Turner's syndrome are at risk of X-linked recessive disorders. We report a case of a young girl with Turner's syndrome with persistent mildly abnormal coagulation studies associated with a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis. The abnormalities were initially attributed to intrahepatic cholestasis and were partially responsive to vitamin K. After an interval of several years an episode of unexplained iron deficiency anaemia prompted re-investigation of the mild coagulopathy. Disproportionate reduction in the factor IX concentration and restoration of haemostasis with factor IX concentrate lead to a revised provisional diagnosis of mild haemophilia B which was subsequently confirmed by sequencing the factor IX gene.

  3. Fumarate Hydratase-deficient Uterine Leiomyomas Occur in Both the Syndromic and Sporadic Settings.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Wesley J; Andrici, Juliana; Maclean, Fiona; Madadi-Ghahan, Raha; Farzin, Mahtab; Sioson, Loretta; Toon, Christopher W; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Pickett, Justine; Field, Michael; Crook, Ashley; Tucker, Katherine; Goodwin, Annabel; Anderson, Lyndal; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Grossmann, Petr; Martinek, Petr; Ondič, Ondrej; Hes, Ondřej; Trpkov, Kiril; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) syndrome secondary to germline fumarate hydratase (FH) mutation presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and a distinctive aggressive renal carcinoma. Identification of HLRCC patients presenting first with uterine leiomyomas may allow early intervention for renal carcinoma. We reviewed the morphology and immunohistochemical (IHC) findings in patients with uterine leiomyomas and confirmed or presumed HLRCC. IHC was also performed on a tissue microarray of unselected uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas underwent Sanger and massively parallel sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. All 5 patients with HLRCC had at least 1 FH-deficient leiomyoma: defined as completely negative FH staining with positive internal controls. One percent (12/1152) of unselected uterine leiomyomas but 0 of 88 leiomyosarcomas were FH deficient. FH-deficient leiomyoma patients were younger (42.7 vs. 48.8 y, P=0.024) and commonly demonstrated a distinctive hemangiopericytomatous vasculature. Other features reported to be associated with FH-deficient leiomyomas (hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, inclusion-like nucleoli, stromal edema) were inconstantly present. Somatic FH mutations were identified in 6 of 10 informative unselected FH-deficient leiomyomas. None of these mutations were found in the germline. We conclude that, while the great majority of patients with HLRCC will have FH-deficient leiomyomas, 1% of all uterine leiomyomas are FH deficient usually due to somatic inactivation. Although IHC screening for FH may have a role in confirming patients at high risk for hereditary disease before genetic testing, prospective identification of FH-deficient leiomyomas is of limited clinical benefit in screening unselected patients because of the relatively high incidence of somatic mutations.

  4. Fumarate Hydratase–deficient Uterine Leiomyomas Occur in Both the Syndromic and Sporadic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Wesley J.; Andrici, Juliana; Maclean, Fiona; Madadi-Ghahan, Raha; Farzin, Mahtab; Sioson, Loretta; Toon, Christopher W.; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Pickett, Justine; Field, Michael; Crook, Ashley; Tucker, Katherine; Goodwin, Annabel; Anderson, Lyndal; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Grossmann, Petr; Martinek, Petr; Ondič, Ondrej; Hes, Ondřej; Trpkov, Kiril; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J.; Dwight, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) syndrome secondary to germline fumarate hydratase (FH) mutation presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and a distinctive aggressive renal carcinoma. Identification of HLRCC patients presenting first with uterine leiomyomas may allow early intervention for renal carcinoma. We reviewed the morphology and immunohistochemical (IHC) findings in patients with uterine leiomyomas and confirmed or presumed HLRCC. IHC was also performed on a tissue microarray of unselected uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas underwent Sanger and massively parallel sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. All 5 patients with HLRCC had at least 1 FH-deficient leiomyoma: defined as completely negative FH staining with positive internal controls. One percent (12/1152) of unselected uterine leiomyomas but 0 of 88 leiomyosarcomas were FH deficient. FH-deficient leiomyoma patients were younger (42.7 vs. 48.8 y, P=0.024) and commonly demonstrated a distinctive hemangiopericytomatous vasculature. Other features reported to be associated with FH-deficient leiomyomas (hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, inclusion-like nucleoli, stromal edema) were inconstantly present. Somatic FH mutations were identified in 6 of 10 informative unselected FH-deficient leiomyomas. None of these mutations were found in the germline. We conclude that, while the great majority of patients with HLRCC will have FH-deficient leiomyomas, 1% of all uterine leiomyomas are FH deficient usually due to somatic inactivation. Although IHC screening for FH may have a role in confirming patients at high risk for hereditary disease before genetic testing, prospective identification of FH-deficient leiomyomas is of limited clinical benefit in screening unselected patients because of the relatively high incidence of somatic mutations. PMID:26574848

  5. Fumarate Hydratase-deficient Uterine Leiomyomas Occur in Both the Syndromic and Sporadic Settings.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Wesley J; Andrici, Juliana; Maclean, Fiona; Madadi-Ghahan, Raha; Farzin, Mahtab; Sioson, Loretta; Toon, Christopher W; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Pickett, Justine; Field, Michael; Crook, Ashley; Tucker, Katherine; Goodwin, Annabel; Anderson, Lyndal; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Grossmann, Petr; Martinek, Petr; Ondič, Ondrej; Hes, Ondřej; Trpkov, Kiril; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) syndrome secondary to germline fumarate hydratase (FH) mutation presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and a distinctive aggressive renal carcinoma. Identification of HLRCC patients presenting first with uterine leiomyomas may allow early intervention for renal carcinoma. We reviewed the morphology and immunohistochemical (IHC) findings in patients with uterine leiomyomas and confirmed or presumed HLRCC. IHC was also performed on a tissue microarray of unselected uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas underwent Sanger and massively parallel sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. All 5 patients with HLRCC had at least 1 FH-deficient leiomyoma: defined as completely negative FH staining with positive internal controls. One percent (12/1152) of unselected uterine leiomyomas but 0 of 88 leiomyosarcomas were FH deficient. FH-deficient leiomyoma patients were younger (42.7 vs. 48.8 y, P=0.024) and commonly demonstrated a distinctive hemangiopericytomatous vasculature. Other features reported to be associated with FH-deficient leiomyomas (hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, inclusion-like nucleoli, stromal edema) were inconstantly present. Somatic FH mutations were identified in 6 of 10 informative unselected FH-deficient leiomyomas. None of these mutations were found in the germline. We conclude that, while the great majority of patients with HLRCC will have FH-deficient leiomyomas, 1% of all uterine leiomyomas are FH deficient usually due to somatic inactivation. Although IHC screening for FH may have a role in confirming patients at high risk for hereditary disease before genetic testing, prospective identification of FH-deficient leiomyomas is of limited clinical benefit in screening unselected patients because of the relatively high incidence of somatic mutations. PMID:26574848

  6. Treacher Collins Syndrome: A Case Report and a Brief Review on Diagnostic Aids

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann; Pidamale, Raghavendra

    2011-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (Mandibulofacial dysostosis) is characterized by deafness, hypoplasia of facial bones (mandible, maxilla and cheek bone), antimongoloid slant of palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower lid and bilateral anomalies of the auricle. Hypoplasia of the facial bones may be the first indicator of the disorder. We present a case report of Treacher Collins syndrome with their extraoral findings, intraoral findings and their treatment plan. We have also included the various etiological factors, clinical diagnostic aids, and multidisciplinary team approach.

  7. Treacher Collins Syndrome: A Case Report and a Brief Review on Diagnostic Aids.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sowmya B; Thomas, Ann; Pidamale, Raghavendra

    2011-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (Mandibulofacial dysostosis) is characterized by deafness, hypoplasia of facial bones (mandible, maxilla and cheek bone), antimongoloid slant of palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower lid and bilateral anomalies of the auricle. Hypoplasia of the facial bones may be the first indicator of the disorder. We present a case report of Treacher Collins syndrome with their extraoral findings, intraoral findings and their treatment plan. We have also included the various etiological factors, clinical diagnostic aids, and multidisciplinary team approach.

  8. HIV/AIDS Education for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colson, Steven E.; Carlson, Judith K.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses human immune deficiency disease, the role of education as a prevention tool, a rationale for the inclusion of students with special needs in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education, a scope and sequence of skills related to AIDS, suggestions for implementing objectives across curricular areas, and multimedia…

  9. Attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals towards people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akgun Kostak, Melahat; Unsar, Serap; Kurt, Seda; Erol, Ozgul

    2012-10-01

    Health professionals caring for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) show poor or negative attitudes because of fear of contagion. Therefore, it is important to know the attitudes of midwives' and nurses' towards people living with HIV/AIDS. The aim of this descriptive and cross-sectional study is to assess the attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals to people living with HIV/AIDS and to identify factors that affect these attitudes. A group of 46 midwives and 192 nurses working in hospitals were included in the study. Data were collected through AIDS Attitude Scale. Age, professional experience, number of children and marital status influenced the attitudes of the participants towards people living with HIV/AIDS. We concluded that higher level of education appear to positively influence the attitudes of the participants. Education programmes including evidence-based nursing implications might be planned to improve positive attitudes and to prevent stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS.

  10. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring. PMID:26924592

  11. Living with AIDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graubard, Stephen R., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Because events move swiftly in the contemporary world, it is easy to forget that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a phenomenon of the 1980s. It is generally agreed that this is only the very beginning of a scientific investigation that will go on well into the 21st century. This issue attempts to provide some of the basic information…

  12. AIDS: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heather G., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews the course of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its current status, examining changing patterns of sexual behavior and intravenous drug use, the distribution of cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the results of intervention efforts under way. It also discusses prevention…

  13. Street Youth & AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Joyce L.; And Others

    Interviews were conducted with 712 Canadian street youth (ages 15-20 years) to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Youth were interviewed in 10 cities across Canada on the basis of 5 street culture lifestyles: prostitution, drug…

  14. Creatine Deficiency Syndrome could be Missed Easily: A Case Report of Guanidinoacetate Methyltransferase Deficiency Presented with Neurodevelopmental Delay, Seizures, and Behavioral Changes, but Normal Structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Pacheva, Iliyana; Ivanov, Ivan; Penkov, Marin; Kancheva, Daliya; Jordanova, Albena; Ivanova, Mariya

    2016-09-01

    A case with GAMT deficiency (homozygous c.64dupG mutation) presented with neurodevelopmental delay, rare seizures, behavioral disturbances, and mild hypotonia, posing diagnostic challenges. Metabolic investigations showed low creatinine in plasma and urine (guanidinoacetate couldn't be investigated) and slightly elevated lactate. MRI was normal. Correct diagnosis was possible only after MR spectroscopy was performed at age 5½ years. A homozygous c.64dupG mutation of the GAMT gene was identified in the proband. In conclusion, every case with neurodevelopmental delay or arrest, especially when accompanied by seizures, behavioral impairment, muscle hypotonia or extrapyramidal symptoms should undergo MRI with MR spectroscopy. Normal structural MRI doesn't exclude a creatine deficiency syndrome. Biochemical investigations of guanidinoacetate, creatine, and creatinine in body fluid should be done to diagnose cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes and to specify the deficient enzyme. Thus, a treatable disease will not be missed. PMID:27650626

  15. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  16. Wild birds of declining European species are dying from a thiamine deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Lennart; Hägerroth, Per-Åke; Åkerman, Gun; Hanson, Marsha; Tjärnlund, Ulla; Hansson, Tomas; Hallgrimsson, Gunnar Thor; Zebühr, Yngve; Broman, Dag; Mörner, Torsten; Sundberg, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Wild birds of several species are dying in large numbers from an idiopathic paralytic disease in the Baltic Sea area. Here, we demonstrate strong relationships between this disease, breeding failure, and thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in eggs, pulli, and full-grown individuals. Thiamine is essential for vertebrates, and its diphosphorylated form functions as a cofactor for several life sustaining enzymes, whereas the triphosphorylated form is necessary for the functioning of neuronal membranes. Paralyzed individuals were remedied by thiamine treatment. Moreover, thiamine deficiency and detrimental effects on thiamine-dependent enzymes were demonstrated in the yolk, liver, and brain. We propose that the mortality and breeding failure are part of a thiamine deficiency syndrome, which may have contributed significantly to declines in many bird populations during the last decades. PMID:19597145

  17. Hypocretin-1 deficiency in a girl with ROHHAD syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Karlien; Verloo, Patrick; Verhelst, Hélène; Van Coster, Rudy; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2013-09-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare and complex pediatric syndrome, essentially caused by dysfunction of 3 vital systems regulating endocrine, respiratory, and autonomic nervous system functioning. The clinical spectrum of ROHHAD is broad, but sleep/wake disorders have received relatively little attention so far, although the central hypothalamic dysfunction would make the occurrence of sleep symptoms likely. In this case report, we expand the phenotype of ROHHAD with a number of striking sleep symptoms that together can be classified as a secondary form of narcolepsy. We present a 7-year-old girl with ROHHAD who displayed the classic features of narcolepsy with cataplexy: excessive daytime sleepiness with daytime naps, visual hallucinations, and partial cataplexy reflected in intermittent loss of facial muscle tone. Nocturnal polysomnography revealed sleep fragmentation and a sleep-onset REM period characteristic for narcolepsy. The diagnosis was confirmed by showing an absence of hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. We discuss potential pathophysiological implications as well as symptomatic treatment options.

  18. Conjunctival mucin deficiency in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Moretti, Costanzo; Micera, Alessandra; Bonini, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Sex steroid hormones are essential for a healthy ocular surface and the androgen receptor impairment found in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has been described to cause meibomian gland dysfunction and functional dry eye for lipid tear film layer instability. However, it has not been reported if the mucous layer is also affected. A 37-year-old CAIS patient with persistent symptoms of dry eye underwent ophthalmological examination and was evaluated for qualitative and quantitative tear function tests and conjunctival cytology. Samples obtained from the conjunctival epithelium were stained for histology and immunohistochemistry and compared with three age-matched female controls. Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR for MUC1 and MUC5AC were also performed on these samples. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR showed a decrease in the expression of MUC1 and MUC5AC in CAIS. Changes in the tear film mucous layer were accompanied by a reduction in the tear film break up time test. This is the first report describing mucous layer alteration associated with androgen receptor impairment. Decreased mucin levels contribute in explaining the tear film instability in CAIS and should be considered an additional cause of dry eye in sex steroid hormone pathology.

  19. Deficiency of pluripotent hemopoietic progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Geissler, K; Hinterberger, W; Jäger, U; Bettelheim, P; Neumann, E; Haas, O; Ambros, P; Chott, A; Radaszkiewicz, T; Lechner, K

    1988-07-01

    Pluripotent (CFU-MIX), erythroid (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitor cells were examined in bone marrow (BM) from 23 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Patients were grouped according to the FAB classification: Refractory anemia (RA), n = 3; RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), n = 3; RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), n = 8; RA with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), n = 7; chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), n = 2. In FAB groups RA, RARS, RAEB and RAEBt CFU-GM concentrations were normal or decreased but both CMML-patients had increased CFU-GM values. Abnormal cluster growth was observed in 9 of 23 MDS-patients. BFU-E colony formation was subnormal in all cases. Mixed-colony assay values were at the lower limit of controls in one patient and decreased in the remaining 22 MDS-patients. A similar growth pattern of hemopoietic progenitor cells was observed in 19 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), who were studied for comparison. These data suggest a quantitative or qualitative/functional defect of the pluripotent progenitor cell compartment as the major cause for the cytopenia in MDS-patients.

  20. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  1. Social support and response to AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arijit; Tracy, Melissa; Aiello, Allison; Des Jarlais, Don C; Galea, Sandro

    2008-05-01

    Negative public reactions to emerging infectious diseases can adversely affect population health. We assessed whether social support was associated with knowledge of, worry about, and attitudes towards AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Our findings suggest that social support may be central to our understanding of public responses to emerging infectious diseases.

  2. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS). Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. PMID:26298651

  3. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease. PMID:25877652

  4. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease.

  5. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients With Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Wu, Angela; Linos, Eleni; Parimi, Neeta; Lee, Wayne; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Asgari, Maryam M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate vitamin D status in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) who practice photo-protection because of their genetic predisposition to skin cancer and to determine risk factors for deficiency. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic medical centers. Patients Forty-one ambulatory patients with BCNS who participated in a 2-year chemoprevention clinical trial. Population-based controls (n=360) were selected and matched by age, sex, Fitzpatrick skin type, and season/geography. Main Outcome Measures Levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) and vitamin D deficiency (defined as a 25[OH]D level of ≤20 ng/mL). Results Twenty-three patients with BCNS (56%) were vitamin D deficient. Patients with BCNS had mean 25(OH)D levels below those of the general population (−3 ng/mL; P=.02) and were 3 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (56% vs 18%; P<.001). Levels of 25(OH)D were lower in patients who were overweight (−3.0 ng/mL; P=.04) and who had blood collected in the winter compared with the summer (−7.1 ng/mL; P<.001). Conclusion Patients with BCNS may be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency, depending on their adherence to photoprotection practices. PMID:20956641

  6. The Tragedy of AIDS: A New Trial for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Linda C.; Poteet, Gaye W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents some recent facts regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses the needs of nursing students for knowledge about this disease and how to protect themselves while caring for patients. Discusses the fear of contagion among health workers. (CH)

  7. AIDS and Herpes Carry Weighty Policy Implications for Your Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1985-01-01

    Few schools have policies to deal specifically with herpes and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses some schools and states that have developed such policies and includes a source list for more information. (MD)

  8. AIDS, Social Sciences, and Health Education: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, June E.

    1986-01-01

    Explores the nature of the new AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) virus and its diseases, avoidance strategies, neurologic disease and AIDS, co-factors involved in progression from asymptomatic infection to disease, AIDS versus civil liberties--barriers to effective communication, the importance of language in communication, and health…

  9. Latinas and HIV/AIDS: Implications for the 90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Miguelina

    1991-01-01

    Among Latinas, the number of cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is increasing relentlessly. From August 1989 to August 1990, there was a 53 percent increase nationally in cumulative AIDS cases among Latinas. In New York City, AIDS is the leading cause of death among Latinas aged 25-34. The conditions and circumstances that place…

  10. The Science of AIDS. Readings from Scientific American Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific American, Inc., New York, NY.

    This collection of scientific articles on the subject of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) covers many facets of the physical and social aspects of the disease. Technical articles deal with the molecular and cellular biology of AIDS and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The national and international epidemiology of AIDS and HIV are…

  11. Training Medical Professionals in the Prevention and Intervention of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bander, Ricki S.

    Most physicians can expect to counsel a family or individual concerned about possible exposure to acquired immue deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Medical professionals need comprehensive AIDS training and educational programs which cover medical, epidemiologic, psychosocial, and neuropsychiatric aspects of AIDS. Counseling psychologists can provide a…

  12. AIDS: What Early Childhood Educators Need To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spar, Ruth

    Noting that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is expected to become the fifth leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 4, this paper provides relevant information on AIDS and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) to help educators understand that they can work with children and adults who are HIV positive or who have AIDS. The…

  13. "Repellent and Shameful": The Portrayal of AIDS in "America Responds to AIDS" Broadcast Public Service Announcements, 1987-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    To address a need for increased discussion of the dangers of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and an increased educative effort to prevent people from acquiring HIV infection, a study investigated one element of an AIDS campaign of the past: the "America Responds to AIDS" television and radio public service announcements (PSAs). Taking…

  14. Confronting the Lack of Resources for Patients with AIDS Dementia Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Krista C.; McGill, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Notes that social workers face new challenges in meeting changing service needs of people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses San Francisco's efforts to serve people with AIDS who are suffering from AIDS-related cognitive impairments that range from mild cognitive disturbance to moderate and severe AIDS dementia complex…

  15. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S.; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T.; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V.; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17+ T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  16. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kreins, Alexandra Y; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie

    2015-09-21

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17(+) T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Does it Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir; Attar, Suzan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Vitamin D has been found to be strongly associated with many systemic disorders. There has been an augmented interest within the medical community in vitamin D, especially its deficiency, in various systemic disorders. Although the role of vitamin D deficiency in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not yet been established, studies are underway to clearly establish its role in the disease. The objective of our study was to elucidate and establish the role of vitamin D deficiency in IBS patients compared to a healthy control group. Methods This study is a comparative case control study of vitamin D deficiency in patients with IBS diagnosed with ROME 3 criteria of classification (the third ROME foundation classification) to an age and gender matched healthy control group. The vitamin D level was measured in both cohorts for comparison and the results interpreted statistically. Sixty patients with IBS and 100 healthy individuals were included as test and control groups, respectively, in the study. The mean serum vitamin D level (nmol/L) of IBS patients was compared to the control group. Results Vitamin D deficiency was detected in 49 patients (82%) in the IBS group and 31 patients (31%) in the control group. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean vitamin D level (p=0.025) between the IBS group and control group. Conclusions Our study shows that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with IBS and these results seem to have therapeutic implications. Vitamin D supplementation could play a therapeutic role in the control of IBS. PMID:25960837

  18. Workers' Reactions to AIDS and Other Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Eugene P.; And Others

    Previous research on the public's response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been concerned with attitudes and knowledge in relation to the disease itself. This study investigated people's willingness to interact with individuals with AIDS in the workplace. Participants (N=358) were college students with an average age of 25.…

  19. Illness Cognition and Responses to AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, George D.

    Along with the current epidemic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has come what some have called an epidemic of fear. Two studies were conducted to explore lay responses to AIDS from the perspective of recent research on how lay people process illness information. The research examines the cognitive organization of disease information…

  20. Judicial Attitude toward Legal Rights and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavis, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    Caselaw that functions as law until statutes are enacted has been characteristic of legal issues surrounding the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) diseases. In most cases such caselaw has protected the civil rights of persons with HIV/AIDS under established law as well as the traditions of Western…

  1. AIDS Policies and Resources for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Ralph; Klein, Charlie

    This report was developed to assist California community college districts in developing policies and educational programs to prevent the further spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). First, the report discusses the epidemiology of AIDS, and outlines institutional and legislative actions taken to provide public education about the…

  2. College Students' Perception of AIDS Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Roger C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated college students' (N=60) perceptions of victims of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) based on how the victim contracted the disease. Found in nondeterioration condition victims contracting AIDS via sexual encounters or illicit drug injection were perceived as less trustworthy, less moral, and less desirable as a prospective…

  3. Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

  4. Topoisomerase I deficiency causes RNA polymerase II accumulation and increases AID abundance in immunoglobulin variable genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Cao, Zheng; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2015-06-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a DNA cytosine deaminase that diversifies immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulation correlates with AID recruitment. However, a direct link between Pol II and AID abundance has not been tested. We used the DT40 B-cell line to manipulate levels of Pol II by decreasing topoisomerase I (Top1), which relaxes DNA supercoiling in front of the transcription complex. Top1 was decreased by stable transfection of a short hairpin RNA against Top1, which produced an accumulation of Pol II in transcribed genes, compared to cells transfected with sh-control RNA. The increased Pol II density enhanced AID recruitment to variable genes in the λ light chain locus, and resulted in higher levels of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. It has been proposed by another lab that AID itself might directly suppress Top1 to increase somatic hypermutation. However, we found that in both AID(+/+) and AID(-/-) B cells from DT40 and mice, Top1 protein levels were identical, indicating that the presence or absence of AID did not decrease Top1 expression. Rather, our results suggest that the mechanism for increased diversity when Top1 is reduced is that Pol II accumulates and recruits AID to variable genes.

  5. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract.

  6. Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome as a Rare Presentation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh; Mohammadi, S. Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome is a triad consisting of ipsilateral optic atrophy, contralateral optic disc edema, and ipsilateral anosmia in the absence of an intracranial mass. Vitamin B12 plays an important role in DNA synthesis, and its deficiency causes peripheral neuropathy, myeloneuropathy, and, very rarely, optic neuropathy. Case Presentation In this study, we describe a 34-year-old male who presented with progressive loss of visual acuity and field. Fundoscopy showed optic disc edema with telangiectasia in the right eye, while the left eye had optic disc atrophy. We ruled out nearly all possible and common causes of optic neuropathy, and vitamin B12 deficiency was finally diagnosed. After treatment with vitamin B12, the patient improved. Conclusions Demyelinating disease, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, autoimmune disease, and hereditary optic neuropathy could cause optic neuropathy. Normal CBC parameters and the absence of clinical manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency could not rule out its diagnosis. Careful physical examinations and history-taking with a classical approach led us to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment. PMID:27621919

  7. Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome as a Rare Presentation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh; Mohammadi, S. Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome is a triad consisting of ipsilateral optic atrophy, contralateral optic disc edema, and ipsilateral anosmia in the absence of an intracranial mass. Vitamin B12 plays an important role in DNA synthesis, and its deficiency causes peripheral neuropathy, myeloneuropathy, and, very rarely, optic neuropathy. Case Presentation In this study, we describe a 34-year-old male who presented with progressive loss of visual acuity and field. Fundoscopy showed optic disc edema with telangiectasia in the right eye, while the left eye had optic disc atrophy. We ruled out nearly all possible and common causes of optic neuropathy, and vitamin B12 deficiency was finally diagnosed. After treatment with vitamin B12, the patient improved. Conclusions Demyelinating disease, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, autoimmune disease, and hereditary optic neuropathy could cause optic neuropathy. Normal CBC parameters and the absence of clinical manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency could not rule out its diagnosis. Careful physical examinations and history-taking with a classical approach led us to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.

  8. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  9. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes Tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Lissandra Castellan; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M.; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H.; Hughes, Zoë A.; Krystal, John H.; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. Dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm HDC deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify histamine-dopamine interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  10. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Castellan Baldan, Lissandra; Williams, Kyle A; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Pogorelov, Vladimir; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H; Hughes, Zoë A; Krystal, John H; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W; Pittenger, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine (DA) D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal DA levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. DA D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm histidine decarboxylase deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify HA-DA interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  11. Deficient auditory processing in children with Asperger Syndrome, as indexed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Ceponiene, Rita; Kielinen, Marko; Suominen, Kalervo; Jäntti, Ville; Linna, Sirkka Liisa; Moilanen, Irma; Näätänen, Risto

    2003-03-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is characterized by normal language development but deficient understanding and use of the intonation and prosody of speech. While individuals with AS report difficulties in auditory perception, there are no studies addressing auditory processing at the sensory level. In this study, event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded for syllables and tones in children with AS and in their control counterparts. Children with AS displayed abnormalities in transient sound-feature encoding, as indexed by the obligatory ERPs, and in sound discrimination, as indexed by the mismatch negativity. These deficits were more severe for the tone stimuli than for the syllables. These results indicate that auditory sensory processing is deficient in children with AS, and that these deficits might be implicated in the perceptual problems encountered by children with AS.

  12. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14highCD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27lo) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  13. Cholestasis Reveals Severe Cortisol Deficiency in Neonatal Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mauvais, Francois-Xavier; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Davit-Spraul, Anne; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Brauner, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cholestasis has been reported during the course of congenital hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency, but crucial information is lacking regarding both its origin and prognosis. We aimed to characterize the course of cholestasis and factors contributing to it in patients with deficiency due to pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS). Methods We conducted a retrospective single-center, case-cohort study including 16 patients with PSIS diagnosed before one year of age. We collected clinical and biological parameters from medical records and compared the characteristics of the endocrine syndrome in PSIS patients with and without cholestasis. Results 5/16 patients had cholestasis, all with a neonatal onset and multiple hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency. Patients with cholestasis presented with lower Apgar score and higher rate of ophthalmic malformations: 3/5 vs 1/11, p = 0.03 and 5/5 vs 4/11, p = 0.02, respectively. The plasma cortisol level was strongly decreased in patients with cholestasis: 12.4 ng/mL (8–15 ng/mL) vs 79.4 ng/mL (10–210 ng/mL), p = 0.04. Cholestasis resolved within 9 months following hormone supplementation. No development of chronic liver disease was observed during a median follow-up of 9.4 years (range, 1.3–13.3 years). Conclusions Cholestasis is a frequent symptom at presentation of PSIS during the neonatal period that may help earlier diagnosis and that indicates a profound cortisol deficiency. PMID:26829045

  14. How To Talk to Your Teens and Children about AIDS = Como hablar con sus adolescentes y sus ninos sobre el SIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    Two brochures, one in English and one in Spanish, provide parents with basic information that will enable them to educate their children about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Contents address 11 questions: (1) What is AIDS? (2) How do you get AIDS? (3) How is AIDS not spread? (4) Who can get AIDS? (5) How can you tell if someone has…

  15. Hematological aspect of Rh deficiency syndrome: a case report and a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, R.; Shojania, A.M.

    1987-03-01

    The hematological aspects of the original case of Rhmod are reported. The subject, as in other reported cases, had a chronic hemolytic anemia characterized by stomatocytosis, reduced osmotic fragility, and abnormal autohemolysis correctable with the addition of glucose. The /sup 51/Cr red cell survival studies showed the spleen to be the preferential site of red cell destruction and splenectomy produced a dramatic improvement in red cell survival. The topic of Rh deficiency syndrome (Rhnull and Rhmod) is briefly reviewed with regard to the number of cases reported, to genetic aspects, to the hematological findings, and to the results of splenectomy.

  16. Multiglandular Hormone Deficiency in a Patient with Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Then, Cornelia; Ritzel, Katrin; Seibold, Christa; Mann, Johannes F. E.; Reincke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare but potentially fatal disorder characterized by a loss of fluid and proteins into the interstitial space leading to intravascular hypovolemia up to the point of hypovolemic shock. We report the case of a 64-year-old man with SCLS and multiple hormone abnormalities (primary hypothyroidism, hypoadrenalism, and hypogonadism), deficiency of hormone binding globulins, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins, theophylline, and terbutaline. Strikingly, with the dissolution of peripheral edema, hormone levels improved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SCLS associated with polyglandular abnormalities. PMID:25685157

  17. Serum antibody-negative Goodpasture syndrome with delta granule pool storage deficiency and eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Kussman, Ashleigh; Gohara, Amira

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture syndrome is a rare, life-threatening autoimmune disease characterized by a triad of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, a hemorrhagic pulmonary condition and the presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies. The antibodies initiate destruction of the kidney glomeruli, resulting in a focal necrotizing glomerulitis, which may progress rapidly to renal failure. Autoantibody-mediated damage of alveolar basement membranes leads to diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, which in some cases may be severe enough to cause respiratory failure. Many clinicians use a variety of assays to detect serum anti-GBM antibodies; however, these tests may be falsely negative in up to 15% of patients with Goodpasture syndrome. Here, we report an unusual case of a 40-year-old man with clinical evidence of Goodpasture syndrome, a negative anti-GBM antibody serum result, eosinophilia and delta granule pool storage deficiency. After a 14-day hospital stay and extensive workup, as well as treatment with antibiotics, steroids and ventilator support for respiratory failure, the patient continued to deteriorate and entered multisystem organ failure. The family decided to withdraw ventilator support, and the patient expired. Immunofluorescence testing for anti-GBM autoantibodies on lung and kidney tissues during an autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Goodpasture syndrome. PMID:26069804

  18. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  19. The role of nurses in the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome policy process in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Phaladze, N A

    2003-03-01

    In Botswana, there is dearth of literature on the role of nursing in health-care policy and resource allocation and yet nurses constitute the majority (85%) of health manpower. The health-care delivery system depends mostly on nurses for service provision. There were two main purposes of this study: first, to gather descriptive data from major key players (with particular emphasis on nurses) concerning knowledge of the policy process and resource allocation for management and care of clients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Botswana; and, second, to identify nurse characteristics (e.g. position, education, experience, job category) associated with motivation to influence health-care policy in HIV/AIDS management and care in Botswana. A policy process conceptual framework was used to guide data collection and analysis. A case-study research method was used to conduct in-depth interviews from a purposive sample of 19 policy makers, and a survey questionnaire was used to collect data from a purposive sample of 95 registered nurses from six study sites in Botswana. The study findings indicate minimal participation of nurses in health-care policy process and resource allocation. The demographic variable of position was a predictor of the involvement of nurses in policy and in budgetary decisions. Both survey and interview data indicated that this minimal participation of nurses in the policy process resulted in implementation problems, thus compromising service provision. Implications of the findings for the nursing profession, nursing practice and policy, which address the importance of nurses' involvement, are discussed. PMID:12581124

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Survey in African-Americans with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, Claire; McCarty, Frances; Hankerson-Dyson, Dana; DiClemente, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of the current study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a culturally- and stage-of-disease-appropriate measure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among a population of African-American individuals with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) using a mixed-method design. Design Data were collected in two phases. In phase 1, qualitative data were used to refine an existing CAM measure for the specific study population in the present study. In phase 2, this refined instrument was implemented in a larger sample. The resulting numeric data were analyzed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the revised CAM instrument. Setting Data were collected from patients who were receiving care from the infectious disease clinic of a large, public, urban hospital in the Southeastern United States. Subjects Patients were eligible to participate if they (1) were receiving their care from the clinic, (2) had an AIDS diagnosis, (3) were identified as African-American, (4) were ≥21 years of age, (5) spoke English, and (6) were not cognitively impaired. Measures Focus groups in phase 1 were conducted with a semistructured focus group guide. Participants also completed a basic sociodemographic survey. Phase 2 participants used programmed laptops to answer questions about their CAM use and several sociodemographic questions. Results Information from the focus groups prompted some substantive revisions in the already-existing CAM survey. The revised instrument had satisfactory face validity and adequate test–retest reliability (r = 0.79). Furthermore, the instrument factored in a manner that was interpretable and consistent with prior findings. Conclusions In order for human immunodeficiency virus health care providers to provide the best care to their patients, they need to be informed about the types and frequency of CAM use among their patients. This can be accomplished by methodologically developing

  1. Orchitis and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected cells in reproductive tissues from men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pudney, J.; Anderson, D.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the male reproductive tract and the sexual transmission of HIV-1 through semen are poorly understood. To address these issues, the authors performed morphologic and immunocytochemical analyses of reproductive tissues obtained at autopsy from 43 male acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing different subpopulations of white blood cells were used to detect leukocyte infiltration and map the location of potential lymphocytic/monocytic HIV-1 host cells and immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques were used to detect HIV-1-infected cells in the testis, excurrent ducts, and prostate. Distinct pathologic changes were observed in a majority of testes of AIDS patients that included azoospermia, hyalinization of the boundary wall of seminiferous tubules, and lymphocytic infiltration of the interstitium. The reproductive excurrent ducts and prostate appeared morphologically normal except for the presence of focal accumulations of white blood cells in the connective tissue stroma. In the testis many white blood cells were shown to be CD4+, indicating the presence of abundant host cells (T-helper/inducer lymphocytes and macrophages) for HIV-1. Furthermore macrophages and cells of lymphocytic morphology were observed migrating across the boundary walls of hyalinized seminiferous in tubules to enter the lumen. In 9 of the 23 cases tested for HIV-1 protein expression by immunocytochemistry. HIV-1 + cells of lymphocytic/monocytic morphology were found in the seminiferous tubules and interstitium of the testis, epididymal epithelium, and connective tissue of the epididymis and prostate. One patient with epididymal blockage had accumulations of HIV-1-antigen-positive cells of macrophages morphology in the distended lumen of the efferent ducts. There was no evidence of active HIV-1 infection in germ cells or Sertoli cells of the seminiferous

  2. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  3. Toenail onychomycosis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: treatment with terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Herranz, P; García, J; De Lucas, R; González, J; Peña, J M; Díaz, R; Casado, M

    1997-10-01

    Skin infections caused by dermatophytes are one of the most frequent dermatological complications in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) resulting from infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Tinea unguium associated with AIDS is characterized by being clinically more aggressive and therapeutically more difficult to treat than in the general population. Terbinafine is considered to be a first-choice option for the treatment of dermatophyte onychomycosis in immunocompetent individuals. This drug has been used in a series of 21 HIV-positive patients diagnosed with tinea unguium for 1 year in the University Hospital La Paz, Madrid. All patients underwent a subsequent clinical follow-up for 6 months. The results showed a high percentage of clinical and mycological cures, as well as maintenance of the response after follow-up; no drug interactions or significant adverse effects related to the drug under study were recorded.

  4. [The use of growth hormone to treat endocrine-metabolic disturbances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients].

    PubMed

    Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana A; da Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2008-07-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids) was initially related to HIV-associated wasting syndrome, and its metabolic disturbances to altered body composition. After Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) was started, malnutrition has declined and HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome has emerged as an important metabolic disorder. Aids is also characterized by hormonal disturbances, principally in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. The use of recombinant human GH (hrGH) was formerly indicated to treat wasting syndrome, in order to increase lean body mass. Even though the use of hrGH in lipodystrophy syndrome has been considered, the decrease in insulin sensitivity is a limitation for its use, which has not been officially approved yet. Diversity in therapeutic regimen is another limitation to its use in Aids patients. The present study has reviewed the main HIV-related endocrine-metabolic disorders as well as the use of hrGH in such conditions.

  5. Neonatal liver failure and Leigh syndrome possibly due to CoQ-responsive OXPHOS deficiency.

    PubMed

    Leshinsky-Silver, E; Levine, A; Nissenkorn, A; Barash, V; Perach, M; Buzhaker, E; Shahmurov, M; Polak-Charcon, S; Lev, D; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2003-08-01

    CoQ transfers electrons from complexes I and II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain to complex III. There are very few reports on human CoQ deficiency. The clinical presentation is usually characterized by: epilepsy, muscle weakness, ataxia, cerebellar atrophy, migraine, myogloblinuria and developmental delay. We describe a patient who presented with neonatal liver and pancreatic insufficiency, tyrosinemia and hyperammonemia and later developed sensorineural hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. Liver biopsy revealed markedly reduced complex I+III and II+III. Addition of CoQ to the liver homogenate restored the activities, suggesting CoQ depletion. Histological staining showed prominent bridging; septal fibrosis and widening of portal spaces with prominent mixed inflammatory infiltrate, associated with interface hepatitis, bile duct proliferation with numerous bile plugs. Electron microscopy revealed a large number of mitochondria, which were altered in shape and size, widened and disordered intercristal spaces. This may be the first case of Leigh syndrome with liver and pancreas insufficiency, possibly caused by CoQ responsive oxphos deficiency. PMID:12948744

  6. Antimicrobial synergism against Mycobacterium avium complex strains isolated from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yajko, D M; Kirihara, J; Sanders, C; Nassos, P; Hadley, W K

    1988-01-01

    Pairs of 11 antimicrobial agents were tested in vitro for their ability to act synergistically against three strains of Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. From the combinations tested, four drugs (ethambutol, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin) were selected for more extensive study against 20 strains of M. avium complex. The inhibitory and killing synergism obtained with combinations of two, three, or four drugs was assessed by determining the fractional inhibitory concentration index and fractional bactericidal concentration index. Inhibitory synergism occurred against 90 to 100% of the strains for all drug combinations in which ethambutol was included. Killing synergism occurred against 85 to 95% of the strains when ethambutol was used in combinations which included either rifampin or ciprofloxacin. However, killing synergism occurred against only 45% of the strains when drugs were tested at concentrations that can be obtained in patient serum. In other experiments, rifabutin (Ansamycin) gave results that were comparable to those obtained with rifampin. Clofazimine did not show synergistic killing activity at a concentration that is achievable in serum for any of the drugs tested. Our results indicate that there is considerable variability in the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. avium isolates obtained from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This variability could have significant impact on the clinical response to various therapies. PMID:3196000

  7. Human USP18 deficiency underlies type 1 interferonopathy leading to severe pseudo-TORCH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meuwissen, Marije E C; Schot, Rachel; Buta, Sofija; Oudesluijs, Grétel; Tinschert, Sigrid; Speer, Scott D; Li, Zhi; van Unen, Leontine; Heijsman, Daphne; Goldmann, Tobias; Lequin, Maarten H; Kros, Johan M; Stam, Wendy; Hermann, Mark; Willemsen, Rob; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Martin-Fernandez, Marta; de Coo, Irenaeus; Dudink, Jeroen; de Vries, Femke A T; Bertoli Avella, Aida; Prinz, Marco; Crow, Yanick J; Verheijen, Frans W; Pellegrini, Sandra; Bogunovic, Dusan; Mancini, Grazia M S

    2016-06-27

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome (PTS) is characterized by microcephaly, enlarged ventricles, cerebral calcification, and, occasionally, by systemic features at birth resembling the sequelae of congenital infection but in the absence of an infectious agent. Genetic defects resulting in activation of type 1 interferon (IFN) responses have been documented to cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, which is a cause of PTS. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 (USP18) is a key negative regulator of type I IFN signaling. In this study, we identified loss-of-function recessive mutations of USP18 in five PTS patients from two unrelated families. Ex vivo brain autopsy material demonstrated innate immune inflammation with calcification and polymicrogyria. In vitro, patient fibroblasts displayed severely enhanced IFN-induced inflammation, which was completely rescued by lentiviral transduction of USP18. These findings add USP18 deficiency to the list of genetic disorders collectively termed type I interferonopathies. Moreover, USP18 deficiency represents the first genetic disorder of PTS caused by dysregulation of the response to type I IFNs. Therapeutically, this places USP18 as a promising target not only for genetic but also acquired IFN-mediated CNS disorders. PMID:27325888

  8. Guide to Planning Health Promotion for AIDS Prevention and Control. WHO AIDS Series 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide is intended to provide planners, managers, and technical staff with guidelines for planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) health promotion program. As such, it can be used in the development of a detailed AIDS health promotion action plan. The guide reviews the steps, processes,…

  9. Physicians Mutual Aid Group: A Response to AIDS-Related Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Describes origins and functioning of physician's mutual aid group for physicians providing primary care to people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Offers suggestions related to overcoming resistance physicians might have to participating in such a group and reviews modalities that were helpful in facilitating participants' ability…

  10. High School Students' Knowledge of HIV/AIDS and Perceived Risk of Currently Having AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuRant, Robert H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Study examined factors associated with adolescents' knowledge of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and perceived risk of human immunodeficiency infection (HIV). Results of a health risk survey indicated that minority youth, particularly IV drug users, had the most need of intensive, specialized HIV/AIDS education. (SM)

  11. AIDS Resource Manual. A Guide for Teaching about AIDS in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This resource manual discusses Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and offers suggestions on activities and games that can be used to enhance education. The manual begins with question-and-answer sections that address basic facts about AIDS, such as its transmission, prevention, cure, infection in the workplace, loss of income from illness,…

  12. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Singh, Ratnesh K; Michel, Vera; Zeisel, Steven H; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Johnson, Amy R; Mudd, Harvey S; Bakovic, Marica

    2015-05-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), who presented with low plasma choline and betaine, were studied to determine the metabolic characteristics of the choline deficiency. Choline is required for the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and for betaine, an important osmoregulator. Here, choline transport, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondria function were analyzed in skin fibroblasts from POTS and compared with control cells. The choline transporter-like protein 1/solute carrier 44A1 (CTL1/SLC44A1) and mRNA expression were 2-3 times lower in POTS fibroblasts, and choline uptake was reduced 60% (P < 0.05). Disturbances of membrane homeostasis were observed by reduced ratios between PC:phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin:cholesterol, as well as by modified phospholipid fatty acid composition. Choline deficiency also impaired mitochondria function, which was observed by a reduction in oxygen consumption, mitochondrial potential, and glycolytic activity. When POTS cells were treated with choline, transporter was up-regulated, and uptake of choline increased, offering an option for patient treatment. The characteristics of the POTS fibroblasts described here represent a first model of choline and CTL1/SLC44A1 deficiency, in which choline transport, membrane homeostasis, and mitochondrial function are impaired.

  13. CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency: New form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (CHST14/D4ST1) deficiency represents a specific form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CHST14. The disorder has been independently termed "adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome", "EDS, Kosho type", and "EDS, musculocontractural type". To date, 31 affected patients from 21 families have been described. Clinically, CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency is characterized by multiple congenital malformations (craniofacial features including large fontanelle, hypertelorism, short and downslanting palpebral fissures, blue sclerae, short nose with hypoplastic columella, low-set and rotated ears, high palate, long philtrum, thin upper lip vermilion, small mouth, and micro-retrognathia; multiple congenital contractures including adduction-flexion contractures and talipes equinovarus as well as other visceral or ophthalmological malformations) and progressive multisystem fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; pneumothorax or pneumohemothorax; large subcutaneous hematomas; and diverticular perforation). Etiologically, multisystem fragility is presumably caused by impaired assembly of collagen fibrils resulting from loss of dermatan sulfate (DS) in the decorin glycosaminoglycan side chain that promotes electrostatic binding between collagen fibrils. This is the first reported human disorder that specifically affects biosynthesis of DS. Its clinical characteristics indicate that CHST14/D4ST1 and, more fundamentally, DS, play a critical role in fetal development and maintenance of connective tissues in multiple organs. Considering that patients with CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency develop progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, establishment of a comprehensive and detailed natural history and health-care guidelines as well as further elucidation

  14. CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency: New form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (CHST14/D4ST1) deficiency represents a specific form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CHST14. The disorder has been independently termed "adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome", "EDS, Kosho type", and "EDS, musculocontractural type". To date, 31 affected patients from 21 families have been described. Clinically, CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency is characterized by multiple congenital malformations (craniofacial features including large fontanelle, hypertelorism, short and downslanting palpebral fissures, blue sclerae, short nose with hypoplastic columella, low-set and rotated ears, high palate, long philtrum, thin upper lip vermilion, small mouth, and micro-retrognathia; multiple congenital contractures including adduction-flexion contractures and talipes equinovarus as well as other visceral or ophthalmological malformations) and progressive multisystem fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; pneumothorax or pneumohemothorax; large subcutaneous hematomas; and diverticular perforation). Etiologically, multisystem fragility is presumably caused by impaired assembly of collagen fibrils resulting from loss of dermatan sulfate (DS) in the decorin glycosaminoglycan side chain that promotes electrostatic binding between collagen fibrils. This is the first reported human disorder that specifically affects biosynthesis of DS. Its clinical characteristics indicate that CHST14/D4ST1 and, more fundamentally, DS, play a critical role in fetal development and maintenance of connective tissues in multiple organs. Considering that patients with CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency develop progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, establishment of a comprehensive and detailed natural history and health-care guidelines as well as further elucidation

  15. The implications of 7-dehydrosterol-7-reductase deficiency (Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome) to neurosteroid production.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Josep; Guo, Li-Wei; Wilson, William K; Porter, Forbes D; Shackleton, Cedric

    2004-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple malformation/mental retardation syndrome with an estimated incidence among individuals of European ancestry of 1 in 20000 to 1 in 30000. It is caused by inactivity of the enzyme 7-dehydrosterol-delta(7)-reductase, which catalyses the terminal transformation in cholesterol synthesis. Patients show not only an increased level of 7-dehydrocholesterol in blood and tissues, but also increased 8-dehydrocholesterol because of the presence of an active delta(8)-delta(7) isomerase. A major consequence of these biochemical abnormalities is the alteration of normal embryonic and fetal somatic development causing postnatal abnormalities of growth, learning, language and behavior. While deficient cholesterol during early development is the primary cause of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and retardation, we questioned whether neurosteroids could also be involved since they can have a profound influence on behavioral characteristics. Disordered neurosteroidogenesis would be expected in SLOS and could be caused by a deficiency in classical neurosteroid synthesis secondary to cholesterol deficiency, or by synthesis from 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol of novel neurosteroids with delta(7) or delta(8) unsaturation which may have altered activity compared with conventional neurosteroids. In particular we sought analogues of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, pregnenolone sulfate and the pregnanolone epimers. We targeted urine from post-pubertal females, as this type of sample would be most likely to yield identifiable amounts of the pregnanolone metabolites of progesterone. Analysis by GC/MS of urinary steroids excreted by post-pubertal females confirmed the presence of neurosteroid-like compounds in SLOS patient's urine. Even though the new neuroactive steroids identified were unlikely to have been formed in the brain, it is likely that mechanisms for their synthesis are operable in this organ.

  16. The dark side of testosterone deficiency: I. Metabolic syndrome and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Guay, Andre; Feeley, Robert; Saad, Farid

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is considered the most important public health threat of the 21st century. This syndrome is characterized by a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors including increased central abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein, high blood pressure, increased fasting glucose, and hyperinsulinemia. These factors increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or type 2 diabetes. Although the etiology of this syndrome is thought to stem from obesity and physical inactivity, the extent of interactions of the individual MetS components with one another remains poorly defined. Obesity, diabetes, hypogonadism, and specific hormone and metabolic profiles have been implicated in the pathophysiology of CVD. The evolving role of androgens in MetS and CVD is of paramount importance. Reduced androgen levels associated with hypogonadism or androgen deprivation therapy increase cardiovascular risk factors and produce marked adverse effects on cardiovascular function. MetS has been associated with hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction (ED), and MetS may be considered a risk factor for ED. It is suggested that MetS, diabetes, and CVD will increase in the upcoming decades. Thus, it is critically important to develop a better understanding of how obesity, diabetes and hypogonadism contribute to androgen deficiency and the various pathophysiologic states of vascular disease. In this review we discuss the current literature pertaining to androgen deficiency, MetS, and ED, because the relationship of these factors is of scientific and clinical importance. Specifically, we will focus on exploring the relationships between hypogonadism, obesity, MetS, and ED. PMID:18641413

  17. Fear of AIDS and Risk Reduction among Heroin-Addicted Female Street Prostitutes: Personal Interviews with 72 Southern California Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Interviewed 72 heroin-addicted female street prostitutes and assessed fear of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS risk reduction behavior, and prostitutes' recommendations for AIDS risk reduction programs. Self-reported data showed that, although subjects were afraid of AIDS, irrationality produced by addiction compelled risky…

  18. Opportunistic infections in acquired immune deficiency syndrome result from synergistic defects of both the natural and adaptive components of cellular immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, F P; Lopez, C; Fitzgerald, P A; Shah, K; Baron, P; Leiderman, I Z; Imperato, D; Landesman, S

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the cellular immunity of 408 clinically stratified subjects at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), to define the role of interferon-alpha production deficits in the pathogenesis of opportunistic infections (OI). We followed 115 prospectively for up to 45 mo. Onset of OI was associated with, and predicted by, deficiency both of interferon-alpha generation in vitro, and of circulating Leu-3a+ cells. Interferon-alpha production is an index of the function of certain non-T, non-B, large granular lymphocytes (LGL) that are independent of T cell help. Leu-3a+ cell counts are a marker of T cell function. OI did not usually develop until both of these mutually independent immune functions were simultaneously critically depressed, leading to a synergistic interaction. These data suggest that the AIDS virus affects a subset of LGL, and that cytokine production by these cells is an important component of the host defense against intracellular pathogens that becomes crucial in the presence of severe T cell immunodeficiency. PMID:3088039

  19. AIDS Victims and Heterosexual Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Knud S.; And Others

    This study reports on the development of a Likert scale measuring attitudes toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) victims (ATAV) in five phases. Participants included a total of 215 male and 268 female undergraduates at Oregon State University. The results for phase 1 yielded a scale with high part-whole correlations, corrected…

  20. Adolescents, AIDS and HIV. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources for Educators, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of educational resources is designed for communities which have been either overlooked in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts or disproportionately affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The materials listed target Blacks, Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, young…

  1. AIDS. CSAP Prevention Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Karen, Ed.

    This resource guide was compiled from a variety of publications and data bases and represents the most current information to date on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention. The guide is organized into three major sections. The first section lists prevention materials. For each entry, information is provided on the organization…

  2. Predictive genetic testing in children: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency cancer predisposing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruwer, Zandrè; Algar, Ursula; Vorster, Alvera; Fieggen, Karen; Davidson, Alan; Goldberg, Paul; Wainwright, Helen; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes predispose to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D). The condition is characterized by a broad spectrum of early-onset tumors, including hematological, brain and bowel and is frequently associated with features of Neurofibromatosis type 1. Few definitive screening recommendations have been suggested and no published reports have described predictive testing. We report on the first case of predictive testing for CMMR-D following the identification of two non-consanguineous parents, with the same heterozygous mutation in MLH1: c.1528C > T. The genetic counseling offered to the family, for their two at-risk daughters, is discussed with a focus on the ethical considerations of testing children for known cancer-causing variants. The challenges that are encountered when reporting on heterozygosity in a child younger than 18 years (disclosure of carrier status and risk for Lynch syndrome), when discovered during testing for homozygosity, are addressed. In addition, the identification of CMMR-D in a three year old, and the recommended clinical surveillance that was proposed for this individual is discussed. Despite predictive testing and presymptomatic screening, the sudden death of the child with CMMR-D syndrome occurred 6 months after her last surveillance MRI. This report further highlights the difficulty of developing guidelines, as a result of the rarity of cases and diversity of presentation.

  3. Generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells from Aid-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Ren; Amano, Naoki; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okita, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this action is still unclear. Previous reports indicated that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aid, also known as Aicda) is involved in DNA demethylation in several developmental processes, as well as cell fusion-mediated reprogramming. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that Aid may be involved in the DNA demethylation that occurs during the generation of iPS cells. In this study, we examined the function of Aid in iPS cell generation using Aid knockout (Aid⁻/⁻) mice expressing a GFP reporter under the control of a pluripotent stem cell marker, Nanog. By introducing Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, Nanog-GFP-positive iPS cells could be generated from the fibroblasts and primary B cells of Aid⁻/⁻ mice. Their induction efficiency was similar to that of wild-type (Aid⁺/⁺) iPS cells. The Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells showed normal proliferation and gave rise to chimeras, indicating their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. A comprehensive DNA methylation analysis showed only a few differences between Aid⁺/⁺ and Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells. These data suggest that Aid does not have crucial functions in DNA demethylation during iPS cell generation. PMID:24718089

  4. PIXE analysis of human serum - A preliminary study of the correlation between trace elements in human serum and the ``Deficiency Syndrome Complex'' theory of traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-chien, Li; Ming-guang, Tan; Jun-fa, Chin; Kang-long, Shen; Zhi-xiang, Chen; Jia-hua, Chang; Wen, Zhu; Wei-yi, Li; Zong-qin, Xia; An-kun, Kuang

    1981-03-01

    To be able to study the correlation between trace elements and the "Deficiency Syndrome Complex" theory of traditional Chinese medicine, we have used a completely automated PIXE analysis system to determine the trace element concentrations in human serum. The experimental results show a marked correlation between the concentrations of trace elements in serum and the two types of patients with the "Deficiency Syndrome Complex".

  5. [Mental development disorders and attention-deficit syndrome caused by iodine deficiency: a clinical and epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Zhukov, A O

    2007-01-01

    A clinical and epidemiological study including 2,397 children of school age living in the areas with different levels of or without iodine deficiency has been carried out. An increased frequency of cases with IQ not more than 80-85 scores was observed in iodine deficient areas. Iodine deficiency was a cause of clinically diagnosed borderline development delay only in 7% of children. Attention deficit syndrome (without hyperactivity) and anxiety-depressive disorders as well as asthenic symptoms were observed most frequently. Basing on the literature data and own observations, the author suggests a hypothesis on the pathogenetic basis of these disorders. PMID:18379482

  6. Loss of B cells and their precursors is the most constant feature of GATA-2 deficiency in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Michaela; Žaliová, Markéta; Suková, Martina; Wlodarski, Marcin; Janda, Aleš; Froňková, Eva; Campr, Vít; Lejhancová, Kateřina; Zapletal, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, Dagmar; Černá, Zdeňka; Kuhn, Tomáš; Švec, Peter; Pelková, Vendula; Zemanová, Zuzana; Kerndrup, Gitte; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; van der Velden, Vincent; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Kalina, Tomáš; Trka, Jan; Starý, Jan; Hrušák, Ondřej; Mejstříková, Ester

    2016-01-01

    GATA-2 deficiency was recently described as common cause of overlapping syndromes of immunodeficiency, lymphedema, familiar myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of our study was to analyze bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of children with myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia to define prevalence of the GATA2 mutation and to assess whether mutations in GATA-2 transcription factor exhibit specific immunophenotypic features. The prevalence of a GATA2 mutation in a consecutively diagnosed cohort of children was 14% in advanced forms of myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and myelodysplasia-related acute myeloid leukemia), 17% in refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 0% in aplastic anemia. In GATA-2-deficient cases, we found the most profound B-cell lymphopenia, including its progenitors in blood and bone marrow, which correlated with significantly diminished intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles in comparison to other myelodysplastic syndrome/aplastic anemia cases. The other typical features of GATA-2 deficiency (monocytopenia and natural killer cell lymphopenia) were less discriminative. In conclusion, we suggest screening for GATA2 mutations in pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, preferentially in patients with impaired B-cell homeostasis in bone marrow and peripheral blood (low number of progenitors, intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles and naïve cells). PMID:27013649

  7. Survival transcriptome in the coenzyme Q10 deficiency syndrome is acquired by epigenetic modifications: a modelling study for human coenzyme Q10 deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Guerra, Ignacio; Jiménez-Gancedo, Sandra; Cascajo, Maria V; Gavilán, Angela; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Briones, Paz; Artuch, Rafael; De Cabo, Rafael; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Plácido

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency syndrome is a rare condition that causes mitochondrial dysfunction and includes a variety of clinical presentations as encephalomyopathy, ataxia and renal failure. First, we sought to set up what all have in common, and then investigate why CoQ10 supplementation reverses the bioenergetics alterations in cultured cells but not all the cellular phenotypes. Design Modelling study This work models the transcriptome of human CoQ10 deficiency syndrome in primary fibroblast from patients and study the genetic response to CoQ10 treatment in these cells. Setting Four hospitals and medical centres from Spain, Italy and the USA, and two research laboratories from Spain and the USA. Participants Primary cells were collected from patients in the above centres. Measurements We characterised by microarray analysis the expression profile of fibroblasts from seven CoQ10-deficient patients (three had primary deficiency and four had a secondary form) and aged-matched controls, before and after CoQ10 supplementation. Results were validated by Q-RT-PCR. The profile of DNA (CpG) methylation was evaluated for a subset of gene with displayed altered expression. Results CoQ10-deficient fibroblasts (independently from the aetiology) showed a common transcriptomic profile that promotes cell survival by activating cell cycle and growth, cell stress responses and inhibiting cell death and immune responses. Energy production was supported mainly by glycolysis while CoQ10 supplementation restored oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of genes involved in cell death pathways was partially restored by treatment, while genes involved in differentiation, cell cycle and growth were not affected. Stably demethylated genes were unaffected by treatment whereas we observed restored gene expression in either non-methylated genes or those with an unchanged methylation pattern. Conclusions CoQ10 deficiency induces a specific transcriptomic profile that promotes

  8. A Generation in Jeopardy: Children and AIDS. A Report of the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (December 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document presents a Congressional report on the topic of children and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These topics are addressed: (1) dramatic increases in AIDS among infants and young children; (2) differences in pediatric AIDS and AIDS among adults; (3) minority children's disproportional rate of infection with AIDS; (4)…

  9. Learning about AIDS. Interim Materials. Participatory Health Education Strategies for Health Educators with a Responsibility for Adult Education about AIDS [and] Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homans, Hilary; And Others

    Intended for those who are responsible for educating other educators about AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), these materials are designed to result in learner-centered instruction about AIDS--helping students of all kinds explore their own anxieties about AIDS and consider the implications of factual information for their own behavior…

  10. Women and AIDS: What We Need To Know. A Workshop and Resource Manual on Educating Women about AIDS and Safer Sex (January 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Julie M.

    This document focuses on women and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first part discusses the topic of women and AIDS. A workshop is described and a agenda provided. The role of facilitators is discussed. Materials required for the workshop are listed. The second section presents a curriculum on women and AIDS. An overview of the…

  11. "Does AIDS Hurt?": Educating Young Children about AIDS. Suggestions for Parents, Teachers, and Other Care Providers of Children to Age 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Villarreal, Sylvia

    This document gives parents, teachers, and others basic information and suggested guidelines for teaching children aged 10 and younger about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These topics concerning AIDS and young children are discussed: (1) talking with young children about AIDS; (2) things to keep in mind when talking with children,…

  12. What High School Students Who Are Mildly Mentally Retarded Know about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Hazel B.; Horn, Charles J., Jr.

    Alabama high school students (N=309) with mild mental retardation completed a questionnaire concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Students demonstrated some basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and expressed some concern about getting AIDS. They…

  13. The thymus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Comparison with other types of immunodeficiency diseases, and presence of components of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, H. J.; Krone, W. J.; Broekhuizen, R.; van Baarlen, J.; van Veen, P.; Golstein, A. L.; Huber, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied thymus specimens taken at autopsy from eight acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and compared these with those taken from four patients with congenital immunodeficiency (unrelated to an intrinsic thymus defect) and seven patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In all cases, histology showed a severely involuted architecture, compatible with a debilitating disease before death. There were no major differences between thymus tissue in AIDS patients and in the other patients studied. This argues against the claim expressed in the literature that the epithelial microenvironment incurs particular HIV-1-induced injury in AIDS. This conclusion is substantiated by immunohistochemistry for HIV-1 gag and env proteins, and by hybridohistochemistry for gag/pol and env mRNA of HIV-1. Positive cells were observed only in low numbers, both inside the epithelial parenchyma and in the (expanded) perivascular areas. An interesting finding was the labeling of subcapsular/medullary epithelium in normal uninvoluted thymus by a number of antibodies to HIV-1 gag p17 and p24 proteins. Compatible with this labeling was the staining of epithelial stalks in hyperinvoluted thymuses irrespective of disease category. The previously reported cross-reactivity between HIV-1 core protein and thymosin alpha 1 cannot fully explain this observation, because the epithelium in the hyperinvoluted state is negative for thymosin alpha 1. This study confirms and extends previous reports on the endogenous presence of epitopes of retroviral antigens in thymic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2474255

  14. Length of survival of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Marasca, G; McEvoy, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the lengths of survival of patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome presenting with different opportunistic diseases was performed using epidemiological data routinely collected at the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. The overall crude case fatality rate was 55.4% (93/168). The median survival times were: 21.2 months for Kaposi's sarcoma, 12.5 months for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and 13.3 months for other opportunistic infections. The shortest median survival time (6.6 months) was found for those with both Kaposi's sarcoma and P carinii pneumonia. There were significant differences between durations of survival of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and those with all other diseases, which indicated impaired cellular immunity apart from opportunistic infections. This analysis shows that those with Kaposi's sarcoma alone have the most favourable prognosis. PMID:3089373

  15. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in the carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I (CDG1)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijs, G.; Legius, E.; Schollen, E.

    1996-08-01

    We have analyzed a series of polymorphic markers on chromosome 16p13 in 17 families with carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I (CDG1). First, linkage to the region between D15S406 and D16S500 is confirmed. The telomeric border of the candidate region is now definitively placed proximal to D16S406 by crossovers observed in 2 families. Second, in 1 family with affected siblings, the disease is not linked to chromosome 16p. Genetic heterogeneity has not been previously reported for CDG1, and this observation has implications for prenatal diagnosis. Third, allelic associations suggest that the disease locus is localized close to D16S414/D16S497. This places the region of interest centromeric of its published localization. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders and/or Hospice Care, Psychological Health, and Quality of Life among Children/Adolescents with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Maureen E.; Williams, Paige L.; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Hutton, Nancy; Butler, Anne M.; Sibinga, Erica; Brady, Michael T.; Oleske, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The frequency of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and hospice enrollment in children/adolescents living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and followed in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) Study 219C was examined, and evaluated for any association with racial disparities or enhanced quality of life (QOL), particularly psychological adjustment. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of children with AIDS enrolled in this prospective multicenter observational study between 2000 and 2005 was conducted to evaluate the incidence of DNR/hospice overall and by calendar time. Linear regression models were used to compare caregivers' reported QOL scores within 6 domains between those with and without DNR/hospice care, adjusting for confounders. Results Seven hundred twenty-six (726) children with AIDS had a mean age of 12.9 years (standard deviation [SD] = 4.5), 51% were male, 60% black, 25% Hispanic. Twenty-one (2.9%) had either a DNR order (n = 16), hospice enrollment (n = 7), or both (n = 2). Of 41 children who died, 80% had no DNR/hospice care. Increased odds of DNR/hospice were observed for those with CD4% less than 15%, no current antiretroviral use, and prior hospitalization. No differences by race were detected. Adjusted mean QOL scores were significantly lower for those with DNR/hospice enrollment than those without across all domains except for psychological status and health care utilization. Poorer psychological status correlated with higher symptom distress, but not with DNR/hospice enrollment after adjusting for symptoms. Conclusions Children who died of AIDS rarely had DNR/hospice enrollment. National guidelines recommend that quality palliative care be integrated routinely with HIV care. Further research is needed to explore the barriers to palliative care and advance care planning in this population. PMID:18363489

  17. Recent Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Efforts and Their Implications for AIDS Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Mildred Zeldes; DeJong, William

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe the principles and underlying assumptions that have guided the design of their STD (sexually transmitted diseases) initiatives, drawing special attention to the implications for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) health education efforts. (Author/CT)

  18. Hexosaminidase A deficiency is an uncommon cause of a syndrome mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Drory, Vivian E; Birnbaum, Miriam; Peleg, Leah; Goldman, Boleslaw; Korczyn, Amos D

    2003-07-01

    Patients with adult hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency may have clinical manifestations similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in the hexosaminidase A (HEXA) gene are common in the Jewish Ashkenazi population in Israel. Serum samples of 115 Israeli patients with sporadic ALS were screened for enzymatic activity to detect "enzyme-based carriers." Fifteen samples with low (< 50%) enzymatic activity were subjected to mutation analysis, which included the two common mutations in the HEXA gene among Ashkenazi Jews (+1278TATC and IVS12+1G-->C). Three "enzymatic carrier" patients of Moroccan origin were checked for two additional mutations (DeltaF304/305 and Arg170-->Gln), specific to this ethnic group. Two "enzymatic carrier" patients of Iraqi origin were analyzed for the mutation Gly250-->Val, specific to this population. The mutation Gly 269-->Ser was screened in carriers of Ashkenazi origin only (n = 10). The only abnormalities found were heterozygous +1278TATC mutations in two Ashkenazi patients. Their clinical presentation was not different from that usually encountered in ALS. The frequency of mutations in the HEXA gene among Israeli ALS patients was not higher than in the healthy Israeli population. Therefore, Hex A deficiency seems to be a very unlikely cause of an ALS-mimic syndrome. PMID:12811781

  19. Why Cockayne syndrome patients do not get cancer despite their DNA repair deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reid-Bayliss, Kate S; Arron, Sarah T; Loeb, Lawrence A; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Cleaver, James E

    2016-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are human photosensitive diseases with mutations in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which repairs DNA damage from UV exposure. CS is mutated in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) branch of the NER pathway and exhibits developmental and neurological pathologies. The XP-C group of XP patients have mutations in the global genome repair (GGR) branch of the NER pathway and have a very high incidence of UV-induced skin cancer. Cultured cells from both diseases have similar sensitivity to UV-induced cytotoxicity, but CS patients have never been reported to develop cancer, although they often exhibit photosensitivity. Because cancers are associated with increased mutations, especially when initiated by DNA damage, we examined UV-induced mutagenesis in both XP-C and CS cells, using duplex sequencing for high-sensitivity mutation detection. Duplex sequencing detects rare mutagenic events, independent of selection and in multiple loci, enabling examination of all mutations rather than just those that confer major changes to a specific protein. We found telomerase-positive normal and CS-B cells had increased background mutation frequencies that decreased upon irradiation, purging the population of subclonal variants. Primary XP-C cells had increased UV-induced mutation frequencies compared with normal cells, consistent with their GGR deficiency. CS cells, in contrast, had normal levels of mutagenesis despite their TCR deficiency. The lack of elevated UV-induced mutagenesis in CS cells reveals that their TCR deficiency, although increasing cytotoxicity, is not mutagenic. Therefore the absence of cancer in CS patients results from the absence of UV-induced mutagenesis rather than from enhanced lethality. PMID:27543334

  20. Neuronal damage and its relation to dementia in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Trillo-Pazos, G; Everall, I P

    1996-01-01

    There are an estimated 21.8 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide [Weekly Epidemiol Rec 1996; 27:204-208] and 90% of these people will have some form of neuropathological abnormality during the course of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this review, we will highlight the primary HIV-associated brain disorders. The role of HIV proteins and cytokines on neuronal damage will be assessed. We will also discuss the role of neuronal loss and functional damage in HIV-associated dementia.

  1. [IRON-DEFICIENCY ANEMIA AS A FACTOR OF DEVELOPMENT OF ASTHENIA SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Muldaeva, G; Rukaber, N; Arystan, L; Haydargalieva, L; Kenzhetaeva, Z

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the frequency and degree of severity of asthenic syndrome (AS) and estimation of physical health of women with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) and without it. 30 women were inspected with the set diagnosis of IDA and 20 nearly were healthy. All participants were assessed according objective status. AS was determined by the scale of estimation of asthenia - Scale Asthenic Conditions (SAC) of LD Malkova, the scale of subjective evaluation of asthenia (MFI-20). Level of somatic health was appraised by methodology of LG Apanasenko. As a result of research it was found that in 100% of women with IDA , which more often occurs with expressed hypoxic syndrome, that aggravates a process of AS. The severity of AS directly depends on the degree of IDA. The presence of IDA contributes to decreased physical activity of patients because of progressive weakness and fatigue. The level of physical health is rated as "low" due to low reserve capacity of the cardiorespiratory system and power qualities. In the control group, incidence of AS is significantly lower (40-55%) and the degree of severity in most cases is weak and moderate. The obtained data allow to make the conclusion that the medicines for correction of AS must be necessarily included in therapy of IDA. PMID:27661280

  2. Psychological Distress amongst AIDS-Orphaned Children in Urban South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background: South Africa is predicted to have 2.3 million children orphaned by Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by 2020 (Actuarial Society of South Africa, 2005). There is little knowledge about impacts of AIDS-related bereavement on children, to aid planning of services. This study aimed to investigate psychological consequences of AIDS…

  3. AIDS and the Education of Our Children: A Guide for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines for parents, teachers, and other adults to use in the education of children about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are presented in this document. The first part of the document presents a review of the known facts concerning the history and spread of AIDS. Specific topics discussed include AIDS symptoms, lack of a cure or…

  4. College Students and AIDS Awareness: The Effects of Condom Perception and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ulysses J. III; Jara, Ursula; Braxton, Erika

    2005-01-01

    This paper examined the attitudes and perceptions of urban college students regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) awareness and prevention. AIDS has devastated the lives of citizens in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that the AIDS incidence rate for young Americans between the ages of 13 to…

  5. Coping with AIDS: Psychological and Social Considerations in Helping People with HTLV-III Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runck, Bette

    This booklet was written to familiarize health and mental health professionals and paraprofessionals with the psychological and social problems associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It briefly reviews the realities of AIDS and describes the challenge that AIDS poses for health care professionals. A section on neuropsychiatric…

  6. The heartstrings mutation in zebrafish causes heart/fin Tbx5 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Deborah M; Childs, Sarah; Fishman, Mark C

    2002-10-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome is one of the autosomal dominant human "heart-hand" disorders, with a combination of upper limb malformations and cardiac defects. Holt-Oram syndrome is caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene, a member of a large family of T-box transcription factors that play important roles in cell-type specification and morphogenesis. In a screen for mutations affecting zebrafish cardiac function, we isolated the recessive lethal mutant heartstrings, which lacks pectoral fins and exhibits severe cardiac dysfunction, beginning with a slow heart rate and progressing to a stretched, non-functional heart. We mapped and cloned the heartstrings mutation and find it to encode the zebrafish ortholog of the TBX5 gene. The heartstrings mutation causes premature termination at amino acid 316. Homozygous mutant embryos never develop pectoral fin buds and do not express several markers of early fin differentiation. The total absence of any fin bud differentiation distinguishes heartstrings from most other mutations that affect zebrafish fin development, suggesting that Tbx5 functions very early in the pectoral fin induction pathway. Moderate reduction of Tbx5 by morpholino causes fin malformations, revealing an additional early requirement for Tbx5 in coordinating the axes of fin outgrowth. The heart of heartstrings mutant embryos appears to form and function normally through the early heart tube stage, manifesting only a slight bradycardia compared with wild-type siblings. However, the heart fails to loop and then progressively deteriorates, a process affecting the ventricle as well as the atrium. Relative to mammals, fish require lower levels of Tbx5 to produce malformed appendages and display whole-heart rather than atrial-predominant cardiac defects. However, the syndromic deficiencies of tbx5 mutation are remarkably well retained between fish and mammals. PMID:12223419

  7. AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes, Provisional Data from the National Health Interview Survey: United States, August 1987. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 146.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Deborah A.; And Others

    This document presents provisional data for all Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire items from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for August 1987. It notes that the AIDS questionnaire was designed to provide baseline estimates of public knowledge and attitudes about AIDS transmission, the prevention of AIDS virus…

  8. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  9. Attitudes of Dental Hygiene Students toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Joen Iannucci; Lind, Laura J.

    1992-01-01

    At Ohio State University, 81 dental hygiene students' attitudes toward homosexual and heterosexual patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia were assessed using ratings of prejudice, social interaction, and interpersonal interaction. Negative bias toward individuals with AIDS and unwillingness to engage in everyday…

  10. The African American Family and AIDS: Counseling Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Patrick; Beamish, Patricia M.

    This document discusses the application of a systems approach for family counseling for African American families with a family member infected with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It begins by citing statistics that illustrate that there exists a disproportionate representation of cases of AIDS among African Americans. A discussion on…

  11. Survival Models for People with AIDS in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzel, George S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes four modes of positive survival with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and analyzes them as they appear in support groups for people with AIDS. Sees beneficent, artistic-spiritual, heroic, and rational-instrumental survival modes as compromise solutions to fears of life and death described by Rank. Calls analysis nonpejorative…

  12. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  13. The Impact of AIDS on the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatchett, David

    1990-01-01

    More than 25 percent of those who have the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus are African American, and, in large urban areas, the disease is a leading cause of death, especially among black women. AIDS education is vital to supplement health care efforts in the black community. (SLD)

  14. School-Based HIV-AIDS Education in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Margaret C.

    Health and education matters in Canada are the responsibility of the government of each individual province. These opportunities for improvement in the Canadian system regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education exist. First, a nationally standardized curriculum is needed. Second, more time allocated for AIDS education is…

  15. Factors That Influence HIV/AIDS Instruction in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Dan R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed 98 schools in Louisiana, where sex education and human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education are optional, to determine effects of sex education on HIV/AIDS instruction. Schools with sex education covered more content. Schools with predominantly minority enrollments were less likely to devote time…

  16. Is AIDS a Biasing Factor in Teacher Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David W.; Hulecki, Mary B.

    1989-01-01

    Regular-education, third-grade teachers (n=91) in Indiana reviewed one of two psychological reports, identical except that one reported a diagnosis of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and one reported a diagnosis of rheumatic fever. AIDS was not found to be a biasing factor in teachers' judgments regarding special education placement.…

  17. Developing an AIDS Program in a Juvenile Detention Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelber, Seymour

    1988-01-01

    Examines what is being done and what more must be done in terms of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) testing, screening, counseling. Discusses education about AIDS for young people in juvenile detention centers, penal institutions, and residential rehabilitation programs. Dade County Juvenile Detention Center (Florida) exemplifies…

  18. The Role of Nutrition in AIDS and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumwalt, Sally A.; Schmidt, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in immunity both among the elderly and among persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Appropriate nutritional intake and counseling may improve immune status and enable both prevention and progression of AIDS and the susceptibility of the elderly to infectious diseases. (SK)

  19. AIDS: Are Children at Risk? ERIC Digest 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    Lack of knowledge and misinformation about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a fatal disease with no cure or vaccine, has caused widespread public concern. Education is an effective way to reduce fears and prevent the spread of the disease. Public school personnel must have accurate information about AIDS in order to make suitable…

  20. The Law and AIDS on the College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Deborah L.; Strope, John L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Addresses legal implications for college students who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or have acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Discusses legal theories students with AIDS can use to protect their rights on campus; describes rights other students and university personnel have to know whether someone is HIV positive; and explains…

  1. The New Plymouth Framework for HIV/AIDS Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Plymouth School District, ID.

    A framework is presented for Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education in elementary and secondary schools. The objective is to enable students to understand the nature of the AIDS epidemic and acquire the knowledge and skills needed to maintain behaviors that eliminate risk of infection. The plan was…

  2. AIDS Awareness of High School Students: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.; Calvin, Richmond E.

    The Surgeon General's information material on the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), which was mailed to every household in the United States, was used to develop an AIDS Awareness Inventory. The inventory was designed for administration to 182 high school students enrolled in schools in three districts, which have adopted an AIDS…

  3. History, Ethics, and Politics in AIDS Prevention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Stepherson, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Biological questions about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are minor compared with political and ethical problems related to the AIDS epidemic in the United States. Lack of public confidence in the work of public health officials and the controversy surrounding New York City's syringe exchange program are two examples. (SLD)

  4. Problems in Financing the Care of AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozawa, Martha N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Notes that financing care of patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has reached crisis proportions. Discusses how components of U.S. health care financing system attempt to minimize their financial exposure to AIDS. Presents remedies that have been suggested in literature. Points out flaws in current system for dealing with…

  5. Countertransference Issues in Working with Persons with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel, Joan; Hatfield, Shellie

    1986-01-01

    In the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, social workers must interact with numerous systems-persons diagnosed with AIDS and their friends and families and human services agencies. Subsequently, workers must deal with their responses to such interaction, including countertransference. Eight countertransference issues and…

  6. AIDS in Rural Areas: Challenges to Providing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined the development and provision of social services to persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and their families in rural areas and barriers to the delivery of care. Subjects (N=15) were persons who coordinated or provided services to AIDS victims. Found structural factors, confidentiality, fear of contagion, and homophobia…

  7. Children and AIDS: A Need to Rethink Child Welfare Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jaclyn; Carlton, Thomas O.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the problems of children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Questions whether society is prepared to respond to these children's needs. Asserts that the definitions of child abuse and neglect need to include the transmission of AIDS and that the foster care system will probably not be able to meet the needs of this…

  8. An Interview with AIDS Vaccine Researcher Chris Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The search for an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) vaccine is truly a global effort, with university laboratories, biotech firms, pharmaceutical companies, nonprofit research organizations, hospitals, and clinics all working together to develop an effective vaccine as quickly as possible. The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI)…

  9. AIDS Education through Schools: An Address by Mary H. Futrell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futrell, Mary H.

    1988-01-01

    All school employees, including support staff, should receive preservice or inservice training about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It is important that urban minority children be alerted to the dangers of AIDS, and that all children be aware that prevention must begin before self-destructive behavior begins. (JD)

  10. AIDS in Canada: Knowledge, Behaviour, and Attitudes of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Michael D.

    A questionnaire dealing with knowledge about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and how it is communicated, with behavior involving risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and with public policy for dealing with AIDS was completed by 1,259 Canadian adults. Canadians had a generally high level of knowledge about the…

  11. Evaluation of an AIDS Prevention Program for "At Risk" Parolees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Harry K.; And Others

    Surveys of the nation's jail and prison populations suggest that about 75% have used illicit drugs at one time or another. Incidence rates for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases among prison inmates is much higher in correctional systems than in the population as a whole. In this study an AIDS prevention and education program for…

  12. An Unforgiving Enemy: AIDS. Student Reader and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education Services, Johnstown, PA.

    These adult basic education instructional materials on the prevention of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) include a student reader and a teacher's guide. The student reader contains six chapters. Chapter 1 introduces two characters--Ricco and Francis--and focuses on the definition of AIDS, the three stages of the disease, the cause, and…

  13. HIV-AIDS Information and the American Library Community: An Overview of Responses to the HIV-AIDS Health Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    This paper presents an overview of how American libraries have responded to the health crisis caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS information dissemination practices of libraries and the social role which American librarians have articulated regarding their special responsibilities are…

  14. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease. PMID:26694631

  15. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease.

  16. Sclerostin inhibition reverses skeletal fragility in an Lrp5-deficient mouse model of OPPG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Veera, Shreya; Horan, Daniel J; Moss, Rachel E; Ayturk, Ugur M; Jacobsen, Christina M; Bowen, Margot E; Paszty, Chris; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2013-11-13

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare genetic disease that produces debilitating effects in the skeleton. OPPG is caused by mutations in LRP5, a WNT co-receptor that mediates osteoblast activity. WNT signaling through LRP5, and also through the closely related receptor LRP6, is inhibited by the protein sclerostin (SOST). It is unclear whether OPPG patients might benefit from the anabolic action of sclerostin neutralization therapy (an approach currently being pursued in clinical trials for postmenopausal osteoporosis) in light of their LRP5 deficiency and consequent osteoblast impairment. To assess whether loss of sclerostin is anabolic in OPPG, we measured bone properties in a mouse model of OPPG (Lrp5(-/-)), a mouse model of sclerosteosis (Sost(-/-)), and in mice with both genes knocked out (Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-)). Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-) mice have larger, denser, and stronger bones than do Lrp5(-/-) mice, indicating that SOST deficiency can improve bone properties via pathways that do not require LRP5. Next, we determined whether the anabolic effects of sclerostin depletion in Lrp5(-/-) mice are retained in adult mice by treating 17-week-old Lrp5(-/-) mice with a sclerostin antibody for 3 weeks. Lrp5(+/+) and Lrp5(-/-) mice each exhibited osteoanabolic responses to antibody therapy, as indicated by increased bone mineral density, content, and formation rates. Collectively, our data show that inhibiting sclerostin can improve bone mass whether LRP5 is present or not. In the absence of LRP5, the anabolic effects of SOST depletion can occur via other receptors (such as LRP4/6). Regardless of the mechanism, our results suggest that humans with OPPG might benefit from sclerostin neutralization therapies.

  17. White Monkey Syndrome and Presumptive Copper Deficiency in Wild Savannah Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Markham, A. Catherine; Gesquiere, Laurence R.; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Alberts, Susan C.; Altmann, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    In immature wild savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus), we observed symptoms consistent with copper (Cu) deficiency and, more specifically, with a disorder referred to as white monkey syndrome (WMS) in laboratory primates. The objectives of this study were to characterize this pathology and test three hypotheses – that Cu deficiency may have been induced by zinc (Zn) toxicity, that it may have been induced by molybdenum (Mo) toxicity, and that cumulative rainfall during the perinatal period and particularly during gestation is an ecological factor distinguishing infants afflicted with WMS from non-WMS infants. During 2001–09, we observed 22 instances of WMS out of a total 377 live-births in the study population. Visible symptoms exhibited by WMS infants included whitening of the animal’s fur and/or impaired mobility characterized by an apparent “stiffening” of the hindlimbs. Occurrence of WMS did not vary significantly by gender. However, among individuals that survived at least 180 days, WMS males had a significantly lower survivorship probability than non-WMS males. Zn/Cu ratios assessed from hair samples of adult female baboons were higher in females who had produced at least one WMS offspring relative to females who had not had a WMS offspring. This was true even when the hair sample was collected long after the birth of the female’s afflicted infant. We consider this potentially indicative of a robust tendency for low Cu levels induced by elevated Zn intake in some individuals. No significant differences of Mo/Cu ratios were observed. Cumulative rainfall during gestation (~179 days) was 50% lower for WMS infants relative to non-WMS infants. In contrast, rainfall for the two classes of infants did not differ in the 180 days prior to conception or in the 180 days following birth. This finding highlights the importance of prenatal ecological conditions in healthy fetal development with regard to WMS. PMID:21898510

  18. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  19. White monkey syndrome and presumptive copper deficiency in wild savannah baboons.

    PubMed

    Markham, A Catherine; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2011-11-01

    In immature wild savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus), we observed symptoms consistent with copper (Cu) deficiency and, more specifically, with a disorder referred to as white monkey syndrome (WMS) in laboratory primates. The objectives of this study were to characterize this pathology, and test three hypotheses that (1) Cu deficiency may have been induced by zinc (Zn) toxicity, (2) it may have been induced by molybdenum (Mo) toxicity, and (3) cumulative rainfall during the perinatal period and particularly during gestation is an ecological factor distinguishing infants afflicted with WMS from non-WMS infants. During 2001-2009, we observed 22 instances of WMS out of a total 377 live births in the study population. Visible symptoms exhibited by WMS infants included whitening of the animal's fur and/or impaired mobility characterized by an apparent "stiffening" of the hindlimbs. Occurrence of WMS did not vary significantly by gender. However, among individuals that survived at least 180 days, WMS males had a significantly lower survivorship probability than non-WMS males. Zn/Cu ratios assessed from hair samples of adult female baboons were higher in females who had produced at least one WMS offspring relative to females who had not had a WMS offspring. This was true even when the hair sample was collected long after the birth of the female's afflicted infant. We consider this potentially indicative of a robust tendency for low Cu levels induced by elevated Zn intake in some individuals. No significant differences of Mo/Cu ratios were observed. Cumulative rainfall during gestation (∼179 days) was 50% lower for WMS infants relative to non-WMS infants. In contrast, rainfall for the two classes of infants did not differ in the 180 days before conception or in the 180 days following birth. This finding highlights the importance of prenatal ecological conditions in healthy fetal development with regard to WMS.

  20. Reduced secreted mu mRNA synthesis in selective IgM deficiency of Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, N; Ozawa, T; Kato, Y; Motoyoshi, F; Kasahara, K; Kameyama, T; Orii, T

    1992-01-01

    Serum IgM concentrations were low although serum IgG and IgA concentrations were normal in both our patients with Bloom's syndrome. Although the percentages of surface IgM-bearing cells were not reduced, the numbers of IgM-secreting cells were markedly reduced. The membrane-bound mu (microns) and secreted mu (microseconds) mRNAs are produced from transcripts of a single immunoglobulin mu gene by alternative RNA processing pathways. The control of microseconds mRNA synthesis depends on the addition of poly(A) to microseconds C-terminal segment. In both patients, mu mRNA was well detected but microseconds C-terminal mRNA was scarcely detected, suggesting that microns mRNA was well transcribed but microseconds mRNA was not. There was, at least, no mutation or deletion in the microseconds C-terminal coding sequence, the RNA splice site (GG/TAAAC) at the 5' end of microseconds C-terminal segment and the AATAAA poly(A) signal sequence in both patients. Our results suggest that selective IgM deficiency in Bloom's syndrome is due to an abnormality in the maturation of surface IgM-bearing B cells into IgM-secreting cells and a failure of microseconds mRNA synthesis. Moreover, reduced microseconds mRNA synthesis may be due to the defect on developmental regulation of the site at which poly(A) is added to transcripts of the mu gene. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1563106

  1. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  2. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:26577109

  3. Type IX Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Menkes syndrome: the decrease in lysyl oxidase activity is associated with a corresponding deficiency in the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, H; Peltonen, L; Kivirikko, K I

    1985-01-01

    Type IX of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (E-D IX) and the Menkes syndrome are X-linked recessively inherited disorders characterized by abnormalities in copper metabolism. These abnormalities are associated with a severe reduction in the activity of lysyl oxidase, the extracellular copper enzyme that initiates crosslinking of collagens and elastin. No increase in this deficient enzyme activity was obtained when culture media from fibroblasts of patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome were incubated with copper under various conditions in vitro. A distinct, although small, increase in lysyl oxidase activity was obtained, however, when copper-supplemented media were used during culturing of the fibroblasts, although even under these conditions, the enzyme activity in the media from the affected cells remained markedly below that of the controls. Immunoprecipitation, dot-blotting, and immunoperoxidase staining experiments with antisera to human lysyl oxidase indicated that fibroblasts from patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome do not secrete into their medium, or contain inside the cell, any significant amounts of a copper-deficient, catalytically inactive lysyl oxidase protein. These findings appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that synthesis of the lysyl oxidase protein itself is impaired. The possibility is not excluded, however, that a copper-deficient enzyme protein may be synthesized in normal amounts but become degraded very rapidly inside the cell. The failure to obtain any large increase in the deficient lysyl oxidase activity upon various forms of copper administration suggests that it may not be possible to obtain any significant improvement in the connective tissue manifestations of these disorders by copper therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:9556668

  4. Recurrent gastrointestinal perforation in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to tenascin-X deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Tomo; Kubo, Akiharu; Sasaki, Takashi; Yamada, Taketo; Yabe, Nobushige; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Futei, Yuko

    2015-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Using a customized targeted exome-sequencing system we identified nonsense mutations in TNXB in a patient who had recurrent gastrointestinal perforation due to tissue fragility. This case highlights the utility of targeted exome sequencing for the diagnosis of congenital diseases showing genetic heterogeneity, and the importance of attention to gastrointestinal perforation in patients with tenascin-X deficient type EDS. PMID:25772043

  5. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-01-01

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876179

  6. Occurrence of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in patients treated with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Nakken, Karl O; Haavardsholm, Kathrine Cammermeyer; Selmer, Kaja Kristine

    2014-03-01

    Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is a treatable metabolic encephalopathy caused by a mutation in the SLC2A1 gene. This mutation causes a compromised transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier. The treatment of choice is ketogenic diet, with which most patients become seizure-free. At the National Centre for Epilepsy, we have, since 2005, offered treatment with ketogenic diet (KD) and modified Atkins diet (MAD) to children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy. As we believe many children with GLUT1-DS are unrecognized, the aim of this study was to search for patients with GLUT1-DS among those who had been responders (>50% reduction in seizure frequency) to KD or MAD. Of the 130 children included, 58 (44%) were defined as responders. Among these, 11 were already diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. No mutations in the SLC2A1 gene were detected in the remaining patients. However, the clinical features of these patients differed considerably from the patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. While 9 out of 10 patients with GLUT1-DS became seizure-free with dietary treatment, only 3 out of the 33 remaining patients were seizure-free with KD or MAD treatment. We therefore conclude that a seizure reduction of >50% following dietary treatment is not a suitable criterion for identifying patients with GLUT1-DS, as these patients generally achieve complete seizure freedom shortly after diet initiation.

  7. Modified Atkins diet therapy for a case with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Ito, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Ohinata, Junko; Osawa, Makiko

    2008-03-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS), giving rise to impaired glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, is characterized by infantile seizures, complex motor disorders, global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, and hypoglycorrhachia. GLUT-1 DS can be treated effectively with a ketogenic diet because it can provide an alternative fuel for brain metabolism; however, the excessive restriction of food intake involved frequently makes it difficult for patients to initiate or continue the diet. Recently, the modified Atkins diet, which is much less restrictive in terms of the total calorie and protein intake than the classical ketogenic diet, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated in children with intractable epilepsy. We successfully introduced the modified Atkins diet to a 7-year-old boy with GLUT-1 DS, whose caregivers refused ketogenic diet treatment because of strong concerns over restricting the diet. The modified Atkins diet should be considered for patients with GLUT-1 DS as an alternative to the traditional ketogenic diet.

  8. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-10-15

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. PMID:8876179

  9. Genetic Addiction Risk Score (GARS): molecular neurogenetic evidence for predisposition to Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Barh, Debmalya; Gold, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    We have published extensively on the neurogenetics of brain reward systems with reference to the genes related to dopaminergic function in particular. In 1996, we coined "Reward Deficiency Syndrome" (RDS), to portray behaviors found to have gene-based association with hypodopaminergic function. RDS as a useful concept has been embraced in many subsequent studies, to increase our understanding of Substance Use Disorder (SUD), addictions, and other obsessive, compulsive, and impulsive behaviors. Interestingly, albeit others, in one published study, we were able to describe lifetime RDS behaviors in a recovering addict (17 years sober) blindly by assessing resultant Genetic Addiction Risk Score (GARS™) data only. We hypothesize that genetic testing at an early age may be an effective preventive strategy to reduce or eliminate pathological substance and behavioral seeking activity. Here, we consider a select number of genes, their polymorphisms, and associated risks for RDS whereby, utilizing GWAS, there is evidence for convergence to reward candidate genes. The evidence presented serves as a plausible brain-print providing relevant genetic information that will reinforce targeted therapies, to improve recovery and prevent relapse on an individualized basis. The primary driver of RDS is a hypodopaminergic trait (genes) as well as epigenetic states (methylation and deacetylation on chromatin structure). We now have entered a new era in addiction medicine that embraces the neuroscience of addiction and RDS as a pathological condition in brain reward circuitry that calls for appropriate evidence-based therapy and early genetic diagnosis and that requires further intensive investigation.

  10. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is associated with platelet storage pool deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gunning, William T; Karabin, Beverly L; Blomquist, Thomas M; Grubb, Blair P

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms have been postulated to explain postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), however, the etiology of this often debilitating disorder remains unknown. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 181 POTS patients who exhibited/reported bleeding symptoms for a specific platelet (PL) dysfunction disorder, delta granule storage pool deficiency (δ-SPD).Patients were included only if results of blood tests for δ-SPD were available. Electron microscopy was utilized to diagnose δ-SPD. An ELISA assay was used to determine serotonin (5HT) concentration in PLs and medical record review was employed to collect patients' clinical symptoms.The most common bleeding symptom was easy bruising (71%) but frequent nose bleeds, heavy menstrual bleeding, and a family history of bleeding were also commonly reported. Of the patients studied, 81% were diagnosed with δ-SPD. Our investigation of 5HT concentration extracted from PLs revealed significantly lower levels of 5HT in POTS patients when compared to that of control subjects. Our data suggest that patients with POTS have significant comorbidities including bleeding symptoms and/or family bleeding histories, and have diminished PL 5HT levels supporting the hypothesis that POTS is a low 5HT level disorder. While we describe a significant relationship with POTS and δ-SPD, this finding does not constitute an etiology for POTS.Our results establish an additional comorbidity frequently seen in POTS that could explain a number of disparate symptoms often affecting the severity of POTS. PMID:27631244

  11. Reward Deficiency Syndrome: Attentional/Arousal Subtypes, Limitations of Current Diagnostic Nosology, and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We theorise that in some cases Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) predisposes to narcolepsy and hypersomnia, and that there may be a shared pathophysiology with various addictions [Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)]. Reticence to acknowledge such connections may be due to a narrow nosological framework. Additionally, we theorise that the development of narcolepsy on a baseline of ADHD/RDS leads to an additional assault on the dopaminergic reward system in such individuals. In this study, we propose to test these hypotheses by using a combination of broad genetic screening, and neuroimaging with and without pharmacological intervention, in those with pure ADHD, pure narcolepsy, and the combined ADHD-narcolepsy phenotype. Results of this proposed study may reveal a common pathophysiology of ADHD, narcolepsy and RDS, and perhaps an additional compromise to the reward system in those with combined ADHD-narcolepsy. If the evidence supports the hypothesis that indeed there is a shared pathophysiology for narcolepsy with RDS and thus its subtype ADHD, early intervention/preventative treatment amongst those with ADHD may be beneficial with the putative dopaminergic compound KB220Z™. PMID:26306327

  12. Conocimiento de Transmision de SIDA y Percepcion Hacia los Ninos con SIDA en el Salon de Clases de los Maestros de Educacion Especial (Knowledge of AIDS Transmission and Special Education Teachers' Attitudes towards Children with AIDS in the Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez de Williams, Milka

    This Spanish-language master's thesis presents a study which measured special education teachers' knowledge of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) virus transmission and their attitudes toward children with AIDS in schools. Attitudes were then related to social variables such as sex, teacher's age, and knowing someone with AIDS. A survey of…

  13. Mechanisms of androgen deficiency in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with the wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grinspoon, S; Corcoran, C; Stanley, T; Rabe, J; Wilkie, S

    2001-09-01

    Although prior studies suggest reduced androgen levels in women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting, little is known regarding the regulation of adrenal and ovarian androgen secretion in such patients. We investigated ovarian and adrenal function in 13 human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting and 21 age- and body mass index-matched healthy control subjects studied in the early follicular phase. Subjects received hCG (5000 U, im) on d 1 and Cosyntropin (0.25 mg, i.v.) on d 3 after dexamethasone (1 mg, orally, at 2400 h) pretreatment on d 2. At baseline, human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects demonstrated significantly reduced T [18 +/- 2 vs. 25 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], free T [1.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.2 pg/ml (5.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 8.3 +/- 0.6 pmol/liter); P = 0.001], androstenedione [119 +/- 6 vs. 162 +/- 14 ng/dl (4.16 +/- 0.20 vs. 5.66 +/- 0.48 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.55 +/- 0.19 microg/ml (2.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.5 micromol/liter); P = 0.047] levels compared with the control subjects. T [8 +/- 2 vs. 6 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.48], free T [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (1.7 +/- 0.7 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.5 pmol/liter); P = 0.85], 17 hydroxyprogesterone [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 microg/liter (1.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 nmol/liter); P = 0.63], and androstenedione [-1 +/- 12 vs. 8 +/- 11 ng/dl (-0.03 +/- 0.42 vs. 0.28 +/- 0.39 nmol/liter), P = 0.61] responses to hCG were not different between the groups. Cortisol responses were increased and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate responses were decreased in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected vs. control subjects after ACTH stimulation. The ratio of DHEA to cortisol was significantly decreased at 60 (71 +/- 11 vs. 107 +/- 10; P = 0.02) and 90 (63 +/- 8 vs. 102 +/- 9; P = 0.004) min post-ACTH in the human immunodeficiency

  14. Down syndrome and arterial ischemic stroke in childhood: a potential immunologic link with selective IgG4 subclass deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Falsaperla, Raffaele; De Silva, Kasun; Taibi, Rosaria; Verrotti, Alberto; Trifiletti, Rosario R; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    We report four children with Down Syndrome (DS) without evidence of congenital heart disease who sustained cerebral infarction in the context of an infectious disease. In one child, stroke occurred in the context of acute infection with Mycoplasma pneumonia. In another child, stroke occurred in the context of Streptococcus oralis (viridans subgroup) infection. In two other children, stroke occurred in the context of a bibasilar pneumonia for which an etiologic agent was not found. All patients had evidence of selective IgG4 subclass deficiency. We followed 8 other children with down syndrome with infectious diseases, but without stroke and a control group of healthy children, and measured the value of IgG4 for each group. We found a statistical significant difference of levels of IgG4 subclass deficiency in the group of stroke, in comparison with the other two groups (P values <0.001). We, therefore, suggest an association between IgG4 subclass deficiency and stroke in DS patients. IgG4 subclass deficiency could conceivably play a role in the high frequency of para-infectious related stroke in this population. PMID:24613243

  15. Training Volunteers for an AIDS Buddy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; And Others

    In 1986, the Baton Rouge Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Task Force began to implement an individual volunteer support program to provide support services through a companion, a buddy, whose functions would be either emotional support or assistance in daily activities, or both. In order to have trained volunteers, an education program…

  16. Liability for Failure To Provide AIDS Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Constitution guarantees a right to privacy that requires deputies and jailers to avoid the unnecessary disclosure of sensitive information about a person. This privacy right especially covers Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-related (AIDS) information, and it even protects the immediate family of persons infected with human…

  17. Psychotherapy with AIDS Patients: Countertransference Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilk, Carole A.

    This paper provides a personal account of the process of psychotherapy for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, as seen from both the client's and the psychotherapist's perspective, with a focus on countertransference issues found in the early phases of treatment. Based on case material, the discussion explores themes presented by…

  18. SAFE: Stopping AIDS through Functional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylton, Judith

    This functional curriculum is intended to teach people with developmental disabilities or other learning problems how to prevent infection with HIV/AIDS (Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The entire curriculum includes six video segments, four illustrated brochures, 28 slides and illustrations, as well as a guide…

  19. HIV/AIDS Education: Audio Visual Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This directory of audiovisual materials on Human Immunedeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) lists approximately 60 titles available as of September 1992. In addition to titles, the catalog provides borrowing information, short descriptions of videotapes, names of producers, language (five Spanish titles), price,…

  20. Optometric Education's Challenge: AIDS in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    A national survey of schools of optometry suggests that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) needs to be more thoroughly addressed in some curricula. Suggestions are made for curriculum development in the areas of public health, basic coursework, immunology, clinical medicine, psychology, ocular manifestations, and contact lenses. (MSE)

  1. Taking Care of Young Children with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federlein, Anne Cairns

    This booklet provides an overview of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and guidelines for child care administrators and caregivers. It is argued that reason must overcome fear about the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in early childhood centers. Discussion addresses such questions as: (1) Can child caregivers get AIDS…

  2. AIDS and the Medicinal Power of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Anne

    1989-01-01

    Describes Multitasking Systems (MTS), an office services firm that employs only people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. It was established by an infectious disease specialist who observed that patients who remain employed do remarkably better than those who do not. (JOW)

  3. Prospective investigation of autism and genotype-phenotype correlations in 22q13 deletion syndrome and SHANK3 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 22q13 deletion syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, hypotonia, delayed or absent speech, and autistic features. SHANK3 has been identified as the critical gene in the neurological and behavioral aspects of this syndrome. The phenotype of SHANK3 deficiency has been described primarily from case studies, with limited evaluation of behavioral and cognitive deficits. The present study used a prospective design and inter-disciplinary clinical evaluations to assess patients with SHANK3 deficiency, with the goal of providing a comprehensive picture of the medical and behavioral profile of the syndrome. Methods A serially ascertained sample of patients with SHANK3 deficiency (n = 32) was evaluated by a team of child psychiatrists, neurologists, clinical geneticists, molecular geneticists and psychologists. Patients were evaluated for autism spectrum disorder using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-G. Results Thirty participants with 22q13.3 deletions ranging in size from 101 kb to 8.45 Mb and two participants with de novo SHANK3 mutations were included. The sample was characterized by high rates of autism spectrum disorder: 27 (84%) met criteria for autism spectrum disorder and 24 (75%) for autistic disorder. Most patients (77%) exhibited severe to profound intellectual disability and only five (19%) used some words spontaneously to communicate. Dysmorphic features, hypotonia, gait disturbance, recurring upper respiratory tract infections, gastroesophageal reflux and seizures were also common. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations indicated that larger deletions were associated with increased levels of dysmorphic features, medical comorbidities and social communication impairments related to autism. Analyses of individuals with small deletions or point mutations identified features related to SHANK3 haploinsufficiency

  4. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Rebouche, C J; Engel, A G

    1984-01-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine was administered intravenously to six normal subjects, one patient with primary muscle carnitine deficiency (MCD), and four patients with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD). Specific radioactivity was followed in plasma for 28 d. A three-compartment model (extracellular fluid, muscle, and "other tissues") was adopted. Rate constants, fluxes, pool sizes, and turnover times were calculated. Results of these calculations indicated reduced transport of carnitine into muscle in both forms of primary carnitine deficiency. However, in SCD, the reduced rate of carnitine transport was attributed to reduced plasma carnitine concentration. In MCD, the results are consistent with an intrinsic defect in the transport process. Abnormal fluctuations of the plasma carnitine, but of a different form, occurred in MCD and SCD. The significance of these are unclear, but in SCD they suggest abnormal regulation of the muscle/plasma carnitine concentration gradient. In 8 of 11 subjects, carnitine excretion was less than dietary carnitine intake. Carnitine excretion rates calculated by kinetic compartmental analysis were higher than corresponding rates measured directly, indicating degradation of carnitine. However, we found no radioactive metabolites of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine in urine. These observations suggest that dietary carnitine was metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6707204

  5. A Rare Combination: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due To 21 Hydroxylase Deficiency and Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Önder, Aşan

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Turner syndrome (TS) and classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is rare. A one-day-old newborn was referred to our hospital with ambiguous genitalia. The parents were third-degree relatives. The infant’s weight was 3350g (50-75p), and the head circumference was 34.5cm (50p). The gonads were nonpalpable. Presence of a 3 cm phallus, one urogenital opening into the perineum, and incomplete labial fusion were identified. Laboratory tests revealed a classical type of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Karyotyping revealed a 45X0(35)/46XX(22) pattern with negative sex-determining region Y (SRY) on gene analysis. At the most recent follow-up visit, the patient appeared to be in good health - her height was 70.4 cm [-1.5 standard deviation (SD)] and her weight was 9.8 kg (0.3 SD). She was receiving hydrocortisone in a dose of 10 mg/m2/day, fludrocortisone acetate in a dose of 0.075 mg/day, and oral salt of 1 g/day. System examinations were normal. The patient’s electrolyte levels were found to be normal and she was in good metabolic control. The findings of this patient demonstrate that routine karyotyping during investigation of patients with sexual differentiation disorders can reveal TS. Additionally, signs of virilism should always be investigated at diagnosis or during physical examinations for follow-up of TS cases. [i][/i]SRY analysis should be performed primarily when signs of virilism are observed. CAH should also be considered in patients with negative [i]SRY[/i]. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23261864

  6. A pharmacogenomic approach to the treatment of children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P; Chatelain, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Ambler, G R; Belgorosky, A; Quinteiro, S; Deal, C; Stevens, A; Raelson, J; Croteau, P; Destenaves, B; Olivier, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective Individual sensitivity to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) is variable. Identification of genetic factors contributing to this variability has potential use for individualization of treatment. The objective of this study was to identify genetic markers and gene expression profiles associated with growth response on r-hGH therapy in treatment-naïve, prepubertal children with GH deficiency (GHD) or Turner syndrome (TS). Design A prospective, multicenter, international, open-label pharmacogenomic study. Methods The associations of genotypes in 103 growth- and metabolism-related genes and baseline gene expression profiles with growth response to r-hGH (cm/year) over the first year were evaluated. Genotype associations were assessed with growth response as a continuous variable and as a categorical variable divided into quartiles. Results Eleven genes in GHD and ten in TS, with two overlapping between conditions, were significantly associated with growth response either as a continuous variable (seven in GHD, two in TS) or as a categorical variable (four more in GHD, eight more in TS). For example, in GHD, GRB10 was associated with high response (≥Q3; P=0.0012), while SOS2 was associated with low response (≤Q1; P=0.006), while in TS, LHX4 was associated with high response (P=0.0003) and PTPN1 with low response (P=0.0037). Differences in expression were identified for one of the growth response-associated genes in GHD (AKT1) and for two in TS (KRAS and MYOD1). Conclusions Carriage of specific growth-related genetic markers is associated with growth response in GHD and TS. These findings indicate that pharmacogenomics could have a role in individualized management of childhood growth disorders. PMID:23761422

  7. Latest Study on the Relationship between Pathological Process of Inflammatory Injury and the Syndrome of Spleen Deficiency and Fluid Retention in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Beibei; Zhou, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jiangyuan; Ling, Yun; Hu, Qianfeng; Wang, Yi; Bai, Kangkang

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation exists throughout the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) differentiates the pathogenesis of AD as kidney essence deficiency and qi and blood deficiency as well as blood stasis in syndromes, whose action mechanisms are all associated with the intervention in its inflammatory process. Our preliminary studies both in clinic and in vitro have demonstrated that the syndrome of spleen deficiency and fluid retention has also been an important pathogenesis for the incidence and development of AD. Hence, the paper aims to further illustrate the correlation between inflammatory process in AD and the syndrome of spleen deficiency and fluid retention, laying solid foundation for the application of invigorating the spleen and eliminating the dampness in clinic, and enriching the theoretical connotation for AD prevention and treatment in TCM. PMID:24799943

  8. Designing and Implementing an Educational Program on AIDS for Minority Childbearing Women To Enhance AIDS Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimphius, Gail M.

    Ignorance, misinformation, and a failure to personalize the risk for acquisition of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus has created a situation in which the incidence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) seroprevalence among minority childbearing women in a Florida county is increasing. An increased incidence in this population…

  9. School Health Education To Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. WHO AIDS Series 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide provides a framework within which education authorities can work with teachers, parents, and community leaders to help young people learn the facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). It emphasizes the importance of education about human behavior and sexuality that is appropriate to…

  10. The Incorporation of HIV/AIDS Into Identity Over Time: Transformational Tales Continued.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Lisa M.

    The incorporation of human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) into identity over time was examined by collecting data from the same 11 HIV-positive individuals at 3 points in time (in 1995, early 1998, and late 1999). By the time of their semi-structured interviews in late 1999, the seven men and four women…

  11. Metachronous T-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child With Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Thomas B; McGee, Rose B; Kaye, Erica C; McCarville, Mary Beth; Choi, John K; Cavender, Cary P; Nichols, Kim E; Sandlund, John T

    2016-08-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with a high risk of developing early-onset malignancies of the blood, brain, and intestinal tract. We present the case of a patient with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma at the age of 3 years, followed by Burkitt lymphoma 10 years later. This patient also exhibited numerous nonmalignant findings including café au lait spots, lipomas, bilateral renal nodules, a nonossifying fibroma, multiple colonic adenomas, and a rapidly enlarging pilomatrixoma. The spectrum of malignant and nonmalignant neoplasms in this patient highlights the remarkable diversity, and early onset, of lesions seen in children with CMMRD. PMID:27037742

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in association with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis: Views over hidden possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Sekar, Ramalingam; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2007-01-01

    Gut immune components are severely compromised among persons with AIDS, which allows increased translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. These microbial LPS are reportedly increased in chronically HIV-infected individuals and findings have correlated convincingly with measures of immune activation. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an adverse consequence of the restoration of pathogen-specific immune responses in a subset of HIV-infected subjects with underlying latent infections during the initial months of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Whether IRIS is the result of a response to a high antigen burden, an excessive response by the recovering immune system, exacerbated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines or a lack of immune regulation due to inability to produce regulatory cytokines remains to be determined. We theorize that those who develop IRIS have a high burden of proinflammatory cytokines produced also in response to systemic bacterial LPS that nonspecifically act on latent mycobacterial antigens. We also hypothesize that subjects that do not develop IRIS could have developed either tolerance (anergy) to persistent LPS/tubercle antigens or could have normal FOXP3+ gene and that those with defective FOXP3+ gene or those with enormous plasma LPS could be vulnerable to IRIS. The measure of microbial LPS, anti-LPS antibodies and nonspecific plasma cytokines in subjects on HAART shall predict the role of these components in IRIS. PMID:18053126

  13. Health care and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peck, J; Bezold, C

    1992-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a harbinger for change in health care. There are many powerful forces poised to transform the industrialized health care structure of the twentieth century, and AIDS may act as either a catalyst or an amplifier for these forces. AIDS could, for example, swamp local resources and thereby help trigger national reform in a health care system that has already lost public confidence. AIDS can also hasten the paradigm shift that is occurring throughout health care. Many of the choices society will confront when dealing with AIDS carry implications beyond health care. Information about who has the disease, for example, already pits traditional individual rights against group interests. Future information systems could make discrimination based upon medical records a nightmare for a growing number of individuals. Yet these systems also offer the hope of accelerated progress against not only AIDS but other major health threats as well. The policy choices that will define society's response to AIDS can best be made in the context of a clearly articulated vision of a society that reflects our deepest values. PMID:10119289

  14. Experiential Service-Based Learning: An Integrated HIV/AIDS Education Model for College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Judith R.; Schwartz, Lisa B.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a approach to teaching the sociology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) by combining coursework with weekly volunteer work in an AIDS agency. Concludes with a discussion of the benefits of experiential learning and five guidelines for establishing similar community service programs. (CFR)

  15. AIDS/HIV among Hispanics in the Northeast and Puerto Rico: Report of Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia

    1991-01-01

    Discusses six findings of the Northeast Hispanic Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) consortium's assessment of 2,527 members of the Hispanic community of the northeast United States and Puerto Rico. Highlights the subjects' needs for information, education, risk reduction, and services related to AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus…

  16. "An Instrument of Accountability." ILO/AIDS: A Global Plan and a New Code of Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the International Labor Organization's plan of action to fight the global epidemic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Describes the code of practice that provides workers, employers, and governments with guidelines for addressing AIDS and its impact on the workplace. Includes key principles of the code. (JOW)

  17. AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options. Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammett, Theodore M.

    This document, written for officials involved in making and implementing decisions regarding the correctional response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), provides the most current figures and trend data on the incidence of AIDS among incarcerated offenders. The stated purpose of this document is to be informational rather than…

  18. Extenuating Circumstances in Perceptions of Suicide: Disease Diagnosis (AIDS, Cancer), Pain Level, and Life Expectancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephen K.; Range, Lillian M.

    1991-01-01

    Examined whether illness type, pain level, and life expectancy affected reactions of undergraduates (n=160) toward a terminal illness suicide with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or cancer. AIDS patients were more stigmatized than cancer patients; suicide was more tolerated if victim was suffering greater pain. (Author/ABL)

  19. The Evaluation of Educational Help in Aids Prevention among Youth for Educators Working Outside the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Louise; And Others

    Training of professionals as educators in the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and sex education domains has been seen as part of the solution to slow down the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission and eventually stop it. This study evaluated an educational guide for AIDS prevention which was distributed to youth workers…

  20. AIDS and Child Care: A Booklet for Child Care Workers, Management Committees and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricke, Caroline; Glasson, Mark

    This booklet provides Australians with basic information about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Contents cover the definiton of AIDS, ways the disease is transmitted, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody testing for adults and children, variations among children infected with HIV, information that HIV is not transmitted…

  1. AIDS Education under Democracy: Gay Men, Sexual Dissent, and the Limits of Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofes, Eric

    This paper reviews past and current Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education and prevention efforts, describes three specific phases of efforts, and analyzes AIDS education and prevention in relation to emancipatory models of education. First the paper reviews data measuring the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among…

  2. The Responsibility of Librarians for Collecting and Making AIDS Materials Available.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Mark W.

    This paper is a call for academic and public libraries to contemplate their role in meeting the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) information needs of their patrons. Librarians are urged to consider the potential negative consequences of neglecting to provide up-to-date and representative collections of AIDS materials. It is suggested…

  3. AIDS in the World of Work: When Information Is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhrer, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a critical problem in Africa, where 80 percent of AIDS-related deaths attack the 20- to 49-year age group. Uganda has developed a strategy to fight the epidemic, including unions' work in fighting the virus and the discrimination affecting those with the disease. (JOW)

  4. Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Young Adults. and Update on AIDS for Teachers and Policy Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarber, William L.; Newschwander, Gregg E.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles on the topics of (1) sexually transmitted diseases and (2) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Yarber discusses how these topics should be taught to young people, with emphasis on health education as opposed to morality. Newschwander states the facts related to AIDS, including risks of enrolling infected students.…

  5. Female Secondary School Adolescents' Sexual Behavior and School Based HIV/AIDS Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P.

    2013-01-01

    Most adolescents engage in indiscriminate sexual experimentations. This practice exposes them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndromes (AIDS) are among the deadly diseases that exist globally. Twice as many girls, compared to boys…

  6. The Development and Validation of the International AIDS Questionnaire-Chinese Version (IAQ-C).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cindy; Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Chan, Shui-Fun Fiona; Noel, Beth

    1999-01-01

    Developed and standardized an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire which was tested with 1,667 adolescents and 277 college students in Hong Kong. Results support the reliability and validity of the scores from this measure of AIDS knowledge among adolescents in Hong Kong. (SLD)

  7. Getting the Word Out: A Practical Guide to AIDS Materials Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo, Ed.

    This book provides health professionals with a "how to" approach to developing culturally sensitive and effective Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education materials. It is a collection of chapters written by community AIDS educators who have specialized knowledge and skill in developing educational materials in multi-ethnic…

  8. AIDS in South Africa: Therapeutic Interventions to Strengthen Resilience among Orphans and Vulnerable Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Melissa Allen; Donald, David R.; Theron, Linda C.; Lyon, Rachel Crook

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 10% of the 34.2 million individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are under the age of 18. Additionally, 17.8 million children have experienced one or both parents dying of HIV/AIDS. In comparison to other countries, South Africa has the highest per capita of…

  9. Toward an Understanding of (EM)Power(Ment) for HIV/AIDS Prevention with Adolescent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Lorraine; Oh, Hyun Joo; Gillmore, Mary Rogers

    Preventing the spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among women is a national priority. In the United States, AIDS is the sixth leading cause of death among young adult women, and their rate of infection is four times higher than men. This article was developed to help stimulate interest in the power dynamics of relationships and…

  10. A Clash of Symbols: An Analysis of Competing Images and Arguments in the AIDS Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilder, Eric

    Efforts to contain the spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) have been slowed by numerous arguing factions, political, religious, and medical, all of which perceive the AIDS epidemic through a different set of symbols. The images can be more easily understood using Kenneth Boulding's Threat, Integry, and Exchange (or TIE) model. The…

  11. Predictors of Intention To Take Precautions against AIDS among Black College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashakkori, Abbas; Thompson, Vaida D.

    This research explored the effects of a number of factors derived from extant intention-behavior models on a general behavioral intention to engage in protection against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and a specific behavioral intention to use condoms as protection in vaginal sex. Data pertaining to beliefs, knowledge about AIDS, fear…

  12. The AIDS Awareness and Sexual Behaviour of Young People in the South-west of England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    Assessed Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) awareness and sexual behavior of 2,955 subjects, ages 16-24. Found fairly reasonable levels of knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS but very low personally perceived vulnerability to infection. Sexual culture was one of fairly early ages of first intercourse, moderate levels of…

  13. Steps To Help Your School Set Up an AIDS Education Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition of Advocates for Students, Boston, MA.

    This guide for setting up an educational program on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is divided into four sections: (1) "A School's Role"; (2) "How To Help Your School Set Up a Good HIV and AIDS Education Program"; (3) "A Checklist for Picking a Good HIV Curriculum"; and (4) "Resources." The first…

  14. Older Americans and AIDS: Transmission Risks and Primary Prevention Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catania, Joseph A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Growing number of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases among older Americans is of increasing concern. In context of primary prevention, reviews findings that bear on modes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (blood transfusions, sexual) among older individuals and knowledge of magnitude of the AIDS problem represented…

  15. Safe Sex and Dangerous Poems: AIDS, Literature and the Gay and Lesbian Community College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engler, Robert Klein

    Some of the denial and fear that accompanies homosexuality and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) can be dealt with by discussing the following three issues: the AIDS epidemic, the problems of gay and lesbian community college students, and finally, the teaching of literature--especially poetry. Exploring both poetry and the AIDS…

  16. Experiencing an Epidemic: The Development of an AIDS Education Program for Community College Students in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochlin, Joyce T.

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to suggest components for an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education program for community college students. The project sought to identify AIDS programs and policies in place at the 17 community colleges in Maryland; assessed community college students' knowledge about the spread and prevention of…

  17. Family Structure and Functions Identified by Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong-Wylie, Gina; Doherty-Poirier, Maryanne; Kieren, Dianne

    1999-01-01

    A study looked at the structural and functional aspects of family from the perspective of six people living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results showing how HIV/AIDS affects all members of the sufferer's family have implications for family practitioners. (Author/JOW)

  18. Social Constructs and Disease: Implications for a Controlled Vocabulary for HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Gillaspy, Mary L.

    1998-01-01

    The body of knowledge associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represents complexity not present in any other disease. A controlled vocabulary and classification structure used to organize the body of knowledge associated with HIV/AIDS is discussed. (Author/AEF)

  19. Lazarus and Group Psychotherapy: AIDS in the Era of Protease Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Brazaitis, Sarah J.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of medications, protease inhibitors, has dramatically improved the health of many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This development has had a major impact on the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS. This article considers how a group is affected by the larger systems of…

  20. AIDS-Related Training in U.S. Schools of Social Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Yolanda E.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 70 master of social work programs to determine how curricula included instruction on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Most programs offered training in foundation areas pertinent to AIDS (health/mental health systems, practice with racial/ethnic minorities, substance abuse prevention/treatment). Over 40% of programs provided no…

  1. The Facts about AIDS. A Special NEA "Higher Education Advocate" Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Harold, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is presented to alert National Education Association educators to behaviors that place people at risk for AIDS. The material was prepared by the Public Health Service. Topics include: sexual transmission, transmission from injected blood, transmission during pregnancy, groups at greatest…

  2. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profiles by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.

  3. Successful Medical Therapy for Hypophosphatemic Rickets due to Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induced de Toni-Debré-Fanconi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Patel, Hiren P.; Beebe, Allan; McBride, Kim L.

    2013-01-01

    Primary de Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome is a non-FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic disorder due to a primary defect in renal proximal tubule cell function resulting in hyperphosphaturia, renal tubular acidosis, glycosuria, and generalized aminoaciduria. The orthopaedic sequela and response to treatment of this rare disorder are limited in the literature. Herein we report a long term followup of a 10-year-old female presenting at 1 year of age with rickets initially misdiagnosed as vitamin D deficiency rickets. She was referred to the metabolic bone and genetics clinics at 5 years of age with severe genu valgum deformities of 24 degrees and worsening rickets. She had polyuria, polydipsia, enuresis, and bone pain. Diagnosis of hypophosphatemic rickets due to de Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome was subsequently made. Respiratory chain enzyme analysis identified a complex I mitochondrial deficiency as the underlying cause. She was treated with phosphate (50–70 mg/kg/day), calcitriol (30 ng/kg/day), and sodium citrate with resolution of bone pain and normal growth. By 10 years of age, her genu valgus deformities were 4 degrees with healing of rickets. Her excellent orthopaedic outcome despite late proper medical therapy is likely due to the intrinsic renal tubular defect that is more responsive to combined alkali, phosphate, and calcitriol therapy. PMID:24386581

  4. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  5. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients. PMID:26979507

  6. Repair in ribosomal RNA genes is deficient in xeroderma pigmentosum group C and in Cockayne's syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Christians, F C; Hanawalt, P C

    1994-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled DNA repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II but not in ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), which are transcribed by RNA polymerase I. The removal of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from rDNA in repair-proficient human cells has been shown to be slow but detectable and apparently not coupled to transcription. We studied the induction and removal of CPD from rDNA in cultured cells from two repair-deficient human disorders. Primary xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, whether proliferating or nondividing, removed no CPD from either rDNA strand in 24 h post-UV, a result which supports earlier conclusions that XP-C cells lack the general, transcription-independent pathway of nucleotide excision repair. We also observed lower than normal repair of rDNA in Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells from complementation groups A and B. In agreement with previous findings, the repair of both strands of the RNA polymerase II-transcribed dihydrofolate reductase gene was also deficient relative to that of normal cells. This strongly suggests that the defect in CS cells is not limited to a deficiency in a transcription-repair coupling factor. Rather, the defect may interfere with the ability of repair proteins to gain access to all expressed genes. PMID:7512688

  7. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients.

  8. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  9. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N.; Grossfeld, Paul D.; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients. PMID:26979507

  10. AIDS antibody tests on inpatient psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L

    1987-02-01

    An antibody test for the causative virus of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) became commercially available in 1985. The author discusses the use of the AIDS antibody test on inpatient psychiatric units. She reviews the controversial legal and ethical questions related to its use, addressing such questions as Who should be tested for the AIDS antibody? When and to whom should the results of the test be disclosed? and How should the doctrine of "right to privacy" be balanced with the "duty to warn"?

  11. Pi (Spleen)-deficiency syndrome in tumor microenvironment is the pivotal pathogenesis of colorectal cancer immune escape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Gang; Lin, Xiao-Chang; Diao, Jian-Xin; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Li, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Cancer immunoediting consists of three sequential phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape. For colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the adenoma dysplastic progression may represent an equilibrium phase and the cancer stage as escape phase. Immune system eliminates transformed enterocytes by destroying them at first, sculpts them at the same time and selects the variants subsequently that are no longer recognized and insensitive to immune effectors, and finally induces immunosuppressive state within the tumor microenvironment that facilitates immune escape and tumor outgrowth. Immunosuppression and inflammation are the two crucial features of Pi (Spleen)-deficiency. Classic quotations, immune evidence and clinical observations suggest that Spleen (but not other organs) deficiency is the key pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) microenvironment. Weakness of old age, immunosuppressive cytokines from chronic inflammation, tumor-derived immunosuppressive factors and surrendered immune cells-regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) constitutes CRC microenvironment of Pi-deficiency. Furthermore, excess in superficiality, such as phlegm stagnation, blood stasis and toxin accumulation are induced by chronic inflammation on the basis of asthenia in origin, an immunosuppressive state. Great masters of Chinese medicine emphasize that strengthen Pi is the chief therapeutic principle for CRC which receives good therapeutic effects. So, Pi-deficiency based syndrome is the pivotal pathogenesis of tumor microenvironment. The immunosuppressive microenvironment facilitates immune escape which play an important role in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. There are some signs that strengthen Pi based treatment has potential capacity to ameliorate tumor environment. It might be a novel starting point to explore the mechanism of strengthen Pi based therapy in the prevention and treatment of CRC through regulation of

  12. Informed Choice for Participation in Down Syndrome Screening: Development and Content of a Web-Based Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Helle Ploug; Draborg, Eva; Pedersen, Claus Duedal; Lamont, Ronald F; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

    2015-01-01

    Background In Denmark, all pregnant women are offered screening in early pregnancy to estimate the risk of having a fetus with Down syndrome. Pregnant women participating in the screening program should be provided with information and support to allow them to make an informed choice. There is increasing interest in the use of Web-based technology to provide information and digital solutions for the delivery of health care. Objective The aim of this study was to develop an eHealth tool that contained accurate and relevant information to allow pregnant women to make an informed choice about whether to accept or reject participation in screening for Down syndrome. Methods The development of the eHealth tool involved the cooperation of researchers, technology experts, clinicians, and users. The underlying theoretical framework was based on participatory design, the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) Collaboration guide to develop a patient decision aid, and the roadmap for developing eHealth technologies from the Center for eHealth Research and Disease Management (CeHRes). The methods employed were a systematic literature search, focus group interviews with 3 care providers and 14 pregnant women, and 2 weeks of field observations. A qualitative descriptive approach was used in this study. Results Relevant themes from pregnant women and care providers with respect to information about Down syndrome screening were identified. Based on formalized processes for developing patient decision aids and eHealth technologies, an interactive website containing information about Down syndrome, methods of screening, and consequences of the test was developed. The intervention was based on user requests and needs, and reflected the current hospital practice and national guidelines. Conclusions This paper describes the development and content of an interactive website to support pregnant women in making informed choices about Down syndrome screening. To develop the

  13. AIDS Epidemic. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on Reviewing Federal Efforts Being Conducted toward Combating the AIDS Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The text of a Senate hearing called to review federal efforts combating acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is presented in this document. Opening statements reviewing the AIDS crisis are given by Senators Edward Kennedy and Lowell Weicker, Jr. Prepared statements are included by Senators Orrin Hatch and Ted Stevens. David Baltimore and…

  14. Seasons: The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center Quarterly. 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Andrea Green, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The three 1993 issues of "Seasons" (the Spring/Summer issues are combined) address various aspects of dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Native Americans. The Winter issue focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and its incidence and treatment among HIV-positive individuals. "Remembering…

  15. Are Victims of AIDS 'Handicapped' under Federal Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses whether the disease AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) could be considered a "handicap." Describes a recent court decision, "Arline vs. School Board of Nassau County," in which the court found that a teacher with tuberculosis could be defined as handicapped and that her dismissal was in violation of Section 504 of the…

  16. AIDS: New Challenge to the Counseling Psychologist in Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fradkin, Howard R.

    Counseling psychologists, especially those who work with homosexual men, may find that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a major focus of their work. Therapists must be comfortable talking explicitly with these clients about sex, and must be able to help clients talk explicitly about their behavior. Clients often feel ambivalent about…

  17. Campuses Confront AIDS: Tapping the Vitality of Caring and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    In response to needs created by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, colleges and universities have struggled to develop or redesign policies and services to promote behavioral change. Effective institutional response requires comprehensive policy, services and referral, and education and prevention focusing on identity and…

  18. Death and Its Rituals in Novels on AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joseph J.; Nouss, Alexis

    1993-01-01

    Reviews novels dealing with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, noting that their perspectives on death can be extracted through content analysis. Concludes that, overall, these novels present weak symbolization about death with rituals that are not highly elaborated and that complex images of the afterlife are not offered.…

  19. Understanding HIV and AIDS: Preparing Students for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Sue J.

    1995-01-01

    Current biological, immunological, and medical knowledge about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), including methods of preventing transmission, is reviewed and presented in a format suitable for inclusion in a social work curriculum. Various ways in which the information can be incorporated into…

  20. AIDS and Persons with Developmental Disabilities: The Legal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennert, Sharon; And Others

    This report provides lawyers and service providers with legal information and analysis about issues affecting persons with developmental disabilities and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The report reviews relevant medical facts, discusses federal and state laws which define the rights and responsibilities of disabled individuals and…

  1. Guidelines on AIDS in Europe. First Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoffmann, H.; And Others

    The problem of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Europe and public health measures that can be taken to reduce the spread of infection are discussed. These guidelines cover: the magnitude of the problem in Europe, the virus and its mode of transmission, major clinical features of the disease, laboratory tests, possibilities of…

  2. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  3. Teaching about AIDS/HIV Disease to College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Joseph R.

    This paper presents a psychology professor's account of his experiences teaching a course on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) to college students. The first section discusses how to introduce and market the course on campus, and anticipate students' and colleagues' questions about one's motivations for…

  4. Victims of AIDS: Family, Society, Cost and Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Doris F.

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become an increasing problem throughout the nation. Experts predict that there will have been 270,000 cases, including 179,000 deaths, by 1991. The disease has devastating psychosocial as well as physical effects. Neither preventive medicine nor a cure is anywhere in sight. Everyone needs to be…

  5. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting for an 18-month time period. Interventions included individual psychotherapy, mental status assessments, staff group sessions, and supportive services for families and significant others. During that time,…

  6. Complications in Working with AIDS Patients in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnell, Gil

    Numerous research studies have documented that for patients coping with chronic illness, social support is extremely important in facilitating adjustment to the illness. The support may come from organized therapy and self-help groups or from interpersonal relationships outside a group. However, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a…

  7. AIDS/HIV Infection and the Workplace: NIDA Workgroup Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    In October 1989, the Division of Applied Research of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) convened a panel of experts to assess whether the basic principles and approaches that have been used in the development of workplace drug abuse programs and community acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) education programs can be applied to…

  8. AIDS in Michigan: A Report to Gov. James J. Blanchard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Health, Lansing.

    This report presents information regarding the incidence, effects, programs, policies, and services pertaining to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in Michigan. A list of 55 recommendations concerning prevention and control, provider and institutional care, state government policy, and financing precedes sections detailing the current…

  9. AIDS and Social Work: The Ethics and Civil Liberties Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1993-01-01

    Provides overview of six major ethical and civil liberties issues pertaining to social work practice related to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS): mandatory screening and testing of clients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); client access to health insurance; professionals' duty to treat HIV-infected clients; privacy and…

  10. Political Reflections on AIDS and Developmental Disabilities: Conference Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmorland, Timothy M.

    1989-01-01

    The keynote address of a November, 1988, symposium on developmental disabilities and the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) examines four basic areas of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) concern in Congress: research, education, testing and discrimination protection, and health care services. (DB)

  11. AIDS: An Inter-Disciplinary Secondary Curriculum Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Marianne

    This curriculum guide to teaching secondary students about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) using an interdisciplinary approach includes lessons that are meant to supplement the existing curriculum, but may be used to supplant existing lessons. Most of the lessons employ the investigative approach to learning and require student…

  12. Gambling with Your Health: Predictors of Risk for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasorsa, Dominic L.; Shoemaker, Pamela J.

    To examine risk for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in terms of risk-related behaviors, and to investigate the factors that may be involved in putting one at risk, a study conducted telephone interviews with 493 randomly selected adults (18 years or older) in Austin, Texas in the fall of 1987. Respondents answered approximately 40…

  13. Medical Students' Perceptions and Proposed Treatment Strategies for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladany, Nicholas; Stern, Marilyn

    Research has consistently found that health care providers report having negative attitudes and perceptions toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. This study was conducted to examine the independent and joint influences of a patient's mode of acquisition of illness (blood transfusion versus sexual promiscuity), patient blame…

  14. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  15. Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation of AIDS Education Programs for Dentists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbert, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An office-based continuing education program on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for dentists is described, including needs assessment, model development, local piloting, national implementation with 119 dentists, and evaluation phases. Program evaluation indicated an improvement in risk perception, knowledge, and practice resulted, but…

  16. Medical and Nursing Students' Attitudes about AIDS Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesch, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A 12-item questionnaire was administered in 1987-88 to 445 medical students, 133 medical school applicants, and 111 nursing students to assess any differences in their attitudes toward medicine-related AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) issues. The findings suggest that education has an important role in changing attitudes. (Author/MLW)

  17. Indiana AIDS Prevention Plan, 1986. Version 1.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Board of Health, Indianapolis.

    The Indiana statewide Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention plan focuses on community education efforts targeted for specific high risk groups as well as health care and other professionals. Plans are summarized for dissemination of information to the following groups: risk groups, physicians, dental health, nursing, ancillary…

  18. Linking People with AIDS in Rural Communities: The Telephone Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Notes that rural people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) have difficulty obtaining support. Describes development, implementation, and evaluation of model to bring support groups into homes of rural residents through six telephone group sessions. Describes goals of psychoeducational group being to increase information and social…

  19. AIDS Resource Directory and Repertoire de ressources sur le SIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This set of documents presents directories of resources on the topic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) available in Canada in English and in French. The first section in each directory contains a list of names, addresses, and telephone numbers of organizations from which readers may obtain the listed resources. Resources are then…

  20. Mass Media Messages, Myths and Martyrs: Analyzing "America Responds to AIDS" Public Service Announcements, 1987-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    Focusing on the federal government's efforts to educate the public to the dangers of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a study examined "America Responds to AIDS" public service announcements (PSA's) through a traditional rhetorical analysis (PSA characters, plot, pace, tone, and message design). Forty-four English-language television…

  1. How Can You Teach Middle Grade Students about the Effects of AIDS and the HIV Virus in a Conservative Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrand, Shirley; Wattenbarger, Barbara

    This paper describes an interdisciplinary approach to conveying knowledge and promoting understanding of the disease of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) at the middle school level in a conservative community. Discussion of AIDS was included in a sixth grade unit on communicable diseases designed to teach how diseases are transmitted, how…

  2. A Perspective on AIDS: A Catastrophic Disease but a Symptom of Deeper Problems in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Andrew D.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is undisputedly the most significant public health problem facing the Black community today. From the outset, it was apparent that the disease disproportionately affected Blacks. In 1981, when AIDS was first identified, 21.5 percent of the first 107 cases were Blacks and Hispanics. This report discusses…

  3. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse

    1991-01-01

    The Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in black males caused distrust by blacks of the public health system that has implications for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) studies. AIDS prevention among blacks may require openness about the Tuskegee study to allay fears of repetition. (SLD)

  4. Relationships between Time Orientation, Knowledge of AIDS, and Self-Reported Sexual Behavioral Changes in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Andrew S.

    College students as young adults are sexually active. Authorities on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are concerned about the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in college students since students are sexually active but do not perceive precautions against AIDS as necessary for themselves. This study examined what college…

  5. Representation of AIDS in Televised Public Service Announcements: The Discursive Practices of Government in the Constitution of Knowledge about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Roger; And Others

    Using a textualist approach (looking at meaning above and beyond overt message elements), a study examined televised public service announcements (PSAs) about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) produced by the Ad Council and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Both ads identify young people who should be concerned…

  6. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(−)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(−) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:27041916

  7. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(-)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(-) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:27041916

  8. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(-)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(-) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  9. Thiamine deficiency in self-induced refeeding syndrome, an undetected and potentially lethal condition.

    PubMed

    Hershkowitz, Einat; Reshef, Alon; Munich, Olga; Yosefi, Bracha; Markel, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid restoration of nutrients and electrolytes after prolonged starvation could result in a life threatening condition characterized by sensory and neurological dysfunction and severe metabolic imbalance that has been designated as refeeding syndrome. Its diagnosis is frequently missed resulting in severe complications and even death. We describe a 25-years-old female patient with mental disorders and severe malnutrition who developed severe clinical manifestations and biochemical abnormalities characteristic of the refeeding syndrome, after restarting oral feeding on her own. Schizophrenia was later diagnosed. Increased awareness of this condition and its complications is necessary to prevent its detrimental complications.

  10. Thiamine Deficiency in Self-Induced Refeeding Syndrome, an Undetected and Potentially Lethal Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hershkowitz, Einat; Reshef, Alon; Munich, Olga; Yosefi, Bracha; Markel, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid restoration of nutrients and electrolytes after prolonged starvation could result in a life threatening condition characterized by sensory and neurological dysfunction and severe metabolic imbalance that has been designated as refeeding syndrome. Its diagnosis is frequently missed resulting in severe complications and even death. We describe a 25-years-old female patient with mental disorders and severe malnutrition who developed severe clinical manifestations and biochemical abnormalities characteristic of the refeeding syndrome, after restarting oral feeding on her own. Schizophrenia was later diagnosed. Increased awareness of this condition and its complications is necessary to prevent its detrimental complications. PMID:25614745

  11. Radiologic evaluation of the acute abdomen in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): the role of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Wu, C M; Davis, F; Fishman, E K

    1998-04-01

    Abdominal complaints are common in the HIV-infected patient, and the signs and symptoms of disease may be masked by concurrent illness and a weak immune response, making accurate diagnosis difficult. Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are susceptible to diseases common to the general population; however, their generalized state of immunodeficiency places them at increased risk for many unusual disorders, predominately infectious and neoplastic. Radiologic evaluation, in particular, computed tomography (CT) with its ability to image the entire abdomen and pelvis, plays a crucial role in the prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of these patients.

  12. Identification of the First ATRIP–Deficient Patient and Novel Mutations in ATR Define a Clinical Spectrum for ATR–ATRIP Seckel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Hobson, Emma; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Carpenter, Gillian; Prescott, Katrina; Suri, Mohnish; Byrd, Philip J.; Matsuse, Michiko; Mitsutake, Norisato; Nakazawa, Yuka; Vasudevan, Pradeep; Barrow, Margaret; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.

    2012-01-01

    A homozygous mutational change in the Ataxia-Telangiectasia and RAD3 related (ATR) gene was previously reported in two related families displaying Seckel Syndrome (SS). Here, we provide the first identification of a Seckel Syndrome patient with mutations in ATRIP, the gene encoding ATR–Interacting Protein (ATRIP), the partner protein of ATR required for ATR stability and recruitment to the site of DNA damage. The patient has compound heterozygous mutations in ATRIP resulting in reduced ATRIP and ATR expression. A nonsense mutational change in one ATRIP allele results in a C-terminal truncated protein, which impairs ATR–ATRIP interaction; the other allele is abnormally spliced. We additionally describe two further unrelated patients native to the UK with the same novel, heterozygous mutations in ATR, which cause dramatically reduced ATR expression. All patient-derived cells showed defective DNA damage responses that can be attributed to impaired ATR–ATRIP function. Seckel Syndrome is characterised by microcephaly and growth delay, features also displayed by several related disorders including Majewski (microcephalic) osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism (MOPD) type II and Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). The identification of an ATRIP–deficient patient provides a novel genetic defect for Seckel Syndrome. Coupled with the identification of further ATR–deficient patients, our findings allow a spectrum of clinical features that can be ascribed to the ATR–ATRIP deficient sub-class of Seckel Syndrome. ATR–ATRIP patients are characterised by extremely severe microcephaly and growth delay, microtia (small ears), micrognathia (small and receding chin), and dental crowding. While aberrant bone development was mild in the original ATR–SS patient, some of the patients described here display skeletal abnormalities including, in one patient, small patellae, a feature characteristically observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome. Collectively, our analysis exposes an

  13. [Atypical hemolytic and uremic syndrome associated with von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS 13) deficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Boukedi, A; Bensalah, M; Maalej, B; Gargour, L; Turk, F; Ben Halima, N; Wolf, M; Veyradier, A; Mahfoudh, A

    2013-08-01

    Hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) is a classical form of thrombotic microangiopathies characterized by the association of hemolytic anemia with schizocytes, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Two forms of HUS have been described: the typical form that occurs after ingestion of a strain of bacteria, usually Escherichia coli types, which expresses verotoxin (also called shiga-like toxin), typically followed by bloody diarrhea, and atypical HUS, which is rare during childhood and can also be revealed by bloody diarrhea. We report a case of a 25-month-old infant who presented with hematuria and pallor after an episode of diarrhea. Biological tests revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. The diagnosis of typical HUS was made, but the causal microorganism was not identified. Progression was favorable within 5 days of plasma transfusions. Two months later, the patient presented with the same symptoms and neurological impairment without any diarrhea. Von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease activity (ADAMTS 13) was low. Therefore, the diagnosis of atypical HUS by severe deficiency of ADAMTS 13 was suggested. The treatment was based on plasma transfusions resulting in remission. Atypical HUS associated with severe ADAMTS 13 deficiency rarely occurs in childhood. The prognosis, usually threatening, has been completely transformed thanks to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and to therapeutic progress.

  14. Postnatal Proteasome Inhibition Induces Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Deficiencies in Adult Mice: A New Model of Neurodevelopment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Granados, Rocío; Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Aguilar-Montilla, Francisco Javier; Carrión, Ángel Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the ubiquitin-proteasome system have been related to aging and the development of neurodegenerative disease, although the effects of deficient proteasome activity during early postnatal development are poorly understood. Accordingly, we have assessed how proteasome dysfunction during early postnatal development, induced by administering proteasome inhibitors daily during the first 10 days of life, affects the behaviour of adult mice. We found that this regime of exposure to the proteasome inhibitors MG132 or lactacystin did not produce significant behavioural or morphological changes in the first 15 days of life. However, towards the end of the treatment with proteasome inhibitors, there was a loss of mitochondrial markers and activity, and an increase in DNA oxidation. On reaching adulthood, the memory of mice that were injected with proteasome inhibitors postnatally was impaired in hippocampal and amygdala-dependent tasks, and they suffered motor dysfunction and imbalance. These behavioural deficiencies were correlated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus, amygdala and brainstem, and with diminished adult neurogenesis. Accordingly, impairing proteasome activity at early postnatal ages appears to cause morphological and behavioural alterations in adult mice that resemble those associated with certain neurodegenerative diseases and/or syndromes of mental retardation. PMID:22174927

  15. [Effect of Jingui Shenqi pill combined with nifedipine for the treatment of elderly hypertensive patients with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-dong; Fu, Jian; Feng, Mu-zhong; Zhang, Zheng-hua

    2015-12-01

    Totally 96 elderly patients with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency type hypertension were selected in this study. Patients were randomly divided into study and control group. It was treated with the Jingui Shenqi pill combined nifedipine sustained-release tablets in the study group and only nifedipine sustained-release tablets for the control group. Meanwhile, the clinical features including reducing blood pressure, blood lipid and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndromes of the two groups were observed pre and post treatment. Finally, the results showed that it could significantly reduce the hypertensive, hyperlipidemia and TCM syndromes in the study group compared with the control group (P < 0.05), which indicated that the combination of the Jingui Shenqi pill with nifedipine sustained-release tablets was effective for the patients with hypertension with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency type, especially for decreasing TCM syndromes and the blood lipid. PMID:27245042

  16. Association of VDR-gene variants with factors related to the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Khan, Nasiruddin; Mohammed, Abdul Khader; Vinodson, Benjamin; Ansari, Mohammed Ghouse Ahmed; Alenad, Amal; Alokail, Majed S

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is rising alarmingly in the Saudi Arabian population. This study was conducted to assess the association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to components of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and vitamin D deficiency in the Saudi Arabian population. Five-hundred-seventy Saudi individuals (285 MetS and 285 controls) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. TaqI, BsmI, ApaI and FokI single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the VDR gene were genotyped. The CT genotype and allele T of BsmI were associated with lower HDL-C levels [OR 0.60 (0.37, 0.96), p=0.03] and obesity [OR 1.4 (1.0, 1.90), p=0.04], respectively. The CT genotype and the dominant model CT+TT of BsmI were associated with increased risk of diabetes [OR 1.7 (1.2, 2.4), p=0.007], and [OR 1.5 (1.1, 2.2), p=0.01], respectively. On the contrary, the CT and CT+CC genotypes of FokI exhibited an association with a reduced risk of diabetes [OR 0.70 (0.49, 0.99), p=0.05] and [OR 0.67 (0.48, 0.94), p=0.02], respectively. The allele C of FokI was associated with lower risk of developing T2DM [OR 0.73 (0.56, 0.95), p=0.02]. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was lower in subjects with the AC genotype of ApaI [OR, 0.34 (0.14, 0.80), p=0.01]. Components of the MetS such as obesity, low HDL and T2DM were associated with the VDR gene. FokI and BsmI have protective and facilitative effects on the risk for T2DM, while the ApaI genotype was associated with reduced vitamin D deficiency.

  17. Homozygosity for a novel truncating mutation confirms TBX15 deficiency as the cause of Cousin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dikoglu, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gulen Eda; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Boduroglu, Koray; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Cousin syndrome, also called pelviscapular dysplasia (OMIM 260660), is characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and multiple skeletal anomalies. Following its description in two sibs in 1982, no new cases have been observed until the observation of two unrelated cases in 2008 who were homozygous for frameshift mutations in TBX15. We investigated an adult individual with short stature, a complex craniofacial dysmorphism, malformed and rotated ears, short neck, elbow contractures, hypoacusis, and hypoplasia of scapula and pelvis on radiographs. We identified homozygosity for a novel nonsense mutation (c.841C>T) in TBX15 predicted to cause a premature stop (p.Arg281*) with truncation of the protein. This observation confirms that Cousin syndrome is a consistent and clinically recognizable phenotype caused by loss of function of TBX15.

  18. Deficient immune function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R P; Stembridge, A M; Gardner, E J

    1985-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to certain cancers is recognized as a contributor to malignancy in man and experimental animals. Colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with Gardner syndrome is considered to be a hereditary form of cancer in which family members are at increased risk because they inherit an autosomal dominant gene for adenomas of the colorectum. The adenomas, if untreated, transform into adenocarcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to characterize immune function in patients with Gardner syndrome since reports exist of immune defects in patients with other forms of hereditary cancer. An analysis of the ability of lymphocytes from the patients to be stimulated by the T cell mitogens, phytohaemmaglutinin and concanavalin A, revealed severely depressed responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all of the patients studied. A depressed response by patient PBMC to the B cell mitogen, pokeweed mitogen, also was observed but the extent of depression was not statistically significant. Natural killer (NK) cell activity of the patients was studied to determine if a possible genetic defect in this function is associated with Gardner syndrome. PBMC from half of the patients had marginally depressed NK cell function. An enumeration of patient cells revealed a significantly lower ratio of T4 (helper) to T8 (suppressor) T cells, but normal percentages of rosette forming, 7.2 (Ia) positive and Leu 11 positive (NK) cells. PMID:3160513

  19. Aldosterone deficiency after unilateral adrenalectomy for Conn’s syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yorke, Ekua; Stafford, Sara; Holmes, Daniel; Sheth, Sachiv; Melck, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 35% of cases of Conn’s syndrome (primary aldosteronism) result from a solitary functioning adrenal adenoma, and these patients are best managed by adrenalectomy. Postoperative hypoaldosteronism after unilateral adrenalectomy is uncommon. Case presentation We present a case and literature review of hypoaldosteronism after unilateral adrenalectomy for Conn’s syndrome, which demonstrates the insidious and sometimes delayed presentation. Discussion In this clinical case we summarize the previously published cases of post-adrenalectomy hypoaldosteronism based on a PUBMED and EBSCOhost search of all peer-reviewed publications (original articles and reviews) on this topic. A few cases of aldosterone insufficiency post-adrenalectomy for Conn’s syndrome were identified. The etiological factors for prolonged selective suppression of aldosterone secretion after unilateral adrenalectomy remain unclear. Conclusion It is important to be aware of the risk of postoperative hypoaldosteronism in this patient population. Close postoperative follow-up is necessary and strongly recommended, especially in patients with certain risk factors. Patients may need mineralocorticoid supplementation during this period. PMID:25604311

  20. Human ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligase deficiency causes syndromic multisystem autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Naomi J; Molleston, Jean P; Strauss, Kevin A; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A; Squires, Robert H; Rider, Nicholas L; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Cummings, Oscar W; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2010-03-12

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  1. Human ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Deficiency Causes Syndromic Multisystem Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Naomi J.; Molleston, Jean P.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A.; Squires, Robert H.; Rider, Nicholas L.; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  2. SLE like syndrome and functional deficiency of C1q in members of a large family.

    PubMed

    Hannema, A J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Mallée, C; van Helden, H P

    1984-01-01

    Two sisters and a brother from one family are described whose sera were deficient in haemolytic complement function. This defect was restored by addition of purified C1q. In their sera, C1q like material was found, whereas C1r and C1s were normal or increased in concentration, as were the other complement components tested. All three had suffered from glomerulonephritis during childhood. A renal biopsy in the brother recently disclosed a membranous glomerulopathy stage 1; otherwise, he is apparently healthy. In both sisters, a systemic lupus erythematosus like disease became manifest at the age of 20 and 23, respectively, resulting in the death of one of them. In the serum of these three family members, the C1q like material was antigenically deficient compared with normal C1q and had, on sucrose gradient analysis, a molecular weight of approximately 65,000 daltons. It did not bind to C1r and C1s. Binding of the dysfunctional C1q to aggregated human gammaglobulin could be demonstrated. On double immunodiffusion analysis, the abnormal C1q was identical with reduced and alkylated C1q. The possible structure of the abnormal C1q molecule is discussed.

  3. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: I. Deficiency and short open-time of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Engel, A G; Nagel, A; Walls, T J; Harper, C M; Waisburg, H A

    1993-12-01

    A 5.5-year-old girl had myasthenic symptoms since birth. Tests for antiacetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies were negative. To investigate the character of the neuromuscular transmission defect, an intercostal muscle specimen was obtained at age 27 months. Immune deposits were absent from the endplates. On electron microscopy, most postsynaptic regions appeared normal, but the density of AChR on the junctional folds was diffusely reduced. In vitro microelectrode studies revealed that the number of transmitter quanta released by nerve impulse was normal. The amplitude of miniature of endplate potentials and currents was abnormally low. A study of the kinetic properties of AChR by analysis of acetylcholine-induced current noise demonstrated a significant decrease in mean channel open-time; the mean channel conductance was normal. The safety margin of neuromuscular transmission in this disorder is likely to be compromised by the deficiency and abnormal kinetic properties of AChR. The findings are unique among those patients with congenital AChR deficiency described to date. PMID:8232383

  4. The gene expression and deficiency phenotypes of Cockayne syndrome B protein in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myon Hee; Ahn, Byungchan; Choi, In Soon; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2002-07-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Cockayne syndrome B protein homologue is encoded by 10 exons of the predicted open reading frame F53H4.1. The gene is expressed in germ cells and all somatic cells of the embryonic to adult stage. Although the gene expression was ubiquitous, its expression level was relatively higher in dividing cells and cells that play fundamental roles in essential physiological functions such as feeding, sensation, and reproduction. RNA interference of the gene hypersensitized C. elegans to UV radiation, as observed in enhanced germ cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis, and increased embryonic lethality, suggesting its role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:12095617

  5. Warburg Micro syndrome is caused by RAB18 deficiency or dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Mark T.; Carpanini, Sarah M.; Mali, Girish R.; Sidjanin, Duska J.; Aligianis, Irene A.; Jackson, Ian J.; FitzPatrick, David R.

    2015-01-01

    RAB18, RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2 and TBC1D20 are each mutated in Warburg Micro syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. RAB3GAP1 and RAB3GAP2 form a binary ‘RAB3GAP’ complex that functions as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RAB18, whereas TBC1D20 shows modest RAB18 GTPase-activating (GAP) activity in vitro. Here, we show that in the absence of functional RAB3GAP or TBC1D20, the level, localization and dynamics of cellular RAB18 is altered. In cell lines where TBC1D20 is absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), RAB18 becomes more stably ER-associated and less cytosolic than in control cells. These data suggest that RAB18 is a physiological substrate of TBC1D20 and contribute to a model in which a Rab-GAP can be essential for the activity of a target Rab. Together with previous reports, this indicates that Warburg Micro syndrome can be caused directly by loss of RAB18, or indirectly through loss of RAB18 regulators RAB3GAP or TBC1D20. PMID:26063829

  6. Warburg Micro syndrome is caused by RAB18 deficiency or dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Handley, Mark T; Carpanini, Sarah M; Mali, Girish R; Sidjanin, Duska J; Aligianis, Irene A; Jackson, Ian J; FitzPatrick, David R

    2015-06-01

    RAB18, RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2 and TBC1D20 are each mutated in Warburg Micro syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. RAB3GAP1 and RAB3GAP2 form a binary 'RAB3GAP' complex that functions as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RAB18, whereas TBC1D20 shows modest RAB18 GTPase-activating (GAP) activity in vitro. Here, we show that in the absence of functional RAB3GAP or TBC1D20, the level, localization and dynamics of cellular RAB18 is altered. In cell lines where TBC1D20 is absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), RAB18 becomes more stably ER-associated and less cytosolic than in control cells. These data suggest that RAB18 is a physiological substrate of TBC1D20 and contribute to a model in which a Rab-GAP can be essential for the activity of a target Rab. Together with previous reports, this indicates that Warburg Micro syndrome can be caused directly by loss of RAB18, or indirectly through loss of RAB18 regulators RAB3GAP or TBC1D20. PMID:26063829

  7. Leigh syndrome associated with mitochondrial complex I deficiency due to novel mutations In NDUFV1 and NDUFS2.

    PubMed

    Marin, Samantha E; Mesterman, Ronit; Robinson, Brian; Rodenburg, Richard J; Smeitink, Jan; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by either mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations resulting in dysfunctional mitochondrial energy metabolism. Mutations in genes encoding for subunits of the respiratory chain or assembly factors of respiratory chain complexes are often documented in LS cases. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH):ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) enzyme deficiencies account for a significant proportion of mitochondrial disorders, including LS. In an attempt to expand the repertoire of known mutations accounting for LS, we describe the clinical, radiological, biochemical and molecular data of six patients with LS found to have novel mutations in two complex I subunits (NDUFV1 and NDUFS2). Two siblings were homozygous for the previously undescribed R386C mutation in NDUFV1, one patient was a compound heterozygote for the R386C mutation in NDUFV1 and a frameshift mutation in the same gene, one patient was a compound heterozygote for the R88G and R199P mutations in NDUFV1, and two siblings were compound heterozygotes for an undescribed E104A mutation in NDUFS2. After the novel mutations were identified, we employed prediction models using protein conservation analysis (SIFT, PolyPhen and UCSC genome browser) to determine pathogenicity. The R386C, R88G, R199P, and E104A mutations were found to be likely pathogenic, and thus presumably account for the LS phenotype. This case series broadens our understanding of the etiology of LS by identifying new molecular defects that can result in complex I deficiency and may assist in targeted diagnostics and/or prenatal diagnosis of LS in the future.

  8. Impaired hippocampal plasticity and altered neurogenesis in adult Ube3a maternal deficient mouse model for Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Sandrine; Rampon, Claire; Salvert, Denise; Fort, Patrice; Sarda, Nicole

    2009-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and sleep disturbances. It results from lack of the functional maternal allele of UBE3A gene. Ube3a maternal-deficient mice (Ube3a m-/p+), animal models for AS, are impaired in hippocampal-dependent learning tasks as compared with control (Ube3a m+/p+) mice. We first examined the basal expression of immediate early genes which expression is required for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We found that basal expression of c-fos and Arc genes is reduced in the DG of Ube3a maternal deficient mice compared to their non-transgenic littermates. We then examined whether adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which likely serves as a mechanism toward brain plasticity, is altered in these transgenic mice. Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in mammalian dentate gyrus (DG) and recent findings suggest that newborn granule cells are involved in some forms of learning and memory. Whether maternal Ube3a deletion is detrimental on hippocampal neurogenesis is unclear. Herein, we show, using the mitotic marker Ki67, the birthdating marker 5-bromo-2'-dexoyuridine (BrdU) and the marker doublecortin (DCX) to respectively label cell proliferation, cell survival or young neuron production, that the Ube3a maternal deletion does not affect the proliferation nor the survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus. In contrast, using the postmitotic neuronal marker (NeuN), we show that Ube3a maternal deletion is associated with a lower fraction of BrdU+/NeuN+ newborn neurons among the population of surviving new cells in the hippocampus. Collectively, these findings suggest that some aspects of adult neurogenesis and plasticity are affected by Ube3a deletion and may contribute to the hippocampal dysfunction observed in AS mice.

  9. AIDS in the Black Community: Programmatic Directions for New York State. Preliminary Report, Human Services Subcommittee. The Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany. Volume 2, Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany.

    There is a critical need for culturally appropriate community-based services in the black community to stop the spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and to support those with the disease. AIDS is a priority health and social services issue for black New Yorkers, affecting not only individual men and women but whole families.…

  10. Condom Advertising and AIDS. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This document present witnesses' testimonies from the Congressional hearing called to examine condom advertising and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Opening statements are included by Congressmen Henry Waxman, William Dannemeyer, and Jim Bates. C. Everett Koop, United States Surgeon General, and Gary Noble, AIDS coordinator for the…

  11. Scarcity of HIV-AIDS Risk-Reduction Materials Targeting the Needs of Older Adults among State Departments of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orel, Nancy A.; Wright, Jeanne M.; Wagner, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the availability of printed human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education/prevention materials from state departments of public health within the United States, which specifically targeted the older adult population. Information on HIV/AIDS from public health departments in each of…

  12. Training Drug Treatment Staff in the Age of AIDS: A Frontline Perspective. Report of a Meeting (April 1989). Clinical Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashery, Rebecca S., Ed.

    In April 1989, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) convened a meeting of 17 Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education and training experts to discuss AIDS and substance abuse training and to examine NIDA-initiated training efforts. Participants were asked to develop specific recommendations for NIDA regarding its role in…

  13. The Social Studies Link to HIV Education. A Sourcebook for HIV/AIDS Education in the Social Studies Classroom, Grades 11-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBonte, Karen

    This sourcebook was developed to present ideas on how to bring the discussion of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) into the 11th and 12th grade social studies classroom, while continuing to focus on social studies concepts and skills. The manual's four main sections examine HIV and AIDS from the…

  14. Risk of Cataract among Subjects with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Free of Ocular Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, John H.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Varma, Rohit; Dunn, James P.; Heinemann, Murk-Hein; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lyon, Alice T.; Lewis, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk of cataract in the setting of AIDS. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants Subjects with AIDS free of ocular opportunistic infections throughout catamnesis. Methods During 1998–2008 inclusive, subjects ≥13 years of age were enrolled. Demographic characteristics and clinical characteristics were documented at enrollment and semiannually. Main Outcome Measures Cataract was defined as high-grade lens opacity observed by biomicroscopy and judged to be the cause of a best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery during follow-up were considered to have developed cataract prior to the first visit when pseudophakia or aphakia was observed. Results Among 1,606 participants (3,212 eyes), at enrollment 1.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3%−2.7%) were observed to have cataract or prior cataract surgery. Among the 2,812 eyes initially free of cataract, and followed longitudinally (median follow-up=4.6 years), the incidence of cataract was 0.37%/eye-year (95% CI: 0.26%– 0.53%). In addition to age, significant cataract risk factors included prior cataract in the contralateral eye (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=21.6, 95% CI: 10.4–44.8), anterior segment inflammation (aHR=4.40, 95% CI: 1.64–11.9), prior retinal detachment (aHR=4.94, 95% CI: 2.21–11.0), and vitreous inflammation (aHR=7.12, 95% CI: 2.02– 25.0), each studied as a time-updated characteristic. Detectable HIV RNA in peripheral blood was associated with lower risk of cataract at enrollment (adjusted odds ratio=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12–0.80) but not of incident cataract (aHR=1.58, 95% CI: 0.90–2.76). After adjustment for other factors, neither the then current absolute CD4+ T cell count nor antiretroviral therapy status showed consistent association with cataract risk, nor did an additive diagnosis of other other co-morbidities. Compared to the available population-based studies that used similar definitions of cataract, the age

  15. B cell–intrinsic deficiency of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) causes severe abnormalities of the peripheral B-cell compartment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Mike; Burns, Siobhan O.; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Volpi, Stefano; Dahlberg, Carin; Walter, Jolan E.; Moffitt, Kristin; Mathew, Divij; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Philipp A.; Patrizi, Laura; Falet, Hervé; Keszei, Marton; Mizui, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Eva; Candotti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari; Bouma, Gerben; Delmonte, Ottavia M.; Frugoni, Francesco; Fomin, Angela B. Ferraz; Buchbinder, David; Lundequist, Emma Maria; Massaad, Michel J.; Tsokos, George C.; Hartwig, John; Manis, John; Terhorst, Cox; Geha, Raif S.; Snapper, Scott; Lang, Karl S.; Malley, Richard; Westerberg, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by mutations in the WAS gene that encodes for a protein (WASp) involved in cytoskeleton organization in hematopoietic cells. Several distinctive abnormalities of T, B, and natural killer lymphocytes; dendritic cells; and phagocytes have been found in WASp-deficient patients and mice; however, the in vivo consequence of WASp deficiency within individual blood cell lineages has not been definitively evaluated. By conditional gene deletion we have generated mice with selective deficiency of WASp in the B-cell lineage (B/WcKO mice). We show that this is sufficient to cause a severe reduction of marginal zone B cells and inability to respond to type II T-independent Ags, thereby recapitulating phenotypic features of complete WASp deficiency. In addition, B/WcKO mice showed prominent signs of B-cell dysregulation, as indicated by an increase in serum IgM levels, expansion of germinal center B cells and plasma cells, and elevated autoantibody production. These findings are accompanied by hyperproliferation of WASp-deficient follicular and germinal center B cells in heterozygous B/WcKO mice in vivo and excessive differentiation of WASp-deficient B cells into class-switched plasmablasts in vitro, suggesting that WASp-dependent B cell–intrinsic mechanisms critically contribute to WAS-associated autoimmunity. PMID:22302739

  16. Severely deficient autobiographical memory (SDAM) in healthy adults: A new mnemonic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Daniela J; Alain, Claude; Söderlund, Hedvig; Khuu, Wayne; Levine, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Recollection of previously experienced events is a key element of human memory that entails recovery of spatial, perceptual, and mental state details. While deficits in this capacity in association with brain disease have serious functional consequences, little is known about individual differences in autobiographical memory (AM) in healthy individuals. Recently, healthy adults with highly superior autobiographical capacities have been identified (e.g., LePort, A.K., Mattfeld, A.T., Dickinson-Anson, H., Fallon, J.H., Stark, C.E., Kruggel, F., McGaugh, J.L., 2012. Behavioral and neuroanatomical investigation of Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory (HSAM). Neurobiol. Learn. Mem. 98(1), 78-92. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2012.05.002). Here we report data from three healthy, high functioning adults with the reverse pattern: lifelong severely deficient autobiographical memory (SDAM) with otherwise preserved cognitive function. Their self-reported selective inability to vividly recollect personally experienced events from a first-person perspective was corroborated by absence of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) biomarkers associated with naturalistic and laboratory episodic recollection, as well as by behavioral evidence of impaired episodic retrieval, particularly for visual information. Yet learning and memory were otherwise intact, as long as these tasks could be accomplished by non-episodic processes. Thus these individuals function normally in day-to-day life, even though their past is experienced in the absence of recollection. PMID:25892594

  17. [Characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans strains isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)].

    PubMed

    Garza-Garza, D; Buendía-Uribe, J L; Martínez-Cruz, E; Argüero-Licea, B

    1995-01-01

    In Mexico cryptococosis ranks third in frequency among the mycoses ocurring as complications in AIDS patients. Neither the prevalence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in these patients nor the morphological and physiological changes suffered by these strains in AIDS patients are known. A total of 60 isolates were obtained from patients with AIDS from the Hospital de Infectología, Centro Médico "La Raza" IMSS. The identity of each isolate was established by: growth at 37 degrees C, colony and microscopic characteristics, urease and phenoloxidase activity, carbon sources assimilation. The canavanine glycine-bromothymol blue agar was used to distinguish C. neoformans var. neoformans and C. neoformans var. gattii. Pathogenicity in mice was also tested. Fifty one isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans and nine of C. neoformans var. gattii were identified. All strains grew well at 37 degrees C, urease and phenoloxidase were positive, the morphology and the auxanographic profile were variable. C. neoformans var. neoformans was more virulent in mouse than C. neoformans var. gattii. This study has confirmed the presence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in Mexico with 85% prevalence of var. neoformans and 15% of var. gattii in AIDS patients. This frequency was higher than in reports from other countries.

  18. The Role of Color Cues in Facilitating Accurate and Rapid Location of Aided Symbols by Children with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Krista; Carlin, Michael; Thistle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research examined how the color distribution of symbols within a visual aided augmentative and alternative communication array influenced the speed and accuracy with which participants with and without Down syndrome located a target picture symbol. Method: Eight typically developing children below the age of 4 years, 8 typically…

  19. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  20. Linkage of a locus for carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I (CDG1) to chromosome 16p-markers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinsson, T.; Bjursell, C.; Wahlstroem, J.

    1994-09-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I is a multisystem disease with early severe nervous system involvement. The disease, which is inherited as a recessive autosomal trait, is biochemically characterized by complex defects in the terminal carbohydrate residues of a number of serum glycoproteins. This can be most readily detected in transferrin. A whole genome scan was initiated in order to try localizing the gene (CDG1) with linkage technique. We therefore analyzed 25 CDG1-pedigrees with several highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and after exclusion of about 30% of the genome, linkage was detected with markers located in chromosome region 16p. The lod score (Zmax) was above 8 (theta=0.00) for several markers in the region. In order to further sublocalize the CDG1 gene, recombination and linkage disequilibrium analyses were performed. Recombination events in some pedigrees indicated that the CDG1 gene is located in a 13 cM interval between microsatellite markers D16S406 and D16S500. Furthermore, allelic association was shown for marker D16S406, indicating that the CDG1 gene is located close to this. No heterogeneity could be detected in the European family material tested by us.

  1. Naive T-cells in myelodysplastic syndrome display intrinsic human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Mailloux, A; Rollison, D E; Painter, J S; Maciejewski, J; Paquette, R L; Loughran, T P; McGraw, K; Makishima, H; Radhakrishnan, R; Wei, S; Ren, X; Komrokji, R; List, A F; Epling-Burnette, P K

    2013-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures providing chromosome integrity during cellular division along with protection against premature senescence and apoptosis. Accelerated telomere attrition in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurs by an undefined mechanism. Although the MDS clone originates within the myeloid compartment, T-lymphocytes display repertoire contraction and loss of naive T-cells. The replicative lifespan of T-cells is stringently regulated by telomerase activity. In MDS cases, we show that purified CD3+ T-cells have significantly shorter telomere length and reduced proliferative capacity upon stimulation compared with controls. To understand the mechanism, telomerase enzymatic activity and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), gene expression were compared in MDS cases (n=35) and healthy controls (n=42) within different T-cell compartments. Telomerase activity is greatest in naive T-cells illustrating the importance of telomere repair in homeostatic repertoire regulation. Compared with healthy controls, MDS cases had lower telomerase induction (P<0.0001) that correlated with significantly lower hTERT mRNA (P<0.0001), independent of age and disease stratification. hTERT mRNA deficiency affected naive but not memory T-cells, and telomere erosion in MDS occurred without evidence of an hTERT-promoter mutation, copy number variation or deletion. Telomerase insufficiency may undermine homeostatic control within the hematopoietic compartment and promote a change in the T-cell repertoire in MDS.

  2. Calpain 1 inhibitor BDA-410 ameliorates α-klotho-deficiency phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Yoko; Washida, Miwa; Tamura, Masaru; Maeno, Akiteru; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Imura, Akihiro; Razzaque, M Shawkat; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Taking good care of elderly is a major challenge of our society, and thus identification of potential drug targets to reduce age-associated disease burden is desirable. α-klotho(-/-) (α-kl) is a short-lived mouse model that displays multiple phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes. Such ageing phenotype of α-kl(-/-) mice is associated with activation of a proteolytic enzyme, Calpain-1. We hypothesized that uncontrolled activation of calpain-1 might be causing age-related phenotypes in α-kl-deficient mice. We found that daily administration of BDA-410, a calpain-1 inhibitor, strikingly ameliorated multiple aging-related phenotypes. Treated mice showed recovery of reproductive ability, increased body weight, reduced organ atrophy, and suppression of ectopic calcifications, bone mineral density reduction, pulmonary emphysema and senile atrophy of skin. We also observed ectopic expression of FGF23 in calcified arteries of α-kl(-/-) mice, which might account for the clinically observed association of increased FGF23 level with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. These findings allow us to propose that modulation of calpain-1 activity is a potential therapeutic option for delaying age-associated organ pathology, particularly caused by the dysregulation of mineral ion homeostasis.

  3. The protein CD63 is in platelet dense granules, is deficient in a patient with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and appears identical to granulophysin.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibori, M; Cham, B; McNicol, A; Shalev, A; Jain, N; Gerrard, J M

    1993-01-01

    The levels and expression of the proteins CD63 and granulophysin in platelets from control and from a Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome subject (a condition characterized by dense granule and lysosomal deficiencies and the accumulation of ceroid-like material in reticuloendothelial cells) were examined. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that anti-CD63 and anti-granulophysin antibodies recognized similar numbers of granules; coapplication of antibodies did not identify more granules than the individual antibodies. Significantly fewer granules were recognized in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome platelets than in control using either antibody. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that anti-CD63 and anti-granulophysin antibodies apparently recognize the same protein, which was deficient in Hermansky-Pudlak platelets. Analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) showed biphasic expression of CD63 and granulophysin after thrombin stimulation of control but not Hermansky-Pudlak platelets. Anti-CD63 effectively blocked detection of the protein by anti-granulophysin using immunofluorescence, ELISA, immunoblotting, and FACS analysis. Amino-terminal sequencing over the first 37 amino acids revealed that granulophysin was homologous to CD63, melanoma antigen ME491, and pltgp40. These results suggest that granulophysin and CD63 are possibly identical proteins. This is the first report of a protein present in platelet dense granules, lysosomes, and melanocytes, but deficient in a patient with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Images PMID:7682577

  4. Knowing Both: Towards Integrating Two Main Approaches to the Tertiary Education of Health Care Workers Involved in Caring for People Living with HIV/AIDS. A Needs Assessment of HIV/AIDS Tertiary Education for Health Care Workers in Metropolitan South Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsey, Barry; Mills, Patricia

    The need for continuing education about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was assessed for health care workers in metropolitan South Australia. Seventeen focus group discussions were held to solicit the views and experiences of various persons regarding HIV/AIDS tertiary education. Included in the…

  5. Strategies for Implementing AIDS/HIV Policy Guidelines in Developmental and Mental Health Services: A Background and Checklist for Advocates. AIDS Technical Report, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. Through a series of case examples, questions, background information, and…

  6. Epidemiology of children with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (stage 3): A referral hospital-based study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Zahra; Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Keshavarz Valian, Nasrin; Sabouni, Farah; Ramezani, Amitis; Bahador, Abbas; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Lack of recognition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection especially in children and delayed implementation of effective control programs makes HIV infection as a major cause for concern. Information on HIV epidemiology in Iran as well as other Islamic countries is limited. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical manifestation and laboratory finding of HIV infected children who were admitted to a referral Children Medical Center (CMC) in Tehran, Iran, during 11 years from January 2002 to January 2013. This was a retrospective study carried out over a period of 11 years. The records of all patients attending to the CMC with confirmed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were screened. The patients were evaluated for social circumstance, family history, age, gender, clinical, and laboratory features. Clinical data including fever, respiratory distress, diarrhea, rash, etc. as well as laboratory tests including complete blood count, serum glucose level, electrolytes, liver function test, cultures, CD4 lymphocyte count were evaluated. During the study period, 32 HIV positive children were enrolled. The majority of patients were presented with weight loss, prolonged fever, respiratory infection and chronic diarrhea. In this study, salmonella infections as well as streptococcal pneumonia and candida infections followed by, tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were the predominant opportunistic infections. Since the number of HIV-positive children has been alarmingly increasing in recent years and perinatal transmission is the most common route of HIV infection in children, essential recommendations for prenatal HIV testing as well as appropriate antiretroviral therapy by HIV infected mothers are needed.

  7. [Research on composition rules of prescriptions dealing with syndrome of deficiency of both qi and blood from National Standard for Chinese Patent Drugs].

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei-rong; Shen, Dan; Tang, Shi-huan

    2015-05-01

    Based on the software of Traditional Chinese Medicine Inheritance Support System (TCMISS), the article made analysis on the composition rules of prescriptions dealing with syndrome of deficiency of both qi and blood from National Standard for Chinese Patent Drugs (NSCPD) enacted by Ministry of Public Health of China. First, prescriptions were collected from NSCPD. Second, used integrated data mining methods in TCMISS, including association rules, improved mutual information method, et al. to analyze the medication rules. At last, irregular menstruation, insomnia, consumptive diseases with the same syndrome of deficiency of both qi and blood, were chosen to make comparative analysis on frequency of medicines used, core drug combinations, et al. to better find the similarities and differences of medications rules when confronted with the same syndrome while different diseases. And the similar core drug combinations directly reflected the characters of clinical practices of traditional Chinese medicine, which emphasizes on the treatment based on the syndromes of differentiation, and treating different diseases with the same methods.

  8. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): a commentary on the international aspects of the disease.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1988-02-01

    By the beginning of 1987 there were 1100 heterosexual cases of AIDS in the US, and by 1991 an estimated 1/4 million US citizens will have AIDS, or will have already died from it. The situation in the 3rd World is even more grim. In parts of Africa the annual incidence of HIV infection is approaching 1%. Up to 12% of pregnant women in urban hospitals in Zaire carry the virus, and 25-88% of the prostitutes in some of the large cities in sub-Sahara Africa have the disease. Already, 5-10 million people around the world may be carrying HIV. Like the influenza virus, HIV can change its protein coat rapidly. The victim can appear perfectly healthy and still spread the disease. In countries with low maternal mortality, it could become the most common cause of maternal death. If people are to adopt safe sex practices, they must be convinced that they are at risk, that a lethal disease can be asymptomatic but ineffective for many years. They must know that safety practices--including the use of condoms, and perhaps especially spermicidally lubricated condoms--offer worthwhile protection. If any link in this chain is broken, individuals will not adopt such voluntary practices. There are no known political or geographical barriers to human copulation; now is the time to act, particularly in countries with a low or no prevalence of AIDS. Obstetricians must fight AIDS with the same commitment to preventative medicine that they bring to good obstetrics and good family planning.

  10. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  11. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  12. Cholesterol Biosynthesis from Birth to Adulthood in a Mouse Model for 7-dehydrosterol reductase deficiency (Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Josep; Shackleton, Cedric H.L.; Buddhikot, Madhavee M.; Porter, Forbes D.; Watson, Gordon L.

    2007-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by deficiency in the terminal step of cholesterol biosynthesis, which is catalyzed by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). The disorder exhibits several phenotypic traits including dysmorphia and mental retardation with a broad range of severity. Pathogenesis of SLOS is complex due to multiple roles of cholesterol and may be further complicated by unknown effects of aberrant metabolites that arise when 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), the substrate for DHCR7, accumulates. A viable mouse model for SLOS has recently been developed, and here we characterize cholesterol metabolism in this model with emphasis on changes during the first few weeks of postnatal development. Cholesterol and 7-DHC were measured in “SLOS” mice and compared with measurements in normal mice. SLOS mice had measurable levels of 7-DHC at all ages tested (up to one year), while 7-DHC was below the threshold for detection in normal mice. In perinatal to weaning age SLOS mice, cholesterol and 7-DHC levels changed dramatically. Changes in brain and liver were independent; in brain cholesterol increased several fold while 7-DHC remained relatively constant, but in liver cholesterol first increased then decreased again while 7-DHC first decreased then increased. In older SLOS animals the ratio of 7-DHC/cholesterol, which is an index of biochemical severity, tended to approach, but not reach, normal. While these mice provide the best available genetic animal model for the study of SLOS pathogenesis and treatment, they probably will be most useful at early ages when the metabolic effects of the mutations are most dramatic. To correlate any experimental treatment with improved sterol metabolism will require age-matched controls. Finally, determining the mechanism by which these “SLOS” mice tend to normalize may provide insight into the future development of therapy. PMID:17714750

  13. The pleiotropic effects of decanoic acid treatment on mitochondrial function in fibroblasts from patients with complex I deficient Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, Marta; Fassone, Elisa; Hughes, Sean David; Bilooei, Sara Farahi; Rutherford, Tricia; Donnell, Maura O'; Heales, Simon J R; Rahman, Shamima

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in the use of the ketogenic diet (KD) to treat inherited metabolic diseases including mitochondrial disorders. However, neither the mechanism whereby the diet may be working, nor if it could benefit all patients with mitochondrial disease, is known. This study focusses on decanoic acid (C10), a component of the medium chain triglyceride KD, and a ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-γ known to be involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. The effects of C10 were investigated in primary fibroblasts from a cohort of patients with Leigh syndrome (LS) caused by nuclear-encoded defects of respiratory chain complex I, using mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme assays, gene expression microarray, qPCR and flow cytometry. Treatment with C10 increased citrate synthase activity, a marker of cellular mitochondrial content, in 50 % of fibroblasts obtained from individuals diagnosed with LS in a PPAR-γ-mediated manner. Gene expression analysis and qPCR studies suggested that treating cells with C10 supports fatty acid metabolism, through increasing ACADVL and CPT1 expression, whilst downregulating genes involved in glucose metabolism (PDK3, PDK4). PCK2, involved in blocking glucose metabolism, was upregulated, as was CAT, encoding catalase. Moreover, treatment with C10 also decreased oxidative stress in complex I deficient (rotenone treated) cells. However, since not all cells from subjects with LS appeared to respond to C10, prior cellular testing in vitro could be employed as a means for selecting individuals for subsequent clinical studies involving C10 preparations. PMID:27080638

  14. Development of thiamine deficiencies and early mortality syndrome in lake trout by feeding experimental and feral fish diets containing thiaminase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Tillitt, D.E.; Zajicek, J.L.; Brown, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a laboratory investigation on the consequences of feeding predatory saimonids either experimental diets low in thiamine or diets containing alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. In experiment 1, adult lake trout Salvelinus namaycush were fed experimental diets containing bacterial thiaminase. In experiment 2, adult lake trout were fed natural prey species, alewives, and bloaters Coregonus hoyi. The diets consisted of four combinations of alewives and bloaters from Lake Michigan (100% alewives, 65% alewives-35% bloaters, 35% alewives-65% bloaters, and 100% bloaters), alewives from Cayuga Lake, a casein bacterial thiaminase, and a commercial trout diet. We assessed the effects of each diet on egg thiamine concentration and incidence of an embryonic early mortality syndrome (EMS). In experiment 1, incidence of EMS ranged from 0% to 100%. Significant relationships were found between the incidence of EMS and thiamine. In experiment 2, adult lake trout fed 100% alewives from either Lake Michigan or Cayuga Lake or fish fed the casein bacterial thiaminase diet produced eggs with low thiamine and swim-up fry with EMS. At either 35% or 65% alewives in the diet, egg thiamine was significantly lowered. The number of females that produced offspring that died from EMS were low but demonstrated the negative potential if feral lake trout foraged on either 35% or 65% alewives. Depleted egg thiamine and the onset of EMS required diets containing thiaminase for a minimum of 2 years in lake trout initially fully thiamine replete. We conclude that EMS can be caused by extensive feeding on 100% alewives and dietary levels of 35% or greater may prove detrimental to sustainable reproduction of salmonids in the Great Lakes. The data are consistent with that observed in feral lake trout, and it is concluded that EMS is the result of a thiamine deficiency. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  15. Risk assessment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in pediatric patients with vitamin D deficiency: A questionnaire-based study.

    PubMed

    Ozgurhan, Gamze; Vehapoglu, Aysel; Vermezoglu, Oznur; Temiz, Rabia Nur; Guney, Asuman; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the following study is to evaluate the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in subjects with vitamin D deficiency.Prospective and comparative study.We enrolled 240 subjects into the study. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels: low level of 25(OH)D (<20 ng/mL) group (n = 120) and control (>20 ng/mL) group (n = 120). Subjects were classified as being at a high or low risk of developing OSAS by using the Berlin Questionnaire. Risk of developing OSAS, gender, age, and body mass index (BMI) z-score were assessed by comparing the low level of 25(OH)D group and control group.No statistically significant difference was observed between the low level of 25(OH)D group and control group in terms of gender, age, and BMI z-score distributions; P = 0.323, P = 0.387, and P = 0.093, respectively. There were 24 subjects with high risk of developing OSAS in 2 groups (17 subjects in the low level of 25[OH]D group and 7 subjects in the control group). In the low level of 25(OH)D group, the risk of developing OSAS was found to be significantly higher than the control group (P = 0.030). BMI z-score was found significantly higher in high-risk groups than low-risk groups (P = 0.034 for low-level 25[OH]D group and P = 0.023 for control group).The findings revealed that low level of 25(OH)D increases the risk of developing OSAS. PMID:27684795

  16. Why AIDS? The Mystery of How HIV Attacks the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Damaris

    1999-01-01

    Reviews differing theories surrounding the mystery of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system. Claims that understanding how HIV triggers immune-cell depletion may enable researchers to block its effects. New knowledge could reveal strategies for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapies that go beyond the drugs…

  17. Guidelines for Counselling about HIV Infection and Disease. WHO AIDS Series 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The present guidelines have been prepared to provide counselors, health care workers, and others with a model for use in counseling people affected directly or indirectly by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The guidelines describe the nature, role, and principles of counseling, the…

  18. AIDS at the Medical College of Georgia--A Study in Institutional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koelbl, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The article addresses issues arising when a dental student is positive for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or has AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Considered are the student's right to confidentiality, the duty to warn, the patient's right to informed consent, guidelines of the American Dental Association, possible alternatives…

  19. Youth and HIV/AIDS: A Guide to Training and Technical Assistance Resources. Safe Choices Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Network for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This publication lists Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) materials and organizations as identified by the Safe Choices Project. It cites resources and organizations used by the Project for its national HIV/STD prevention trainings and when responding to requests for technical assistance. The publication…

  20. Issues in the Development of Undergraduate Courses on the Psychosocial Implications of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Steven R.

    This paper discusses the issues that should be addressed in an undergraduate course dealing with the psychosocial implications of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). These issues are: (1) the medical aspects of HIV infection and transmission; (2) death and dying versus life and living; (3) homosexuality; (4) intravenous drug use; (5)…

  1. AIDS/HIV Infection Policies for Early Childhood and School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Public Health, Boston.

    This volume of policies related to children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) describes appropriate ways to guarantee students' rights while maintaining public health, and answers questions for parents, educators, and caregivers. Section 1 presents policy guidelines for infants, toddlers, and…

  2. Assessment of Discharge Planning Referral to Nursing Homes for People with AIDS and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, Nathan L.; Marder, Reggi E.

    This study was conducted to identify efforts by hospital discharge planners to refer clients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to nursing homes; to determine the responses of the facilities contacted; and to identify gaps in services, discharge planner practices, and relationships between…

  3. Children with HIV/AIDS: A Sourcebook for Caring. A Guide for Establishing Programs for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allbritten, Dorothy J.

    This manual is intended for administrators and professional caregivers who wish to provide comprehensive health care to children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Chapter 1, an overview, examines the societal and economic issues that affect care and treatment of children…

  4. A Study of Parent-Child Attachments in HIV+/AIDS Minority Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Yvette; And Others

    This study examined medical services and support services available to and utilized by minority families where a child and/or parent was identified as having Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Sixteen caregivers of children (ages 2-4) diagnosed as HIV positive or children who had been exposed to the…

  5. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  6. Act Smart. HIV/AIDS Education Curriculum for Three Age Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American National Red Cross, Washington, DC.

    This Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education curriculum was developed for boys and girls, ages 6 to 17 years. It is a supplement to a similar program, "SMART Moves," aimed at prevention of drug abuse and premature sexual activity. The Act SMART prevention team should consist of a staff facilitator…

  7. Considerations for Reaching the Latino Population with Sexuality and HIV/AIDS Information and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega, Ernesto

    1990-01-01

    Latino and Latina sexual attitudes and behaviors must be understood if educators and counselors hope to reach this population with effective sexuality and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) information and education. The general U.S. Latino population is mostly sexually conservative; direct talk in public…

  8. Responding to HIV and AIDS. A Training Manual for United States Probation Officers. Participant's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Jimmy L.

    This training manual provides U.S. Probation Officers with a useful guide in understanding the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It also gives advice on making this information specific and appropriate to the offenders with whom they work on their caseloads. The manual contains six core…

  9. AIDS/HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Risk Behavior. Minnesota Student Survey Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Student Survey, including questions on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus transmission and sexual activity, was completed by approximately 88,000 6th-, 9th-, and 12th-graders during the 1988-89 school year. Sexual activity questions were not asked of sixth graders. Over 90% of high school students knew about sharing…

  10. Health through Knowledge: An ESL Curriculum with a Special Focus on AIDS Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Network of California Community Coll. Foundations, Rancho Cucamonga, CA.

    Health concerns that refugees and immigrants might have are discussed in a culturally relevant and sensitive way, and information on sensitive topics, such as drugs, sexuality, and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is provided so that refugee and immigrant parents can protect themselves as well as teach their children to protect…

  11. A Disease Called AIDS. For Grades 5 through 7. Instructor's Guide and Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Betty M.

    The introductory section of the first of two related guides provides information that describes and assists in teaching a curriculum on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). The introduction discusses the scope of the problem and includes an overview of the curriculum, a review of teaching strategies,…

  12. Sex, AIDS, and the Use of Condoms: A Survey of Compliance in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Robert; Matsen, Krista

    The potential for an increase in the transmission of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) exists because the practice of sexual intercourse among unmarried individuals has increased in all age groups. Nonetheless, an earlier study in 1984 had found that the sexual activity and minimal condom use of college students had not changed…

  13. Task Force Report on HIV/AIDS and Health Services Administration Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Nancy Cross

    In November 1987, a task force met to review the major organizational, structural, and policy-related issues for health care administration professionals related to the growing impact of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) on the health care delivery system and to make recommendations on the training needs of persons within the health care…

  14. Growing Special and Free To Say No to HIV. HIV/AIDS Preventative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    This curriculum guide is written to provide special education teachers with a model for teaching students about the prevention of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It is noted that special education students may be at risk for contracting the virus because they are often vulnerable to high-risk behaviors in an effort to belong to a peer…

  15. Level of Interactivity of Videodisc Instruction on College Students' Recall of AIDS Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritch, Kale M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments confirmed the greater effectiveness of constructed-response interactive videodisc instruction when compared to a click-to-continue or passive viewing formats on posttest recall of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) information by 101 college students. The necessity of constructing answers appears to be an important factor…

  16. Scope and Limits of Medical Discourse Concerning AIDS Prevention--Rationale and Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singy, Pascal; Guex, Patrice

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a preliminary stage of a project funded by the Federal Office of Public Health in Switzerland to gain insights into physician-patient communication regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and apply findings to their teaching programs. Particular focus is on aspects of communication relating to primary prevention of HIV and…

  17. Software for Teaching about AIDS & Sex: A Critical Review of Products. A MicroSIFT Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Dave

    This document contains critical reviews of 10 microcomputer software packages and two interactive videodisc products designed for use in teaching about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and sex at the secondary school level and above. Each package was reviewed by one or two secondary school health teachers and by a staff member from the…

  18. What Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adolescents Know and Think about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckner, John L.; Gonzales, B. Robert

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 204 secondary students with deafness or hearing impairment suggested that adolescents had a general idea about what human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are and the potential impact of the disease. However, they demonstrated gaps in knowledge of how the disease is transmitted and prevented…

  19. HIV Liability & Disability Services Providers: An Introduction to Tort Principles. AIDS Technical Report, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. This report focuses on liability issues from worker and client exposure to HIV.…

  20. The Save-Your-Life Glossary of Alcohol, AIDS, Drug, & Tobacco Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Deborah

    This document presents the Save-Your-Life Glossary, which consists of four parts: (1) the glossary itself, which defines alcohol, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), drug, and tobacco-related terms; (2) the alerts sections, which focus on popular drugs or issues that concern young people; (3) the focus sections, which categorize and…

  1. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war. PMID:10330595

  2. [Facial deformity associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Castillo Ariza, M; Almonte Paulino, R; Ariza Castillo, F

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss 2 cases of facial dysmorphism associated with AIDS. Both children were evaluated by staff members an results showed that the 4-year old male showed most of the criteria for the diagnosis of facial dysmorphism (a severe case). The 10-month infant showed a less typical form of dysmorphism, described by the author as more moderate in severity. The 2 children were severely immunodepressed and showed positive HIV titers. In the 1st case, the mother did of an undiagnosed immunodeficiency status when the child was 2 years old. In the other case, both parents were HIV positive and the father was suffering from the disease at that time. The facial features included: boxlike forehead, a flattened, scooped-out appearance of the nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent triangular philtrum, prominent patoulos lips, prominent palpebrae fissure, mild upward obliquity of the eyes, blue sclerae, and 2 epicanthal folds unique to these cases. The 2 children represent the 1st cases of facial dysmorphism associated with congenital AIDS in the medical literature. (author's modified)

  3. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war.

  4. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  5. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: transmission, virology and therapeutic targeting to aid in outbreak control

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes high fever, cough, acute respiratory tract infection and multiorgan dysfunction that may eventually lead to the death of the infected individuals. MERS-CoV is thought to be transmitted to humans through dromedary camels. The occurrence of the virus was first reported in the Middle East and it subsequently spread to several parts of the world. Since 2012, about 1368 infections, including ~487 deaths, have been reported worldwide. Notably, the recent human-to-human ‘superspreading' of MERS-CoV in hospitals in South Korea has raised a major global health concern. The fatality rate in MERS-CoV infection is four times higher compared with that of the closely related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection. Currently, no drug has been clinically approved to control MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we highlight the potential drug targets that can be used to develop anti-MERS-CoV therapeutics. PMID:26315600

  6. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and high fructose intake in the development of metabolic syndrome, brain metabolic abnormalities, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2013-08-01

    Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health. PMID:23896654

  7. Mice Exposed to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Simulate Clinical Features of Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chengzhi; Kou, Junping; Zhu, Danni; Yan, Yongqing; Yu, Boyang

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome (DQYS) is one of the common syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), mainly characterized by tiredness, emaciation, anorexia, fidget, palpitation and rapid pulse, and so forth. Currently, there is no available animal model which can reflect the clinical features of this syndrome. In the present paper, we observed the time-course changes of whole behavior, body weight, food intake, locomotive activity and electrocardiogram in mice exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 6 weeks, and measured bleeding time at last according to the clinical features of DQYS and one key pathological factor. The results showed that the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia for certain time presented lackluster hair, dull looking hair, resistance, attacking, body weight loss, food intake decline, locomotive activity decrease, heart rate quickening and T wave elevating, which were similar to the major clinical features of DQYS. Meanwhile, bleeding time shortening was also found, which was consistent with the clinical fact that DQYS often accompanied with blood stasis. The possible explanation was also outlined according to the available literature. Such findings suggested chronic intermittent hypoxia could induce similar symptoms and signs in mice accorded with the clinical features of DQYS, which provided a suitable animal model for evaluation of drugs for the treatment of this syndrome and further exploration of pathological process or correlation of the syndrome and related diseases.

  8. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. ||

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  9. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

  10. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome. PMID:24781758

  11. A Transmembrane Polymorphism of Fcγ Receptor IIb Is Associated with Kidney Deficiency Syndrome in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Na; Lai, Ruogu; Luo, Shizi; Xie, Jianglin; Wang, Xizi; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose is to investigate the role of kidney deficiency and the association between kidney deficiency and a polymorphism FcγRIIb 695T>C coding for nonsynonymous substitution IIe232Thr (I232T) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Clinical parameters and autoantibodies were analyzed and genotyping was performed in 159 kidney deficiency and 161 non-kidney-deficiency RA patients. Results. The age of disease onset and disease duration exhibited significant differences between two groups (P < 0.01). Patients with kidney deficiency tend to have higher activity of disease (P < 0.05). Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides antibodies (ACPA) levels of patients with kidney deficiency were higher than the controls (P = 0.039). 125 (78.6%) kidney deficiency and 114 (70.8%) non-kidney-deficiency patients had both ACPA-positive and RF-positive (P = 0.04, OR = 3.29). FcγRIIb I232TT homozygotes were identified in 10 of 159 (6.3%) kidney deficiency subjects and 1 of 161 (0.6%) controls (P = 0.000, OR = 16.45). Furthermore, in pooled genotype analysis, I232IT and I232TT homozygotes were significantly enriched in kidney deficiency individuals compared with the controls (P = 0.000, OR = 3.79). Frequency of T allele was associated with kidney deficiency RA population (P = 0.000, OR = 3.18). Conclusion. This study confirmed that kidney deficiency was closely associated with disease activity and autoimmune disorder in RA. Kidney deficiency in RA is first to reveal a strong genetic link to FcγRIIb variants. PMID:27051449

  12. Technological aids to support choice strategies by three girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Fabrizio; Perilli, Viviana; Di Leone, Antonia; Damiani, Rita; Albano, Vincenza; Stella, Anna; Damato, Concetta

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at extending the use of assistive technology (i.e., photocells, interface and personal computer) to support choice strategies by three girls with Rett syndrome and severe to profound developmental disabilities. A second purpose of the study was to reduce stereotypic behaviors exhibited by the participants involved (i.e., body rocking, hand washing and hand mouthing). Finally, a third goal of the study was to monitor the effects of such program on the participants' indices of happiness. The study was carried out according to a multiple probe design across responses for each participant. Results showed that the three girls increased the adaptive responses and decreased the stereotyped behaviors during intervention phases compared to baseline. Moreover, during intervention phases, the indices of happiness augmented for each girl as well. Clinical, psychological and rehabilitative implications of the findings are discussed.

  13. Identification of novel allelic variants of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene and screening for Bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome in Indian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Subodh; Deb, Sitangsu M; Mitra, Abhijit; Niranjan, Saket K; Naskar, Soumen; Sharma, Arjava

    2009-01-01

    A fragment of 570 bp corresponding to exon 5 and 6 of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene was amplified for screening D128G mutation in one hundred and fifty two buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) which causes bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome (BLAD) in cattle, as well as to ascertain polymorphism. TaqI PCR-RFLP revealed no such mutation thus indicating the absence of bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BuLAD) allele in animals under study. However, the polymorphism studies using MspI restriction enzyme revealed two genotypic patterns viz. AA pattern (bands of 293, 141, 105, and 31 bp) and BB pattern (bands of 293, 105, 77, 64, and 31 bp). The sequences of A and B alleles were submitted to the GenBank (EU853307 and AY821799). PMID:19544212

  14. Identification of novel allelic variants of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene and screening for Bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome in Indian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Subodh; Deb, Sitangsu M; Mitra, Abhijit; Niranjan, Saket K; Naskar, Soumen; Sharma, Arjava

    2009-01-01

    A fragment of 570 bp corresponding to exon 5 and 6 of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene was amplified for screening D128G mutation in one hundred and fifty two buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) which causes bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome (BLAD) in cattle, as well as to ascertain polymorphism. TaqI PCR-RFLP revealed no such mutation thus indicating the absence of bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BuLAD) allele in animals under study. However, the polymorphism studies using MspI restriction enzyme revealed two genotypic patterns viz. AA pattern (bands of 293, 141, 105, and 31 bp) and BB pattern (bands of 293, 105, 77, 64, and 31 bp). The sequences of A and B alleles were submitted to the GenBank (EU853307 and AY821799).

  15. An AIDS campaign in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Janoff, D

    1987-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) distribution program in Brazil, spearheaded by the National Division of Sanitary Surveillance in Ports, Airports, and Borders, was part of the government's massive education campaign to prevent the transmission of HIV-AIDS in Brazil. Beginning in February 1987, the climate was sufficiently favorable to operate a coordinated information campaign during the Carnival celebration, and tourists arriving in the cities of Brazil for the annual Carnival celebration were handed an educational brochure in Portugese, Spanish, English, and French. Yet, beyond reaching the tourist populations, it is particularly important to reach large portions of the Brazilian population. Planners of the national AIDS campaign intend to use television, radio, and all major newspapers in their effort to cover the country. Initial television coverage is comprised of short informational messages directed at high-risk groups. There also are plans to use radio and the print media in order to reach a wider audience. It is estimated that US $6 million will be needed to adequately meet the costs of AIDS prevention and medical care, but due to extreme budget constraints, only $45,000 has been earmarked for ongoing AIDS activities at this time. PMID:12281284

  16. West Syndrome in an Infant with Vitamin B[subscript 12] Deficiency in the Absence of Macrocytic Anaemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erol, Ilknur; Alehan, Fusun; Gumus, Ayten

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin B[subscript 12] deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits, including macrocytic anaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor, and seizures. The diagnosis of vitamin B[subscript 12] deficiency can be difficult when the typical macrocytic…

  17. Redefining the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: report of the fourth patient with B4GALT7 deficiency and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guo, Michael H; Stoler, Joan; Lui, Julian; Nilsson, Ola; Bianchi, Diana W; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Dauber, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Proteoglycans are a component of the extracellular matrix and are critical for cellular and tissue function. Mutations in proteoglycan components and enzymes involved in proteoglycan synthesis have been implicated in several growth disorders, with common features including short stature and skeletal dysplasia. For example, mutations in B4GALT7, a gene whose protein product catalyzes proteoglycan synthesis, have been associated with the rare progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Here, we conducted exome sequencing in a patient with a previously undiagnosed growth disorder and identified compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7. This patient is just the fourth individual with genetically confirmed progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The mutations include a previously characterized c.808C>T p.Arg270Cys substitution, and a novel c.122T>C p.Leu41Pro substitution. We demonstrate that the novel mutation caused decreased levels of the enzyme, supporting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our report identifies a novel mutation in B4GALT7 causing the progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and contributes an extensive phenotypic characterization of a patient with the syndrome. We also reviewed the previous literature in addition to the present patient, and conclude that the key features associated with B4GALT7 deficiency are short stature, developmental anomalies of the forearm bones and elbow, and bowing of the extremities, in addition to the classic features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. This report helps define the phenotype of the progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and furthers our understanding of the effect of proteoglycan defects in growth disorders.

  18. Structure and lipid distribution of polyenoic very-long-chain fatty acids in the brain of peroxisome-deficient patients (Zellweger syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, P; Poulos, A; Fellenberg, A; Johnson, D

    1987-01-01

    The polyenoic fatty acids with carbon chain lengths from 26 to 38 (very-long-chain fatty acids, VLCFA) previously detected in abnormal amounts in Zellweger syndrome brain have been shown to be n-6 derivatives and therefore probably derived by chain elongation of shorter-chain n-6 fatty acids such as linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. Polyenoic VLCFA are also present in Zellweger syndrome liver, but this tissue differs significantly from brain in that the saturated and mono-unsaturated derivatives are the major VLCFA. Zellweger syndrome brain polyenoic VLCFA are present in the neutral lipids predominantly in cholesterol esters, with smaller amounts in the non-esterified fatty acid and triacylglycerol fractions. These fatty acids are barely detectable in any of the major phospholipids, but are present in significant amounts in an unidentified minor phospholipid. The polyenoic VLCFA composition of this lipid differs markedly from that observed for all other lipids, as it contains high proportions of pentaenoic and hexaenoic fatty acids with 34, 36 and 38 carbon atoms. A polar lipid with the chromatographic properties in normal brain contains similar fatty acids. It is postulated that the polyenoic VLCFA may play an important role in normal brain and accumulate in Zellweger syndrome brain because of a deficiency in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway, although a possible peroxisomal role in the control of carbon-chain elongation cannot be discounted. PMID:3435449

  19. Fumarate Hydratase-deficient Renal Cell Carcinoma Is Strongly Correlated With Fumarate Hydratase Mutation and Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trpkov, Kiril; Hes, Ondrej; Agaimy, Abbas; Bonert, Michael; Martinek, Petr; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Kristiansen, Glen; Lüders, Christine; Nesi, Gabriella; Compérat, Eva; Sibony, Mathilde; Berney, Daniel M; Mehra, Rohit; Brimo, Fadi; Hartmann, Arndt; Husain, Arjumand; Frizzell, Norma; Hills, Kirsten; Maclean, Fiona; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are difficult to diagnose prospectively. We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to identify fumarate hydratase (FH)-deficient tumors (defined as FH negative, 2-succinocysteine [2SC] positive) in cases diagnosed as "unclassified RCC, high grade or with papillary pattern," or "papillary RCC type 2," from multiple institutions. A total of 124 tumors (from 118 patients) were evaluated by IHC for FH and 2SC. An FH deficiency was found in 24/124 (19%) cases. An indeterminate result (only 1 marker abnormal) was found in 27/124 (22%) cases. In a tissue microarray of 776 RCCs of different types, only 2 (0.5%) tumors, initially considered papillary type 2, were FH deficient. FH mutations were found in 19/21 FH-deficient tumors (with confirmed germline mutations in 9 of 9 tumors in which germline status could be assessed) and in 1/26 FH-indeterminate tumors identified by IHC. No FH mutations were found in 2/21 FH-deficient RCCs, 25/26 FH-indeterminate RCCs, and 10/10 RCCs demonstrating FH expression by IHC. Patients with FH-deficient RCC had a median age of 44 years (range, 21 to 65 y). Average tumor size was 8.2 cm (range, 0.9 to 18 cm). FH-deficient RCCs were characterized by at least focal macronucleoli and demonstrated 2 or more growth patterns in 93% cases. Papillary was the most common (74%) and dominant (59%) pattern, whereas other common patterns included: solid (44%), tubulocystic (41%), cribriform (41%), and cystic (33%). At presentation, 57% were stage ≥pT3, 52% had positive nodes, and 19% had distant metastases. After a mean follow-up of 27 months (range, 1 to 114 mo), 39% of patients were dead of disease, and 26% had disease progression. We conclude that FH and 2SC are useful IHC ancillary tools, which allow recognition of FH-deficient RCC. PMID:26900816

  20. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  1. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype–phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  2. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  3. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype–phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  4. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A Text Size What's in ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  5. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  6. Molecular analysis and anticonvulsant therapy in two patients with glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome: a successful use of zonisamide for controlling the seizures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Ohinata, Junko; Suzuki, Nao; Amamiya, Satoshi; Kajihama, Aya; Sugai, Rika; Araki, Akiko; Fujieda, Kenji; Tanaka, Hajime

    2008-07-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome is caused by a deficit in glucose transport to the brain during the pre- and postnatal periods. Here, we report two cases of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, reduced GLUT1 activities, and mutations in the GLUT1 gene. Patient 1 had a novel heterozygous 1bp insertion in exon 7 that resulted in a shift of the reading frame and the introduction of a premature stop codon at amino acid position 380. His clinical phenotype appeared to be more severe than that of Patient 2 who had a missense mutation in exon 8 resulting in an arginine-to-tryptophan substitution at amino acid position 333. Patient 1 had no meaningful words and could not walk unassisted, while Patient 2 could speak and walk unassisted. Both the patients developed seizures of various types that have been successfully treated with zonisamide. Although several antiepileptic drugs, including barbiturates, diazepam, chloralhydrate, and valproic acid, have been shown to inhibit GLUT1 function, the present study demonstrated no inhibitory effect of zonisamide on GLUT1-mediated glucose transport. Our data suggested that zonisamide might be preferable if add-on anticonvulsant therapy is required to control the seizures in patients with this disorder.

  7. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels. PMID:26078744

  8. AIDS-Related Stigmas and Safe-Sex Practices of African-American College Students: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.

    This study examined the safe-sex practices of African-American colleges students in light of culturally-specific beliefs that stigmatize Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the African-American community. A total of 21 self-selected, sexually-active African-American students (15 females and 6 males) aged 18-22 completed the AIDS…

  9. Development and Implementation of an AIDS Prevention Program for African-American Women at a Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moten-Tolson, Paula

    This program was designed to provide Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention education for African-American women of child bearing age at a child care center which serves low income high risk families. The primary goal was to reduce the risk of African-American women at the child care center for contracting the Human Immunodeficiency…

  10. Incarcerated Adolescents' Engagement in AIDS/HIV High-Risk Behaviors: Ethnic-Racial and Gender Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Gary W.

    Incarcerated youth are a subgroup of adolescents who are at particularly high risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This study explored ethnic-racial and gender differences in incarcerated adolescents' engagement in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)/HIV high-risk behaviors. All subjects for the study were residents of…

  11. The Role of Language and Education in Eradicating HIV/AIDS in Africa: Evidence from Parents, Teachers, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okebukola, Foluso O.; Adegbite, Hassan H.; Owolabi, Tunde

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on the eradication and reversal of the spread of HIV/AIDS (human immune virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome) as one of the main thrusts of Africa's 21st Century Development Goals. It investigates the significant role which language and education can play in fast tracking the attainment of this goal using a three-pronged…

  12. American Teens: Sexually Active, Sexually Illiterate and AIDS Education in Our Schools: A Chance to Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattleton, Faye; Levy, Susan

    1988-01-01

    Two articles discuss sexual activity of teenagers, sex education in elementary and secondary schools, and instruction on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Highlights include disadvantaged teens, parent-child communication, television's influence, curriculum recommendations, and media reviews of video tapes and filmstrips dealing with…

  13. AIDS: A Catholic Educational Approach to HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus): Teacher's Manual and Implementation Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum guide aims to help teachers and students in Catholic schools and parish religious education programs to: (1) become more deeply rooted in Gospel values and Catholic moral teaching; (2) understand the HIV virus and the disease which it causes, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS); and (3) develop decision-making and leadership…

  14. Pathophysiology of B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Taubenheim, Nadine; Peron, Sophie; Fischer, Alain

    2007-01-01

    B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination (Ig-CSR) deficiencies, previously termed hyper-IgM syndromes, are genetically determined conditions characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels and an absence or very low levels of IgG, IgA, and IgE. As a function of the molecular mechanism, the defective CSR is variably associated to a defect in the generation of somatic hypermutations (SHMs) in the Ig variable region. The study of Ig-CSR deficiencies contributed to a better delineation of the mechanisms underlying CSR and SHM, the major events of antigen-triggered antibody maturation. Four Ig-CSR deficiency phenotypes have been so far reported: the description of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency (Ig-CSR deficiency 1), caused by recessive mutations of AICDA gene, characterized by a defect in CSR and SHM, clearly established the role of AID in the induction of the Ig gene rearrangements underlying CSR and SHM. A CSR-specific function of AID has, however, been detected by the observation of a selective CSR defect caused by mutations affecting the C-terminus of AID. Ig-CSR deficiency 2 is the consequence of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency. Because UNG, a molecule of the base excision repair machinery, removes uracils from DNA and AID deaminates cytosines into uracils, that observation indicates that the AID-UNG pathway directly targets DNA of switch regions from the Ig heavy-chain locus to induce the CSR process. Ig-CSR deficiencies 3 and 4 are characterized by a selective CSR defect resulting from blocks at distinct steps of CSR. A further understanding of the CSR machinery is expected from their molecular definition. PMID:17560278

  15. Histopathological comparison of Kearns-Sayre syndrome and PGC-1α-deficient mice suggests a novel concept for vacuole formation in mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Szalardy, L; Molnar, M; Torok, R; Zadori, D; Vecsei, L; Klivenyi, P; Liberski, P; Kovacs, G G

    2016-01-01

    Despite the current hypotheses about myelinic and astrocytic ion-dyshomeostasis underlying white (WM) and grey matter (GM) vacuolation in mitochondrial encephalopathies, there is a paucity of data on the exact mechanism of vacuole formation. To revisit the concepts of vacuole formation associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, we performed a comparative neuropathological analysis in Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and full-length peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g coactivator-1a (FL-PGC-1a)-deficient mice, a recently proposed morphological model of mitochondrial encephalopathies. Brain tissues from an individual with genetically proven KSS (22-year-old man) and aged FL-PGC-1a-deficient and wild-type (male, 70-75-week-old) mice were analysed using ultrastructural and immunohistochemical methods, with a specific focus on myelin-related, oligodendroglial, axonal and astrocytic pathologies. Besides demonstrating remarkable similarities in the lesion profile of KSS and FL-PGC-1a-deficient mice, this study first provides morphological evidence for the identical origin of WM and GM vacuolation as well as for the presence of intracytoplasmic oligodendroglial vacuoles in mitochondriopathies. Based on these observations, the paper proposes a theoretical model for the development of focal myelin vacuolation as opposed to the original concepts of intramyelin oedema. Placing oligodendrocytes in the centre of tissue lesioning in conditions related to defects in mitochondria, our observations support the rationale for cytoprotective targeting of oligodendrocytes in mitochondrial encephalopathies, and may also have implications in brain aging and multiple sclerosis, as discussed.

  16. Hair and skin sterols in normal mice and those with deficient dehydrosterol reductase (DHCR7), the enzyme associated with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Montserrat; Matabosch, Xavier; Ying, Lee; Watson, Gordon; Shackleton, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies have focused on cholesterol synthesis in mouse models for 7-dehydrosterolreductase (DHCR7) deficiency, also known as Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Investigations of such mutants have relied on tissue and blood levels of the cholesterol precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) and its 8-dehydro isomer. In this investigation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we have identified and quantified cholesterol and its precursors (7DHC, desmosterol, lathosterol, lanosterol and cholest-7,24-dien-3β-ol) in mouse hair. The components were characterized and their concentrations were compared to those found in mouse skin and serum. Hair appeared unique in that desmosterol was a major sterol component, almost matching in concentration cholesterol itself. In DHCR7 deficient mice, dehydrodesmosterol (DHD) was the dominant hair Δ7 sterol. Mutant mouse hair had much higher concentrations of 7-dehydrosterols relative to cholesterol than did serum or tissue at all ages studied. The 7DHC/C ratio in hair was typically about sevenfold the value in serum or skin and the DHD/D ratio was 100X that of the serum 7DHC/C ratio. Mutant mice compensate for their DHCR7 deficiency with maturity, and the tissue and blood 7DHC/C become close to normal. That hair retains high relative concentrations of the dehydro precursors suggests that the apparent up-regulation of Dhcr7 seen in liver is slower to develop at the site of hair cholesterol synthesis. PMID:20804844

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated with Severity of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and High Rates of Sun Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Fernando; Caribé, Ana; Vasconcelos, Karine Ferreira; Segundo, Alexandre Dantas; Bandeira, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evidence shows that patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations have a higher risk of developing coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D as a predictor of the severity in diabetics with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). METHODS A total of 166 patients were diagnosed with ACS. Serum 25OHD concentrations were analyzed, and risk factors for ACS were evaluated. RESULTS Patients diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction with elevation of the ST segment had a higher rate of 25OHD, <20 ng/mL compared to ≥30 ng/mL (47.8% × 13.4%, P = 0.03). Diabetics with vitamin D deficiency had more multivessel lesions in the coronary angiography than non-diabetics (69% × 31.8%, P = 0.007). After adjustments for confounders, serum 25OHD remained associated with more severe disease. CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency is associated with more severe ACS and is a predictor of more extensive coronary lesions in patients with T2DM.

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated with Severity of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and High Rates of Sun Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Fernando; Caribé, Ana; Vasconcelos, Karine Ferreira; Segundo, Alexandre Dantas; Bandeira, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evidence shows that patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations have a higher risk of developing coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D as a predictor of the severity in diabetics with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). METHODS A total of 166 patients were diagnosed with ACS. Serum 25OHD concentrations were analyzed, and risk factors for ACS were evaluated. RESULTS Patients diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction with elevation of the ST segment had a higher rate of 25OHD, <20 ng/mL compared to ≥30 ng/mL (47.8% × 13.4%, P = 0.03). Diabetics with vitamin D deficiency had more multivessel lesions in the coronary angiography than non-diabetics (69% × 31.8%, P = 0.007). After adjustments for confounders, serum 25OHD remained associated with more severe disease. CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency is associated with more severe ACS and is a predictor of more extensive coronary lesions in patients with T2DM. PMID:27625577

  19. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  20. Brainstem deficiency of the 14-3-3 regulator of serotonin synthesis: a proteomics analysis in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Broadbelt, Kevin G; Rivera, Keith D; Paterson, David S; Duncan, Jhodie R; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Paulo, Joao A; Stapels, Martha D; Borenstein, Natalia S; Belliveau, Richard A; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F; Steen, Hanno; Kinney, Hannah C

    2012-01-01

    Impaired brainstem responses to homeostatic challenges during sleep may result in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Previously we reported a deficiency of serotonin (5-HT) and its key biosynthetic enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2), in SIDS infants in the medullary 5-HT system that modulates homeostatic responses during sleep. Yet, the underlying basis of the TPH2 and 5-HT deficiency is unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that proteomics would uncover previously unrecognized abnormal levels of proteins related to TPH2 and 5-HT regulation in SIDS cases compared with controls, which could provide novel insight into the basis of their deficiency. We first performed a discovery proteomic analysis of the gigantocellularis of the medullary 5-HT system in the same data set with deficiencies of TPH2 and 5-HT levels. Analysis in 6 SIDS cases and 4 controls revealed a 42-75% reduction in abundance in 5 of the 6 isoforms identified of the 14-3-3 signal transduction family, which is known to influence TPH2 activity (p < 0.07). These findings were corroborated in an additional SIDS and control sample using an orthogonal MS(E)-based quantitative proteomic strategy. To confirm these proteomics results in a larger data set (38 SIDS, 11 controls), we applied Western blot analysis in the gigantocellularis and found that 4/7 14-3-3 isoforms identified were significantly reduced in SIDS cases (p ≤ 0.02), with a 43% reduction in all 14-3-3 isoforms combined (p < 0.001). Abnormalities in 5-HT and TPH2 levels and 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were associated with the 14-3-3 deficits in the same SIDS cases. These data suggest a potential molecular defect in SIDS related to TPH2 regulation, as 14-3-3 is critical in this process. PMID:21976671