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Sample records for deficient small cell

  1. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M.; Wang, Charles X.; An, W. Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  2. Iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a non-small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Linsen, Philip V.M.; Linsen, Victor M.J.; Buunk, Gerba; Arnold, Dorothee E.; Aerts, Joachim G.J.V.

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal metastases secondary to lung cancer are very rare and most of the time asymptomatic. When symptomatic they usually present with bowel obstruction or perforation. We here describe the case of a 68 year-old man with a solitary metastasis in the duodenum from a non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The patient presented with reduced exercise tolerance and iron deficiency anemia without clinical gastrointestinal blood loss. Further investigation showed a tumor in the left upper lung lobe and a duodenal metastasis for which he received chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a duodenal metastasis from a NSCLC. PMID:26744672

  3. Heightening Energetic Stress Selectively Targets LKB1-Deficient Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milica; McMickle, Robert; Abt, Evan; Seki, Atsuko; Simko, Sarah A; Magyar, Clara; Stout, David B; Fishbein, Michael C; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Shackelford, David B

    2015-11-15

    Inactivation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor is a frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) leading to the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and sensitivity to the metabolic stress inducer phenformin. In this study, we explored the combinatorial use of phenformin with the mTOR catalytic kinase inhibitor MLN0128 as a treatment strategy for NSCLC bearing comutations in the LKB1 and KRAS genes. NSCLC is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disease, giving rise to lung tumors of varying histologies that include adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that phenformin in combination with MLN0128 induced a significant therapeutic response in KRAS/LKB1-mutant human cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC that develop both adenocarcinomas and SCCs. Specifically, we found that KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung adenocarcinomas responded strongly to phenformin + MLN0128 treatment, but the response of SCCs to single or combined treatment with MLN0128 was more attenuated due to acquired resistance to mTOR inhibition through modulation of the AKT-GSK signaling axis. Combinatorial use of the mTOR inhibitor and AKT inhibitor MK2206 robustly inhibited the growth and viability of squamous lung tumors, thus providing an effective strategy to overcome resistance. Taken together, our findings define new personalized therapeutic strategies that may be rapidly translated into clinical use for the treatment of KRAS/LKB1-mutant adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors.

  4. Heightening energetic stress selectively targets LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Momcilovic, Milica; McMickle, Robert; Abt, Evan; Seki, Atsuko; Simko, Sarah A.; Magyar, Clara; Stout, David B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Walser, Tonya C.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Shackelford, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor is a frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) leading to the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and sensitivity to the metabolic stress inducer phenformin. In this study, we explored the combinatorial use of phenformin with the mTOR catalytic kinase inhibitor MLN0128 as a treatment strategy for NSCLC bearing co-mutations in the LKB1 and KRAS genes. NSCLC is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disease, giving rise to lung tumors of varying histologies that include adenocarcinomas (ADCs) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). We demonstrate that phenformin in combination with MLN0128 induced a significant therapeutic response in KRAS/LKB1 mutant human cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC that develop both ADCs and SCCs. Specifically, we found that KRAS/LKB1 mutant lung ADCs responded strongly to phenformin + MLN0128 treatment, but the response of SCCs to single or combined treatment with MLN0128 was more attenuated due to acquired resistance to mTOR inhibition through modulation of the AKT-GSK signaling axis. Combinatorial use of the mTOR inhibitor and AKT inhibitor MK2206 robustly inhibited the growth and viability of squamous lung tumors thus providing an effective strategy to overcome resistance. Taken together, our findings define new personalized therapeutic strategies that may be rapidly translated into clinical use for the treatment of KRAS/LKB1 mutant adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors. PMID:26574479

  5. WEE1 Kinase Inhibitor AZD1775 Has Preclinical Efficacy in LKB1-Deficient Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Richer, Amanda L; Cala, Jacqueline M; O'Brien, Kelley; Carson, Vashti M; Inge, Landon J; Whitsett, Timothy G

    2017-09-01

    G1-S checkpoint loss contributes to carcinogenesis and increases reliance upon the G2-M checkpoint for adaptation to stress and DNA repair, making G2-M checkpoint inhibition a target for novel therapeutic development. AZD1775, an inhibitor against the critical G2-M checkpoint protein WEE1, is currently in clinical trials across a number of tumor types. AZD1775 and DNA-damaging agents have displayed favorable activity in several preclinical tumor models, often in the molecular context of TP53 loss. Whether AZD1775 efficacy is modulated by other molecular contexts remains poorly understood. The tumor suppressor serine/threonine kinase 11 (LKB1/STK11) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is commonly comutated with oncogenic KRAS mutations. We investigated the preclinical effects of AZD1775 in the context of KRAS/LKB1 in NSCLC. Using NSCLC cell lines, we found that AZD1775 alone and in combination with DNA-damaging agents (e.g., cisplatin and radiation) decreased tumor cell viability in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. In vitro, LKB1 deficiency enhanced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to AZD1775 exposure compared with wild-type LKB1 cells. In a genetically engineered mouse model of mutant Kras with concomitant loss of Lkb1, combined AZD1775 and cisplatin extended overall survival compared with cisplatin alone. Our data suggest that lack of phosphorylation of LKB1 by ATM was involved in AZD1775-mediated cytotoxicity. Collectively, these findings provide a clinical application for AZD1775 with DNA-damaging agents in KRAS/LKB1 NSCLC. Cancer Res; 77(17); 4663-72. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  7. p21waf1/cip1 deficiency does not perturb the intestinal crypt stem cell population after massive small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Longshore, Shannon W.; Nair, Rajalakshmi; Perrone, Erin E.; Erwin, Christopher R.; Guo, Jun; Warner, Brad W.

    2009-01-01

    Background After small bowel resection (SBR), adaptation is initiated in intestinal crypts where stem cells reside. Prior studies revealed SBR induced enterocyte proliferation requires the expression of p21waf1/cip1. Since deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1 has been shown to result in reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells, we sought to test the hypothesis that p21waf1/cip1 deficiency similarly perturbs the intestinal stem cell population after SBR. Methods Control (n=21; C57Bl/6) and p21waf1/cip1-null mice (n=30) underwent 50% proximal SBR or sham operation. After 3 days, the ileum was harvested and the crypt stem cell population evaluated by counting crypt base columnar (CBC) cells on histological sections, determining the expression of Musashi-1 and Lgr5, and profiling the transcriptional expression of 84 known stem cell genes. Results There were no significant differences in CBC cells, expression of Musashi-1 or Lgr5, or in stem cell gene expression after SBR in control mice. Further, there were no differences in these markers between controls and p21waf1/cip1-null mice. Conclusion In contrast with bone marrow stem cells, the stem cell population of the gut is unaffected by deficient expression of p21waf1/cip1. Additional mechanisms for the role of p21waf1/cip1 in small bowel proliferation and adaptation following massive SBR must be considered. PMID:19524718

  8. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  9. SMARCA4-deficient undifferentiated carcinoma of the ovary (small cell carcinoma, hypercalcemic type): clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Agaimy, Abbas; Thiel, Falk; Hartmann, Arndt; Fukunaga, Masaharu

    2015-10-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type is a very rare aggressive neoplasm of unknown histogenesis, affecting mainly girls and young women. Recently, inactivating mutations in SMARCA4 (BRG1), a member of the switch/sucrose nonfermenting chromatin remodeling complex, has been identified as driver events in most cases. We herein describe 3 cases in 34, 34, and 37-year-old women. Symptoms were mainly abdominal pain and mass. One patient was normocalcemic, and the other 2 had no preoperative serum calcium values available. All patients received radical hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy, lymphadenectomy, and variable multimodality therapy. Two developed abdominal recurrences/metastases and died of disease at 4 and 12 months. One patient was alive without disease 17 months after surgery and radiochemotherapy. Histologic examination showed undifferentiated neoplasms composed of diffuse sheets, nests and cords of noncohesive monomorphic small blue/basaloid cells (classic variant, 1 case), and large undifferentiated/rhabdoid cells with abundant cytoplasm (large cell/rhabdoid variant, 2 case) admixed with minor small cell areas. One case contained rare isolated goblet cells, but true glandular component was absent. All tumors expressed vimentin and variably pancytokeratin and WT1. Nuclear SMARCB1 was intact in all cases (1 case showed small foci with mosaic loss). All tumors showed complete loss of SMARCA4. In conclusion, SMARCA4 immunohistochemistry represents a highly valuable emerging tool in identifying small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type in routine practice. Distinguishing this aggressive neoplasm from juvenile granulosa cell tumor and other undifferentiated ovarian cancers is mandatory in selecting appropriate chemotherapeutic regimens and would allow better characterization of this entity, for which targeted molecular therapy still remains to be established.

  10. Immunoproteasome deficiency is a feature of non-small cell lung cancer with a mesenchymal phenotype and is associated with a poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Satyendra C.; Peters, Haley L.; Taguchi, Ayumu; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Wang, Hong; Momin, Amin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Celiktas, Muge; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Hanash, Samir M.; Ostrin, Edwin J.

    2016-01-01

    The immunoproteasome plays a key role in generation of HLA peptides for T cell-mediated immunity. Integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines revealed significantly reduced expression of immunoproteasome components and their regulators associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Low expression of immunoproteasome subunits in early stage NSCLC patients was associated with recurrence and metastasis. Depleted repertoire of HLA class I-bound peptides in mesenchymal cells deficient in immunoproteasome components was restored with either IFNγ or 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment. Our findings point to a mechanism of immune evasion of cells with a mesenchymal phenotype and suggest a strategy to overcome immune evasion through induction of the immunoproteasome to increase the cellular repertoire of HLA class I-bound peptides. PMID:26929325

  11. Genome-Wide Small RNA Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis Reveals a microRNA Profile of Cancer Susceptibility in ATM-Deficient Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Jill E.; Liu, Liwen; Innes, Cynthia L.; Cui, Yuxia; Palii, Stela S.; Paules, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in the ATM gene are the underlying cause for ataxia telangiectasia, a syndrome characterized by neurological, motor and immunological defects, and a predisposition to cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are useful tools for cancer profiling and prediction of therapeutic responses to clinical regimens. We investigated the consequences of ATM deficiency on miRNA expression and associated gene expression in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HME-CCs). We identified 81 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs in ATM-deficient HME-CCs using small RNA sequencing. Many of these have been implicated in tumorigenesis and proliferation and include down-regulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-16, as well as over-expressed pro-oncogenic miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-221. MicroRNA changes were integrated with genome wide gene expression profiles to investigate possible miRNA targets. Predicted mRNA targets of the miRNAs significantly regulated after ATM depletion included many genes associated with cancer formation and progression, such as SOCS1 and the proto-oncogene MAF. While a number of miRNAs have been reported as altered in cancerous cells, there is little understanding as to how these small RNAs might be driving cancer formation or how they might be used as biomarkers for cancer susceptibility. This study provides preliminary data for defining miRNA profiles that may be used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers for breast cancer. Our integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression allows us to gain a better understanding of the signaling involved in breast cancer predisposition and suggests a mechanism for the breast cancer-prone phenotype seen in ATM-deficient patients. PMID:23741392

  12. The Effect of Small Molecules on Sterol Homeostasis: Measuring 7-Dehydrocholesterol in Dhcr7-Deficient Neuro2a Cells and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Korade, Zeljka; Kim, Hye-Young H; Tallman, Keri A; Liu, Wei; Koczok, Katalin; Balogh, Istvan; Xu, Libin; Mirnics, Karoly; Porter, Ned A

    2016-02-11

    Well-established cell culture models were combined with new analytical methods to assess the effects of small molecules on the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. The analytical protocol, which is based on sterol derivation with the dienolphile PTAD, was found to be reliable for the analysis of 7-DHC and desmosterol. The PTAD method was applied to the screening of a small library of pharmacologically active substances, and the effect of compounds on the cholesterol pathway was determined. Of some 727 compounds, over 30 compounds decreased 7-DHC in Dhcr7-deficient Neuro2a cells. The examination of chemical structures of active molecules in the screen grouped the compounds into distinct categories. In addition to statins, our screen found that SERMs, antifungals, and several antipsychotic medications reduced levels of 7-DHC. The activities of selected compounds were verified in human fibroblasts derived from Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) patients and linked to specific transformations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway.

  13. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk of non-small cell lung cancer in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Cui, Jiuwei; Gu, Jingkai; He, Hua; Li, Biao; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The association between vitamin D levels and lung cancer risk varies among distinct demographic populations; however, whether vitamin D levels are related to the risk of lung cancer in Chinese population is unknown. We aimed to elucidate the association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level with the risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Chinese population. A total of 100 NSCLC patients and, 100 age-, gender-, blood-collection-season- and resident area-matched, cancer-free controls were recruited. Plasma 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 levels were measured by LC/MS/MS mass spectrometry and HPLC. A logistic regression model was applied to estimate the association between 25(OH)D concentrations and NSCLC risk. Multivariable analysis showed that smoking history, and 25(OH)D deficiency (< 20 ng/mL) were related to a higher risk of NSCLC (P = 0.03). In addition, late stage (stage IIIB-IV) NSCLC was associated with lower 25(OH)D levels, as indicated by univariate analysis. Similarly, multivariate analysis showed that late stage (IIIB-IV) NSCLC was related to 25(OH)D deficiency. Plasma 25(OH)D deficiency is significantly associated with a higher risk of NSCLC, specifically late stage NSCLC.

  14. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative for limbal deficiency were analyzed. Risk factors, clinical findings and sequelae were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight eyes of six patients with stem cell deficiency not secondary to a known diagnosis were described. All eyes had prior ocular surgery involving the corneoscleral limbus. Six eyes had been on chronic topical medications and all eyes had concurrent external disease such as pterygium, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, rosacea or herpes simplex virus keratitis. All eyes had superior quadrants affected corresponding to areas of prior limbal surgery. Sequelae of disease included corneal scarring and neo-vascularization, and five eyes had with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. CONCLUSIONS: Because the epitheliopathy started peripherally and extended centrally in all patients, we feel it represents a stem cell deficiency. The fact that all patients were affected superiorly, at sites of a prior limbal surgical incision, points to surgical trauma to the SC as the likely major etiologic factor for the deficiency. The surgical trauma to the limbal SC probably made these cells more susceptible to damage from other external disease influences and toxicity from chronic topical medications. Because the stem cell deficiency is secondary to prior ocular surgery and chronic topical medications, we propose the term "iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency". Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B PMID:9440165

  15. Corneal epithelial stem cells: deficiency and regulation.

    PubMed

    Secker, Genevieve A; Daniels, Julie T

    2008-09-01

    The corneal epithelium is continuously renewed by a population of stem cells that reside in the corneoscleral junction, otherwise known as the limbus. These limbal epithelial stem cells (LESC) are imperative for corneal maintenance with deficiencies leading to in-growth of conjunctival cells, neovascularisation of the corneal stroma and eventual corneal opacity and visual loss. One such disease that has traditionally been thought to be due to LESC deficiency is aniridia, a pan-ocular congenital eye disease due to mutations in the PAX6 gene. Corneal changes or aniridia related keratopathy (ARK) seen in aniridia are typical of LESC deficiency. However, the pathophysiology behind ARK is still ill defined, with current theories suggesting it may be caused by a deficiency in the stem cell niche and adjacent corneal stroma, with altered wound healing responses also playing a role (Ramaesh et al, International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 37:547-557, 2005) or abnormal epidermal differentiation of LESC (Li et al., The Journal of Pathology 214:9, 2008). PAX6 is considered the master control gene for the eye and is required for normal eye development with expression continuing in the adult cornea, thus inferring a role for corneal repair and regeneration (Sivak et al., Developments in Biologicals 222:41-54, 2000). Studies of models of Pax6 deficiency, such as the small eyed (sey) mouse, should help to reveal the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved in normal LESC function.

  16. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  17. Selective killing of SMARCA2- and SMARCA4-deficient small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type cells by inhibition of EZH2: In vitro and in vivo preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Chan-Penebre, Elayne; Armstrong, Kelli; Drew, Allison; Grassian, Alexandra R; Feldman, Igor; Knutson, Sarah K; Kuplast-Barr, Kristy; Roche, Maria; Campbell, John; Ho, Peter; Copeland, Robert A; Chesworth, Richard; Smith, Jesse J; Keilhack, Heike; Ribich, Scott A

    2017-03-14

    The SWI/SNF complex is a major regulator of gene expression and is increasingly thought to play an important role in human cancer, as evidenced by the high frequency of subunit mutations across virtually all cancer types. We previously reported that in preclinical models, malignant rhabdoid tumors, which are deficient in the SWI/SNF core component INI1 (SMARCB1), are selectively killed by inhibitors of the H3K27 histone methyltransferase EZH2. Given the demonstrated antagonistic activities of the SWI/SNF complex and the EZH2-containing PRC2 complex, we investigated whether additional cancers with SWI/SNF mutations are sensitive to selective EZH2 inhibition. It has been recently reported that ovarian cancers with dual loss of the redundant SWI/SNF components SMARCA4 and SMARCA2 are characteristic of a rare rhabdoid-like subtype known as small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT). Here, we provide evidence that a subset of commonly used ovarian carcinoma cell lines were misdiagnosed and instead were derived from a SCCOHT tumor. We also demonstrate that tazemetostat, a potent and selective EZH2 inhibitor currently in Phase II clinical trials, induces potent anti-proliferative and anti-tumor effects in SCCOHT cell lines and xenografts deficient in both SMARCA2 and SMARCA4. These results exemplify an additional class of rhabdoid-like tumors that are dependent on EZH2 activity for survival.

  18. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  19. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vendetti, Frank P; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P; O'Connor, Mark J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2015-12-29

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts.

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  1. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (right)   The structure of tightly packed "closed cells" in a layer of marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific Ocean ... into interesting structures such as those shown here. These cells are notably small, with diameters ranging from 10-15 kilometers, instead ...

  2. Paediatric idiopathic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Stephen J; Lee, Graham A

    2017-03-20

    Acquired limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) describes a condition in which the corneal limbal stem cells are altered or destroyed, typically due to ocular trauma, chronic allergy or inflammation. Idiopathic LSCD is a term used to describe limbal stem cell failure in the absence of any identifiable causative factor. While several cases of adult-onset LSCD have been identified previously, this case report describes a rare presentation of bilateral asymmetric idiopathic paediatric limbal stem cell deficiency in a sixteen-year-old male with an otherwise unremarkable ocular history.

  3. Caspase 12 in calnexin-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Groenendyk, Jody; Zuppini, Anna; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2006-11-07

    We investigated a role for calnexin, caspase 12, and Bap31 in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a calnexin-deficient human T cell line (NKR). We showed that calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts are relatively resistant to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Western blot analysis demonstrated that both wild-type and calnexin-deficient cells contained a caspase 12 protein. Caspase 12 expression was slightly inhibited in calnexin-deficient cells, and the protein carried out specific cleavage in the presence of thapsigargin. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that in the endoplasmic reticulum, caspase 12 forms complexes with Bap31 and calnexin. Treatment of wild-type cells with thapsigargin induced apoptosis and cleavage of Bap31. However, in the absence of calnexin, there was no significant cleavage of Bap31. There was also a negligible processing of caspase 8 in these cells. This work indicates that calnexin may play a role in modulating the sensitivity of a cell to apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, in conjunction with caspase 12 and Bap31.

  4. [Limbal stem cell deficiency management. A review].

    PubMed

    Kocaba, V; Damour, O; Auxenfans, C; Burillon, C

    2016-11-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency is predominantly caused by severe eye burns resulting in a decreased or a complete ablation of the regenerative potential of these stem cells. The inability to reconstruct the corneal epithelium further leads conjunctivalization of the gimbal-epithelial barrier. These abnormalities collectively result in the progressive opacification of the cornea responsible for blindness that is driven by chronic corneal ulceration and neovascularization. The underlying pathology of the cornea affects the homeostasis of the neighboring conjunctiva, eyelids, and tear film. Therefore, the ocular reconstruction to treat limbal stem cell deficiency is quite prolonged and involves a continued treatment plan. The management of limbal stem cell deficiency has undergone a multitude of changes over the past several decades. The understanding of limbal anatomy and physiology, as well as therapeutic advances in the stem cell field have propelled the development of new treatments offering new hope to severely disabled patients. Cultivated limbal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial transplantations are therefore viable alternatives that could be utilized for the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency.

  5. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  6. Small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura Qm; Downey, Robert J; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W; Merritt, Robert E; Moran, Cesar A; Niell, Harvey B; O'Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M; Williams, Charles C; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted.

  7. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for CD3δ deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Nufar; Takada, Hidetoshi; Law, Jason; Cowan, Morton J; Gil, Juana; Regueiro, Jose; Lopez de Sabando, Diego Plaza; Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Dalal, Jignesh; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Manfred, Hoenig; Hanson, I. Celine; Grunebaum, Eyal; Shearer, William T; Roifman, Chaim M.

    2012-01-01

    Background CD3δ deficiency is a fatal form of severe combined immunodeficiency which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The presence of a thymus loaded with T cell progenitors in these patients may require special considerations in choosing the regimen of conditioning and the type of HSCT. Objectives To study the outcome of CD3δ deficiency using various modalities of stem cell transplantation. Methods We analyzed data on 13 patients with CD3δ deficiency who underwent HSCT in 7 centers. HSCT was performed using different sources of donor stem cells as well as various conditioning regimens. Results Two patients who received stem cells from matched related donors and survived, both needed substantial conditioning in order to engraft. Only one of six other patients who received a related mismatched donor (MMRD) transplant survived, two of them had no conditioning while the others received various combinations of conditioning regimens. Three other patients received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD), survived and enjoyed full immune reconstitution. Two other patients received unrelated cord blood without conditioning. One of them has had a partial but stable engraftment, while the other engrafted well but is only 12 months after HSCT. We also report here for the first time that patients with CD3δ deficiency can present with typical features of Omenn syndrome. Conclusions HSCT is a successful treatment for patients with CD3δ deficiency. The small number of patients in this report prevent definitive statements on the importance of survival factors, but several are suggested: 1) HLA matched donor transplants are associated with superior reconstitution and survival than mismatched donor transplants; 2) substantial conditioning appears necessary; 3) early diagnosis and absence of opportunistic infections. PMID:21757226

  8. Secretory IgA Deficiency in Individual Small Airways Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation and Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Richmond, Bradley W; Du, Rui-Hong; Cates, Justin M; Wu, Pingsheng; Nian, Hui; Massion, Pierre P; Ware, Lorraine B; Lee, Jae Woo; Kononov, Alexey V; Lawson, William E; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2017-04-15

    Maintenance of a surface immune barrier is important for homeostasis in organs with mucosal surfaces that interface with the external environment; however, the role of the mucosal immune system in chronic lung diseases is incompletely understood. We examined the relationship between secretory IgA (SIgA) on the mucosal surface of small airways and parameters of inflammation and airway wall remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We studied 1,104 small airways (<2 mm in diameter) from 50 former smokers with COPD and 39 control subjects. Small airways were identified on serial tissue sections and examined for epithelial morphology, SIgA, bacterial DNA, nuclear factor-κB activation, neutrophil and macrophage infiltration, and airway wall thickness. Morphometric evaluation of small airways revealed increased mean airway wall thickness and inflammatory cell counts in lungs from patients with COPD compared with control subjects, whereas SIgA level on the mucosal surface was decreased. However, when small airways were classified as SIgA intact or SIgA deficient, we found that pathologic changes were localized almost exclusively to SIgA-deficient airways, regardless of study group. SIgA-deficient airways were characterized by (1) abnormal epithelial morphology, (2) invasion of bacteria across the apical epithelial barrier, (3) nuclear factor-κB activation, (4) accumulation of macrophages and neutrophils, and (5) fibrotic remodeling of the airway wall. Our findings support the concept that localized, acquired SIgA deficiency in individual small airways of patients with COPD allows colonizing bacteria to cross the epithelial barrier and drive persistent inflammation and airway wall remodeling, even after smoking cessation.

  9. Mast cell deficiency exacerbates inflammatory bowel symptoms in interleukin-10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanying; Xue, Yansong; Wang, Hui; Huang, Yan; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test the role of mast cells in gut inflammation and colitis using interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice as an experimental model. METHODS: Mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice were crossbred with IL-10-deficient mice to obtain double knockout (DKO) mice. The growth, mucosal damage and colitis status of DKO mice were compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates. RESULTS: DKO mice exhibited exacerbated colitis compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates, as shown by increased pathological score, higher myeloperoxidase content, enhanced Th1 type pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory signaling, elevated oxidative stress, as well as pronounced goblet cell loss. In addition, deficiency in mast cells resulted in enhanced mucosal damage, increased gut permeability, and impaired epithelial tight junctions. Mast cell deficiency was also linked to systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by higher serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ in DKO mice than that in IL-10-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Mast cell deficiency in IL-10-deficient mice resulted in systematic and gut inflammation, impaired gut barrier function, and severer Th1-mediated colitis when compared to mice with only IL-10-deficiency. Inflammation and impaired gut epithelial barrier function likely form a vicious cycle to worsen colitis in the DKO mice. PMID:25083083

  10. Erythropoietin and small molecule agonists of the tissue-protective erythropoietin receptor increase FXN expression in neuronal cells in vitro and in Fxn-deficient KIKO mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miller, James L; Rai, Myriam; Frigon, Normand L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Punnonen, Juha; Spencer, Jeffrey R

    2017-09-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by reduced levels of the mitochondrial protein frataxin (FXN). Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) increased FXN protein in vitro and in early clinical studies, while no published reports evaluate rhEPO in animal models of FA. STS-E412 and STS-E424 are novel small molecule agonists of the tissue-protective, but not the erythropoietic EPO receptor. We find that rhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 increase FXN expression in vitro and in vivo. RhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 increase FXN by up to 2-fold in primary human cortical cells and in retinoic-acid differentiated murine P19 cells. In primary human cortical cells, the increase in FXN protein was accompanied by an increase in FXN mRNA, detectable within 4 h. RhEPO and low nanomolar concentrations of STS-E412 and STS-E424 also increase FXN in normal and FA patient-derived PBMC by 20%-40% within 24 h, an effect that was comparable to that by HDAC inhibitor 4b. In vivo, STS-E412 increased Fxn mRNA and protein in wild-type C57BL6/j mice. RhEPO, STS-E412, and STS-E424 increase FXN expression in the heart of FXN-deficient KIKO mice. In contrast, FXN expression in the brains of KIKO mice increased following treatment with STS-E412 and STS-E424, but not following treatment with rhEPO. Unexpectedly, rhEPO-treated KIKO mice developed severe splenomegaly, while no splenomegaly was observed in STS-E412- or STS-E424-treated mice. RhEPO, STS-E412 and STS-E424 upregulate FXN expression in vitro at equal efficacy, however, the effects of the small molecules on FXN expression in the CNS are superior to rhEPO in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth as a cause of lactase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, N A; Ruchkina, I N; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L

    2015-01-01

    To establish the rate of lactase deficiency (LD) in patients with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), to define a role of enteric bacteria in the pathogenesis of hypolactasia, and to evaluate the efficiency of probiotic therapy. Examinations were made in 386 patients with PI-IBS, including 112 (79.4%) women; mean age 33.9 ± 9.1 years; disease duration 2.6 ± 1.4 years. Rapid tests of small intestinal mucosa (SIM) biopsy specimens obtained from the duodenal retrobulbar segment were used to diagnose LD. Bacterial growth was estimated by a hydrogen breath test using a H2 MICRO gas analyzer. The patients with PI-IBS were revealed to have moderate and severe LD in 25.6 and 10.9%, respectively. All the patients with LD were detected to have small intestinal (SI) bacterial overgrowth (BOG). An inverse correlation was found between LD and the degree of SI BOG (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). 73.7% of the patients with moderate LD showed a positive effect of probiotic therapy as regression of clinical symptoms of LD, a decrease of hydrogen levels in expired air from 72.4 ± 25.1 to 16.41 ± 3.2 ppm (p < 0.05), an increase of lactate activity in the SIM biopsy specimens and an improvement of quality of life from 2.69 ± 0.53 to 5.53 ± 0.64 scores according to the GCI scale. No improvement occurred in 73.8% of the patients with severe LD. LD was identified in 36.5% of the patients with PI-IBS. There was an inverse correlation between the degree of LD and SI BOG. The good therapeutic effect of probiotics in LD suggests that the symbiotic gut microflora positively affects the activity of lactase in the human SIM. No therapeutic effect of probiotics in patients with severe LN serves as the basis for a search for more active probiotic therapy.

  12. Zinc Deficiency and Microtubule Function in Prostate Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    in rat models of zinc deficiency with no reported change between control and deficient conditions [Oteiza et al., 1990]. However, microtubule...polymerization rates were decreased in zinc deficient rats in that study. The authors suggested that zinc deficiency might cause a change in the expression of...spermatozoan motility I. Distribution of iron, zinc and copper in sea urchin spermatozoa . 1972 Exp Cell Res. 70(2):311-316, 1972. Oteiza PI, Hurley LS

  13. In HepG2 cells, coexisting carnitine deficiency masks important indicators of marginal biotin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy. In this study we hypothesized that coexisting carnitine deficiency can prevent the increase in 3HIAc due to biotin deficiency. We used a 2-factor nutrient depletion design to induce isolated and combined biotin and carnitine deficiency in HepG2 cells and then repleted cells with carnitine. To elucidate the metabolic pathogenesis, we quantitated intracellular and extracellular free carnitine, acylcarnitines, and acylcarnitine ratios using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Relative to biotin-sufficient, carnitine-sufficient cells, intracellular acetylcarnitine increased by 90%, propionylcarnitine more than doubled, and 3HIAc increased by >10-fold in biotin-deficient, carnitine-sufficient (BDCS) cells, consistent with a defensive mechanism in which biotin-deficient cells transesterify the acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates of the biotin-dependent carboxylases to the related acylcarnitines. Likewise, in BDCS cells, the ratio of acetylcarnitine to malonylcarnitine and the ratio of propionylcarnitine to methylmalonylcarnitine both more than tripled, and the ratio of 3HIAc to 3-methylglutarylcarnitine (MGc) increased by >10-fold. In biotin-deficient, carnitine-deficient (BDCD) cells, the 3 substrate-derived acylcarnitines changed little, but the substrate:product ratios were masked to a lesser extent. Moreover, carnitine repletion unmasked biotin deficiency in BDCD cells as shown by increases in acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and 3HIAc (each increased by >50-fold). Likewise, ratios of acetylcarnitine:malonylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine:methylmalonylcarnitine, and 3HIAc:MGc all increased by >8-fold. Our findings provide strong

  14. Effect of iron and protein deficiency on the expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis from the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, T D; Davis, A E; Cummins, A G; Duncombe, V M; Kelly, J D

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between iron deficiency and protein deficiency and infestation of the rat with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was investigated. There was a significant delay in the expulsion of N. brasiliensis from the small intestine of both iron deficient and protein deficient animals and those with a combined deficiency of iron and protein. Iron repletion returned the time of worm expulsion to normal and this would appear to be related to iron deficiency per se rather than to anaemia. Antibody initiated damage to worms was normal in the control animals and in animals with nutritional deficiencies. This suggests that the defect in worm expulsion occurs either in the cell-mediated immune system or in one of the other mediators of expulsion. Extrapolation to the human situation has important therapeutic implications in that iron and protein deficiency may play an important role in the perpetuation of helminth infestations. Thus, to be successful antihelminth therapy should be accompanied by iron and protein supplementation. PMID:558135

  15. GREG cells, a dysferlin-deficient myogenic mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Glen W.; Mekhedov, Elena; Blank, Paul S.; Morree, Antoine de; Pekkurnaz, Gulcin; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-15

    The dysferlinopathies (e.g. LGMD2b, Myoshi myopathy) are progressive, adult-onset muscle wasting syndromes caused by mutations in the gene coding for dysferlin. Dysferlin is a large ({approx} 200 kDa) membrane-anchored protein, required for maintenance of plasmalemmal integrity in muscle fibers. To facilitate analysis of dysferlin function in muscle cells, we have established a dysferlin-deficient myogenic cell line (GREG cells) from the A/J mouse, a genetic model for dysferlinopathy. GREG cells have no detectable dysferlin expression, but proliferate normally in growth medium and fuse into functional myotubes in differentiation medium. GREG myotubes exhibit deficiencies in plasma membrane repair, as measured by laser wounding in the presence of FM1-43 dye. Under the wounding conditions used, the majority ({approx} 66%) of GREG myotubes lack membrane repair capacity, while no membrane repair deficiency was observed in dysferlin-normal C2C12 myotubes, assayed under the same conditions. We discuss the possibility that the observed heterogeneity in membrane resealing represents genetic compensation for dysferlin deficiency.

  16. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  17. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M; Sinha, Ghanshyam P; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M; Belyantseva, Inna A; Anderson, James M; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-09-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Beta Cell Deficient Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Baqiyyah; Innes, Karen E; Long, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) are synthetic hydrocarbons shown to preserve pancreatic islet cell viability and reduce islet cell hypoxia and apoptosis. We investigated the relationship of serum PFAS with diabetes, and whether this varied by diabetes type. Methods 6,460 individuals with and 60,439 without diabetes from the C8 Health Project, were categorized into three groups: Type 1 (n=820), Type 2 (n=4,291), or Uncategorized diabetes (n=1,349, missing data on diabetes type or diabetes based on blood sugar at study entry). Four PFAS were investigated: perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluoroctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoroctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononaoic acid (PFNA). Results PFAS levels were significantly lower in those with diabetes, and lowest in those with Type 1 diabetes. In age and sex adjusted analyses, ORs (CI) for Type 1, Type 2, and Uncategorized diabetes compared to no diabetes were 0.59 (0.54–0.64), 0.74 (0.71–0.77), 0.84 (0.78–0.90) respectively for PFHxS; 0.69 (0.65–0.74), 0.87 (0.89–0.91), 0.92 (0.88–0.97) respectively for PFOA; 0.65 (0.61–0.70), 0.86 (0.82–0.90), 0.93 (0.86–1.03) respectively for PFOS; and 0.65 (0.57–0.74), 0.94 (0.88–1.00), 0.95 (0.85–1.06), respectively for PFNA. Further adjustment for eGFR and other covariates did not eliminate these inverse associations. Conclusions PFAS levels were negatively associated with diabetes. This inverse relationship was strongest for Type 1 diabetes, suggesting the relationship with serum PFAS may vary with the severity of islet cell deficiency. PMID:27311784

  19. Selenoprotein O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jidong; Fei, Yao; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2016-10-01

    Selenoprotein O (Sel O) is a selenium-containing protein, but its function is still unclear. In the present study, we observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Sel O increased during chondrogenic induction of ATDC5 cells. The effects of Sel O on chondrocyte differentiation were then examined through shRNA-mediated gene silencing technique. The expression of Sel O was significantly suppressed at both mRNA and protein levels in a stable cell line transfected with a Sel O-specific target shRNA construct. Thereafter, we demonstrated that Sel O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Sel O deficiencies inhibited expression of chondrogenic gene Sox9, Col II, and aggrecan. Sel O-deficient cells also accumulated a few cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, Sel O deficiencies inhibited chondrocyte proliferation through delayed cell cycle progression by suppression of cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, Sel O deficiencies induced chondrocyte death through cell apoptosis. In summary, we describe the expression patterns and the essential roles of Sel O in chondrocyte viability, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. Additionally, Sel O deficiency-mediated impaired chondrogenesis may illustrate the mechanisms of Se deficiency in the pathophysiological process of the endemic osteoarthropathy.

  20. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  1. Cell Lineage metastability in Gfi1-deficient mouse intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bjerknes, Matthew; Cheng, Hazel

    2010-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms determining multipotent progenitor cell fate remains a fundamental project of contemporary biology. Various tissues of mice and men with defects in the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Gfi1 have dramatic perturbations in the proportions of their differentiated cell types. In Gfi1-deficient intestinal epithelium there is a shift from mucous and Paneth towards enteroendocrine cells, leading to the proposal that Gfi1 functions in the allocation of the progeny derived from a hypothetical common granulocytic progenitor. However, studies of clones have yielded no evidence of such a common progenitor prompting us to investigate alternate mechanisms explaining the Gfi1-deficient phenotype. We report that mucous and Paneth but not enteroendocrine lineage cells normally express Gfi1. Sporadic mucous and Paneth lineage cells in the crypts of Gfi1-deficient mice aberrantly express the pro-enteroendocrine transcription factor Neurog3, indicating that stable repression of Neurog3 in these lineages requires Gfi1. Importantly, we also find mucous and Paneth lineage cells in various stages of cellular reprogramming into the enteroendocrine lineage in Gfi1-deficient mice. We propose that mucous and Paneth cell lineage metastability, rather than reallocation at the level of a hypothetical common granulocytic progenitor, is responsible for the shifts in cell type proportions observed in Gfi1-deficient intestinal epithelium. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  3. Frequent Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency in Mixed Endometrioid and Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Endometrium.

    PubMed

    Köbel, Martin; Tessier-Cloutier, Basile; Leo, Joyce; Hoang, Lien N; Gilks, C Blake; Soslow, Robert A; Delair, Deborah; Stewart, Colin J R; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-20

    Mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma of the endometrium refers to a scenario in which the tumor exhibits histologic features of both endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma. We observed a tendency for these tumors to occur in a mismatch repair (MMR) protein-deficient molecular background in a prior study that examined a small cohort of mixed-type endometrial carcinomas. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of MMR protein deficiency in a larger series of endometrial mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas, through a retrospective survey of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 expression in such tumors at 5 tertiary centers. A total of 41 cases were identified and 27 (66%) tumors demonstrated MMR protein deficiency with a comparable frequency across the contributing centers (ranging from 56% to 83%). Among the MMR protein-deficient cases, 59% showed concurrent MLH1 and PMS2 loss, 33% showed concurrent MSH2 and MSH6 loss, and 4% showed isolated PMS2 or MSH6 loss. Compared with a previously published series of 15 pure endometrial clear cell carcinomas, mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas are associated with significantly better disease-specific survival (P=0.02). In summary, endometrial carcinomas with mixed endometrioid and clear cell histology are frequently MMR protein deficient. This finding has implications both for our understanding of its tumor biology and for the identification of patients with potential Lynch syndrome.

  4. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O.; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf; Augsburger, Marc; Paganetti, Harald; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Pruschy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  5. Numb-deficient satellite cells have regeneration and proliferation defects

    PubMed Central

    George, Rajani M.; Biressi, Stefano; Beres, Brian J.; Rogers, Erik; Mulia, Amanda K.; Allen, Ronald E.; Rawls, Alan; Rando, Thomas A.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    The adaptor protein Numb has been implicated in the switch between cell proliferation and differentiation made by satellite cells during muscle repair. Using two genetic approaches to ablate Numb, we determined that, in its absence, muscle regeneration in response to injury was impaired. Single myofiber cultures demonstrated a lack of satellite cell proliferation in the absence of Numb, and the proliferation defect was confirmed in satellite cell cultures. Quantitative RT-PCR from Numb-deficient satellite cells demonstrated highly up-regulated expression of p21 and Myostatin, both inhibitors of myoblast proliferation. Transfection with Myostatin-specific siRNA rescued the proliferation defect of Numb-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Numb in satellite cells inhibited Myostatin expression. These data indicate a unique function for Numb during the initial activation and proliferation of satellite cells in response to muscle injury. PMID:24170859

  6. Replication Fork Stability Confers Chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A.; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Panzarino, Nicholas J.; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M.; de Ruiter, Julian R.; Daniel, Jeremy A.; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K.; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-01-01

    Brca1- and Brca2-deficient cells have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore HR activity at DSBs. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARPi and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork (RF) protection in Brca2-deficient tumor cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of RF protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumor cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  7. Small intestinal lymphoma in three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Bridges, N; Feiner, H D; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of small bowel lymphoma in young homosexual men are presented. All three had acquired immune deficiency syndrome as demonstrated by demography, sexual history, cachexia, opportunistic infections by Cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis carinii, atypical Mycobacterium, Candida, and/or evidence of immune deficiency, such as skin test anergy, lymphopenia, inversion of T-helper/T-suppressor ratio, and diminished lymphocyte response to either phytohemmaglutinin or pokeweed mitogen. All had peripheral and/or abdominal lymphadenopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms, e.g., diarrhea, spasms, constipation, and oral candidiasis. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made at laparotomy in all cases. All three had complete removal of localized tumor (stage Ie or IIe), yet died within 6 months of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Thus gastrointestinal complaints may not always be related to "gay bowel" syndrome, or other infectious diseases in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Small intestinal lymphoma should be added to the list of neoplasms to which this group is susceptible.

  8. Biallelic IRF8 Mutations Causing NK Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    López-Soto, Alejandro; Lorenzo-Herrero, Seila; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2017-03-01

    Human primary immunodeficiencies result in an exacerbated susceptibility to contracting infectious diseases. Recent work by Mace et al., published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, unveils a novel genetic cause for the development of familial natural killer (NK) cell deficiency: a biallelic compound heterozygous mutation in IRF8, which leads to impaired NK cell development and cytotoxic activity.

  9. TRAF2 deficiency in B lymphocytes predisposes to chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma in mice1

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Llobet, David; Pardo, Constanza; Pindado, Jose; Choi, Yongwon; Reed, John C.; Zapata, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that transgenic mice expressing in B lymphocytes both BCL-2 and a TRAF2 mutant lacking the RING and zinc finger domains (TRAF2DN) develop small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with high incidence. Further analysis of the expression of TRAF2 and TRAF2DN in purified B cells demonstrated that expression of both endogenous TRAF2 and transgenic TRAF2DN was negligible in Traf2DN-tg B cells compared to wild-type mice. This was the result of proteasome-dependent degradation, and rendered TRAF2DN B cells as bona fide TRAF2 deficient B cells. Similar to B cells with targeted Traf2 deletion, Traf2DN-tg mice show expanded marginal zone (MZ) B cell population and have constitutive p100 NF- κ B2 processing. Also, TRAF3, XIAP and Bcl-XL expression levels were increased, while cIAP1/2 levels were drastically reduced compared to those found in wild-type B cells. Moreover, consistent with previous results, we also show that TRAF2 was required for efficient JNK and ERK activation in response to CD40 engagement. However, TRAF2 was deleterious for BCR-mediated activation of these kinases. In contrast, TRAF2 deficiency had no effect on CD40-mediated p38 MAPK activation but significantly reduced BCR-mediated p38 activation. Finally, we further confirm that TRAF2 was required for CD40-mediated proliferation, but its absence relieved B cells of the need for BAFF for survival. Altogether, our results suggest that TRAF2 deficiency cooperates with BCL-2 in promoting CLL/SLL in mice, possibly by specifically enforcing MZ B cell accumulation, increasing XIAP expression, and rendering B cells independent of BAFF for survival. PMID:22711886

  10. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery.

    PubMed

    Jorrisch, Melissa H; Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2013-04-15

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B), we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  11. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit Localization in Response to Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M; Zhang, Caiguo; Wu, Xiaorong; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Puig, Sergi

    2016-04-29

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in eukaryotes. Living organisms have developed multiple strategies to tightly modulate RNR function to avoid inadequate or unbalanced deoxyribonucleotide pools that cause DNA damage and genome instability. Yeast cells activate RNR in response to genotoxic stress and iron deficiency by facilitating redistribution of its small heterodimeric subunit Rnr2-Rnr4 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it forms an active holoenzyme with large Rnr1 subunit. Dif1 protein inhibits RNR by promoting nuclear import of Rnr2-Rnr4. Upon DNA damage, Dif1 phosphorylation by the Dun1 checkpoint kinase and its subsequent degradation enhances RNR function. In this report, we demonstrate that Dun1 kinase triggers Rnr2-Rnr4 redistribution to the cytoplasm in response to iron deficiency. We show that Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization by low iron requires Dun1 kinase activity and phosphorylation site Thr-380 in the Dun1 activation loop, but not the Dun1 forkhead-associated domain. By using different Dif1 mutant proteins, we uncover that Dun1 phosphorylates Dif1 Ser-104 and Thr-105 residues upon iron scarcity. We observe that the Dif1 phosphorylation pattern differs depending on the stimuli, which suggests different Dun1 activating pathways. Importantly, the Dif1-S104A/T105A mutant exhibits defects in nucleus-to-cytoplasm redistribution of Rnr2-Rnr4 by iron limitation. Taken together, these results reveal that, in response to iron starvation, Dun1 kinase phosphorylates Dif1 to stimulate Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization to the cytoplasm and promote RNR function.

  12. Maternal zinc deficiency, but not copper deficiency or diabetes, results in increased embryonic cell death in the rat: implications for mechanisms underlying abnormal development.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M A; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Rucker, R B; Rogers, J M; Keen, C L

    1995-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of maternal copper deficiency, zinc deficiency, and diabetes are largely unknown. Here we investigated whether these insults are associated with altered patterns of cell death in gestation day (GD) 11.0 rat embryos. Four weeks prior to mating, rats in the copper-deficient group (CuD) were fed a copper-deficient diet supplemented with the chelator, triethylenetetramine, to facilitate the depletion of tissue copper stores. Rats in this group were switched to a triethylenetetramine-free copper-deficient diet 1 week prior to mating. Dams in the diabetic and control groups were fed a control (8 micrograms copper, 25 micrograms zinc/g) diet throughout the study. On GD 3.0, one subset of the control dams was assigned to the zinc-deficient group (ZnD) and fed a zinc-deficient diet. A second subset of control dams was assigned to a restricted fed group and fed the control diet in quantities consumed by the zinc-deficient dams. Litters were taken by cesarean section on GD 11.0. Embryos were examined for gross morphology and assessed for patterns of cell death using Nile blue sulfate. Embryos from the CuD dams were characterized by edematous hindbrain. Embryos from the diabetic group were characterized by delayed development. Altered patterns of cell death were only detected in embryos from the ZnD dams. Within the ZnD group, embryos were either characterized by small size, edematous head region, and control patterns of cell death, or normal size, normal morphology, and increased cell death. These different patterns of morphology and cell death in the embryos of ZnD dams were associated with different patterns of maternal food intake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Generation of Peroxisome-Deficient Somatic Animal Cell Mutants.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Kanji; Fujiki, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    Cell mutants with a genetic defect affecting various cellular phenotypes are widely utilized as a powerful tool in genetic, biochemical, and cell biological research. More than a dozen complementation groups of animal somatic mutant cells defective in peroxisome biogenesis have been successfully isolated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and used as a model system reflecting fatal human severe genetic disorders named peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD). Isolation and characterization of peroxisome-deficient CHO cell mutants has allowed the identification of PEX genes and the gene products peroxins, which directly leads to the accomplishment of isolation of pathogenic genes responsible for human PBDs, as well as elucidation of their functional roles in peroxisome biogenesis. Here, we describe the procedure to isolate peroxisome-deficient mammalian cell mutants from CHO cells, by making use of an effective, photo-sensitized selection method.

  14. Partial MCM4 deficiency in patients with growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gineau, Laure; Cognet, Céline; Kara, Nihan; Lach, Francis Peter; Dunne, Jean; Veturi, Uma; Picard, Capucine; Trouillet, Céline; Eidenschenk, Céline; Aoufouchi, Said; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Smith, Owen; Geissmann, Frédéric; Feighery, Conleth; Abel, Laurent; Smogorzewska, Agata; Stillman, Bruce; Vivier, Eric; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes that exert potent and nonredundant antiviral activity and antitumoral activity in the mouse; however, their function in host defense in humans remains unclear. Here, we investigated 6 related patients with autosomal recessive growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and a selective NK cell deficiency characterized by a lack of the CD56dim NK subset. Using linkage analysis and fine mapping, we identified the disease-causing gene, MCM4, which encodes a component of the MCM2-7 helicase complex required for DNA replication. A splice-site mutation in the patients produced a frameshift, but the mutation was hypomorphic due to the creation of two new translation initiation methionine codons downstream of the premature termination codon. The patients’ fibroblasts exhibited genomic instability, which was rescued by expression of WT MCM4. These data indicate that the patients’ growth retardation and adrenal insufficiency likely reflect the ubiquitous but heterogeneous impact of the MCM4 mutation in various tissues. In addition, the specific loss of the NK CD56dim subset in patients was associated with a lower rate of NK CD56bright cell proliferation, and the maturation of NK CD56bright cells toward an NK CD56dim phenotype was tightly dependent on MCM4-dependent cell division. Thus, partial MCM4 deficiency results in a genetic syndrome of growth retardation with adrenal insufficiency and selective NK deficiency. PMID:22354167

  15. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. Complementation of multiple sulfatase deficiency in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fedde, K; Horwitz, A L

    1984-05-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited disorder characterized by deficient activity of seven different sulfatases. Genetic complementation for steroid sulfatase (STS), arylsulfatase A, and N-acetylgalactosamine 6-SO4 sulfatase was demonstrated in somatic cell hybrids between MSD fibroblasts and mouse cells ( LA9 ) or Chinese hamster cells ( CHW ). In an electrophoretic system that separates human and rodent STS isozymes, enzyme from hybrids migrated as human enzyme. We concluded that the rodent cell complemented the MSD deficiency and allowed normal expression of the STS structural gene. Some MSD- LA9 hybrids showed significant levels of human arylsulfatase A activity, as shown by the immunoprecipitation of active enzyme by human-specific antiserum. Complementation was also suggested for N-acetylgalactosamine 6- sulfatate sulfatase (GalNAc-6S sulfatase) in several MSD- LA9 hybrids by the demonstration of a significant increase in activity (10-fold) over that of the GalNAc-6S sulfatase-deficient parental mouse and MSD cells. Thus, it was possible to demonstrate complementation for more than one sulfatase in a single MSD-rodent hybrid. Normal levels of sulfatase activity in hybrids indicate that the sulfatase structural genes are intact in MSD cells.

  19. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  20. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  1. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  2. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  3. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    PubMed

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  4. Copper Redistribution in Atox1-deficient Mouse Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Reagan; Lai, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative SXRF imaging of adherent mouse fibroblast cells deficient in Atox1, a metallochaperone protein responsible for delivering copper (Cu) to cuproenzymes in the trans-Golgi network, revealed striking differences in the subcellular Cu distribution compared to wildtype cells. While the latter showed a pronounced perinculear localization of Cu, the Atox1-deficient cells displayed a mostly unstructured and diffuse distribution throughout the entire cell body. Comparison of the SXRF elemental maps for Zn and Fe of the same samples showed no marked differences between the two cell lines. The data underscore the importance of Atox1, not only as a metallochaperone for delivering Cu to cuproenzymes, but also as a key player in maintaining the proper distribution and organization of Cu at the cellular level. PMID:19865834

  5. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  6. ATM-deficiency sensitizes Mantle Cell Lymphoma cells to PARP-1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chris T.; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G.; Zamò, Alberto; O’Connor, Mark J.; Bebb, D. Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept, termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) gene is altered in a number of human cancers including Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition, than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (previously known as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumour growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells, while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  7. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  8. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  9. B-cell deficiency and severe autoimmunity caused by deficiency of protein kinase C δ.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Klaver, Stefanie; Ban, Sol A; Emminger, Wolfgang; Prengemann, Nina Kathrin; Garncarz, Wojciech; Müllauer, Leonhard; Kain, Renate; Boztug, Heidrun; Heitger, Andreas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Eitelberger, Franz; Seidel, Markus G; Holter, Wolfgang; Pollak, Arnold; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Boztug, Kaan

    2013-04-18

    Primary B-cell disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of inherited immunodeficiencies, often associated with autoimmunity causing significant morbidity. The underlying genetic etiology remains elusive in the majority of patients. In this study, we investigated a patient from a consanguineous family suffering from recurrent infections and severe lupuslike autoimmunity. Immunophenotyping revealed progressive decrease of CD19(+) B cells, a defective class switch indicated by low numbers of IgM- and IgG-memory B cells, as well as increased numbers of CD21(low) B cells. Combined homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a biallelic splice-site mutation in protein C kinase δ (PRKCD), causing the absence of the corresponding protein product. Consequently, phosphorylation of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate was decreased, and mRNA levels of nuclear factor interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-6 were increased. Our study uncovers human PRKCD deficiency as a novel cause of common variable immunodeficiency-like B-cell deficiency with severe autoimmunity.

  10. Autophagy regulates pancreatic beta cell death in response to Pdx1 deficiency and nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kei; Hanson, Piia T; Tran, Hung; Ford, Eric L; Han, Zhiqiang; Johnson, James D; Schmidt, Robert E; Green, Karen G; Wice, Burton M; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2009-10-02

    There are three types of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. The possibility that activation of the macroautophagy (autophagy) pathway may increase beta cell death is addressed in this study. Increased autophagy was present in pancreatic islets from Pdx1(+/-) mice with reduced insulin secretion and beta cell mass. Pdx1 expression was reduced in mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells by delivering small hairpin RNAs using a lentiviral vector. The MIN6 cells died after 7 days of Pdx1 deficiency, and autophagy was evident prior to the onset of cell death. Inhibition of autophagy prolonged cell survival and delayed cell death. Nutrient deprivation increased autophagy in MIN6 cells and mouse and human islets after starvation. Autophagy inhibition partly prevented amino acid starvation-induced MIN6 cell death. The in vivo effects of reduced autophagy were studied by crossing Pdx1(+/-) mice to Becn1(+/-) mice. After 1 week on a high fat diet, 4-week-old Pdx1(+/-) Becn1(+/-) mice showed normal glucose tolerance, preserved beta cell function, and increased beta cell mass compared with Pdx1(+/-) mice. This protective effect of reduced autophagy had worn off after 7 weeks on a high fat diet. Increased autophagy contributes to pancreatic beta cell death in Pdx1 deficiency and following nutrient deprivation. The role of autophagy should be considered in studies of pancreatic beta cell death and diabetes and as a target for novel therapeutic intervention.

  11. In HepG2 Cells, Coexisting Carnitine Deficiency Masks Important Indicators of Marginal Biotin Deficiency123

    PubMed Central

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy. Objective: In this study we hypothesized that coexisting carnitine deficiency can prevent the increase in 3HIAc due to biotin deficiency. Methods: We used a 2-factor nutrient depletion design to induce isolated and combined biotin and carnitine deficiency in HepG2 cells and then repleted cells with carnitine. To elucidate the metabolic pathogenesis, we quantitated intracellular and extracellular free carnitine, acylcarnitines, and acylcarnitine ratios using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Relative to biotin-sufficient, carnitine-sufficient cells, intracellular acetylcarnitine increased by 90%, propionylcarnitine more than doubled, and 3HIAc increased by >10-fold in biotin-deficient, carnitine-sufficient (BDCS) cells, consistent with a defensive mechanism in which biotin-deficient cells transesterify the acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates of the biotin-dependent carboxylases to the related acylcarnitines. Likewise, in BDCS cells, the ratio of acetylcarnitine to malonylcarnitine and the ratio of propionylcarnitine to methylmalonylcarnitine both more than tripled, and the ratio of 3HIAc to 3-methylglutarylcarnitine (MGc) increased by >10-fold. In biotin-deficient, carnitine-deficient (BDCD) cells, the 3 substrate-derived acylcarnitines changed little, but the substrate:product ratios were masked to a lesser extent. Moreover, carnitine repletion unmasked biotin deficiency in BDCD cells as shown by increases in acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and 3HIAc (each increased by >50-fold). Likewise, ratios of acetylcarnitine:malonylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine:methylmalonylcarnitine, and 3HIAc:MGc all increased

  12. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  13. Acquired factor VII deficiency in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Toor, A A; Slungaard, A; Hedner, U; Weisdorf, D J; Key, N S

    2002-03-01

    Acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency in the absence of vitamin K deficiency, oral anticoagulant therapy, synthetic liver dysfunction, or DIC is rare, with only a handful of cases thus far reported. In the period from 1990 to 1996 we identified eight patients with acquired FVII deficiency, all of whom presented with prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) in the first 2 weeks following stem cell transplantation (SCT). The mean plasma FVII clotting activity (FVII:c) was 22% (range 8-35%) with an approximately equivalent reduction in FVII antigen (FVII:Ag) level. Mean plasma levels of fibrinogen and factors II, V, IX, and X were normal. Protein C activity was significantly depressed in only one of the three patients in whom it was measured. Several patients experienced bleeding complications, and hemorrhage directly accounted for death in two cases. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver developed in three patients. We conclude that FVII deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged PT in patients who have recently undergone SCT. The mechanism of this acquired deficiency state remains to be defined.

  14. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  15. α-Catenin-Deficient F9 Cells Differentiate into Signet Ring Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeno, Yoshito; Moroi, Seiji; Nagashima, Hirotaka; Noda, Tetsuo; Shiozaki, Hitoshi; Monden, Morito; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Nagafuchi, Akira

    1999-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that α-catenin is frequently lost in diffuse type adenocarcinomas. We have isolated α-catenin-deficient mouse teratocarcinoma F9 cells by gene targeting. Wild-type F9 cell aggregates cultured in the presence of retinoic acid differentiated into embryoid bodies with an outer layer of epithelial cells. In contrast, cell aggregates of α-catenin-deficient cells did not develop outer layers under the same conditions. The outer surface cells of α-catenin-deficient cell aggregates, however, differentiated into epithelial cells as determined by their expression of epithelial marker proteins. These differentiated cells scattered from aggregates and showed signet ring cell morphology, which is frequently observed in diffuse type adenocarcinomas. We have provided clear evidence that a single mutation in the α-catenin gene may be a direct cause not only of the scattered properties of cells but also of signet ring cell formation in diffuse type adenocarcinoma. PMID:10329584

  16. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Narang, Amol K.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Dan; Eckhauser, Fred E.; Olson, Mathew T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Miller, Robert C.; Andersen, Dana K.

    2011-01-01

    Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions' experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients) and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients) were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27–60). All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9–173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation. PMID:21464878

  17. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency. PMID:27708219

  18. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Zhou; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-11-22

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency.

  19. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  20. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  1. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  2. Contact Lens-induced Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Jennifer; Amram, Alec; Milani, Behrad; Park, Dongwook; Harthan, Jennifer; Joslin, Charlotte; McMahon, Timothy; Djalilian, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a pathologic condition caused by the dysfunction and/or destruction of stem cell precursors of the corneal epithelium, typified clinically by corneal conjunctivalization. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss a less well-known cause of limbal stem cell disease: contact lens (CL) wear. A literature search was conducted to include original articles containing patients with CL-induced LSCD. This review describes epidemiology, diagnostic strategies, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and treatment modalities for this condition.

  3. How do plants achieve tolerance to phosphorus deficiency? Small causes with big effects.

    PubMed

    Wissuwa, Matthias

    2003-12-01

    Genotypic differences in phosphorus (P) uptake from P-deficient soils may be due to higher root growth or higher external root efficiency (micrograms of P taken up per square centimeter of root surface area). Both factors are highly interrelated because any additional P provided by externally efficient roots will also stimulate root growth. It will be necessary to separate both factors to identify a primary mechanism to formulate hypotheses on pathways and genes causing genotypic differences in P uptake. For this purpose, a plant growth model was developed for rice (Oryza sativa) grown under highly P-deficient conditions. Model simulations showed that small changes in root growth-related parameters had big effects on P uptake. Increasing root fineness or the internal efficiency for root dry matter production (dry matter accumulated per unit P distributed to roots) by 22% was sufficient to increase P uptake by a factor of three. That same effect could be achieved by a 33% increase in external root efficiency. However, the direct effect of increasing external root efficiency accounted for little over 10% of the 3-fold increase in P uptake. The remaining 90% was due to enhanced root growth as a result of higher P uptake per unit root size. These results demonstrate that large genotypic differences in P uptake from a P-deficient soil can be caused by rather small changes in tolerance mechanisms. Such changes will be particularly difficult to detect for external efficiency because they are likely overshadowed by secondary root growth effects.

  4. Leptin deficiency causes pycnotic change in fetal cingulate cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Jun; Nimura, Masayuki; Kagohashi, Yukiko; Otani, Hiroki

    2006-03-01

    Leptin is an obese gene product, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice develop hyperphagia and reduced locomotor activity. Leptin is thought to be related to brain development, because leptin receptors are widely expressed in the brain, and because brain weight as well as brain protein and DNA contents were reduced in adult ob/ob mice. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on the fetal cingulate cortex, since the leptin receptor is expressed in the neurons of the cingulate cortex, which is involved in emotion as well as in sensory, motor, and cognitive processes. The ob/ob fetuses had more pycnotic cells than wild-type fetuses in the cingulate cortex at embryonic day (E) 18. Many pycnotic cells were observed in the intermediate zone of the cingulate cortex. Most cells observed in this area were neuronal lineage cells, while few undifferentiated cells and oligodendrocyte precursor cells were found. At E18 there was no significant difference in the rostrocaudal length of the corpus callosum, which contains the neuronal projection from the cingulate cortex, between ob/ob and wild-type fetuses. We also showed that the length of the cerebrum was greater and the width of the cerebrum and cerebellum were lesser in ob/ob fetuses than in wild-type at E16. These results suggest an increased cell death in neuronal lineage cells in the intermediate zone of the cingulate cortex in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency may also alter the gross morphology of the brain in development, but not the formation of the corpus callosum.

  5. [Cell biology of respiration-deficient mutants of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Shigeji; Ito-Kuwa, Shoko; Nakamura, Kenjirou; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    Respiration-deficient (petite) mutation is caused by hereditary impairment in mitochondrial functions. Yeasts have been grouped into "petite-positive" and "petite-negative" yeasts. Candida albicans has been regarded as a member of the petite-negative yeasts in which the respiration deficiency cannot be easily induced. We have succeeded in inducing the petite mutation in C. albicans by culturing in the presence of a chemical mutagen, acriflavine, at an elevated temperature. In the present review, we describe the cell biology of C. albicans petite mutants on the basis of experiments performed by our research group: namely, on respiratory activity and cytochrome composition, fine structures of cells and mitochondria, mitochondrial DNA structure, pathogenicity, oxidative stress sensitivity, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the roles of ROS in antifungal actions. We discuss also the usefulness of petite mutants in Candida research.

  6. IRAS colors within M31: Evidence for deficiency of very small grains?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Cong; Helou, George

    1994-01-01

    Significant differences are found in the IRAS color-color diagrams of small regions (2 min x 2 min, or 0.4 x 1.8 kpc) within the disk of M31 compared to Galactic cirrus, most noticeably demonstrated by a trend of low 60 to 100 micrometer surface brightness ratio and high 12 to 25 micrometer ratio. Based on physical arguments, we conclude that these color differences are best explained by assuming that 'very small grains' (VSG; but not polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons) are only half as abundant in M31 as they are in Galactic cirrus. We confirm this conclusion and test its detailed agreement with data by using the phenomenological model of Desert et al. (1990). In particular, we show that the data cannot be explained by postulating weaker UV heating in the disk of M31. We also show that the VSG-deficient model predicts correctly the correspondence between the IRAS colors and the 100 micrometer emissivity per H I atom in the outer disk of M31. 'Very small grains' are a leading candidate for the carrier of the 2175 A bump in the extinction curve. Our suggested VSG deficiency in M31 is thus consistent with recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations which show evidence for a weaker and narrower 2175 A bump on the M31 extinction curve. Some speculation is offered as to possible links between very small grains and the low rate of current star formation in M31.

  7. IRAS colors within M31: Evidence for deficiency of very small grains?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cong; Helou, George

    1994-05-01

    Significant differences are found in the IRAS color-color diagrams of small regions (2 min x 2 min, or 0.4 x 1.8 kpc) within the disk of M31 compared to Galactic cirrus, most noticeably demonstrated by a trend of low 60 to 100 micrometer surface brightness ratio and high 12 to 25 micrometer ratio. Based on physical arguments, we conclude that these color differences are best explained by assuming that 'very small grains' (VSG; but not polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons) are only half as abundant in M31 as they are in Galactic cirrus. We confirm this conclusion and test its detailed agreement with data by using the phenomenological model of Desert et al. (1990). In particular, we show that the data cannot be explained by postulating weaker UV heating in the disk of M31. We also show that the VSG-deficient model predicts correctly the correspondence between the IRAS colors and the 100 micrometer emissivity per H I atom in the outer disk of M31. 'Very small grains' are a leading candidate for the carrier of the 2175 A bump in the extinction curve. Our suggested VSG deficiency in M31 is thus consistent with recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations which show evidence for a weaker and narrower 2175 A bump on the M31 extinction curve. Some speculation is offered as to possible links between very small grains and the low rate of current star formation in M31.

  8. Automatic analysis of image of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Hu, K; Cai, N; Su, W; Xiong, H; Lou, Z; Lin, T; Hu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Some computer applications for cell characterization in medicine and biology, such as analysis of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC (El Tor Vibrio of Cholera), operate with cell samples taken from very small areas of interest. In order to perform texture characterization in such an application, only a few texture operators can be employed: the operators should be insensitive to noise and image distortion and be reliable in order to estimate texture quality from images. Therefore, we introduce wavelet theory and mathematical morphology to analyse the cellular surface micro-area image obtained by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to describe the quality of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC, we propose a fully automatic computerized method. The image analysis process is carried out in two steps. In the first, we decompose the given image by dyadic wavelet transform and form an image approximation with higher resolution, by doing so, we perform edge detection of given images efficiently. In the second, we introduce many operations of mathematical morphology to obtain morphological quantitative parameters of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC. The obtained results prove that the method can eliminate noise, detect the edge and extract the feature parameters validly. In this work, we have built automatic analytic software named "EVC.CELL".

  9. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  10. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  11. Single Cavernous Hemangioma of the Small Bowel Diagnosed by Using Capsule Endoscopy in a Child with Chronic Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Jin; Hwang, Geol; Kang, Hyun Sik; Song, Hyun Joo; Chang, Weon Young; Maeng, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are extremely rare. In particular, the diagnosis of small bowel hemangiomas is very difficult in children. A 13-year-old boy presented at the outpatient clinic with dizziness and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia at 3 years of age and had been treated with iron supplements continuously and pure red cell transfusion intermittently. Laboratory tests indicated that the patient currently had iron-deficiency anemia. There was no evidence of gross bleeding, such as hematemesis or bloody stool. Laboratory findings indicated no bleeding tendency. Gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy results were negative. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent capsule endoscopy. A purplish stalked mass was found in the jejunum, and the mass was excised successfully. We report of a 13-year-old boy who presented with severe and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia caused by a cavernous hemangioma in the small bowel without symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26240811

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and small airways function. Effects of disease activity, smoking, and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mountz, J D; Turner, R A; Collins, R L; Gallup, K R; Semble, E L

    1984-07-01

    The sensitive pulmonary function tests of change in maximum expiratory flow (delta Vmax 50) and volume of isoflow were used to determine the effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), smoking, and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency phenotypes on peripheral airways. Patients were prospectively divided into 4 groups: 14 smokers with RA, 12 nonsmokers with RA, 11 smokers without RA, and 13 nonsmokers without RA. delta Vmax 50 was the most discriminating variable and demonstrated significant small airway obstructive disease in the first 3 groups, with an additive effect in the group of smokers with RA. An increased incidence of the alpha 1-antitrypsin-deficient MS phenotype was seen in the RA smoker group, and this phenotype was associated with severe pulmonary disease.

  13. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Current Treatment Options and Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Haagdorens, Michel; Van Acker, Sara Ilse; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Ní Dhubhghaill, Sorcha; Koppen, Carina; Tassignon, Marie-José; Zakaria, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Severe ocular surface disease can result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a condition leading to decreased visual acuity, photophobia, and ocular pain. To restore the ocular surface in advanced stem cell deficient corneas, an autologous or allogenic limbal stem cell transplantation is performed. In recent years, the risk of secondary LSCD due to removal of large limbal grafts has been significantly reduced by the optimization of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET). Despite the great successes of CLET, there still is room for improvement as overall success rate is 70% and visual acuity often remains suboptimal after successful transplantation. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation reports higher success rates but has not been performed in as many patients yet. This review focuses on limbal epithelial stem cells and the pathophysiology of LSCD. State-of-the-art therapeutic management of LSCD is described, and new and evolving techniques in ocular surface regeneration are being discussed, in particular, advantages and disadvantages of alternative cell scaffolds and cell sources for cell based ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:26788074

  14. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma Frequently Exhibits Lynch Syndrome-associated Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency But Does Not Harbor Sporadic MLH1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Xia, Michelle; Singhi, Aatur D; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2017-07-01

    Universal screening for Lynch syndrome has been advocated for colorectal carcinoma but its utility in small bowel adenocarcinoma has not been reported. We analyzed a consecutive series of 71 small bowel adenocarcinomas identified over an 8-year period for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression to (1) compare the clinicopathologic features of small bowel adenocarcinoma stratified into MMR-deficient (MMRD) and MMR-proficient (MMRP) groups and (2) examine the patterns of MMR protein expression in small bowel adenocarcinoma compared with colorectal carcinoma. Six of 71 (8.5%) small bowel adenocarcinomas and 149 of 1291 (11.5%) colorectal carcinomas demonstrated MMRD. The 6 MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas had the following expression pattern: 3 with concurrent loss of MSH2 and MSH6, 1 with isolated loss of MSH6, and 2 with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 in patients with a family history suggestive of genetic cancer susceptibility. Histopathology suggestive of MMR protein deficiency as proposed by the revised Bethesda guidelines was commonly seen in both MMRP (63%) and MMRD (67%) small bowel adenocarcinomas (P>0.05). MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently demonstrated abnormalities of MSH2 and/or MSH6 (4/6, 67%) compared with MMRD colorectal carcinoma (23/149, 15%) (P=0.01). None of the MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas harbored the BRAF V600E mutation, whereas 60% of MMRD colorectal carcinomas were positive for BRAF V600E with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression. Small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently harbored Lynch syndrome-associated MMRD compared with colorectal carcinoma, providing support for screening of small bowel adenocarcinoma to identify patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. In contrast to colorectal carcinoma, sporadic MLH1 deficiency is not seen in small bowel adenocarcinoma. Clinicopathologic and histologic features do not distinguish between MMRP and MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma indicating that universal screening in small

  15. Deficiency of two red-cell flavin enzymes in a population in Sardinia: was glutathione reductase deficiency specifically selected for by malaria?

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Corda, L; Perry, G M; Pilato, D; Giuberti, M; Vullo, C

    1995-09-01

    In two areas in Italy where malaria was endemic--in the Po delta and Maremma on the west coast--we have found a high prevalence of an inherited flavin-deficient red cell in the normal population, suggesting selection by malaria. This study in Sardinia enabled a direct comparison of red-cell activities of FAD-dependent glutathione reductase (EGR) and FMN-dependent pyridoxine phosphate (PNP) oxidase in an ethnically homogeneous population, between two coastal villages where malaria was endemic from 300 B.C. and two mountain villages with no history of malaria. Both enzyme activities were significantly lower on the coast, and it did not seem that this could be explained by possible small differences in dietary riboflavin. As was thought to be the case in Ferrara and Grosseto, it is probable that a genetically controlled flavin-deficient red cell was selected for by malaria. Low EGR apoenzyme activity was more common on the coast, usually explaining the accompanying low basic EGR activity, and may also have been selected for by malaria. This adds to evidence from others that the mechanism of defence of a flavin-deficient red cell against malaria may be through EGR deficiency. It could also play a part in the protection given by heterozygous beta-thalassemia. The multifactorial protection of the population against malaria is discussed.

  16. Intracranial reticulum cell sarcoma associated with immunoglobulin A deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, M. C.; Hughes, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of a 46 year old woman who died after a five month illness characterized by focal neurological signs, evidence of meningeal irritation, and the finding of `blast' cells in the CSF. Immunoglobulin A was consistently absent from her serum and secretions. Necropsy showed extensive infiltration by a reticulum-cell sarcoma of the subarachnoid space, with tumour nodules on several cranial nerves and tumour infiltration of the tuber cinereum. The significance of the association between immunoglobulin A deficiency and neoplasia is discussed. Images PMID:4356731

  17. Presentation, diagnosis and management of limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sejpal, Kunjal; Bakhtiari, Pejman; Deng, Sophie X

    2013-01-01

    The human corneal surface epithelium is continuously repopulated by the limbal stem cells (LSCs). Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD) can lead to corneal opacity and vascularization, with consequent visual impairment or blindness. Many acquired and congenital diseases can lead to LCSD by direct injury to the LSCs, destruction of LSC niche, or both. Based on the severity of the disease, LSCD can present with various symptoms and signs. Although LSCD can be detected clinically, laboratory tests are necessary to confirm the diagnosis and monitor the disease progression. This article concisely reviews the clinical presentation, techniques for diagnosis and management of LSCD.

  18. Synergistic effect of olaparib with combination of cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Takata, Minoru; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-02-01

    PARP enzyme plays a key role in the cellular machinery responsible for DNA damage repair. PTEN is a tumor-suppressor gene deactivating PI3K downstream of EGFR signaling. We hypothesize that PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells suppressed DNA damage signaling and that the absence of PTEN can sensitize these cells to a concurrent treatment of a DNA-damaging agent (cisplatin) and a PARP inhibitor (olaparib). To investigate the effect of olaparib and cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung tumors, two EGFR-mutant (deletion in exon19) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, PC-9 (PTEN wild-type) and H1650 (PTEN loss), were used. We transfected intact PTEN gene into H1650 cells (H1650(PTEN+)) and knocked down PTEN expression in the PC-9 cells (PC-9(PTEN-)) using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Combination of cisplatin with olaparib showed a synergistic effect in vitro according to the combination index in H1650 cells. Restoration of PTEN in the H1650 cells decreased sensitivity to the combination. Ablation of PTEN in PC-9 cells increased sensitivity to olaparib and cisplatin. We also examined the effectiveness of cisplatin and olaparib in a xenograft model using H1650 and PC-9(PTEN-) cells. The combination of cisplatin with olaparib was more effective than each agent individually. This effect was not observed in a xenograft model using H1650(PTEN+) and PC-9 cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that PTEN deficiency caused reductions in nuclear RAD51 and RPA focus formation and phosphorylated Chk1 and Mre11. Thus, genetic inactivation of PTEN led to the suppression of DNA repair.

  19. T cell immune deficiency in zap70 mutant zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moore, John C; Mulligan, Timothy S; Torres Yordán, Nora; Castranova, Daniel; Pham, Van N; Tang, Qin; Lobbardi, Riadh; Anselmo, Anthony; Liwski, Robert S; Berman, Jason N; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Weinstein, Brant M; Langenau, David M

    2016-09-06

    The zeta-chain (TCR) associated protein kinase 70kDa (ZAP70) is required for T-cell activation. ZAP70 deficiencies in humans and null mutations in mice lead to severe combined immunodeficiency. Here, we describe a zap70 loss-of-function mutation in zebrafish (zap70(y442)) that was created using TALENs. In contrast to what has been reported in morphant zebrafish, zap70(y442) homozygous mutant zebrafish displayed normal development of blood and lymphatic vasculature. Hematopoietic cell development was also largely unaffected in mutant larvae. However, mutant fish had reduced lck:GFP+ thymic T cells by 5 days post-fertilization that persisted into adult stages. Morphological analysis, RNA sequencing and single-cell gene expression profiling of whole kidney marrow cells of adult fish revealed complete loss of mature T cells in zap70(y442) mutant animals. T cell immunodeficiency was confirmed through transplantation of unmatched normal and malignant donor cells into zap70(y442) mutant zebrafish, with T cell loss being sufficient for robust allogeneic cell engraftment. zap70 mutant zebrafish show remarkable conservation of immune cell dysfunction as found in mice and humans and will serve as a valuable model to study zap70 immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Identification of cetrimonium bromide and irinotecan as compounds with synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Michel D; Mendonca, Janet; Kim, Eunice; Kim, Eugene; Shim, Joong S; Kaelber, Nadine S; Kant, Huub; Hammers, Hans; Commes, Therese; Van Diest, Paul J; Liu, Jun O; Kachhap, Sushant K

    2013-05-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a metastasis-suppressor gene in prostate cancer (PCa). Compounds targeting PCa cells deficient in NDRG1 could potentially decrease invasion/metastasis of PCa. A cell based screening strategy was employed to identify small molecules that selectively target NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. DU-145 PCa cells rendered deficient in NDRG1 expression by a lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown strategy were used in the primary screen. Compounds filtered from the primary screen were further validated through proliferation and clonogenic survival assays in parental and NDRG1 knockdown PCa cells. Screening of 3360 compounds revealed irinotecan and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as compounds that exhibited synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. A three-dimensional (3-D) invasion assay was utilized to test the ability of CTAB to inhibit invasion of DU-145 cells. CTAB was found to remarkably decrease invasion of DU-145 cells in collagen matrix. Our results suggest that CTAB and irinotecan could be further explored for their potential clinical benefit in patients with NDRG1 deficient PCa.

  1. Altus small button cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, C.; Bis, F.; Warbutton, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of testing performed on Altus lithium thionyl chloride cells are presented. The test plan followed simulates the mine environment. It involves nondestructive testing, ruggedness testing and destructive testing. The nondestructive testing involves open circuit voltage measurements initially on all the cells, alternating current resistance measurements initially on all the cells and closed circuit voltage pulses, 20s on and 20s through 1000, 100, 10 and 1 ohms at temperatures of -54 to 71 C. The ruggedness testing involves low frequency vibration, high frequency vibration, and two-phase water entry shock at temperatures of -54, 25 and 71 C. It also involves thermal shock tests.

  2. HepG2 cells develop signs of riboflavin deficiency within four days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Ricarda; Manthey, Karoline C.; Griffin, Jacob B.; Zempleni, Janos

    2006-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide are essential coenzymes in redox reactions. For example, flavin adenine dinucleotide is a coenzyme for both glutathione reductase and enzymes that mediate the oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Here we investigated short-term effects of moderately riboflavin-deficient culture medium on flavin-related responses in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. Cells were cultured in riboflavin-deficient (3.1 nmol/L) medium for up to six days; controls were cultured in riboflavin-sufficient (532 nmol/L) medium. The activity of glutathione reductase decreased by 98% within four days of riboflavin-deficient culture. Transport rates of riboflavin increased in response to riboflavin depletion, whereas expression of enzymes mediating flavocoenzyme synthesis (flavokinase and flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetase) decreased in response to depletion. The oxidative folding and synthesis of plasminogen and apolipoprotein B-100, respectively, was impaired within four days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium; this is consistent with impaired processing of secretory proteins in riboflavin-deficient cells. Riboflavin depletion was associated with increased DNA-binding activities of transcription factors with affinity for endoplasmic reticulum stress elements and NF-κB consensus elements, suggesting cell stress. Moreover, the abundance of the stress-induced protein GADD153 was greater in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with controls. Riboflavin deficiency was associated with decreased rates of cell proliferation caused by arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that HepG2 cells have a great demand for riboflavin, and that cell stress develops rapidly if riboflavin supply is marginally low. PMID:16081269

  3. HepG2 cells develop signs of riboflavin deficiency within 4 days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ricarda; Manthey, Karoline C; Griffin, Jacob B; Zempleni, Janos

    2005-10-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are essential coenzymes in redox reactions. For example, FAD is a coenzyme for both glutathione reductase and enzymes that mediate the oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Here we investigated short-term effects of moderately riboflavin-deficient culture medium on flavin-related responses in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. Cells were cultured in riboflavin-deficient (3.1 nmol/l) medium for up to 6 days; controls were cultured in riboflavin-sufficient (532 nmol/l) medium. The activity of glutathione reductase decreased by 98% within 4 days of riboflavin-deficient culture. Transport rates of riboflavin increased in response to riboflavin depletion, whereas expression of enzymes mediating flavocoenzyme synthesis (flavokinase and FAD synthetase) decreased in response to depletion. The oxidative folding and synthesis of plasminogen and apolipoprotein B-100 was impaired within 4 days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium; this is consistent with impaired processing of secretory proteins in riboflavin-deficient cells. Riboflavin depletion was associated with increased DNA-binding activities of transcription factors with affinity for endoplasmic reticulum stress elements and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) consensus elements, suggesting cell stress. Moreover, the abundance of the stress-induced protein GADD153 was greater in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with controls. Riboflavin deficiency was associated with decreased rates of cell proliferation caused by arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that HepG2 cells have a great demand for riboflavin and that cell stress develops rapidly if riboflavin supply is marginally low.

  4. Evidence for Mitochondrial Respiratory Deficiency in Rat Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Vanessa E.; Sabido, Odile; Defour, Aurélia; Castells, Josiane; Lefai, Etienne; Roussel, Damien; Freyssenet, Damien

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondria can sense signals linked to variations in energy demand to regulate nuclear gene expression. This retrograde signaling pathway is presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells are characterized by their failure to both irreversibly exit the cell cycle and complete myogenic differentiation. However, it is currently unknown whether mitochondria are involved in the failure of rhabdomyosarcoma cells to differentiate. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism were studied in rat L6E9 myoblasts and R1H rhabdomyosacoma cells during the cell cycle and after 36 hours of differentiation. Using a combination of flow cytometry, polarographic and molecular analyses, we evidenced a marked decrease in the cardiolipin content of R1H cells cultured in growth and differentiation media, together with a significant increase in the content of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins. Altogether, these data indicate that the mitochondrial inner membrane composition and the overall process of mitochondrial biogenesis are markedly altered in R1H cells. Importantly, the dysregulation of protein-to-cardiolipin ratio was associated with major deficiencies in both basal and maximal mitochondrial respiration rates. This deficiency in mitochondrial respiration probably contributes to the inability of R1H cells to decrease mitochondrial H2O2 level at the onset of differentiation. Conclusion/Significance A defect in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial metabolism may thus be an epigenetic mechanism that may contribute to the tumoral behavior of R1H cells. Our data underline the importance of mitochondria in the regulation of myogenic differentiation. PMID:20072609

  5. Combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency causes cell death in guinea pig skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina E; Motley, Amy K; May, James M; Burk, Raymond F

    2009-03-01

    Combined antioxidant deficiencies of selenium and vitamin E or vitamin E and vitamin C in guinea pigs result in clinical illness. We hypothesized that combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency would have clinical consequences because in vitro interactions of these antioxidant nutrients have been reported. Because guinea pigs are dependent on dietary vitamin C, weanling male guinea pigs were fed selenium-deficient or control diet for 15 weeks before imposing vitamin C deficiency. Four dietary groups were formed and studied 3 weeks later: controls, vitamin C deficient, selenium deficient, and doubly deficient. Deficiencies were confirmed by determinations of glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C concentration in liver and skeletal muscle. Plasma creatine phosphokinase activity and liver, kidney, heart, and quadriceps histopathology were determined. Doubly deficient animals had moderately severe skeletal muscle cell death as judged by histopathology and plasma creatine phosphokinase activity of 6630 +/- 4400 IU/L (control, 70 + or - 5; vitamin C deficient, 95 + or - 110; selenium deficient, 280 + or - 250). Liver, kidney, and heart histology was normal in all groups. Muscle alpha-tocopherol levels were not depressed in the doubly deficient group, but muscle F2 isoprostane concentrations were elevated in them and correlated with markers of cell death. We conclude that combining selenium and vitamin C deficiencies in the guinea pig causes cell death in skeletal muscle that is more severe than the injury caused by selenium deficiency. The elevation of muscle F2 isoprostanes is compatible with the cell death being caused by oxidative stress.

  6. Combined Selenium and Vitamin C Deficiency Causes Cell Death in Guinea Pig Skeletal Muscle1

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; May, James M.; Burk, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Combined antioxidant deficiencies of selenium and vitamin E or vitamin E and vitamin C in guinea pigs result in clinical illness. We hypothesized that combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency would have clinical consequences because in vitro interactions of these antioxidant nutrients have been reported. Since guinea pigs are dependent on dietary vitamin C, weanling male guinea pigs were fed selenium-deficient or control diet for 15 weeks prior to imposing vitamin C deficiency. Four dietary groups were formed and studied 3 weeks later: controls, vitamin C deficient, selenium deficient, and doubly deficient. Deficiencies were confirmed by determinations of glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C concentration in liver and skeletal muscle. Plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity and liver, kidney, heart, and quadriceps histopathology were determined. Doubly deficient animals had moderately severe skeletal muscle cell death as judged by histopathology and plasma CPK activity of 6630 ± 4400 IU/L (control 70 ± 5; vitamin C deficient 95 ± 110; selenium deficient 280 ± 250). Liver, kidney, and heart histology was normal in all groups. Muscle α-tocopherol levels were not depressed in the doubly deficient group but muscle F2 isoprostane concentrations were elevated in them and correlated with markers of cell death. We conclude that combining selenium and vitamin C deficiencies in the guinea pig causes cell death in skeletal muscle that is more severe than the injury caused by selenium deficiency. The elevation of muscle F2 isoprostanes is compatible with the cell death being caused by oxidative stress. PMID:19358936

  7. MORPHOLOGICAL ABERRATION OF ARTHROBACTER GLOBIFORMIS CELLS DUE TO BIOTIN DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    CHAN, E C

    1964-03-01

    Chan, E. C. S. (University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada). Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis cells due to biotin deficiency. J. Bacteriol. 87:641-651. 1964.-Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis strain 425 was shown to occur during growth in a chemically defined medium without added biotin. Such aberrant cells could revert back to normal coccoid forms upon inoculation into fresh medium supplemented with the vitamin. This abnormal cellular development occurred even when there was good growth (turbidity) or increase in total cell mass. Light photomicrographs of negative and cell-wall stains of the organism at different times of the morphological growth cycle are presented in support of these observations. The relationship between cellular aberration and the biochemical role of biotin is briefly discussed.

  8. How Small Is a Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an inquiry-based activity involving yeast, wherein students learned about cell size. The activity allows students to employ math connections and to learn experimental techniques while practicing microscope skills. The activity can be adapted for students at all levels of biology. The author presents details…

  9. How Small Is a Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an inquiry-based activity involving yeast, wherein students learned about cell size. The activity allows students to employ math connections and to learn experimental techniques while practicing microscope skills. The activity can be adapted for students at all levels of biology. The author presents details…

  10. A model of metabolic changes in respiration-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, F Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Cells lacking aerobic metabolism because of damaged mtDNA accumulate in many postmitotic tissues in the course aging. Although being only a small fraction of cells, they might play a major role in oxidative stress affecting the whole body. However, it remains unclear how such cells, which are under normal circumstances dependent on aerobic metabolism, are able to survive for decades in vivo. Here a new model is presented that proposes a coexistence of anaerobic glycolysis and a partly reversed TCA cycle. Succinate plays a key role in the changed metabolic pathways because it has to be exported by the cell. This hypothesis supports the view that some respiration-deficient cells are able to survive permanently within the body and contribute to human aging.

  11. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ehinger, Johannes K.; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J.; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J.; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [13C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Factors Restore Function to Human Frataxin-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Dey, Rimi; Cook, Amelia; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2017-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited neurological disorder characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. At present, no therapy has been shown to reduce disease progression. Strategies being trialled to treat Friedreich's ataxia include drugs that improve mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative injury. In addition, stem cells have been investigated as a potential therapeutic approach. We have used siRNA-induced knockdown of frataxin in SH-SY5Y cells as an in vitro cellular model for Friedreich's ataxia. Knockdown of frataxin protein expression to levels detected in patients with the disorder was achieved, leading to decreased cellular viability, increased susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, dysregulation of key anti-oxidant molecules and deficiencies in both cell proliferation and differentiation. Bone marrow stem cells are being investigated extensively as potential treatments for a wide range of neurological disorders, including Friedreich's ataxia. The potential neuroprotective effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were therefore studied using our frataxin-deficient cell model. Soluble factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells protected against cellular changes induced by frataxin deficiency, leading to restoration in frataxin levels and anti-oxidant defences, improved survival against oxidative stress and stimulated both cell proliferation and differentiation down the Schwann cell lineage. The demonstration that mesenchymal stem cell-derived factors can restore cellular homeostasis and function to frataxin-deficient cells further suggests that they may have potential therapeutic benefits for patients with Friedreich's ataxia.

  13. Runx1 Deficiency Decreases Ribosome Biogenesis and Confers Stress Resistance to Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R; Gilliland, D Gary; Mason, Philip J; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A

    2015-08-06

    The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating preleukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counterintuitively, that Runx1-deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins and binds the rDNA repeats. Runx1-deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and ER stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1-deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Immortalization and characterization of a cell line exhibiting a severe multiple sulphatase deficiency phenotype.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K; Bielicki, J; Anson, D S

    1997-08-15

    Multiple sulphatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare genetic defect that causes a simultaneous deficiency of all known sulphatases. All available evidence suggests that the deficient gene product is normally responsible for the post-translational modification of a conserved cysteine residue to 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid and that this modification is necessary for sulphatase activity. MSD often has an enzymically mild phenotype, with significant levels of residual sulphatase activity being detectable. Here we identify an MSD cell line in which the residual activity of the sulphatases assayed was generally very low. To characterize the phenotype of this cell line further, immortalized lines were established after transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen. Immortalized cell lines representing normal and MSD phenotypes were then transduced with a retroviral vector carrying the gene encoding human N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase. Analysis of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase protein synthesis and enzyme activity showed that transduced cell lines expressed large amounts of enzyme and that the specific activity of this enzyme was approx. 0.5-1.5% of normal, confirming that this cell line defines a severe phenotype for MSD. N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase purified from a transduced MSD cell line seemed normal on denaturing PAGE. Kinetic analysis of the purified enzyme suggests that the residual activity is due to small amounts of normal enzyme rather than unmodified enzyme with low levels of residual activity. These cell lines and the availability of large amounts of inactive N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase from MSD cells should facilitate the further study of this disorder.

  15. The potential role of small fish species in improving micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries: building evidence.

    PubMed

    Kawarazuka, Nozomi; Béné, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    To build a comprehensive overview of the potential role of fish in improving nutrition with respect to certain micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries. A comprehensive literature review was completed. For this the electronic library databases ASFA, CABD and Scopus were systematically searched and relevant references cited in these sources were carefully analysed. The search terms used were 'fish', 'small fish species', 'micronutrients', 'food-based strategies', 'fish consumption' and 'developing countries'. The quality of data on nutritional analyses was carefully reviewed and data that lacked proper information on methods, units and samples were excluded. The evidence collected confirmed the high levels of vitamin A, Fe and Zn in some of the small fish species in developing countries. These small fish are reported to be more affordable and accessible than the larger fish and other usual animal-source foods and vegetables. Evidence suggests that these locally available small fish have considerable potential as cost-effective food-based strategies to enhance micronutrient intakes or as a complementary food for undernourished children. However, the present review shows that only a few studies have been able to rigorously assess the impact of fish consumption on improved nutritional status in developing countries. Further research is required in areas such as determination of fish consumption patterns of poor households, the nutritional value of local fish and other aquatic animals and the impact of fish intake on improved nutritional status in developing countries where undernutrition is a major public health problem.

  16. Pathogenesis of sialadenosis: possible role of functionally deficient myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ihrler, Stephan; Rath, Christian; Zengel, Pamela; Kirchner, Thomas; Harrison, John D; Weiler, Christoph

    2010-08-01

    The pathogenesis of acinar enlargement in sialadenosis is obscure. As myoepithelial cells had been reported to show degenerative changes, we decided to investigate the possible role of functionally deficient myoepithelial cells in the development of sialadenosis. This study was a morphometric analysis of glands immunohistochemically stained for CK14, alpha-actin, and Ki67 in 10 cases of sialadenosis and 11 normal parotids. In sialadenosis, acini were much larger; there was a minor decrease in the density of the distribution of myoepithelial cells stained for CK14 and a major decrease in the density of the distribution and thickness of the myofilament component of myoepithelial cells stained for alpha-actin; and the proliferation of acinar and myoepithelial cells was reduced. Our results demonstrate a major loss and thinning of the myofilament component of the myoepithelial cells and thereby a loss of mechanical support for the acini in sialadenosis. This possibly allows acinar cells to expand as secretory granules accumulate intracellularly to produce the great acinar enlargement. This functional myoepithelial insufficiency is possibly a consequence of an autonomic neuropathy secondary to severe metabolic or hormonal disorders. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Sickle Cell Patients.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Peter C; Knupp, Charles L; Liles, Darla K; Walker, Kaitlyn

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D levels in adult black Americans with sickle cell disease (SCD) are comparatively lower than those found in the general population of black Americans. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adults with various subtypes of sickle cell disease and identify risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. In a retrospective study serum Vitamin D25(OH)D and/or VitaminD1,25(OH)2D levels were obtained in 120 subjects with sickle cell disease. Baseline studies also included LFTs, total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and creatinine levels. In a portion of subjects that were treated with oral ergocalciferol vitamin D levels and chemistries were obtained within 6 months of treatment. Data was statistically analyzed with Welch two sample t-tests and individual simple linear regressions (including logarithmic values) for each variable. Vitamin D25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly lower in a group of subjects with Hgb SS disease, than in a group with other subtypes of sickle cell disease. In both groups combined, significant (p = 0.05) and clinically suggestive negative correlations with Vitamin D25(OH)D were seen for total bilirubin and total protein, respectively. When total bilirubin and total protein levels were compared between the Hgb SS and HgbS/other groups, t-test revealed these levels were significantly higher in the Hgb SS group levels at p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively. Low total Vitamin D25(OH)D levels in adults with sickle cell disease may be a reflection of chronic inflammation and overall disease severity. Copyright © 2016 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous regulatory T cell deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J; Chatila, Talal A; Oettgen, Hans C

    2010-07-15

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To test whether Treg deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3(KO)) mice, which completely lack FoxP3(+) Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8(+) effector T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells than controls, had higher viral loads, and exhibited abnormal Th2-polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4(KO) FoxP3(KO) bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3(KO) mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared with controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II IFNs and IL-12, were reduced, whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-beta, and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a noncutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV.

  19. Small Intestine Inflammation in Roquin-Mutant and Roquin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jeremy S.; Montufar-Solis, Dina; Nakra, Niyati; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Klein, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Roquin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that localizes to cytosolic RNA granules, is involved in regulating mRNA stability and translation. Mice that have a M199R mutation in the Roquin protein (referred to as sanroque or Roquinsan/san mice) develop autoimmune pathologies, although the extent to which these occur in the intestinal mucosa has not been determined. Here, we demonstrate that Roquinsan/san mice reproducibly develop intestinal inflammation in the small intestine but not the colon. Similarly, mice generated in our laboratory in which the Roquin gene was disrupted by insertion of a gene trap cassette (Roquingt/gt mice) had small intestinal inflammation that mimicked that of Roquinsan/san mice. MLN cells in Roquinsan/san mice consisted of activated proliferating T cells, and had increased numbers of CD44hi CD62Llo KLRG1+ short-lived effector cells. Proportionally more small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes in Roquinsan/san mice expressed the ICOS T cell activation marker. Of particular interest, small intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes in Roquinsan/san mice consisted of a high proportion of Gr-1+ T cells that included IL-17A+ cells and CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells. Extensive cytokine dysregulation resulting in both over-expression and under-expression of chemotactic cytokines occurred in the ileum of Roquinsan/san mice, the region most prone to the development of inflammation. These findings demonstrate that chronic inflammation ensues in the intestine following Roquin alteration either as a consequence of protein mutation or gene disruption, and they have implications for understanding how small intestinal inflammation is perpetuated in Crohn's disease (CD). Due to the paucity of animal models of CD-like pathophysiology in the small intestine, and because the primary gene/protein defects of the Roquin animal systems used here are well-defined, it will be possible to further elucidate the underlying genetic and molecular mechanisms that drive the disease process

  20. Small Intestine but Not Liver Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) Deficiency Has a Dominant Effect on Plasma Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Inamul; Li, Zhiqiang; Bui, Hai H; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gao, Guangping; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) is involved in phosphatidylcholine remodeling in the small intestine and liver. We investigated lipid metabolism in inducible intestine-specific and liver-specificLpcat3gene knock-out mice. We producedLpcat3-Flox/villin-Cre-ER(T2)mice, which were treated with tamoxifen (at days 1, 3, 5, and 7), to deleteLpcat3specifically in the small intestine. At day 9 after the treatment, we found that Lpcat3 deficiency in enterocytes significantly reduced polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines in the enterocyte plasma membrane and reduced Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), CD36, ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and ABCG8 levels on the membrane, thus significantly reducing lipid absorption, cholesterol secretion through apoB-dependent and apoB-independent pathways, and plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels, as well as body weight. Moreover, Lpcat3 deficiency does not cause significant lipid accumulation in the small intestine. We also utilized adenovirus-associated virus-Cre to depleteLpcat3in the liver. We found that liver deficiency only reduces plasma triglyceride levels but not other lipid levels. Furthermore, there is no significant lipid accumulation in the liver. Importantly, small intestine Lpcat3 deficiency has a much bigger effect on plasma lipid levels than that of liver deficiency. Thus, inhibition of small intestine Lpcat3 might constitute a novel approach for treating hyperlipidemia.

  1. Pulse Performance of Small Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric C.; Cowles, Philip R.

    2002-01-01

    Five types of small commercial cells were subject to capacity and resistance measurements under pulsed conditions and under a worst case application conditions. Results indicate that an 82S-102P array of 18650 cells will exceed the power/energy requirements for a proposed Space Shuttle EAPU battery system.

  2. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Candida albicans Mutants Deficient in Respiration Are Resistant to the Small Cationic Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide Histatin 5

    PubMed Central

    Gyurko, Csilla; Lendenmann, Urs; Troxler, Robert F.; Oppenheim, Frank G.

    2000-01-01

    Histatins are a group of small cationic peptides in human saliva which are well known for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. In a previous study we demonstrated that histatin 5 kills both blastoconidia and germ tubes of Candida albicans in a time- and concentration-dependent manner at 37°C, whereas no killing was detected at 4°C. This indicated that killing activity depends on cellular energy. To test histatin 5 killing activity at lower cellular ATP levels at 37°C, respiratory mutants, or so-called petite mutants, of C. albicans were prepared. These mutants are deficient in respiration due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Mutants were initially identified by their small colony size and were further characterized with respect to colony morphology, growth characteristics, respiratory activity, and cytochrome spectra. The killing activity of histatin 5 at the highest concentration was only 28 to 30% against respiratory mutants, whereas 98% of the wild-type cells were killed. Furthermore, histatin 5 killing activity was also tested on wild-type cells in the presence of the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide or, alternatively, the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. In both cases histatin 5 killing activity was significantly reduced. Additionally, supernatants and pellets of cells incubated with histatin 5 in the presence or absence of inhibitors of mitochondrial ATP synthesis were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. It was observed that wild-type cells accumulated large amounts of histatin 5, while wild-type cells treated with inhibitors or petite mutants did not accumulate significant amounts of the peptide. These data showed first that cellular accumulation of histatin 5 is necessary for killing activity and second that accumulation of histatin 5 depends on the availability of cellular energy. Therefore, mitochondrial ATP synthesis is required for effective killing activity of histatin 5. PMID:10639361

  4. Predominant neuronal B-cell loss in L5 DRG of p75 receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Dreetz Gjerstad, M; Tandrup, T; Koltzenburg, M; Jakobsen, J

    2002-01-01

    The significance of the p75 low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, for the maintenance and survival of DRG cells, was studied in p75-deficient mice. Perikarya of the L5 DRG of 12-week-old p75 receptor-deficient mice and healthy Balb C mice were compared using stereological techniques. Following systematic sampling, the optical fractionator and the planar vertical rotator were used to estimate the number and mean volume of the cell bodies of the two neuronal subpopulations. The loss of B-cells was 57% (P < 0.00001), numbers being 7300 (CV = 0.12) in controls and 3100 in p75 receptor-deficient mice (CV = 0.18). Also, A-cells showed a significant loss of 39% (P < 0.0001), numbers being 2600 (CV = 0.12) in control mice and 1500 (CV = 0.16) in p75 receptor-deficient mice. The volume of A-cells was reduced by 30% (P < 0.01), from 24.700 µm3 (CV = 0.17) perikarya in p75 knock-out mice to 15.100 µm3 (CV = 0.17) in controls. B-cell volume did not change significantly. It is concluded that the p75 receptor plays a major role in the survival of DRG cells. The predominant loss of small B-cells indicates that the effect of neurotrophins is dependent upon the presence of the p75 low-affinity receptor. PMID:11833656

  5. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division.

    PubMed

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I

    2013-09-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells.

  6. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  7. Small cell sweat gland carcinoma of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Drut, R; Giménez, O P; Oliva, J

    2005-01-01

    Small cell sweat gland carcinoma appears to represent a very unusual histological type of sweat gland anlage tumour presenting in children. The differential diagnosis from other small blue cell tumours involving the skin is often difficult. The present report confirms the original observation describing two patients of 2 and 5 years of age harbouring cutaneous tumours. The histology of these lesions showed a monomorphic proliferation of small cells with a high mitotic rate and areas of necrosis. Immunohistochemically, the cells were negative for desmin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, Cam 5.2, CD99, chromogranin, CD56, synaptophysin, and S-100, and focally positive for the pancytokeratin marker AE1/AE3, carcinoembryonic antigen (one case), and neurone specific enolase (one case). The prognosis of this type of tumour seems to be good. As more cases are added, the clinical pathological spectrum of the lesion will become better defined. PMID:16311358

  8. Choline Deficiency Causes Colonic Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cell Loss and Alleviates Murine Colitis under Type I NKT Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sagami, Shintaro; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Fujita, Akira; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryohei; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Serum levels of choline and its derivatives are lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of choline deficiency on the severity of colitis has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the role of choline deficiency in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. Methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet lowered the levels of type II natural killer T (NKT) cells in the colonic lamina propria, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph nodes, and increased the levels of type II NKT cells in the livers of wild-type B6 mice compared with that in mice fed a control (CTR) diet. The gene expression pattern of the chemokine receptor CXCR6, which promotes NKT cell accumulation, varied between colon and liver in a manner dependent on the changes in the type II NKT cell levels. To examine the role of type II NKT cells in colitis under choline-deficient conditions, we assessed the severity of DSS-induced colitis in type I NKT cell-deficient (Jα18-/-) or type I and type II NKT cell-deficient (CD1d-/-) mice fed the MCD or CTR diets. The MCD diet led to amelioration of inflammation, decreases in interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 secretion, and a decrease in the number of IFN-γ and IL-4-producing NKT cells in Jα18-/- mice but not in CD1d-/- mice. Finally, adaptive transfer of lymphocytes with type II NKT cells exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in Jα18-/- mice with MCD diet. These results suggest that choline deficiency causes proinflammatory type II NKT cell loss and alleviates DSS-induced colitis. Thus, inflammation in DSS-induced colitis under choline deficiency is caused by type II NKT cell-dependent mechanisms, including decreased type II NKT cell and proinflammatory cytokine levels.

  9. Choline Deficiency Causes Colonic Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cell Loss and Alleviates Murine Colitis under Type I NKT Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sagami, Shintaro; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Fujita, Akira; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryohei; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Serum levels of choline and its derivatives are lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of choline deficiency on the severity of colitis has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the role of choline deficiency in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. Methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet lowered the levels of type II natural killer T (NKT) cells in the colonic lamina propria, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph nodes, and increased the levels of type II NKT cells in the livers of wild-type B6 mice compared with that in mice fed a control (CTR) diet. The gene expression pattern of the chemokine receptor CXCR6, which promotes NKT cell accumulation, varied between colon and liver in a manner dependent on the changes in the type II NKT cell levels. To examine the role of type II NKT cells in colitis under choline-deficient conditions, we assessed the severity of DSS-induced colitis in type I NKT cell-deficient (Jα18-/-) or type I and type II NKT cell-deficient (CD1d-/-) mice fed the MCD or CTR diets. The MCD diet led to amelioration of inflammation, decreases in interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 secretion, and a decrease in the number of IFN-γ and IL-4-producing NKT cells in Jα18-/- mice but not in CD1d-/- mice. Finally, adaptive transfer of lymphocytes with type II NKT cells exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in Jα18-/- mice with MCD diet. These results suggest that choline deficiency causes proinflammatory type II NKT cell loss and alleviates DSS-induced colitis. Thus, inflammation in DSS-induced colitis under choline deficiency is caused by type II NKT cell-dependent mechanisms, including decreased type II NKT cell and proinflammatory cytokine levels. PMID:28095507

  10. Panasonic Small Cell Testing for AHPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, C.; Blackmore, P.; Lain, M.; Walpole, A.; Darcy, Eric

    2006-01-01

    AEA selection and successful Interim Design Review for AHPS proves maturity of small cell approach for very large batteries. Cells show excellent opportunity for battery mass reduction for AHPS and other low cycle applications. Lack of cycle and extended calendar life make EOL battery performance difficult (AHPS 8 year mission). Preliminary design, AEA retained SONY 18650HC cell as baseline: a) Well characterized performance; b) Wealth of safety test data.

  11. Protein Deficiency Induces Alterations in the Distribution of T-Cell Subsets in Experimental Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Elsie S.; McMurray, David N.

    1998-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that dietary protein deficiency alters resistance to experimental pulmonary tuberculosis, in part, by affecting the distribution and trafficking of antigen-reactive T cells. In this study, guinea pigs were maintained on either a protein-deficient (10% ovalbumin) or control (30% ovalbumin) diet and infected 4 to 6 weeks later with a low dose of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by the respiratory route. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the CD4 or CD8 markers on guinea pig lymphocytes were used in a flow cytofluorometric assay to determine the proportion of each subset in the peripheral circulation, spleen, and bronchotracheal lymph nodes at 4 weeks after infection. In uninfected guinea pigs, only the spleen exhibited an effect of diet on T-cell distribution, with small but consistent reductions in the proportions of both CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. However, following infection, protein deficiency exerted a profound effect on T-cell distribution. Malnourished, tuberculous guinea pigs harbored only 20 and 60% of the T cells (as a proportion of total lymphoid cells) found in the spleen and blood, respectively, of their well-nourished counterparts. Normal relative proportions of CD4 and CD8 cells were observed, however. In striking contrast, the bronchotracheal lymph nodes of protein-deprived guinea pigs with tuberculosis contained more than twice the numbers of T cells of control guinea pigs, and the normal CD4-to-CD8 ratio was reversed. Peripheral T-cell function, as measured by the delayed hypersensitivity skin test to tuberculin, and antigen-induced lymphoproliferation in vitro were markedly suppressed in protein-malnourished animals. Conversely, purified protein derivative-induced (but not concanavalin A-induced) proliferation was significantly enhanced in cultures of lymph node cells from protein-deprived tuberculous animals. Taken together, these results suggest that immunological abnormalities and loss of

  12. Effect of protein deficiency on macroelement and trace element levels of weanling rats' small intestine and liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Kilicalp, D; Dede, S; Belge, F; Tatar, M

    2005-12-01

    Protein energy malnutrition has become a major health issue in developing countries. In the present study, the effect of protein deficiency on the small intestine and liver tissue content of macroelements and trace elements was investigated in weanling rats. Forty-five male weanling Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. The control group (C) was fed a standard diet containing 25% casein, whereas the two experimental groups E1 and E2 consumed 12% and 3% casein, respectively, over a period of 45 d. The tissue samples were analyzed for zinc, copper, iron, manganese, calcium, and magnesium by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The protein-deficient groups showed increased levels of iron in both tissues and decreased manganese in small intestine tissue from the E1 group. No other differences were found for the other elements. These results suggest that protein deficiency might cause iron accumulation in the liver and intestine and decreases of manganese in the small intestine.

  13. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (less than 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver, anemia, low plasma ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and increased 64Cu whole-body retention. Freshly isolated liver parenchymal cells from copper-deficient rats showed a higher 64Cu influx, which was associated with a higher apparent Vmax of 45 {plus minus} 4 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 as compared with 30 {plus minus} 3 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 for cells isolated from copper-sufficient rats. No significant difference in the apparent Km (approximately 30 mumol/L) was observed. Relative 64Cu efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats was significantly smaller than the efflux from cells from copper-sufficient rats after prelabeling as determined by 2-h efflux experiments. Analysis of the medium after efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats showed elevated protein-associated 64Cu, suggesting a higher incorporation of radioactive copper during metalloprotein synthesis. Effects of copper deficiency persist in primary cultures of parenchymal cells derived from copper-deficient rats, and short-term cultures of these cells offer a prospect for the study of cell biological aspects of the metabolic adaptation of the liver to copper deficiency.

  14. Deficient autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction in Kaposi's sarcoma associated with deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Safai, B

    1983-01-01

    Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) and T cell subsets defined with monoclonal antibodies were analyzed in the peripheral blood of homosexual males with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). All seven patients demonstrated decreased AMLR (P less than 0.001) when compared with age- and sex-matched simultaneously studied controls. These patients also showed decreased proportions of Leu-3+ (helper/inducer phenotype) and an increase in the proportion of Leu-2+ (suppressor/cytotoxic phenotype) T cells. Leu-3+ T cells were purified from two patients by depleting Leu-2+ T cells in complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Leu-3+ T cells from both patients demonstrated poor proliferative response in the AMLR. In allogeneic MLR, patients' T cells were poor responders and their non-T cells were poor stimulators against healthy controls. This study demonstrates deficiency of both AMLR and allogeneic MLR in patients with KS. The decreased AMLR is associated with qualitative and functional deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells. Whether the functional deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells in the AMLR is a general phenomena or a feature of a subset of patients with KS remains to be determined. PMID:6218186

  15. Dual T cell- and B cell-intrinsic deficiency in humans with biallelic RLTPR mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Cindy S; Ling, Yun; Bousfiha, Aziz; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Jacquot, Serge; Payne, Kathryn; Crestani, Elena; Roncagalli, Romain; Belkadi, Aziz; Kerner, Gaspard; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Deswarte, Caroline; Chrabieh, Maya; Patin, Etienne; Vincent, Quentin B; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ailal, Fatima; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Fraitag, Sylvie; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard; Abel, Laurent; Hovnanian, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Tangye, Stuart G; Béziat, Vivien; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-10-17

    Combined immunodeficiency (CID) refers to inborn errors of human T cells that also affect B cells because of the T cell deficit or an additional B cell-intrinsic deficit. In this study, we report six patients from three unrelated families with biallelic loss-of-function mutations in RLTPR, the mouse orthologue of which is essential for CD28 signaling. The patients have cutaneous and pulmonary allergy, as well as a variety of bacterial and fungal infectious diseases, including invasive tuberculosis and mucocutaneous candidiasis. Proportions of circulating regulatory T cells and memory CD4(+) T cells are reduced. Their CD4(+) T cells do not respond to CD28 stimulation. Their CD4(+) T cells exhibit a "Th2" cell bias ex vivo and when cultured in vitro, contrasting with the paucity of "Th1," "Th17," and T follicular helper cells. The patients also display few memory B cells and poor antibody responses. This B cell phenotype does not result solely from the T cell deficiency, as the patients' B cells fail to activate NF-κB upon B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation. Human RLTPR deficiency is a CID affecting at least the CD28-responsive pathway in T cells and the BCR-responsive pathway in B cells. © 2016 Wang et al.

  16. Novel cancer stem cell targets during epithelial to mesenchymal transition in PTEN-deficient trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Mari; Xu, Fangying; Jiang, Hui; Lin, Chang-Ching; Myers, Ila; Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Yajing; Connarn, Jamie; He, Huining; Zhang, Ning; Wicha, Max S.; Sun, Duxin

    2016-01-01

    Continued use of trastuzumab in PTEN-deficient HER2+ breast cancer induces the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), transforms HER2+ to triple negative breast cancer, and expands breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Using cancer cell lines with two distinct states, epithelial and mesenchymal, we identified novel targets during EMT in PTEN-deficient trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer. Differential gene expression and distinct responses to a small molecule in BT474 (HER2+ trastuzumab-sensitive) and the PTEN-deficient trastuzumab-resistant derivative (BT474-PTEN-LTT) provided the selection tools to identify targets during EMT. siRNA knockdown and small molecule inhibition confirmed MEOX1 as one of the critical molecular targets to regulate both BCSCs and mesenchymal-like cell proliferation. MEOX1 was associated with poor survival, lymph node metastasis, and stage of breast cancer patients. These findings suggest that MEOX1 is a clinically relevant novel target in BCSCs and mesenchymal-like cancer cells in PTEN-deficient trastuzumab resistant breast cancer and may serve as target for future drug development. PMID:27285982

  17. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; De Mattia, D.; Pagnini, D.; Alfinito, F.; Schettini, F.; Luzzatto, L.; Martini, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G-->A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C-->T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8808605

  18. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G.

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  20. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  1. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  2. Corneal Goblet Cells and their Niche: Implications for Corneal Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Stepp, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Goblet cells are terminally differentiated cells secreting mucins and anti-bacterial peptides that play an important role in maintaining the health of the cornea. In corneal stem cell deficiency, the progenitor cells giving rise to goblet cells on the cornea are presumed to arise from differentiation of cells that migrate onto the cornea from the neighboring conjunctiva. This occurs in response to the inability of corneal epithelial progenitor cells at the limbus to maintain an intact corneal epithelium. This study characterizes clusters of cells we refer to as compound niches at the limbal:corneal border in the unwounded mouse. Compound niches are identified by high expression of simple epithelial keratin 8 (K8) and 19 (K19). They contain variable numbers of cells in one of several differentiation states: slow-cycling corneal progenitor cells, proliferating cells, non-proliferating cells, and post-mitotic differentiated K12+Muc5ac+goblet cells. Expression of K12 differentiates these goblet cells from those in the conjunctival epithelium and suggests that corneal epithelial progenitor cells give rise to both corneal epithelial and goblet cells. After wounds that remove corneal epithelial cells near the limbus, compound niches migrate from the limbal:corneal border onto the cornea where K8+ cells proliferate and goblet cells increase in number. By contrast, no migration of goblet cells from the bulbar conjunctiva onto the cornea is observed. This study is the first description of compound niches and corneal goblet cells and demonstration of a role for these cells in the pathology typically associated with corneal stem cell deficiency. PMID:22821715

  3. Intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Mark; Goldstine, Jimena V; Gatti, Richard A

    2007-09-15

    One of the characteristic features of cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is that they are in a state of continuous oxidative stress and exhibit constitutive activation of pathways that normally respond to oxidative damage. In this report, we investigated whether the oxidative stress phenotype of A-T cells might be a reflection of an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitotracker Red staining showed that the structural organization of mitochondria in A-T cells was abnormal compared to wild-type. Moreover, A-T cells harbored a much larger population of mitochondria with decreased membrane potential (DeltaPsi) than control cells. In addition, the basal expression levels of several nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative damage responsive genes whose proteins are targeted to the mitochondria--polymerase gamma, mitochondrial topoisomerase I, peroxiredoxin 3 and manganese superoxide dismutase--are elevated in A-T cells. Consistent with these results, we found that overall mitochondrial respiratory activity was diminished in A-T compared to wild-type cells. Treating A-T cells with the antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), restored mitochondrial respiration rates to levels approaching those of wild-type. When wild-type cells were transfected with ATM-targeted siRNA, we observed a small but significant reduction in the respiration rates of mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondria in A-T cells induced to stably express full-length ATM, exhibited respiration rates approaching those of wild-type cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence for an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in A-T cells, and implicate a requirement for ATM in the regulation of mitochondrial function.

  4. Sutureless Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Partial Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    KHEIRKHAH, AHMAD; CASAS, VICTORIA; RAJU, VADREVU K.; TSENG, SCHEFFER C. G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the results of sutureless amniotic membrane (AM) transplantation using fibrin glue for reconstructing corneal surfaces with partial limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). DESIGN Retrospective noncomparative interventional case series. METHODS Eleven eyes of nine patients that had LSCD with 120 degrees to almost 360 degrees of limbal involvement underwent superficial keratectomy to remove the conjunctivalized pannus followed by AM transplantation using fibrin glue. Additional sutureless AM patch (ProKera; Bio-Tissue, Inc, Miami, Florida, USA) was used in seven patients, and mitomycin C was applied on the cornea in four eyes and during fornix reconstruction in seven eyes. The surgery was repeated in three eyes for residual pannus. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 14.2 ± 7.7 months (range, six to 26 months), all eyes maintained a smooth and stable corneal epithelial surface without recurrent erosion or persistent epithelial defect, and showed less stromal cloudiness and vascularization. Best-corrected visual acuity improved in nine eyes (81.8%). Corneal epithelialization proceeded by epithelial growth over AM (n = 4), accompanied by dissolution of AM (n = 4) or a combination of both (n = 3). No complication was noted regarding initial or repeated uses of fibrin glue. CONCLUSION AM transplantation using fibrin glue appears to be a safe and effective method of restoring a stable corneal epithelium for cases with partial LSCD. This approach avoids the need of transplanting limbal epithelial stem cells. PMID:18329626

  5. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  6. Rhoh deficiency reduces peripheral T-cell function and attenuates allogenic transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Porubsky, Stefan; Wang, Shijun; Kiss, Eva; Dehmel, Stefan; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Dorn, Tatjana; Luckow, Bruno; Brakebusch, Cord; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rhoh is a hematopoietic system-specific GTPase. Rhoh-deficient T cells have been shown to have a defect in TCR signaling manifested during their thymic development. Our aims were to investigate the phenotype of peripheral Rhoh-deficient T cells and to explore in vivo the potential benefit of Rhoh deficiency in a clinically relevant situation, in which T-cell inhibition is desirable. In murine allogenic kidney transplantation, Rhoh deficiency caused a significant 75% reduction of acute and chronic transplant rejection accompanied by 75% lower alloantigen-specific antibody levels and significantly better graft function. This effect was independent of the lower T-cell numbers in Rhoh-deficient recipients, because injection of equal numbers of Rhoh-deficient or control T cells into kidney transplanted mice with SCID led again to a significant 60% reduction of rejection. Mixed lymphocyte reaction revealed that the weaker alloreactivity was associated with a 85% lower cytotoxicity and a 50-80% lower cytokine release in Rhoh-deficient T cells without an influence on the secretion itself. Antigen uptake and presentation in DC were unaffected by Rhoh deficiency. These findings stress the importance of Rhoh for the function of peripheral T cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Massive cell death of immature hematopoietic cells and neurons in Bcl-x-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Wang, F; Roth, K A; Sawa, H; Nakayama, K; Nakayama, K; Negishi, I; Senju, S; Zhang, Q; Fujii, S

    1995-03-10

    bcl-x is a member of the bcl-2 gene family, which may regulate programmed cell death. Mice were generated that lacked Bcl-x. The Bcl-x-deficient mice died around embryonic day 13. Extensive apoptotic cell death was evident in postmitotic immature neurons of the developing brain, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia. Hematopoietic cells in the liver were also apoptotic. Analyses of bcl-x double-knockout chimeric mice showed that the maturation of Bcl-x-deficient lymphocytes was diminished. The life-span of immature lymphocytes, but not mature lymphocytes, was shortened. Thus, Bcl-x functions to support the viability of immature cells during the development of the nervous and hematopoietic systems.

  8. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates ‘aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  9. Method of assay of red cell folate activity and the value of the assay as a test for folate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoffbrand, A. V.; Newcombe, Beverley F. A.; Mollin, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    A simplified microbiological assay for determining the folate content of red cells is described. As in previously reported methods Lactobacillus casei is used as test organism but two modifications are introduced. First, haemolysis is carried out in water containing 1 g.% of ascorbic acid; secondly, haemolysates are not incubated before the assay. Using this assay, recovery of pteroylglutamic acid added in two different concentrations to five different whole blood samples was 97·0 ± 1·9 S.E. % and 106·1 ± 4·7 S.E. % respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay was between 11·2 and 15·0%. Haemolysates were best stored deep frozen, showing no significant loss of L. casei activity for three to five months at −20°C. On the other hand, non-haemolysed blood samples were best stored at 4°C. when there was no loss of activity for seven to 10 days. Experiments confirmed that plasma is necessary for the maximum release of red cell L. casei activity, and showed that only small amounts of plasma are necessary; folate- and B12-deficient plasma released slightly lower L. casei activities from red cells than did normal plasma. The red cell folate levels of 40 healthy normal subjects ranged from 160 to 640 mμg. per ml. of packed red cells. One hundred and twenty patients with subnormal serum folate levels due to idiopathic steatorrhoea, nutritional folate deficiency and Crohn's disease, partial gastrectomy, myelosclerosis, and polycythaemia vera were studied. Red cell folate levels were subnormal (range from 7 to 143 mμg. per ml.) in 40 patients with megaloblastic anaemia, the lowest levels occurring in the most anaemic patients. Subnormal red cell folate levels also occurred in 23 (29%) of the 80 non-anaemic patients. There was a good correlation between red cell folate level and severity of folate deficiency assessed by polymorph nuclear lobe counts, and, in the non-anaemic patients bone marrow morphology. It is concluded that, in the absence of B12

  10. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Kober, Olivia I; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ(-/-)) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ(-/-) mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ(-/-) and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency in neonatal jaundice cases in egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel Fattah, Mohammed; Abdel Ghany, Eman; Adel, Alia; Mosallam, Dalia; Kamal, Shahira

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can lead to acute hemolytic anemia, chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, and neonatal jaundice. Neonatal red cell pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency may cause clinical patterns, ranging from extremely severe hemolytic anemia to moderate jaundice. The authors aimed at studying the prevalence of G6PD and PK deficiency among Egyptian neonates with pathological indirect hyperbilirubinemia in Cairo. This case-series study included 69 newborns with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. All were subjected to clinical history, laboratory investigations, e.g., complete blood counts, reticulocytic counts, direct and indirect serum bilirubin levels, Coombs tests, qualitative assay of G6PD activity by methemoglobin reduction test, and measurement of erythrocytic PK levels. The study detected 10 neonates with G6PD deficiency, which means that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Egyptian neonates with hyperbilirubinemia is 14.4% (21.2% of males). G6PD deficiency was significantly higher in males than females (P = .01). The authors detected 2 cases with PK deficiency, making the prevalence of its deficiency 2.8%. These data demonstrate that G6PD deficiency is an important cause for neonatal jaundice in Egyptians. Neonatal screening for its deficiency is recommended. PK deficiency is not a common cause of neonatal jaundice. However, this needs further investigation on a larger scale.

  12. Gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Bella, Camillo Di; Cambareri, Antonino Roberto; Buda, Carmelo Antonio; Corti, Gianluigi; Magri, Filippo; Crippa, Stefano; Baldini, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. We describe a case of gastric metastasis due to primary lung cancer, revealed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). Haematogenous metastases to the stomach are a rare event. To our knowledge, only 55 cases have been described in the international literature. In these patients, the prognosis is very poor. We report herein a case of gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma, with a review of the literature about this rare entity. PMID:16810769

  13. [Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma has known significant improvements over the past 10 years especially through routine use of PET-CT in the initial work-up and contouring before treatment. Prophylactic cranial irradiation remains a standard of care for locally advanced disease and is a subject of controversy for metastatic disease. A new indication for thoracic radiotherapy may soon arise for metastatic disease, still confirmation studies are ongoing.

  14. Lipocalin 2 deficiency inhibits cell proliferation, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Daozhong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xiaoli

    2011-05-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) has been recently implicated as a critical player in multiple cancer tumorigeneses. However, the molecular mechanisms for its tumorigenic role are poorly understood. Herein, we investigated the effects of LCN2 on cell proliferation, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis in MEF cells. We observed that LCN2 deficiency significantly inhibited cell proliferation and autophagy in MEF cells. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA content, mRNA expression levels of mitochondrial-encoded gene cytochrome oxidase 2 and PGC-1α were all markedly reduced in LCN2⁻/⁻ MEF cells. Additionally, when compared with wild-type MEF cells, LCN2⁻/⁻ MEF cells expressed significantly higher levels of IRS-1, and displayed more potent TNFα-stimulated NF-κB activation. These findings demonstrate that LCN2 is a critical regulator of cell proliferation, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis.

  15. Inverted, semitransparent small molecule photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xin; Lee, Kyusang; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate semitransparent small molecule organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on inverted mixed and hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction (PM-HJ) structures comprised of a neat acceptor layer located beneath the donor/acceptor mixed region. The fill factor increases from 0.53 ± 0.01 for the mixed HJ to 0.58 ± 0.01 for the PM-HJ due to reduced series resistance, whereas the internal quantum efficiency increases from an average of 75% to 85% between the wavelengths of λ = 450 nm and 550 nm. The inverted, semitransparent PM-HJ cell achieves a power conversion efficiency of PCE = 3.9% ± 0.2% under simulated AM1.5G illumination at one sun intensity with an average optical transmission of T ¯ = 51% ± 2% across the visible spectrum, corresponding to > 10% improvement compared with the mixed HJ cell. We also demonstrate an inverted semitransparent tandem cell incorporating two PM-HJ sub-cells with different absorption spectra. The tandem cell achieves a PCE = 5.3% ± 0.3% under simulated AM1.5G at one sun intensity with T ¯ = 31% ± 1% across the visible. Almost identical efficiencies are obtained for tandem cells illuminated via either the cathode or anode surfaces.

  16. Adherent-phagocytic cells influence suppressed concanavalin-A induced proliferation of spleen lymphoid cells in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, T.R.; Briske-Anderson, M.; Johnson, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, and deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of cu. Cu-deficient rats showed typical biochemical and hematological changes. Immunological changes exhibited by Cu-deficient rats were influenced by the presence of splenic adherent-phagocytic cells (macrophage-like), but not by cytochrome-c oxidase activity of spleen lymphoid cells (SLC). Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. Following removal of plastic-adherent phagocytic cells from the SLC suspensions, equivalent proliferation was exhibited by Con-A stimulated nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Decreased cytochrome-c oxidase activity was exhibited by both unstimulated SLC and nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient rats, but decreased proliferation was exhibited only in Con-A stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. These findings indicate that nonadherent splenic T-lymphocytes of Cu-deficient rats are not impaired in their ability to proliferate, and that cytochrome-c oxidase activity in unstimulated lymphoid cells of Cu-deficient rats is apparently not related to levels of proliferation by the Con-A stimulated cells.

  17. Impression cytology and in vivo confocal microscopy in corneas with total limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Aline Lütz de; Ricardo, José Reinaldo da Silva; Sakai, Vivian Naomi; Barros, Jeison Nadai de; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2013-10-01

    To describe corneal changes seen on in vivo confocal microscopy in patients with total limbal stem cell deficiency and to correlate them with cytological findings. A prospective case series including 13 eyes (8 patients) with total limbal deficiency was carried out. Stem cell deficiency was diagnosed clinically and by corneal impression cytology. Confocal images of the central cornea were taken with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II, Rostock Corneal Module (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Impression cytology of the cornea revealed conjunctival epithelial cells and goblet cells in all cases. In vivo confocal microscopy showed disruption of normal layers of the corneal epithelium in all eyes. Confocal images showed cells with characteristics of conjunctival epithelium at the cornea in 76.9% of the total. These findings on confocal microscopy were compatible to limbal stem cell deficiency. Additionally, goblet cells, squamous metaplasia, inflammatory cells and dendritic cells were observed. The sub-basal nerve plexus was not identified in any of the corneas. Corneal neovessels were observed at the epithelium and stroma. All cases showed diffuse hyper-reflective images of the stroma corresponding to opacity of the tissue. Limbal stem cell deficiency had been confirmed by impression cytology in all cases, and 76.9% of the cases could also be diagnosed by in vivo confocal microscopy through the conjunctival epithelial cell visualization on the corneal surface. Frequent confocal microscopy findings were abnormal cells at the cornea (conjunctival epithelial, goblet and inflammatory cells), corneal neovessels and diffuse hyper-reflection of the stroma.

  18. Synthetic lethal targeting of superoxide dismutase 1 selectively kills RAD54B-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sajesh, Babu V; Bailey, Melanie; Lichtensztejn, Zelda; Hieter, Philip; McManus, Kirk J

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic lethality is a rational approach to identify candidate drug targets for selective killing of cancer cells harboring somatic mutations that cause chromosome instability (CIN). To identify a set of the most highly connected synthetic lethal partner genes in yeast for subsequent testing in mammalian cells, we used the entire set of 692 yeast CIN genes to query the genome-wide synthetic lethal datasets. Hierarchical clustering revealed a highly connected set of synthetic lethal partners of yeast genes whose human orthologs are somatically mutated in colorectal cancer. Testing of a small matrix of synthetic lethal gene pairs in mammalian cells suggested that members of a pathway that remove reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage would be excellent candidates for further testing. We show that the synthetic lethal interaction between budding yeast rad54 and sod1 is conserved within a human colorectal cancer context. Specifically, we demonstrate RAD54B-deficient cells are selectively killed relative to controls via siRNA-based silencing and chemical inhibition and further demonstrate that this interaction is conserved in an unrelated cell type. We further show that the DNA double strand breaks, resulting from increased reactive oxygen species following SOD1 inhibition, persist within the RAD54B-deficient cells and result in apoptosis. Collectively, these data identify SOD1 as a novel candidate cancer drug target and suggest that SOD1 inhibition may have broad-spectrum applicability in a variety of tumor types exhibiting RAD54B deficiencies.

  19. Phosphorus Deficiency Inhibits Cell Division But Not Growth in the Dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meizhen; Shi, Xinguo; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-h diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio) and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus. PMID:27313570

  20. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kung, Charles; Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-09-14

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A.; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. PMID:28760888

  2. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation.

  3. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation. PMID:27460411

  4. Allospecific rejection of MHC class I-deficient bone marrow by CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Haspot, Fabienne; Li, Hao Wei; Lucas, Carrie L.; Fehr, Thomas; Beyaz, Semir; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance of long-term immunosuppression is a desired goal in organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism offers a promising approach to tolerance induction, and we have aimed to develop low-toxicity, non-immunodepleting approaches to achieve this outcome. In a mouse model achieving fully MHC-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow engraftment with minimal conditioning (3 Gy total body irradiation followed by anti-CD154 and T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow cells), CD4 T cells in the recipient are required to promote tolerance of pre-existing alloreactive recipient CD8 T cells and thereby permit chimerism induction. We now demonstrate that mice devoid of CD4 T cells and NK cells reject MHC class-I deficient and class I/class II-deficient marrow in a CD8 T cell-dependent manner. This rejection is specific for donor alloantigens, since recipient hematopoiesis is not affected by donor marrow rejection and MHC class-I deficient bone marrow that is syngeneic to the recipient is not rejected. Recipient CD8 T cells are activated and develop cytotoxicity against MHC class I-deficient donor cells in association with rejection. These data implicate a novel CD8 T cell-dependent bone marrow rejection pathway, wherein recipient CD8 T cells indirectly activated by donor alloantigens promote direct killing, in a TCR-independent manner, of class I-deficient donor cells. PMID:24304495

  5. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-02-17

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  6. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Metcalf, Robert L; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P E; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Richard E B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Rothwell, Dominic G; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2016-11-09

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form 'endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (P<0.025). VM vessels are also observed in 9/10 CTC patient-derived explants (CDX), where molecular analysis of fractionated VE-cadherin-positive cells uncovered copy-number alterations and mutated TP53, confirming human tumour origin. VE-cadherin is required for VM in NCI-H446 SCLC xenografts, where VM decreases tumour latency and, despite increased cisplatin intra-tumour delivery, decreases cisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Stuart C.; Metcalf, Robert L.; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P. E.; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J. C.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L.; Blackhall, Fiona H.; Dive, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form ‘endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (P<0.025). VM vessels are also observed in 9/10 CTC patient-derived explants (CDX), where molecular analysis of fractionated VE-cadherin-positive cells uncovered copy-number alterations and mutated TP53, confirming human tumour origin. VE-cadherin is required for VM in NCI-H446 SCLC xenografts, where VM decreases tumour latency and, despite increased cisplatin intra-tumour delivery, decreases cisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27827359

  8. LKB1 inactivation sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to pharmacological aggravation of ER stress.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Friel, Jacqueline M; Richer, Amanda L; Fowler, Aaron J; Whitsett, Timothy; Smith, Michael A; Tran, Nhan L; Bremner, Ross M

    2014-10-01

    Five-year survival rates for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have seen minimal improvement despite aggressive therapy with standard chemotherapeutic agents, indicating a need for new treatment approaches. Studies show inactivating mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor are common in NSCLC. Genetic and mechanistic analysis has defined LKB1-deficient NSCLC tumors as a phenotypically distinct subpopulation of NSCLC with potential avenues for therapeutic gain. In expanding on previous work indicating hypersensitivity of LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells to 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), we find that 2DG has in vivo efficacy in LKB1-deficient NSCLC using transgenic murine models of NSCLC. Deciphering of the molecular mechanisms behind this phenotype reveals that loss of LKB1 in NSCLC cells imparts increased sensitivity to pharmacological compounds that aggravate ER stress. In comparison to NSCLC cells with functional LKB1, treatment of NSCLC cells lacking LKB1 with the ER stress activators (ERSA), tunicamycin, brefeldin A or 2DG, resulted in aggravation of ER stress, increased cytotoxicity, and evidence of ER stress-mediated cell death. Based upon these findings, we suggest that ERSAs represent a potential treatment avenue for NSCLC patients whose tumors are deficient in LKB1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC–MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson’s disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency. PMID:28367977

  10. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-04-03

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC-MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson's disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency.

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and thiamine deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Shilen V; Shah, Hiral N; Alexander, Kenneth; Finelli, Frederick C; Kirkpatrick, John R; Koch, Timothy R

    2008-05-01

    It has been proposed that thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients results from prolonged nausea and emesis. We hypothesized that thiamine deficiency is induced by altered gut ecology. This report includes 2 retrospective studies of obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery at our institution from 1999 to 2005. In the first study, 80 patients (52 women and 28 men) had measurement of whole-blood thiamine diphosphate level and serum folate level. In these 80 patients, 39 (49%) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range, and 28 (72%) of the 39 had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range, an indicator of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. In 41 patients with normal thiamine levels, only 14 (34%) had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range (chi(2) test, P < .01). In the second study, 21 patients (17 women and 4 men) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range and abnormal glucose-hydrogen breath tests, consistent with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Fifteen patients received oral thiamine supplements, but repeated thiamine levels remained low in all 15. Nine of these patients then received oral antibiotic therapy; repeated thiamine levels were found to be normal in all 9 patients. These results support the hypothesis that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth results from altered gut ecology and induces thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.

  12. Restoration of ATM Expression in DNA-PKcs-Deficient Cells Inhibits Signal End Joining.

    PubMed

    Neal, Jessica A; Xu, Yao; Abe, Masumi; Hendrickson, Eric; Meek, Katheryn

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)-deficient mouse cell strains, we show in the present study that targeted deletion of DNA-PKcs in two different human cell lines abrogates VDJ signal end joining in episomal assays. Although the mechanism is not well defined, DNA-PKcs deficiency results in spontaneous reduction of ATM expression in many cultured cell lines (including those examined in this study) and in DNA-PKcs-deficient mice. We considered that varying loss of ATM expression might explain differences in signal end joining in different cell strains and animal models, and we investigated the impact of ATM and/or DNA-PKcs loss on VDJ recombination in cultured human and rodent cell strains. To our surprise, in DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cell strains that are proficient in signal end joining, restoration of ATM expression markedly inhibits signal end joining. In contrast, in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells that are deficient in signal end joining, complete loss of ATM enhances signal (but not coding) joint formation. We propose that ATM facilitates restriction of signal ends to the classical nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  14. Calcium homeostasis and cell death in Sol8 dystrophin-deficient cell line in culture.

    PubMed

    Marchand, E; Constantin, B; Vandebrouck, C; Raymond, G; Cognard, C

    2001-02-01

    Abnormalities of calcium homeostasis are involved in the process of cell injuries such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy characterized by the absence of the protein dystrophin. But how the absence of dystrophin leads to cytosolic calcium overload is as yet poorly understood. This question has been addressed with skeletal muscle cells from human DMD muscles or mdx mice. Although easier to obtain than human muscles, mdx muscle cells have provided controversial data concerning the resting intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+](i)). This work describes the culture of Sol8 cell line that expresses neither dystrophin nor adhalin, a dystrophin-associated protein. The [Ca2+](i)and intracellular calcium transients induced by different stimuli (acetylcholine, caffeine and high potassium) are normal during the first days of culture. At later stages, calcium homeostasis exhibits drastic alterations with a breaking down of the calcium responses and a large [Ca2+](i)elevation. Concomitantly, Sol8 cells exhibit morphological signs of cell death like cytoplasmic shrinkage and incorporation of propidium iodide. Cell death could be significantly reduced by blocking the activity of calpains, a type of calcium-regulated proteases. These results suggest that Sol8 cell line provides an alternative model of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle cells for which a clear disturbance of the calcium homeostasis is observed in culture in association with calpain-dependent cell death. It is shown that transfection with a plasmid cDNA permits the forced expression of dystrophin in Sol8 myotubes as well as a correct sorting of the protein. This approach could be used to explore possible interactions between dystrophin deficiency, calcium homeostasis alteration, and dystrophic cell death. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  15. Involvement of two different cell death pathways in retinal atrophy of cathepsin D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Shibata, Masahiro; Ohsawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Koga, Tomoyuki; Kametaka, Satoshi; Waguri, Satoshi; Momoi, Takashi; Kominami, Eiki; Peters, Christoph; Figura, Kurt von; Saftig, Paul; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2003-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms of retinal atrophy in cathepsin D-deficient mice, the postnatal development of their retinae was analyzed. TUNEL-positive cells appeared abundantly in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and slightly in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was induced in microglial cells which invaded retinal layers and phagocytosed dead cell debris, while NOS inhibitors prevented cell death in the INL but not in the ONL. Caspases 9 and 3 were activated only in the ONL after P15. Moreover, no atrophic change was detected in the retina of mice deficient in cathepsin B or L. These results suggest that cathepsin D is essential for the metabolic maintenance of retinal photoreceptor cells and that its deficiency induces apoptosis of the cells, while the loss of INL neurons is mediated by NO from microglial cells.

  16. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  17. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting. PMID:25571970

  18. Cathepsin E Deficiency Ameliorates Graft-versus-Host Disease and Modifies Dendritic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mengwasser, Jörg; Babes, Liane; Cordes, Steffen; Mertlitz, Sarah; Riesner, Katarina; Shi, Yu; McGearey, Aleixandria; Kalupa, Martina; Reinheckel, Thomas; Penack, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Microbial products influence immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). In this context, the role of cathepsin E (Ctse), an aspartate protease known to cleave bacterial peptides for antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs), has not been studied. During experimental acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we found infiltration by Ctse-positive immune cells leading to higher Ctse RNA- and protein levels in target organs. In Ctse-deficient allo-SCT recipients, we found ameliorated GVHD, improved survival, and lower numbers of tissue-infiltrating DCs. Donor T cell proliferation was not different in Ctse-deficient vs. wild-type allo-SCT recipients in MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched models. Furthermore, Ctse-deficient DCs had an intact ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, suggesting that its role in antigen presentation may not be the main mechanism how Ctse impacts GVHD. We found that Ctse deficiency significantly decreases DC motility in vivo, reduces adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM), and diminishes invasion through ECM. We conclude that Ctse has a previously unrecognized role in regulating DC motility that possibly contributes to reduced DC counts and ameliorated inflammation in GVHD target organs of Ctse-deficient allo-SCT recipients. However, our data do not provide definite proof that the observed effect of Ctse−/− deficiency is exclusively mediated by DCs. A contribution of Ctse−/−-mediated functions in other recipient cell types, e.g., macrophages, cannot be excluded. PMID:28298913

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Regulation of the viability of Nf1 deficient cells by PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Ling; Parris, Toshima; Huang, Junchi; Yi, Bo; Helou, Khalil; Chen, Changyan

    2014-11-15

    Suppression of protein kinase C (PKC) is known to be synthetically lethal with ras mutations in various types of cancer cells. The studies also showed that blockade of PKC affected the viability of Nf1 deficient cells. Since PKC family consists of more than 10 isoforms, our study aimed at identifying which isoform(s) played the crucial role in sensitizing Nf1 deficient cells to apoptosis. Using genetic and chemical PKC inhibitors, we demonstrated that the concurrent inhibition of PKC α and β induced Nf1 deficient ST or 96.2 cells, but not SNF02.2 cells with a normal Nf1 or ST cells ectopically expressing Nf1 effective domain gene, to apoptosis. In this process, PKC δ in Nf1 deficient cells, but not in ST/Nf1 cells, was upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. Furthermore, caspase 3 was cleaved and cytochrome c was released to the cytosol. Thus, it appeared that PKC δ and α/β are the crucial components for sustaining the aberrant Ras signaling and further viability of Nf1 deficient cells. The abrogation of these two isoforms activated their opponent PKC δ for switching on the caspase 3-governed apoptotic machinery.

  1. Taurine deficiency damages retinal neurones: cone photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, David; Arnault, Emilie; Husson, Zoé; Froger, Nicolas; Dubus, Elisabeth; Gondouin, Pauline; Dherbécourt, Diane; Degardin, Julie; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Benahmed, M A; Elbayed, K; Namer, Izzie-Jacques; Massin, Pascale; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-11-01

    In 1970s, taurine deficiency was reported to induce photoreceptor degeneration in cats and rats. Recently, we found that taurine deficiency contributes to the retinal toxicity of vigabatrin, an antiepileptic drug. However, in this toxicity, retinal ganglion cells were degenerating in parallel to cone photoreceptors. The aim of this study was to re-assess a classic mouse model of taurine deficiency following a treatment with guanidoethane sulfonate (GES), a taurine transporter inhibitor to determine whether retinal ganglion cells are also affected. GES treatment induced a significant reduction in the taurine plasma levels and a lower weight increase. At the functional level, photopic electroretinograms were reduced indicating a dysfunction in the cone pathway. A change in the autofluorescence appearance of the eye fundus was explained on histological sections by an increased autofluorescence of the retinal pigment epithelium. Although the general morphology of the retina was not affected, cell damages were indicated by the general increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression. When cell quantification was achieved on retinal sections, the number of outer/inner segments of cone photoreceptors was reduced (20 %) as the number of retinal ganglion cells (19 %). An abnormal synaptic plasticity of rod bipolar cell dendrites was also observed in GES-treated mice. These results indicate that taurine deficiency can not only lead to photoreceptor degeneration but also to retinal ganglion cell loss. Cone photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells appear as the most sensitive cells to taurine deficiency. These results may explain the recent therapeutic interest of taurine in retinal degenerative pathologies.

  2. Impaired mast cell maturation and degranulation and attenuated allergic responses in Ndrg1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sunaga, Kohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Arata, Satoru; Okuda, Tomohiko; Moon, Tae-Chul; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is an early inducible protein during the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) toward a connective tissue mast cell-like phenotype. To clarify the function of NDRG1 in mast cells and allergic responses, we herein analyzed mast cell-associated phenotypes of mice lacking the Ndrg1 gene. Allergic responses including IgE-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were markedly attenuated in Ndrg1-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. In Ndrg1-deficient mice, dermal and peritoneal mast cells were decreased in number and morphologically abnormal with impaired degranulating ability. Ex vivo, Ndrg1-deficient BMMCs cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor, a condition that facilitates the maturation of BMMCs toward a CTMC-like phenotype, displayed less exocytosis than replicate wild-type cells after the cross-linking of FcepsilonRI or stimulation with compound 48/80, even though the exocytotic response of IL-3-maintained, immature BMMCs from both genotypes was comparable. Unlike degranulation, the production of leukotriene and cytokines by cocultured BMMCs was unaffected by NDRG1 deficiency. Taken together, the altered phenotypes of Ndrg1-deficient mast cells both in vivo and ex vivo suggest that NDRG1 has roles in the terminal maturation and effector function (degranulation) of mast cells.

  3. Regulatory T cells in the humoral response of protein deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Price, P; Turner, K J

    1979-01-01

    Cell suspensions from the spleen or thymus of mice fed normally or mice that were protein deficient were injected into mice from each dietary group and also syngeneic nudes. Antigen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), was injected at the stage of cell transfer and the antibody titres of the recipient animals were compared with those of control animals given only antigen. The regime was repeated using cell suspensions from donor animals which had been primed with antigen. These experiments showed that spleen cells were suppressive only when transferred from deficient to normal mice. Thymocytes generally lacked suppressive effects, except when given to irradiated mice also injected with "normal" spleen cells. However, thymocytes from deficient mice were marginally enhancing in nude mice, deficient mice and older "normals". To explain these results, it is suggested that responses to PVP are determined by distinct "suppressor-inducing" and "suppressor" T cells which act via helper T cells. The latter probably affect B cells directly and largely influence IgG production. It also appears likely that the ratio of helper to suppressor (inducer and effector) T cells is increased by protein deficiency. PMID:311719

  4. Regulatory T cells in the humoral response of protein deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Price, P; Turner, K J

    1979-01-01

    Cell suspensions from the spleen or thymus of mice fed normally or mice that were protein deficient were injected into mice from each dietary group and also syngeneic nudes. Antigen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), was injected at the stage of cell transfer and the antibody titres of the recipient animals were compared with those of control animals given only antigen. The regime was repeated using cell suspensions from donor animals which had been primed with antigen. These experiments showed that spleen cells were suppressive only when transferred from deficient to normal mice. Thymocytes generally lacked suppressive effects, except when given to irradiated mice also injected with "normal" spleen cells. However, thymocytes from deficient mice were marginally enhancing in nude mice, deficient mice and older "normals". To explain these results, it is suggested that responses to PVP are determined by distinct "suppressor-inducing" and "suppressor" T cells which act via helper T cells. The latter probably affect B cells directly and largely influence IgG production. It also appears likely that the ratio of helper to suppressor (inducer and effector) T cells is increased by protein deficiency.

  5. [Application of small molecule compounds inducing differentiation of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Shan, Lei; Li, Wen-lin; Zhang, Shou-de; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2011-02-01

    With the development of stem cells and regenerative medicine (treatment of various diseases using stem cells) research, the induction of differentiation of human stem cell technology has also made significant progress. The development of chemical biology offers a variety of small biological molecules for stem cell biology. This review focuses on how small molecule compounds (natural and synthetic) induce differentiation of stem cells.

  6. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27994588

  7. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity.

  8. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  9. Spindle checkpoint deficiency is tolerated by murine epidermal cells but not hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Foijer, Floris; DiTommaso, Tia; Donati, Giacomo; Hautaviita, Katta; Xie, Stephanie Z.; Heath, Emma; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Sorger, Peter K.; Bradley, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis by preventing aneuploidy, an event that is detrimental to the fitness and survival of normal cells but oncogenic in tumor cells. Deletion of SAC genes is incompatible with early mouse development, and RNAi-mediated depletion of SAC components in cultured cells results in rapid death. Here we describe the use of a conditional KO of mouse Mad2, an essential component of the SAC signaling cascade, as a means to selectively induce chromosome instability and aneuploidy in the epidermis of the skin. We observe that SAC inactivation is tolerated by interfollicular epidermal cells but results in depletion of hair follicle bulge stem cells. Eventually, a histologically normal epidermis develops within ∼1 mo after birth, albeit without any hair. Mad2-deficient cells in this epidermis exhibited abnormal transcription of metabolic genes, consistent with aneuploid cell state. Hair follicle bulge stem cells were completely absent, despite the continued presence of rudimentary hair follicles. These data demonstrate that different cell lineages within a single tissue respond differently to chromosome instability: some proliferating cell lineages can survive, but stem cells are highly sensitive. PMID:23382243

  10. [Single prostatic metastasis of a small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Yañez, Isabel; Perez Lopez, Maria Eva; Rodriguez Lopez, Jose Angel; Arias Santos, Maria Dolores; Garcia Gomez, Jesus; Garcia Mata, Jesus

    2009-03-01

    To make the difference between two uncommon entities, small cell prostate carcinoma and prostatic metastasis of small cell lung cancer. We describe a case of single extrapulmonar metastasis in the prostate from small lung carcinoma. We describe a case of single extrapulmonar metastasis in the prostate from small lung carcinoma. Clinical and radiographic findings and inmunohistochemistry allow differential diagnosis.

  11. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  12. Cells deficient in base-excision repair reveal cancer hallmarks originating from adjustments to genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Enni; Fischer, Roman; Ledentcova, Marina; Kessler, Benedikt M; Dianov, Grigory L

    2015-04-20

    Genetic instability, provoked by exogenous mutagens, is well linked to initiation of cancer. However, even in unstressed cells, DNA undergoes a plethora of spontaneous alterations provoked by its inherent chemical instability and the intracellular milieu. Base excision repair (BER) is the major cellular pathway responsible for repair of these lesions, and as deficiency in BER activity results in DNA damage it has been proposed that it may trigger the development of sporadic cancers. Nevertheless, experimental evidence for this model remains inconsistent and elusive. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of BER deficient human cells using stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), and demonstrate that BER deficiency, which induces genetic instability, results in dramatic changes in gene expression, resembling changes found in many cancers. We observed profound alterations in tissue homeostasis, serine biosynthesis, and one-carbon- and amino acid metabolism, all of which have been identified as cancer cell 'hallmarks'. For the first time, this study describes gene expression changes characteristic for cells deficient in repair of endogenous DNA lesions by BER. These expression changes resemble those observed in cancer cells, suggesting that genetically unstable BER deficient cells may be a source of pre-cancerous cells.

  13. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  14. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Deficiency in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Soo; Jin, Hye-Mi; Cho, Young-Nan; Kim, Moon-Ju; Kang, Jeong-Hwa; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Ki-Jeong; Kee, Hae Jin; Kee, Seung-Jung; Park, Yong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells have been reported to play an important role in mucosal immunity. However, little is known about the roles of MAIT cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aims of this study were to examine the levels of circulating MAIT cells and their subsets in COPD patients and to investigate the potential relationship between clinical parameters and MAIT cell levels. Forty-five COPD patients and 57 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Circulating MAIT cells and their subset levels in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Disease grades were classified according to the GOLD criteria for the assessment of severity of COPD. Circulating MAIT cell levels were found to be significantly reduced in COPD patients. In particular, this MAIT cell deficiency was more prominent in CD8+ and double-negative T cell subsets. Interestingly, elevated serum C-reactive protein level and reduced FEV1/FVC ratio were associated with MAIT cell deficiency in COPD patients. Furthermore, the circulating MAIT levels were found to be significantly lower in patients with moderate to severe COPD than in patients with mild COPD. Our data shows that MAIT cells are numerically deficient in the peripheral blood of patients with COPD. In addition, this MAIT cell deficiency was found to reflect inflammatory activity and disease severity. These findings provide important information for monitoring the changes in MAIT cell levels and for predicting the prognosis during the disease course.

  15. Natural killer (NK) cell deficiency associated with an epitope-deficient Fc receptor type IIIA (CD16-II)

    PubMed Central

    JAWAHAR, S.; MOODY, C.; CHAN, M.; FINBERG, R.; GEHA, R.; CHATILA, T.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility to herpes virus infections has been described in experimental animals depleted of NK cells and in patients with defective NK cell function. We have identified a child with recurrent infections, especially with herpes simplex virus, who had a decreased number of CD56+CD3− NK cells in circulation. Her NK cells expressed an altered form of the Fc receptor for IgG type IIIA (FcγRIIIA or CD16-II) which was not reactive with the anti-CD16-II MoAb B73.1. Sequence analysis revealed the patient to be homozygous for a T to A substitution at position 230 of CD16-II cDNA, predicting a Leu66 to His66 change in the first immunoglobulin domain of CD16-II at the B73.1 recognition site. Spontaneous NK cell activity of the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was markedly decreased, while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was unaffected. These results suggest that this child suffers from a defect affecting the development and function of NK cells, resulting in NK cytopenia and clinically significant immunodeficiency. The role of the CD16-II mutant in the pathogenesis of the patient's NK cell deficiency is discussed. PMID:8608639

  16. Decreased UV light resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair and small, acid-soluble spore proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, B.; Setlow, P.

    1988-05-01

    Loss of small, acid-soluble spore protein alpha reduced spore UV resistance 30- to 50-fold in Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair, but gave only a 5- to 8-fold reduction in UV resistance in repair-proficient strains. However, both repair-proficient and -deficient spores lacking this protein had identical heat and gamma-radiation resistance.

  17. The role of ATM in the deficiency in nonhomologous end-joining near telomeres in a human cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Keiko; Han, Limei; Miller, Douglas; Murnane, John P

    2013-03-01

    Telomeres distinguish chromosome ends from double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevent chromosome fusion. However, telomeres can also interfere with DNA repair, as shown by a deficiency in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and an increase in large deletions at telomeric DSBs. The sensitivity of telomeric regions to DSBs is important in the cellular response to ionizing radiation and oncogene-induced replication stress, either by preventing cell division in normal cells, or by promoting chromosome instability in cancer cells. We have previously proposed that the telomeric protein TRF2 causes the sensitivity of telomeric regions to DSBs, either through its inhibition of ATM, or by promoting the processing of DSBs as though they are telomeres, which is independent of ATM. Our current study addresses the mechanism responsible for the deficiency in repair of DSBs near telomeres by combining assays for large deletions, NHEJ, small deletions, and gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs) to compare the types of events resulting from DSBs at interstitial and telomeric DSBs. Our results confirm the sensitivity of telomeric regions to DSBs by demonstrating that the frequency of GCRs is greatly increased at DSBs near telomeres and that the role of ATM in DSB repair is very different at interstitial and telomeric DSBs. Unlike at interstitial DSBs, a deficiency in ATM decreases NHEJ and small deletions at telomeric DSBs, while it increases large deletions. These results strongly suggest that ATM is functional near telomeres and is involved in end protection at telomeric DSBs, but is not required for the extensive resection at telomeric DSBs. The results support our model in which the deficiency in DSB repair near telomeres is a result of ATM-independent processing of DSBs as though they are telomeres, leading to extensive resection, telomere loss, and GCRs involving alternative NHEJ.

  18. Leptin deficiency in vivo enhances the ability of splenic dendritic cells to activate T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Oscar; Garza, Kristine M

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine that is critical for regulating food intake and energy expenditure and also participates in functions of the immune system, including those of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we assess the effect of leptin deficiency on the function splenic dendritic cells (sDC). sDC from leptin-deficient mice (Lep(ob)) were evaluated ex vivo for phenotype, ability to respond to inflammatory stimuli, to acquire and process antigens and to activate T cells. The data show that Lep(ob) sDC express activation markers similar to controls and respond similarly to LPS activation or anti-CD40 cross-linking. In addition, antigen acquisition and processing by Lep(ob) sDC was similar to controls. However, Lep(ob) sDC elicited higher production of IFN-γ in mixed lymphocyte reactions and increased production of IL-2 by antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma relative to controls. To assess Lep(ob) sDC activation of T cells in vivo, Lep(ob) and control mice were infected systemically with Mycobacterium avium. Lep(ob) mice were significantly better at neutralizing the infection as measured by splenic bacterial load over time. This was mirrored with an increased percentage of activated T cells in M. avium-infected Lep(ob) mice. Thus, although no changes were detected in sDC phenotype, activation, antigen processing or presentation, these DC surprisingly presented an enhanced ability to activate T cells ex vivo and in vivo. These data demonstrate that leptin can modulate DC function and suggest that leptin may dampen T-cell responsiveness in the physiological setting. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Leptin deficiency in vivo enhances the ability of splenic dendritic cells to activate T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine that is critical for regulating food intake and energy expenditure and also participates in functions of the immune system, including those of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we assess the effect of leptin deficiency on the function splenic dendritic cells (sDC). sDC from leptin-deficient mice (Lepob) were evaluated ex vivo for phenotype, ability to respond to inflammatory stimuli, to acquire and process antigens and to activate T cells. The data show that Lepob sDC express activation markers similar to controls and respond similarly to LPS activation or anti-CD40 cross-linking. In addition, antigen acquisition and processing by Lepob sDC was similar to controls. However, Lepob sDC elicited higher production of IFN-γ in mixed lymphocyte reactions and increased production of IL-2 by antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma relative to controls. To assess Lepob sDC activation of T cells in vivo, Lepob and control mice were infected systemically with Mycobacterium avium. Lepob mice were significantly better at neutralizing the infection as measured by splenic bacterial load over time. This was mirrored with an increased percentage of activated T cells in M. avium-infected Lepob mice. Thus, although no changes were detected in sDC phenotype, activation, antigen processing or presentation, these DC surprisingly presented an enhanced ability to activate T cells ex vivo and in vivo. These data demonstrate that leptin can modulate DC function and suggest that leptin may dampen T-cell responsiveness in the physiological setting. PMID:24966213

  20. Malignant thoracopulmonary small-cell (Askin) tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, I.J.; Kurtz, D.W.; Cazenave, L.; Lieber, M.R.; Miser, J.S.; Chandra, R.; Triche, T.J.

    1985-09-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of 10 patients with documented malignant small-cell tumor of the thoracopulmonary region (Askin tumor) were reviewed. The tumor represents a distinct pathologic entity of neuroectodermal origin. Clinically, it presents as a chest-wall mass with or without pain. Its radiographic appearance is that of a soft-tissue mass with or without pleural or rib involvement, often with metastatic disease - to the skeletal system, bone marrow, thorax, and sympathetic chain. Two patients developed metastases to the adrenal gland and liver, one after autologous bone marrow transplantation. The radiologist should be aware of this entity and its pattern of metastatic spread since metastases are treated aggressively.

  1. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  2. Induction of mitotic catastrophe by PKC inhibition in Nf1-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shen, Ling; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Chen, Changyan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of tumor suppressor Nf1 gene deregulate Ras-mediated signaling, which confers the predisposition for developing benign or malignant tumors. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to be in synergy with aberrant Ras for the induction of apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. However, it has not been investigated whether loss of PKC is lethal for Nf1-deficient cells. In this study, using HMG (3-hydroxy-3-methylgutaryl, a PKC inhibitor), we demonstrate that the inhibition of PKC by HMG treatment triggered a persistently mitotic arrest, resulting in the occurrence of mitotic catastrophe in Nf1-deficient ST8814 cells. However, the introduction of the Nf1 effective domain gene into ST8814 cells abolished this mitotic crisis. In addition, HMG injection significantly attenuated the growth of the xenografted ST8814 tumors. Moreover, Chk1 was phosphorylated, accompanied with the persistent increase of cyclin B1 expression in HMG-treated ST8814 cells. The knockdown of Chk1 by the siRNA prevented the Nf1-deficient cells from undergoing HMG-mediated mitotic arrest as well as mitotic catastrophe. Thus, our data suggested that the suppression of PKC activates the Chk1-mediated mitotic exit checkpoint in Nf1-deficient cells, leading to the induction of apoptosis via mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, the study indicates that targeting PKC may be a potential option for developing new strategies to treat Nf1-deficiency-related diseases.

  3. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  4. Natural killer cell deficiencies in a consecutive series of children with herpetic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Almerigogna, F; Fassio, F; Giudizi, M G; Biagiotti, R; Manuelli, C; Chiappini, E; Galli, L; Romagnani, S; De Martino, M

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a fundamental role in innate and early phases of adaptive immunity against viral infections, both in humans and in animal models. To date, NK cell deficiencies in patients with severe herpetic infections have been reported in single cases, and their role as predisposing factor is still controversial. Five children affected by herpetic encephalitis were consecutively admitted to the Anna Meyer Children's Hospital in Florence (Italy) between 2003 and 2005. We therefore investigated the presence of NK cell deficiencies in a consecutive series of children with herpetic encephalitis. Five healthy children were included in the study as controls. Differential WBC counts, main Ig and IgE class serum analysis, cytofluorimetric analysis of circulating T, B and NK cells were performed on our study population. Sequencing of a selected region of CD16A gene transcript was carried out in two patients. All patients resulted to be affected by deficiencies related to NK cells in respect to controls. One patient was also affected by lymphopenia, while no other significant deficits of immunity were detected in the study population. To date, this is the first survey that demonstrates isolated NK cell deficiencies in a cohort of consecutive patients affected by severe herpes simplex infections. These findings suggest a role for NK cell deficiencies as a predisposing factor for increased susceptibility and severe course of disease in these patients.

  5. Centrilobular endothelial cell injury by diquat in the selenium-deficient rat liver.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J B; Hill, K E; Burk, R F

    2001-02-01

    Low doses of diquat cause massive liver necrosis and death of selenium-deficient rats within a few hours. Protection against this injury by selenium correlates with the presence of selenoprotein P, an extracellular selenoprotein that associates with endothelial cells. Selenium-deficient rats were injected with diquat (10 mg/kg) and their livers were removed for light and electron microscopy at times up to 120 minutes after injection. Selenium-replete animals were studied before and 120 minutes after the same dose of diquat. With selenium deficiency, diquat caused injury to centrilobular endothelial cells. This injury was evident 20 minutes after diquat injection and progressed to cell loss at 60 minutes after diquat injection. At 120 minutes, endothelial cells were virtually absent from the centrilobular regions and hepatocytes in those areas were undergoing necrosis. Portal and midzonal areas remained normal in selenium-deficient livers, as did the entire liver lobule of selenium-replete rats. These findings indicate that the initial liver lesion in selenium-deficient rats given diquat is injury of the endothelial cells in the centrilobular region. After detachment of the endothelial cells, centrilobular hepatocytes undergo necrosis. We postulate that selenoprotein P protects the centrilobular endothelial cells against injury by oxidant molecules that result from diquat administration.

  6. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  7. Marked increase of calcium uptake in the ATP-depleted red cells of patients with iron deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoda, M.; Yawata, Y.

    1985-05-01

    Calcium (Ca) uptake was markedly increased in ATP-depleted red cells of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) compared to ATP- depleted normal red cells. The extent of increased Ca uptake was related to the severity of iron deficiency as judged by decreased mean cell volume. Moreover, the increased Ca uptake returned to normal levels after oral iron supplementation therapy. The net calcium content of fresh red cells from iron-deficient individuals was the same as in red cells from normal subjects. Sodium influx and ferric ion uptake appeared to be virtually unaffected in the iron deficient red cells.

  8. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia using density-based fractionation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Kumar, Ashok A; Wiltschko, Alex B; Patton, Matthew R; Lee, Si Yi Ryan; Brugnara, Carlo; Adams, Ryan P; Whitesides, George M

    2016-10-05

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a nutritional disorder that impacts over one billion people worldwide; it may cause permanent cognitive impairment in children, fatigue in adults, and suboptimal outcomes in pregnancy. IDA can be diagnosed by detection of red blood cells (RBCs) that are characteristically small (microcytic) and deficient in hemoglobin (hypochromic), typically by examining the results of a complete blood count performed by a hematology analyzer. These instruments are expensive, not portable, and require trained personnel; they are, therefore, unavailable in many low-resource settings. This paper describes a low-cost and rapid method to diagnose IDA using aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS)-thermodynamically stable mixtures of biocompatible polymers and salt that spontaneously form discrete layers having sharp steps in density. AMPS are preloaded into a microhematocrit tube and used with a drop of blood from a fingerstick. After only two minutes in a low-cost centrifuge, the tests (n = 152) were read by eye with a sensitivity of 84% (72-93%) and a specificity of 78% (68-86%), corresponding to an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. The AMPS test outperforms diagnosis by hemoglobin alone (AUC = 0.73) and is comparable to methods used in clinics like reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (AUC = 0.91). Standard machine learning tools were used to analyze images of the resulting tests captured by a standard desktop scanner to 1) slightly improve diagnosis of IDA-sensitivity of 90% (83-96%) and a specificity of 77% (64-87%), and 2) predict several important red blood cell parameters, such as mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These results suggest that the use of AMPS combined with machine learning provides an approach to developing point-of-care hematology.

  9. Effects of Vitamin B6 Deficiency on the Composition and Functional Potential of T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Bingjun; Shen, Shanqi; Zhang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is critical in preventing infection and cancer, and malnutrition can weaken different aspects of the immune system to undermine immunity. Previous studies suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency could decrease serum antibody production with concomitant increase in IL4 expression. However, evidence on whether vitamin B6 deficiency would impair immune cell differentiation, cytokines secretion, and signal molecule expression involved in JAK/STAT signaling pathway to regulate immune response remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of vitamin B6 deficiency on the immune system through analysis of T lymphocyte differentiation, IL-2, IL-4, and INF-γ secretion, and SOCS-1 and T-bet gene transcription. We generated a vitamin B6-deficient mouse model via vitamin B6-depletion diet. The results showed that vitamin B6 deficiency retards growth, inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, and interferes with its differentiation. After ConA stimulation, vitamin B6 deficiency led to decrease in IL-2 and increase in IL-4 but had no influence on IFN-γ. Real-time PCR analysis showed that vitamin B6 deficiency downregulated T-bet and upregulated SOCS-1 transcription. This study suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency influenced the immunity in organisms. Meanwhile, the appropriate supplement of vitamin B6 could benefit immunity of the organism. PMID:28367454

  10. Management of desmoplastic small round cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Modak, Shakeel

    2016-10-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a soft tissue sarcoma of mesenchymal cell origin that typically presents with multiple intra-abdominal tumors and exhibits a multi-phenotypic pattern of immunohistochemical staining. The specific organ or tissue type of origin has yet to be identified. DSRCT rarely arises as a singular tumor in the abdomen; in most cases, there are dozens to hundreds of abdominal peritoneal tumors that are detected on diagnosis. One very large dominant mass is usually present in the omentum, with an additional one or two large conglomerates of tumors in the pelvis and right peritoneum, respectively. Despite an often overwhelmingly large number of abdominal tumors, symptoms of bowel obstruction are rare. Ascites may be present. In late stages, pleural effusions, pleural implants, mediastinal adenopathy, supraclavicular adenopathy, or bone metastasis may be present. With this challenging disease, multidisciplinary therapy, including aggressive surgery, is warranted. This review will address DSRCT biology and treatment options and discuss outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ccr5 deficiency regulates the proliferation and trafficking of natural killer cells under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ido D; Shoham, Hadas; Wald, Ori; Wald, Hanna; Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Barashi, Neta; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2011-06-01

    Chemokines were shown to govern the trafficking of immune cells and may also play important roles in the survival and activation of these cells. We report here that under physiological conditions, the bone marrow (BM), spleen, blood and liver of Ccr5, but not of Ccr1-deficient mice, contain reduced numbers of NK cells. NK cells in the BM of Ccr5-deficient mice proliferate to a lesser extent compared to WT mice. Furthermore, spleen NK cells derived from Ccr5-deficient mice that were transplanted into irradiated recipients failed to proliferate in the host. Ccr5, but not Ccr1-deficient NK cells, failed to migrate in vitro in response to RANTES and MIP-1β but not MIP-1β or SDF-1 and had reduced activation, lower expression levels of NK cell markers and a slightly reduced capacity to adhere to target cells and stimulate their killing. Using the polyI:C mouse model for NK trafficking, we found that in the absence of Ccr5, but not Ccr1, NK cells failed to accumulate in the liver. In contrast, using the influenza viral infection as a model to evaluate NK cell proliferation, we found that Ccr5-deficient NK cells in the BM had a higher proliferation rate than WT NK cells. These results suggest a role for Ccr5 in NK cell proliferation and circulation under physiological conditions and a complex role for Ccr5 in determining the fate of NK cells under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Exacerbated experimental arthritis in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficiency: modulatory role of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Gerben; Carter, Natalie A; Recher, Mike; Malinova, Dessislava; Adriani, Marsilio; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Burns, Siobhan O; Mauri, Claudia; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    Patients deficient in the cytoskeletal regulator Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) are predisposed to varied autoimmunity, suggesting it has an important controlling role in participating cells. IL-10-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells are emerging as important mediators of immunosuppressive activity. In experimental, antigen-induced arthritis WASp-deficient (WASp knockout [WAS KO]) mice developed exacerbated disease associated with decreased Breg cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells, but increased Th17 cells in knee-draining LNs. Arthritic WAS KO mice showed increased serum levels of B-cell-activating factor, while their B cells were unresponsive in terms of B-cell-activating factor induced survival and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of WT Breg cells ameliorated arthritis in WAS KO recipients and restored a normal balance of Treg and Th17 cells. Mice with B-cell-restricted WASp deficiency, however, did not develop exacerbated arthritis, despite exhibiting reduced Breg- and Treg-cell numbers during active disease, and Th17 cells were not increased over equivalent WT levels. These findings support a contributory role for defective Breg cells in the development of WAS-related autoimmunity, but demonstrate that functional competence in other regulatory populations can be compensatory. A properly regulated cytoskeleton is therefore important for normal Breg-cell activity and complementation of defects in this lineage is likely to have important therapeutic benefits. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Suppression of autophagy enhances preferential toxicity of paclitaxel to folliculin-deficient renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, can induce apoptosis in variety of cancer cells. A previous study has shown preferential toxicity of paclitaxel to FLCN-deficient kidney cancer cell line, UOK257. In this report, we investigate the cellular and molecular mechanism of paclitaxel-induced autophagy and apoptosis in renal cancer cells with and without FLCN expression. Methods Two pairs of cell lines were used: FLCN siRNA-silenced ACHN cell line (ACHN-5968) and scrambled ACHN cell line (ACHN-sc); FLCN-null UOK257 cell line and UOK257-2 cell line restored with ectopic expression of FLCN. Autophagy was examined by western blot, GFP-LC3, transmission electron microscopy, and MDC assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected using MTT assay, DAPI stain and TUNEL assay. After inhibition of autophagy with 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) or Beclin 1 siRNA, cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and TUNEL assay. Results After paclitaxel treatment, a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and increase in apoptosis were observed in FLCN-deficient UOK257 and ACHN-5968 cells compared to their FLCN-expressing counterparts, suggesting that renal cancer cells without FLCN were more sensitive to paclitaxel. Enhanced autophagy was found to be associated with paclitaxel treatment in FLCN-deficient RCC cells. The MAPK pathway was also identified as a key pathway for the activation of autophagy in these kidney cancer cells. Inhibition of phosphorylated ERK with ERK inhibitor U0126 showed a significant decrease in autophagy. Furthermore, after inhibition of autophagy with 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) or Beclin 1 siRNA, apoptosis induced by paclitaxel was significantly increased in FLCN-deficient UOK257 and ACHN-5968 cells. Conclusions Preferential toxicity of paclitaxel to FLCN-deficient kidney cancer cells is associated with enhanced autophagy. Suppression of autophagy further enhances paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in FLCN-deficient renal cancer cells. Our

  14. Severe mitochondrial damage associated with low-dose radiation sensitivity in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Junya; Komatsu, Kenshi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-dose radiation risks remain unclear owing to a lack of sufficient studies. We previously reported that low-dose, long-term fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 d inflicts oxidative stress in human fibroblasts due to excess levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). To identify the small effects of low-dose radiation, we investigated how mitochondria respond to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive human ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS)1-deficient cell lines compared with corresponding cell lines expressing ATM and NBS1. Consistent with previous results in normal fibroblasts, low-dose, long-term FR increased mitochondrial mass and caused accumulation of mitochondrial ROS in ATM- and NBS1-complemented cell lines. Excess mitochondrial ROS resulted in mitochondrial damage that was in turn recognized by Parkin, leading to mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). In contrast, ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells showed defective induction of mitophagy after low-dose, long-term FR, leading to accumulation of abnormal mitochondria; this was determined by mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Consequently, apoptosis was induced in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells after low-dose, long-term FR. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine was effective as a radioprotective agent against mitochondrial damage induced by low-dose, long-term FR among all cell lines, including radiosensitive cell lines. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mitochondria are target organelles of low-dose radiation. Mitochondrial response influences radiation sensitivity in human cells. Our findings provide new insights into cancer risk estimation associated with low-dose radiation exposure. PMID:26940879

  15. Severe mitochondrial damage associated with low-dose radiation sensitivity in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Junya; Komatsu, Kenshi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose radiation risks remain unclear owing to a lack of sufficient studies. We previously reported that low-dose, long-term fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 d inflicts oxidative stress in human fibroblasts due to excess levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). To identify the small effects of low-dose radiation, we investigated how mitochondria respond to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive human ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS)1-deficient cell lines compared with corresponding cell lines expressing ATM and NBS1. Consistent with previous results in normal fibroblasts, low-dose, long-term FR increased mitochondrial mass and caused accumulation of mitochondrial ROS in ATM- and NBS1-complemented cell lines. Excess mitochondrial ROS resulted in mitochondrial damage that was in turn recognized by Parkin, leading to mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). In contrast, ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells showed defective induction of mitophagy after low-dose, long-term FR, leading to accumulation of abnormal mitochondria; this was determined by mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Consequently, apoptosis was induced in ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells after low-dose, long-term FR. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine was effective as a radioprotective agent against mitochondrial damage induced by low-dose, long-term FR among all cell lines, including radiosensitive cell lines. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mitochondria are target organelles of low-dose radiation. Mitochondrial response influences radiation sensitivity in human cells. Our findings provide new insights into cancer risk estimation associated with low-dose radiation exposure.

  16. Natural killer cells eradicate galectin-1-deficient glioma in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Doherty, Robert; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-09-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells safeguard against early tumor formation by destroying transformed target cells in a process referred to as NK immune surveillance. However, the immune escape mechanisms used by malignant brain tumors to subvert this innate type of immune surveillance remain unclear. Here we show that malignant glioma cells suppress NK immune surveillance by overexpressing the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1. Conversely, galectin-1-deficient glioma cells could be eradicated by host NK cells before the initiation of an antitumor T-cell response. In vitro experiments demonstrated that galectin-1-deficient GL26-Cit glioma cells are ∼3-fold more sensitive to NK-mediated tumor lysis than galectin-1-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 suppression in human glioma could improve patient survival by restoring NK immune surveillance that can eradicate glioma cells. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5079-90. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Capicua deficiency induces autoimmunity and promotes follicular helper T cell differentiation via derepression of ETV5

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seungwon; Lee, Choong-Gu; Park, Guk Yeol; Hong, Hyebeen; Lee, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Sung Bae; Hwang, Daehee; Choi, Youn Soo; Fryer, John D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Yoontae

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity antibody production through the germinal centre (GC) response is a pivotal process in adaptive immunity. Abnormal development of follicular helper T (TFH) cells can induce the GC response to self-antigens, subsequently leading to autoimmunity. Here we show the transcriptional repressor Capicua/CIC maintains peripheral immune tolerance by suppressing aberrant activation of adaptive immunity. CIC deficiency induces excessive development of TFH cells and GC responses in a T-cell-intrinsic manner. ETV5 expression is derepressed in Cic null TFH cells and knockdown of Etv5 suppresses the enhanced TFH cell differentiation in Cic-deficient CD4+ T cells, suggesting that Etv5 is a critical CIC target gene in TFH cell differentiation. Furthermore, we identify Maf as a downstream target of the CIC–ETV5 axis in this process. These data demonstrate that CIC maintains T-cell homeostasis and negatively regulates TFH cell development and autoimmunity. PMID:28855737

  18. A nucleolytic lupus autoantibody is toxic to BRCA2-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Philip W.; Young, Melissa R.; Bernatsky, Sasha; Weisbart, Richard H.; Hansen, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells with defects in DNA repair are highly susceptible to DNA-damaging agents, but delivery of therapeutic agents into cell nuclei can be challenging. A subset of lupus autoantibodies is associated with nucleolytic activity, and some of these antibodies are capable of nuclear penetration. We hypothesized that such antibodies might have potential as therapeutic agents targeted towards DNA repair-deficient malignancies. We identified the lupus autoantibody 5C6 as a cell-penetrating nucleolytic antibody and found that 5C6 has a differential effect on a matched pair of BRCA2-proficient and deficient DLD1 colon cancer cells. 5C6 selectively induced γH2AX in, and suppressed the growth of, the BRCA2-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate the potential utility of 5C6 in targeted therapy for DNA repair-deficient malignancies and strengthen the rationale for studies of additional lupus autoantibodies in order to identify the best candidates for development as therapeutic agents. In addition, the toxic effect of 5C6 on BRCA2-deficient cells provides further support for the hypothesis that some lupus autoantibodies contribute to the lower risk of specific cancers associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:25091037

  19. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  20. RAD51C-deficient cancer cells are highly sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib.

    PubMed

    Min, Ahrum; Im, Seock-Ah; Yoon, Young-Kwang; Song, Sang-Hyun; Nam, Hyun-Jin; Hur, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-You; O'Connor, Mark J; Kim, Woo-Ho; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2013-06-01

    A PARP inhibitor is a rationally designed targeted therapy for cancers with impaired DNA repair abilities. RAD51C is a paralog of RAD51 that has an important role in the DNA damage response. We found that cell lines sensitive to a novel oral PARP inhibitor, olaparib, had low levels of RAD51C expression using microarray analysis, and we therefore hypothesized that low expression of RAD51C may hamper the DNA repair process, resulting in increased sensitivity to olaparib. Compared with the cells with normal RAD51C expression levels, RAD51C-deficient cancer cells were more sensitive to olaparib, and a higher proportion underwent cell death by inducing G2-M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The restoration of RAD51C in a sensitive cell line caused attenuation of olaparib sensitivity. In contrast, silencing of RAD51C in a resistant cell line enhanced the sensitivity to olaparib, and the number of RAD51 foci decreased with ablated RAD51C expression. We also found the expression of RAD51C was downregulated in cancer cells due to epigenetic changes and RAD51C expression was low in some gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, olaparib significantly suppressed RAD51C-deficient tumor growth in a xenograft model. In summary, RAD51C-deficient cancer cells are highly sensitive to olaparib and offer preclinical proof-of-principle that RAD51C deficiency may be considered a biomarker for predicting the antitumor effects of olaparib. ©2013 AACR

  1. KLF2 deficiency in T cells results in unrestrained cytokine production and bystander chemokine receptor upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Michael A.; Takada, Kensuke; Skon, Cara; Reiner, Steven L.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcription factor KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by promoting expression of the lipid binding receptor, S1P1, and the selectin, CD62L. Recently, it was proposed that KLF2 also represses the expression of chemokine receptors. We confirm the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on KLF2 deficient T cells. However, we show that this is a cell nonautonomous effect, as revealed by CXCR3 upregulation on WT bystander cells in mixed bone marrow chimeras with KLF2 deficient cells. Furthermore, we show that KLF2 deficient T cells overproduce IL-4, leading to the upregulation of CXCR3 through an IL-4 receptor and eomesodermin dependent pathway. Consistent with the increased IL-4 production, we find high levels of serum IgE in mice with T cell specific KLF2 deficiency. Our findings support a model where KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by direct regulation of S1P1 and CD62L, and restrains spontaneous cytokine production in naive T cells. PMID:19592277

  2. Mutation of Fnip1 is associated with B-cell deficiency, cardiomyopathy, and elevated AMPK activity

    PubMed Central

    Siggs, Owen M.; Stockenhuber, Alexander; Deobagkar-Lele, Mukta; Bull, Katherine R.; Crockford, Tanya L.; Kingston, Bethany L.; Crawford, Greg; Anzilotti, Consuelo; Steeples, Violetta; Ghaffari, Sahar; Czibik, Gabor; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Watkins, Hugh; Ashrafian, Houman; Davies, Benjamin; Woods, Angela; Carling, David; Yavari, Arash; Beutler, Bruce; Cornall, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Folliculin (FLCN) is a tumor-suppressor protein mutated in the Birt–Hogg–Dubé (BHD) syndrome, which associates with two paralogous proteins, folliculin-interacting protein (FNIP)1 and FNIP2, forming a complex that interacts with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Although it is clear that this complex influences AMPK and other metabolic regulators, reports of its effects have been inconsistent. To address this issue, we created a recessive loss-of-function variant of Fnip1. Homozygous FNIP1 deficiency resulted in profound B-cell deficiency, partially restored by overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2, whereas heterozygous deficiency caused a loss of marginal zone B cells. FNIP1-deficient mice developed cardiomyopathy characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and glycogen accumulation, with close parallels to mice and humans bearing gain-of-function mutations in the γ2 subunit of AMPK. Concordantly, γ2-specific AMPK activity was elevated in neonatal FNIP1-deficient myocardium, whereas AMPK-dependent unc-51–like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) phosphorylation and autophagy were increased in FNIP1-deficient B-cell progenitors. These data support a role for FNIP1 as a negative regulator of AMPK. PMID:27303042

  3. Surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation initiate cancer in cytokeratin-19+- liver cells deficient for p53 and Rb

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, Klaas M; van Vuuren, Luciel D; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Nijkamp, Maarten W; Pandit, Shusil K; Tooten, Peter CJ; Koster, Mirjam H; Holleman, Kaylee; Schot, Arend; Gu, Guoqiang; Spee, Bart; Roskams, Tania; Rinkes, Inne Borel; Schotanus, Baukje; Kranenburg, Onno; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The long term prognosis of liver cancer patients remains unsatisfactory because of cancer recurrence after surgical interventions, particularly in patients with viral infections. Since hepatitis B and C viral proteins lead to inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and Retinoblastoma (Rb), we hypothesize that surgery in the context of p53/Rb inactivation initiate de novo tumorigenesis. We, therefore, generated transgenic mice with hepatocyte and cholangiocyte/liver progenitor cell (LPC)-specific deletion of p53 and Rb, by interbreeding conditional p53/Rb knockout mice with either Albumin-cre or Cytokeratin-19-cre transgenic mice. We show that liver cancer develops at the necrotic injury site after surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation in p53/Rb deficient livers. Cancer initiation occurs as a result of specific migration, expansion and transformation of cytokeratin-19+-liver (CK-19+) cells. At the injury site migrating CK-19+ cells formed small bile ducts and adjacent cells strongly expressed the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Isolated cytokeratin-19+ cells deficient for p53/Rb were resistant against hypoxia and TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition. CK-19+ specific deletion of p53/Rb verified that carcinomas at the injury site originates from cholangiocytes or liver progenitor cells. These findings suggest that human liver patients with hepatitis B and C viral infection or with mutations for p53 and Rb are at high risk to develop tumors at the surgical intervention site. PMID:27323406

  4. Surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation initiate cancer in cytokeratin-19+- liver cells deficient for p53 and Rb.

    PubMed

    Matondo, Ramadhan B; Toussaint, Mathilda Jm; Govaert, Klaas M; van Vuuren, Luciel D; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Nijkamp, Maarten W; Pandit, Shusil K; Tooten, Peter Cj; Koster, Mirjam H; Holleman, Kaylee; Schot, Arend; Gu, Guoqiang; Spee, Bart; Roskams, Tania; Rinkes, Inne Borel; Schotanus, Baukje; Kranenburg, Onno; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-08-23

    The long term prognosis of liver cancer patients remains unsatisfactory because of cancer recurrence after surgical interventions, particularly in patients with viral infections. Since hepatitis B and C viral proteins lead to inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and Retinoblastoma (Rb), we hypothesize that surgery in the context of p53/Rb inactivation initiate de novo tumorigenesis.We, therefore, generated transgenic mice with hepatocyte and cholangiocyte/liver progenitor cell (LPC)-specific deletion of p53 and Rb, by interbreeding conditional p53/Rb knockout mice with either Albumin-cre or Cytokeratin-19-cre transgenic mice.We show that liver cancer develops at the necrotic injury site after surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation in p53/Rb deficient livers. Cancer initiation occurs as a result of specific migration, expansion and transformation of cytokeratin-19+-liver (CK-19+) cells. At the injury site migrating CK-19+ cells formed small bile ducts and adjacent cells strongly expressed the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Isolated cytokeratin-19+ cells deficient for p53/Rb were resistant against hypoxia and TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition. CK-19+ specific deletion of p53/Rb verified that carcinomas at the injury site originates from cholangiocytes or liver progenitor cells.These findings suggest that human liver patients with hepatitis B and C viral infection or with mutations for p53 and Rb are at high risk to develop tumors at the surgical intervention site.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes L-forms respond to cell wall deficiency by modifying gene expression and the mode of division.

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Simone; Buchrieser, Carmen; Couvé, Elisabeth; Schnell, Barbara; Briers, Yves; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J

    2009-07-01

    Cell wall-deficient bacteria referred to as L-forms have lost the ability to maintain or build a rigid peptidoglycan envelope. We have generated stable, non-reverting L-form variants of the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, and studied the cellular and molecular changes associated with this transition. Stable L-form cells can occur as small protoplast-like vesicles and as multinucleated, large bodies. They have lost the thick, multilayered murein sacculus and are surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane only, although peptidoglycan precursors are still produced. While they lack murein-associated molecules including Internalin A, membrane-anchored proteins such as Internalin B are retained. Surprisingly, L-forms were found to be able to divide and propagate indefinitely without a wall. Time-lapse microscopy of fluorescently labelled L-forms indicated a switch to a novel form of cell division, where genome-containing membrane vesicles are first formed within enlarged L-forms, and subsequently released by collapse of the mother cell. Array-based transcriptomics of parent and L-form cells revealed manifold differences in expression of genes associated with morphological and physiological functions. The L-forms feature downregulated metabolic functions correlating with the dramatic shift in surface to volume ratio, whereas upregulation of stress genes reflects the difficulties in adapting to this unusual, cell wall-deficient lifestyle.

  6. Influence of zinc deficiency on cell-membrane fluidity in Jurkat, 3T3 and IMR-32 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Zago, M Paola; MacKenzie, Gerardo G; Keen, Carl L; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether zinc deficiency can affect plasma membrane rheology. Three cell lines, human leukaemia T-cells (Jurkat), rat fibroblasts (3T3) and human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32), were cultured for 48 h in control medium, in zinc-deficient medium (1.5 microM zinc; 1.5 Zn), or in the zinc-deficient medium supplemented with 15 microM zinc (15 Zn). The number of viable cells was lower in the 1.5 Zn group than in the control and 15 Zn groups. The frequency of apoptosis was higher in the 1.5 Zn group than in the control and 15 Zn groups. Membrane fluidity was evaluated using the 6-(9-anthroyloxy)stearic acid and 16-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitic acid probes. Membrane fluidity was higher in 1.5 Zn cells than in the control cells; no differences were observed between control cells and 15 Zn cells. The effect of zinc deficiency on membrane fluidity at the water/lipid interface was associated with a higher phosphatidylserine externalization. The higher membrane fluidity in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer was correlated with a lower content of arachidonic acid. We suggest that the increased fluidity of the membrane secondary to zinc deficiency is in part due to a decrease in arachidonic acid content and the apoptosis-related changes in phosphatidylserine distribution. PMID:14629198

  7. Reconstitution of T cell receptor signaling in ZAP-70-deficient cells by retroviral transduction of the ZAP-70 gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Bacon, K B; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kadlecek, T A; Uribe, L; Kohn, D B; Gelfand, E W; Weiss, A; Weinberg, K

    1996-11-01

    A variant of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) with a selective inability to produce CD8 single positive T cells and a signal transduction defect in peripheral CD4+ cells has recently been shown to be the result of mutations in the ZAP-70 gene. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling requires the association of the ZAP-70 protein tyrosine kinase with the TCR complex. Human T cell leukemia virus type I-transformed CD4+ T cell lines were established from ZAP-70-deficient patients and normal controls. ZAP-70 was expressed and appropriately phosphorylated in normal T cell lines after TCR engagement, but was not detected in T cell lines from ZAP-70-deficient patients. To determine whether signaling could be reconstituted, wild-type ZAP-70 was introduced into deficient cells with a ZAP-70 retroviral vector. High titer producer clones expressing ZAP-70 were generated in the Gibbon ape leukemia virus packaging line PG13. After transduction, ZAP-70 was detected at levels equivalent to those observed in normal cells, and was appropriately phosphorylated on tyrosine after receptor engagement. The kinase activity of ZAP-70 in the reconstituted cells was also appropriately upregulated by receptor aggregation. Moreover, normal and transduced cells, but not ZAP-70-deficient cells, were able to mobilize calcium after receptor ligation, indicating that proximal TCR signaling was reconstituted. These results indicate that this form of SCID may be corrected by gene therapy.

  8. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Olivia I.; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ−/−) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ−/− mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ−/− mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ−/− mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ−/− and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine. PMID:24503767

  9. Clearance of Giardia muris infection in mice deficient in natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, M F; Kung, J E; Eriksson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice and beige mice (which are deficient in natural killer cells) were infected with Giardia muris. Both types of mice cleared G. muris infection at similar rates. This observation suggests that clearance of G. muris parasites from the mouse intestine is not mediated by natural killer cells. PMID:3781631

  10. Reconstitution of the NF1 GAP-related domain in NF1-deficient human Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stacey L.; Deadwyler, Gail D.; Tang, Jun; Stubbs, Evan B.; Muir, David; Hiatt, Kelly K. . E-mail: George.Devries@med.va.gov

    2006-09-29

    Schwann cells derived from peripheral nerve sheath tumors from individuals with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are deficient for the protein neurofibromin, which contains a GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD). Neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells have increased Ras activation, increased proliferation in response to certain growth stimuli, increased angiogenic potential, and altered cell morphology. This study examined whether expression of functional NF1-GRD can reverse the transformed phenotype of neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells from both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We reconstituted the NF1-GRD using retroviral transduction and examined the effects on cell morphology, growth potential, and angiogenic potential. NF1-GRD reconstitution resulted in morphologic changes, a 16-33% reduction in Ras activation, and a 53% decrease in proliferation in neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells. However, NF1-GRD reconstitution was not sufficient to decrease the in vitro angiogenic potential of the cells. This study demonstrates that reconstitution of the NF1-GRD can at least partially reverse the transformation of human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cells.

  11. B-cell development and functions and therapeutic options in adenosine deaminase–deficient patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigida, Immacolata; Sauer, Aisha V.; Ferrua, Francesca; Giannelli, Stefania; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pistoia, Valentina; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Barendregt, Barbara H.; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Brombin, Chiara; Puck, Jennifer; Müller, Klaus; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Montin, Davide; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes severe cellular and humoral immune defects and dysregulation because of metabolic toxicity. Alterations in B-cell development and function have been poorly studied. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy (GT) are therapeutic options for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) transplant donor. Objective We sought to study alterations in B-cell development in ADA-deficient patients and investigate the ability of ERT and HSC-GT to restore normal B-cell differentiation and function. Methods Flow cytometry was used to characterize B-cell development in BM and the periphery. The percentage of gene-corrected B cells was measured by using quantitative PCR. B cells were assessed for their capacity to proliferate and release IgM after stimulation. Results Despite the severe peripheral B-cell lymphopenia, patients with ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency showed a partial block in central BM development. Treatment with ERT or HSC-GT reverted most BM alterations, but ERT led to immature B-cell expansion. In the periphery transitional B cells accumulated under ERT, and the defect in maturation persisted long-term. HSC-GT led to a progressive improvement in B-cell numbers and development, along with increased levels of gene correction. The strongest selective advantage for ADA-transduced cells occurred at the transition from immature to naive cells. B-cell proliferative responses and differentiation to immunoglobulin secreting IgM after B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor triggering were severely impaired after ERT and improved significantly after HSC-GT. Conclusions ADA-deficient patients show specific defects in B-cell development and functions that are differently corrected after ERT and HSC-GT. PMID:24506932

  12. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-03-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells.

  13. Dissection of Autophagosome Formation Using Apg5-Deficient Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, Noboru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Hatano, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kabeya, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2001-01-01

    In macroautophagy, cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation via autophagosomes that are formed by closure of cup-shaped isolation membranes. However, how the isolation membranes are formed is poorly understood. We recently found in yeast that a novel ubiquitin-like system, the Apg12-Apg5 conjugation system, is essential for autophagy. Here we show that mouse Apg12-Apg5 conjugate localizes to the isolation membranes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Using green fluorescent protein–tagged Apg5, we revealed that the cup-shaped isolation membrane is developed from a small crescent-shaped compartment. Apg5 localizes on the isolation membrane throughout its elongation process. To examine the role of Apg5, we generated Apg5-deficient embryonic stem cells, which showed defects in autophagosome formation. The covalent modification of Apg5 with Apg12 is not required for its membrane targeting, but is essential for involvement of Apg5 in elongation of the isolation membranes. We also show that Apg12-Apg5 is required for targeting of a mammalian Aut7/Apg8 homologue, LC3, to the isolation membranes. These results suggest that the Apg12-Apg5 conjugate plays essential roles in isolation membrane development. PMID:11266458

  14. Non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Rossi, Antonio; Carbone, David P; Guarize, Juliana; Karachaliou, Niki; Mok, Tony; Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-05-21

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a heterogeneous class of tumours, represents approximately 85% of all new lung cancer diagnoses. Tobacco smoking remains the main risk factor for developing this disease, but radon exposure and air pollution also have a role. Most patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease owing to inadequate screening programmes and late onset of clinical symptoms; consequently, patients have a very poor prognosis. Several diagnostic approaches can be used for NSCLC, including X-ray, CT and PET imaging, and histological examination of tumour biopsies. Accurate staging of the cancer is required to determine the optimal management strategy, which includes surgery, radiochemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted approaches with anti-angiogenic monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors if tumours harbour oncogene mutations. Several of these driver mutations have been identified (for example, in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)), and therapy continues to advance to tackle acquired resistance problems. Also, palliative care has a central role in patient management and greatly improves quality of life. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/rWYFgg.

  15. Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Faridani, Omid R; Abdullayev, Ilgar; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Schell, John P; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the heterogeneity of small-RNA expression as small-RNA profiling has so far required large numbers of cells. Here we present a single-cell method for small-RNA sequencing and apply it to naive and primed human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Analysis of microRNAs and fragments of tRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) reveals the potential of microRNAs as markers for different cell types and states.

  16. Patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells derived RPE cells: understanding the pathogenesis of retinopathy in LCHAD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Polinati, Padmini; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Trokovic, Ras; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Otonkoski, Timo; Suomalainen, Anu; Skottman, Heli; Tyni, Tiina A

    2014-06-03

    Purpose: Retinopathy is an important manifestation of trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiencies but not of other defects of fatty acid oxidation. The common homozygous mutation in the TFP alpha subunit gene HADHA (hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase), c.1528G>C, affects the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) activity of TFP, and blindness in infancy. The pathogenesis of the retinopathy is unknown. This study aims to utilize human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology to create a disease model for the disorder, and to derive clues for retinopathy pathogenesis. Methods: We implemented hiPSC technology to generate LCHAD deficiency (LCHADD) patient specific retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) monolayers. These patient and control RPEs were extensively characterised for function and structure, as well as for lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Results: The hiPSC derived RPE monolayers of patients and controls were functional, as they both were able to phagocytose the photoreceptor outer segments in vitro. Interestingly, the patient RPEs had intense cytoplasmic neutral lipid accumulation and lipidomic analysis revealed an increased triglyceride accumulation. Further, patient RPEs were small and irregular in shape, and their tight junctions were disorganized. Their ultrastructure showed decreased pigmentation, few melanosomes, and more melanolysosomes. Conclusion: We demonstrate that RPE cell model reveals novel early pathogenic changes in LCHADD retinopathy, with robust lipid accumulation, inefficient pigmentation that is evident soon after differentiation, and a defect in forming tight junctions inducing apoptosis. We propose that LCHADD-RPEs are an important model for mitochondrial TFP retinopathy, and that their early pathogenic changes contribute to infantile blindness of LCHADD. Copyright © 2014 by Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

  17. Cell envelope stress response in cell wall-deficient L-forms of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Diana; Domínguez-Cuevas, Patricia; Daniel, Richard A; Mascher, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria that can grow and proliferate in osmotically stabilizing media. Recently, a strain of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis was constructed that allowed controlled switching between rod-shaped wild-type cells and corresponding L-forms. Both states can be stably maintained under suitable culture conditions. Because of the absence of a cell wall, L-forms are known to be insensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, but reports on the susceptibility of L-forms to other antibiotics that interfere with membrane-anchored steps of cell wall biosynthesis are sparse, conflicting, and strongly influenced by strain background and method of L-form generation. Here we investigated the response of B. subtilis to the presence of cell envelope antibiotics, with regard to both antibiotic resistance and the induction of the known LiaRS- and BceRS-dependent cell envelope stress biosensors. Our results show that B. subtilis L-forms are resistant to antibiotics that interfere with the bactoprenol cycle, such as bacitracin, vancomycin, and mersacidin, but are hypersensitive to nisin and daptomycin, which both affect membrane integrity. Moreover, we established a lacZ-based reporter gene assay for L-forms and provide evidence that LiaRS senses its inducers indirectly (damage sensing), while the Bce module detects its inducers directly (drug sensing).

  18. Cell Envelope Stress Response in Cell Wall-Deficient L-Forms of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Diana; Domínguez-Cuevas, Patricia; Daniel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria that can grow and proliferate in osmotically stabilizing media. Recently, a strain of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis was constructed that allowed controlled switching between rod-shaped wild-type cells and corresponding L-forms. Both states can be stably maintained under suitable culture conditions. Because of the absence of a cell wall, L-forms are known to be insensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, but reports on the susceptibility of L-forms to other antibiotics that interfere with membrane-anchored steps of cell wall biosynthesis are sparse, conflicting, and strongly influenced by strain background and method of L-form generation. Here we investigated the response of B. subtilis to the presence of cell envelope antibiotics, with regard to both antibiotic resistance and the induction of the known LiaRS- and BceRS-dependent cell envelope stress biosensors. Our results show that B. subtilis L-forms are resistant to antibiotics that interfere with the bactoprenol cycle, such as bacitracin, vancomycin, and mersacidin, but are hypersensitive to nisin and daptomycin, which both affect membrane integrity. Moreover, we established a lacZ-based reporter gene assay for L-forms and provide evidence that LiaRS senses its inducers indirectly (damage sensing), while the Bce module detects its inducers directly (drug sensing). PMID:22964256

  19. Targeting HIF2α Translation with Tempol in VHL-Deficient Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Manik C.; Ghosh, Sanchari; Yang, Youfeng; Gupta, Gopal; DeGraff, William; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.; Rouault, Tracey A.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene, Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), is frequently mutated in the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). In hypoxic conditions, or when there is a VHL mutation, the hypoxia inducible factors, HIF1α and HIF2α, are stabilized and transcribe a panel of genes associated with cancer such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Recent studies in clear cell kidney cancer have suggested that HIF2α, but not HIF1α, is the critical oncoprotein in the VHL pathway. Therefore, targeting HIF2α could provide a potential therapeutic approach for patients with advanced CCRCC. Since iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is known to inhibit the translation of HIF2α, we investigated whether Tempol, a stable nitroxide that activates IRP1 towards IRE-binding, might have a therapeutic effect on a panel of human CCRCC cells expressing both HIF1α and HIF2α. We first evaluated the protein expression of HIF1α and HIF2α in 15 different clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines established from patient tumors in our laboratory. Tempol decreased the expression of HIF2α, and its downstream targets in all the cell lines of the panel. This effect was attributed to a dramatic increase of IRE-binding activity of IRP1. Several cell lines were found to have an increased IRP1 basal activity at 20% O2 compared to 5% O2, which may lower HIF2α expression in some of the cell lines in a VHL-independent manner. Taken together our data identify Tempol as an agent with potential therapeutic activity targeting expression of HIF2α in VHL-deficient clear cell kidney cancer and illustrate the importance of studying biochemical processes at relevant physiological O2 levels. PMID:23178531

  20. Human neuroblastoma cell growth in xenogeneic hosts: comparison of T cell-deficient and NK-deficient hosts, and subcutaneous or intravenous injection routes.

    PubMed

    Turner, W J; Chatten, J; Lampson, L A

    1990-04-01

    We have examined two features of neuroblastoma cells that had not been well-characterized in a xenogeneic model: The cells display unusual immunologic properties in other experimental systems, and the original tumors display widespread and characteristic patterns of metastasis. To determine the most appropriate immunodeficient host for primary tumor growth, T cell-deficient nude mice, NK-deficient beige mice, beige-nudes, and controls were injected with the well-characterized line CHP-100. To define the pattern of tumor spread, complete autopsies were performed following subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous injections. CHP-100 consistently formed subcutaneous tumors in T cell-deficient mice (nude and beige-nude), but not in T cell-competent mice (beige, heterozygous nu/+ and bg/+, or wild-type). The growth rate and final size of the subcutaneous tumors were not greater in beige-nudes than in nudes. All mice showed early CHP-100 cell death after subcutaneous injection; the nature of the immunodeficiency was more relevant for the surviving subpopulation. Widespread dissemination was seen following intravenous injection, particularly in beige-nudes. Aspects of the growth patterns were appropriate to the tumor of origin. The behavior in immunodeficient mice suggests that T cells can play a role in controlling the growth of these cells; the next steps will be to define the effector mechanisms, and to determine if they can be exploited for human patients. The hematogenous spread following intravenous injection suggests that insights into the control of blood-borne tumor may also come from further study of this model.

  1. Cystine Deprivation Triggers Programmed Necrosis in VHL-Deficient Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohu; Wu, Jianli; Ding, Chien-Kuang; Lu, Min; Keenan, Melissa M; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Lin, Chih-An; Wang, Charles C; George, Daniel; Hsu, David S; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2016-04-01

    Oncogenic transformation may reprogram tumor metabolism and render cancer cells addicted to extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of these nutrients may therefore represent a therapeutic opportunity, but predicting which nutrients cancer cells become addicted remains difficult. Here, we performed a nutrigenetic screen to determine the phenotypes of isogenic pairs of clear cell renal cancer cells (ccRCC), with or without VHL, upon the deprivation of individual amino acids. We found that cystine deprivation triggered rapid programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient cell lines and primary ccRCC tumor cells, but not in VHL-restored counterparts. Blocking cystine uptake significantly delayed xenograft growth of ccRCC. Importantly, cystine deprivation triggered similar metabolic changes regardless of VHL status, suggesting that metabolic responses alone are not sufficient to explain the observed distinct fates of VHL-deficient and restored cells. Instead, we found that increased levels of TNFα associated with VHL loss forced VHL-deficient cells to rely on intact RIPK1 to inhibit apoptosis. However, the preexisting elevation in TNFα expression rendered VHL-deficient cells susceptible to necrosis triggered by cystine deprivation. We further determined that reciprocal amplification of the Src-p38 (MAPK14)-Noxa (PMAIP1) signaling and TNFα-RIP1/3 (RIPK1/RIPK3)-MLKL necrosis pathways potentiated cystine-deprived necrosis. Together, our findings reveal that cystine deprivation in VHL-deficient RCCs presents an attractive therapeutic opportunity that may bypass the apoptosis-evading mechanisms characteristic of drug-resistant tumor cells. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1892-903. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Cystine deprivation triggers programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Wu, Jianli; Ding, Chien-Kuang; Lu, Min; Keenan, Melissa M.; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Lin, Chih-An; Wang, Charles C.; George, Daniel; Hsu, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation may reprogram tumor metabolism and render cancer cells addicted to extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of these nutrients may therefore represent a therapeutic opportunity, but predicting which nutrients cancer cells become addicted to remains difficult. Here, we performed a nutrigenetic screen to determine the phenotypes of isogenic pairs of clear-cell renal cancer cells (ccRCC), with or without VHL, upon the deprivation of individual amino acids. We found that cystine deprivation triggered rapid programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient cell lines and primary ccRCC tumor cells, but not in VHL-restored counterparts. Blocking cystine uptake significantly delayed xenograft growth of ccRCC. Importantly, cystine deprivation triggered similar metabolic changes regardless of VHL status, suggesting that metabolic responses alone are not sufficient to explain the observed distinct fates of VHL-deficient and restored cells. Instead, we found that increased levels of TNFα (TNF) associated with VHL loss forced VHL-deficient cells to rely on intact RIPK1 to inhibit apoptosis. However, the pre-existing elevation in TNFα expression rendered VHL-deficient cells susceptible to necrosis triggered by cystine deprivation. We further determined that reciprocal amplification of the Src-p38 (MAPK14)-Noxa (PMAIP1) signaling and TNFα-RIP1/3 (RALBP1/RIPK3)-MLKL necrosis pathways potentiated cystine deprived-necrosis. Together, our findings reveal that cystine deprivation in VHL-deficient RCCs presents an attractive therapeutic opportunity that may bypass the apoptosis-evading mechanisms characteristic of drug-resistant tumor cells. PMID:26833124

  3. Low energy costs of F1Fo ATP synthase reversal in colon carcinoma cells deficient in mitochondrial complex IV.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Alexander V; Andreev, Dmitry E; Baranov, Pavel V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial polarisation is paramount for a variety of cellular functions. Under ischemia, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and proton gradient (ΔpH) are maintained via a reversal of mitochondrial F1Fo ATP synthase (mATPase), which can rapidly deplete ATP and drive cells into energy crisis. We found that under normal conditions in cells with disassembled cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX-deficient HCT116), mATPase maintains ΔΨm at levels only 15-20% lower than in WT cells, and for this utilises relatively little ATP. For a small energy expenditure, mATPase enables mitochondrial ΔpH, protein import, Ca(2+) turnover, and supports free radical detoxication machinery enlarged to protect the cells from oxidative damage. Whereas in COX-deficient cells the main source of ATP is glycolysis, the ΔΨm is still maintained upon inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocators with bongkrekic acid and carboxyatractyloside, indicating that the role of ANTs is redundant, and matrix substrate level phosphorylation alone or in cooperation with ATP-Mg/Pi carriers can continuously support the mATPase activity. Intriguingly, we found that mitochondrial complex III is active, and it contributes not only to free radical production, but also to ΔΨm maintenance and energy budget of COX-deficient cells. Overall, this study demonstrates that F1Fo ATP synthase can support general mitochondrial and cellular functions, working in extremely efficient 'energy saving' reverse mode and flexibly recruiting free radical detoxication and ATP producing / transporting pathways.

  4. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  5. ROCK1 deficiency enhances protective effects of antioxidants against apoptosis and cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Surma, Michelle; Handy, Caitlin; Chang, Jiang; Kapur, Reuben; Wei, Lei; Shi, Jianjian

    2014-01-01

    We have recently reported that the homologous Rho kinases, ROCK1 and ROCK2, play different roles in regulating stress-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment, and the ROCK1 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) has remarkable anti-apoptotic, anti-detachment and pro-survival effects against doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. This study investigated the roles of ROCK isoforms in doxorubicin-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation which is believed to be the major mechanism underlying its cytotoxicity to normal cells, and especially to cardiomyocytes. Different antioxidants have been shown to provide a protective role reported in numerous experimental studies, but clinical trials of antioxidant therapy showed insufficient benefit against the cardiac side effect. We found that both ROCK1-/- and ROCK2-/- MEFs exhibited reduced ROS production in response to doxorubicin treatment. Interestingly, only ROCK1 deficiency, but not ROCK2 deficiency, significantly enhanced the protective effects of antioxidants against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. First, ROCK1 deficiency and N-acetylcysteine (an anti-oxidant) treatment synergistically reduced ROS levels, caspase activation and cell detachment. In addition, the reduction of ROS generation in ROCK1-/- MEFs in response to doxorubicin treatment was in part through inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, ROCK1 deficiency enhanced the inhibitory effects of diphenyleneiodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase) on ROS generation and caspase 3 activation induced by doxorubicin. Finally, ROCK1 deficiency had greater protective effects than antioxidant treatment, especially on reducing actin cytoskeleton remodeling. ROCK1 deficiency not only reduced actomyosin contraction but also preserved central stress fiber stability, whereas antioxidant treatment only reduced actomyosin contraction without preserving central stress fibers. These results reveal a novel strategy to enhance the protective

  6. Generation of Oxygen Deficiency in Cell Culture Using a Two-Enzyme System to Evaluate Agents Targeting Hypoxic Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Raymond P.; Penketh, Philip G.; Seow, Helen A.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    2008-01-01

    The poor and aberrant vascularization of solid tumors makes them susceptible to localized areas of oxygen deficiency that can be considered sites of tumor vulnerability to pro-drugs that are preferentially activated to cytotoxic species under conditions of low oxygenation. To readily facilitate the selection of agents targeted to oxygen-deficient cells in solid tumors, we have developed a simple and convenient two-enzyme system to generate oxygen deficiency in cell cultures. Glucose oxidase is employed to deplete oxygen from the medium by selectively oxidizing glucose and reducing molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide; an excess of catalase is also used to scavenge the peroxide molecules. Rapid and sustained depletion of oxygen occurs in medium or buffer, even in the presence of oxygen at the liquid/air interface. Studies using CHO/AA8 Chinese hamster cells, EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma cells, and U251 human glioma cells indicate that this system generates an oxygen deficiency that produces activation of the hypoxia-targeted prodrug KS119. This method of generating oxygen deficiency in cell culture is inexpensive, does not require cumbersome equipment, permits longer incubation times to be used without the loss of sample volume, and should be adaptable for high-throughput screening in 96-well plates. PMID:18959466

  7. Small cell osteosarcoma: cytopathologic characteristics and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Shum, Chung H; Sheth, Sheila; Wakely, Paul E; Ali, Syed Z

    2010-05-01

    Small cell osteosarcoma may present a challenging primary diagnosis on cytologic assessment owing to its rarity and its morphologic similarity to other small round blue cell tumors. Five cases of small cell osteosarcoma from our cytopathology archives were identified and reviewed and cytologic features elaborated. Three cases were fine-needle aspirations from bony lesions in the classic location for osteosarcoma (2 distal femur and 1 proximal tibia), and 2 aspirations were from metastases. Common cytomorphologic features included relatively small to intermediate cell size, high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratios, round nuclei, minimal anisonucleosis, finely granular nuclear chromatin, fine cytoplasmic vacuoles, and only rare osteoid. Small cell osteosarcoma shares many of the well-described cytomorphologic features of classic osteosarcoma, but the relatively small cells, round hyperchromatic nuclei, and scant osteoid constitute the common denominator. Correlation with radiographic findings and ancillary tests can aid in definitive diagnosis.

  8. Thymic Stromal-Cell Abnormalities and Dysregulated T-Cell Development in IL-2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reya, Tannishtha; Bassiri, Hamid; Biancaniello, Renée

    1998-01-01

    The role that interleukin-2 (IL-2) plays in T-cell development is not known. To address this issue, we have investigated the nature of the abnormal thymic development and autoimmune disorders that occurs in IL-2-deficient (IL-2–/–) mice. After 4 to 5 weeks of birth, IL-2–/– mice progressively develop a thymic disorder resulting in the disruption of thymocyte maturation. This disorder is characterized by a dramatic reduction in cellularity, the selective loss of immature CD4-8- (double negative; DN) and CD4+8+ (double positive; DP) thymocytes and defects in the thymic stromal-cell compartment. Immunohistochemical staining of sections of thymuses from specific pathogen-free and germ-free IL-2–/– mice of various ages showed a progressive ,loss of cortical epithelial cells, MHC class II-expressing cells, monocytes, and macrophages. Reduced numbers of macrophages were apparent as early as week after birth. Since IL-2–/– thymocyte progenitor populations could mature normally on transfer into a normal thymus, the thymic defect in IL-2–/– mice appears to be due to abnormalities among thymic stromal cells. These results underscore the role of IL-2 in maintaining functional microenvironments that are necessary to support thymocyte growth, development, and selection. PMID:9814585

  9. Novel therapies in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Induru, Raghava; Jalal, Shadia I.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the lung with a tendency to metastasize widely early in the course of the disease. The VA staging system classifies the disease into limited stage (LS) which is confined to one hemithorax and can be included into one radiation field or extensive stage (ES) which extends beyond one hemithorax. Current standard of care is concurrent chemoradiation for LS disease and chemotherapy alone for ES disease. Only a quarter of patients with LS disease will be cured with current standard treatments and majority of the patients ultimately succumb to their disease. A very complex genetic landscape of SCLC accounts for its resistance to conventional therapy and a high recurrence rate, however, at the same time this complexity can form the basis for effective targeted therapy for the disease. In recent years, several different therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in SCLC. Several of them including EGFR TKIs, BCR-ABL TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, and VEGF inhibitors have been unsuccessful in showing a survival advantage in this disease. Several others including DNA repair inhibitors, cellular developmental pathway inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), as well as immune therapy with vaccines, immunomodulators, and immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested. So far, none of these agents are approved for use in SCLC and the majority are in phase I/II clinical trials, with immune checkpoint inhibitors being the most promising therapeutic strategy. In this article, we will discuss these novel therapeutic agents and currently available data in SCLC. PMID:26629422

  10. High incidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma-like B-cell lymphoproliferations with EBV latency profile 2 in children with interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bienemann, Kirsten; Borkhardt, Arndt; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) deficiency is an inherited T-cell deficiency characterized by the development of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferations. We aimed to describe the histopathological features of lymphoproliferative processes arising in ITK deficiency, and to compare them with lymphoproliferations in otherwise immunocompromised patients. We revised the histopathological diagnoses of 12 biopsies of lymphoproliferations from seven ITK-deficient children according to the World Health Organization criteria, and determined the EBV latency types and lytic activity by staining for EBV-encoded small RNA, latent membrane protein 1, EBV nuclear antigen 2, and ZEBRA. We found polymorphic and borderline polymorphic to monomorphic B-cell lymphoproliferations with variable contents in large cells (five cases), a Hodgkin-like B-cell proliferation (one case), and classic mixed-cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma (six cases). All cases (12/12) were EBV-positive. The Hodgkin lymphoma-like and Hodgkin lymphoma, and all but one polymorphic B-cell lymphoproliferation, showed EBV latency type 2, as observed in classic EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma. The 100% EBV association, the high percentage of EBV-positive classic Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin-like B-cell proliferations and the predominance of EBV latency type 2 even in polymorphic lesions are the main features of lymphoproliferations in patients with ITK deficiency, and suggest a unique pathomechanism of lymphomagenesis in this T-cell immunodeficiency. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    PubMed

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.2±0.01) pregnant women compared to insufficient (0.34±0.01) and sufficient (0.45±0.02) pregnant women. Similarly, cord blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.63±0.03) pregnant women when compared to insufficient (1.05±0.04) and sufficient (1.75±0.02) pregnant women. Mean (%)±SE of B cells with CD23 and CD21 in maternal blood was higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient pregnant women (0.35±0.02; 1.65±0.04) when compared to insufficient (0.22±0.02; 0.55±0.05) and sufficient (0.15±0.02; 0.21±0.01) pregnant women. Similarly, mean (%)±SE of B cell population with CD23 and CD21 in cord blood was also higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.41±0.02; 1.2±0.03) when compared to insufficient (0.32±0.01; 0.6±0.05) and sufficient (0.2±0.01; 0.4±0.02) pregnant women. Regulatory cytokines, TGF

  12. Alteration in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated epigenetic regulation leads to Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhang, Ying; Hart, Ronald P.; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing mystery surrounding ataxia-telangiectasia is why it is mainly cerebellar neurons, Purkinje cells in particular, that appear vulnerable to ATM deficiency. Here we present data showing that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a newly recognized epigenetic marker found at high levels in neurons, is substantially reduced in human ataxia-telangiectasia and Atm−/− mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. We further show that TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC, responds to DNA damage and manipulation of TET1 activity directly affects the DNA damage signalling and ATM-deficient neuronal cell cycle re-entry and death. Quantitative genome-wide analysis of 5hmC-containing sequences shows that in ATM deficiency there is a cerebellum- and Purkinje cell-specific shift in 5hmC enrichment in both regulatory elements and repeated sequences. Finally, we verify that TET1-mediated 5hmC production is linked to the degenerative process of Purkinje cells and behavioural deficits in Atm−/− mice. Taken together, the selective loss of 5hmC plays a critical role in driving Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency. PMID:26510954

  13. Alteration in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated epigenetic regulation leads to Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhang, Ying; Hart, Ronald P; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl; Li, Jiali

    2015-12-01

    A long-standing mystery surrounding ataxia-telangiectasia is why it is mainly cerebellar neurons, Purkinje cells in particular, that appear vulnerable to ATM deficiency. Here we present data showing that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a newly recognized epigenetic marker found at high levels in neurons, is substantially reduced in human ataxia-telangiectasia and Atm(-/-) mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. We further show that TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC, responds to DNA damage and manipulation of TET1 activity directly affects the DNA damage signalling and ATM-deficient neuronal cell cycle re-entry and death. Quantitative genome-wide analysis of 5hmC-containing sequences shows that in ATM deficiency there is a cerebellum- and Purkinje cell-specific shift in 5hmC enrichment in both regulatory elements and repeated sequences. Finally, we verify that TET1-mediated 5hmC production is linked to the degenerative process of Purkinje cells and behavioural deficits in Atm(-/-) mice. Taken together, the selective loss of 5hmC plays a critical role in driving Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  15. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  16. The yeast metacaspase is implicated in oxidative stress response in frataxin-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Auchère, Françoise; Brossas, Caroline; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Boggetto, Nicole; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Madeo, Frank; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-01-20

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease and is caused by reduced expression of mitochondrial frataxin. Frataxin depletion causes impairment in iron-sulfur cluster and heme biosynthesis, disruption of iron homeostasis and hypersensitivity to oxidants. Currently no pharmacological treatment blocks disease progression, although antioxidant therapies proved to benefit patients. We show that sensitivity of yeast frataxin-deficient cells to hydrogen peroxide is partially mediated by the metacaspase. Metacaspase deletion in frataxin-deficient cells results in recovery of antioxidant capacity and heme synthesis. In addition, our results suggest that metacaspase is associated with mitochondrial respiration, intracellular redox control and genomic stability.

  17. Mismatch repair genes identified using genetic screens in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; Wang, Wei; Bradley, Allan

    2004-06-24

    Phenotype-driven recessive genetic screens in diploid organisms require a strategy to render the mutation homozygous. Although homozygous mutant mice can be generated by breeding, a reliable method to make homozygous mutations in cultured cells has not been available, limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to elaborate the fundamental components and physiological systems of a mammalian cell. Here we have exploited the high rate of mitotic recombination in Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm)-deficient ES cells to generate a genome-wide library of homozygous mutant cells from heterozygous mutations induced with a revertible gene trap retrovirus. We have screened this library for cells with defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a system that detects and repairs base-base mismatches. We demonstrate the recovery of cells with homozygous mutations in known and novel MMR genes. We identified Dnmt1(ref. 5) as a novel MMR gene and confirmed that Dnmt1-deficient ES cells exhibit micro-satellite instability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the role of Dnmt1 in cancer. The combination of insertional mutagenesis in Blm-deficient ES cells establishes a new approach for phenotype-based recessive genetic screens in ES cells.

  18. Rapid capping in alpha-spectrin-deficient MEL cells from mice afflicted with hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A spectrin-based membrane skeleton is important for the stability and organization of the erythrocyte. To study the role of spectrin in cells that possess complex cytoskeletons, we have generated alpha-spectrin- deficient erythroleukemia cell lines from sph/sph mice. These cells contain beta-spectrin, but lack alpha-spectrin as determined by immunoblot and Northern blot analyses. The effects of alpha-spectrin deficiency are apparent in the cells' irregular shape and fragility in culture. Capping of membrane glycoproteins by fluorescent lectin or antibodies occurs more rapidly in sph/sph than in wild-type erythroleukemia cells, and the caps appear more concentrated. The data support the idea that spectrin plays an important role in organizing membrane structure and limiting the lateral mobility of integral membrane glycoproteins in cells other than mature erythrocytes. PMID:8195289

  19. NACA deficiency reveals the crucial role of somite-derived stromal cells in haematopoietic niche formation.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Emi; Sarris, Milka; Redd, Michael; Le Guyader, Dorothée; Vivier, Catherine; Horsley, Wyatt; Trede, Nikolaus; Herbomel, Philippe

    2015-09-28

    The ontogeny of haematopoietic niches in vertebrates is essentially unknown. Here we show that the stromal cells of the caudal haematopoietic tissue (CHT), the first niche where definitive haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) home in zebrafish development, derive from the caudal somites through an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The resulting stromal cell progenitors accompany the formation of the caudal vein sinusoids, the other main component of the CHT niche, and mature into reticular cells lining and interconnecting sinusoids. We characterize a zebrafish mutant defective in definitive haematopoiesis due to a deficiency in the nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (NACA). We demonstrate that the defect resides not in HSPCs but in the CHT niche. NACA-deficient stromal cell progenitors initially develop normally together with the sinusoids, and HSPCs home to the resulting niche, but stromal cell maturation is compromised, leading to a niche that is unable to support HSPC maintenance, expansion and differentiation.

  20. Differential Programming of B Cells in AID Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; Velds, Arno; van den Berk, Paul CM.; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; van Steensel, Bas; Jacobs, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The Aicda locus encodes the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and is highly expressed in germinal center (GC) B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Besides these Ig specific activities in B cells, AID has been implicated in active DNA demethylation in non-B cell systems. We here determined a potential role of AID as an epigenetic eraser and transcriptional regulator in B cells. RNA-Seq on different B cell subsets revealed that Aicda−/− B cells are developmentally affected. However as shown by RNA-Seq, MethylCap-Seq, and SNP analysis these transcriptome alterations may not relate to AID, but alternatively to a CBA mouse strain derived region around the targeted Aicda locus. These unexpected confounding parameters provide alternative, AID-independent interpretations on genotype-phenotype correlations previously reported in numerous studies on AID using the Aicda−/− mouse strain. PMID:23922811

  1. Reprogramming of root epidermal cells in response to nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Perry, P; Linke, B; Schmidt, W

    2007-02-01

    Post-embryonic development of the root system is highly plastic to environmental cues, compensating for the sessile lifestyle of plants. The fate of epidermal cells of Arabidopsis roots is particularly responsive to nutritional signals, leading to an increase in the root's surface area in the absence of the essential but immobile minerals iron, phosphate and manganese. The resulting phenotype is characteristic of the respective condition. Growth under nutrient starvation affects the expression of genes involved in cell specification, indicating that environmental signals are perceived at an early stage of cell development. Cell fate decisions are controlled at different levels, probably integrated at the level of chromatin organization.

  2. Appropriateness of the study of iron deficiency anemia prior to referral for small bowel evaluation at a tertiary center

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jaime Pereira; Pinho, Rolando; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Sousa, Mafalda; Silva, João Carlos; Carvalho, João

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the adequacy of the study of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in real life practice prior to referral to a gastroenterology department for small bowel evaluation. METHODS All consecutive patients referred to a gastroenterology department for small bowel investigation due to iron deficiency anemia, between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Both patients referred from general practitioners or directly from different hospital departments were selected. Relevant clinical information regarding prior anemia workup was retrospectively collected from medical records. An appropriate pre-referral study was considered the execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) investigation, colonoscopy with quality standards (recent, total and with adequate preparation) and celiac disease (CD) screening (through serologic testing and/or histopathological investigation). RESULTS A total of 77 patients (58.4% female, mean age 67.1 ± 16.7 years) were included. Most (53.2%) patients were referred from general practitioners, 41.6% from other hospital specialties and 5.2% directly from the emergency department. The mean pre-referral hemoglobin concentration was 8.8 ± 2.0 g/dL and the majority of anemias had microcytic (71.4%) and hypochromic (72.7%) characteristics. 77.9% of patients presented with an incomplete pre-referral study: EGD in 97.4%, with H. pylori investigation in 58.3%, colonoscopy with quality criteria in 63.6%, and CD screening in 24.7%. Patients with an appropriate study at the time of referral were younger (48.7 ± 17.7 vs 72.3 ± 12.3 years, P < 0.001). Small bowel evaluation was ultimately undertaken in 72.7% of patients, with a more frequent evaluation in patients with a quality colonoscopy at referral (78.6% vs 23.8%); P < 0.001 (OR = 11.7, 95%CI: 3.6-38.6). The most common diagnosis regarded as the likely cause of IDA was small bowel angioectasia (18.2%) but additional causes were also found in the upper

  3. Redeployment of Myc and E2f1-3 drives Rb deficient cell cycles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huayang; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Pécot, Thierry; Daniel, Piotr; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin; Reyes, Stephan; Fackler, Nicholas; Bajwa, Amneet; Kladney, Raleigh; Koivisto, Christopher; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Qianben; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Sáenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Cantalupo, Paul; Pipas, James M.; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Robust mechanisms to control cell proliferation have evolved to maintain the integrity of organ architecture. Here, we investigated how two critical proliferative pathways, Myc and E2f, are integrated to control cell cycles in normal and Rb deficient cells using a murine intestinal model. We show that Myc and E2f1-3 have little impact on normal G1-S transitions. Instead, they synergistically control an S-G2 transcriptional program required for normal cell divisions and maintaining crypt-villus integrity. Surprisingly, Rb deficiency results in the Myc-dependent accumulation of E2f3 protein and chromatin repositioning of both Myc and E2f3, leading to the ‘super activation’ of a G1-S transcriptional program, ectopic S phase entry and rampant cell proliferation. These findings reveal that Rb deficient cells hijack and redeploy Myc and E2f3 from an S-G2 program essential for normal cell cycles to a G1-S program that re-engages ectopic cell cycles, exposing an unanticipated addiction of Rb-null cells on Myc. PMID:26192440

  4. BH3-Only Molecule Bim Mediates β-Cell Death in IRS2 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Decheng; Sun, Juan; Mao, Liqun; Ye, Honggang

    2014-01-01

    Irs2-deficient mice develop type 2–like diabetes due to a reduction in β-cell mass and a failure of pancreatic islets to undergo compensatory hyperplasia in response to insulin resistance. In order to define the molecular mechanisms, we knocked down Irs2 gene expression in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) suppression induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with an increase in expression of the BH3-only molecule Bim. Knockdown (KD) of Bim reduced apoptotic β-cell death induced by IRS2 suppression. In Irs2-deficient mice, Bim ablation restored β-cell mass, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells, and restored normal glucose tolerance after glucose challenge. FoxO1 mediates Bim upregulation induced by IRS2 suppression, and FoxO1 KD partially inhibits β-cell death induced by IRS2 suppression. These results suggest that Bim plays an important role in mediating the increase in β-cell apoptosis and the reduction in β-cell mass that occurs in IRS2-deficient diabetes. PMID:24760140

  5. Mantle cell lymphoma in cyclin D1 transgenic mice with Bim-deficient B cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, Samuel G; Labelle, James L; Meng, Hailong; Valeriano, Regina P; Fisher, Jill K; Sun, Heather; Rodig, Scott J; Kleinstein, Steven H; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-02-06

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a highly aggressive B-cell lymphoma resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Although defined by the characteristic t(11;14) translocation, MCL has not been recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of cyclin D1 overexpression alone. Indeed, several genetic aberrations have been identified in MCL that may contribute to its pathogenesis and chemoresistance. Of particular interest is the frequent biallelic deletion of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein BIM. BIM exerts its pro-death function via its α-helical BH3 death domain that has the dual capacity to inhibit antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 and MCL-1 and directly trigger proapoptotic proteins such as the mitochondrial executioner protein BAX. To evaluate a functional role for Bim deletion in the pathogenesis of MCL, we generated cyclin D1-transgenic mice harboring Bim-deficient B cells. In response to immunization, Eμ(CycD1)CD19(CRE)Bim(fl/fl) mice manifested selective expansion of their splenic mantle zone compartment. Three distinct immune stimulation regimens induced lymphomas with histopathologic and molecular features of human MCL in a subset of mice. Thus, deletion of Bim in B cells, in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression, disrupts a critical control point in lymphoid maturation and predisposes to the development of MCL. This genetic proof of concept for MCL pathogenesis suggests an opportunity to reactivate the death pathway by pharmacologic mimicry of proapoptotic BIM.

  6. Cisplatin-mediated radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer cells is stimulated by ATM inhibition.

    PubMed

    Toulany, Mahmoud; Mihatsch, Julia; Holler, Marina; Chaachouay, Hassan; Rodemann, H Peter

    2014-05-01

    Cisplatin activates ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), a protein with roles in DNA repair, cell cycle progression and autophagy. We investigated the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin with respect to its effect on ATM pathway activation. Non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC) cell lines (A549, H460) and human fibroblast (ATM-deficient AT5, ATM-proficient 1BR3) cells were used. The effects of cisplatin combined with irradiation on ATM pathway activity, clonogenicity, DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair and cell cycle progression were analyzed with Western blotting, colony formation and γ-H2AX foci assays as well as FACS analysis, respectively. Cisplatin radiosensitized H460 cells, but not A549 cells. Radiosensitization of H460 cells was not due to impaired DNA-DSB repair, increased apoptosis or cell cycle dysregulation. The lack of radiosensitization demonstrated for A549 cells was associated with cisplatin-mediated stimulation of ATM (S1981) and AMPKα (T172) phosphorylation and autophagy. However, in both cell lines inhibition of ATM and autophagy by KU-55933 and chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) respectively resulted in a significant radiosensitization. Combined treatment with the AMPK inhibitor compound-C led to radiosensitization of A549 but not of H460 cells. As compared to the treatment with KU-55933 alone, radiosensitivity of A549 cells was markedly stimulated by the combination of KU-55933 and cisplatin. However, the combination of CQ and cisplatin did not modulate the pattern of radiation sensitivity of A549 or H460 cells. In accordance with the results that cisplatin via stimulation of ATM activity can abrogate its radiosensitizing effect, ATM deficient cells were significantly sensitized to ionizing radiation by cisplatin. The results obtained indicate that ATM targeting can potentiate cisplatin-induced radiosensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency Reduces the Immune Response, Phagocytosis Rate, and Intracellular Killing Rate of Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  8. LEAD CLEANER CELLS, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHWEST. NOTE SMALL HANDWHEELS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEAD CLEANER CELLS, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHWEST. NOTE SMALL HANDWHEELS FOR GATE VALVES USED TO ADJUST FLOW BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL CELLS. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  9. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Sickle Cell Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Vikki G.; Nottage, Kerri A.; Cole, Elliott W.; Hankins, Jane S.; Gurney, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has emerged as a public health focus in recent years and patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) reportedly have a high prevalence of the condition. Our objectives were to summarize definitions of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency used in the literature, and to determine the prevalence and magnitude of each in patients with SCD through a systematic review conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. From a PubMed search, 34 potential articles were identified and 15 met eligibility criteria for inclusion. Definitions of deficiency and insufficiency varied greatly across studies making direct comparisons difficult. This review provides evidence to suggest that suboptimal vitamin D levels are highly prevalent among those with SCD, far more so than in comparable non-SCD patients or matched control populations. Defining deficiency as vitamin D <20ng/mL, prevalence estimates in SCD populations range from 56.4% to 96.4%. When compared with results from the population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, however, the general African American population appeared to have a similarly high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. African American patients with and without SCD were both substantially higher than that of Caucasians. What remains to be determined is whether there are adverse health effects for patients with SCD because of concurrent vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25734582

  10. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in sickle cell disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Vikki G; Nottage, Kerri A; Cole, Elliott W; Hankins, Jane S; Gurney, James G

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has emerged as a public health focus in recent years and patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) reportedly have a high prevalence of the condition. Our objectives were to summarize definitions of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency used in the literature, and to determine the prevalence and magnitude of each in patients with SCD through a systematic review conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. From a PubMed search, 34 potential articles were identified and 15 met eligibility criteria for inclusion. Definitions of deficiency and insufficiency varied greatly across studies making direct comparisons difficult. This review provides evidence to suggest that suboptimal vitamin D levels are highly prevalent among those with SCD, far more so than in comparable non-SCD patients or matched control populations. Defining deficiency as vitamin D < 20 ng/mL, prevalence estimates in SCD populations range from 56.4% to 96.4%. When compared with results from the population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, however, the general African American population appeared to have a similarly high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. African American patients with and without SCD were both substantially higher than that of Caucasians. What remains to be determined is whether there are adverse health effects for patients with SCD because of concurrent vitamin D deficiency.

  11. LKB1 inactivation dictates therapeutic response of non-small cell lung cancer to the metabolism drug phenformin.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, David B; Abt, Evan; Gerken, Laurie; Vasquez, Debbie S; Seki, Atsuko; Leblanc, Mathias; Wei, Liu; Fishbein, Michael C; Czernin, Johannes; Mischel, Paul S; Shaw, Reuben J

    2013-02-11

    The LKB1 (also called STK11) tumor suppressor is mutationally inactivated in ∼20% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). LKB1 is the major upstream kinase activating the energy-sensing kinase AMPK, making LKB1-deficient cells unable to appropriately sense metabolic stress. We tested the therapeutic potential of metabolic drugs in NSCLC and identified phenformin, a mitochondrial inhibitor and analog of the diabetes therapeutic metformin, as selectively inducing apoptosis in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. Therapeutic trials in Kras-dependent mouse models of NSCLC revealed that tumors with Kras and Lkb1 mutations, but not those with Kras and p53 mutations, showed selective response to phenformin as a single agent, resulting in prolonged survival. This study suggests phenformin as a cancer metabolism-based therapeutic to selectively target LKB1-deficient tumors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. LKB1 inactivation dictates therapeutic response of non-small cell lung cancer to the metabolism drug phenformin

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Abt, Evan; Gerken, Laurie; Vasquez, Debbie S.; Seki, Atsuko; Leblanc, Mathias; Wei, Liu; Fishbein, Michael C.; Czernin, Johannes; Mischel, Paul S.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The LKB1 (also called STK11) tumor suppressor is mutationally inactivated in ~20% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). LKB1 is the major upstream kinase activating the energy-sensing kinase AMPK, making LKB1-deficient cells unable to appropriately sense metabolic stress. We tested the therapeutic potential of metabolic drugs in NSCLC and identified phenformin, a mitochondrial inhibitor and analog of the diabetes therapeutic metformin, as selectively inducing apoptosis in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. Therapeutic trials in Kras-dependent mouse models of NSCLC revealed that tumors with Kras and Lkb1 mutations, but not those with Kras and p53 mutations showed selective response to phenformin as a single agent, resulting in prolonged survival. This study suggests phenformin as a cancer metabolism-based therapeutic to selectively target LKB1-deficient tumors. PMID:23352126

  13. Detection of nitrogen deficiency in potatoes using small unmanned aircraft systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. However, research is required to determine which sensors and data processing methods are required to use sUAS in an efficient and cost-effective manner. We set up a ni...

  14. CT findings of small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjun; Rho, Ji Young; Kang, Seunghun; Yoo, Koun Joy; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to clarify the recognizable computed tomography (CT) features of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Contrast enhanced CT scans were reviewed retrospectively for mass location, mediastinal extension, and other concomitant findings in 142 patients with pathologically proven SCLC. SCLC was classified into hilar mass only (type I), hilar mass with ipsilateral mediastinal extension (type II), hilar mass with bilateral mediastinal extension (type III), and peripheral mass (type IV). When mediastinal lymphadenopathy (m-LAP) was indistinguishable from a hilar mass, we defined it as a mediastinal conglomerate mass (m-CM). Type IIa or IIIa had ipsilateral or bilateral m-LAP and type IIb, IIIb or IIIc had ipsilateral or bilateral m-CM. Type I (n = 8, 5.6%), type II (n = 58, 40.8%), type III (n = 55, 38.8%), and type IV (n = 21, 14.8%) were manifested. The combination of a hilar mass and m-CM was found in 68 patients (47.9%). Type IV masses showed lobulation in 11, microlobulation in 4, both lobulated and irregular margins in 4, and spiculation in 2. A total of 120 patients (84.5%) had a bronchial stenosis/obstruction; single (n = 52) and 2 or more (n = 68). Ninety-five patients (67.0%) had vascular invasion including main/lobar pulmonary artery and superior vena cava, and 55 (38.7%) had pleural effusion and/or pleural nodules. Concomitant parenchymal findings (n = 92, 64.8%) were noted: contiguous consolidation/nodule (n = 45), hematogeneous spread (n = 32), lymphangitic spread (n = 21), obstructive pneumonia (n = 22), and obstructive atelectasis (n = 14). In conclusion, the recognizable CT features of SCLC were a hilar mass with m-CM. Most of the hilar masses showed 2 or more bronchial stenoses/obstructions. Most cases of peripheral SCLC manifested as a lobulated mass rather than a spiculated mass. Vascular invasion and concomitant parenchymal findings were observed commonly. PMID:27893684

  15. Pathophysiology of B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Taubenheim, Nadine; Peron, Sophie; Fischer, Alain

    2007-01-01

    B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination (Ig-CSR) deficiencies, previously termed hyper-IgM syndromes, are genetically determined conditions characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels and an absence or very low levels of IgG, IgA, and IgE. As a function of the molecular mechanism, the defective CSR is variably associated to a defect in the generation of somatic hypermutations (SHMs) in the Ig variable region. The study of Ig-CSR deficiencies contributed to a better delineation of the mechanisms underlying CSR and SHM, the major events of antigen-triggered antibody maturation. Four Ig-CSR deficiency phenotypes have been so far reported: the description of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency (Ig-CSR deficiency 1), caused by recessive mutations of AICDA gene, characterized by a defect in CSR and SHM, clearly established the role of AID in the induction of the Ig gene rearrangements underlying CSR and SHM. A CSR-specific function of AID has, however, been detected by the observation of a selective CSR defect caused by mutations affecting the C-terminus of AID. Ig-CSR deficiency 2 is the consequence of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency. Because UNG, a molecule of the base excision repair machinery, removes uracils from DNA and AID deaminates cytosines into uracils, that observation indicates that the AID-UNG pathway directly targets DNA of switch regions from the Ig heavy-chain locus to induce the CSR process. Ig-CSR deficiencies 3 and 4 are characterized by a selective CSR defect resulting from blocks at distinct steps of CSR. A further understanding of the CSR machinery is expected from their molecular definition.

  16. p16 loss rescues functional decline of Brca1-deficient mammary stem cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexandria; Bai, Feng; Chan, Ho Lam; Liu, Shiqin; Slingerland, Joyce M; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J; Pei, Xin-Hai

    2017-02-22

    Recent evidence indicates that the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage can induce senescence and limit the function of adult stem cells. It remains elusive whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional alteration of mammary stem cells. In this article, we reported that senescence was induced in mammary epithelial cells during aging along with increased expression of p16Ink4a (p16), an inhibitor of CDK4 and CKD6. Loss of p16 abrogated the age-induced senescence in mammary epithelial cells and significantly increased mammary stem cell function. We showed that loss of Brca1, a tumor suppressor that functions in DNA damage repair, in the mammary epithelium induced senescence with induction of p16 and a decline of stem cell function, which was rescued by p16 loss. These data not only answer the question as to whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional decline of mammary stem cells, but also identify the role of p16 in suppressing Brca1-deficient mammary stem cell function.

  17. Selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells by SP600125

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Berardinelli, Francesco; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Senovilla, Laura; Mariño, Guillermo; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Lissa, Delphine; Antoccia, Antonio; Tailler, Maximilien; Schlemmer, Frederic; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The genetic or functional inactivation of p53 is highly prevalent in human cancers. Using high-content videomicroscopy based on fluorescent TP53+/+ and TP53−/− human colon carcinoma cells, we discovered that SP600125, a broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, kills p53-deficient cells more efficiently than their p53-proficient counterparts, in vitro. Similar observations were obtained in vivo, in mice carrying p53-deficient and -proficient human xenografts. Such a preferential cytotoxicity could be attributed to the failure of p53-deficient cells to undergo cell cycle arrest in response to SP600125. TP53−/− (but not TP53+/+) cells treated with SP600125 became polyploid upon mitotic abortion and progressively succumbed to mitochondrial apoptosis. The expression of an SP600125-resistant variant of the mitotic kinase MPS1 in TP53−/− cells reduced SP600125-induced polyploidization. Thus, by targeting MPS1, SP600125 triggers a polyploidization program that cannot be sustained by TP53−/− cells, resulting in the activation of mitotic catastrophe, an oncosuppressive mechanism for the eradication of mitosis-incompetent cells. PMID:22438244

  18. Differences in sensitivity to DNA-damaging Agents between XRCC4- and Artemis-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Mori, Masahiko; Tsuji, Hideo; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Shiomi, Naoko; Onoda, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. XRCC4 is indispensable to NHEJ and functions together with DNA ligase IV in the rejoining of broken DNA ends. Artemis is a nuclease required for trimming of some, but not all, types of broken DNA ends prior to rejoining by the DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 complex. To better understand the roles of these factors, we generated XRCC4- and Artemis-deficient cells from the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 by gene targeting and examined their cellular responses to several DNA-damaging agents including X-rays. As anticipated, kinetic analyses of γ-H2AX foci and chromosomal aberrations after ionizing radiation (IR) demonstrated a serious incompetence of DSB repair in the XRCC4-deficient cells, and relatively moderate impairment in the Artemis-deficient cells. The XRCC4-deficient cells were highly sensitive to etoposide and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine as well as IR, and moderately sensitive to camptothecin, methyl methanesulfonate, cisplatin, mitomycin C, aphidicolin and hydroxyurea, compared to the parental HCT116 cells. The Artemis-deficient cells were not as sensitive as the XRCC4-deficient cells, except to cisplatin and mitomycin C. By contrast, the Artemis-deficient cells were significantly more resistant to hydroxyurea than the parental cells. These observations suggest that Artemis also functions in some DNA damage response pathways other than NHEJ in human cells.

  19. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3–15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  20. Effect of iron deficiency on c-kit⁺ cardiac stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongqiang; Li, Yuanmin; Cao, Jiatian; Han, Zhihua; Gao, Lin; Xu, Zuojun; Yin, Zhaofang; Wang, Guifang; Fan, Yuqi; Wang, Changqian

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a common comorbidity in chronic heart failure (CHF) which may exacerbate CHF. The c-kit⁺ cardiac stem cells (CSCs) play a vital role in cardiac function repair. However, much is unknown regarding the role of iron deficiency in regulating c-kit⁺ CSCs function. In this study, we investigated whether iron deficiency regulates c-kit⁺ CSCs proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and differentiation in vitro. All c-kit⁺ CSCs were isolated from adult C57BL/6 mice. The c-kit⁺ CSCs were cultured with deferoxamine (DFO, an iron chelator), mimosine (MIM, another iron chelator), or a complex of DFO and iron (Fe(III)), respectively. Cell migration was assayed using a 48-well chamber system. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of c-kit⁺ CSCs were analyzed with BrdU labeling, population doubling time assay, CCK-8 assay, and flow cytometry. Caspase-3 protein level and activity were examined with Western blotting and spectrophotometric detection. The changes in the expression of cardiac-specific proteins (GATA-4,TNI, and β-MHC) and cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin D1, RB, and pRB) were detected with Western blotting. DFO and MIM suppressed c-kit⁺ CSCs proliferation and differentiation. They also modulated cell cycle and cardiac-specific protein expression. Iron chelators down-regulated the expression and phosphorylation of cell cycle-related proteins. Iron reversed those suppressive effects of DFO. DFO and MIM didn't affect c-kit⁺ CSCs migration and apoptosis. Iron deficiency suppressed proliferation and differentiation of c-kit⁺ CSCs. This may partly explain how iron deficiency affects CHF prognosis.

  1. AMIGO2 modulates T cell functions and its deficiency in mice ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Khan, Mohd Moin; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Zhi Jane; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Rauvala, Heikki; Tian, Li

    2017-05-01

    The immune function of AMIGO2 is currently unknown. Here, we revealed novel roles of AMIGO2 in modulating T-cell functions and EAE using Amigo2-knockout (AMG2KO) mice. Amigo2 was abundantly expressed by murine T helper (Th) cells. Its deficiency impaired transplanted T-cell infiltration into the secondary lymphoid organs and dampened Th-cell activation, but promoted splenic Th-cell proliferation and abundancy therein. AMG2KO Th cells had respectively elevated T-bet in Th1- and GATA-3 in Th2-lineage during early Th-cell differentiation, accompanied with increased IFN-γ and IL-10 but decreased IL-17A production. AMG2KO mice exhibited ameliorated EAE, dampened spinal T-cell accumulation, decreased serum IL-17A levels and enhanced splenic IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic AMG2KO T cells induced milder EAE and dampened spinal Th-cell accumulation and Tnf expression. Mechanistically, Amigo2-overexpression in 293T cells dampened NF-kB transcriptional activity, while Amigo2-deficiency enhanced Akt but suppressed GSK-3β phosphorylation and promoted nuclear translocations of NF-kB and NFAT1 in Th-cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that AMIGO2 is important in regulating T-cell functions and EAE, and may be harnessed as a potential therapeutic target for multiple sclerosis.

  2. Normal mast cell numbers in the tissues of AhR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Caroline; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Sonner, Jana; Redaelli, Chiara; Peter, Katharina; Kunze, Anja; Haas, Katharina; Esser, Charlotte; Schäkel, Knut; Wick, Wolfgang; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Lanz, Tobias V; Platten, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) acts as an immunomodulatory molecule in several immune cell lineages. Recently, it has been implicated in development and maintenance of immune cells in barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa. To investigate its role on mast cell development and maintenance in skin, peritoneal exudate cells (PECs) and lymph nodes, we studied in depth their phenotype in AhR-deficient mice. Our findings do not provide any evidence for a suspected role of the AhR in mast cell homeostasis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mixture-based combinatorial libraries from small individual peptide libraries: a case study on α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Pin; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The design, synthesis and screening of diversity-oriented peptide libraries using a "libraries from libraries" strategy for the development of inhibitors of α1-antitrypsin deficiency are described. The major buttress of the biochemical approach presented here is the use of well-established solid-phase split-and-mix method for the generation of mixture-based libraries. The combinatorial technique iterative deconvolution was employed for library screening. While molecular diversity is the general consideration of combinatorial libraries, exquisite design through systematic screening of small individual libraries is a prerequisite for effective library screening and can avoid potential problems in some cases. This review will also illustrate how large peptide libraries were designed, as well as how a conformation-sensitive assay was developed based on the mechanism of the conformational disease. Finally, the combinatorially selected peptide inhibitor capable of blocking abnormal protein aggregation will be characterized by biophysical, cellular and computational methods.

  4. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kipari, Tiina; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Iqbal, Javaid; Man, Tak-Yung; Miller, Eileen; Coutinho, Agnes E; Zhang, Zhenguang; Sullivan, Katie M; Mitic, Tijana; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Schrecker, Christopher; Samuel, Kay; White, Christopher I; Bouhlel, M Amine; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R; Savill, John S; Chapman, Karen E; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2013-04-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 (11β-HSD1) converts inert cortisone into active cortisol, amplifying intracellular glucocorticoid action. 11β-HSD1 deficiency improves cardiovascular risk factors in obesity but exacerbates acute inflammation. To determine the effects of 11β-HSD1 deficiency on atherosclerosis and its inflammation, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mice were treated with a selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor or crossed with 11β-HSD1-KO mice to generate double knockouts (DKOs) and challenged with an atherogenic Western diet. 11β-HSD1 inhibition or deficiency attenuated atherosclerosis (74-76%) without deleterious effects on plaque structure. This occurred without affecting plasma lipids or glucose, suggesting independence from classical metabolic risk factors. KO plaques were not more inflamed and indeed had 36% less T-cell infiltration, associated with 38% reduced circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and 36% lower lesional vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Bone marrow (BM) cells are key to the atheroprotection, since transplantation of DKO BM to irradiated ApoE-KO mice reduced atherosclerosis by 51%. 11β-HSD1-null macrophages show 76% enhanced cholesterol ester export. Thus, 11β-HSD1 deficiency reduces atherosclerosis without exaggerated lesional inflammation independent of metabolic risk factors. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitors promise novel antiatherosclerosis effects over and above their benefits for metabolic risk factors via effects on BM cells, plausibly macrophages.

  5. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  6. MCM4 mutation causes adrenal failure, short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Claire R.; Guasti, Leonardo; Meimaridou, Eirini; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Schimenti, John C.; King, Peter J.; Costigan, Colm; Clark, Adrian J.L.; Metherell, Louise A.

    2012-01-01

    An interesting variant of familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD), an autosomal recessive form of adrenal failure, exists in a genetically isolated Irish population. In addition to hypocortisolemia, affected children show signs of growth failure, increased chromosomal breakage, and NK cell deficiency. Targeted exome sequencing in 8 patients identified a variant (c.71-1insG) in minichromosome maintenance–deficient 4 (MCM4) that was predicted to result in a severely truncated protein (p.Pro24ArgfsX4). Western blotting of patient samples revealed that the major 96-kDa isoform present in unaffected human controls was absent, while the presence of the minor 85-kDa isoform was preserved. Interestingly, histological studies with Mcm4-depleted mice showed grossly abnormal adrenal morphology that was characterized by non-steroidogenic GATA4- and Gli1-positive cells within the steroidogenic cortex, which reduced the number of steroidogenic cells in the zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex. Since MCM4 is one part of a MCM2-7 complex recently confirmed as the replicative helicase essential for normal DNA replication and genome stability in all eukaryotes, it is possible that our patients may have an increased risk of neoplastic change. In summary, we have identified what we believe to be the first human mutation in MCM4 and have shown that it is associated with adrenal insufficiency, short stature, and NK cell deficiency. PMID:22354170

  7. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  8. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for Patients With Primary Immune Deficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    SCID; Omenn's Syndrome; Reticular Dysgenesis; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; CD40 Ligand Deficiency; Hyper IgM Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Griscelli Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Langerhan's Cell Histiocytosis

  9. Glycosylation inhibition reduces cholesterol accumulation in NPC1 protein-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deffieu, Maika S; Lee, Peter L; Saha, Piyali; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomes are lined with a glycocalyx that protects the limiting membrane from the action of degradative enzymes. We tested the hypothesis that Niemann-Pick type C 1 (NPC1) protein aids the transfer of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol across this glycocalyx. A prediction of this model is that cells will be less dependent upon NPC1 if their glycocalyx is decreased in density. Lysosome cholesterol content was significantly lower after treatment of NPC1-deficient human fibroblasts with benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside, an inhibitor of O-linked glycosylation. Direct biochemical measurement of cholesterol showed that lysosomes purified from NPC1-deficient fibroblasts contained at least 30% less cholesterol when O-linked glycosylation was blocked. As an independent means to modify protein glycosylation, we used Chinese hamster ovary ldl-D cells defective in UDP-Gal/UDP-GalNAc 4-epimerase in which N- and O-linked glycosylation can be controlled. CRISPR generated, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells supplemented with galactose accumulated more cholesterol than those in which sugar addition was blocked. In the absence of galactose supplementation, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells also transported more cholesterol from lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, as monitored by an increase in cholesteryl [(14)C]-oleate levels. These experiments support a model in which NPC1 protein functions to transfer cholesterol past a lysosomal glycocalyx.

  10. Induction of protective CTL immunity against peptide transporter TAP-deficient tumors through dendritic cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Benedict; Grufman, Per; Fredriksson, Vanoohi; Andersson, Kenth; Roseboom, Marjet; Laban, Sandra; Camps, Marcel; Wolpert, Elisabeth Z; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Offringa, Rienk; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; van Hall, Thorbald

    2007-09-15

    A large proportion of human cancers show deficiencies in the MHC class I antigen-processing machinery. Such defects render tumors resistant to immune eradication by tumoricidal CTLs. We recently identified a unique population of CTL that selectively targets tumor immune-escape variants through recognition of MHC-presented peptides, termed TEIPP (T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing), expressed on cells lacking functional TAP-peptide transporters. Previously, we showed that vaccination with TEIPP peptides mediates protection against TAP-deficient tumors. Here, we further explored the concept of TEIPP-targeted therapy using a dendritic cell (DC)-based cellular vaccine. Impairment of TAP function in DC induced the presentation of endogenous TEIPP antigens by MHC class I molecules, and immunization with these DCs protected mice against the outgrowth of TAP-deficient lymphomas and fibrosarcomas. Immune analysis of vaccinated mice revealed strong TEIPP-specific CTL responses, and a crucial role for CD8(+) cells in tumor resistance. Finally, we show that TEIPP antigens could be successfully induced in wild-type DC by introducing the viral TAP inhibitor UL49.5. Our results imply that immune intervention strategies with TAP-inhibited DC could be developed for the treatment of antigen processing-deficient cancers in humans.

  11. Argonaute and Argonaute-Bound Small RNAs in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lihong; Wang, Lin; Teng, Feng; Zhou, Lanting; Zhang, Wenjing; Xiao, Juan; Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs are essential for a variety of cellular functions. Argonaute (AGO) proteins are associated with all of the different classes of small RNAs, and are indispensable in small RNA-mediated regulatory pathways. AGO proteins have been identified in various types of stem cells in diverse species from plants and animals. This review article highlights recent progress on how AGO proteins and AGO-bound small RNAs regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of distinct stem cell types, including pluripotent, germline, somatic, and cancer stem cells. PMID:26861290

  12. The impact of FANCD2 deficiency on formaldehyde-induced toxicity in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuefeng; Ji, Zhiying; McHale, Cliona M; Yuh, Jessica; Bersonda, Jessica; Tang, Maycky; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a major industrial chemical and ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has recently been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a human leukemogen. The major mode of action of FA is thought to be the formation of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Repair of DPCs may be mediated by the Fanconi anemia pathway; however, data supporting the involvement of this pathway are limited, particularly in human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we assessed the role of FANCD2, a critical component of the Fanconi anemia pathway, in FA-induced toxicity in human lymphoblast cell models of FANCD2 deficiency (PD20 cells) and FANCD2 sufficiency (PD20-D2 cells). After treatment of the cells with 0-150 μM FA for 24 h, DPCs were increased in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells. FA also induced cytotoxicity, micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in cytotoxicity and apoptosis in PD20 cells. Increased levels of γ-ATR and γ-H2AX in both cell lines suggested the recognition of FA-induced DNA damage; however, the induction of BRCA2 was compromised in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells, potentially reducing the capacity to repair DPCs. Together, these findings suggest that FANCD2 protein and the Fanconi anemia pathway are essential to protect human lymphoblastoid cells against FA toxicity. Future studies are needed to delineate the role of this pathway in mitigating FA-induced toxicity, particularly in hematopoietic stem cells, the target cells in leukemia.

  13. Cell death caused by selenium deficiency and protective effect of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Akazawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Niki, Etsuo

    2003-10-10

    Selenium is an essential trace element and it is well known that selenium is necessary for cell culture. However, the mechanism underlying the role of selenium in cellular proliferation and survival is still unknown. The present study using Jurkat cells showed that selenium deficiency in a serum-free medium decreased the selenium-dependent enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductase) within cells and cell viability. To understand the mechanism of this effect of selenium, we examined the effect of other antioxidants, which act by different mechanisms. Vitamin E, a lipid-soluble radical-scavenging antioxidant, completely blocked selenium deficiency-induced cell death, although alpha-tocopherol (biologically the most active form of vitamin E) could not preserve selenium-dependent enzyme activity. Other antioxidants, such as different isoforms and derivatives of vitamin E, BO-653 and deferoxamine mesylate, also exerted an inhibitory effect. However, the water-soluble antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid, N-acetyl cysteine, and glutathione, displayed no such effect. Dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) assay revealed that cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased before cell death, and sodium selenite and alpha-tocopherol inhibited ROS increase in a dose-dependent manner. The generation of lipid hydroperoxides was observed by fluorescence probe diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP) and HPLC chemiluminescence only in selenium-deficient cells. These results suggest that the ROS, especially lipid hydroperoxides, are involved in the cell death caused by selenium deficiency and that selenium and vitamin E cooperate in the defense against oxidative stress upon cells by detoxifying and inhibiting the formation of lipid hydroperoxides.

  14. B cell hyperactivity and abnormalities in T cell markers and immunoregulatory function in a patient with nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Zabay, J M; De La Concha, E G; Ludeña, C; Lozano, C; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Bootello, A; Gonzalezporqué, P

    1982-01-01

    We describe a 2 year old girl with nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, who had low blood T cell numbers and T lymphocyte blastogenic response to mitogens, hypergammaglobulinaemia, high titres of antibodies to many common antigens, various autoantibodies, a monoclonal IgM-kappa protein, an increased frequency of mature Ig containing blood B cells and a high production of Ig in vitro in unstimulated cultures. E rosetting cells showed faint or no immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibodies directed against T cell membrane antigens. In vitro Ig production in response to pokeweed mitogen was defective, and no T cell helper or suppressor activity was observed. It is suggested that the immunoregulatory deficiency might have caused the B cell hyperactivity. PMID:6819909

  15. Energy Efficiency Challenges of 5G Small Cell Networks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaohu; Yang, Jing; Gharavi, Hamid; Sun, Yang

    2017-05-01

    The deployment of a large number of small cells poses new challenges to energy efficiency, which has often been ignored in fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. While massive multiple-input multiple outputs (MIMO) will reduce the transmission power at the expense of higher computational cost, the question remains as to which computation or transmission power is more important in the energy efficiency of 5G small cell networks. Thus, the main objective in this paper is to investigate the computation power based on the Landauer principle. Simulation results reveal that more than 50% of the energy is consumed by the computation power at 5G small cell base stations (BSs). Moreover, the computation power of 5G small cell BS can approach 800 watt when the massive MIMO (e.g., 128 antennas) is deployed to transmit high volume traffic. This clearly indicates that computation power optimization can play a major role in the energy efficiency of small cell networks.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    manner ( Bekker -Jensen et al., 2006; Savic et al., 2009). Indeed, the extent of g-H2AX spreading from an I-SceI-induced DSBs at the IgH locus is confined to...and Adachi, Y. (2001). Phosphorylation and rapid relocalization of 53BP1 to nuclear foci upon DNA damage. Mol. Cell. Biol. 21, 1719–1729. Bekker ...ATM-depen- dent checkpoint pathway that is constitutively activated in human cancer. Nat. Cell Biol. 4, 998–1002. Doil, C., Mailand, N., Bekker

  17. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency in T cells suppresses the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Taisuke; Kimura, Akihiro; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chinen, Ichino; Hanieh, Hamza; Nohara, Keiko; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Ahr deficiency ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Collagen-immunized Ahr KO mice showed decreased serum levels of such proinflammatory cytokines as IL-1β and IL-6. The Th17 and Th1 cell populations in lymph nodes from these mice decreased and increased, respectively, whereas the percentage of regulatory T cells was unchanged. Interestingly, a lack of Ahr specifically in T cells significantly suppressed collagen-induced arthritis development, whereas Ahr deficiency in macrophages had no effect. These finding indicate that the development of experimental autoimmune arthritis depends on the presence of Ahr in T cells, and that Th1/Th17 balance may be particularly important for this process. PMID:21825138

  18. Brief report: impaired cell reprogramming in nonhomologous end joining deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Molina-Estevez, F Javier; Lozano, M Luz; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Grabundzija, Ivana; Ivics, Zoltan; Samper, Enrique; Bueren, Juan A; Guenechea, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Although there is an increasing interest in defining the role of DNA damage response mechanisms in cell reprogramming, the relevance of proteins participating in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), a major mechanism of DNA double-strand breaks repair, in this process remains to be investigated. Herein, we present data related to the reprogramming of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from severe combined immunodeficient (Scid) mice defective in DNA-PKcs, a key protein for NHEJ. Reduced numbers of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies were generated from Scid cells using reprogramming lentiviral vectors (LV), being the reprogramming efficiency fourfold to sevenfold lower than that observed in wt cells. Moreover, these Scid iPSC-like clones were prematurely lost or differentiated spontaneously. While the Scid mutation neither reduce the proliferation rate nor the transduction efficacy of fibroblasts transduced with reprogramming LV, both the expression of SA-β-Gal and of P16/INK(4a) senescence markers were highly increased in Scid versus wt MEFs during the reprogramming process, accounting for the reduced reprogramming efficacy of Scid MEFs. The use of improved Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase systems allowed us, however, to isolate DNA-PKcs-deficient iPSCs which preserved their parental genotype and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. This new disease-specific iPSC model would be useful to understand the physiological consequences of the DNA-PKcs mutation during development and would help to improve current cell and gene therapy strategies for the disease. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot.

  20. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency.

  1. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  2. Cell Motility and Invasiveness of Neurofibromin-Deficient Neural Crest Cells and Malignant Triton Tumor Lines. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    first branchial arch mesenchymal populations, as well as trigeminal ganglion non- neuronal cells, from mouse embryos and measured their performance in...responses to PDGF-BB in human MPNST, as compared to normal Schwann cells, and we have used our MPNST lines and cultures of embryonic Schwann cells to...can be isolated prior to this stage and maintained in culture. Sensory and sympathetic neurons isolated from Nf1-deficient mouse embryos survive

  3. Cleft lip and palate due to deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    van Limborgh, J; Lieuw Kie Song, S H; Been, W

    1983-07-01

    The mesencephalic crest was partially eliminated in chick embryos by means of tangential microlaser. The heads of the surviving embryos were serially sectioned and microscopically studied. A deficiency of mesenshyme in the anlage of the maxillary process was observed in 4 of the 42 embryos sacrificed after 24 hours, on the side of irradiation. Among the 99 surviving embryos sacrificed at the ages of 7 or 12 days, 26 showed a unilateral cleft lip, a wide palatal cleft or a combination of these anomalies. It is concluded that cleft lip and palate can result from insufficient growth of the mesenchyme in the maxillary process caused by partial deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

  4. Respiration-Deficient Astrocytes Survive As Glycolytic Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Supplie, Lotti M; Düking, Tim; Campbell, Graham; Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T; Götz, Magdalena; Hamprecht, Bernd; Boretius, Susann; Mahad, Don; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2017-04-19

    Neurons and glial cells exchange energy-rich metabolites and it has been suggested, originally based on in vitro data, that astrocytes provide lactate to glutamatergic synapses ("lactate shuttle"). Here, we have studied astrocytes that lack mitochondrial respiration in vitro and in vivo A novel mouse mutant (GLAST(CreERT2)::Cox10(flox/flox)) was generated, in which the administration of tamoxifen causes mutant astrocytes to fail in the assembly of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Focusing on cerebellar Bergmann glia (BG) cells, which exhibit the highest rate of Cre-mediated recombination, we found a normal density of viable astrocytes even 1 year after tamoxifen-induced Cox10 gene targeting. Our data show that BG cells, and presumably all astrocytes, can survive by aerobic glycolysis for an extended period of time in the absence of glial pathology or unspecific signs of neurodegeneration.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT When astrocytes are placed into culture, they import glucose and release lactate, an energy-rich metabolite readily metabolized by neurons. This observation led to the "glia-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis," but in vivo evidence for this hypothesis is weak. To study astroglial energy metabolism and the directionality of lactate flux, we generated conditional Cox10 mouse mutants lacking mitochondrial respiration in astrocytes, which forces these cells to survive by aerobic glycolysis. Here, we report that these mice are fully viable in the absence of any signs of glial or neuronal loss, suggesting that astrocytes are naturally glycolytic cells. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/374231-12$15.00/0.

  5. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  6. Early B Cell Progenitors Deficient for GON4L Fail To Differentiate Due to a Block in Mitotic Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jennifer Y; Goodfellow, Renee X; Colgan, Diana F; Colgan, John D

    2017-04-05

    B cell development in Justy mutant mice is blocked due to a precursor mRNA splicing defect that depletes the protein GON4-like (GON4L) in B cell progenitors. Genetic and biochemical studies have suggested that GON4L is a transcriptional regulator that coordinates cell division with differentiation, but its role in B cell development is unknown. To understand the function of GON4L, we characterized B cell differentiation, cell cycle control, and mitotic gene expression in GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors from Justy mice. We found that these cells established key aspects of the transcription factor network that guides B cell development and proliferation and rearranged the IgH gene locus. However, despite intact IL-7 signaling, GON4L-deficient pro-B cell stage precursors failed to undergo a characteristic IL-7-dependent proliferative burst. These cells also failed to upregulate genes required for mitotic division, including those encoding the G1/S cyclin D3 and E2F transcription factors and their targets. Additionally, GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors displayed defects in DNA synthesis and passage through the G1/S transition, contained fragmented DNA, and underwent apoptosis. These phenotypes were not suppressed by transgenic expression of prosurvival factors. However, transgenic expression of cyclin D3 or other regulators of the G1/S transition restored pro-B cell development from Justy progenitor cells, suggesting that GON4L acts at the beginning of the cell cycle. Together, our findings indicate that GON4L is essential for cell cycle progression and division during the early stages of B cell development.

  7. Cell sorting analysis of cell cycle-dependent X-ray sensitivity in end joining-deficient human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Matsui, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka; Date, Takayasu

    2008-08-08

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) plays a major role in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), especially during the G1-phase of the cell cycle. Using a flow cytometric cell sorter, we fractionated G1- and S/G2-phase cells based on size to assess the DSB-repair activity in NHEJ factor-deficient DT40 and Nalm-6 cell lines. Colony formation assays revealed that the X-ray sensitivities of the G1-enriched populations correctly reflected the DSB-repair activities of both the DT40 and Nalm-6 cell lines. Furthermore, as assessed by {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, the sorted cells exhibited less DNA damage than chemically synchronized cells. Given that it does not use fluorescent labeling or chemical agents, this method of cell sorting is simpler and less toxic than other methods, making it applicable to a variety of cell lines, including those that cannot be synchronized by standard chemical treatments.

  8. Characterization of an adenosine deaminase-deficient human histiocytic lymphoma cell line (DHL-9) and selection of mutants deficient in adenosir kinase and deoxycytidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kubota, M; Kamatani, N; Daddona, P E; Carson, D A

    1983-06-01

    The association of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency with immunodeficiency disease has emphasized the importance of this purine metabolic enzyme for human lymphocyte growth and function. This report describes the natural occurrence of ADA deficiency in a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, DHL-9. The minimal ADA activity in DHL-9 extracts, 0.028 nmol/min/mg protein, was less than 50% of the activity in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from ADA-deficient patients and was resistant to the potent ADA inhibitor deoxycoformycin. A sensitive radioimmunoassay failed to detect immunoreactive ADA in DHL-9 cells. Moreover, in DHL-9 cells, deoxycoformycin did not augment either the growth-inhibitory effects of adenosine and deoxyadenosine or the accumulation of deoxyadenosine triphosphate from deoxyadenosine. When compared to six other human hematopoietic cell lines, DHL-9 had 5.6-fold-higher levels of adenosylhomocysteinase. Chromosome 20, which bears the structural gene for ADA and adenosylhomocysteinase, was diploid and had a normal Giemsa banding pattern. The parental DHL-9 cell line was used for the selection and cloning of secondary mutants deficient in deoxycytidine kinase and adenosine kinase.

  9. Rapamycin inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation and obstructive arteriopathy attributable to elastin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Qingle; Qin, Lingfeng; Ali, Rahmat; Qyang, Yibing; Tassabehji, May; Pober, Barbara R; Sessa, William C; Giordano, Frank J; Tellides, George

    2013-05-01

    Patients with elastin deficiency attributable to gene mutation (supravalvular aortic stenosis) or chromosomal microdeletion (Williams syndrome) are characterized by obstructive arteriopathy resulting from excessive smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, mural expansion, and inadequate vessel size. We investigated whether rapamycin, an inhibitor of the cell growth regulator mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and effective against other SMC proliferative disorders, is of therapeutic benefit in experimental models of elastin deficiency. As previously reported, Eln(-/-) mice demonstrated SMC hyperplasia and severe stenosis of the aorta, whereas Eln(+/-) mice exhibited a smaller diameter aorta with more numerous but thinner elastic lamellae. Increased mTOR signaling was detected in elastin-deficient aortas of newborn pups that was inhibited by maternal administration of rapamycin. mTOR inhibition reduced SMC proliferation and aortic obstruction in Eln(-/-) pups and prevented medial hyperlamellation in Eln(+/-) weanlings without compromising aortic size. However, rapamycin did not prolong the survival of Eln(-/-) pups, and it retarded the somatic growth of juvenile Eln(+/-) and Eln(+/+) mice. In cell cultures, rapamycin inhibited prolonged mTOR activation and enhanced proliferation of SMC derived from patients with supravalvular aortic stenosis and with Williams syndrome. mTOR inhibition may represent a pharmacological strategy to treat diffuse arteriopathy resulting from elastin deficiency.

  10. Isolated Prolactin Deficiency Associated With Serum Autoantibodies Against Prolactin-Secreting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwama, Shintaro; Welt, Corrine K.; Romero, Christopher J.; Radovick, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Context: Isolated prolactin (PRL) deficiency is a rare entity of unknown etiology manifesting as failure of puerperal lactogenesis. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the cause of isolated PRL deficiency in an affected woman. Design and Setting: We examined genetic and autoimmune causes of isolated PRL deficiency at academic medical centers. Patient: The patient was a 39-year-old woman with puerperal alactogenesis after two deliveries and undetectable PRL. The other pituitary axes, serum calcium levels, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Intervention: Recombinant human PRL (r-hPRL) was administered to the patient. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the sequencing of candidate genes and immunofluorescence analysis of autoantibodies directed against pituitary endocrine cells. Results: There were no rare sequence variants in the genes encoding for PRL, putative PRL-releasing peptide, putative PRL-releasing peptide receptor, or in other genes important for lactotroph lineage development (POU1F1, PROP1, LHX3, LHX4, HESX1, OTX2, and LSD1). The patient serum, on the contrary, contained autoantibodies that specifically recognized a subset of PRL-secreting cells but not PRL itself or any other pituitary cells or hormones. The mother was able to lactate fully after 17 days of treatment with r-hPRL 60 μg/kg every 12 hours, but alactogenesis resumed after treatment was completed. Conclusions: These studies report a new autoimmune etiology for women with isolated PRL deficiency and puerperal alactogenesis. PMID:23940128

  11. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  12. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  13. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer by targeting APC-deficient cells for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ren, Xiaoyang; Alt, Eckhard; Bai, Xiaowen; Huang, Shaoyi; Xu, Zhengming; Lynch, Patrick M; Moyer, Mary P; Wen, Xian-Feng; Wu, Xiangwei

    2010-04-15

    Cancer chemoprevention uses natural, synthetic, or biological substances to reverse, suppress, or prevent either the initial phase of carcinogenesis or the progression of neoplastic cells to cancer. It holds promise for overcoming problems associated with the treatment of late-stage cancers. However, the broad application of chemoprevention is compromised at present by limited effectiveness and potential toxicity. To overcome these challenges, here we developed a new chemoprevention approach that specifically targets premalignant tumour cells for apoptosis. We show that a deficiency in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and subsequent activation of beta-catenin lead to the repression of cellular caspase-8 inhibitor c-FLIP (also known as CFLAR) expression through activation of c-Myc, and that all-trans-retinyl acetate (RAc) independently upregulates tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and suppresses decoy receptors. Thus, the combination of TRAIL and RAc induces apoptosis in APC-deficient premalignant cells without affecting normal cells in vitro. In addition, we show that short-term and non-continuous TRAIL and RAc treatment induce apoptosis specifically in intestinal polyps, strongly inhibit tumour growth, and prolong survival in multiple intestinal neoplasms C57BL/6J-Apc(Min)/J (Apc(Min)) mice. With our approach, we further demonstrate that TRAIL and RAc induce significant cell death in human colon polyps, providing a potentially selective approach for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting APC-deficient cells for apoptosis.

  14. Cells deficient in the FANC/BRCA pathway are hypersensitive to plasma levels of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, John R; Nakamura, Ayumi; Tano, Keizo; Luke, April M; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Gillespie, David A F; Sale, Julian E; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Bishop, Douglas K; Takata, Minoru; Takeda, Shunichi; Watanabe, Masami; Swenberg, James A; Nakamura, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an aliphatic monoaldehyde and is a highly reactive environmental human carcinogen. Whereas humans are continuously exposed to exogenous formaldehyde, this reactive aldehyde is a naturally occurring biological compound that is present in human plasma at concentrations ranging from 13 to 97 micromol/L. It has been well documented that DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) likely play an important role with regard to the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde. However, little is known about which DNA damage response pathways are essential for cells to counteract formaldehyde. In the present study, we first assessed the DNA damage response to plasma levels of formaldehyde using chicken DT40 cells with targeted mutations in various DNA repair genes. Here, we show that the hypersensitivity to formaldehyde is detected in DT40 mutants deficient in the BRCA/FANC pathway, homologous recombination, or translesion DNA synthesis. In addition, FANCD2-deficient DT40 cells are hypersensitive to acetaldehyde, but not to acrolein, crotonaldehyde, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal. Human cells deficient in FANCC and FANCG are also hypersensitive to plasma levels of formaldehyde. These results indicate that the BRCA/FANC pathway is essential to counteract DPCs caused by aliphatic monoaldehydes. Based on the results obtained in the present study, we are currently proposing that endogenous formaldehyde might have an effect on highly proliferating cells, such as bone marrow cells, as well as an etiology of cancer in Fanconi anemia patients.

  15. Hematopoietic Kit Deficiency, rather than Lack of Mast Cells, Protects Mice from Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Dario A; Muralidhar, Sathya; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Herzig, Stephan; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2015-05-05

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and related pathologies are associated with immune-mediated chronic inflammation. Kit mutant mice are protected from diet-induced obesity and associated co-morbidities, and this phenotype has previously been attributed to their lack of mast cells. We performed a comprehensive metabolic analysis of Kit-dependent Kit(W/Wv) and Kit-independent Cpa3(Cre/+) mast-cell-deficient mouse strains, employing diet-induced or genetic (Lep(Ob/Ob) background) models of obesity. Our results show that mast cell deficiency, in the absence of Kit mutations, plays no role in the regulation of weight gain or insulin resistance. Moreover, we provide evidence that the metabolic phenotype observed in Kit mutant mice, while independent of mast cells, is immune regulated. Our data underscore the value of definitive mast cell deficiency models to conclusively test the involvement of this enigmatic cell in immune-mediated pathologies and identify Kit as a key hematopoietic factor in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PKK deficiency in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle lupus mice.

    PubMed

    Oleksyn, D; Zhao, J; Vosoughi, A; Zhao, J C; Misra, R; Pentland, A P; Ryan, D; Anolik, J; Ritchlin, C; Looney, J; Anandarajah, A P; Schwartz, G; Calvi, L M; Georger, M; Mohan, C; Sanz, I; Chen, L

    2017-03-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can result in damage to multiple organs. It is well documented that B cells play a critical role in the development of the disease. We previously showed that protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) is required for B1 cell development as well as for the survival of recirculating mature B cells and B-lymphoma cells. Here, we investigated the role of PKK in lupus development in a lupus mouse model. We demonstrate that the conditional deletion of PKK in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle1Sle3 mice. The loss of PKK in Sle mice resulted in the amelioration of multiple classical lupus-associated phenotypes and histologic features of lupus nephritis, including marked reduction in the levels of serum autoantibodies, proteinuria, spleen size, peritoneal B-1 cell population and the number of activated CD4 T cells. In addition, the abundance of autoreactive plasma cells normally seen in Sle lupus mice was also significantly decreased in the PKK-deficient Sle mice. Sle B cells deficient in PKK display defective proliferation responses to BCR and LPS stimulation. Consistently, B cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation, which is required for the survival of activated B cells, was impaired in the PKK-deficient B cells. Taken together, our work uncovers a critical role of PKK in lupus development and suggests that targeting the PKK-mediated pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for lupus treatment.

  17. MicroRNA-155 Deficiency in Kupffer Cells Ameliorates Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yakun; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is known to be involved in autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and transplantation. However, its role in a warm hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model has not been fully elucidated. Partial hepatic IR was performed in wild-type and miR-155-deficient mice treated with or without GdCl3, and then the serum transaminase concentration and histology were analyzed. Kupffer cells (KCs) were isolated from the liver after IR, and immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate activation and polarization. In addition, the mRNA concentrations of various inflammatory cytokines were measured. Macrophages were obtained from the abdominal cavity and challenged with or without lipopolysaccharide to determine the influence of miR-155 deficiency on macrophage polarization in vitro. Furthermore, we used in vitro coculture assays to determine the effect of miR-155 deficiency on hepatocyte apoptosis induced directly by KCs. miR-155 deficiency ameliorated liver IR injury, and inhibition of KCs by GdCl3 abolished this protective effect. miR-155 deficiency decreased CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II expression in KCs after IR and tipped the M1/M2 balance toward an anti-inflammatory profile, where proinflammatory cytokine secretion was suppressed and IL-10 was enhanced. In addition, hepatocyte apoptosis was reduced in coculture with miR-155-deficient KCs in vitro. miR-155 deficiency plays an effective role in attenuating liver IR injury likely by regulating the activation and inflammatory response, as well as modifying the polarization of KCs.

  18. EGF-Receptor Signaling in Endocytosis Deficient Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    B-XX-Tfn, biotinylated Tfn; C6-NBD-SM, N-((6-(7-nitrobenz- Fax: 858-784-9126; E-mail: slschmid@scripps.edu. 2- oxa -l,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino) hexanoyl...Gibco BRL), to provide selection pressure for the tTA gene (Damke et al., 1995). tTA-HepG2 cells were generated by LipofectAMINE (Gibco BRL) transfection

  19. Haploidentical Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for DOCK8 Deficiency Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Freeman, Alexandra F; Su, Helen; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Moutsopoulos, Niki M; Baris, Safa; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Hughes, Thomas E; Kong, Heidi H; Holland, Steve M; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2017-03-10

    Dedicator-of-Cytokinesis-8 (DOCK8) deficiency, a primary immunodeficiency disease, can be reversed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); however, there are few reports describing the use of alternative donor sources for HSCT in DOCK8 deficiency. We describe HSCT for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor using bone marrow from haploidentical related donors and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) for GVHD prophylaxis. Seven patients with DOCK8 deficiency (median age 20 years, range 7-25 years) received a haploidentical related donor HSCT. The conditioning regimen included 2 days of low-dose cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, three days of busulfan, and 200 cGy TBI. Graft-versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) 50 mg/kg/day on days +3 and +4, and tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil starting at day +5. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 15 and 19 days, respectively. All patients attained >90% donor engraftment by day +30. Four subjects developed acute GVHD (one with maximum grade 3). No patient developed chronic GVHD. With a median follow-up time of 20.6 months (range 9.5 - 31.7 months), 6 of 7 patients are alive and disease-free. Haploidentical related donor HSCT with PT/CY represents an effective therapeutic approach for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor.

  20. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H.; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E.; Martineau, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair. PMID:28350850

  1. Distorted secretory granule composition in mast cells with multiple protease deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grujic, Mirjana; Calounova, Gabriela; Eriksson, Inger; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Tchougounova, Elena; Kjellén, Lena; Pejler, Gunnar

    2013-10-01

    Mast cells are characterized by an abundance of secretory granules densely packed with inflammatory mediators such as bioactive amines, cytokines, serglycin proteoglycans with negatively charged glycosaminoglycan side chains of either heparin or chondroitin sulfate type, and large amounts of positively charged proteases. Despite the large biological impact of mast cell granules and their contents on various pathologies, the mechanisms that regulate granule composition are incompletely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that granule composition is dependent on a dynamic electrostatic interrelationship between different granule compounds. As a tool to evaluate this possibility, we generated mice in which mast cells are multideficient in a panel of positively charged proteases: the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4, the tryptase mouse mast cell protease-6, and carboxypeptidase A3. Through a posttranslational effect, mast cells from these mice additionally lack mouse mast cell protease-5 protein. Mast cells from mice deficient in individual proteases showed normal morphology. In contrast, mast cells with combined protease deficiency displayed a profound distortion of granule integrity, as seen both by conventional morphological criteria and by transmission electron microscopy. An assessment of granule content revealed that the distorted granule integrity in multiprotease-deficient mast cells was associated with a profound reduction of highly negatively charged heparin, whereas no reduction in chondroitin sulfate storage was observed. Taken together with previous findings showing that the storage of basic proteases conversely is regulated by anionic proteoglycans, these data suggest that secretory granule composition in mast cells is dependent on a dynamic interrelationship between granule compounds of opposite electrical charge.

  2. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  3. Stem Cell Selection In Vivo Using Foamy Vectors Cures Canine Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Robert A.; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Conclusions/Significance Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies. PMID:23028826

  4. Stem cell selection in vivo using foamy vectors cures canine pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant D; Beard, Brian C; Wu, Robert A; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies.

  5. B cell maturation antigen deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M; Greenley, Erin J; Tung, Kenneth S; Erickson, Loren D

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PCs). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine BAFF that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation Ag (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring Ab protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 causes dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity.

  6. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  7. Perforin Gene Transfer Into Hematopoietic Stem Cells Improves Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Perforin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8+ lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  8. SIGLEC-G deficiency increases susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Giorgia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Rodriguez, Tania Veliz; Apollonio, Benedetta; Dagklis, Antonis; Rocchi, Martina; Innocenzi, Anna; Casola, Stefano; Winkler, Thomas H.; Nitschke, Lars; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ghia, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin SIGLEC-G is a negative regulator of B-cell receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Its deficiency leads to reduced turnover and increased proliferation and survival of murine B-1a cells. Siglecg−/− mice show a premature expansion of polyclonal CD5+ B cells in the spleen and the peritoneal cavity. Here we studied the fate of B lymphocytes in Siglecg−/− mice over time. We demonstrate that in aging animals SIGLEC-G deficiency promotes progressive accumulation of monoclonal B lymphocytes and increases the susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Lymphoid tumors arising in aged Siglecg−/− mice are monoclonal and histologically heterogeneous as they include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and medium-to-large B-cell monomorphic lymphoma but surprisingly not chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The tumors express high levels of BCL-2 and are transplantable. In keeping with these findings we have also observed a remarkable down-regulation of the human ortholog SIGLEC10 in human B-cell lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Taken together, these observations indicate that the down-regulation of negative B-cell receptor regulators such as SIGLEC-G/SIGLEC10 may represent another mechanism relevant to the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24859880

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in B-cell-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, A M; Santoro, F; Afchain, D; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of neonatally initiated injections of anti-mu rabbit antiserum on immunity of rats against Trypanosoma cruzi infection was investigated in vivo. Anti-mu treatment resulted in a loss of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG2a synthesis and, subsequently, of antibody production. These rats so treated were shown to be significantly more susceptible to the acute phase of the infection than the control rats treated with normal rabbit serum, as measured by increased parasitemia and mortality. These results indicate the essential role of antibodies, probably in association with complement or effector cells or both, in immunity to acute Chagas' disease. PMID:6783543

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Rif1 was originally identified in budding yeast as a protein with a key role in telomere length maintenance (13). However, in mam- malian cells, Rif1 is...observed in yeast . Similar to CFSs, sites located in ‘‘replication slow zones’’ (RSZs) are late replicating and breakage prone (Cha and Kleck- ner, 2002). In...preferentially around a subset of early firing replication origins in yeast (Raveendranathan et al., 2006), which do not overlap with RSZs (Cha and Kleckner, 2002

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  12. Adenoviral Vector Driven by a Minimal Rad51 Promoter Is Selective for p53-Deficient Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Vincent; Osterbur, Marika; Capella, Cristina; Kim, Yo-El; Hine, Christopher; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. Conclusions/Significance Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53. PMID:22174876

  13. Adenoviral vector driven by a minimal Rad51 promoter is selective for p53-deficient tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Vincent; Osterbur, Marika; Capella, Cristina; Kim, Yo-El; Hine, Christopher; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53.

  14. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  15. Screening for Active Small Molecules in Mitochondrial Complex I Deficient Patient's Fibroblasts, Reveals AICAR as the Most Beneficial Compound

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Sarah; Link, Gabriela; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Saada, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (CI) is a common defect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite major advances in the biochemical and molecular diagnostics and the deciphering of CI structure, function assembly and pathomechanism, there is currently no satisfactory cure for patients with mitochondrial complex I defects. Small molecules provide one feasible therapeutic option, however their use has not been systematically evaluated using a standardized experimental system. In order to evaluate potentially therapeutic compounds, we set up a relatively simple system measuring different parameters using only a small amount of patient's fibroblasts, in glucose free medium, where growth is highly OXPOS dependent. Ten different compounds were screened using fibroblasts derived from seven CI patients, harboring different mutations. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR) was found to be the most beneficial compound improving growth and ATP content while decreasing ROS production. AICAR also increased mitochondrial biogenesis without altering mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ). Fluorescence microscopy data supported increased mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). Other compounds such as; bezafibrate and oltipraz were rated as favorable while polyphenolic phytochemicals (resverastrol, grape seed extract, genistein and epigallocatechin gallate) were found not significant or detrimental. Although the results have to be verified by more thorough investigation of additional OXPHOS parameters, preliminary rapid screening of potential therapeutic compounds in individual patient's fibroblasts could direct and advance personalized medical treatment. PMID:22046392

  16. Small RNA profiling reveals phosphorus deficiency as a contributing factor in symptom expression for citrus huanglongbing disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Albrecht, Ute; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Wang, Airong; Coffey, Michael D; Girke, Thomas; Wang, Zonghua; Close, Timothy J; Roose, Mikeal; Yokomi, Raymond K; Folimonova, Svetlana; Vidalakis, Georgios; Rouse, Robert; Bowman, Kim D; Jin, Hailing

    2013-03-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus 'Candidatus Liberibacter' (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn-a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology.

  17. Small RNA Profiling Reveals Phosphorus Deficiency as a Contributing Factor in Symptom Expression for Citrus Huanglongbing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Jin, Hailing

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn—a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology. PMID:23292880

  18. Dicer suppresses the malignant phenotype in VHL-deficient clear cell renal cell carcinoma by inhibiting HIF-2α

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Gao, Yu; Bao, Xu; Du, Qingshan; Ma, Minghui; Liu, Kan; Yao, Yuanxin; Huang, Qingbo; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Both the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and microRNA (miRNA) regulation are important mechanisms underlying the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here we demonstrate that VHL deficiency leads to downregulation of Dicer and, in turn, defects in the miRNA biogenesis machinery in ccRCCs. Dicer inhibited expression of HIF-2α, which was a direct target of Dicer-dependent miR-182-5p in VHL-deficient ccRCCs. Ectopic Dicer expression in VHL-deficient ccRCCs suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-2α both in vitro and in vivo. Reduced Dicer mRNA levels served as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in patients with VHL-deficient ccRCC. Our results indicate that downregulation of Dicer in VHL-deficient ccRCCs contributes to high levels of HIF-2α and a malignant phenotype, which suggests Dicer could be a useful therapeutic target for managing this disease. PMID:26943772

  19. Dicer suppresses the malignant phenotype in VHL-deficient clear cell renal cell carcinoma by inhibiting HIF-2α.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang; Li, Hongzhao; Ma, Xin; Gao, Yu; Bao, Xu; Du, Qingshan; Ma, Minghui; Liu, Kan; Yao, Yuanxin; Huang, Qingbo; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-04-05

    Both the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and microRNA (miRNA) regulation are important mechanisms underlying the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here we demonstrate that VHL deficiency leads to downregulation of Dicer and, in turn, defects in the miRNA biogenesis machinery in ccRCCs. Dicer inhibited expression of HIF-2α, which was a direct target of Dicer-dependent miR-182-5p in VHL-deficient ccRCCs. Ectopic Dicer expression in VHL-deficient ccRCCs suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-2α both in vitro and in vivo. Reduced Dicer mRNA levels served as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in patients with VHL-deficient ccRCC. Our results indicate that downregulation of Dicer in VHL-deficient ccRCCs contributes to high levels of HIF-2α and a malignant phenotype, which suggests Dicer could be a useful therapeutic target for managing this disease.

  20. Investigating complex I deficiency in Purkinje cells and synapses in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrysostomou, Alexia; Grady, John P.; Laude, Alex; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebellar ataxia is common in patients with mitochondrial disease, and despite previous neuropathological investigations demonstrating vulnerability of the olivocerebellar pathway in patients with mitochondrial disease, the exact neurodegenerative mechanisms are still not clear. We use quantitative quadruple immunofluorescence to enable precise quantification of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression in Purkinje cell bodies and their synaptic terminals in the dentate nucleus. Methods We investigated NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 13 protein expression in 12 clinically and genetically defined patients with mitochondrial disease and ataxia and 10 age‐matched controls. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to determine heteroplasmy levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in Purkinje cell bodies and inhibitory synapses. Results Our data reveal that complex I deficiency is present in both Purkinje cell bodies and their inhibitory synapses which surround dentate nucleus neurons. Inhibitory synapses are fewer and enlarged in patients which could represent a compensatory mechanism. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy demonstrated similarly high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in cell bodies and synapses. Conclusions This is the first study to use a validated quantitative immunofluorescence technique to determine complex I expression in neurons and presynaptic terminals, evaluating the distribution of respiratory chain deficiencies and assessing the degree of morphological abnormalities affecting synapses. Respiratory chain deficiencies detected in Purkinje cell bodies and their synapses and structural synaptic changes are likely to contribute to altered cerebellar circuitry and progression of ataxia. PMID:26337858

  1. Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptor-deficient mouse EPRO cells.

    PubMed

    Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Gaines, Peter; Olins, Ada L; Olins, Donald E

    2008-08-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic deficiency of LBR during granulopoiesis results in hypolobulation of the mature neutrophil nucleus, as observed in human Pelger-Huët anomaly and mouse ichthyosis (ic). In this study, we utilized differentiated early promyelocytes (EPRO cells) that were derived from the bone marrow of homozygous and heterozygous ichthyosis mice to examine changes to the expression of nuclear envelope proteins and heterochromatin structure that result from deficient LBR expression. Wild-type (+/+), heterozygous (+/ic), and homozygous (ic/ic) granulocytic forms of EPRO cells were analyzed for the expression of multiple lamins and inner nuclear envelope proteins by immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. The heterochromatin architecture was also examined by immunostaining for histone lysine methylation. Wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/ic) granulocytic forms revealed ring-shaped nuclei and contained LBR within the nuclear envelope; ic/ic granulocytes exhibited smaller ovoid nuclei devoid of LBR. The pericentric heterochromatin of undifferentiated and granulocytic ic/ic cells was condensed into larger spots and shifted away from the nuclear envelope, compared to +/+ and +/ic cell forms. Lamin A/C, which is normally not present in mature granulocytes, was significantly elevated in LBR-deficient EPRO cells. Our observations suggest roles for LBR during granulopoiesis, which can involve augmenting nuclear membrane growth, facilitating compartmentalization of heterochromatin, and promoting downregulation of lamin A/C expression.

  2. Chemosensitive Relapse in Small Cell Lung Cancer Proceeds through an EZH2-SLFN11 Axis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Eric E; Lok, Benjamin H; Schneeberger, Valentina E; Desmeules, Patrice; Miles, Linde A; Arnold, Paige K; Ni, Andy; Khodos, Inna; de Stanchina, Elisa; Nguyen, Thuyen; Sage, Julien; Campbell, John E; Ribich, Scott; Rekhtman, Natasha; Dowlati, Afshin; Massion, Pierre P; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2017-02-13

    Small cell lung cancer is initially highly responsive to cisplatin and etoposide but in almost every case becomes rapidly chemoresistant, leading to death within 1 year. We modeled acquired chemoresistance in vivo using a series of patient-derived xenografts to generate paired chemosensitive and chemoresistant cancers. Multiple chemoresistant models demonstrated suppression of SLFN11, a factor implicated in DNA-damage repair deficiency. In vivo silencing of SLFN11 was associated with marked deposition of H3K27me3, a histone modification placed by EZH2, within the gene body of SLFN11, inducing local chromatin condensation and gene silencing. Inclusion of an EZH2 inhibitor with standard cytotoxic therapies prevented emergence of acquired resistance and augmented chemotherapeutic efficacy in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant models of small cell lung cancer.

  3. Rubisco small subunits from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas complement Rubisco-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky; Leitão, Nuno; Orr, Douglas J; Meyer, Moritz T; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-04-01

    Introducing components of algal carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into higher plant chloroplasts could increase photosynthetic productivity. A key component is the Rubisco-containing pyrenoid that is needed to minimise CO2 retro-diffusion for CCM operating efficiency. Rubisco in Arabidopsis was re-engineered to incorporate sequence elements that are thought to be essential for recruitment of Rubisco to the pyrenoid, namely the algal Rubisco small subunit (SSU, encoded by rbcS) or only the surface-exposed algal SSU α-helices. Leaves of Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing 'pyrenoid-competent' chimeric Arabidopsis SSUs containing the SSU α-helices from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can form hybrid Rubisco complexes with catalytic properties similar to those of native Rubisco, suggesting that the α-helices are catalytically neutral. The growth and photosynthetic performance of complemented Arabidopsis rbcs mutants producing near wild-type levels of the hybrid Rubisco were similar to those of wild-type controls. Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing a Chlamydomonas SSU differed from wild-type plants with respect to Rubisco catalysis, photosynthesis and growth. This confirms a role for the SSU in influencing Rubisco catalytic properties.

  4. Small-cell carcinoma of the ovary in peritoneal fluid.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, S M

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of small-cell carcinoma of the ovary in the ascitic fluid and peritoneal/pelvic washings of a 30- and 28-yr-old woman, respectively, are presented and discussed. Smear preparations from the ascitic fluid showed loose clusters and single malignant cells with scant cytoplasm and nuclei with smooth to irregular nuclear membranes, granular chromatin, and small nucleoli. In the second case peritoneal/pelvic washing specimens contained clusters and single malignant cells with a moderate amount of cytoplasm and nuclei with smooth nuclear membranes, granular, clumped chromatin, and prominent nucleoli. Hisology confirmed the diagnosis of small-cell carcinoma of the ovary. These are the first reported cases of this rare ovarian neoplasm present on fluid cytology. Its differentiation from other small-cell neoplasms on peritoneal fluid cytology from young women is discussed.

  5. An electron-deficient small molecule accessible from sustainable synthesis and building blocks for use as a fullerene alternative in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Seth M; Topple, Jessica M; Payne, Abby-Jo; Sun, Jon-Paul; Hill, Ian G; Welch, Gregory C

    2015-04-27

    An electron-deficient small molecule accessible from sustainable isoindigo and phthalimide building blocks was synthesized via optimized synthetic procedures that incorporate microwave-assisted synthesis and a heterogeneous catalyst for Suzuki coupling, and direct heteroarylation carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. The material was designed as a non-fullerene acceptor with the help of DFT calculations and characterized by optical, electronic, and thermal analysis. Further investigation of the material revealed a differing solid-state morphology with the use of three well-known processing conditions: thermal annealing, solvent vapor annealing and small volume fractions of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) additive. These unique morphologies persist in the active layer blends and have demonstrated a distinct influence on device performance. Organic photovoltaic-bulk heterojunction (OPV-BHJ) devices show an inherently high open circuit voltage (Voc ) with the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) cells reaching 1.0 V with 0.4 v/v % DIO as a processing additive.

  6. Physicochemical and physiological properties of cholylsarcosine. A potential replacement detergent for bile acid deficiency states in the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Lillienau, J; Schteingart, C D; Hofmann, A F

    1992-01-01

    The properties of cholylsarcosine (the synthetic N-acyl conjugate of cholic acid with sarcosine [N-methylglycine]) were examined to determine its suitability as a bile acid replacement agent for conditions of bile acid deficiency in the small intestine, which causes fat malabsorption. Previous studies in rodents had shown that the compound was well transported by the liver and ileum and underwent neither deconjugation nor dehydroxylation during enterohepatic cycling. By 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, cholylsarcosine was found to exist in dilute aqueous solution as an almost equimolar mixture of two geometric isomers--cis and trans (around the amide bond)--in contrast to cholylglycine, which was present entirely in the trans form. The critical micellization concentration was 11 mmol/liter, similar to that of cholylglycine (10 mmol/liter). By nonaqueous titrimetry, the pKa' of cholylsarcosine was 3.7, only slightly lower than that of cholylglycine (3.9). Cholylsarcosine was poorly soluble below pH 3.7, but highly soluble above pH 4. In vitro, cholylsarcosine behaved as cholylglycine with respect to promoting lipolysis by lipase/colipase. There was little difference between cholylsarcosine and cholylglycine in their solubilization of an equimolar mixture of oleic acid, oleate, and monoolein (designed to simulate digestive products of triglyceride) or in their solubilization of monooleyl-glycerol alone. When a [3H]triolein emulsion with either cholylsarcosine or cholyltaurine was infused intraduodenally in biliary fistula rats, recovery of 3H in lymph was 52 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD) for cholylsarcosine and 52 +/- 11% for cholyltaurine. When perfused into the colon of the anesthetized rabbit, cholylsarcosine (5 mmol/liter) did not influence water absorption or permeability to erythritol, in contrast to chenodeoxycholate, which induced vigorous water secretion and caused erythritol loss. We conclude that cholylsarcosine possesses the physicochemical and physiological

  7. Notch signaling deficiency underlies age-dependent depletion of satellite cells in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunhui; Wen, Yefei; Kuroda, Kazuki; Hannon, Kevin; Rudnicki, Michael A; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease characterized by muscle wasting, loss of mobility and death in early adulthood. Satellite cells are muscle-resident stem cells responsible for the repair and regeneration of damaged muscles. One pathological feature of DMD is the progressive depletion of satellite cells, leading to the failure of muscle repair. Here, we attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell ablation in the dystrophin mutant mdx mouse, a well-established model for DMD. Initial muscle degeneration activates satellite cells, resulting in increased satellite cell number in young mdx mice. This is followed by rapid loss of satellite cells with age due to the reduced self-renewal ability of mdx satellite cells. In addition, satellite cell composition is altered even in young mdx mice, with significant reductions in the abundance of non-committed (Pax7+ and Myf5-) satellite cells. Using a Notch-reporter mouse, we found that the mdx satellite cells have reduced activation of Notch signaling, which has been shown to be necessary to maintain satellite cell quiescence and self-renewal. Concomitantly, the expression of Notch1, Notch3, Jag1, Hey1 and HeyL are reduced in the mdx primary myoblast. Finally, we established a mouse model to constitutively activate Notch signaling in satellite cells, and show that Notch activation is sufficient to rescue the self-renewal deficiencies of mdx satellite cells. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling is essential for maintaining the satellite cell pool and that its deficiency leads to depletion of satellite cells in DMD.

  8. Notch signaling deficiency underlies age-dependent depletion of satellite cells in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunhui; Wen, Yefei; Kuroda, Kazuki; Hannon, Kevin; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease characterized by muscle wasting, loss of mobility and death in early adulthood. Satellite cells are muscle-resident stem cells responsible for the repair and regeneration of damaged muscles. One pathological feature of DMD is the progressive depletion of satellite cells, leading to the failure of muscle repair. Here, we attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell ablation in the dystrophin mutant mdx mouse, a well-established model for DMD. Initial muscle degeneration activates satellite cells, resulting in increased satellite cell number in young mdx mice. This is followed by rapid loss of satellite cells with age due to the reduced self-renewal ability of mdx satellite cells. In addition, satellite cell composition is altered even in young mdx mice, with significant reductions in the abundance of non-committed (Pax7+ and Myf5−) satellite cells. Using a Notch-reporter mouse, we found that the mdx satellite cells have reduced activation of Notch signaling, which has been shown to be necessary to maintain satellite cell quiescence and self-renewal. Concomitantly, the expression of Notch1, Notch3, Jag1, Hey1 and HeyL are reduced in the mdx primary myoblast. Finally, we established a mouse model to constitutively activate Notch signaling in satellite cells, and show that Notch activation is sufficient to rescue the self-renewal deficiencies of mdx satellite cells. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling is essential for maintaining the satellite cell pool and that its deficiency leads to depletion of satellite cells in DMD. PMID:24906372

  9. A non-leaky Artemis-deficient mouse that accurately models the human severe combined immune deficiency phenotype, including resistance to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zheng; Dunn, Elizabeth; Singh, Kanal; Khan, Imran S; Yannone, Steven M; Cowan, Morton J

    2009-01-01

    Two Artemis-deficient (mArt(-/-)) mouse models, generated independently on 129/SvJ backgrounds, have the expected T(-)B(-)NK(+) severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) phenotype but fail to mimic the human disease because of CD4(+) T cell leakiness. Moreover, immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is achieved more readily in these leaky mouse models than in Artemis-deficient humans. To develop a more clinically relevant animal model, we backcrossed the mArt(-/-) mutation onto the C57Bl/6 (B6) background (99.9%), which resulted in virtually no CD4(+) T cell leakiness compared with 129/SvJ mArt(+/-) mice (0.3% +/- 0.25% vs 19.5% +/- 15.1%, P < .001). The nonleaky mouse also was uniquely resistant to engraftment using allogeneic mismatched hematopoietic stem cells, comparable to what is seen in human Artemis deficiency. The genetic background also influenced Artemis-associated radiation sensitivity, with differing degrees of x-ray hypersensitivity evident in 129/SvJ and B6 backgrounds with both the mArt(-/-) and mArt(+/-) genotypes. Our results indicate that immunogenic and DNA repair phenotypes associated with Artemis deficiency are significantly altered by genetic background, which has important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of SCID. Moreover, the B6 mArt(-/-) mouse provides a more accurate model for the human disease and a more appropriate system for studying human Artemis deficiency and for developing improved transplantation and gene therapy regimens for the treatment of children with SCID.

  10. CD8+ T-Cell Deficiency, Epstein-Barr Virus Infection, Vitamin D Deficiency, and Steps to Autoimmunity: A Unifying Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T-cell deficiency is a feature of many chronic autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, vitiligo, bullous pemphigoid, alopecia areata, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, and pernicious anaemia. It also occurs in healthy blood relatives of patients with autoimmune diseases, suggesting it is genetically determined. Here it is proposed that this CD8+ T-cell deficiency underlies the development of chronic autoimmune diseases by impairing CD8+ T-cell control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, with the result that EBV-infected autoreactive B cells accumulate in the target organ where they produce pathogenic autoantibodies and provide costimulatory survival signals to autoreactive T cells which would otherwise die in the target organ by activation-induced apoptosis. Autoimmunity is postulated to evolve in the following steps: (1) CD8+ T-cell deficiency, (2) primary EBV infection, (3) decreased CD8+ T-cell control of EBV, (4) increased EBV load and increased anti-EBV antibodies, (5) EBV infection in the target organ, (6) clonal expansion of EBV-infected autoreactive B cells in the target organ, (7) infiltration of autoreactive T cells into the target organ, and (8) development of ectopic lymphoid follicles in the target organ. It is also proposed that deprivation of sunlight and vitamin D at higher latitudes facilitates the development of autoimmune diseases by aggravating the CD8+ T-cell deficiency and thereby further impairing control of EBV. The hypothesis makes predictions which can be tested, including the prevention and successful treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases by controlling EBV infection. PMID

  11. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances germ cell apoptosis and causes defective embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, H-C; Chen, T-L; Wu, Y-H; Cheng, K-P; Lin, Y-H; Cheng, M-L; Ho, H-Y; Lo, S J; Chiu, D T-Y

    2013-05-02

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, known as favism, is classically manifested by hemolytic anemia in human. More recently, it has been shown that mild G6PD deficiency moderately affects cardiac function, whereas severe G6PD deficiency leads to embryonic lethality in mice. How G6PD deficiency affects organisms has not been fully elucidated due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans was established by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown to delineate the role of G6PD in animal physiology. Upon G6PD RNAi knockdown, G6PD activity was significantly hampered in C. elegans in parallel with increased oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage. Phenotypically, G6PD-knockdown enhanced germ cell apoptosis (2-fold increase), reduced egg production (65% of mock), and hatching (10% of mock). To determine whether oxidative stress is associated with G6PD knockdown-induced reproduction defects, C. elegans was challenged with a short-term hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The early phase egg production of both mock and G6PD-knockdown C. elegans were significantly affected by H2O2. However, H2O2-induced germ cell apoptosis was more dramatic in mock than that in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. To investigate the signaling pathways involved in defective oogenesis and embryogenesis caused by G6PD knockdown, mutants of p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were examined. Despite the upregulation of CEP-1 (p53), cep-1 mutation did not affect egg production and hatching in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Neither pmk-1 nor mek-1 mutation significantly affected egg production, whereas sek-1 mutation further decreased egg production in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Intriguingly, loss of function of sek-1 or mek-1 dramatically rescued defective hatching (8.3- and 9.6-fold increase, respectively) induced by G6PD knockdown. Taken together, these findings show that G6PD knockdown reduces egg production and hatching in C. elegans

  12. Bioinspired assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2017-03-30

    Self-assembly, the autonomous organization of components to form patterns or structures, is a prevalent process in nature at all scales. Particularly, biological systems offer remarkable examples of diverse structures (as well as building blocks) and processes resulting from self-assembly. The exploration of bioinspired assemblies not only allows for mimicking the structures of living systems, but it also leads to functions for applications in different fields that benefit humans. In the last several decades, efforts on understanding and controlling self-assembly of small molecules have produced a large library of candidates for developing the biomedical applications of assemblies of small molecules. Moreover, recent findings in biology have provided new insights on the assemblies of small molecules to modulate essential cellular processes (such as apoptosis). These observations indicate that the self-assembly of small molecules, as multifaceted entities and processes to interact with multiple proteins, can have profound biological impacts on cells. In this review, we illustrate that the generation of assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu with their interactions with multiple cellular proteins for regulating cellular processes can result in primary phenotypes, thus providing a fundamentally new molecular approach for controlling cell behavior. By discussing the correlation between molecular assemblies in nature and the assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu, illustrating the functions of the assemblies of small molecules, and summarizing some guiding principles, we hope this review will stimulate more molecular scientists to explore the bioinspired self-assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

  13. Deficiencies of Circulating Mucosal-associated Invariant T Cells and Natural Killer T Cells in Patients with Multiple Trauma.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young Goun; Choi, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jung Chul; Cho, Young Nan; Kang, Jeong Hwa; Jin, Hye Mi; Kee, Seung Jung; Park, Yong Wook

    2017-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells are known to play important roles in autoimmunity, infectious diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the roles of these invariant T cells in multiple trauma. The purposes of this study were to examine MAIT and NKT cell levels in patients with multiple trauma and to investigate potential relationships between these cell levels and clinical parameters. The study cohort was composed of 14 patients with multiple trauma and 22 non-injured healthy controls (HCs). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell levels in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. The severity of injury was categorised according to the scoring systems, such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers were significantly lower in multiple trauma patients than in HCs. Linear regression analysis showed that circulating MAIT cell numbers were significantly correlated with age, APACHE II, SAPS II, ISS category, hemoglobin, and platelet count. NKT cell numbers in the peripheral blood were found to be significantly correlated with APACHE II, SAPS II, and ISS category. This study shows numerical deficiencies of circulating MAIT cells and NKT cells in multiple trauma. In addition, these invariant T cell deficiencies were found to be associated with disease severity. These findings provide important information for predicting the prognosis of multiple trauma. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  14. Chemotherapy dose--response relationships in non-small cell lung cancer and implied resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Chiritescu, Gabriela; Dahrouge, Simone; Banerjee, Srabani; Tomiak, Eva M

    2007-04-01

    We hypothesized excess resistance factor ("active resistance") gives a dose--response curve (DRC) shoulder, deficiency of a factor required for drug sensitivity ("saturable passive resistance") gives a DRC terminal plateau, and alteration of a factor gives decreased DRC slope. We used response rates from published non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical studies to estimate mean percent tumor cell kill in each study (assuming cell kill is proportional to tumor volume change) and performed regression and meta-regression analyses of percent cell survival and patient survival vs planned dose-intensity. As single agents, cell kill approached that of combinations only at highest doses. While DRC shape varied between single agents, DRCs for all combinations tested flattened at higher doses. Patient median survival times also failed to vary significantly with dose for any combination. DRC flattening at higher doses suggests therapy efficacy is limited by deficiency/saturation of factors required for cell killing. Based on this and other clinical observations, we hypothesize: (1) active resistance may modulate cell killing at lower doses, but ability to overcome this by increasing doses is limited by saturable passive resistance (e.g. by non-cycling cells). (2) Cells surviving initial chemotherapy may upregulate active resistance mechanisms (permitting growth despite therapy). (3) If active resistance mechanisms are insufficient for growth/survival, cells may survive until therapy cessation by downregulating metabolism/cycling, becoming temporarily quiescent. This could help explain broad cross-resistance between agents and would imply that improved targeting of non-cycling cells will be required for major improvement in therapy efficacy.

  15. Abolishment of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2008-02-13

    Mucosal mast cells are implicated in visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we investigated the role of mast cells in the development of visceral hypersensitivity by using mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rats and their control (W+/W+). In W+/W+ rats, an injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon. Severe mucosal necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity were observed in the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, whereas neither necrosis nor increased myeloperoxidase activity occurred in the distal colon, indicating that TNBS-induced hypersensitivity is not caused by the local tissue damage or inflammation in the region of the gut where distention stimuli were applied. On the other hand, TNBS failed to elicit visceral hypersensitivity in Ws/Ws rats. This finding indicates that mast cells are essential for development of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats. Since the severity of TNBS-induced proximal colon injury and MPO activity was not affected by mast cell deficiency, it is unlikely that abolishment of visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats was a result of altered development of the primary injury in the proximal colon. There was no difference between sham-operated Ws/Ws and W+/W+ rats in colonic pain threshold to distention stimuli, indicating that mast cells play no modulatory roles in normal colonic nociception. The present results support the view that mucosal mast cells play key roles in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  16. T cells deficient in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor are resistant to apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, T; Marks, A R

    1997-01-01

    The type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1) calcium release channel is present on the endoplasmic reticulum of most cell types. T lymphocytes which have been made deficient in IP3R1 lack detectable IP3-induced intracellular calcium release and exhibit defective signaling via the T-cell receptor (TCR) (T. Jayaraman, E. Ondriasova, K. Ondrias, D. Harnick, and A. R. Marks, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:6007-6011, 1995). We now show that IP3R1-deficient T cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by dexamethasone, TCR stimulation, ionizing radiation, and Fas. Resistance to TCR-mediated apoptosis in IP3R1-deficient cells is reversed by pharmacologically raising cytoplasmic calcium levels. TCR-mediated apoptosis can be induced in calcium-free media, indicating that extracellular calcium influx is not required. These findings suggest that intracellular calcium release via the IP3R1 is a critical mediator of apoptosis. PMID:9154798

  17. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphological abnormality of Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pengon, Jutharat; Svasti, Saovaros; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Vattanaviboon, Phantip

    2017-06-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and thalassemia are genetically independent hemolytic disorders. Co-inheritance of both disorders may affect red blood cell pathology to a greater extent than normally seen in either disorder alone. This study determines the prevalence and evaluates hematological changes of G-6-PD deficiency and thalassemia co-inheritance. G-6-PD deficiency was screened from 200 male thalassemia blood samples using a fluorescent spot test. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphology were evaluated among G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance, G-6-PD deficiency alone, thalassemia alone, and normal individuals. G-6-PD deficiency was detected together with hemoglobin (Hb) E heterozygote, Hb E homozygote, β-thalassemia trait, and β-thalassemia/Hb E, α-thalassemia-2 trait, and Hb H disease. Hb level, hematocrit, mean cell volume, and mean cell Hb of G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with asymptomatic thalassemia carriers show significantly lower mean values compared to carriers with only the same thalassemia genotypes. Higher mean red blood cell distribution width was observed in G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with Hb E heterozygote, as with numbers of hemighost cells in G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance compared to those with either disorder. Apart from Hb level, hematological parameters of co-inheritance disorders were not different from individuals with a single thalassemia disease. G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia in males was present in 10% of the participants, resulting in worsening of red blood cell pathology compared with inheritance of thalassemia alone. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impaired natural killer cell self-education and “missing-self” responses in Ly49-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Simon; Tu, Megan M.; Rahim, Mir Munir Ahmed; Mahmoud, Ahmad B.; Patel, Rajen; Tai, Lee-Hwa; Troke, Angela D.; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Landry, Josette-Renée; Zhu, Qinzhang; Tung, Kenneth S.; Raulet, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Ly49-mediated recognition of MHC-I molecules on host cells is considered vital for natural killer (NK)–cell regulation and education; however, gene-deficient animal models are lacking because of the difficulty in deleting this large multigene family. Here, we describe NK gene complex knockdown (NKCKD) mice that lack expression of Ly49 and related MHC-I receptors on most NK cells. NKCKD NK cells exhibit defective killing of MHC-I–deficient, but otherwise normal, target cells, resulting in defective rejection by NKCKD mice of transplants from various types of MHC-I–deficient mice. Self–MHC-I immunosurveillance by NK cells in NKCKD mice can be rescued by self–MHC-I–specific Ly49 transgenes. Although NKCKD mice display defective recognition of MHC-I–deficient tumor cells, resulting in decreased in vivo tumor cell clearance, NKG2D- or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity–induced tumor cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production induced by activation receptors was efficient in Ly49-deficient NK cells, suggesting MHC-I education of NK cells is a single facet regulating their total potential. These results provide direct genetic evidence that Ly49 expression is necessary for NK-cell education to self–MHC-I molecules and that the absence of these receptors leads to loss of MHC-I–dependent “missing-self” immunosurveillance by NK cells. PMID:22661698

  19. Characteristics of Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Patients With Plasma Cell Disorders.

    PubMed

    Braschi, Caitlyn; Doucette, John; Chari, Ajai

    2017-07-12

    Although increased rates of vitamin B12 deficiency have been reported in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs), no mechanism has been identified. Excess free light chains (FLCs) could disrupt the renal proximal tubule receptors where B12 is reabsorbed. We sought to characterize the relationship between B12 deficiency and PCDs. We hypothesized that rates of B12 deficiency would be highest in patients with PCDs with high FLC burdens. We reviewed the electronic medical records of 501 patients who met inclusion criteria (diagnosed PCD with documented serum B12 and FLC levels) to obtain clinical data recorded prior to patients' lowest B12 levels. Overall, 20.0% of patients had low vitamin B12. There was an expected negative correlation between estimated glomular filtration rate and FLC (rs = -0.317; P < .001). However, low B12 levels were more prevalent in patients with preserved renal function (P = .047). Low B12 was associated with lower mean corpuscular volume (P = .037). Higher FLC burden was associated with poor kidney function but not with low B12. Low B12 was seen more commonly in patients with preserved kidney function. Mean corpuscular volume was statistically but not clinically different between patients with low and normal B12 and, therefore, may not be a reliable indicator of B12 deficiency in PCDs. Prospective studies should compare B12 metabolites with FLC levels. Detection of B12 deficiency among patients with PCDs remains important to reduce neurologic dysfunction and cytopenias, sequelae common to B12 deficiency and PCDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 hypomethylation in folate-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shaoyan; Wang, Li; Guan, Yunqian; Shangguan, Shaofang; Du, Qingan; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Folate is thought to contribute to health and development by methylation regulation. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1), which is regulated by methylation modification, plays an important role in sculpting the structure and function of genomes. Some studies have shown that folate concentration is related to LINE-1 methylation. However, the direct association between LINE-1 methylation and folate deficiency remains unclear. To explore whether folate deficiency directly induced LINE-1 hypomethylation and to analyze the relationship between folate concentration and the LINE-1 methylation level, mouse ESCs were treated with various concentrations of folate which was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and the homocysteine content was detected by ELISA. LINE-1 methylation was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry at various time points. Concurrently, cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. The result showed that the intracellular folate decreases under folate-deficient condition, conversely, homocysteine content increased gradually and there was a negatively correlated between them. Folate insufficiency induced LINE-1 hypomethylation at the lowest levels in folate-free group and moderate in folate-deficient group, compared with that in the folate-normal group at day 18. Moreover, LINE-1 methylation level was positively correlated with folate content, and negatively correlated with homocysteine content. At corresponding time points, proliferation and differentiation of mouse ESCs showed no alteration in all groups. Our data indicated that folate deficiency affected the homeostasis of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, leading to reduced LINE-1 methylation in mouse ESCs. This study provides preliminary evidence of folate deficiency affecting early embryonic development.

  1. Chromatin remodeling by the small RNA machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin states, quite different from changes in DNA sequence, can impact fundamental cellular processes such as determination of cell identity and development of disease. However, how chromatin states are established and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. In several lower eukaryotes, the small RNA machinery comprised of small RNA and its partners, the Argonaute proteins, is known to play important roles in the establishment of heterochromatin and silencing of repetitive sequences. In mammalian cells, however, the nuclear function of the small RNA machinery is largely unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that components of the small RNA pathway interact with chromatin to regulate nuclear events, including gene transcription and alternative splicing. In addition, these endogenous mechanisms are being exploited to target specific genomic loci for manipulation of gene expression and splicing events. In this review, I summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling by small RNAs in mammalian cells and highlight recent efforts to map genome-wide interactions between RNAi-related factors and chromatin.

  2. Immunoglobulin-mediated signal transduction in B cells from CD45- deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD45 expression is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig)-mediated B cell activation. Treatments with either anti-Ig or anti-CD45 suggest that CD45 may facilitate early signaling events such as calcium mobilization, and phosphoinositide hydrolyis as well as later events leading to transcription of genes such as c-myc. To examine the role of CD45 more extensively, CD45-deficient mice were generated by disruption of exon 6. Although normal numbers of B cells were found in peripheral lymphoid tissues, CD45-deficient cells failed to proliferate upon IgM crosslinking. In the present study, we demonstrate that the fraction of high buoyant density B cells is reduced while low buoyant density cells are increased. Moreover, there is a significant decline in the number of splenic B cells of the mature IgDhi, IgMlo phenotype. Although both the basal and anti-Ig-induced levels of phosphorylation of Ig-alpha and phospholipase C gamma 2 are indistinguishable from that observed in CD45+ control B cells, a major distinction was found in Ca2+ mobilization. While anti-Ig-induced mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores was normal, influx from extracellular sources was abrogated. This finding reveals a novel pathway of regulating B cell responses mediated by CD45. PMID:8551241

  3. CD8(+)IL-17(+) T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet-Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lendermon, Elizabeth A; Dodd-o, Jeffrey M; Coon, Tiffany A; Miller, Hannah L; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F

    2015-05-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet(-/-) recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet(-/-) recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8(+) T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ-dominant responses in WT mice. CD4(+) T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet(-/-) recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) responses in both T-bet(-/-) and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet(-/-) recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet(-/-) recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade-resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet(-/-) recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet(-/-) allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet-deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade-resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8(+)IL-17(+) T cells. Our data support T-bet-deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation.

  4. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, Karen S; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L; Maul, Robert W; Steinberg, Seth M; Gearhart, Patricia J; Staudt, Louis M; Morse, Herbert C; Ried, Thomas; Hodes, Richard J

    2015-11-12

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M(+) B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell-like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors.

  5. TACI deficiency impairs sustained Blimp-1 expression in B cells decreasing long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoichiro; Cortesão, Catarina; Bram, Richard J; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2011-11-24

    Deficiencies in transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) result in common variable immune deficiency, a syndrome marked by recurrent infections with encapsulated microorganisms, impaired production of antibodies, and lymphoproliferation. How TACI promotes antibody production and inhibits lymphoproliferation is not understood. To answer this question, we studied the generation of immunity to protein antigens in both TACI-deficient and TACI-proficient mice. We show that TACI promotes sustained Blimp-1 expression by B cells responding to antigen, which in turn limits B-cell clonal expansion and facilitates differentiation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. Short-term IgG secretion occurs independently of TACI as DNA double-strand breaks associated with isotype class switching induce Blimp-1 transiently, independently of TACI. Our results showing that TACI induces and maintains Blimp-1 provide, for the first time, a unified molecular and cellular mechanism explaining the primary features of common variable immune deficiency, exquisite vulnerability to infection with encapsulated organisms, lymphoproliferation, and hypogammaglobulinemia.

  6. TACI deficiency impairs sustained Blimp-1 expression in B cells decreasing long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shoichiro; Cortesão, Catarina; Bram, Richard J.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiencies in transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) result in common variable immune deficiency, a syndrome marked by recurrent infections with encapsulated microorganisms, impaired production of antibodies, and lymphoproliferation. How TACI promotes antibody production and inhibits lymphoproliferation is not understood. To answer this question, we studied the generation of immunity to protein antigens in both TACI-deficient and TACI-proficient mice. We show that TACI promotes sustained Blimp-1 expression by B cells responding to antigen, which in turn limits B-cell clonal expansion and facilitates differentiation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. Short-term IgG secretion occurs independently of TACI as DNA double-strand breaks associated with isotype class switching induce Blimp-1 transiently, independently of TACI. Our results showing that TACI induces and maintains Blimp-1 provide, for the first time, a unified molecular and cellular mechanism explaining the primary features of common variable immune deficiency, exquisite vulnerability to infection with encapsulated organisms, lymphoproliferation, and hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:21984806

  7. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J.; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M.; Herrera-Rodríguez, M. Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M. Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag+, an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2‐oxo)‐indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2‐1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency. PMID:25922480

  8. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-07-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag(+), an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2-1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia. Results There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25453653

  10. Accumulation of Phosphorylated β-Catenin Enhances ROS-Induced Cell Death in Presenilin-Deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung H.; Song, Hyundong; Kim, Ji E.; Kang, David E.; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2009-01-01

    Presenilin (PS) is involved in many cellular events under physiological and pathological conditions. Previous reports have revealed that PS deficiency results in hyperproliferation and resistance to apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PS on β-catenin and cell mortality during serum deprivation. Under these conditions, PS1/PS2 double-knockout MEFs showed aberrant accumulation of phospho-β-catenin, higher ROS generation, and notable cell death. Inhibition of β-catenin phosphorylation by LiCl reversed ROS generation and cell death in PS deficient cells. In addition, the K19/49R mutant form of β-catenin, which undergoes normal phosphorylation but not ubiquitination, induced cytotoxicity, while the phosphorylation deficient S37A β-catenin mutant failed to induce cytotoxicity. These results indicate that aberrant accumulation of phospho-β-catenin underlies ROS-mediated cell death in the absence of PS. We propose that the regulation of β-catenin is useful for identifying therapeutic targets of hyperproliferative diseases and other degenerative conditions. PMID:19137062

  11. Cell behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells in response to silica/collagen based xerogels and calcium deficient culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Alena-Svenja; Glenske, Kristina; Henß, Anja; Kruppke, Benjamin; Rößler, Sina; Hanke, Thomas; Moritz, Andreas; Rohnke, Marcus; Kressin, Monika; Arnhold, Stefan; Schnettler, Reinhard; Wenisch, Sabine

    2017-07-04

    Herein, we aim to elucidate osteogenic effects of two silica-based xerogels with different degrees of bioactivity on human bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells by means of scanning electron microscopy, quantitative PCR enhanced osteogenic effects and the formation of an extracellular matrix which could be ascribed to the sample with lower bioactivity. Given the high levels of bioactivity, the cells revealed remarkable sensitivity to extremely low calcium levels of the media. Therefore, additional experiments were performed to elucidate cell behavior under calcium deficient conditions. The results refer to capacity of the bone-derived stromal cells to overcome calcium deficiency even though proliferation, migration and osteogenic differentiation capabilities were diminished. One reason for the differences of the cellular response (on tissue culture plates versus xerogels) to calcium deficiency seems to be the positive effect of silica. The silica could be detected intracellularly as shown by time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry after cultivation of primary cells for 21 days on the surfaces of the xerogels. Thus, the present findings refer to different osteogenic differentiation potentials of the xerogels according to the different degrees of bioactivity, and to the role of silica as a stimulator of osteogenesis. Finally, the observed pattern of connexin-based hemichannel gating supports the assumption that connexin 43 is a key factor for calcium-mediated osteogenesis in bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

  12. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  13. Thoracic Presentations of Small Round Blue Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Annalice; Pfeifer, Kyle; Chen, Peter; Kalra, Vivek; Shin, Myung Soo

    2016-01-01

    The term “small round blue cell” is frequently used as a cursory radiologic pathological correlation of aggressive tumors throughout the body. We present a pictorial essay of common and uncommon subtypes of small round blue cell tumors in the chest illustrating the characteristic radiologic findings of each lesion. In addition, we review the pathologic findings of each tumor subtype with characteristic hematoxylin- and eosin-stained photomicrographs and immunohistochemical and molecular studies. Represented tumors include small cell carcinoma, Ewing sarcoma, extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Understanding and ability to recognize these lesions are essential to broaden the radiologist's differential diagnosis and help guide patient care. PMID:27403403

  14. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-22

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  15. Enhanced Genotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in DNA Repair Deficient Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P. V.; Hande, M. Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure. PMID:22707954

  16. Enhanced genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in DNA repair deficient Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure.

  17. A small-scale proteomic approach reveals a survival strategy, including a reduction in alkaloid biosynthesis, in Hyoscyamus albus roots subjected to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Khandakar, Jebunnahar; Haraguchi, Izumi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2013-01-01

    Hyoscyamus albus is a well-known source of the tropane alkaloids, hyoscyamine and scopolamine, which are biosynthesized in the roots. To assess the major biochemical adaptations that occur in the roots of this plant in response to iron deficiency, we used a small-scale proteomic approach in which 100 mg of root tips were treated with and without Fe, respectively, for 5 days. Two-dimensional mini gels showed that 48 spots were differentially accumulated between the two conditions of Fe availability and a further 36 proteins were identified from these spots using MALDI-QIT-TOF mass spectrometry. The proteins that showed elevated levels in the roots lacking Fe were found to be associated variously with carbohydrate metabolism, cell differentiation, secondary metabolism, and oxidative defense. Most of the proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism were increased in abundance, but mitochondrial NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was decreased, possibly resulting in malate secretion. Otherwise, all the proteins showing diminished levels in the roots were identified as either Fe-containing or ATP-requiring. For example, a significant decrease was observed in the levels of hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase (H6H), which requires Fe and is involved in the conversion of hyoscyamine to scopolamine. To investigate the effects of Fe deficiency on alkaloid biosynthesis, gene expression studies were undertaken both for H6H and for another Fe-dependent protein, Cyp80F1, which is involved in the final stage of hyoscyamine biosynthesis. In addition, tropane alkaloid contents were determined. Reduced gene expression was observed in the case of both of these proteins and was accompanied by a decrease in the content of both hyoscyamine and scopolamine. Finally, we have discussed energetic and Fe-conservation strategies that might be adopted by the roots of H. albus to maintain iron homeostasis under Fe-limiting conditions. PMID:24009619

  18. [Small cell prostatic carcinoma detected at the stage of metastases].

    PubMed

    Rabii, Redouane; Meziane, Anas; Taha, Abdelatif; Joual, Abdenabi; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-09-01

    Small cell prostatic carcinoma is rare, with a poor prognosis. The authors report a case of small cell prostatic carcinoma in a 30-year-old patient diagnosed at the stage of metastases. Immunohistochemistry showed positive anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE.) and anti-synaptophysin antibodies, while serum PSA was normal (1.2 ng/ml). The patient was treated by cisplatin-etoposide combination chemotherapy, but died 20 days after the first course.

  19. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  20. Interleukin (IL)-18 Binding Protein Deficiency Disrupts Natural Killer Cell Maturation and Diminishes Circulating IL-18.

    PubMed

    Harms, Robert Z; Creer, Austin J; Lorenzo-Arteaga, Kristina M; Ostlund, Katie R; Sarvetnick, Nora E

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 is a crucial amplifier of natural killer (NK) cell function. IL-18 signaling is regulated by the inhibitory effects of IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Using mice deficient in IL-18BP (IL-18BPKO), we investigated the impact of mismanaged IL-18 signaling on NK cells. We found an overall reduced abundance of splenic NK cells in the absence of IL-18BP. Closer examination of NK cell subsets in spleen and bone marrow using CD27 and CD11b expression revealed that immature NK cells were increased in abundance, while the mature population of NK cells was reduced. Also, NK cells were polarized to greater production of TNF-α, while dedicated IFN-γ producers were reduced. A novel subset of IL-18 receptor α(-) NK cells contributed to the expansion of immature NK cells in IL-18BPKO mice. Splenocytes cultured with IL-18 resulted in alterations similar to those observed in IL-18BP deficiency. NK cell changes were associated with significantly reduced levels of circulating plasma IL-18. However, IL-18BPKO mice exhibited normal weight gain and responded to LPS challenge with a >10-fold increase in IFN-γ compared to wild type. Finally, we identified that the source of splenic IL-18BP was among dendritic cells/macrophage localized to the T cell-rich regions of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that IL-18BP is required for normal NK cell abundance and function and also contributes to maintaining steady-state levels of circulating IL-18. Thus, IL-18BP appears to have functions suggestive of a carrier protein, not just an inhibitor.

  1. Interleukin (IL)-18 Binding Protein Deficiency Disrupts Natural Killer Cell Maturation and Diminishes Circulating IL-18

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Robert Z.; Creer, Austin J.; Lorenzo-Arteaga, Kristina M.; Ostlund, Katie R.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 is a crucial amplifier of natural killer (NK) cell function. IL-18 signaling is regulated by the inhibitory effects of IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Using mice deficient in IL-18BP (IL-18BPKO), we investigated the impact of mismanaged IL-18 signaling on NK cells. We found an overall reduced abundance of splenic NK cells in the absence of IL-18BP. Closer examination of NK cell subsets in spleen and bone marrow using CD27 and CD11b expression revealed that immature NK cells were increased in abundance, while the mature population of NK cells was reduced. Also, NK cells were polarized to greater production of TNF-α, while dedicated IFN-γ producers were reduced. A novel subset of IL-18 receptor α− NK cells contributed to the expansion of immature NK cells in IL-18BPKO mice. Splenocytes cultured with IL-18 resulted in alterations similar to those observed in IL-18BP deficiency. NK cell changes were associated with significantly reduced levels of circulating plasma IL-18. However, IL-18BPKO mice exhibited normal weight gain and responded to LPS challenge with a >10-fold increase in IFN-γ compared to wild type. Finally, we identified that the source of splenic IL-18BP was among dendritic cells/macrophage localized to the T cell-rich regions of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that IL-18BP is required for normal NK cell abundance and function and also contributes to maintaining steady-state levels of circulating IL-18. Thus, IL-18BP appears to have functions suggestive of a carrier protein, not just an inhibitor. PMID:28900426

  2. Type 1 diabetes in NOD mice unaffected by mast cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Dario A; Fu, Wenxian; Schonefeldt, Susann; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Lampi, Yulia; Liston, Adrian; Mathis, Diane; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2014-11-01

    Mast cells have been invoked as important players in immune responses associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on in vitro studies, or in vivo through the use of Kit mutant mice, mast cells have been suggested to play immunological roles in direct antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, in the regulation of T-cell and dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes, and in Th1 versus Th2 polarization, all of which could significantly impact the immune response against self-antigens in autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Until now, the role of mast cells in the onset and incidence of T1D has only been indirectly tested through the use of low-specificity mast cell inhibitors and activators, and published studies reported contrasting results. Our three laboratories have generated independently two strains of mast cell-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD.Cpa3(Cre/+) (Heidelberg) and NOD.Kit(W-sh/W-sh) (Leuven and Boston), to address the effects of mast cell deficiency on the development of T1D in the NOD strain. Our collective data demonstrate that both incidence and progression of T1D in NOD mice are independent of mast cells. Moreover, analysis of pancreatic lymph node cells indicated that lack of mast cells has no discernible effect on the autoimmune response, which involves both innate and adaptive immune components. Our results demonstrate that mast cells are not involved in T1D in the NOD strain, making their role in this process nonessential and excluding them as potential therapeutic targets. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Genotoxic effects of two-generational selenium deficiency in mouse somatic and testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Graupner, Anne; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Dertinger, Stephen D; Salbu, Brit; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have investigated genotoxic effects of high Se diets but very few have addressed the genotoxicity of Se deprivation and its consequences in germ cells and none in somatic cells. To address these data gaps, C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to Se deprivation starting in the parental generation, i.e. before conception. Mice were given a diet of either low (0.01mg Se/kg diet) or normal (0.23mg Se/kg diet) Se content. Ogg1-deficient (Ogg1 (-/-) ) mice were used as a sensitive model towards oxidative stress due to their reduced capacity to repair oxidised purines. Ogg1 (-/-) mice also mimic the repair characteristics of human post-meiotic male germ cells which have a reduced ability to repair such lesions. The genotoxicity of Se deficiency was addressed by measuring DNA lesions with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (+ Fpg to detect oxidised DNA lesions) in somatic cells (nucleated blood cells and lung cells) and male germ cells (testicular cells). Total Se concentration in liver and GPx activity in plasma and testicular cells were measured. Gene mutation was evaluated by an erythrocyte-based Pig-a assay. We found that Se deprivation of F1 from their conception and until early adulthood led to the induction of DNA lesions in testicular and lung cells expressed as significantly increased levels of DNA lesions, irrespective of the mouse genotype. In blood cells, Se levels did not appear to affect DNA lesions or mutant cell frequencies. The results suggest that the testis was the most sensitive tissue. Thus, genotoxicity induced by the low Se diet in the spermatozoal genome has potential implications for the offspring.

  4. Cutting edge: DNAX accessory molecule 1-deficient CD8+ T cells display immunological synapse defects that impair antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Hawkins, Edwin D; Shimoni, Raz; McGrath, Mairi; Chan, Christopher J; Russell, Sarah M; Smyth, Mark J; Oliaro, Jane

    2014-01-15

    DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1) is expressed on all CD8(+) T cells and promotes their activation and effector function. DNAM-1 interacts with LFA-1, a critical molecule for immunological synapse formation between T cells and APCs, and for cytotoxic killing of target cells. Mice that lack DNAM-1 display abnormal T cell responses and antitumor activity; however, the mechanism involved is unclear. In this article, we show that DNAM-1 deficiency results in reduced proliferation of CD8(+) T cells after Ag presentation and impaired cytotoxic activity. We also demonstrate that DNAM-1-deficient T cells show reduced conjugations with tumor cells and decreased recruitment of both LFA-1 and lipid rafts to the immunological synapse, which correlates with reduced tumor cell killing in vitro. This synapse defect may explain why DNAM-1-deficient mice cannot clear tumors in vivo, and highlights the importance of DNAM-1 and the immunological synapse in T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

  5. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun; Bartish, Margarita; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Børglum, Anders D; Gatti, Richard A; Törngren, Therese; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-02-17

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism underlying BRCA1's function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  6. The human syndrome of dendritic cell, monocyte, B and NK lymphoid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Venetia; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Doulatov, Sergei; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Rachel; McGovern, Naomi; Jardine, Laura; Pagan, Sarah; Dimmick, Ian; Chua, Ignatius; Wallis, Jonathan; Lordan, Jim; Morgan, Cliff; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Doffinger, Rainer; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques; Cant, Andrew; Dick, John E.; Hambleton, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Congenital or acquired cellular deficiencies in humans have the potential to reveal much about normal hematopoiesis and immune function. We show that a recently described syndrome of monocytopenia, B and NK lymphoid deficiency additionally includes the near absence of dendritic cells. Four subjects showed severe depletion of the peripheral blood HLA-DR+ lineage− compartment, with virtually no CD123+ or CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and very few CD14+ or CD16+ monocytes. The only remaining HLA-DR+ lineage− cells were circulating CD34+ progenitor cells. Dermal CD14+ and CD1a+ DC were also absent, consistent with their dependence on blood-derived precursors. In contrast, epidermal Langerhans cells and tissue macrophages were largely preserved. Combined loss of peripheral DCs, monocytes, and B and NK lymphocytes was mirrored in the bone marrow by complete absence of multilymphoid progenitors and depletion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Depletion of the HLA-DR+ peripheral blood compartment was associated with elevated serum fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand and reduced circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ T cells, supporting a role for DC in T reg cell homeostasis. PMID:21242295

  7. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  8. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  9. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  10. Pyruvate carboxylation enables growth of SDH-deficient cells by supporting aspartate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Zheng, Liang; MacKay, Gillian; van den Broek, Niels J F; MacKenzie, Elaine D; Nixon, Colin; Stevenson, David; Tumanov, Sergey; Bulusu, Vinay; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Vazquez, Alexei; Fleming, Stewart; Schiavi, Francesca; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Strathdee, Douglas; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric nuclear-encoded complex responsible for the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes are associated with cancer formation. However, the impact of SDH loss on cell metabolism and the mechanisms enabling growth of SDH-defective cells are largely unknown. Here, we generated Sdhb-ablated kidney mouse cells and used comparative metabolomics and stable-isotope-labelling approaches to identify nutritional requirements and metabolic adaptations to SDH loss. We found that lack of SDH activity commits cells to consume extracellular pyruvate, which sustains Warburg-like bioenergetic features. We further demonstrated that pyruvate carboxylation diverts glucose-derived carbons into aspartate biosynthesis, thus sustaining cell growth. By identifying pyruvate carboxylase as essential for the proliferation and tumorigenic capacity of SDH-deficient cells, this study revealed a metabolic vulnerability for potential future treatment of SDH-associated malignancies.

  11. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  12. Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient C2C12 cells in the absence of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulian; Medeiros, Denis M; Jennings, Dianne

    2005-07-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient rat hearts, but it is uncertain if this will lead to the onset of apoptosis. To determine if copper deficiency per se leads to apoptosis, C2C12 cells were made copper deficient by treatment with the copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). In TEPA-treated cells, the activity of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase and cytochrome-c oxidase decreased dramatically. The protein levels of nuclear-encoded subunits of the cytochromie-c oxidase decreased, but the mitochondrial-encoded subunits remained unchanged. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was indicated in TEPA-treated cells, but further investigation of the potential induction of apoptosis by measuring caspase-3 activity, protein concentrations of Bcl-2 and Bax, and DNA fragmentation suggested that apoptosis is not induced in TEPA-treated C2C12 cells. Cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were not destined to apoptosis as a result of copper deficiency.

  13. 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jeremy, Kris P.; Plummer, Zoe E.; Head, David J.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Sanders, Kelly L.; Wallington, Amanda; Storry, Jill R.; Gilsanz, Florinda; Delaunay, Jean; Avent, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein 4.1R is an important component of the red cell membrane skeleton. It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin. Design and Methods Spontaneous and ligation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure on erythrocytes from two patients with 4.1R deficiency were studied, using CD47 glycoprotein and glycophorin C as ligands. We also looked for protein abnormalities in the 4.1R - based multiprotein complex. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly increased in 4.1R-deficient erythrocytes obtained from the two different individuals when ligands to CD47 glycoprotein were bound. Spontaneous phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. 4.1R, glycophorin C and p55 were missing or sharply reduced. Furthermore there was an alteration or deficiency of CD47 glycoprotein and a lack of CD44 glycoprotein. Based on a recent study in 4.1R-deficient mice, we found that there are clear functional differences between interactions of human red cell 4.1R and its murine counterpart. Conclusions Glycophorin C is known to bind 4.1R, and we have defined previously that it also binds CD47. From our evidence, we suggest that 4.1R plays a role in the phosphatidylserine exposure signaling pathway that is of fundamental importance in red cell turnover. The linkage of CD44 to 4.1R may be relevant to this process. PMID:19794081

  14. Mice deficient in small leucine-rich proteoglycans: novel in vivo models for osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, muscular dystrophy, and corneal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ameye, Laurent; Young, Marian F

    2002-09-01

    Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are extracellular molecules that bind to TGFbetas and collagens and other matrix molecules. In vitro, SLRPs were shown to regulate collagen fibrillogenesis, a process essential in development, tissue repair, and metastasis. To better understand their functions in vivo, mice deficient in one or two of the four most prominent and widely expressed SLRPs (biglycan, decorin, fibromodulin, and lumican) were recently generated. All four SLRP deficiencies result in the formation of abnormal collagen fibrils. Taken together, the collagen phenotypes demonstrate a cooperative, sequential, timely orchestrated action of the SLRPs that altogether shape the architecture and mechanical properties of the collagen matrix. In addition, SLRP-deficient mice develop a wide array of diseases (osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, muscular dystrophy, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and corneal diseases), most of them resulting primarily from an abnormal collagen fibrillogenesis. The development of these diseases by SLRP-deficient mice suggests that mutations in SLRPs may be part of undiagnosed predisposing genetic factors for these diseases. Although the distinct phenotypes developed by the different singly deficient mice point to distinct in vivo function for each SLRP, the analysis of the double-deficient mice also demonstrates the existence of rescuing/compensation mechanisms, indicating some functional overlap within the SLRP family.

  15. Telomerase Deficiency Causes Alveolar Stem Cell Senescence-associated Low-grade Inflammation in Lungs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruping; Zhang, Kexiong; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Xiaoyin; Wang, Jianqiu; Li, Li; Cong, Yusheng; Ju, Zhenyu; Xu, Dakang; Williams, Bryan R G; Jia, Jihui; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2015-12-25

    Mutations of human telomerase RNA component (TERC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are associated with a subset of lung aging diseases, but the mechanisms by which TERC and TERT participate in lung diseases remain unclear. In this report, we show that knock-out (KO) of the mouse gene Terc or Tert causes pulmonary alveolar stem cell replicative senescence, epithelial impairment, formation of alveolar sacs, and characteristic inflammatory phenotype. Deficiency in TERC or TERT causes a remarkable elevation in various proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, CXCL15 (human IL-8 homolog), IL-10, TNF-α, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2)); decrease in TGF-β1 and TGFβRI receptor in the lungs; and spillover of IL-6 and CXCL15 into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. In addition to increased gene expressions of α-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1α1, suggesting myofibroblast differentiation, TERC deficiency also leads to marked cellular infiltrations of a mononuclear cell population positive for the leukocyte common antigen CD45, low-affinity Fc receptor CD16/CD32, and pattern recognition receptor CD11b in the lungs. Our data demonstrate for the first time that telomerase deficiency triggers alveolar stem cell replicative senescence-associated low-grade inflammation, thereby driving pulmonary premature aging, alveolar sac formation, and fibrotic lesion. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Small Cell Lung Cancer. Methodology and Preliminary Results of the SMALL CELL Study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ángeles; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Torres-Durán, María; Vidal-García, Iria; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; García-García, Silvia; Provencio, Mariano; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Abdulkader, Ihab; Abal-Arca, José; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Amenedo, Margarita; Guzmán-Taveras, Rosirys; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2017-06-13

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive histologic type of lung cancer, and accounts for approximately 10%-15% of all cases. Few studies have analyzed the effect of residential radon. Our aim is to determine the risk factors of SCLC. We designed a multicenter, hospital-based case-control study with the participation of 11 hospitals in 4 autonomous communities. Results of the first 113 cases have been analyzed, 63 of which included residential radon measurements. Median age at diagnosis was 63 years; 11% of cases were younger than 50 years of age; 22% were women; 57% had extended disease; and 95% were smokers or former smokers. Median residential radon concentration was 128Bq/m(3). Concentrations higher than 400Bq/m(3) were found in 8% of cases. The only remarkable difference by gender was the percentage of never smokers, which was higher in women compared to men (P<.001). Radon concentration was higher in patients with stageIV disease (non-significant difference) and in individuals diagnosed at 63 years of age or older (P=.032). A high percentage of SCLC cases are diagnosed early and there is a predominance of disseminated disease at diagnosis. Residential radon seems to play an important role on the onset of this disease, with some cases having very high indoor radon concentrations. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Small Molecule Probes for Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian S.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics. PMID:22639673

  18. Small Molecule Suppressors of Drosophila Kinesin Deficiency Rescue Motor Axon Development in a Zebrafish Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gassman, Andrew; Hao, Le T.; Bhoite, Leena; Bradford, Chad L.; Chien, Chi-Bin; Beattie, Christine E.; Manfredi, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common inherited motor neuropathy and the leading hereditary cause of infant mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for the disease, reflecting a need for pharmacologic interventions that restore performance of dysfunctional motor neurons or suppress the consequences of their dysfunction. In a series of assays relevant to motor neuron biology, we explored the activities of a collection of tetrahydroindoles that were reported to alter the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). In Drosophila larvae the compounds suppressed aberrant larval locomotion due to mutations in the Khc and Klc genes, which respectively encode the heavy and light chains of kinesin-1. A representative compound of this class also suppressed the appearance of axonal swellings (alternatively termed axonal spheroids or neuritic beads) in the segmental nerves of the kinesin-deficient Drosophila larvae. Given the importance of kinesin-dependent transport for extension and maintenance of axons and their growth cones, three members of the class were tested for neurotrophic effects on isolated rat spinal motor neurons. Each compound stimulated neurite outgrowth. In addition, consistent with SMA being an axonopathy of motor neurons, the three axonotrophic compounds rescued motor axon development in a zebrafish model of SMA. The results introduce a collection of small molecules as pharmacologic suppressors of SMA-associated phenotypes and nominate specific members of the collection for development as candidate SMA therapeutics. More generally, the results reinforce the perception of SMA as an axonopathy and suggest novel approaches to treating the disease. PMID:24023935

  19. Deficiency of microRNA miR-34a expands cell fate potential in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jin; Lin, Chao-Po; Risso, Davide; Chen, Sean; Kim, Thomas Aquinas; Tan, Meng How; Li, Jin Billy; Wu, Yalei; Chen, Caifu; Xuan, Zhenyu; Macfarlan, Todd; Peng, Weiqun; Lloyd, K C Kent; Kim, Sang Yong; Speed, Terence P; He, Lin

    2017-02-10

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) efficiently generate all embryonic cell lineages but rarely generate extraembryonic cell types. We found that microRNA miR-34a deficiency expands the developmental potential of mouse pluripotent stem cells, yielding both embryonic and extraembryonic lineages and strongly inducing MuERV-L (MERVL) endogenous retroviruses, similar to what is seen with features of totipotent two-cell blastomeres. miR-34a restricts the acquisition of expanded cell fate potential in pluripotent stem cells, and it represses MERVL expression through transcriptional regulation, at least in part by targeting the transcription factor Gata2. Our studies reveal a complex molecular network that defines and restricts pluripotent developmental potential in cultured ESCs and iPSCs.

  20. Utility of Transmission Electron Microscopy in Small Round Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Ha, Seung Yeon; Cho, Hyun Yee

    2015-01-01

    Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of small, primitive, and undifferentiated cells sharing similar histology under light microscopy. SRCTs include Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor family tumors, neuroblastoma, desmoplastic SRCT, rhabdomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated round cell synovial sarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, small cell osteosarcoma, small cell malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and small cell schwannoma. Non-Hodgkin’s malignant lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, malignant melanoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor may also present as SRCT. The current shift towards immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic molecular techniques for SRCT may be inappropriate because of antigenic overlapping or inconclusive molecular results due to the lack of differentiation of primitive cells and unavailable genetic service or limited moleculocytogenetic experience. Although usage has declined, electron microscopy (EM) remains very useful and shows salient features for the diagnosis of SRCTs. Although EM is not always required, it provides reliability and validity in the diagnosis of SRCT. Here, the ultrastructural characteristics of SRCTs are reviewed and we suggest that EM would be utilized as one of the reliable modalities for the diagnosis of undifferentiated and poorly differentiated SRCTs. PMID:25812730

  1. Crypt cell production rate in the small intestine of the zinc-supplemented mouse.

    PubMed

    Duff, Michael; Ettarh, Rajunor R

    2002-01-01

    Zinc is a trace element which is necessary in the body and the daily requirement is usually provided mainly through food intake. The effects of zinc deficiency are multisystemic and in the gastrointestinal tract include ulceration and inflammation. Many of these effects in the mammalian small intestine are reversible by zinc replenishment in a manner that is thought to be linked to the effect of this element on intestinal mucosal cell kinetics. However, the effects of continued replenishment (supplementation) have not been closely examined. This study examined the effects of zinc supplementation on gut crypt cell production in zinc-replete animals. Fifteen CD-1 mice were given zinc sulphate (0.3 mmol/l) in tap water while a second (control) group of 15 mice received only tap water. After 14 days, the small intestine was removed, measured and divided into four equal lengths and then sampled at the midpoint of each of the resulting four segments. Whole crypt numbers and crypt cell production rate were determined for each intestinal site for both groups of mice. While crypt dimensions and crypt numbers in zinc-fed mice showed no significant change from control levels, the crypt cell production in zinc-fed mice was significantly increased and duration of mitosis reduced in the third (distal) intestinal segment when compared to values from control mice. These findings show that the addition of subtoxic quantities of zinc to diet in zinc-replete animals enhances cell production and indicate that the reversal of zinc deficiency-induced gut damage following dietary zinc replenishment may be due to a direct effect on cell kinetics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. IL-12 receptor β1 deficiency alters in vivo T follicular helper cell response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Bourdery, Laure; Bentebibel, Salah Eddine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Hamlin, Fran; Tran, Mau V.; Blankenship, Derek; Pascual, Virginia; Savino, Daniel A.; Banchereau, Jacques; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Antibody responses represent a key immune protection mechanism. T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are the major CD4+ T-cell subset that provides help to B cells to generate an antibody response. Tfh cells together with B cells form germinal centers (GCs), the site where high-affinity B cells are selected and differentiate into either memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells. We show here that interleukin-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1)–mediated signaling is important for in vivo Tfh response in humans. Although not prone to B cell-deficient–associated infections, subjects lacking functional IL-12Rβ1, a receptor for IL-12 and IL-23, displayed substantially less circulating memory Tfh and memory B cells than control subjects. GC formation in lymph nodes was also impaired in IL-12Rβ1–deficient subjects. Consistently, the avidity of tetanus toxoid–specific serum antibodies was substantially lower in these subjects than in age-matched controls. Tfh cells in tonsils from control individuals displayed the active form of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4), demonstrating that IL-12 is also acting on Tfh cells in GCs. Thus, our study shows that the IL-12–STAT4 axis is associated with the development and the functions of Tfh cells in vivo in humans. PMID:23476048

  3. Depletion of RNA-binding protein RBM8A (Y14) causes cell cycle deficiency and apoptosis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Tatsuno, Takanori; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Shimasaki, Takeo; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Tomosugi, Naohisa

    2013-08-01

    RBM8A (Y14) contains an RNA-binding motif and forms a tight heterodimer with Magoh. The heterodimer is known to be a member of the exon junction complex that forms on mRNA before export and it is required for mRNA metabolism processes such as splicing, mRNA export and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Recently, deficient cellular proliferation has been observed in RBM8A- or Magoh-depleted cells. These results prompted us to study the role of RBM8A in cell cycle progression of human tumour cells. The depletion of RBM8A in A549 cells resulted in poor cell survival and the accumulation of mitotic cells. After release from G1/S arrest induced by a double thymidine block, the RBM8A-silenced cells could not proceed to the next G1 phase beyond G2/M phase. Finally, the sub-G1 population increased and the apoptosis markers caspases 3/7 were activated. Silenced cells exhibited an increased frequency of multipolar or monopolar centrosomes, which may have caused the observed deficiency in cell cycle progression. Finally, silencing of either RBM8A or Magoh resulted in mutual downregulation of the other protein. These results illustrate that the RBM8A-Magoh mRNA binding complex is required for M phase progression and both proteins may be novel targets for anticancer therapy.

  4. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity.

  5. IgH sequences in common variable immune deficiency reveal altered B cell development and selection**

    PubMed Central

    Roskin, Krishna M.; Simchoni, Noa; Liu, Yi; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Seo, Katie; Hoh, Ramona A.; Pham, Tho; Park, Joon H.; Furman, David; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; James, Judith A.; Nadeau, Kari C.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Boyd, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immune deficiency, affecting ∼1 in 25,000 persons. These patients suffer from impaired antibody responses, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to lymphoid cancers. To explore the cellular basis for these clinical phenotypes, we conducted high-throughput DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements from 93 CVID patients and 105 control subjects and sorted naïve and memory B cells from 13 of the CVID patients and 10 of the control subjects. CVID patients showed abnormal VDJ rearrangement and abnormal formation of complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3). We observed decreased selection against antibodies with long CDR3 regions in memory repertoires and decreased V gene replacement, offering possible mechanisms for increased patient autoreactivity. Our data indicate that patient immunodeficiency might derive both from decreased diversity of the naïve B cell pool and decreased somatic hypermutation in memory repertoires. CVID patients also exhibited abnormal clonal expansion of unmutated B cells relative to controls. Although impaired B cell germinal center activation is commonly viewed as causative in CVID, these data indicate that CVID B cells diverge from controls as early as the pro-B cell stage and suggest possible explanations for the increased incidence of autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and lymphoma CVID patients. PMID:26311730

  6. DNA Methyltransferase protein synthesis is reduced in CXXC finger protein 1-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill S; Palam, Lakshmi R; Tate, Courtney M; Sanford, Jeremy R; Wek, Ronald C; Skalnik, David G

    2009-05-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (CFP1) binds to unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is required for embryogenesis. CFP1 is also a component of the Setd1A and Setd1B histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking CFP1 fail to differentiate, and exhibit a 70% reduction in global genomic cytosine methylation and a 50% reduction in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) protein and activity. This study investigated the underlying mechanism for reduced DNMT1 expression in CFP1-deficient ES cells. DNMT1 transcript levels were significantly elevated in ES cells lacking CFP1, despite the observed reduction in DNMT1 protein levels. To address the posttranscriptional mechanisms by which CFP1 regulates DNMT1 protein activity, pulse/chase analyses were carried out, demonstrating a modest reduction in DNMT1 protein half-life in CFP1-deficient ES cells. Additionally, global protein synthesis was decreased in ES cells lacking CFP1, contributing to a reduction in the synthesis of DNMT1 protein. ES cells lacking CFP1 were found to contain elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF2alpha, and an accompanying reduction in translation initiation as revealed by a lower level of polyribosomes. These results reveal a novel role for CFP1 in the regulation of translation initiation, and indicate that loss of CFP1 function leads to decreased DNMT1 protein synthesis and half-life.

  7. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  8. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficiency in natural killer and dendritic cells affects antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Catucci, Marco; Zanoni, Ivan; Draghici, Elena; Bosticardo, Marita; Castiello, Maria C; Venturini, Massimo; Cesana, Daniela; Montini, Eugenio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Granucci, Francesca; Villa, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by reduced or absent expression of the WAS protein (WASP). WAS patients are affected by microthrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, eczema, autoimmune diseases, and malignancies. Although immune deficiency has been proposed to play a role in tumor pathogenesis, there is little evidence on the correlation between immune cell defects and tumor susceptibility. Taking advantage of a tumor-prone model, we show that the lack of WASP induces early tumor onset because of defective immune surveillance. Consistently, the B16 melanoma model shows that tumor growth and the number of lung metastases are increased in the absence of WASP. We then investigated the in vivo contribution of Was(-/-) NK cells and DCs in controlling B16 melanoma development. We found fewer B16 metastases developed in the lungs of Was(-/-) mice that had received WT NK cells as compared with mice bearing Was(-/-) NK cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Was(-/-) DCs were less efficient in inducing NK-cell activation in vitro and in vivo. In summary, for the first time, we demonstrate in in vivo models that WASP deficiency affects resistance to tumor and causes impairment in the antitumor capacity of NK cells and DCs. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Thiamine deficiency in cultured neuroblastoma cells: effect on mitochondrial function and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Goessens, G; Sluse, F; Wins, P; Bureau, M; Laschet, J; Grisar, T

    1995-05-01

    When neuroblastoma cells were transferred to a medium of low (6 nM) thiamine concentration, a 16-fold decrease in total intracellular thiamine content occurred within 8 days. Respiration and ATP levels were only slightly affected, but addition of a thiamine transport inhibitor (amprolium) decreased ATP content and increased lactate production. Oxygen consumption became low and insensitive to oligomycin and uncouplers. At least 25% of mitochondria were swollen and electron translucent. Cell mortality increased to 75% within 5 days. [3H]PK 11195, a specific ligand of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (located in the outer mitochondrial membrane) binds to the cells with high affinity (KD = 1.4 +/- 0.2 nM). Thiamine deficiency leads to an increase in both Bmax and KD. Changes in binding parameters for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors may be related to structural or permeability changes in mitochondrial outer membranes. In addition to the high-affinity (nanomolar range) binding site for peripheral benzodiazepine ligands, there is a low-affinity (micromolar range) saturable binding for PK 11195. At micromolar concentrations, peripheral benzodiazepines inhibit thiamine uptake by the cells. Altogether, our results suggest that impairment of oxidative metabolism, followed by mitochondrial swelling and disorganization of cristae, is the main cause of cell mortality in severely thiamine-deficient neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Establishment of HeLa Cell Mutants Deficient in Sphingolipid-Related Genes Using TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components in eukaryotes and have various cellular functions. Recent developments in genome-editing technologies have facilitated gene disruption in various organisms and cell lines. We here show the disruption of various sphingolipid metabolic genes in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A TALEN pair targeting the human CERT gene (alternative name COL4A3BP) encoding a ceramide transport protein induced a loss-of-function phenotype in more than 60% of HeLa cells even though the cell line has a pseudo-triploid karyotype. We have isolated several loss-of-function mutant clones for CERT, UGCG (encoding glucosylceramide synthase), and B4GalT5 (encoding the major lactosylceramide synthase), and also a CERT/UGCG double-deficient clone. Characterization of these clones supported previous proposals that CERT primarily contributes to the synthesis of SM but not GlcCer, and that B4GalT5 is the major LacCer synthase. These newly established sphingolipid-deficient HeLa cell mutants together with our previously established stable transfectants provide a ‘sphingolipid-modified HeLa cell panel,’ which will be useful to elucidate the functions of various sphingolipid species against essentially the same genomic background. PMID:24498430

  11. MCT8 deficiency in Purkinje cells disrupts embryonic chicken cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Delbaere, Joke; Vancamp, Pieter; Van Herck, Stijn L J; Bourgeois, Nele M A; Green, Mary J; Wingate, Richard J T; Darras, Veerle M

    2017-02-01

    Inactivating mutations in the human SLC16A2 gene encoding the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) result in the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome accompanied by severe locomotor deficits. The underlying mechanisms of the associated cerebellar maldevelopment were studied using the chicken as a model. Electroporation of an MCT8-RNAi vector into the cerebellar anlage of a 3-day-old embryo allowed knockdown of MCT8 in Purkinje cell precursors. This resulted in the downregulation of the thyroid hormone-responsive gene RORα and the Purkinje cell-specific differentiation marker LHX1/5 at day 6. MCT8 knockdown also results in a smaller and less complex dendritic tree at day 18 suggesting a pivotal role of MCT8 for cell-autonomous Purkinje cell maturation. Early administration of the thyroid hormone analogue 3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid partially rescued early Purkinje cell differentiation. MCT8-deficient Purkinje cells also induced non-autonomous effects as they led to a reduced granule cell precursor proliferation, a thinner external germinal layer and a loss of PAX6 expression. By contrast, at day 18, the external germinal layer thickness was increased, with an increase in presence of Axonin-1-positive post-mitotic granule cells in the initial stage of radial migration. The concomitant accumulation of presumptive migrating granule cells in the molecular layer, suggests that inward radial migration to the internal granular layer is stalled. In conclusion, early MCT8 deficiency in Purkinje cells results in both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous effects on cerebellar development and indicates that MCT8 expression is essential from very early stages of development, providing a novel insight into the ontogenesis of the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome.

  12. Accurate Expression Profiling of Very Small Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Roca, Eva; Garcia-Albéniz, Xabier; Rodriguez-Mulero, Silvia; Gomis, Roger R.; Kornacker, Karl; Auer, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Expression profiling, the measurement of all transcripts of a cell or tissue type, is currently the most comprehensive method to describe their physiological states. Given that accurate profiling methods currently available require RNA amounts found in thousands to millions of cells, many fields of biology working with specialized cell types cannot use these techniques because available cell numbers are limited. Currently available alternative methods for expression profiling from nanograms of RNA or from very small cell populations lack a broad validation of results to provide accurate information about the measured transcripts. Methods and Findings We provide evidence that currently available methods for expression profiling of very small cell populations are prone to technical noise and therefore cannot be used efficiently as discovery tools. Furthermore, we present Pico Profiling, a new expression profiling method from as few as ten cells, and we show that this approach is as informative as standard techniques from thousands to millions of cells. The central component of Pico Profiling is Whole Transcriptome Amplification (WTA), which generates expression profiles that are highly comparable to those produced by others, at different times, by standard protocols or by Real-time PCR. We provide a complete workflow from RNA isolation to analysis of expression profiles. Conclusions Pico Profiling, as presented here, allows generating an accurate expression profile from cell populations as small as ten cells. PMID:21203435

  13. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer.

  14. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Germ-cell deficient (gcd), an insertional mutation manifested as infertility in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Pellas, T C; Ramachandran, B; Duncan, M; Pan, S S; Marone, M; Chada, K

    1991-01-01

    A genetic analysis is necessary to gain a greater understanding of the complex developmental processes in mammals. Toward this end, an insertional transgenic mouse mutant has been isolated that results in abnormal germ-cell development. This recessive mutation manifests as infertility in both males and females and is specific for the reproductive organs, since all other tissues examined were histologically normal. A developmental analysis of the gonadal tissues demonstrated that the germ cells were specifically depleted as early as day 11.5 of embryonic development, while the various somatic cells were apparently unaffected. Therefore, the mutated locus must play a critical role in the migration/proliferation of primordial germ cells to the genital ridges of developing embryos. In addition, females homozygous for the mutation could potentially be a valuable animal model of a human syndrome, premature ovarian failure. This mutation has been named germ-cell deficient, gcd. Images PMID:1924340

  16. Deficiency of Src family kinases compromises the repopulating ability of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Orschell, Christie M.; Borneo, Jovencio; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Ma, Peilin; Sims, Emily; Ramdas, Baskar; Yoder, Mervin C.; Kapur, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Src family kinases (SFK) have been implicated in regulating growth factor and integrin-induced proliferation, migration, and gene expression in multiple cell types. However, little is known about the role of these kinases in the growth, homing, and engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Results Here we show that loss of hematopoietic-specific SFKs Hck, Fgr, and Lyn results in increased number of Sca-1+Lin− cells in the bone marrow, which respond differentially to cytokine-induced growth in vitro and manifest a significant defect in the long-term repopulating potential in vivo. Interestingly, a significant increase in expression of adhesion molecules, known to coincide with the homing potential of wild-type bone marrow cells is also observed on the surface of SFK−/− cells, although, this increase did not affect the homing potential of more primitive Lin−Sca-1+ SFK−/− cells. The stem cell–repopulating defect observed in mice transplanted with SFK−/− bone marrow cells is due to the loss of Lyn Src kinase, because deficiency of Lyn, but not Hck or Fgr, recapitulated the long-term stem cell defect observed in mice transplanted with SFK−/− bone marrow cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate an essential role for Lyn kinase in positively regulating the long-term and multilineage engraftment of stem cells, which is distinct from its role in mature B cells and myeloid cells. PMID:18346837

  17. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  18. A Cardiolipin-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Has an Altered Cell Shape and Is Impaired in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Kontur, Wayne S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell shape has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of bacterial attachment to surfaces and the formation of communities associated with surfaces. We found that a cardiolipin synthase (Δcls) mutant of the rod-shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides—in which synthesis of the anionic, highly curved phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is reduced by 90%—produces ellipsoid-shaped cells that are impaired in biofilm formation. Reducing the concentration of CL did not cause significant defects in R. sphaeroides cell growth, swimming motility, lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide production, surface adhesion protein expression, and membrane permeability. Complementation of the CL-deficient mutant by ectopically expressing CL synthase restored cells to their rod shape and increased biofilm formation. Treating R. sphaeroides cells with a low concentration (10 μg/ml) of the small-molecule MreB inhibitor S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea produced ellipsoid-shaped cells that had no obvious growth defect yet reduced R. sphaeroides biofilm formation. This study demonstrates that CL plays a role in R. sphaeroides cell shape determination, biofilm formation, and the ability of the bacterium to adapt to its environment. IMPORTANCE Membrane composition plays a fundamental role in the adaptation of many bacteria to environmental stress. In this study, we build a new connection between the anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) and cellular adaptation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We demonstrate that CL plays a role in the regulation of R. sphaeroides morphology and is important for the ability of this bacterium to form biofilms. This study correlates CL concentration, cell shape, and biofilm formation and provides the first example of how membrane composition in bacteria alters cell morphology and influences adaptation. This study also provides insight into the potential of phospholipid biosynthesis as a target for new chemical strategies designed to

  19. Artificial cells: building bioinspired systems using small-scale biology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ruder, Warren C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2008-01-01

    Artificial cells have generated much interest since the concept was introduced by Aleksandr Oparin in the 1920s, and they have had an impact on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry in various areas, including potential therapeutic applications. Here, we discuss the development of small-scale, bio-inspired artificial cell components that recreate the function of key cellular and physiological systems. We describe artificial cells, selected current applications and how small-scale biology could be used to provide what might be a next-generation approach in this area. We believe that this type of work is in its infancy and that exploiting small-scale biological inspiration in the field of artificial cells has great potential for successes in the future.

  20. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    V, Pavithra; Shalini, C.N. Sai; Priya, Shanmuga; Rani, Usha; Rajendiran, S; Joseph, Leena Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare and a very aggressive tumour. Once being considered to be a rare type of squamous cell carcinoma, evidence has proven that most of the tumours express one or more markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. The behaviour of this rare malignancy is different from that of squamous cell carcinomas, with a high propensity for nodal and distant metastases. Hence, there is a need to highlight this histopathological entity. PMID:24701511

  1. Clk1 deficiency promotes neuroinflammation and subsequent dopaminergic cell death through regulation of microglial metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruinan; Zhang, Fali; Chen, Gang; Han, Chaojun; Liu, Jay; Ren, Zhaoxiang; Zhu, Yi; Waddington, John L; Zheng, Long Tai; Zhen, Xuechu

    2017-02-01

    Clock (Clk)1/COQ7 is a mitochondrial hydroxylase that is necessary for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q or UQ). Here, we investigate the role of Clk1 in neuroinflammation and consequentially dopaminergic (DA) neuron survival. Reduced expression of Clk1 in microglia enhanced the LPS-induced proinflammatory response and promoted aerobic glycolysis. Inhibition of glycolysis abolished Clk1 deficiency-induced hypersensitivity to the inflammatory stimulation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mTOR/HIF-1α and ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathways were involved in Clk1 deficiency-induced aerobic glycolysis. The increase in neuronal cell death was observed following treatment with conditioned media from Clk1 deficient microglia. Increased DA neuron loss and microgliosis were observed in Clk1(+/-) mice after treatment with MPTP, a rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD). This increase in DA neuron loss was due to an exacerbated microglial inflammatory response, rather than direct susceptibility of Clk1(+/-) DA cells to MPP(+), the active species of MPTP. Exaggerated expressions of proinflammatory genes and loss of DA neurons were also observed in Clk1(+/-) mice after stereotaxic injection of LPS. Our results suggest that Clk1 regulates microglial metabolic reprogramming that is, in turn, involved in the neuroinflammatory processes and PD.

  2. Red blood cell PK deficiency: An update of PK-LR gene mutation database.

    PubMed

    Canu, Giulia; De Bonis, Maria; Minucci, Angelo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is known as being the most common cause of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA). Clinical PK deficiency is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, that can segregate neither in homozygous or in a compound heterozygous modality, respectively. Two PK genes are present in mammals: the pyruvate kinase liver and red blood cells (PK-LR) and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PK-M), of which only the first encodes for the isoenzymes normally expressed in the red blood cells (R-type) and in the liver (L-type). Several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects in PK-LR gene associated to CNSHA. Herein, we present a review of about 250 published mutations and six polymorphisms in PK-LR gene with the corresponding clinical and molecular data. We consulted the PubMed website for searching mutations and papers, along with two main databases: the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD, https://grenada.lumc.nl/LOVD2/mendelian_genes/home.php?select_db=PKLR) and Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD, http://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/ac/gene.php?gene=PKLR) for selecting, reviewing and listing the annotated PK-LR gene mutations present in literature. This paper is aimed to provide useful information to clinicians and laboratory professionals regarding overall reported PK-LR gene mutations, also giving the opportunity to harmonize data regarding PK-deficient individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endo-Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Deficient for Lysosomal Cystine Transporter Cystinosin

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  4. TNFR1-dependent cell death drives inflammation in Sharpin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, James A; Anderton, Holly; Etemadi, Nima; Nachbur, Ueli; Darding, Maurice; Peltzer, Nieves; Lalaoui, Najoua; Lawlor, Kate E; Vanyai, Hannah; Hall, Cathrine; Bankovacki, Aleks; Gangoda, Lahiru; Wong, Wendy Wei-Lynn; Corbin, Jason; Huang, Chunzi; Mocarski, Edward S; Murphy, James M; Alexander, Warren S; Voss, Anne K; Vaux, David L; Kaiser, William J; Walczak, Henning; Silke, John

    2014-01-01

    SHARPIN regulates immune signaling and contributes to full transcriptional activity and prevention of cell death in response to TNF in vitro. The inactivating mouse Sharpin cpdm mutation causes TNF-dependent multi-organ inflammation, characterized by dermatitis, liver inflammation, splenomegaly, and loss of Peyer's patches. TNF-dependent cell death has been proposed to cause the inflammatory phenotype and consistent with this we show Tnfr1, but not Tnfr2, deficiency suppresses the phenotype (and it does so more efficiently than Il1r1 loss). TNFR1-induced apoptosis can proceed through caspase-8 and BID, but reduction in or loss of these players generally did not suppress inflammation, although Casp8 heterozygosity significantly delayed dermatitis. Ripk3 or Mlkl deficiency partially ameliorated the multi-organ phenotype, and combined Ripk3 deletion and Casp8 heterozygosity almost completely suppressed it, even restoring Peyer's patches. Unexpectedly, Sharpin, Ripk3 and Casp8 triple deficiency caused perinatal lethality. These results provide unexpected insights into the developmental importance of SHARPIN. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03464.001 PMID:25443632

  5. A unique cell-surface protein phenotype distinguishes human small-cell from non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baylin, S.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Minna, J.D.; Bernal, S.D.; Sharper, J.H.

    1982-08-01

    Radioiodination (/sup 125/I) and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to determine that small-(oat) cell lung carcinoma (SCC)-a tumor with neuroedocrine features-possesses a surface protein pattern distinct from the other types of lung cancer cells (squamous, adeno-, and large-cell undifferentiated carcinoma). Twelve distinguishing proteins, 40 to 70 kilodaltons (kDal), characterized four separate lines of SCC; three of these, designated E (60 kDal; pI = 7.3), S (30 kDal; pI = 6.0), and U 57 kDal; pI = 5.6), may be unique SCC gene products and were identified only in (/sup 35/S)methionine labeling of SCC and not in non-SCC or human fibroblasts. Two lines of adeno-, one of squamous, and one of undifferentiated large-cell lung carcinoma exhibited similar surface protein patterns to one another. Nine distinguishing proteins (40 to 100 kDal) and at least five large proteins (>100 kDal) were unique to these lines. The surface protein phenotypes for SCC and non-SCC were distinct from those for human lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts. However, the neuroendocrine features of SCC were further substantiated because 6 of the 12 distinguishing SCC surface proteins, including E and U, were identified on human neuroblastoma cells. The proteins identified should (i) help define differentiation steps for normal and neoplastic bronchial epithelial cells, (ii) prove useful in better classifying lung cancers, and (iii) be instrumental in tracing formation of neuroendocrine cells.

  6. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4(+) T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  7. Blood cells from Friedreich ataxia patients harbor frataxin deficiency without a loss of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Selak, Mary A.; Lyver, Elise; Micklow, Elizabeth; Deutsch, Eric C.; Önder, Özlem; Selamoglu, Nur; Yager, Claire; Knight, Simon; Carroll, Martin; Daldal, Fevzi; Dancis, Andrew; Lynch, David R.; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA triplet expansions or point mutations in the FXN gene on chromosome 9q13. The gene product called frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is severely reduced in FRDA patients, leads to mitochondrial iron accumulation, FeS cluster deficiency and oxidative damage. The tissue specificity of this mitochondrial disease is complex and poorly understood. While frataxin is ubiquitously expressed, the cellular phenotype is most severe in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Here, we conducted comprehensive proteomic, metabolic and functional studies to determine whether subclinical abnormalities exist in mitochondria of blood cells from FRDA patients. Frataxin protein levels were significantly decreased in platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from FRDA patients. Furthermore, the most significant differences associated with frataxin deficiency in FRDA blood cell mitochondria were the decrease of two mitochondrial heat shock proteins. We did not observe profound changes in frataxin-targeted mitochondrial proteins or mitochondrial functions or an increase of apoptosis in peripheral blood cells, suggesting that functional defects in these mitochondria are not readily apparent under resting conditions in these cells. PMID:21147271

  8. MERIT40 deficiency expands hematopoietic stem cell pools by regulating thrombopoietin receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rozenova, Krasimira; Jiang, Jing; Donaghy, Ryan; Aressy, Bernadette; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and multilineage reconstitution are controlled by positive and negative signaling cues with perturbations leading to disease. Lnk is an essential signaling adaptor protein that dampens signaling by the cytokine thrombopoietin (Tpo) to limit HSC expansion. Here, we show that MERIT40 (Mediator of RAP80 Interactions and Targeting 40 kDa [M40]), a core subunit of an Lnk-associated Lys63 deubiquitinating (DUB) complex, attenuates HSC expansion. M40 deficiency increases the size of phenotypic and functional HSC pools. M40−/− HSCs are more resistant to cytoablative stress, and exhibit superior repopulating ability and self-renewal upon serial transplantation. M40−/− HSCs display increased quiescence and decelerated cell cycle kinetics accompanied by downregulation of gene sets associated with cell division. Mechanistically, M40 deficiency triggers hypersensitivity to Tpo stimulation and the stem cell phenotypes are abrogated on a background null for the Tpo receptor Mpl. These results establish M40-containing DUB complexes as novel HSC regulators of HSC expansion, implicate Lys63 ubiquitination in HSC signaling, and point to DUB-specific inhibitors as reagents to expand stem cell populations. PMID:25636339

  9. HL-60 cells can be made copper deficient by incubating with tetraethylenepentamine.

    PubMed

    Percival, S S; Layden-Patrice, M

    1992-12-01

    A system for studying copper deficiency was developed in a cell culture model. HL-60 cells were incubated with three chelators known to bind copper. One chelator, tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), reduced cellular copper levels and the activities of two copper-requiring enzymes, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and cytochrome c oxidase. The specificity of the chelator was assessed by incubating cells with both copper and TEPA and, in other experiments, with zinc and TEPA. Copper levels, Cu/Zn-SOD activity and cytochrome c oxidase activity were restored to control values when copper and TEPA were added to cultures simultaneously, indicating the TEPA was responsible for reducing these aspects of copper metabolism. Incubating with both zinc and TEPA reduced copper levels relative to the control, but did not reduce Cu/Zn-SOD activity to the same extent as TEPA alone. The chelation of copper was a time-dependent process that was stable for at least 4 d. Cell growth and viability were not affected by TEPA. Respiratory burst activity, an indicator of differentiation, was not affected by TEPA, demonstrating that the reduction of Cu/Zn-SOD activity was due to copper chelation and not due to changes in Cu/Zn-SOD protein levels that occur during differentiation. Loss of copper, as well as a reduction of the activity of two copper-requiring enzymes, provides evidence that TEPA is a useful compound for creating a functional copper deficiency in cell culture.

  10. Mitofusin 2 Deficiency Affects Energy Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in MEF Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beręsewicz, Małgorzata; Dymkowska, Dorota; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Zabłocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), mitochondrial outer membrane protein which is involved in rearrangement of these organelles, was first described in pathology of hypertension and diabetes, and more recently much attention is paid to its functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A neuropathy (CMT2A). Here, cellular energy metabolism was investigated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) differing in the presence of the Mfn2 gene; control (MEFwt) and with Mfn2 gene depleted MEFMfn2-/-. These two cell lines were compared in terms of various parameters characterizing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here, we have shown that relative rate of proliferation of MEFMfn2-/- cells versus control fibroblasts depend on serum supplementation of the growth media. Moreover, MEFMfn2-/- cells exhibited significantly increased respiration rate in comparison to MEFwt, regardless of serum supplementation of the medium. This effect was correlated with increased level of mitochondrial markers (TOM20 and NAO) as well as mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) protein levels and unchanged total ATP content. Interestingly, mitochondrial DNA content in MEFMfn2-/- cells was not reduced. Fundamentally, these results are in contrast to a commonly accepted belief that mitofusin 2 deficiency inevitably results in debilitation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. However, we suggest a balance between negative metabolic consequences of mitofusin 2 deficiency and adaptive processes exemplified by increased level of PGC-1α and TFAM transcription factor which prevent an excessive depletion of mtDNA and severe impairment of cell metabolism. PMID:26230519

  11. Mitofusin 2 Deficiency Affects Energy Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in MEF Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Boratyńska-Jasińska, Anna; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata; Dymkowska, Dorota; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Zabłocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), mitochondrial outer membrane protein which is involved in rearrangement of these organelles, was first described in pathology of hypertension and diabetes, and more recently much attention is paid to its functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A neuropathy (CMT2A). Here, cellular energy metabolism was investigated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) differing in the presence of the Mfn2 gene; control (MEFwt) and with Mfn2 gene depleted MEFMfn2-/-. These two cell lines were compared in terms of various parameters characterizing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here, we have shown that relative rate of proliferation of MEFMfn2-/- cells versus control fibroblasts depend on serum supplementation of the growth media. Moreover, MEFMfn2-/- cells exhibited significantly increased respiration rate in comparison to MEFwt, regardless of serum supplementation of the medium. This effect was correlated with increased level of mitochondrial markers (TOM20 and NAO) as well as mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) protein levels and unchanged total ATP content. Interestingly, mitochondrial DNA content in MEFMfn2-/- cells was not reduced. Fundamentally, these results are in contrast to a commonly accepted belief that mitofusin 2 deficiency inevitably results in debilitation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. However, we suggest a balance between negative metabolic consequences of mitofusin 2 deficiency and adaptive processes exemplified by increased level of PGC-1α and TFAM transcription factor which prevent an excessive depletion of mtDNA and severe impairment of cell metabolism.

  12. Small Buccal Fat Pad Cells Have High Osteogenic Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Tsurumachi, Niina; Akita, Daisuke; Kano, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Taro; Toriumi, Taku; Kazama, Tomohiko; Oki, Yoshinao; Tamura, Yoko; Tonogi, Morio; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Honda, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have mesenchymal stem cells' (MSCs) characteristics. Generally, mature adipocytes are 60-110 μm in diameter; however, association between adipocyte size and dedifferentiation efficiency is still unknown. This study, therefore, investigated the dedifferentiation efficiency of adipocytes based on cell diameter. Buccal fat pad was harvested from five human donors and dissociated by collagenase digestion. After exclusion of unwanted stromal cells by centrifugation, floating adipocytes were collected and their size distribution was analyzed. The floating adipocytes were then separated into two groups depending on cell size using 40- and 100-μm nylon mesh filters: cell diameters less than 40 μm (small adipocytes: S-adipocytes) and cell diameters of 40-100 μm (large adipocytes: L-adipocytes). Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of adipocyte dedifferentiation and then characterized the resultant DFAT cells. The S-adipocytes showed a higher capacity to dedifferentiate into DFAT cells (S-DFAT cells) compared to the L-adipocytes (L-DFAT cells). The S-DFAT cells also showed a relatively higher proportion of CD146-positive cells than L-DFAT cells, and exhibited more osteogenic differentiation ability based on the alkaline phosphatase activity and amount of calcium deposition. These results suggested that the S- and L-DFAT cells had distinct characteristics, and that the higher dedifferentiation potential of S-adipocytes compared to L-adipocytes gives the former group an advantage in yielding DFAT cells.

  13. Leukocyte TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis by reduced macrophage recruitment and defective T-cell responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Guilielmus H.J.M.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.M.; Anas, Adam A.; Bot, Martine; Asbach, Miriam; Schoneveld, Arjan; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Foks, Amanda C.; Timmers, Leo; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.; van der Poll, Tom; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity, both important players in atherosclerosis. Since evidence for the role of TLR5 is lacking, we aimed to establish this in the immune axis of atherosclerosis. We assessed the effect of the TLR5-specific ligand Flagellin on macrophage maturation and T-cell polarisation. Next, we generated TLR5−/−LDLr−/− chimeras to study the effect of hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency on atherosclerosis formation. Flagellin stimulation did not influence wildtype or TLR5−/− macrophage maturation. Only in wildtype macrophages, Flagellin exposure increased MCP-1 and IL6 expression. Flagellin alone reduced T-helper 1 proliferation, which was completely overruled in the presence of T-cell receptor activation. In vivo, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion formation by ≈25% (1030*103 ± 63*103 vs. 792*103 ± 61*103 μm2; p = 0.013) and decreased macrophage area (81.3 ± 12.0 vs. 44.2 ± 6.6 μm2; p = 0.011). In TLR5−/− chimeric mice, we observed lower IL6 plasma levels (36.4 ± 5.6 vs. 15.1 ± 2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.003), lower (activated) splenic CD4+ T-cell content (32.3 ± 2.1 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.0018), accompanied by impaired T-cell proliferative responses. In conclusion, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation by attenuated macrophage accumulation and defective T-cell responsiveness. PMID:28202909

  14. Hyperactivated JNK is a therapeutic target in pVHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    An, Jiabin; Liu, Huiren; Magyar, Clara E; Guo, Yanchuan; Veena, Mysore S; Srivatsan, Eri S; Huang, Jiaoti; Rettig, Matthew B

    2013-02-15

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC), the major histologic subtype of RCC accounting for more than 80% of cases, are typified by biallelic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Although accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α) is the most well-studied effect of VHL inactivation, direct inhibition of HIFα or restoration of wild-type pVHL protein expression has not proved readily feasible, given the limitations associated with pharmacologic targeting of transcription factors (i.e., HIF-α) and gene replacement therapy of tumor suppressor genes (i.e., VHL). Here, we have established that phosphorylated c-Jun, a substrate of the c-Jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK), is selectively activated in clear cell RCC patient specimens. Using multiple isogenic cell lines, we show that HIF-α-independent JNK hyperactivation is unique to the pVHL-deficient state. Importantly, pVHL-deficient RCCs are dependent upon JNK activ