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Sample records for deficient small cell

  1. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M; Wang, Charles X; An, W Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-05-19

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  2. Heightening Energetic Stress Selectively Targets LKB1-Deficient Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milica; McMickle, Robert; Abt, Evan; Seki, Atsuko; Simko, Sarah A; Magyar, Clara; Stout, David B; Fishbein, Michael C; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Shackelford, David B

    2015-11-15

    Inactivation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor is a frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) leading to the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and sensitivity to the metabolic stress inducer phenformin. In this study, we explored the combinatorial use of phenformin with the mTOR catalytic kinase inhibitor MLN0128 as a treatment strategy for NSCLC bearing comutations in the LKB1 and KRAS genes. NSCLC is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disease, giving rise to lung tumors of varying histologies that include adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that phenformin in combination with MLN0128 induced a significant therapeutic response in KRAS/LKB1-mutant human cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC that develop both adenocarcinomas and SCCs. Specifically, we found that KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung adenocarcinomas responded strongly to phenformin + MLN0128 treatment, but the response of SCCs to single or combined treatment with MLN0128 was more attenuated due to acquired resistance to mTOR inhibition through modulation of the AKT-GSK signaling axis. Combinatorial use of the mTOR inhibitor and AKT inhibitor MK2206 robustly inhibited the growth and viability of squamous lung tumors, thus providing an effective strategy to overcome resistance. Taken together, our findings define new personalized therapeutic strategies that may be rapidly translated into clinical use for the treatment of KRAS/LKB1-mutant adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors. PMID:26574479

  3. Small Mouse Islets Are Deficient in Glucagon-Producing Alpha Cells but Rich in Somatostatin-Secreting Delta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grapengiesser, Eva; Hellman, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Small and big mouse islets were compared with special reference to their content of glucagon-producing α-cells and somatostatin-producing δ-cells. Areas stained for glucagon and somatostatin were measured in the largest cross section of small (diameter < 60 μm) and big (diameter > 100 μm) islets. Comparison of the areas indicated proportionally more δ- than α-cells in the small islets. After isolation with collagenase these islets were practically devoid of α-cells. We evaluated the functional importance of the islet size by measuring the Ca2+ signal for insulin release. A majority of the small islets responded to the hyperpolarization action of somatostatin with periodic decrease of cytoplasmic Ca2+ when glucose was elevated after tolbutamide blockade of the KATP channels. PMID:27504459

  4. LKB1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to energetic stress induced by erlotinib treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Young Mi; Park, Serk In; Trenary, Irina A.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kaufman, Jacob M.; Carbone, David P.; Young, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11 or LKB1) is mutated in 20–30% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient tumors. Loss of LKB1-AMPK signaling confers sensitivity to metabolic inhibition or stress-induced mitochondrial insults. We tested the hypothesis that loss of LKB1 sensitizes NSCLC cells to energetic stress induced by treatment with erlotinib. LKB1-deficient cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib in vitro and in vivo that was associated with alterations in energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. Loss of LKB1 expression altered the cellular response to erlotinib treatment, resulting in impaired ATP homeostasis and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, erlotinib selectively blocked mTOR signaling, inhibited cell growth, and activated apoptosis in LKB1-deficient cells. Erlotinib treatment also induced AMPK activation despite loss of LKB1 expression, which was partially reduced by the application of a CaMKKβ inhibitor (STO-609) or calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM). These findings may have significant implications for the design of novel NSCLC treatments that target dysregulated metabolic and signaling pathways in LKB1-deficient tumors. PMID:26119936

  5. Immunoproteasome deficiency is a feature of non-small cell lung cancer with a mesenchymal phenotype and is associated with a poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Satyendra C.; Peters, Haley L.; Taguchi, Ayumu; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Wang, Hong; Momin, Amin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Celiktas, Muge; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Hanash, Samir M.; Ostrin, Edwin J.

    2016-01-01

    The immunoproteasome plays a key role in generation of HLA peptides for T cell-mediated immunity. Integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines revealed significantly reduced expression of immunoproteasome components and their regulators associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Low expression of immunoproteasome subunits in early stage NSCLC patients was associated with recurrence and metastasis. Depleted repertoire of HLA class I-bound peptides in mesenchymal cells deficient in immunoproteasome components was restored with either IFNγ or 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment. Our findings point to a mechanism of immune evasion of cells with a mesenchymal phenotype and suggest a strategy to overcome immune evasion through induction of the immunoproteasome to increase the cellular repertoire of HLA class I-bound peptides. PMID:26929325

  6. The Effect of Small Molecules on Sterol Homeostasis: Measuring 7-Dehydrocholesterol in Dhcr7-Deficient Neuro2a Cells and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Korade, Zeljka; Kim, Hye-Young H; Tallman, Keri A; Liu, Wei; Koczok, Katalin; Balogh, Istvan; Xu, Libin; Mirnics, Karoly; Porter, Ned A

    2016-02-11

    Well-established cell culture models were combined with new analytical methods to assess the effects of small molecules on the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. The analytical protocol, which is based on sterol derivation with the dienolphile PTAD, was found to be reliable for the analysis of 7-DHC and desmosterol. The PTAD method was applied to the screening of a small library of pharmacologically active substances, and the effect of compounds on the cholesterol pathway was determined. Of some 727 compounds, over 30 compounds decreased 7-DHC in Dhcr7-deficient Neuro2a cells. The examination of chemical structures of active molecules in the screen grouped the compounds into distinct categories. In addition to statins, our screen found that SERMs, antifungals, and several antipsychotic medications reduced levels of 7-DHC. The activities of selected compounds were verified in human fibroblasts derived from Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) patients and linked to specific transformations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. PMID:26789657

  7. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  8. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  9. Cell-mediated immunity in nutritional deficiency.

    PubMed

    McMurray, D N

    1984-01-01

    Dietary deficiencies of specific nutrients profoundly alter cell-mediated immune responses in man and experimental animals. Both moderate and severe deficiencies are associated with significant changes in immunocompetence. Diets with inadequate levels of protein, calories, vitamin A, pyridoxine, biotin and zinc result in loss of thymic cellularity. Secondary to thymic atrophy, the production of thymic hormones critical for the differentiation of T lymphocytes is reduced, especially in protein-calorie malnutrition and zinc deficiency. Confirmation of a T cell maturational defect in nutritional deprivation comes from the observations of decreased total (T3 and rosette-forming) T cells in the peripheral blood of children with kwashiorkor and marasmus, with preferential loss of helper/inducer (T4) T cell subsets. Reduced number and in vitro function of T cells have also been reported in experimental deficiencies of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamins A and E. Loss of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mitogens and antigens is a consistent sequela of dietary deficiencies of protein, vitamins A and C, pyridoxine, iron and zinc. Cell-mediated immunity directed against allogeneic histocompatibility antigens (e.g. mixed leukocyte cultures, graft versus host, skin graft rejection) may actually be enhanced by experimental protein and polyunsaturated fat deficiencies. Alternatively, pyridoxine, ascorbate and biotin deficiencies resulted in delayed rejection of skin allografts. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity is impaired in zinc-, iron- and copper-deficient mice, as well as in scorbutic guinea pigs. Natural killer (NK) cell function may be either enhanced or depressed, depending upon the nutrient and its effects on interferon production. Several authors have demonstrated normal or enhanced macrophage activity in a variety of experimental deficiencies. The extrapolation of these observations to infectious disease resistance is not straightforward, and depends upon the nature of

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  11. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. PMID:27434671

  12. Retention of the In Vitro Radiosensitizing Potential of Gemcitabine Under Anoxic Conditions, in p53 Wild-Type and p53-Deficient Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, An; Pauwels, Bea; Lambrechts, Hilde A.J.; Pattyn, Greet G.O.; Ides, Johan; Baay, Marc; Meijnders, Paul; Peeters, Marc; Vermorken, Jan B.; Lardon, Filip

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Whereas radiosensitization by gemcitabine is well studied under normal oxygen conditions, little is known about its radiosensitizing potential under reduced oxygen conditions. Therefore, the present study evaluated the impact of anoxia on gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic assay was performed in three isogenic A549 cell lines differing in p53 status (24 h, 0-15 nM gemcitabine, 0-8 Gy irradiation, normoxia vs. anoxia). Using radiosensitizing conditions, cells were collected for cell cycle analysis and apoptosis detection. Results: Whereas wild-type p53 A549-LXSN cells were more sensitive to radiation than p53-deficient A549-E6 cells, both cell lines showed similar radiosensitization by gemcitabine under normoxia and anoxia. Independent of p53 functionality, gemcitabine was able to overcome anoxia-induced G{sub 0/1} arrest and established an (early) S phase block in normoxic and anoxic cells. The percentage early and late apoptotic/necrotic cells increased with the gemcitabine/radiation combination, with a significant difference between A549-LXSN and A549-E6. Conclusions: This study is the first to show that gemcitabine retains its radiosensitizing potential under low oxygen conditions. Although radiosensitization was observed in both p53 wild-type and p53-deficient cells, p53 status might influence induction of apoptosis after gemcitabine/radiation treatment, whereas no effect on cell cycle progression was noticed.

  13. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (right)   The structure of tightly packed "closed cells" in a layer of marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific Ocean ... into interesting structures such as those shown here. These cells are notably small, with diameters ranging from 10-15 kilometers, instead ...

  14. Restored physiology in protein-deficient yeast by a small molecule channel

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Alexander G.; Hou, Jennifer; Grillo, Anthony S.; Diaz, Katrina A.; Burke, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies of protein ion channels underlie many currently incurable human diseases. Robust networks of pumps and channels are usually responsible for the directional movement of specific ions in organisms ranging from microbes to humans. We thus questioned whether minimally selective small molecule mimics of missing protein channels might be capable of collaborating with the corresponding protein ion pumps to restore physiology. Here we report vigorous and sustainable restoration of yeast cell growth by replacing missing protein ion channels with imperfect small molecule mimics. We further provide evidence that this tolerance for imperfect mimicry is attributable to collaboration between the channel-forming small molecule and protein ion pumps. These results illuminate a mechanistic framework for pursuing small molecule replacements for deficient protein ion channels that underlie a range of challenging human diseases. PMID:26230309

  15. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for CD3δ deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Nufar; Takada, Hidetoshi; Law, Jason; Cowan, Morton J; Gil, Juana; Regueiro, Jose; Lopez de Sabando, Diego Plaza; Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Dalal, Jignesh; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Manfred, Hoenig; Hanson, I. Celine; Grunebaum, Eyal; Shearer, William T; Roifman, Chaim M.

    2012-01-01

    Background CD3δ deficiency is a fatal form of severe combined immunodeficiency which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The presence of a thymus loaded with T cell progenitors in these patients may require special considerations in choosing the regimen of conditioning and the type of HSCT. Objectives To study the outcome of CD3δ deficiency using various modalities of stem cell transplantation. Methods We analyzed data on 13 patients with CD3δ deficiency who underwent HSCT in 7 centers. HSCT was performed using different sources of donor stem cells as well as various conditioning regimens. Results Two patients who received stem cells from matched related donors and survived, both needed substantial conditioning in order to engraft. Only one of six other patients who received a related mismatched donor (MMRD) transplant survived, two of them had no conditioning while the others received various combinations of conditioning regimens. Three other patients received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD), survived and enjoyed full immune reconstitution. Two other patients received unrelated cord blood without conditioning. One of them has had a partial but stable engraftment, while the other engrafted well but is only 12 months after HSCT. We also report here for the first time that patients with CD3δ deficiency can present with typical features of Omenn syndrome. Conclusions HSCT is a successful treatment for patients with CD3δ deficiency. The small number of patients in this report prevent definitive statements on the importance of survival factors, but several are suggested: 1) HLA matched donor transplants are associated with superior reconstitution and survival than mismatched donor transplants; 2) substantial conditioning appears necessary; 3) early diagnosis and absence of opportunistic infections. PMID:21757226

  16. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245

  17. GREG cells, a dysferlin-deficient myogenic mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Glen W.; Mekhedov, Elena; Blank, Paul S.; Morree, Antoine de; Pekkurnaz, Gulcin; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-15

    The dysferlinopathies (e.g. LGMD2b, Myoshi myopathy) are progressive, adult-onset muscle wasting syndromes caused by mutations in the gene coding for dysferlin. Dysferlin is a large ({approx} 200 kDa) membrane-anchored protein, required for maintenance of plasmalemmal integrity in muscle fibers. To facilitate analysis of dysferlin function in muscle cells, we have established a dysferlin-deficient myogenic cell line (GREG cells) from the A/J mouse, a genetic model for dysferlinopathy. GREG cells have no detectable dysferlin expression, but proliferate normally in growth medium and fuse into functional myotubes in differentiation medium. GREG myotubes exhibit deficiencies in plasma membrane repair, as measured by laser wounding in the presence of FM1-43 dye. Under the wounding conditions used, the majority ({approx} 66%) of GREG myotubes lack membrane repair capacity, while no membrane repair deficiency was observed in dysferlin-normal C2C12 myotubes, assayed under the same conditions. We discuss the possibility that the observed heterogeneity in membrane resealing represents genetic compensation for dysferlin deficiency.

  18. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb(-/y)) mice and found that Fancb(-/y) mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb(-/y) mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb(-/y) mice. Furthermore, Fancb(-/y) BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb(-/y) HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb(-/y) mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  19. Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Erica B; Jalal, Shadia I

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer of neuroendocrine origin, which is strongly associated with cigarette smoking. Patients typically present with a short duration of symptoms and frequently (60-65 %) with metastatic disease. SCLC is a heterogeneous disease including extremely chemosensitive and chemoresistant clones. For this reason, a high percentage of patients respond to first-line chemotherapy but rapidly succumb to the disease. SCLC is generally divided into two stages, limited and extensive. Standard treatment of limited stage disease includes combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for four cycles, thoracic radiation initiated early with the first cycle of chemotherapy, and consideration of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in the subset of patients with good response. Surgery may play a role in TNM stages I and II. In extensive disease, platinum agents and etoposide, used in combination, are again the first-line standard of care in the USA. However, thoracic radiation therapy is used predominately in patients where local control is important and PCI is of uncertain benefit. Despite these treatments, prognosis remains poor and novel therapies are needed to improve survival in this disease. PMID:27535400

  20. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  1. [The "small penis": considerations about subjective penile deficiency].

    PubMed

    Rosso, C; Ostacoli, L; Garbolino, S; Furlan, M P

    1998-12-01

    In sexology clinical practice you can see quite frequently patients who make complaints about their penis not being big enough. The Authors suggest that the subjective feeling of penis deficiency is a symptom which needs to be properly diagnosed and understood, in order to be able to make effective therapeutic interventions, from a psychotherapeutic, psychopharmacologic or surgical point of view.

  2. [The "small penis": considerations about subjective penile deficiency].

    PubMed

    Rosso, C; Ostacoli, L; Garbolino, S; Furlan, M P

    1998-12-01

    In sexology clinical practice you can see quite frequently patients who make complaints about their penis not being big enough. The Authors suggest that the subjective feeling of penis deficiency is a symptom which needs to be properly diagnosed and understood, in order to be able to make effective therapeutic interventions, from a psychotherapeutic, psychopharmacologic or surgical point of view. PMID:9882904

  3. Selenoprotein O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jidong; Fei, Yao; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2016-10-01

    Selenoprotein O (Sel O) is a selenium-containing protein, but its function is still unclear. In the present study, we observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Sel O increased during chondrogenic induction of ATDC5 cells. The effects of Sel O on chondrocyte differentiation were then examined through shRNA-mediated gene silencing technique. The expression of Sel O was significantly suppressed at both mRNA and protein levels in a stable cell line transfected with a Sel O-specific target shRNA construct. Thereafter, we demonstrated that Sel O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Sel O deficiencies inhibited expression of chondrogenic gene Sox9, Col II, and aggrecan. Sel O-deficient cells also accumulated a few cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, Sel O deficiencies inhibited chondrocyte proliferation through delayed cell cycle progression by suppression of cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, Sel O deficiencies induced chondrocyte death through cell apoptosis. In summary, we describe the expression patterns and the essential roles of Sel O in chondrocyte viability, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. Additionally, Sel O deficiency-mediated impaired chondrogenesis may illustrate the mechanisms of Se deficiency in the pathophysiological process of the endemic osteoarthropathy.

  4. Alterations of rat hepatoma cell genomes induced by copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Renault, E; Deschatrette, J

    1997-01-01

    Copper deficiency imposed on a variant rat hepatoma cell line inhibits cell growth and results in genesis of stable well-differentiated, tumorigenic revertants. The treatment caused a substantial increase in DNA content (up to 20%) of G1 and G2/M cells and inhibition of cell proliferation. This phenomenon was correlated with an enhancement of DNA replication. The excess DNA was unstable and rapidly lost with reinitiation of cell growth and mitosis. Minute and double-minute extrachromosomal material was detected by metaphase analysis, suggesting widespread DNA amplification in copper-deficient conditions. Although transitory, these genetic events were associated with genesis of drug-resistant cells and induction of tumorigenicity of the variant hepatoma cells. The data reveal a novel aspect of the consequences of trace element deficiency.

  5. Vitamin A deficiency and small intestinal secretory function in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nzegwu, H; Levin, R J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A on the functions of the small intestine was examined in rats made vitamin A deficient for 40 days by feeding a special diet after weaning and in pair fed vitamin A deficient rats that were given supplementary vitamin A (240 IU/day) in their drinking water. The basal and stimulated electrogenic secretory and absorptive functions of the jejunum and proximal and distal ileum removed from these rats were examined in vitro using the short circuit current as the index of transport activity. The basal short circuit current in the jejunum and proximal ileum was not significantly different but that of the distal ileum was lower. Electrogenic glucose transfer was not significantly affected by the vitamin deficiency. Cholinergic stimulation using the M1/M2 agonist bethanechol showed a greatly enhanced electrogenic secretion in the jejunum of the deficient rats while secretion stimulated by dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate was significantly greater in their distal ilea compared with the supplemented group. The vitamin deficiency also disrupted the normal higher/lower hierarchical pattern of transport activity between the proximal and distal ileum. The enhanced secretory activity of the vitamin A deficient small intestine offers a putative explanation for the well known relation between vitamin A deficiency and diarrhoea found in humans. PMID:1721598

  6. Numb-deficient satellite cells have regeneration and proliferation defects.

    PubMed

    George, Rajani M; Biressi, Stefano; Beres, Brian J; Rogers, Erik; Mulia, Amanda K; Allen, Ronald E; Rawls, Alan; Rando, Thomas A; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2013-11-12

    The adaptor protein Numb has been implicated in the switch between cell proliferation and differentiation made by satellite cells during muscle repair. Using two genetic approaches to ablate Numb, we determined that, in its absence, muscle regeneration in response to injury was impaired. Single myofiber cultures demonstrated a lack of satellite cell proliferation in the absence of Numb, and the proliferation defect was confirmed in satellite cell cultures. Quantitative RT-PCR from Numb-deficient satellite cells demonstrated highly up-regulated expression of p21 and Myostatin, both inhibitors of myoblast proliferation. Transfection with Myostatin-specific siRNA rescued the proliferation defect of Numb-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Numb in satellite cells inhibited Myostatin expression. These data indicate a unique function for Numb during the initial activation and proliferation of satellite cells in response to muscle injury. PMID:24170859

  7. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O.; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf; Augsburger, Marc; Paganetti, Harald; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Pruschy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  8. Relationship of large and small invertases in Saccharomyces: mutant selectively deficient in small invertase.

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, B B; Hackel, R; Mizunaga, T; Lampen, J O

    1978-01-01

    A mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (D10-ER1) has been isolated after a two-step mutagenesis of strain 4059-358D (SUC 1) using ethyl methane sulfonate. Cells of this new strain produced a level of total invertase equaling that of 4059 but contained only trace amounts of the small, internal, aglycan form of the enzyme (less than 0.1% of total in D10-ER1 compared with 6% in 4059). When D10.ER1 was crossed with an invertase-hyperproducing strain dgr3 (SUC3), progeny were isolated (HZ400-5A and HZ400-2C) in which levels of total invertase had at least quadrupled. The percentage of small invertase, however, remained insignificant. Levels of small invertase in strain HZ400-5A were determined by affinity chromatography on conconavalin A-Sepharose, gel permeation chromatography, and isopycnic centrifugation in CsCl. The large invertase of the SUC1 yeasts described here was found to contain a form apparently greater in size than the large invertase of the SUC2 strain FH4C; this probably reflects a higher content of carbohydrate. The overall results of this study do not support a direct structural relationship between large and small invertases. The implications on invertase biosynthesis and structure are discussed. PMID:357425

  9. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A; Panzarino, Nicholas J; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M; de Ruiter, Julian R; Daniel, Jeremy A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-07-21

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  10. Partial MCM4 deficiency in patients with growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gineau, Laure; Cognet, Céline; Kara, Nihan; Lach, Francis Peter; Dunne, Jean; Veturi, Uma; Picard, Capucine; Trouillet, Céline; Eidenschenk, Céline; Aoufouchi, Said; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Smith, Owen; Geissmann, Frédéric; Feighery, Conleth; Abel, Laurent; Smogorzewska, Agata; Stillman, Bruce; Vivier, Eric; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes that exert potent and nonredundant antiviral activity and antitumoral activity in the mouse; however, their function in host defense in humans remains unclear. Here, we investigated 6 related patients with autosomal recessive growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and a selective NK cell deficiency characterized by a lack of the CD56dim NK subset. Using linkage analysis and fine mapping, we identified the disease-causing gene, MCM4, which encodes a component of the MCM2-7 helicase complex required for DNA replication. A splice-site mutation in the patients produced a frameshift, but the mutation was hypomorphic due to the creation of two new translation initiation methionine codons downstream of the premature termination codon. The patients’ fibroblasts exhibited genomic instability, which was rescued by expression of WT MCM4. These data indicate that the patients’ growth retardation and adrenal insufficiency likely reflect the ubiquitous but heterogeneous impact of the MCM4 mutation in various tissues. In addition, the specific loss of the NK CD56dim subset in patients was associated with a lower rate of NK CD56bright cell proliferation, and the maturation of NK CD56bright cells toward an NK CD56dim phenotype was tightly dependent on MCM4-dependent cell division. Thus, partial MCM4 deficiency results in a genetic syndrome of growth retardation with adrenal insufficiency and selective NK deficiency. PMID:22354167

  11. Impaired T cell function in argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; McGuire, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ASS1 is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a role in the conversion of citrulline to arginine. In human and mouse tissues, ASS1 protein is found in several components of the immune system, including the thymus and T cells. However, the role of ASS1 in these tissues remains to be defined. Considerable attention has been focused recently on the role of metabolism in T cell differentiation and function. Based on the expression of ASS1 in the immune system, we hypothesized that ASS1 deficiency would result in T cell defects. To evaluate this question, we characterized immune function in hypomorphic fold/fold mice. Analysis of splenic T cells by flow cytometry showed a marked reduction in T cell numbers with normal expression of activation surface markers. Gene therapy correction of liver ASS1 to enhance survival resulted in a partial recovery of splenic T cells for characterization. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated the persistence of the ASS1 enzyme defect in T cells and abnormal T cell differentiation and function. Overall, our work suggests that ASS1 plays a role in T cell function, and deficiency produces primary immune dysfunction. In addition, these data suggest that patients with ASS1 deficiency (citrullinemia type I) may have T cell dysfunction. PMID:25492936

  12. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  13. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  14. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Hsu, Amy P.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Wilder, Jennifer; Kurlander, Roger; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Holland, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We performed nonmyeloablative HSCT in 6 patients with a newly described genetic immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in GATA2—a disease characterized by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, monocytopenia, B- and NK-cell deficiency, and the propensity to transform to myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Two patients received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from matched-related donors, 2 received PBSCs from matched-unrelated donors, and 2 received stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) donors. Recipients of matched-related and -unrelated donors received fludarabine and 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI); UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide in addition to fludarabine and TBI as conditioning. All patients received tacrolimus and sirolimus posttransplantation. Five patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17.4 months (range, 10-25). All patients achieved high levels of donor engraftment in the hematopoietic compartments that were deficient pretransplantation. Adverse events consisted of delayed engraftment in the recipient of a single UCB, GVHD in 4 patients, and immune-mediated pancytopenia and nephrotic syndrome in the recipient of a double UCB transplantation. Nonmyeloablative HSCT in GATA2 deficiency results in reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, B-cell, and NK-cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00923364. PMID:21816832

  15. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  16. Small intestinal lymphoma in three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Bridges, N; Feiner, H D; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of small bowel lymphoma in young homosexual men are presented. All three had acquired immune deficiency syndrome as demonstrated by demography, sexual history, cachexia, opportunistic infections by Cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis carinii, atypical Mycobacterium, Candida, and/or evidence of immune deficiency, such as skin test anergy, lymphopenia, inversion of T-helper/T-suppressor ratio, and diminished lymphocyte response to either phytohemmaglutinin or pokeweed mitogen. All had peripheral and/or abdominal lymphadenopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms, e.g., diarrhea, spasms, constipation, and oral candidiasis. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made at laparotomy in all cases. All three had complete removal of localized tumor (stage Ie or IIe), yet died within 6 months of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Thus gastrointestinal complaints may not always be related to "gay bowel" syndrome, or other infectious diseases in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Small intestinal lymphoma should be added to the list of neoplasms to which this group is susceptible.

  17. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  18. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit Localization in Response to Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M; Zhang, Caiguo; Wu, Xiaorong; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Puig, Sergi

    2016-04-29

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in eukaryotes. Living organisms have developed multiple strategies to tightly modulate RNR function to avoid inadequate or unbalanced deoxyribonucleotide pools that cause DNA damage and genome instability. Yeast cells activate RNR in response to genotoxic stress and iron deficiency by facilitating redistribution of its small heterodimeric subunit Rnr2-Rnr4 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it forms an active holoenzyme with large Rnr1 subunit. Dif1 protein inhibits RNR by promoting nuclear import of Rnr2-Rnr4. Upon DNA damage, Dif1 phosphorylation by the Dun1 checkpoint kinase and its subsequent degradation enhances RNR function. In this report, we demonstrate that Dun1 kinase triggers Rnr2-Rnr4 redistribution to the cytoplasm in response to iron deficiency. We show that Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization by low iron requires Dun1 kinase activity and phosphorylation site Thr-380 in the Dun1 activation loop, but not the Dun1 forkhead-associated domain. By using different Dif1 mutant proteins, we uncover that Dun1 phosphorylates Dif1 Ser-104 and Thr-105 residues upon iron scarcity. We observe that the Dif1 phosphorylation pattern differs depending on the stimuli, which suggests different Dun1 activating pathways. Importantly, the Dif1-S104A/T105A mutant exhibits defects in nucleus-to-cytoplasm redistribution of Rnr2-Rnr4 by iron limitation. Taken together, these results reveal that, in response to iron starvation, Dun1 kinase phosphorylates Dif1 to stimulate Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization to the cytoplasm and promote RNR function.

  19. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  20. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  1. ATM-deficiency sensitizes Mantle Cell Lymphoma cells to PARP-1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chris T.; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G.; Zamò, Alberto; O’Connor, Mark J.; Bebb, D. Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept, termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) gene is altered in a number of human cancers including Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition, than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (previously known as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumour growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells, while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  2. Clinical experience in T cell deficient patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    T cell disorders have been poorly understood until recently. Lack of knowledge of underlying molecular mechanisms together with incomplete data on long term outcome have made it difficult to assess prognosis and give the most effective treatment. Rapid progress in defining molecular defects, improved supportive care and much improved results from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) now mean that curative treatment is possible for many patients. However, this depends on prompt recognition, accurate diagnosis and careful treatment planning. This review will discuss recent progress in our clinical and molecular understanding of a variety of disorders including: severe combined immunodeficiency, specific T cell immunodeficiencies, signaling defects, DNA repair defects, immune-osseous dysplasias, thymic disorders and abnormalities of apoptosis. There is still much to discover in this area and some conditions which are as yet very poorly understood. However, with increased knowledge about how these disorders can present and the particular problems each group may face it is hoped that these patients can be recognized early and managed appropriately, so providing them with the best possible outcome. PMID:20465788

  3. In HepG2 Cells, Coexisting Carnitine Deficiency Masks Important Indicators of Marginal Biotin Deficiency123

    PubMed Central

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy. Objective: In this study we hypothesized that coexisting carnitine deficiency can prevent the increase in 3HIAc due to biotin deficiency. Methods: We used a 2-factor nutrient depletion design to induce isolated and combined biotin and carnitine deficiency in HepG2 cells and then repleted cells with carnitine. To elucidate the metabolic pathogenesis, we quantitated intracellular and extracellular free carnitine, acylcarnitines, and acylcarnitine ratios using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Relative to biotin-sufficient, carnitine-sufficient cells, intracellular acetylcarnitine increased by 90%, propionylcarnitine more than doubled, and 3HIAc increased by >10-fold in biotin-deficient, carnitine-sufficient (BDCS) cells, consistent with a defensive mechanism in which biotin-deficient cells transesterify the acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates of the biotin-dependent carboxylases to the related acylcarnitines. Likewise, in BDCS cells, the ratio of acetylcarnitine to malonylcarnitine and the ratio of propionylcarnitine to methylmalonylcarnitine both more than tripled, and the ratio of 3HIAc to 3-methylglutarylcarnitine (MGc) increased by >10-fold. In biotin-deficient, carnitine-deficient (BDCD) cells, the 3 substrate-derived acylcarnitines changed little, but the substrate:product ratios were masked to a lesser extent. Moreover, carnitine repletion unmasked biotin deficiency in BDCD cells as shown by increases in acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and 3HIAc (each increased by >50-fold). Likewise, ratios of acetylcarnitine:malonylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine:methylmalonylcarnitine, and 3HIAc:MGc all increased

  4. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  5. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare. PMID:12012283

  6. [Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A

    2016-03-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) represents a type II mitochondrial complex related to the respiratory chain and Krebs cycle. The complex is composed of four major subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD. The oncogenic role of this enzyme complex has only recently been recognized and the complex is currently considered an important oncogenic signaling pathway with tumor suppressor properties. In addition to the familial paraganglioma syndromes (types 1-5) as prototypical SDH-related diseases, many other tumors have been defined as SDH-deficient, in particular a subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), rare hypophyseal adenomas, a subset of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (recently added) and a variety of other tumor entities, the latter mainly described as rare case reports. As a central core subunit responsible for the integrity of the SDH complex, the expression of SDHB is lost in all SDH-deficient neoplasms irrespective of the specific SDH subunit affected by a genetic mutation in addition to concurrent loss of the subunit specifically affected by genetic alteration. Accordingly, all SDH-deficient neoplasms are by definition SDHB-deficient. The SDH-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has only recently been well-characterized and it is included as a specific subtype of RCC in the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification published in 2016. In this review, the major clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic features of this rare disease entity are presented and discussed in the context of the broad differential diagnosis. PMID:26979428

  7. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  8. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  9. Defective triglyceride biosynthesis in CETP-deficient SW872 cells

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Diane J.; Izem, Lahoucine; Morton, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that reducing the expression of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) disrupts cholesterol homeostasis in SW872 cells and causes an ∼50% reduction in TG. The causes of this reduced TG content, investigated here, could not be attributed to changes in the differentiation status of CETP-deficient cells, nor was there evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In short-term studies, the total flux of oleate through the TG biosynthetic pathway was not altered in CETP-deficient cells, although mRNA levels of some pathway enzymes were different. However, the conversion of diglyceride (DG) to TG was impaired. In longer-term studies, newly synthesized TG was not effectively transported to lipid droplets, yet this lipid did not accumulate in the ER, apparently due to elevated lipase activity in this organelle. DG, shown to be a novel CETP substrate, was also inefficiently transferred to lipid droplets. This may reduce TG synthesis on droplets by resident diacylglycerol acyltransferase. Overall, these data suggest that the decreased TG content of CETP-deficient cells arises from the reduced conversion of DG to TG in the ER and/or on the lipid droplet surface, and enhanced TG degradation in the ER due to its ineffective transport from this organelle. PMID:26203075

  10. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  14. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Current Treatment Options and Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Haagdorens, Michel; Van Acker, Sara Ilse; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Ní Dhubhghaill, Sorcha; Koppen, Carina; Tassignon, Marie-José; Zakaria, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Severe ocular surface disease can result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a condition leading to decreased visual acuity, photophobia, and ocular pain. To restore the ocular surface in advanced stem cell deficient corneas, an autologous or allogenic limbal stem cell transplantation is performed. In recent years, the risk of secondary LSCD due to removal of large limbal grafts has been significantly reduced by the optimization of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET). Despite the great successes of CLET, there still is room for improvement as overall success rate is 70% and visual acuity often remains suboptimal after successful transplantation. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation reports higher success rates but has not been performed in as many patients yet. This review focuses on limbal epithelial stem cells and the pathophysiology of LSCD. State-of-the-art therapeutic management of LSCD is described, and new and evolving techniques in ocular surface regeneration are being discussed, in particular, advantages and disadvantages of alternative cell scaffolds and cell sources for cell based ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:26788074

  15. AIRE deficiency leads to impaired iNKT cell development.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Emma; Rosmaraki, Eleftheria; Berg, Louise; Brauner, Hanna; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Peltonen, Leena; Höglund, Petter; Winqvist, Ola

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome type I (APS I) is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator gene (AIRE), and results in the immunological destruction of endocrine organs. Herein we have characterized the CD1d-restricted invariant NKT cells (iNKT) and NK cells in APS I patients and Aire(-/-) mice, two cell populations known to play a role in the regulation of autoimmune disease. We show that the frequency of circulating iNKT cells is reduced in APS I patients compared to healthy controls. In accordance with this, iNKT cells are significantly reduced in the thymus and peripheral organs of Aire(-/-) mice. Bone marrow transfer from wild type donors into lethally irradiated Aire(-/-) recipients led to a decreased iNKT cell population in the liver, suggesting an impaired development of iNKT cells in the absence of Aire expression in radio-resistant cells. In contrast to the iNKT cells, both conventional NK cells and thymus-derived NK cells were unaffected by Aire deficiency and differentiated normally in Aire(-/-) mice. Our results show that expression of Aire in radio-resistant cells is important for the development of iNKT cells, whereas NK cell development and function does not depend on Aire.

  16. Automatic analysis of image of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Hu, K; Cai, N; Su, W; Xiong, H; Lou, Z; Lin, T; Hu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Some computer applications for cell characterization in medicine and biology, such as analysis of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC (El Tor Vibrio of Cholera), operate with cell samples taken from very small areas of interest. In order to perform texture characterization in such an application, only a few texture operators can be employed: the operators should be insensitive to noise and image distortion and be reliable in order to estimate texture quality from images. Therefore, we introduce wavelet theory and mathematical morphology to analyse the cellular surface micro-area image obtained by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to describe the quality of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC, we propose a fully automatic computerized method. The image analysis process is carried out in two steps. In the first, we decompose the given image by dyadic wavelet transform and form an image approximation with higher resolution, by doing so, we perform edge detection of given images efficiently. In the second, we introduce many operations of mathematical morphology to obtain morphological quantitative parameters of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC. The obtained results prove that the method can eliminate noise, detect the edge and extract the feature parameters validly. In this work, we have built automatic analytic software named "EVC.CELL".

  17. Generation of Recombination Activating Gene-1-Deficient Neonatal Piglets: A Model of T and B Cell Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuya; Sendai, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Seki-Soma, Marie; Hirose, Kensuke; Watanabe, Motoo; Fukawa, Kazuo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Although severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a very important research model for mice and SCID mice are widely used, there are only few reports describing the SCID pig models. Therefore, additional research in this area is needed. In this study, we describe the generation of Recombination activating gene-1 (Rag-1)-deficient neonatal piglets in Duroc breed using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with gene targeting and analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histology. We constructed porcine Rag-1 gene targeting vectors for the Exon 2 region and obtained heterozygous/homozygous Rag-1 knockout cell colonies using SCNT. We generated two Rag-1-deficient neonatal piglets and compared them with wild-type neonatal piglets. FACS analysis showed that Rag-1 disruption causes a lack of Immunoglobulin M-positive B cells and CD3-positive T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistent with FACS analysis, histological analysis revealed structural defects and an absence of mature lymphocytes in the spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLNs), and thymus in Rag-1-deficient piglets. These results confirm that Rag-1 is necessary for the generation of lymphocytes in pigs, and Rag-1-deficient piglets exhibit a T and B cell deficient SCID (T-B-SCID) phenotype similar to that of rodents and humans. The T-B-SCID pigs with Rag-1 deficiency generated in this study could be a suitably versatile model for laboratory, translational, and biomedical research, including the development of a humanized model and assessment of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25437445

  18. Chk1 deficiency in the mouse small intestine results in p53-independent crypt death and subsequent intestinal compensation.

    PubMed

    Greenow, K R; Clarke, A R; Jones, R H

    2009-03-19

    Chk1 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by a wide range of DNA-damaging agents to slow the cell cycle during S phase and G2/M. Abrogation of these cell-cycle checkpoints using Chk1 inhibitors results in hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and may provide a potential therapeutic tool to sensitize tumour cells in vivo. We have generated a Cre-Lox-based mouse model in which Chkl can be inducibly deleted from somatic epithelial cells in the adult mouse small intestine and liver. Loss of Chk1 in the liver is tolerated with no apparent phenotype. In contrast, the loss of Chk1 within the small intestine results in immediate DNA damage and high levels of p53-independent apoptosis leading to crypt death. However, the intestine is able to compensate for this death by undergoing complete re-population with Chk1-proficient cells. These data therefore show that Chk1 deficiency is cell lethal, but the intestine can tolerate such lethality at the organ level.

  19. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury. PMID:26976750

  20. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury.

  1. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and small for gestational age (SGA): genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Jancevska, A; Gucev, Z S; Tasic, V; Pop-Jordanova, N

    2009-12-01

    Short stature associated with GH deficiency has been estimated to occur in about 1 in 4000 to 1 in 10,000 in various studies. In the last decade new genetic defects have been described in all the levels of the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH)-GH-IGF (insulin-like growth factor) axis. Genetic defects in the GHRH and in various parts of the Insulin-like growth factor system have been demonstrated. Genetic defects causing isolated GH deficiency (GHD), as well as multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies have been analysed in detail. Signalling molecules and transcription factors leading to the development of the pituitary gland have been discovered and their function recognized. In animal models and in humans the importance of the transcription factors HESX1, PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, LHX4, TBX19, SOX2 and SOX3 has been extensively studied. Genetic alterations of those transcription factors dictate the highly variable phenotype: from isolated hypopituitarism to multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies with or without malformations (e.g. septo-optic dysplasia or holoprosencephaly). Small for gestational age (SGA) children are increasingly recognized to be a heterogeneous group in which new mechanisms of growth retardation and metabolic disturbances have been proposed. Since SGA is considered to be the main reason for the short stature in 10% of short adults this is a large group with a great potential for novel insights into mechanisms of growth and metabolic disturbances. A group of signalling proteins are involved in prenatal (SGA) growth retardation: IRS-1, PDK1, AKT1, and S6K1. In addition, an attractive modern theory supposes that a disturbed mother-placenta-foetus relation results in the activation of the so-called "thrifty phenotype" of which the IGF system is a vital part. The mechanisms assure short-term postnatal survival in conditions of deficient nutritional supply. However, as a consequence, the abundant postnatal nutritional supply and the "thrifty

  2. T cell responses in calcineurin A alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have created embryonic stem (ES) cells and mice lacking the predominant isoform (alpha) of the calcineurin A subunit (CNA alpha) to study the role of this serine/threonine phosphatase in the immune system. T and B cell maturation appeared to be normal in CNA alpha -/- mice. CNA alpha -/- T cells responded normally to mitogenic stimulation (i.e., PMA plus ionomycin, concanavalin A, and anti-CD3 epsilon antibody). However, CNA alpha -/- mice generated defective antigen- specific T cell responses in vivo. Mice produced from CNA alpha -/- ES cells injected into RAG-2-deficient blastocysts had a similar defective T cell response, indicating that CNA alpha is required for T cell function per se, rather than for an activity of other cell types involved in the immune response. CNA alpha -/- T cells remained sensitive to both cyclosporin A and FK506, suggesting that CNA beta or another CNA-like molecule can mediate the action of these immunosuppressive drugs. CNA alpha -/- mice provide an animal model for dissecting the physiologic functions of calcineurin as well as the effects of FK506 and CsA. PMID:8627154

  3. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [(13)C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  4. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ehinger, Johannes K.; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J.; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J.; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [13C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Primary Immune Deficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neena; Raj, Revathi

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides a curative option for children with primary immune deficiency disorders. Increased awareness and rapid diagnosis of these conditions has resulted in early referral and the chance to offer a curative option for affected children. Management of these children involves a multidisciplinary team including infectious disease specialists and intensivists. The use of reduced intensity conditioning chemotherapy, advances in detection and therapy of viral and fungal infections, optimal supportive care and techniques in stem cell processing, including T cell depletion has enabled doctors to transplant children with co-morbid conditions and no matched donors. Transplantation for these children has also brought in deep insights into the world of immunology and infectious diseases. PMID:26920397

  6. A model of metabolic changes in respiration-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, F Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Cells lacking aerobic metabolism because of damaged mtDNA accumulate in many postmitotic tissues in the course aging. Although being only a small fraction of cells, they might play a major role in oxidative stress affecting the whole body. However, it remains unclear how such cells, which are under normal circumstances dependent on aerobic metabolism, are able to survive for decades in vivo. Here a new model is presented that proposes a coexistence of anaerobic glycolysis and a partly reversed TCA cycle. Succinate plays a key role in the changed metabolic pathways because it has to be exported by the cell. This hypothesis supports the view that some respiration-deficient cells are able to survive permanently within the body and contribute to human aging.

  7. Abnormal centrosomal structure and duplication in Cep135-deficient vertebrate cells.

    PubMed

    Inanç, Burcu; Pütz, Monika; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Gergely, Fanni; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2013-09-01

    Centrosomes are key microtubule-organizing centers that contain a pair of centrioles, conserved cylindrical, microtubule-based structures. Centrosome duplication occurs once per cell cycle and relies on templated centriole assembly. In many animal cells this process starts with the formation of a radially symmetrical cartwheel structure. The centrosomal protein Cep135 localizes to this cartwheel, but its role in vertebrates is not well understood. Here we examine the involvement of Cep135 in centriole function by disrupting the Cep135 gene in the DT40 chicken B-cell line. DT40 cells that lack Cep135 are viable and show no major defects in centrosome composition or function, although we note a small decrease in centriole numbers and a concomitant increase in the frequency of monopolar spindles. Furthermore, electron microscopy reveals an atypical structure in the lumen of Cep135-deficient centrioles. Centrosome amplification after hydroxyurea treatment increases significantly in Cep135-deficient cells, suggesting an inhibitory role for the protein in centrosome reduplication during S-phase delay. We propose that Cep135 is required for the structural integrity of centrioles in proliferating vertebrate cells, a role that also limits centrosome amplification in S-phase-arrested cells.

  8. Small cell carcinoma of epididymis: multimodal therapy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Varkarakis, Ioannis M; Allaf, Mohamad E; Fine, Samson W; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-08-01

    Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma is an infrequent tumor that can occur in various organs. Although a few sporadic reports about extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma have been published, much remains to be uncovered about the clinical features, optimal treatment, and natural history. We present a case of small cell carcinoma of the epididymis with retroperitoneal recurrence, an exceedingly rare tumor with behavior and treatment not well characterized. Multimodal therapy with chemotherapy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was necessary to manage this aggressive disease.

  9. Runx1 deficiency decreases ribosome biogenesis and confers stress resistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Mason, Philip J.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating pre-leukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counter-intuitively, that Runx1 deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins, and binds the ribosomal DNA repeats. Runx1 deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1 deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. PMID:26165925

  10. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  11. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous regulatory T cell deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J; Chatila, Talal A; Oettgen, Hans C

    2010-07-15

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To test whether Treg deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3(KO)) mice, which completely lack FoxP3(+) Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8(+) effector T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells than controls, had higher viral loads, and exhibited abnormal Th2-polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4(KO) FoxP3(KO) bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3(KO) mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared with controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II IFNs and IL-12, were reduced, whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-beta, and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a noncutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV.

  12. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. Identification of nucleolar effects in JNK-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Mialon, Antoine; Thastrup, Jacob; Kallunki, Tuula; Mannermaa, Leni; Westermarck, Jukka; Holmström, Tim H

    2008-09-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling pathway has an established role in cellular stress signalling, cell survival and tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of JNK signalling results in partial delocalization of the RNA helicase DDX21 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, increased nucleolar mobility of DDX21 and inhibition of rRNA processing. Furthermore, our results show that JNK signalling regulates DDX21 phosphorylation and protein expression. In conclusion, the results presented in this study reveal a previously unidentified cellular role for JNK signalling in the regulation of nucleolar functions. Based on these results, we propose that JNK-mediated effects on nucleolar homeostasis and rRNA processing should be considered when interpreting cellular phenotypes observed in JNK-deficient cell and animal models. PMID:18703060

  14. Novel mechanism of regulation of the DNA repair enzyme OGG1 in tuberin-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samy L.; Bhandari, Besant K.; Sadek, Nahed; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L.; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberin (protein encodes by tuberous sclerosis complex 2, Tsc2) deficiency is associated with the decrease in the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in tumour kidney of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) patients. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which tuberin regulates OGG1. The partial deficiency in tuberin expression that occurs in the renal proximal tubular cells and kidney cortex of the Eker rat is associated with decreased activator protein 4 (AP4) and OGG1 expression. A complete deficiency in tuberin is associated with loss of AP4 and OGG1 expression in kidney tumour from Eker rats and the accumulation of significant levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Knockdown of tuberin expression in human renal epithelial cells (HEK293) with small interfering RNA (siRNA) also resulted in a marked decrease in the expression of AP4 and OGG1. In contrast, overexpression of tuberin in HEK293 cells increased the expression of AP4 and OGG1 proteins. Downregulation of AP4 expression using siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in the protein expression of OGG1. Immunoprecipitation studies show that AP4 is associated with tuberin in cells. Gel shift analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified the transcription factor AP4 as a positive regulator of the OGG1 promoter. AP4 DNA-binding activity is significantly reduced in Tsc2−/− as compared with Tsc2+/+ cells. Transcriptional activity of the OGG1 promoter is also decreased in tuberin-null cells compared with wild-type cells. These data indicate a novel role for tuberin in the regulation of OGG1 through the transcription factor AP4. This regulation may be important in the pathogenesis of kidney tumours in patients with TSC disease. PMID:20837600

  15. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment. PMID:25735403

  16. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment.

  17. Development of an in vitro model of essential fatty acid deficiency in fish cells.

    PubMed

    Tocher, D R; Dick, J R; Sargent, J R

    1995-11-01

    Levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3) greatly exceed those of arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4, n-6) in the tissue phospholipids of most fish species. Despite this, it is 20:4, n-6-derived eicosanoids that are produced predominantly in fish cells. The development of an essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient fish cell line would greatly assist the study of this selectivity and so several fish cell lines were cultured in EFA-deficient (EFAD) media. All n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and total PUFA were considerably reduced in all lines, except turbot fin (TF) in which total n-9 PUFA doubled from 13.8% to 27.5% of total fatty acids. In the topminnow hepatocarcinoma cell line (PLHC-1), there was almost complete depletion of both n-3 and n-6 PUFA and in TF cells, no n-3 PUFA were detected. In the carp epithelial papilloma cell line (EPC), both n-6 and n-3 PUFA were reduced by approximately 70%. The reduced PUFA in cells cultured in EFAD media was compensated to a large extent in most cell lines by significantly increased percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids, particularly 18:1, n-9. Total n-9 PUFA were significantly increased in all cell lines by culture in EFAD media, with 20:2, n-9 significantly increased in all cell lines. There were relatively small increases, but often significant, in 20:3, n-9 in all cell lines. Of the cell lines investigated, only EPC and PLHC-1 showed proliferation after four passages in EFAD medium, although the growth rates were reduced in comparison with media supplemented with serum, but EPC was the only cell line able to survive and proliferate in long-term culture on EFAD medium. The EFAD-EPC line is a potentially useful model system for the study of the effects of EFA deficiency on cell structure and function and eicosanoid metabolism in fish. PMID:8596777

  18. Small Intestine but Not Liver Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) Deficiency Has a Dominant Effect on Plasma Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Inamul; Li, Zhiqiang; Bui, Hai H; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gao, Guangping; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) is involved in phosphatidylcholine remodeling in the small intestine and liver. We investigated lipid metabolism in inducible intestine-specific and liver-specificLpcat3gene knock-out mice. We producedLpcat3-Flox/villin-Cre-ER(T2)mice, which were treated with tamoxifen (at days 1, 3, 5, and 7), to deleteLpcat3specifically in the small intestine. At day 9 after the treatment, we found that Lpcat3 deficiency in enterocytes significantly reduced polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines in the enterocyte plasma membrane and reduced Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), CD36, ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and ABCG8 levels on the membrane, thus significantly reducing lipid absorption, cholesterol secretion through apoB-dependent and apoB-independent pathways, and plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels, as well as body weight. Moreover, Lpcat3 deficiency does not cause significant lipid accumulation in the small intestine. We also utilized adenovirus-associated virus-Cre to depleteLpcat3in the liver. We found that liver deficiency only reduces plasma triglyceride levels but not other lipid levels. Furthermore, there is no significant lipid accumulation in the liver. Importantly, small intestine Lpcat3 deficiency has a much bigger effect on plasma lipid levels than that of liver deficiency. Thus, inhibition of small intestine Lpcat3 might constitute a novel approach for treating hyperlipidemia.

  19. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  20. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. How Small Is a Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an inquiry-based activity involving yeast, wherein students learned about cell size. The activity allows students to employ math connections and to learn experimental techniques while practicing microscope skills. The activity can be adapted for students at all levels of biology. The author presents details…

  2. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  3. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E.Graham; Davis, Jeffery; Duval, Michel; Eames, Gretchen; Farinha, Nuno; Filopovich, Alexandra; Fischer, Alain; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Heilmann, Carsten; Landais, Paul; Horwitz, Mitchell; Porta, Fulvio; Sedlacek, Petr; Seger, Reinhard; Slatter, Mary; Teague, Lochie; Eapen, Mary; Veys, Paul

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 β-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterised by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus and delayed wound healing. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual centre being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centres worldwide. PATIENTS & METHODS The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis of LAD who underwent HSCT between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analysed. Data was collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID)/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) RESULTS At median followup of 62 months (extending to 14 years) overall survival was 75%. Myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 28 patients, and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in 8 patients, with no deaths in this subgroup. Survival after matched family donor and unrelated donor transplants was similar, with 11/14 matched family donor and 12/14 unrelated donor recipients alive; mortality was greatest following haplo-identical transplants, where 4/8 children did not survive. Twenty seven transplant recipients are alive, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multi-lineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell restricted chimerism in a further 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS HSCT offers long term benefit in LAD and should be considered as an early therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem cell donation is available. Reduced intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed donor chimersim appears sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long term monitoring will be required for these patients. PMID

  4. Dietary iron-deficiency up-regulates hephaestin mRNA level in small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Shoji; Aoyama, Yoritaka

    2002-05-17

    Hephaestin is a protein, recently found from the study of sla (sex-linked anemia) mouse. Hephaestin is suggested to transport iron from intestinal enterocytes into the circulation. Iron is essential for living and for humans to maintain a constant total iron concentration in whole body. In this study, it was found that dietary iron-deficiency up-regulated hephaestin mRNA level in the proximal small intestine of rats. Therefore, it is suggested that in dietary iron-deficiency, hephaestin gene expression in proximal small intestine is up-regulated to absorb more iron from diet.

  5. Mast cells and histamine enhance the proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Uddin, Mohib; Mankuta, David; Dubinett, Steven M; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer with an extremely low survival rate. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process with intense mast cell infiltrate that is associated with reduced survival. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells have an enhancing effect on NSCLC proliferation. To assess the tumor-promoting potential of mast cells, we used the human alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549) and the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell lines, umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMC) and the mast cell-deficient mouse Sash model. The proliferation rate of A549/LLC cells was markedly increased by mast cells and histamine. Histamine proliferating activity was mediated via H(1), H(2) and H(4) receptors and caused ERK phosphorylation. LLC induced in Sash mice or in wild-type mice treated with the mast cell stabilizer nedocromil sodium displayed an accelerated growth (number of metastic colonies in the lungs, total lung area and lung/total mice weight ratio). In summary, we have shown a significant effect of mast cells and histamine in enhancing NSCLC/LLCX growth in vitro, while in a mouse LLC model in vivo we have found that mast cells are important negative regulators of cancer development. Therefore our results would indicate a pro-tumorogenic effect of the mast cells in vitro on established lung tumor cell lines, and anti-tumorogenic effect in mice at lung cancer induction. In conclusion, mast cell/anti-histamine targeted therapies should carefully consider this dual effect. PMID:21733595

  6. Electrochromism and small-polaron hopping in oxygen deficient and lithium intercalated amorphous tungsten oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, C. A.; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A.

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of Li x WO 3 - z with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.27 and 0 ≤ z ≤ 0.27 were prepared by sputter deposition followed by electrochemical lithiation. Kramers-Kronig-consistent complex dielectric functions were obtained for these films by numerical inversion of experimental spectra of optical transmittance and reflectance by using a superposition of Tauc-Lorentz and Lorentz oscillator models. Low-energy optical absorption bands were induced by oxygen vacancies and/or by electrochemical intercalation of Li+ species together with charge compensating electrons. The experimental optical conductivity was fitted to a small-polaron model for disordered systems with strong electron-phonon interaction, taking into account transitions near the Fermi level. The optical absorption is due to small-polaron hopping and associated with the formation of W5+ states due to transfer of electrons from oxygen vacancies and/or insertion of Li+ species. The results also show increases in the Fermi level, caused by oxygen deficiency or Li+ insertion, which occur along with a band gap shift towards higher energies for the Li+ intercalated films.

  7. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption. PMID:27228994

  8. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  9. Villous B Cells of the Small Intestine Are Specialized for Invariant NK T Cell Dependence1

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Peter; Wei, Bo; McPherson, Michael; Mendoza, Lesley Marie A.; Nguyen, Sandra L.; Turovskaya, Olga; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Huang, Tiffany T.; Schrage, Matthew; Lobato, Lynn N.; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Brewer, Sarah; Arditi, Moshe; Cheng, Genhong; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; Braun, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    B cells are important in mucosal microbial homeostasis through their well-known role in secretory IgA production and their emerging role in mucosal immunoregulation. Several specialized intraintestinal B cell compartments have been characterized, but the nature of conventional B cells in the lamina propria is poorly understood. In this study, we identify a B cell population predominantly composed of surface IgM+IgD+cells residing in villi of the small intestine and superficial lamina propria of the large intestine, but distinct from the intraepithelial compartment or organized intestinal lymphoid structures. Small intestinal (villous) B cells are diminished in genotypes that alter the strength of BCR signaling (Bruton tyrosine kinasexid, Gαi2−/−), and in mice lacking cognate BCR specificity. They are not dependent on enteric microbial sensing, because they are abundant in mice that are germfree or genetically deficient in TLR signaling. However, villous B cells are reduced in the absence of invariant NK T cells (Jα18−/− or CD1d−/− mice). These findings define a distinct population of conventional B cells in small intestinal villi, and suggest an immunologic link between CD1-restricted invariant NK T cells and this B cell population. PMID:18354186

  10. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  11. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-12-03

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma.

  12. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  13. Panasonic Small Cell Testing for AHPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, C.; Blackmore, P.; Lain, M.; Walpole, A.; Darcy, Eric

    2006-01-01

    AEA selection and successful Interim Design Review for AHPS proves maturity of small cell approach for very large batteries. Cells show excellent opportunity for battery mass reduction for AHPS and other low cycle applications. Lack of cycle and extended calendar life make EOL battery performance difficult (AHPS 8 year mission). Preliminary design, AEA retained SONY 18650HC cell as baseline: a) Well characterized performance; b) Wealth of safety test data.

  14. Some effects of vitamin A deficiency on the isolated rat lung alveolar type II cell.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Chen, X; Verma, A K; Grummer, M A

    1992-01-01

    Alveolar Type II cells were isolated from control and vitamin A deficient rats and allowed to form a monolayer in plastic dishes for 16-18 hours. The vitamin A content (retinol plus retinyl palmitate) of deficient cells was 50-75% less than in control cells on a per mg protein basis. Isolated Type II cells took up [3H]-retinol, synthesized [3H]-retinyl palmitate, and after 4 hours, 24% of the radioactivity in the Type II cells was [3H]-retinoic acid. Deficiency did not appear to alter retinoic acid synthesis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) synthesis, were slightly less in deficient cells compared to control (95 and 85% respectively). In addition, 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M retinoic acid in the reaction media stimulated both PC and DSPC synthesis by 120-140% in control cells. The stimulating effect of retinoic acid was present in deficient cells as well, but less pronounced (120% with 10(-5) M). Vitamin A deficient Type II cells also had less basal levels of both tissue transglutaminase and epidermal transglutaminase activity than control cells. PMID:1355470

  15. Adherent-phagocytic cells influence suppressed concanavalin-A induced proliferation of spleen lymphoid cells in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, T.R.; Briske-Anderson, M.; Johnson, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, and deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of cu. Cu-deficient rats showed typical biochemical and hematological changes. Immunological changes exhibited by Cu-deficient rats were influenced by the presence of splenic adherent-phagocytic cells (macrophage-like), but not by cytochrome-c oxidase activity of spleen lymphoid cells (SLC). Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. Following removal of plastic-adherent phagocytic cells from the SLC suspensions, equivalent proliferation was exhibited by Con-A stimulated nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Decreased cytochrome-c oxidase activity was exhibited by both unstimulated SLC and nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient rats, but decreased proliferation was exhibited only in Con-A stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. These findings indicate that nonadherent splenic T-lymphocytes of Cu-deficient rats are not impaired in their ability to proliferate, and that cytochrome-c oxidase activity in unstimulated lymphoid cells of Cu-deficient rats is apparently not related to levels of proliferation by the Con-A stimulated cells.

  16. A unique case of female pseudohermaphroditism with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and small supernumerary marker chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Wafa, Abdulsamad; Assaad, Manar; Ehlers, Christian; Liehr, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) are present in ~2.6x10⁶ individuals worldwide. Concerning their clinical consequences as well as their chromosomal origin and shape, sSMCs are a heterogeneous group of derivative chromosomes; 70% of sSMC carriers are clinically normal. In the present study, we report on a female with mosaicism (45%) of a de novo sSMC derived from chromosome 7, in which the observed clinical signs do not correspond to comparable cases in the literature. She is clinically normal apart from problems in gender determination, a uterus without ovaries and an external penis, pointing overall towards an adrenogenital syndrome (AGS). 21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of AGS. A corresponding analysis for underlying mutations in the CYP21A2 gene revealed a homozygous mutation c.518T>A (p.Ile173Asn) inherited from both non-related parents. Overall, in this study, we report a unique case of female pseudohermaphroditism, classified as a simple virilization form of 21-OHD having an additional minute-shaped chromosome 7 [min(7)(:p11.1->q11.23:)]. Notably, AGS was due to a mutation in the CYP21A2 gene located on chromosome 6. This is a further example that detection of an sSMC does not always resolve the clinical case. PMID:23450434

  17. Aqueous Tear Deficiency Increases Conjunctival Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) Expression and Goblet Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Moore, Quianta L.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; Gumus, Koray; Zaheer, Mahira L.; Corrales, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the hypothesis that increased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) expression is associated with conjunctival goblet cell loss in subjects with tear dysfunction. Methods Goblet cell density (GCD) was measured in impression cytology from the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, and gene expression was measured in cytology samples from the nasal bulbar conjunctiva obtained from 68 subjects, including normal control, meibomian gland disease (MGD), non-Sjögren syndrome (non-SSATD)-, and Sjögren syndrome (SSATD)-associated aqueous tear deficiency. Gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. Tear meniscus height (TMH) was measured by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein and lissamine green dye staining evaluated corneal and conjunctival disease, respectively. Between-group mean differences and correlation coefficients were calculated. Results Compared to control, IFN-γ expression was significantly higher in both ATD groups, and its receptor was higher in SSATD. Expression of IL-13 and its receptor was similar in all groups. Goblet cell density was lower in the SSATD group; expression of MUC5AC mucin was lower and cornified envelope precursor small proline-rich region (SPRR)-2G higher in both ATD groups. Interferon-γ transcript number was inversely correlated with GCD (r = −0.37, P < 0.04) and TMH (r = −0.37, P = 0.02), and directly correlated with lissamine green staining (r = 0.51, P < 0.001) and SPRR-2G expression (r = 0.32, P < 0.05). Conclusions Interferon-γ expression in the conjunctiva was higher in aqueous deficiency and correlated with goblet cell loss and severity of conjunctival disease. These results support findings of animal and culture studies showing that IFN-γ reduces conjunctival goblet cell number and mucin production. PMID:26618646

  18. Allospecific rejection of MHC class I-deficient bone marrow by CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Haspot, F; Li, H W; Lucas, C L; Fehr, T; Beyaz, S; Sykes, M

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance of long-term immunosuppression is a desired goal in organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism offers a promising approach to tolerance induction, and we have aimed to develop low-toxicity, nonimmunodepleting approaches to achieve this outcome. In a mouse model achieving fully MHC-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow engraftment with minimal conditioning (3 Gy total body irradiation followed by anti-CD154 and T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow cells), CD4 T cells in the recipient are required to promote tolerance of preexisting alloreactive recipient CD8 T cells and thereby permit chimerism induction. We now demonstrate that mice devoid of CD4 T cells and NK cells reject MHC Class I-deficient and Class I/Class II-deficient marrow in a CD8 T cell-dependent manner. This rejection is specific for donor alloantigens, since recipient hematopoiesis is not affected by donor marrow rejection and MHC Class I-deficient bone marrow that is syngeneic to the recipient is not rejected. Recipient CD8 T cells are activated and develop cytotoxicity against MHC Class I-deficient donor cells in association with rejection. These data implicate a novel CD8 T cell-dependent bone marrow rejection pathway, wherein recipient CD8 T cells indirectly activated by donor alloantigens promote direct killing, in a T cell receptor-independent manner, of Class I-deficient donor cells.

  19. Phosphorus Deficiency Inhibits Cell Division But Not Growth in the Dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meizhen; Shi, Xinguo; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-h diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio) and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus. PMID:27313570

  20. Phosphorus Deficiency Inhibits Cell Division But Not Growth in the Dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae.

    PubMed

    Li, Meizhen; Shi, Xinguo; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-h diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio) and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus. PMID:27313570

  1. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration. PMID:23922464

  2. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation.

  3. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation. PMID:27460411

  4. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress: Driving Cancer Cells to an Early Grave.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibition of WEE1, a cell cycle controlling kinase. PMID:26555168

  5. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D.; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4+ T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra−deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra. PMID:26951334

  6. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  7. Thioredoxin Reductase Deficiency Potentiates Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Dopaminergic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopert, Pamela; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2 levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR) inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells) resulted in a synergistic increase in H2O2 levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2) in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H2O2 the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H2O2 and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD. PMID:23226354

  8. High β-cell mass prevents streptozotocin-induced diabetes in thioredoxin-interacting protein-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Elodie; Koren, Shlomit; Razik, Fathima; Goldberg, Howard; Kwan, Edwin P.; Sheu, Laura; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Fantus, I. George

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TxNIP) is an endogenous inhibitor of thioredoxin, a ubiquitous thiol oxidoreductase, that regulates cellular redox status. Diabetic mice exhibit increased expression of TxNIP in pancreatic islets, and recent studies suggest that TxNIP is a proapoptotic factor in β-cells that may contribute to the development of diabetes. Here, we examined the role of TxNIP deficiency in vivo in the development of insulin-deficient diabetes and whether it impacted on pancreatic β-cell mass and/or insulin secretion. TxNIP-deficient (Hcb-19/TxNIP−/−) mice had lower baseline glycemia, higher circulating insulin concentrations, and higher total pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass than control mice (C3H). Hcb-19/TxNIP−/− did not develop hyperglycemia when injected with standard multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ), in contrast to C3H controls. Surprisingly, although β-cell mass remained higher in Hcb-19/TxNIP−/− mice compared with C3H after STZ exposure, the relative decrease induced by STZ was as great or even greater in the TxNIP-deficient animals. Consistently, cultured pancreatic INS-1 cells transfected with small-interfering RNA against TxNIP were more sensitive to cell death induced by direct exposure to STZ or to the combination of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, when corrected for insulin content, isolated pancreatic islets from TxNIP−/− mice exhibited reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion. These data indicate that TxNIP functions as a regulator of β-cell mass and influences insulin secretion. In conclusion, the relative resistance of TxNIP-deficient mice to STZ-induced diabetes appears to be because of an increase in β-cell mass. However, TxNIP deficiency is associated with sensitization to STZ- and cytokine-induced β-cell death, indicating complex regulatory roles of TxNIP under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID

  9. Pre-Clinical Cell-Based Therapy for Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sehic, Amer; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Ommundsen, Kristoffer; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is essential for normal vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Limbal stem cells, which reside in the corneal periphery, contribute to the homeostasis of the corneal epithelium. Any damage or disease affecting the function of these cells may result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). The condition may result in both severe pain and blindness. Transplantation of ex vivo cultured cells onto the cornea is most often an effective therapeutic strategy for LSCD. The use of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial cells (LEC), oral mucosal epithelial cells, and conjunctival epithelial cells to treat LSCD has been explored in humans. The present review focuses on the current state of knowledge of the many other cell-based therapies of LSCD that have so far exclusively been explored in animal models as there is currently no consensus on the best cell type for treating LSCD. Major findings of all these studies with special emphasis on substrates for culture and transplantation are systematically presented and discussed. Among the many potential cell types that still have not been used clinically, we conclude that two easily accessible autologous sources, epidermal stem cells and hair follicle-derived stem cells, are particularly strong candidates for future clinical trials. PMID:26343740

  10. Zinc deficiency enhanced inflammatory response by increasing immune cell activation and inducing IL6 promoter demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen P.; Rinaldi, Nicole A.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Zinc deficiency results in immune dysfunction and promotes systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zinc deficiency on cellular immune activation and epigenetic mechanisms that promote inflammation. This work is potentially relevant to the aging population given that age-related immune defects, including chronic inflammation, coincide with declining zinc status. Methods and results An in vitro cell culture system and the aged mouse model were used to characterize immune activation and DNA methylation profiles that may contribute to the enhanced proinflammatory response mediated by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency up-regulated cell activation markers ICAM1, MHC class II, and CD86 in THP1 cells, that coincided with increased IL1β and IL6 responses following LPS stimulation. A decreased zinc status in aged mice was similarly associated with increased ICAM1 and IL6 gene expression. Reduced IL6 promoter methylation was observed in zinc deficient THP1 cells, as well as in aged mice and human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from aged individuals. Conclusion Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:25656040

  11. Reduced spleen natural killer cell activity in virally challenged iron-deficient rat pups

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.F.; Sherman, A.R.

    1986-03-01

    Neonatal iron deficiency has been shown to alter several aspects of immunity in rats. This study determined the effects of iron deficiency on cytotoxicity of virally-induced natural killer cells (NK) in spleen. Rats (n = 8-12/grp) were fed 6 (severe deficiency, SID), 10 (moderate deficiency, MID), or 250 (adequate iron status, AIS) ppm iron d 1 pregnancy through d 21 lactation. Litters were adjusted to 7 on d 2. On d 17 pups were challenged intraperitoneally with 5 x 10/sup 5/ plaque forming units of vaccinia virus. Spleens were collected 4 d later and cell suspensions prepared and pooled within each litter. After isolation of mononuclear cells on a Ficoll-Hypaque gradient, macrophages were removed, and the resulting lymphocytes were incubated with Cr/sup 51/ labelled Yac-1 target cells at effector:target ratios (E:T) of 10:1 and 50:1. Cytotoxicity of NK cells were measured after 4 and 16 hrs by the Cr/sup 51/ release assay. In SID and MID groups body weights, spleen weights, and hemoglobin levels were significantly lower than in AIS pups (p < 0.001). Spleen NK cell cytotoxicity was significantly impaired in SID and MID pups. Depending on the E:T and incubation time, SID and MID cells had activities 30-50% of AIS cells (p < 0.001). Both severe and moderate iron deficiency markedly impair the cytotoxic activity of spleen natural killer cells in suckling rats.

  12. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  13. Natural killer (NK) cell deficiency associated with an epitope-deficient Fc receptor type IIIA (CD16-II)

    PubMed Central

    JAWAHAR, S.; MOODY, C.; CHAN, M.; FINBERG, R.; GEHA, R.; CHATILA, T.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility to herpes virus infections has been described in experimental animals depleted of NK cells and in patients with defective NK cell function. We have identified a child with recurrent infections, especially with herpes simplex virus, who had a decreased number of CD56+CD3− NK cells in circulation. Her NK cells expressed an altered form of the Fc receptor for IgG type IIIA (FcγRIIIA or CD16-II) which was not reactive with the anti-CD16-II MoAb B73.1. Sequence analysis revealed the patient to be homozygous for a T to A substitution at position 230 of CD16-II cDNA, predicting a Leu66 to His66 change in the first immunoglobulin domain of CD16-II at the B73.1 recognition site. Spontaneous NK cell activity of the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was markedly decreased, while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was unaffected. These results suggest that this child suffers from a defect affecting the development and function of NK cells, resulting in NK cytopenia and clinically significant immunodeficiency. The role of the CD16-II mutant in the pathogenesis of the patient's NK cell deficiency is discussed. PMID:8608639

  14. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  15. Cells deficient in base-excision repair reveal cancer hallmarks originating from adjustments to genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    Markkanen, Enni; Fischer, Roman; Ledentcova, Marina; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Dianov, Grigory L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic instability, provoked by exogenous mutagens, is well linked to initiation of cancer. However, even in unstressed cells, DNA undergoes a plethora of spontaneous alterations provoked by its inherent chemical instability and the intracellular milieu. Base excision repair (BER) is the major cellular pathway responsible for repair of these lesions, and as deficiency in BER activity results in DNA damage it has been proposed that it may trigger the development of sporadic cancers. Nevertheless, experimental evidence for this model remains inconsistent and elusive. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of BER deficient human cells using stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), and demonstrate that BER deficiency, which induces genetic instability, results in dramatic changes in gene expression, resembling changes found in many cancers. We observed profound alterations in tissue homeostasis, serine biosynthesis, and one-carbon- and amino acid metabolism, all of which have been identified as cancer cell ‘hallmarks’. For the first time, this study describes gene expression changes characteristic for cells deficient in repair of endogenous DNA lesions by BER. These expression changes resemble those observed in cancer cells, suggesting that genetically unstable BER deficient cells may be a source of pre-cancerous cells. PMID:25800737

  16. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  17. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Goodman, B Mitchell; Artz, Nicole; Radford, Barbera; Chen, Ian A

    2010-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to fracture risk and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Adults with sickle cell disease have a high prevalence of low bone density and chronic pain with poorly defined etiologies. We recognized that vitamin D deficiency may represent a treatable etiology and sought to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in adults with sickle cell. We measured 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in adults at 2 university-based sickle cell disease-management programs. Regression was performed in 142 patients to identify predictors of low vitamin D. Mean vitamin D levels were 9.0 ng/mL at Eastern Virginia Medical School and 12.8 ng/mL at University of Chicago; 139 of 142 (98%) had suboptimal levels (<30 ng/mL) and 85/142 (60%) were severely deficient (<10 ng/mL). Vitamin D level was not related to age, sex, hydroxyurea use, sickle cell type, or date of lab draw. Vitamin D deficiency was, therefore, nearly ubiquitous in our patient population, with a majority being severely deficient. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effects of vitamin D repletion on clinical outcomes such as bone density, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and functional status. Clinicians caring for patients with sickle cell disease should be aware of and screen for this important clinical state.

  18. Deficiency of Fyn protein is prerequisite for apoptosis induced by Src family kinase inhibitors in human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Kubo, Shuji; Takeda, Hiromi; Ohta, Toshiro; Tabata, Chiharu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Takashi; Fujimori, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells of serous membranes. Src family kinases (SFKs) have a pivotal role in cell adhesion, proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Here, we examined the effect of SFK inhibitors in NCI-H2052, ACC-MESO-4 and NCI-H28 cells, mesothelioma cell lines and Met5A, a human non-malignant mesothelial cell line. We found that PP2, a selective SFK inhibitor, inhibited SFK activity and induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H28 but not Met5A, NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Src, Yes, Fyn and Lyn protein, which are members of the SFK, were expressed in these cell lines, whereas NCI-H28 cells were deficient in Fyn protein. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Fyn facilitated PP2-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. PP2 reduced Lyn protein levels and suppressed SFK activity in all mesothelioma cell lines. Lyn siRNA induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. However, double RNA interference knockdown of Fyn and Lyn induced apoptosis accompanied by caspase-8 activation in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multi-tyrosine kinases including SFK, also inhibited SFK activity and induced reduction of Lyn protein levels, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in other cell lines. Present study suggests that SFK inhibitors induce caspase-8-dependent apoptosis caused by reduction of Lyn protein in Fyn-deficient mesothelioma cells.

  19. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  20. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  1. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored.

  2. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratigos, Michalis; Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  3. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  4. HIF-1alpha Deficiency Attenuates the Cardiomyogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kudová, Jana; Procházková, Jiřina; Vašiček, Ondřej; Perečko, Tomáš; Sedláčková, Miroslava; Pešl, Martin; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac cell formation, cardiomyogenesis, is critically dependent on oxygen availability. It is known that hypoxia, a reduced oxygen level, modulates the in vitro differentiation of pluripotent cells into cardiomyocytes via hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent mechanisms. However, the direct impact of HIF-1α deficiency on the formation and maturation of cardiac-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) in vitro remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that HIF-1α deficiency significantly altered the quality and quantity of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes. It was accompanied with lower mRNA and protein levels of cardiac cell specific markers (myosin heavy chains 6 and 7) and with a decreasing percentage of myosin heavy chain α and β, and cardiac troponin T-positive cells. As to structural aspects of the differentiated cardiomyocytes, the localization of contractile proteins (cardiac troponin T, myosin heavy chain α and β) and the organization of myofibrils were also different. Simultaneously, HIF-1α deficiency was associated with a lower percentage of beating embryoid bodies. Interestingly, an observed alteration in the in vitro differentiation scheme of HIF-1α deficient cells was accompanied with significantly lower expression of the endodermal marker (hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha). These findings thus suggest that HIF-1α deficiency attenuates spontaneous cardiomyogenesis through the negative regulation of endoderm development in mESC differentiating in vitro. PMID:27355368

  5. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  6. CD1-restricted CD4+ T cells in major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rather unexpectedly, major histocompatibility complex class II- deficient mice have a significant population of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes. We have investigated these cells at the population and clonal levels. CD4+ T lymphocytes from class II-deficient animals are thymically derived, appear early in ontogeny, exhibit the phenotype of resting memory cells, are potentially functional by several criteria, and have a diverse T cell receptor repertoire. They do not include substantially elevated numbers of NK1.1+ cells. Hybridomas derived after polyclonal stimulation of the CD4+ lymphocytes from class II- deficient animals include a subset with an unusual reactivity pattern, responding to splenocytes from many mouse strains including the strain of origin. Most members of this subset recognize the major histocompatibility complex class Ib molecule CD1; their heterogeneous reactivities and T cell receptor usage further suggest the involvement of peptides and/or highly variable posttranslational modifications. PMID:7561702

  7. A Mendelian predisposition to B-cell lymphoma caused by IL-10R deficiency.

    PubMed

    Neven, Bénédicte; Mamessier, Emilie; Bruneau, Julie; Kaltenbach, Sophie; Kotlarz, Daniel; Suarez, Felipe; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Billot, Katy; Canioni, Danielle; Frange, Pierre; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Asnafi, Vahid; Murugan, Dhaarini; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Goulet, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Hermine, Olivier; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Brousse, Nicole; Davi, Frederic; Baud, Véronique; Klein, Christoph; Nadel, Bertrand; Ruemmele, Frank; Fischer, Alain

    2013-11-28

    Monogenic interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) deficiencies cause very early onset severe inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we report that 5 patients with an IL-10R1 (n = 1) or IL-10R2 (n = 4) deficiency developed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma between the ages of 5 and 6 years (which was recurrent in 1 patient). These lymphomas had some of the characteristics of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and contained monoclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-negative germinal center B cells. The tumors displayed a remarkably homogeneous signature, with original activation of the nuclear factor κB pathway and a decrease in intratumor T-cell infiltration. Hence, IL-10R deficiency is associated with a high risk of developing B-cell lymphoma. Our results revealed an unexpected role of the IL-10R pathway in lymphomagenesis. PMID:24089328

  8. Mechanisms of lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells: studies using a LFA-1-deficient cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Haskard, D O; Strobel, S; Thornhill, M; Pitzalis, C; Levinsky, R J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells (EC), we have studied the adhesion of a LFA-1-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-KM, which has < 10% of the cell surface LFA-1 expressed on a normal lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-BJ. The adhesion of ICH-KM cells to unstimulated EC was 49.9 +/- 8.6% (mean +/- SD) that of ICH-BJ cells. Moreover, phorbol ester-stimulated ICH-KM cells showed a considerably weaker increase in adhesion to unstimulated EC compared with ICH-BJ cells (mean +/- SD increase in percentage adhesion, 3.8 +/- 2.3 compared with 18.5 +/- 8.0; P<0.025). In contrast, there was no significant difference between the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM cells and ICH-BJ cells to interleukin-1 (IL-1)-stimulated EC. Thus ICH-KM cells showed a 22.7 +/- 11.0 (mean +/- SD) increase in percentage adhesion to IL-1-stimulated EC compared with the 24.8 +/- 8.5 increase in percentage adhesion of ICH-BJ cells. Anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies had no effect on the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM and ICH-BJ cells to IL-1-stimulated EC but abolished the differences in adhesion between the two cell lines. The study therefore indicates that although a major part of unstimulated and phorbol ester-stimulated lymphocyte-EC adhesion is dependent upon LFA-1, the enhanced adhesion due to stimulation of EC with IL-1 is not dependent upon this molecule. The data therefore supports the existence of cytokine-inducible LFA-1-independent adhesion molecules for lymphocytes on EC. PMID:15493272

  9. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14highCD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27lo) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  10. Importance of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in small intestine for urinary orotic acid excretion: analysis of OTC-deficient spf-ash mice with OTC transgene.

    PubMed

    Saheki, T; Mori, K; Kobayashi, K; Horiuchi, M; Shige, T; Obara, T; Suzuki, S; Mori, M; Yamamura, K

    1995-01-25

    We report the effect of the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) transgene composed of 1.3 kb of the 5' flanking region of the rat OTC gene fused to rat OTC cDNA on urinary orotic acid excretion in OTC-deficient spf-ash (sparse-fur with abnormal skin and hair) mice during overnight-starvation and nitrogen loading. During starvation, spf-ash mice with about 6% and 2% of control levels of OTC activity in the liver and small intestine excreted a large amount of orotic acid in the urine. Transgenic spf-ash mice with about 10% and 30% of the control OTC activities in the liver and small intestine did not excrete more than the normal level of orotic acid. Accidental parasitization of transgenic spf-ash mice with ticks (Myocoptes musculinus) resulted in decrease of the OTC activities in the liver and small intestine to the levels in spf-ash mice, and increased excretion of orotic acid. During extermination of the ticks, the mice showed varied levels of OTC activity and orotic acid excretion. On nitrogen loading, transgenic spf-ash mice as well as spf-ash mice excreted larger amounts of orotic acid, while control mice showed no increase in its excretion. The levels of urinary orotic acid were inversely correlated to the logarithms of the OTC activities in the liver and small intestine, the correlation being significantly higher with intestinal OTC than with hepatic OTC activity. These results suggest that the level of OTC activity in the small intestine is important for production of orotic acid.

  11. B7-deficient autoreactive T cells are highly susceptible to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    May, Kenneth F; Chang, Xing; Zhang, Huiming; Lute, Kenneth D; Zhou, Penghui; Kocak, Ergun; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immunity to infections and tumors as well as autoimmunity and graft-vs-host disease. Since Tregs constitutively express CTLA-4 and activated T cells express B7-1 and B7-2, it has been suggested that the interaction between CTLA-4 on Tregs and B7-1/2 on the effector T cells may be required for immune suppression. In this study, we report that autopathogenic T cells from B7-deficient mice cause multiorgan inflammation when adoptively transferred into syngeneic RAG-1-deficient hosts. More importantly, this inflammation is suppressed by adoptive transfer of purified wild-type (WT) CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. WT Tregs also inhibited lymphoproliferation and acquisition of activation markers by the B7-deficient T cells. An in vitro suppressor assay revealed that WT and B7-deficient T cells are equally susceptible to WT Treg regulation. These results demonstrate that B7-deficient T cells are highly susceptible to immune suppression by WT Tregs and refute the hypothesis that B7-CTLA-4 interaction between effector T cells and Tregs plays an essential role in Treg function.

  12. KLF2 deficiency in T cells results in unrestrained cytokine production and bystander chemokine receptor upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Michael A.; Takada, Kensuke; Skon, Cara; Reiner, Steven L.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcription factor KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by promoting expression of the lipid binding receptor, S1P1, and the selectin, CD62L. Recently, it was proposed that KLF2 also represses the expression of chemokine receptors. We confirm the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on KLF2 deficient T cells. However, we show that this is a cell nonautonomous effect, as revealed by CXCR3 upregulation on WT bystander cells in mixed bone marrow chimeras with KLF2 deficient cells. Furthermore, we show that KLF2 deficient T cells overproduce IL-4, leading to the upregulation of CXCR3 through an IL-4 receptor and eomesodermin dependent pathway. Consistent with the increased IL-4 production, we find high levels of serum IgE in mice with T cell specific KLF2 deficiency. Our findings support a model where KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by direct regulation of S1P1 and CD62L, and restrains spontaneous cytokine production in naive T cells. PMID:19592277

  13. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on testes of Wistar rats: Morphometric and cell quantification studies.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepa; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, Ranveer Singh

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of dietary zinc deficiency on testes of Wistar rats. Pre-pubertal rats (40-50g) were divided into three groups of 10 each viz. zinc control (ZC) and pair fed (PF) [100ppm zinc diet] and zinc deficient (ZD) [1ppm zinc diet]. Experiments were set for 2- and 4-weeks. Pre-pubertal rats fed zinc deficient diet for 2- and 4-weeks exhibited significant (P<0.05) decrease in diet consumption when compared with their respective control groups. Parallel to the reduced diet consumption, a significant (P<0.05) decrease in body and testicular weight of ZD animals was also observed. These observations indicate that the zinc deficiency reduces diet consumption and growth of the animals. Histological studies revealed degeneration in testes of ZD rats as evident by decreased seminiferous tubular diameter and Leydig cell nuclear diameter. Decreased Leydig cell nuclear diameter is responsible for disruption of the biochemical function of Leydig cell. Testicular atrophy (viz. wavy tunica propria, karyolysis, pyknosis, karyorhexis, apoptotic bodies, multinucleated giant cells, few sperms in the lumen, atrophied Leydig cells and accumulation of oedematous fluid in the interstitium) accompanied by significant loss of germ/somatic cells (viz. Type A and Type B spermatogonia, leptotene, zygotene, pachytene spermatocytes, Golgi, cap and acrosome spermatids, Sertoli and Leydig cell) was evident in ZD groups. The degeneration was severe after 4-weeks of zinc deficiency. These observations provide evidence that the functional and morphological changes in testes are probably due to zinc deficiency. Further, the increased oedematous fluid in the interstitial region is due to the cellular death. Impairment of spermatogenesis can be attributed to the direct action of zinc on testes or indirectly from Leydig cell degeneration indicating that zinc is a critical component for maintenance of both mitotic and meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  14. DOCK8 deficient patients have a breakdown in peripheral B cell tolerance and defective regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Erin; Morbach, Henner; Ullas, Sumana; Bannock, Jason M.; Massad, Christopher; Menard, Laurence; Barlan, Isil; Lefranc, Gerard; Su, Helen; Dasouki, Majed; Al-Herz, Waleed; Keles, Sevgi; Chatila, Talal; Geha, Raif S.; Meffre, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Dedicator of Cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency is typified by recurrent infections, elevated serum IgE levels, eosinophilia, and a high incidence of allergic and autoimmune manifestations. Objective We sought to determine the role of DOCK8 in the establishment and maintenance of human B cell tolerance. Methods Autoantibodies were measured in the plasma of DOCK8 deficient patients. The antibody coding genes from new emigrant/transitional and mature naive B cells were cloned and assessed for their ability to bind self-antigens. Regulatory T (Treg) cells in the blood were analyzed by flow cytometry, and their function was tested by examining their capacity to inhibit the proliferation of CD4+CD25− T effector (Teff) cells. Results DOCK8 deficient patients had increased levels of autoantibodies in their plasma. We determined that central B cell tolerance did not require DOCK8 as evidenced by the normal low frequency of polyreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells in DOCK8 deficient patients. In contrast, autoreactive B cells were enriched in the mature naïve B cell compartment, revealing a defective peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint. In addition, we found that Treg cells were decreased and exhibited impaired suppressive activity in DOCK8 deficient patients. Conclusions Our data support a critical role for DOCK8 in Treg cell homeostasis and function and the enforcement of peripheral B cell tolerance. Clinical Implications DOCK8 deficient patients should be evaluated for autoantibodies, the possible emergence of autoimmunity, and end organ damage. PMID:25218284

  15. Reconstitution of the NF1 GAP-related domain in NF1-deficient human Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stacey L.; Deadwyler, Gail D.; Tang, Jun; Stubbs, Evan B.; Muir, David; Hiatt, Kelly K. . E-mail: George.Devries@med.va.gov

    2006-09-29

    Schwann cells derived from peripheral nerve sheath tumors from individuals with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are deficient for the protein neurofibromin, which contains a GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD). Neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells have increased Ras activation, increased proliferation in response to certain growth stimuli, increased angiogenic potential, and altered cell morphology. This study examined whether expression of functional NF1-GRD can reverse the transformed phenotype of neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells from both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We reconstituted the NF1-GRD using retroviral transduction and examined the effects on cell morphology, growth potential, and angiogenic potential. NF1-GRD reconstitution resulted in morphologic changes, a 16-33% reduction in Ras activation, and a 53% decrease in proliferation in neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells. However, NF1-GRD reconstitution was not sufficient to decrease the in vitro angiogenic potential of the cells. This study demonstrates that reconstitution of the NF1-GRD can at least partially reverse the transformation of human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cells.

  16. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-09

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting.

  17. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting. PMID:25571970

  18. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells. PMID:26938569

  19. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Paaske Utheim, Tor; Aass Utheim, Øygunn; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells. PMID:26938569

  20. Small-size biofuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Zhou, Ming; Wen, Dan; Bai, Lu; Lou, Baohua; Dong, Shaojun

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we demonstrated a novel paper-based mediator-less and compartment-less biofuel cell (BFC) with small size (1.5 cm × 1.5 cm). Ionic liquid functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs-IL) nanocomposite was used as support for both stably confining the anodic biocatalyst (i.e., NAD(+)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase, GDH) for glucose electrooxidation and for facilitating direct electrochemistry of the cathodic biocatalyst (i.e., bilirubin oxidase, BOD) for O(2) electroreduction. Such BFC provided a simple approach to fabricate low-cost and portable power devices on small-size paper, which can harvest energy from a wide range of commercial beverages containing glucose (e.g., Nescafe instant coffee, Maidong vitamin water, Watermelon fresh juice, and Minute Maid grape juice). These made the low-cost paper-based biodevice potential for broad energy applications. PMID:22417872

  1. How to target small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Ulsperger, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with dismal prognosis. Although great progress has been made in investigating genetic aberrations and putative drivers of this tumor entity, the mechanisms of rapid dissemination and acquisition of drug resistance are not clear. The majority of SCLC cases are characterized by inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) and, therefore, interchangeable drivers will be difficult to target successfully. Access to pure cultures of SCLC circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and study of their tumor biology has revealed a number of new potential targets. Most important, expression of chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) which controls expression of vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was newly described in these cells. The process switching CHI3L1-negative SCLC cells to CHI3L1-positive CTCs seems to be associated with cytokines released by inflammatory immune cells. Furthermore, these CTCs were found to promote monocyte-macrophage differentiation, most likely of the M2 tumor-promoting type, recently described to express PD-1 immune checkpoint antigen in SCLC. In conclusion, dissemination of SCLC seems to be linked to conversion of regular tumor cells to highly invasive CHI3L1-positive CTCs, which are protected by immune system suppression. Besides the classical targets VEGF, MMP-9 and PD-1, CHI3L1 constitutes a new possibly drugable molecule to retard down dissemination of SCLC cells, which may be similarly relevant for glioblastoma and other tumor entities. PMID:26425658

  2. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  3. Deficiencies of Circulating Mucosal-associated Invariant T Cells and Natural Killer T Cells in Patients with Acute Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Chul; Jin, Hye-Mi; Cho, Young-Nan; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kee, Seung-Jung; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells are known to play crucial roles in a variety of diseases, including autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancers. However, little is known about the roles of these invariant T cells in acute cholecystitis. The purposes of this study were to examine the levels of MAIT cells and NKT cells in patients with acute cholecystitis and to investigate potential relationships between clinical parameters and these cell levels. Thirty patients with pathologically proven acute cholecystitis and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Disease grades were classified according to the revised Tokyo guidelines (TG13) for the severity assessment for acute cholecystitis. Levels of MAIT and NKT cells in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers were significantly lower in acute cholecystitis patients than in healthy controls, and these deficiencies in MAIT cells and NKT cell numbers were associated with aging in acute cholecystitis patients. Notably, a reduction in NKT cell numbers was found to be associated with severe TG13 grade, death, and high blood urea nitrogen levels. The study shows numerical deficiencies of circulating MAIT and NKT cells and age-related decline of these invariant T cells. In addition, NKT cell deficiency was associated with acute cholecystitis severity and outcome. These findings provide an information regarding the monitoring of these changes in circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers during the course of acute cholecystitis and predicting prognosis.

  4. B-Cell Deficiency Predisposes Mice to Disseminating Anaerobic Infections: Protection by Passive Antibody Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Linda; Sasakj, Hajime; Stashenko, Philip

    2000-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a high proportion of RAG-2 SCID knockout mice, which lack T and B cells, develop orofacial abscesses and disseminated infections following pulpal infection, whereas immunocompetent control mice do not. In the present study, we sought to identify the components of the adaptive immune response which contribute to protection against disseminating anaerobic infections and sepsis. For this purpose, various genetically engineered immunodeficient mice were employed, including RAG-2 SCID, Igh-6 (B-cell deficient), Tcrb Tcrd (T-cell deficient) and Hc0 (C5 deficient). For abscess induction, the mandibular first molars were subjected to pulp exposure on day 0. Teeth were infected with a mixture of four anaerobic pathogens, including Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus intermedius, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Peptostreptococcus micros, and teeth were sealed to prevent communication with the oral cavity. The findings demonstrate that both RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice, but not T-cell- or C5-deficient mice, have increased susceptibility to the development of disseminating anaerobic infections. Abscess-susceptible RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice also showed a significant loss of body weight, splenomegaly, and absent antibacterial antibody production. Furthermore, dissemination was significantly reduced, from 74 to 25%, in susceptible RAG-2 mice by passively transferred antibody, predominantly immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) and IgM, against the infecting bacterial innoculum. Fractionated IgG-enriched preparations were more efficient in transferring protection than IgM preparations. We conclude that an antibody-mediated mechanism(s), most likely bacterial opsonization, is of importance in localizing anaerobic root canal infections and in preventing their systemic spread. PMID:10992465

  5. Zinc deficiency impairs neuronal precursor cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via p53-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Rikki S; Tassabehji, Nadine M; Hare, Joan; Sharma, Girdhari; Levenson, Cathy W

    2008-10-27

    The potential importance of stem cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS) that cannot only divide, but also participate in neurogenesis, is now widely appreciated. While we know that the trace element zinc is needed for brain development, the role of this essential nutrient in adult stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis has not been investigated. Adult male rats fed a zinc-restricted diet had approximately 50% fewer Ki67-positive stem cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ) and granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus compared to both zinc-adequate and pair-fed controls (p<0.05). Zinc-deficient rats also had a significant increase the number of TUNEL-labeled cells in the SGZ compared to pair-fed rats (p<0.05). To explore the mechanisms responsible for the effects of zinc deficiency, cultured human Ntera-2 (NT2) neuronal precursor cells were deprived of zinc using the chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Consistent with the effects of deficiency in vivo, TPEN treatment resulted in a significant decrease in cellular proliferation, as measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake, and an increase in caspase3/7-dependent apoptosis. These changes were accompanied by increases in nuclear p53. Oligonucleotide arrays, coupled with use of a dominant-negative p53 construct in NT2 cells, identified 14 differentially regulated p53 target genes. In the early phases zinc deficiency, p53 targets responsible for cell cycle arrest were induced. Continuation of deficiency resulted in the induction of a variety of pro-apoptotic genes such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and retinoblastoma-1 (Rb-1), as well as cellular protection genes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx). These data suggest that zinc plays a role in neurogenesis by regulating p53-dependent molecular mechanisms that control neuronal precursor cell proliferation and survival.

  6. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Rosa; Schweizer, Michael; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Eisenberger, Mario A.

    2015-01-01

    Pure small-cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is a rare entity and one of the most aggressive malignancies of the prostate. Histologically, prostatic SCCs of the prostate are part of a spectrum of anaplastic tumours of the prostate and are similar to SCCs of the lungs. In most cases, SCC of the prostate is associated with conventional prostatic adenocarcinoma. Both components of these mixed tumours frequently share molecular alterations such as ERG gene rearrangements or AURKA and MYCN amplifications, suggesting a common clonal origin. The clinical behaviour of small-cell prostate carcinomas is characterized by extensive local disease, visceral disease, and low PSA levels despite large metastatic burden. Commonly, the emergence of the SCC occurs in patients with high-grade adenocarcinoma who are often treated with androgen deprivation treatment (ADT). However, SCCs do not usually benefit from ADT. A biopsy of accessible lesions is strongly recommended to identify those with SCC pathological features, as management is undoubtedly affected by this finding. Chemotherapy is the standard approach for treating patients with either localized or advanced prostatic SCC. Despite the emergence of more-aggressive treatment modalities, the prognosis of men with prostatic SCC remains dismal. PMID:24535589

  7. Obstructive jaundice in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar Pour, Ali; Masir, Noraidah; Isa, Mohd Rose

    2015-08-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) commonly metastasizes to distant organs. However, metastasis to the pancreas is not a common event. Moreover, obstructive jaundice as a first clinical presentation of SCLC is extremely unusual. This case reports a 51-year-old male with SCLC, manifesting with obstructive jaundice as the initial clinical presentation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograghy (ERCP) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass at the head of the pancreas. The patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure). Histopathology revealed a chromogranin- A-positive poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. No imaging study of the lung was performed before surgery. A few months later, a follow-up CT revealed unilateral lung nodules with ipsilateral hilar nodes. A lung biopsy was done and histopathology reported a TTF- 1-positive, chromogranin A-positive, small cell carcinoma of the lung. On review, the pancreatic tumour was also TTF-1-positive. He was then treated with combination chemotherapy (cisplatin, etoposide). These findings highlight that presentation of a mass at the head of pancreas could be a manifestation of a metastatic tumour from elsewhere such as the lung, and thorough investigations should be performed before metastases can be ruled out. PMID:26277673

  8. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  9. Multiple mechanisms limit the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in the small intestine of mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1.

    PubMed

    Turley, Stephen D; Valasek, Mark A; Repa, Joyce J; Dietschy, John M

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis in the enterocyte is regulated by the interplay of multiple genes that ultimately determines the net amount of cholesterol reaching the circulation from the small intestine. The effect of deleting these genes, particularly acyl CoA:cholesterol acyl transferase 2 (ACAT2), on cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol excretion is well documented. We also know that the intestinal mRNA level for adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) increases in Acat2(-/-) mice. However, none of these studies has specifically addressed how ACAT2 deficiency impacts the relative proportions of esterified and unesterified cholesterol (UC) in the enterocyte and whether the concurrent loss of ABCA1 might result in a marked buildup of UC. Therefore, the present studies measured the expression of numerous genes and related metabolic parameters in the intestine and liver of ACAT2-deficient mice fed diets containing either added cholesterol or ezetimibe, a selective sterol absorption inhibitor. Cholesterol feeding raised the concentration of UC in the small intestine, and this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the relative mRNA level for Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and an increase in the mRNA level for both ABCA1 and ABCG5/8. All these changes were reversed by ezetimibe. When mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1 were fed a high-cholesterol diet, the increase in intestinal UC levels was no greater than it was in mice lacking only ACAT2. This resulted from a combination of compensatory mechanisms including diminished NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake, increased cholesterol efflux via ABCG5/8, and possibly rapid cell turnover.

  10. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    PubMed

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.2±0.01) pregnant women compared to insufficient (0.34±0.01) and sufficient (0.45±0.02) pregnant women. Similarly, cord blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.63±0.03) pregnant women when compared to insufficient (1.05±0.04) and sufficient (1.75±0.02) pregnant women. Mean (%)±SE of B cells with CD23 and CD21 in maternal blood was higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient pregnant women (0.35±0.02; 1.65±0.04) when compared to insufficient (0.22±0.02; 0.55±0.05) and sufficient (0.15±0.02; 0.21±0.01) pregnant women. Similarly, mean (%)±SE of B cell population with CD23 and CD21 in cord blood was also higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.41±0.02; 1.2±0.03) when compared to insufficient (0.32±0.01; 0.6±0.05) and sufficient (0.2±0.01; 0.4±0.02) pregnant women. Regulatory cytokines, TGF

  11. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    PubMed

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.2±0.01) pregnant women compared to insufficient (0.34±0.01) and sufficient (0.45±0.02) pregnant women. Similarly, cord blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.63±0.03) pregnant women when compared to insufficient (1.05±0.04) and sufficient (1.75±0.02) pregnant women. Mean (%)±SE of B cells with CD23 and CD21 in maternal blood was higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient pregnant women (0.35±0.02; 1.65±0.04) when compared to insufficient (0.22±0.02; 0.55±0.05) and sufficient (0.15±0.02; 0.21±0.01) pregnant women. Similarly, mean (%)±SE of B cell population with CD23 and CD21 in cord blood was also higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.41±0.02; 1.2±0.03) when compared to insufficient (0.32±0.01; 0.6±0.05) and sufficient (0.2±0.01; 0.4±0.02) pregnant women. Regulatory cytokines, TGF

  12. The yeast metacaspase is implicated in oxidative stress response in frataxin-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Auchère, Françoise; Brossas, Caroline; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Boggetto, Nicole; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Madeo, Frank; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-01-20

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease and is caused by reduced expression of mitochondrial frataxin. Frataxin depletion causes impairment in iron-sulfur cluster and heme biosynthesis, disruption of iron homeostasis and hypersensitivity to oxidants. Currently no pharmacological treatment blocks disease progression, although antioxidant therapies proved to benefit patients. We show that sensitivity of yeast frataxin-deficient cells to hydrogen peroxide is partially mediated by the metacaspase. Metacaspase deletion in frataxin-deficient cells results in recovery of antioxidant capacity and heme synthesis. In addition, our results suggest that metacaspase is associated with mitochondrial respiration, intracellular redox control and genomic stability.

  13. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  14. Folate Deficiency Induces Neural Stem Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Homocysteine In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Mei; Huang, Guo-Wei; Tian, Zhi-Hong; Ren, Da-Lin; X. Wilson, John

    2009-01-01

    Cellular events for neural progenitor cells, such as proliferation and differentiation, are regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic cell signals. Folate plays a central role in central nervous system development, so folate, as an extrinsic signal, may affect neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of folate deficiency on the cell proliferation, cell apoptosis and homocysteine concentrations in NSCs. NSCs were isolated from fetal rats and identified as NSCs by their expression of immunoreactive nestin. Cell proliferation was quantitated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptotic cells were detected and confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. We measured homocysteine concentrations in NSCs by high performance liquid chromatography and detected the expression of caspase-3 by western blot method. Folate deficiency not only decreased cell proliferation, but also increased the apoptotic rate of NSCs as demonstrated by the increased expression of early apoptotic markers such as caspase-3, compared to control group (p<0.05). Furthermore, There was a statistically significant increase in homocysteine concentration during folate deficiency in NSCs (p<0.05). These data suggest that folate affects the cell proliferation, apoptosis and homocysteine generation in NSC cells. PMID:19590702

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  16. Redeployment of Myc and E2f1-3 drives Rb-deficient cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huayang; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Pécot, Thierry; Daniel, Piotr; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin; Reyes, Stephan; Fackler, Nicholas; Bajwa, Amneet; Kladney, Raleigh; Koivisto, Christopher; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Qianben; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Sáenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Cantalupo, Paul; Pipas, James M; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    Robust mechanisms to control cell proliferation have evolved to maintain the integrity of organ architecture. Here, we investigated how two critical proliferative pathways, Myc and E2f, are integrated to control cell cycles in normal and Rb-deficient cells using a murine intestinal model. We show that Myc and E2f1-3 have little impact on normal G1-S transitions. Instead, they synergistically control an S-G2 transcriptional program required for normal cell divisions and maintaining crypt-villus integrity. Surprisingly, Rb deficiency results in the Myc-dependent accumulation of E2f3 protein and chromatin repositioning of both Myc and E2f3, leading to the 'super activation' of a G1-S transcriptional program, ectopic S phase entry and rampant cell proliferation. These findings reveal that Rb-deficient cells hijack and redeploy Myc and E2f3 from an S-G2 program essential for normal cell cycles to a G1-S program that re-engages ectopic cell cycles, exposing an unanticipated addiction of Rb-null cells on Myc. PMID:26192440

  17. Vitamin d deficiency reduces the immune response, phagocytosis rate, and intracellular killing rate of microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency Reduces the Immune Response, Phagocytosis Rate, and Intracellular Killing Rate of Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  19. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Pathophysiology of B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Taubenheim, Nadine; Peron, Sophie; Fischer, Alain

    2007-01-01

    B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination (Ig-CSR) deficiencies, previously termed hyper-IgM syndromes, are genetically determined conditions characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels and an absence or very low levels of IgG, IgA, and IgE. As a function of the molecular mechanism, the defective CSR is variably associated to a defect in the generation of somatic hypermutations (SHMs) in the Ig variable region. The study of Ig-CSR deficiencies contributed to a better delineation of the mechanisms underlying CSR and SHM, the major events of antigen-triggered antibody maturation. Four Ig-CSR deficiency phenotypes have been so far reported: the description of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency (Ig-CSR deficiency 1), caused by recessive mutations of AICDA gene, characterized by a defect in CSR and SHM, clearly established the role of AID in the induction of the Ig gene rearrangements underlying CSR and SHM. A CSR-specific function of AID has, however, been detected by the observation of a selective CSR defect caused by mutations affecting the C-terminus of AID. Ig-CSR deficiency 2 is the consequence of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency. Because UNG, a molecule of the base excision repair machinery, removes uracils from DNA and AID deaminates cytosines into uracils, that observation indicates that the AID-UNG pathway directly targets DNA of switch regions from the Ig heavy-chain locus to induce the CSR process. Ig-CSR deficiencies 3 and 4 are characterized by a selective CSR defect resulting from blocks at distinct steps of CSR. A further understanding of the CSR machinery is expected from their molecular definition. PMID:17560278

  1. Deciphering the molecular basis of invasiveness in Sdhb-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Loriot, Céline; Domingues, Mélanie; Berger, Adeline; Menara, Mélanie; Ruel, Maëva; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Letouzé, Éric; Martinelli, Cosimo; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Larue, Lionel; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGL) are malignant neuroendocrine tumors frequently associated with germline mutations in the SDHB gene. SDHB-mutated PPGL display a hypermethylator phenotype associated with hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report the characterization of a unique model of Sdhb knockout in mouse chromaffin cells. Sdhb deficient cells exhibit a metastatic phenotype as highlighted by increased individual cell migration (characterized by faster motility and increased persistence) as well as high invasive and adhesion abilities. This phenotype is associated with the modulation of Twist1, Twist2, Tcf3, Snai1, N-cadherin or Krt19 expression, reflecting an EMT-like reprogramming of cells. Krt19 is epigenetically silenced in Sdhb-deficient cells and re-expressed after treatment by the demethylating agent decitabine. Krt19 rescue by lentiviral transduction in Sdhb-deficient cells and Krt19 inhibition by RNA interference in wild-type cells were performed. Both studies revealed the involvement of KRT19 in the invasive phenotype by modulating collective and individual migration and cell/extra-cellular matrix adhesion properties. These findings underline the role of hypermethylation and EMT in the in vitro acquisition of metastatic properties, following SDHB loss of function. PMID:26460615

  2. Deciphering the molecular basis of invasiveness in Sdhb-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Loriot, Céline; Domingues, Mélanie; Berger, Adeline; Menara, Mélanie; Ruel, Maëva; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Letouzé, Éric; Martinelli, Cosimo; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Larue, Lionel; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith

    2015-10-20

    Metastatic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGL) are malignant neuroendocrine tumors frequently associated with germline mutations in the SDHB gene. SDHB-mutated PPGL display a hypermethylator phenotype associated with hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report the characterization of a unique model of Sdhb knockout in mouse chromaffin cells. Sdhb deficient cells exhibit a metastatic phenotype as highlighted by increased individual cell migration (characterized by faster motility and increased persistence) as well as high invasive and adhesion abilities. This phenotype is associated with the modulation of Twist1, Twist2, Tcf3, Snai1, N-cadherin or Krt19 expression, reflecting an EMT-like reprogramming of cells. Krt19 is epigenetically silenced in Sdhb-deficient cells and re-expressed after treatment by the demethylating agent decitabine. Krt19 rescue by lentiviral transduction in Sdhb-deficient cells and Krt19 inhibition by RNA interference in wild-type cells were performed. Both studies revealed the involvement of KRT19 in the invasive phenotype by modulating collective and individual migration and cell/extra-cellular matrix adhesion properties. These findings underline the role of hypermethylation and EMT in the in vitro acquisition of metastatic properties, following SDHB loss of function.

  3. Impaired receptor editing in the primary B cell repertoire of BASH-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Nojima, Takuya; Goitsuka, Ryo; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2004-11-15

    The editing of B cell Ag receptor (BCR) through successive rearrangements of Ig genes has been considered to be a major mechanism for the central B cell tolerance, which precludes appearance of self-reactive B cells, through studies using anti-self-Ig transgenic/knock-in mouse systems. However, contribution of the receptor editing in the development of the normal B cell repertoire remains unclear. In addition, the signaling pathway directing this event is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that receptor editing in anti-DNA Ig knock-in mice is impaired in the absence of an adaptor protein BASH (BLNK/SLP-65) that is involved in BCR signaling. Remarkably, the supposed hallmarks of receptor editing such as Iglambda chain expression, recombination sequence rearrangements at Igkappa loci, and presence of in-frame VkappaJkappa joins in the Igkappa loci inactivated by the recombination sequence rearrangements, were all diminished in BASH-deficient mice with unmanipulated Ig loci. BCR ligation-induced Iglambda gene recombination in vitro was also impaired in BASH-deficient B cells. Furthermore, the BASH-deficient mice showed an excessive Ab response to a DNA carrier immunization, suggesting the presence of unedited DNA-reactive B cells in the periphery. These results not only define a signaling pathway required for receptor editing but indicate that the BCR-signaled receptor editing indeed operates in the development of normal B cell repertoire and contributes to establishing the B cell tolerance.

  4. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Gall Bladder.

    PubMed

    Haid, Max; Gahju, Badri; Schulz, Craig; Sterner, David; Falconer, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the gall bladder (SCCGB) is a rare condition, with only 53 prior cases reported in the world literature when our case was first diagnosed. Our patient was found to have limited stage disease and was treated with sequential laparoscopic cholecystectomy, etoposide/carboplatin chemotherapy followed by consolidating loco-regional radiation therapy. She is alive and well without evidence of disease more than 132 months since diagnosis. We describe here our experience in the diagnosis, staging workup, treatment, and surveillance of a case of SCCGB and review the published literature. Treated aggressively with currently available methods, patients with limited stage SCCGB can have an excellent prognosis. The authors' intent is to provide a reasonable plan of treatment for other physicians facing such an unusual patient. PMID:27197345

  5. Sequential scintigraphic staging of small cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.D.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1981-04-15

    Thirty patients with small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung were sequentially staged following a history and physical exam with liver, bran, bone, and gallium-67 citrate scans. Scintigraphic evaluation disclosed 7 of 30 patients (23%) with advanced disease, stage IIIM1. When Gallium-67 scans were used as the sole criteria for staging, they proved to be accurate and identified six of the seven patients with occult metastatic disease. Gallium-67 scans proved to be accurate in detecting thoracic and extrathoracic metastases in the 30 patients with SCC, especially within the liver and lymph node-bearing area. The diagnostic accuracy of gallium-67 fell in regions such as bone or brain. Despite the limitations of gallium-67 scanning, the authors conclude that these scans are useful in staging patients with SCC and should be the initial scans used in staging such patients.

  6. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for Patients With Primary Immune Deficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    SCID; Omenn's Syndrome; Reticular Dysgenesis; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; CD40 Ligand Deficiency; Hyper IgM Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Griscelli Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Langerhan's Cell Histiocytosis

  7. Glycosylation inhibition reduces cholesterol accumulation in NPC1 protein-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deffieu, Maika S; Lee, Peter L; Saha, Piyali; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomes are lined with a glycocalyx that protects the limiting membrane from the action of degradative enzymes. We tested the hypothesis that Niemann-Pick type C 1 (NPC1) protein aids the transfer of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol across this glycocalyx. A prediction of this model is that cells will be less dependent upon NPC1 if their glycocalyx is decreased in density. Lysosome cholesterol content was significantly lower after treatment of NPC1-deficient human fibroblasts with benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside, an inhibitor of O-linked glycosylation. Direct biochemical measurement of cholesterol showed that lysosomes purified from NPC1-deficient fibroblasts contained at least 30% less cholesterol when O-linked glycosylation was blocked. As an independent means to modify protein glycosylation, we used Chinese hamster ovary ldl-D cells defective in UDP-Gal/UDP-GalNAc 4-epimerase in which N- and O-linked glycosylation can be controlled. CRISPR generated, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells supplemented with galactose accumulated more cholesterol than those in which sugar addition was blocked. In the absence of galactose supplementation, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells also transported more cholesterol from lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, as monitored by an increase in cholesteryl [(14)C]-oleate levels. These experiments support a model in which NPC1 protein functions to transfer cholesterol past a lysosomal glycocalyx.

  8. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  9. The effect of selenium-deficiency on rat fat-cell glucose oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Souness, J E; Stouffer, J E; Chagoya de Sanchez, V

    1983-01-01

    When rats are fed a selenium-deficient diet, the glutathione peroxidase activity of epididymal fat-cells decreases to 5-9% of that of control rats fed the same diet supplemented with 0.5 p.p.m. of selenium as sodium selenite. [1-14C]Glucose oxidation in fat-cells from rats fed a selenium-deficient diet is unresponsive to the action of t-butyl hydroperoxide, which stimulates 14CO2 formation from [1-14C]glucose 4-fold in control rats. Insulin enhances [1-14C]glucose oxidation and incorporation into lipids in fat-cells from both groups of rats; however, the response elicited is reduced in fat-cells prepared from selenium-deficient animals. The 'C-1/C-6 ratio' (ratio of glucose C-1 to glucose C-6 oxidized) is enhanced by insulin to a similar degree in fat-cells from both groups of animals. The stimulatory action of Zn2+ and dithiothreitol on [1-14C]glucose oxidation observed in fat-cells from selenium-supplemented rats is greatly reduced in fat-cells from selenium-deficient rats. [1-14C]Glucose oxidation in fat-cells from both groups of animals is highly sensitive to the stimulatory action of adenosine. It is concluded that the enhanced formation and glutathione-linked destruction of H2O2 plays, at the most, only a minor role in the stimulation of the flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway elicited by insulin, although elimination of glutathione peroxidase activity may influence the action of insulin on glucose oxidation. Production and subsequent destruction of H2O2 may play an important role in the stimulatory action of Zn2+ and dithiothreitol on fat-cell [1-14C]glucose oxidation. PMID:6351853

  10. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  11. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  12. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, M.P.; Wald, N.; Diloy-Puray, M.

    1980-03-01

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings.

  13. Cernunnos Deficiency Reduces Thymocyte Life Span and Alters the T Cell Repertoire in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Gabriella; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Abramowski, Vincent; Malivert, Laurent; Lim, Annick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Martin, Christelle; Florkin, Benoit; Latour, Sylvain; Revy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cernunnos is a DNA repair factor of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery. Its deficiency in humans causes radiosensitive severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) with microcephaly, characterized in part by a profound lymphopenia. In contrast to the human condition, the immune system of Cernunnos knockout (KO) mice is not overwhelmingly affected. In particular, Cernunnos is dispensable during V(D)J recombination in lymphoid cells. Nevertheless, the viability of thymocytes is reduced in Cernunnos KO mice, owing to the chronic activation of a P53-dependent DNA damage response. This translates into a qualitative alteration of the T cell repertoire to one in which the most distal Vα and Jα segments are missing. This results in the contraction of discrete T cell populations, such as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, in both humans and mice. PMID:23207905

  14. Erythroid differentiation is augmented in Reelin-deficient K562 cells and homozygous reeler mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Lee, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Yen-Shu; Tseng, Wei-Lien; Yen, Ching-Ju; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular glycoprotein that is highly conserved in mammals. In addition to its expression in the nervous system, Reelin is present in erythroid cells but its function there is unknown. We report in this study that Reelin is up-regulated during erythroid differentiation of human erythroleukemic K562 cells and is expressed in the erythroid progenitors of murine bone marrow. Reelin deficiency promotes erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and augments erythroid production in murine bone marrow. In accordance with these findings, Reelin deficiency attenuates AKT phosphorylation of the Ter119(+)CD71(+) erythroid progenitors and alters the cell number and frequency of the progenitors at different erythroid differentiation stages. A regulatory role of Reelin in erythroid differentiation is thus defined. PMID:24239537

  15. Anaplastic small cell neoplasms of the thyroid: an immunoperoxidase study.

    PubMed

    Mambo, N C; Irwin, S M

    1984-01-01

    The cell origins of ten anaplastic small cell neoplasms of the thyroid gland were investigated using the immunoperoxidase technique. Sections of the neoplasms were examined for immunostaining for the tissue markers of B lymphocytes, thyroid follicular cells, and C cells by incubation with antisera to the lambda and kappa light chains, human thyroxine and human calcitonin, respectively. Six neoplasms were identified as malignant lymphomas, and two were identified as anaplastic small cell follicular carcinomas. The cell origins of the remaining two neoplasms could not be determined. The prognosis for patients with malignant lymphoma was favorable compared with the prognoses for patients in the other two groups. The prognosis for patients with anaplastic small cell follicular carcinomas was better than for those with small cell malignancies of undetermined cell origins. These findings suggest an important role for the immunoperoxidase technique in the precise classification of anaplastic small cell neoplasms of the thyroid.

  16. Long-term immune deficiency after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: B-cell deficiency is associated with late infections

    PubMed Central

    Corre, Elise; Carmagnat, Maryvonnick; Busson, Marc; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Ribaud, Patricia; Toubert, Antoine; Rabian, Claire; Socié, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Immune reconstitution was analyzed in 140 consecutive patients who were 2-year disease-free and who underwent myeloablative allogeneic transplantation. A CD4 and CD8 defect was observed involving naive, terminally differentiated, memory and competent cells and above limits values for activated subsets. Natural killer cells normalize at six months while we observed expansion of CD19+/CD5+ B cells after three months and a persisting defect of memory B cells. Chronic graft-versus-host disease did not influence significantly those parameters for CD8 subsets while the naïve and competent CD4 subsets were strongly affected. But the most profound impact of chronic graft-versus-host disease was on B-cell subsets, especially on the memory B population. The cumulative incidence of late severe infections was low (14% at four years). Using Cox’s models, only low B-cell counts at 12 (P=0.02) and 24 (P=0.001) months were associated with the hazard of developing late infection, in particular if patients did not develop chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:20133894

  17. LMP1-deficient Epstein-Barr virus mutant requires T cells for lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Plowshay, Julie; Ranheim, Erik A.; Burlingham, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Asimakopoulos, Fotis; Tang, Weihua; Gulley, Margaret L.; Cesarman, Ethel; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection transforms B cells in vitro and is associated with human B cell lymphomas. The major EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), mimics constitutively active CD40 and is essential for outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cells in vitro; however, EBV-positive diffuse large B cell lymphomas and Burkitt lymphomas often express little or no LMP1. Thus, EBV may contribute to the development and maintenance of human lymphomas even in the absence of LMP1. Here, we found that i.p. injection of human cord blood mononuclear cells infected with a LMP1-deficient EBV into immunodeficient mice induces B cell lymphomas. In this model, lymphoma development required the presence of CD4+ T cells in cord blood and was inhibited by CD40-blocking Abs. In contrast, LMP1-deficient EBV established persistent latency but did not induce lymphomas when directly injected into mice engrafted with human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus. WT EBV induced lymphomas in both mouse models and did not require coinjected T cells in the cord blood model. Together, these results demonstrate that LMP1 is not essential for EBV-induced lymphomas in vivo and suggest that T cells supply signals that substitute for LMP1 in EBV-positive B cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:25485679

  18. T-regulatory cells are relatively deficient in squamous carcinomas undergoing regression in mice immunized with a squamous carcinoma vaccine enriched for immunotherapeutic cells.

    PubMed

    Chopra, A; O-Sullivan, I; Carr, J; Kim, T S; Cohen, E P

    2007-06-01

    In a prior report (Int J Cancer 2006; 119: 339-348), we described a new vaccination strategy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The vaccine was prepared by transfer of unfractionated DNA-fragments (25 kb) from KLN205 cells, a squamous carcinoma cell line (DBA/2 origin; H-2(d)) into LM cells, a highly immunogenic mouse fibroblast cell line (C3H/He origin; (H-2(k))). As only a small proportion of the transfected cell population was expected to have incorporated DNA segments that included genes specifying antigens associated with the squamous carcinoma cells, we devised a novel strategy to enrich the vaccine for immunotherapeutic cells. Enhanced immunity to squamous carcinoma was induced in tumor-bearing mice treated solely by immunization with the enriched vaccine, which translated into prolonged survival without toxicity. Here, we describe the characteristics of the cell populations infiltrating established squamous carcinomas undergoing regression in mice immunized with vaccines enriched for immunotherapeutic cells. The results indicated that CD8+ T cells were predominant and that T-regulatory cells (FoxP3+, CD4/CD25+, CD4/CD62L(high), CD4/CTLA-4e) were relatively deficient in the regressing tumors. Inflammatory infiltrates were not detected in various organs and tissues of mice immunized with the DNA-based vaccine.

  19. Decoded Calreticulin-Deficient Embryonic Stem Cell Transcriptome Resolves Latent Cardiophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Randolph S.; Chiriac, Anca; Niederlander, Nicolas J.; Nelson, Timothy J.; Behfar, Atta; Mishra, Prasanna K.; Macura, Slobodan; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Genomic perturbations that challenge normal signaling at the pluripotent stage may trigger unforeseen ontogenic aberrancies. Anticipatory systems biology identification of transcriptome landscapes that underlie latent phenotypes would offer molecular diagnosis before the onset of symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of calreticulin-deficient embryonic stem cell transcriptomes on molecular functions and physiological systems. Bioinformatic surveillance of calreticulin-null stem cells, a monogenic insult model, diagnosed a disruption in transcriptome dynamics, which re-prioritized essential cellular functions. Calreticulin-calibrated signaling axes were uncovered, and network-wide cartography of undifferentiated stem cell transcripts suggested cardiac manifestations. Calreticulin-deficient stem cell-derived cardiac cells verified disorganized sarcomerogenesis, mitochondrial paucity, and cytoarchitectural aberrations to validate calreticulin-dependent network forecasts. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology detected a ventricular septal defect, revealing organogenic manifestation of calreticulin deletion. Thus, bioinformatic deciphering of a primordial calreticulin-deficient transcriptome decoded at the pluripotent stem cell stage a reconfigured multifunctional molecular registry to anticipate predifferentiation susceptibility toward abnormal cardiophenotype. PMID:20506533

  20. Nuclear Lamin A/C Deficiency Induces Defects in Cell Mechanics, Polarization, and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jerry S. H.; Hale, Christopher M.; Panorchan, Porntula; Khatau, Shyam B.; George, Jerry P.; Tseng, Yiider; Stewart, Colin L.; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Lamin A/C is a major constituent of the nuclear lamina, a thin filamentous protein layer that lies beneath the nuclear envelope. Here we show that lamin A/C deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Lmna−/− MEFs) diminishes the ability of these cells to polarize at the edge of a wound and significantly reduces cell migration speed into the wound. Moreover, lamin A/C deficiency induces significant separation of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) from the nuclear envelope. Investigations using ballistic intracellular nanorheology reveal that lamin A/C deficiency also dramatically affects the micromechanical properties of the cytoplasm. Both the elasticity (stretchiness) and the viscosity (propensity of a material to flow) of the cytoplasm in Lmna−/− MEFs are significantly reduced. Disassembly of either the actin filament or microtubule networks in Lmna+/+ MEFs results in decrease of cytoplasmic elasticity and viscosity down to levels found in Lmna−/− MEFs. Together these results show that both the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-based processes, including cell motility, coupled MTOC and nucleus dynamics, and cell polarization, depend critically on the integrity of the nuclear lamina, which suggest the existence of a functional mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. These results also suggest that cell polarization during cell migration requires tight mechanical coupling between MTOC and nucleus, which is mediated by lamin A/C. PMID:17631533

  1. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  2. Deficiency of pluripotent hemopoietic progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Geissler, K; Hinterberger, W; Jäger, U; Bettelheim, P; Neumann, E; Haas, O; Ambros, P; Chott, A; Radaszkiewicz, T; Lechner, K

    1988-07-01

    Pluripotent (CFU-MIX), erythroid (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitor cells were examined in bone marrow (BM) from 23 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Patients were grouped according to the FAB classification: Refractory anemia (RA), n = 3; RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), n = 3; RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), n = 8; RA with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), n = 7; chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), n = 2. In FAB groups RA, RARS, RAEB and RAEBt CFU-GM concentrations were normal or decreased but both CMML-patients had increased CFU-GM values. Abnormal cluster growth was observed in 9 of 23 MDS-patients. BFU-E colony formation was subnormal in all cases. Mixed-colony assay values were at the lower limit of controls in one patient and decreased in the remaining 22 MDS-patients. A similar growth pattern of hemopoietic progenitor cells was observed in 19 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), who were studied for comparison. These data suggest a quantitative or qualitative/functional defect of the pluripotent progenitor cell compartment as the major cause for the cytopenia in MDS-patients.

  3. Coexistence of congenital red cell pyruvate kinase and band 3 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Branca, R; Costa, E; Rocha, S; Coelho, H; Quintanilha, A; Cabeda, J M; Santos-Silva, A; Barbot, J

    2004-08-01

    The authors report the case of a 9-year-old Caucasian girl, born in northern Portugal, with chronic nonspherocytic haemolytic anaemia and without family history of anaemia. The aethiological study of this anaemia revealed pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD), because of two previously described mutations (426Arg-->Trp and 510Arg-->Gln). Since the blood smear revealed features not fully compatible with PKD diagnosis, additional tests were performed for the propositus and her parents, namely red blood cell membrane protein analysis. A decrease in proteins band 3 (15%) and 4.2 (18%) was found in the propositus. Her father presented only a decrease in band 3 (11%). Coexistence of PKD and erythrocyte membrane proteins deficiency in the same patient is very uncommon. Our findings suggest that a careful blood smear observation may lead to the identification of a combined deficiency in erythrocyte membrane proteins and enzymopathies.

  4. Cell sorting analysis of cell cycle-dependent X-ray sensitivity in end joining-deficient human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Matsui, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka; Date, Takayasu

    2008-08-08

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) plays a major role in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), especially during the G1-phase of the cell cycle. Using a flow cytometric cell sorter, we fractionated G1- and S/G2-phase cells based on size to assess the DSB-repair activity in NHEJ factor-deficient DT40 and Nalm-6 cell lines. Colony formation assays revealed that the X-ray sensitivities of the G1-enriched populations correctly reflected the DSB-repair activities of both the DT40 and Nalm-6 cell lines. Furthermore, as assessed by {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, the sorted cells exhibited less DNA damage than chemically synchronized cells. Given that it does not use fluorescent labeling or chemical agents, this method of cell sorting is simpler and less toxic than other methods, making it applicable to a variety of cell lines, including those that cannot be synchronized by standard chemical treatments.

  5. Absence of a red blood cell phenotype in mice with hematopoietic deficiency of SEC23B.

    PubMed

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P; Jones, Morgan; Everett, Lesley; Chase, Jennifer; Tao, Jiayi; Siemieniak, David; Zhang, Bin; Maillard, Ivan; Ginsburg, David

    2014-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease of ineffective erythropoiesis characterized by increased bi/multinucleated erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. CDAII results from mutations in SEC23B. The SEC23 protein is a core component of coat protein complex II-coated vesicles, which transport secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Though the genetic defect underlying CDAII has been identified, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration, with this early mortality limiting evaluation of the adult hematopoietic compartment. We now report that mice with SEC23B deficiency restricted to the hematopoietic compartment survive normally and do not exhibit anemia or other CDAII characteristics. We also demonstrate that SEC23B-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) do not exhibit a disadvantage at reconstituting hematopoiesis when compared directly to wild-type HSC in a competitive repopulation assay. Secondary bone marrow transplants demonstrated continued equivalence of SEC23B-deficient and WT HSC in their hematopoietic reconstitution potential. The surprising discordance in phenotypes between SEC23B-deficient mice and humans may reflect an evolutionary shift in SEC23 paralog function and/or expression, or a change in a specific COPII cargo critical for erythropoiesis. PMID:25071156

  6. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients With Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Wu, Angela; Linos, Eleni; Parimi, Neeta; Lee, Wayne; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Asgari, Maryam M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate vitamin D status in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) who practice photo-protection because of their genetic predisposition to skin cancer and to determine risk factors for deficiency. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic medical centers. Patients Forty-one ambulatory patients with BCNS who participated in a 2-year chemoprevention clinical trial. Population-based controls (n=360) were selected and matched by age, sex, Fitzpatrick skin type, and season/geography. Main Outcome Measures Levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) and vitamin D deficiency (defined as a 25[OH]D level of ≤20 ng/mL). Results Twenty-three patients with BCNS (56%) were vitamin D deficient. Patients with BCNS had mean 25(OH)D levels below those of the general population (−3 ng/mL; P=.02) and were 3 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (56% vs 18%; P<.001). Levels of 25(OH)D were lower in patients who were overweight (−3.0 ng/mL; P=.04) and who had blood collected in the winter compared with the summer (−7.1 ng/mL; P<.001). Conclusion Patients with BCNS may be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency, depending on their adherence to photoprotection practices. PMID:20956641

  7. Large-Scale Identification of MicroRNA Targets in Murine Dgcr8-Deficient Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew P. A.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; van Dongen, Stijn; Lu, Dong; Tate, Peri H.; Bartonicek, Nenad; Kutter, Claudia; Liu, Pentao; Skarnes, William C.; Enright, Anton J.; Dunham, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs such as microRNAs play important roles in embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. A broad range of microRNAs is expressed in embryonic stem cells while only a fraction of their targets have been identified. We have performed large-scale identification of embryonic stem cell microRNA targets using a murine embryonic stem cell line deficient in the expression of Dgcr8. These cells are heavily depleted for microRNAs, allowing us to reintroduce specific microRNA duplexes and identify refined target sets. We used deep sequencing of small RNAs, mRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis of microRNA seed matches in 3′ UTRs to identify target transcripts. Consequently, we have identified a network of microRNAs that converge on the regulation of several important cellular pathways. Additionally, our experiments have revealed a novel candidate for Dgcr8-independent microRNA genesis and highlighted the challenges currently facing miRNA annotation. PMID:22912678

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in B-cell-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, A M; Santoro, F; Afchain, D; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of neonatally initiated injections of anti-mu rabbit antiserum on immunity of rats against Trypanosoma cruzi infection was investigated in vivo. Anti-mu treatment resulted in a loss of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG2a synthesis and, subsequently, of antibody production. These rats so treated were shown to be significantly more susceptible to the acute phase of the infection than the control rats treated with normal rabbit serum, as measured by increased parasitemia and mortality. These results indicate the essential role of antibodies, probably in association with complement or effector cells or both, in immunity to acute Chagas' disease. PMID:6783543

  9. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  10. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  11. Detection of nitrogen deficiency in potatoes using small unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. However, research is required to determine which sensors and data processing methods are required to use sUAS in an efficient and cost-effective manner. We set up a ni...

  12. Pluripotent stem cells induced from mouse neural stem cells and small intestinal epithelial cells by small molecule compounds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junqing; Ge, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Zhengyuan; He, Shan; Wang, Yuping; Lin, Hua; Yang, Weifeng; Liu, Junfang; Zhao, Yang; Deng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported a chemical approach to generate pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts. However, whether chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (CiPSCs) can be derived from other cell types remains to be demonstrated. Here, using lineage tracing, we first verify the generation of CiPSCs from fibroblasts. Next, we demonstrate that neural stem cells (NSCs) from the ectoderm and small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from the endoderm can be chemically reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells. CiPSCs derived from NSCs and IECs resemble mouse embryonic stem cells in proliferation rate, global gene expression profile, epigenetic status, self-renewal and differentiation capacity, and germline transmission competency. Interestingly, the pluripotency gene Sall4 is expressed at the initial stage in the chemical reprogramming process from different cell types, and the same core small molecules are required for the reprogramming, suggesting conservation in the molecular mechanism underlying chemical reprogramming from these diverse cell types. Our analysis also shows that the use of these small molecules should be fine-tuned to meet the requirement of reprogramming from different cell types. Together, these findings demonstrate that full chemical reprogramming approach can be applied in cells of different tissue origins and suggest that chemical reprogramming is a promising strategy with the potential to be extended to more initial types. PMID:26704449

  13. Inherited human cPLA2α deficiency is associated with impaired eicosanoid biosynthesis, small intestinal ulceration, and platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Milne, Ginger L.; Iverson, Tina; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) hydrolyzes arachidonic acid from cellular membrane phospholipids, thereby providing enzymatic substrates for the synthesis of eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. Considerable understanding of cPLA2α function has been derived from investigations of the enzyme and from cPLA2α-null mice, but knowledge of discrete roles for this enzyme in humans is limited. We investigated a patient hypothesized to have an inherited prostanoid biosynthesis deficiency due to his multiple, complicated small intestinal ulcers despite no use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Levels of thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid produced by platelets and leukotriene B4 released from calcium ionophore–activated blood were markedly reduced, indicating defective enzymatic release of the arachidonic acid substrate for the corresponding cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases. Platelet aggregation and degranulation induced by adenosine diphosphate or collagen were diminished but were normal in response to arachidonic acid. Two heterozygous single base pair mutations and a known SNP were found in the coding regions of the patient’s cPLA2α genes (p.[Ser111Pro]+[Arg485His; Lys651Arg]). The total PLA2 activity in sonicated platelets was diminished, and the urinary metabolites of prostacyclin, prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin D2, and thromboxane A2 were also reduced. These findings characterize what we believe is a novel inherited deficiency of cPLA2. PMID:18451993

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  15. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Pant-Purohit, Mukta; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; MacLennan, Gregory T; Cheng, Liang

    2010-02-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is a rare and aggressive cancer of the bladder. SCCUB is part of neuroendocrine family of tumors that affect several organ systems including respiratory, gastrointestinal and male and female genitourinary tract. SCCUB affect males predominantly with common risk factors include smoking, bladder calculi, bladder manipulation, and chronic cystitis. Prognosis of SCCUB remains poor due to high metastatic potential and lack of symptoms in earlier stages of the disease. Pathogenesis of the disease is linked to loss of genetic material, hypermethylation of tumor suppressors and at times amplification of the chromosomal regions carrying oncogenes. Majority of cases are treated with local resection of the tumor with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Radiation therapy is used as alternative to radical cystectomy or as palliative measure. This article provides epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, histochemistry, and current management options for SCCUB. Furthermore we reviewed all recent studies involving advancement in targeted molecular therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:20017108

  16. Investigating complex I deficiency in Purkinje cells and synapses in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrysostomou, Alexia; Grady, John P.; Laude, Alex; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebellar ataxia is common in patients with mitochondrial disease, and despite previous neuropathological investigations demonstrating vulnerability of the olivocerebellar pathway in patients with mitochondrial disease, the exact neurodegenerative mechanisms are still not clear. We use quantitative quadruple immunofluorescence to enable precise quantification of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression in Purkinje cell bodies and their synaptic terminals in the dentate nucleus. Methods We investigated NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 13 protein expression in 12 clinically and genetically defined patients with mitochondrial disease and ataxia and 10 age‐matched controls. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to determine heteroplasmy levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in Purkinje cell bodies and inhibitory synapses. Results Our data reveal that complex I deficiency is present in both Purkinje cell bodies and their inhibitory synapses which surround dentate nucleus neurons. Inhibitory synapses are fewer and enlarged in patients which could represent a compensatory mechanism. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy demonstrated similarly high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in cell bodies and synapses. Conclusions This is the first study to use a validated quantitative immunofluorescence technique to determine complex I expression in neurons and presynaptic terminals, evaluating the distribution of respiratory chain deficiencies and assessing the degree of morphological abnormalities affecting synapses. Respiratory chain deficiencies detected in Purkinje cell bodies and their synapses and structural synaptic changes are likely to contribute to altered cerebellar circuitry and progression of ataxia. PMID:26337858

  17. Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptor-deficient mouse EPRO cells

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Gaines, Peter; Olins, Ada L.; Olins, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic deficiency of LBR during granulopoiesis results in hypolobulation of the mature neutrophil nucleus, as observed in human Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA) and mouse ichthyosis (ic). In this study we have utilized differentiated promyelocytes (EPRO cells) that were derived from the bone marrow of homozygous and heterozygous ichthyosis mice to examine changes to the expression of nuclear envelope proteins and heterochromatin structure that result from deficient LBR expression. Materials and Methods Wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/ic) and homozygous (ic/ic) granulocytic forms of EPRO cells were analyzed for the expression of multiple lamins and inner nuclear envelope proteins by immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. The heterochromatin architecture was also examined by immunostaining for histone lysine methylation. Results Wildtype (+/+) and heterozygous (+/ic) granulocytic forms revealed ring-shaped nuclei and contained LBR within the nuclear envelope; ic/ic granulocytes exhibited smaller ovoid nuclei devoid of LBR. The pericentric heterochromatin of undifferentiated and granulocytic ic/ic cells was condensed into larger spots and shifted away from the nuclear envelope, compared to +/+ and +/ic cell forms. Lamin A/C, which is normally not present in mature granulocytes, was significantly elevated in LBR-deficient EPRO cells. Conclusions Our observations suggest roles for LBR during granulopoiesis which may involve augmenting nuclear membrane growth, facilitating compartmentalization of heterochromatin and promoting down-regulation of lamin A/C expression. PMID:18495328

  18. Dicer suppresses the malignant phenotype in VHL-deficient clear cell renal cell carcinoma by inhibiting HIF-2α.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang; Li, Hongzhao; Ma, Xin; Gao, Yu; Bao, Xu; Du, Qingshan; Ma, Minghui; Liu, Kan; Yao, Yuanxin; Huang, Qingbo; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-04-01

    Both the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and microRNA (miRNA) regulation are important mechanisms underlying the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here we demonstrate that VHL deficiency leads to downregulation of Dicer and, in turn, defects in the miRNA biogenesis machinery in ccRCCs. Dicer inhibited expression of HIF-2α, which was a direct target of Dicer-dependent miR-182-5p in VHL-deficient ccRCCs. Ectopic Dicer expression in VHL-deficient ccRCCs suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-2α both in vitro and in vivo. Reduced Dicer mRNA levels served as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in patients with VHL-deficient ccRCC. Our results indicate that downregulation of Dicer in VHL-deficient ccRCCs contributes to high levels of HIF-2α and a malignant phenotype, which suggests Dicer could be a useful therapeutic target for managing this disease. PMID:26943772

  19. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  20. Mixture-based combinatorial libraries from small individual peptide libraries: a case study on α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Pin; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The design, synthesis and screening of diversity-oriented peptide libraries using a "libraries from libraries" strategy for the development of inhibitors of α1-antitrypsin deficiency are described. The major buttress of the biochemical approach presented here is the use of well-established solid-phase split-and-mix method for the generation of mixture-based libraries. The combinatorial technique iterative deconvolution was employed for library screening. While molecular diversity is the general consideration of combinatorial libraries, exquisite design through systematic screening of small individual libraries is a prerequisite for effective library screening and can avoid potential problems in some cases. This review will also illustrate how large peptide libraries were designed, as well as how a conformation-sensitive assay was developed based on the mechanism of the conformational disease. Finally, the combinatorially selected peptide inhibitor capable of blocking abnormal protein aggregation will be characterized by biophysical, cellular and computational methods.

  1. Notch signaling deficiency underlies age-dependent depletion of satellite cells in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunhui; Wen, Yefei; Kuroda, Kazuki; Hannon, Kevin; Rudnicki, Michael A; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease characterized by muscle wasting, loss of mobility and death in early adulthood. Satellite cells are muscle-resident stem cells responsible for the repair and regeneration of damaged muscles. One pathological feature of DMD is the progressive depletion of satellite cells, leading to the failure of muscle repair. Here, we attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell ablation in the dystrophin mutant mdx mouse, a well-established model for DMD. Initial muscle degeneration activates satellite cells, resulting in increased satellite cell number in young mdx mice. This is followed by rapid loss of satellite cells with age due to the reduced self-renewal ability of mdx satellite cells. In addition, satellite cell composition is altered even in young mdx mice, with significant reductions in the abundance of non-committed (Pax7+ and Myf5-) satellite cells. Using a Notch-reporter mouse, we found that the mdx satellite cells have reduced activation of Notch signaling, which has been shown to be necessary to maintain satellite cell quiescence and self-renewal. Concomitantly, the expression of Notch1, Notch3, Jag1, Hey1 and HeyL are reduced in the mdx primary myoblast. Finally, we established a mouse model to constitutively activate Notch signaling in satellite cells, and show that Notch activation is sufficient to rescue the self-renewal deficiencies of mdx satellite cells. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling is essential for maintaining the satellite cell pool and that its deficiency leads to depletion of satellite cells in DMD.

  2. B cells assist allograft rejection in the deficiency of protein kinase c-theta.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwei; Xu, Rui; Ma, Lian Li; Han, Wei; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Williams, Phillip E; Sciammas, Roger; Chong, Anita S; Yin, Deng Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have previously shown that mice deficient in protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) have the ability to reject cardiac allografts, but are susceptible to tolerance induction. Here we tested role of B cells in assisting alloimmune responses in the absence of PKCθ. Mouse cardiac allograft transplantations were performed from Balb/c (H-2d) to PKCθ knockout (PKCθ(-/-)), PKCθ and B cell double-knockout (PBDK, H-2b) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. PBDK mice spontaneously accepted the allografts with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in the donor cardiac allograft. Anti-B cell antibody (rituximab) significantly delayed allograft rejection in PKCθ(-/-), but not in WT mice. Co-transfer of PKCθ(-/-) T plus PKCθ(-/-) B cells or primed sera triggered allograft rejection in Rag1(-/-) mice, and only major histocompatibility complex class II-enriched B cells, but not class I-enriched B cells, were able to promote rejection. This, together with the inability of PKCθ(-/-) and CD28(-/-) double-deficient (PCDK) mice to acutely reject allografts, suggested that an effective cognate interaction between PKCθ(-/-) T and B cells for acute rejection is CD28 molecule dependent. We conclude that T-B cell interactions synergize with PKCθ(-/-) T cells to mediate acute allograft rejection.

  3. Potassium deficiency triggers the development of dormant cells (akinetes) in Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (Nostocales, Cyanoprokaryota)(1).

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Assaf; Kaplan-Levy, Ruth N; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit; Quesada, Antonio; Hadas, Ora

    2013-06-01

    Akinetes are spore-like nonmotile cells that differentiate from vegetative cells of filamentous cyanobacteria from the order Nostocales. They play a key role in the survival and distribution of these species and contribute to their perennial blooms. Various environmental factors were reported to trigger the differentiation of akinetes including light intensity and quality, temperature, and nutrient deficiency. Here, we report that deprivation of potassium ion (K(+) ) triggers akinete development in the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. Akinetes formation is initiated 3 d-7 d after an induction by K(+) depletion, followed by 2-3 weeks of a maturation process. Akinete formation occurs within a restricted matrix of environmental conditions such as temperature, light intensity or photon flux. Phosphate is essential for akinete maturation and P-limitation restricts the number of mature akinetes. DNA replication is essential for akinete maturation and akinete development is limited in the presence of Nalidixic acid. While our results unequivocally demonstrated the effect of K(+) deficiency on akinete formation in laboratory cultures of A. ovalisporum, this trigger did not cause Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii to produce akinetes. Anabaena crassa however, produced akinetes upon potassium deficiency, but the highest akinete concentration was achieved at conditions that supported vegetative growth. It is speculated that an unknown internal signal is associated with the cellular response to K(+) deficiency to induce the differentiation of a certain vegetative cell in a trichome into an akinete. A universal stress protein that functions as mediator in K(+) deficiency signal transduction cascade, may communicate between the lack of K(+) and akinete induction.

  4. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances germ cell apoptosis and causes defective embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H-C; Chen, T-L; Wu, Y-H; Cheng, K-P; Lin, Y-H; Cheng, M-L; Ho, H-Y; Lo, S J; Chiu, D T-Y

    2013-01-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, known as favism, is classically manifested by hemolytic anemia in human. More recently, it has been shown that mild G6PD deficiency moderately affects cardiac function, whereas severe G6PD deficiency leads to embryonic lethality in mice. How G6PD deficiency affects organisms has not been fully elucidated due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans was established by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown to delineate the role of G6PD in animal physiology. Upon G6PD RNAi knockdown, G6PD activity was significantly hampered in C. elegans in parallel with increased oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage. Phenotypically, G6PD-knockdown enhanced germ cell apoptosis (2-fold increase), reduced egg production (65% of mock), and hatching (10% of mock). To determine whether oxidative stress is associated with G6PD knockdown-induced reproduction defects, C. elegans was challenged with a short-term hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The early phase egg production of both mock and G6PD-knockdown C. elegans were significantly affected by H2O2. However, H2O2-induced germ cell apoptosis was more dramatic in mock than that in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. To investigate the signaling pathways involved in defective oogenesis and embryogenesis caused by G6PD knockdown, mutants of p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were examined. Despite the upregulation of CEP-1 (p53), cep-1 mutation did not affect egg production and hatching in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Neither pmk-1 nor mek-1 mutation significantly affected egg production, whereas sek-1 mutation further decreased egg production in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Intriguingly, loss of function of sek-1 or mek-1 dramatically rescued defective hatching (8.3- and 9.6-fold increase, respectively) induced by G6PD knockdown. Taken together, these findings show that G6PD knockdown reduces egg production and hatching in C. elegans

  5. Down regulation of small intestinal ion transport in PDZK1- (CAP70/NHERF3) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, Jutta; Riederer, Brigitte; Tuo, Biguang; Chen, Mingmin; Manns, Michael; Biber, Jürg; Yun, Chris; Kocher, Olivier; Seidler, Ursula

    2007-07-01

    The PDZ-binding protein PDZK1 (CAP70/PDZ-dc-1/NHERF3) in vitro binds to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the anion exchangers SLC26A3 and SLC26A6 and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3, all of which are major transport proteins for intestinal anion secretion and salt absorption. This study was undertaken to search for a role of PDZK1 in regulating electrolyte transport in native murine small intestine. Short circuit current (I (SC)) and HCO-(3) secretory rate (J(HCO-)(3)) were measured to assess electrogenic anion secretion; (22)Na(+) fluxes to assess sodium absorption in isolated small intestine. NHE3, CFTR, as well as NHERF1, NHERF2, and PDZK1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels, and NHE3 total enterocyte and brush border membrane (BBM) protein abundance were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western analysis. NHE3 localization was performed by immunohistochemistry. In pdzk1 -/- jejunal mucosa, basal net Na(+) absorption as well as the inhibition of Na(+) absorption by forskolin was significantly reduced. In pdzk1 -/- duodenal mucosa, identical basal I (SC) and (J(HCO-)(3)) but a significant, yet mild, reduction of forskolin-stimulated Delta(J(HCO-)(3)) and DeltaI (SC) was observed compared to +/+ tissue. Tissue conductance, morphological features, and the DeltaI (SC) and increase in (22)Na(+) absorption in response to luminal glucose was identical in pdzk1 +/+ and -/- small intestine, ruling out a general absorptive defect. While CFTR mRNA expression levels were unchanged, NHE3 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in small intestinal mucosa of pdzk1 -/- mice. Total enterocyte and BBM abundance was not significantly different, suggesting an increased NHE3 turnover, possibly due to reduced NHE3 membrane retention time. Lack of the PDZ-adapter protein PDZK1 in murine small intestine causes a mild reduction in maximal CFTR activation, but a severe defect in electroneutral Na(+) absorption.

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are involved in lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-induced endothelial cell dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2014-08-15

    The underlying mechanisms that lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency causes infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in multiple organs and subsequent inflammation remain incompletely understood. Endothelial cells (ECs), lining the inner layer of blood vessels, constitute barriers regulating leukocytes transmigration to the site of inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that ECs are dysfunctional in LAL-deficient (lal(-/-)) mice. We found that Ly6G(+) cells transmigrated more efficiently across lal(-/-) ECs than wild-type (lal(+/+)) ECs, which were associated with increased levels of PECAM-1 and MCP-1 in lal(-/-) ECs. In addition, lal(-/-) ECs showed enhanced migration and proliferation, decreased apoptosis, but impaired tube formation and angiogenesis. lal(-/-) ECs also suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, lal(-/-) Ly6G(+) cells promoted in vivo angiogenesis (including a tumor model), EC tube formation, and proliferation. Finally, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was activated in lal(-/-) ECs, and inhibition of mTOR reversed EC dysfunctions, including decreasing Ly6G(+) cell transmigration, delaying migration, and relieving suppression of T cell proliferation, which was mediated by decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that LAL regulates EC functions through interaction with MDSCs and modulation of the mTOR pathway, which may provide a mechanistic basis for targeting MDSCs or mTOR to rejuvenate EC functions in LAL deficiency-related diseases. PMID:25000979

  7. Successful clinical implementation of corneal epithelial stem cell therapy for treatment of unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Sai; Ahmad, Sajjad; Lako, Majlinda; Figueiredo, Francisco

    2010-03-31

    The corneal epithelium is maintained by a population of stem cells known as limbal stem cells (LSCs) due to their location in the basal layer of the outer border of the cornea known as the limbus. Treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) has been achieved with transplantation of ex vivo expanded LSCs taken from a small biopsy of limbus. This is a relatively new technique, and as such, specific national or international guidance has yet to be established. Because of the lack of such specific guidance, our group has sought to minimize any risk to the patient by adopting certain modifications to the research methodologies in use at present. These include the replacement of all non-human animal products from the culture system and the production of all reagents and cultures under Good Manufacturing Practice conditions. In addition, for the first time, a strictly defined uniform group of patients with total unilateral LSCD and no other significant ocular conditions has been used to allow the success or failure of treating LSCD to be attributable directly to the proposed stem cell therapy. A prospectively designed study with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria was used to enroll patients from our database of patients with unilateral LSCD. Eight eyes of eight consecutive patients with unilateral total LSCD treated with ex vivo expanded autologous LSC transplant on human amniotic membrane (HAM) with a mean follow-up of 19 (RANGE) months were included in the study. Postoperatively, satisfactory ocular surface reconstruction with a stable corneal epithelium was obtained in all eyes (100%). At last examination, best corrected visual acuity improved in five eyes and remained unchanged in three eyes. Vision impairment and pain scores improved in all patients (p < .05). This study demonstrates that transplantation of autologous limbal epithelial stem cells cultured on HAM without the use of non-human animal cells or products is a safe and effective method of

  8. Cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes L-forms feature abrogated pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Barbara; Staubli, Titu; Harris, Nicola L.; Rogler, Gerhard; Kopf, Manfred; Loessner, Martin J.; Schuppler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Stable L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria which are able to multiply and propagate indefinitely, despite the absence of a rigid peptidoglycan cell wall. We investigated whether L-forms of the intracellular pathogen L. monocytogenes possibly retain pathogenicity, and if they could trigger an innate immune response. While phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes L-forms by non-activated macrophages sometimes resulted in an unexpected persistence of the bacteria in the phagocytes, they were effectively eliminated by IFN-γ preactivated or bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM). These findings were in line with the observed down-regulation of virulence factors in the cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes. Absence of Interferon-β (IFN-β) triggering indicated inability of L-forms to escape from the phagosome into the cytosol. Moreover, abrogated cytokine response in MyD88-deficient dendritic cells (DC) challenged with L. monocytogenes L-forms suggested an exclusive TLR-dependent host response. Taken together, our data demonstrate a strong attenuation of Listeria monocytogenes L-form pathogenicity, due to diminished expression of virulence factors and innate immunity recognition, eventually resulting in elimination of L-form bacteria from phagocytes. PMID:24904838

  9. Slug deficiency enhances self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells during hematopoietic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Shao, Lijian; Bai, Hao; Wang, Zack Z; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2010-03-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms tightly govern hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) decisions of self-renewal and differentiation. However, transcription factors that can selectively regulate HSC self-renewal division after stress remain to be identified. Slug is an evolutionarily conserved zinc-finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic cells and is critical for the radioprotection of these key cells. We studied the effect of Slug in the regulation of HSCs in Slug-deficient mice under normal and stress conditions using serial functional assays. Here, we show that Slug deficiency does not disturb hematopoiesis or alter HSC homeostasis and differentiation in bone marrow but increases the numbers of primitive hematopoietic cells in the extramedullary spleen site. Deletion of Slug enhances HSC repopulating potential but not its homing and differentiation ability. Furthermore, Slug deficiency increases HSC proliferation and repopulating potential in vivo after myelosuppression and accelerates HSC expansion during in vitro culture. Therefore, we propose that Slug is essential for controlling the transition of HSCs from relative quiescence under steady-state condition to rapid proliferation under stress conditions. Our data suggest that inhibition of Slug in HSCs may present a novel strategy for accelerating hematopoietic recovery, thus providing therapeutic benefits for patients after clinical myelosuppressive treatment.

  10. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 hypomethylation in folate-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shaoyan; Wang, Li; Guan, Yunqian; Shangguan, Shaofang; Du, Qingan; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Folate is thought to contribute to health and development by methylation regulation. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1), which is regulated by methylation modification, plays an important role in sculpting the structure and function of genomes. Some studies have shown that folate concentration is related to LINE-1 methylation. However, the direct association between LINE-1 methylation and folate deficiency remains unclear. To explore whether folate deficiency directly induced LINE-1 hypomethylation and to analyze the relationship between folate concentration and the LINE-1 methylation level, mouse ESCs were treated with various concentrations of folate which was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and the homocysteine content was detected by ELISA. LINE-1 methylation was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry at various time points. Concurrently, cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. The result showed that the intracellular folate decreases under folate-deficient condition, conversely, homocysteine content increased gradually and there was a negatively correlated between them. Folate insufficiency induced LINE-1 hypomethylation at the lowest levels in folate-free group and moderate in folate-deficient group, compared with that in the folate-normal group at day 18. Moreover, LINE-1 methylation level was positively correlated with folate content, and negatively correlated with homocysteine content. At corresponding time points, proliferation and differentiation of mouse ESCs showed no alteration in all groups. Our data indicated that folate deficiency affected the homeostasis of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, leading to reduced LINE-1 methylation in mouse ESCs. This study provides preliminary evidence of folate deficiency affecting early embryonic development.

  11. Effect of red blood cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, Voravarn S; Chonlasin, Rachaneekorn; Suwantol, Lerlugsn; Pung-Amritt, Parichat; Tachavanich, Kalaya; Yogsan, Suthee; Viprakasit, Vip

    2002-08-01

    Eighty nine males aged 1-13 years diagnosed with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and admitted to the Department of Pediatrics Siriraj Hospital from March 1998 to April 2000 were included in this study. 17 cases (19.1%) had red blood cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and 72 cases (80.9%) had normal G-6-PD enzyme activities. Most of the patients were classified as DHF grade II in severity. 3 of 17 G-6-PD deficient cases had serious complications and all of them had acute intravascular hemolysis requiring blood transfusions. One of these also had hematemesis, one had azothemia and the other one had renal failure and severe liver failure with hepatic encephalopathy. In the cases without obvious hemolytic or hepatic complications, G-6-PD deficient cases had mildly but significantly higher total birirubin and indirect bilirubin, as well as a lower hematocrit than those who had normal G-6-PD. Reticulocyte count was low during the acute phase, however, during recovery, the levels were significantly increased in both groups. In the non G-6-PD deficient group, G-6-PD enzyme levels were significantly decreased during the acute phase compared to the normal controls but rose significantly to normal levels during the recovery phase. There were no statistically significant differences in other laboratory data. All patients recovered fully from DHF. The prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency in male patients who had DHF in this study was 19.1 per cent which was higher than the prevalence in a previous study of 12 per cent in Bangkok. This may imply that G-6-PD deficient males suffer more from DHF compared to normal G-6-PD subjects.

  12. KRAS Mutation in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Extrapulmonary Small Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kodaz, Hilmi; Taştekin, Ebru; Erdoğan, Bülent; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tozkır, Hilmi; Gürkan, Hakan; Türkmen, Esma; Demirkan, Bora; Uzunoğlu, Sernaz; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. It is mainly classified into 2 groups: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC) are very rare. The Ras oncogene controls most of the cellular functions in the cell. Overall, 21.6% of human cancers contain a Kirsten Ras (KRAS) mutation. SCLC and EPSCC have several similar features but their clinical course is different. Aims: We investigated the KRAS mutation status in SCLC and EPSCC. Study design: Mutation research. Methods: Thirty-seven SCLC and 15 EPSCC patients were included in the study. The pathological diagnoses were confirmed by a second pathologist. KRAS analysis was performed in our medical genetic department. DNA isolation was performed with primary tumor tissue using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) in all patients. The therascreen KRAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) was used for KRAS analyses. Results: Thirty-four (91.9%) of the SCLC patients were male, while 11 (73.3%) of the EPSCC l patients were female. SCLC was more common in males, and EPSCC in females (p=0.001). A KRAS mutation was found in 6 (16.2%) if SCLC patients. The most common mutation was Q61R (CAA>CGA). Among the 15 EPSCC patients, 2 had a KRAS mutation (13.3%). When KRAS mutant and wild type patients were compared in the SCLC group, no difference was found for overall survival (p=0.6). Conclusion: In previous studies, the incidence of KRAS mutation in SCLC was 1–3%; however, it was 16.2% in our study. Therefore, there may be ethnic and geographical differences in the KRAS mutations of SCLC. As a result, KRAS mutation should not be excluded in SCLC.

  13. Autophagy deficiency leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, ER stress, and cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Munch, David; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Bressendorff, Simon; Park, Ohkmae K; Hofius, Daniel; Petersen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation and recycling process that is also involved in defense against microbial pathogens and in certain forms of cellular suicide. Autophagy has been proposed to negatively regulate plant immunity-associated cell death related to the hypersensitive response (HR), as older autophagy-deficient mutants are unable to contain this type of cell death 5 to 10 d after infection. Such spreading cell death was found to require NPR1 (nonexpressor of PR genes 1), but surprisingly did not occur in younger atg mutants. In contrast, we find that npr1 mutants are not impaired in rapid programmed cell death activation upon pathogen recognition. Furthermore, our molecular evidence suggests that the NPR1-dependent spreading cell death in older atg mutants may originate from an inability to cope with excessive accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and ER stress which derive from salicylic acid (SA)-dependent signaling (e.g., systemic acquired resistance). We also demonstrate that both senescence and immunity-related cell death seen in older atg mutants can be recapitulated in younger atg mutants primed with ER stress. We therefore propose that the reduction in SA signaling caused by npr1 loss-of-function is sufficient to alleviate the stress levels accumulated during aging in autophagy deficient cells which would otherwise become insurmountable and lead to uncontrolled cell death. PMID:25046116

  14. Effect of Iron Deficiency on the Respiration of Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) Cells.

    PubMed

    Pascal, N.; Douce, R.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of iron deficiency on cell culture growth, cell respiration, mitochondrial oxidative properties, and the electron transport chain were studied with suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells. Iron deprivation considerably decreased the initial growth rates and limited the maximum density of the cells. Under these conditions, the cells remained swollen throughout their growth. The absence of iron led to a steady decline in the uncoupled rate of O2 consumption. When the uncoupled rate of O2 uptake closely approximated the respiratory rate, the cells began to collapse. At this stage, the level of all the cytochromes and electron paramagnetic resonance-detectable Fe-S clusters of the mitochondrial inner membrane were dramatically decreased. Nevertheless, it appeared from substrate oxidation measurements that this overall depletion in iron-containing components solely disturbed the functioning of complex II, whereas neither complexes I, III, or IV, nor the machinery involved in ATP synthesis, was apparently impaired in iron-deficient mitochondria. However, our results suggest that the impairment of complex II resulted in a strong reduction of the overall capacity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which was responsible for determining the rate of endogenous respiration in sycamore cells. Finally, this situation led to a depletion of various energy metabolites that could contribute to the premature cell death.

  15. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia. Results There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25453653

  16. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-07-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag(+), an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2-1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency.

  17. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J.; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M.; Herrera-Rodríguez, M. Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M. Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag+, an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2‐oxo)‐indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2‐1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency. PMID:25922480

  18. Reconstruction of limbal stem cell deficient corneal surface with induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Rohaina, Che Man; Then, Kong Yong; Ng, Angela Min Hwei; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Zahidin, Aida Zairani Mohd; Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah B H

    2014-03-01

    The cornea can be damaged by a variety of clinical disorders or chemical, mechanical, and thermal injuries. The objectives of this study were to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to corneal lineage, to form a tissue engineered corneal substitute (TEC) using BMSCs, and to treat corneal surface defects in a limbal stem cell deficiency model. BMSCs were induced to corneal lineage using limbal medium for 10 days. Induced BMSCs demonstrated upregulation of corneal stem cell markers; β1-integrin, C/EBPδ, ABCG2, and p63, increased protein expression of CK3 and p63 significantly compared with the uninduced ones. For TEC formation, passage 1 BMSCs were trypsinized and seeded on amniotic membrane in a transwell co-culture system and were grown in limbal medium. Limbal stem cell deficiency models were induced by alkaline injury, and the TEC was implanted for 8 weeks. Serial slit lamp evaluation revealed remarkable improvement in corneal regeneration in terms of corneal clarity and reduced vascularization. Histologic and optical coherence tomography analyses demonstrated comparable corneal thickness and achieved stratified epithelium with a compact stromal layer resembling that of normal cornea. CK3 and p63 were expressed in the newly regenerated cornea. In conclusion, BMSCs can be induced into corneal epithelial lineage, and these cells are viable for the formation of TEC, to be used for the reconstruction of the corneal surface in the limbal stem cell deficient model.

  19. CD8+IL-17+ T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet–Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Dodd-o, Jeffrey M.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Miller, Hannah L.; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet−/− recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet−/− recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8+ T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ–dominant responses in WT mice. CD4+ T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet−/− recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ responses in both T-bet−/− and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet−/− recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet−/− recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade–resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet−/− recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet−/− allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet–deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade–resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8+IL-17+ T cells. Our data support T-bet–deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation

  20. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  1. Diacylglycerol kinase zeta deficiency in a non-CD4+T cell compartment leads to increased peanut hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Mike; Wan, Chi-Keung; Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Burks, A. Wesley; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Peanut sensitization in diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) deficient mice led to elevated peanut-IgE levels and severe anaphylaxis. DGKζ deficient CD4+T cells did not account for the phenotype. Future studies will determine which immune lineage caused increased food hypersensitivity. PMID:21439625

  2. LEAD CLEANER CELLS, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHWEST. NOTE SMALL HANDWHEELS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEAD CLEANER CELLS, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHWEST. NOTE SMALL HANDWHEELS FOR GATE VALVES USED TO ADJUST FLOW BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL CELLS. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  3. KDM1A promotes tumor cell invasion by silencing TIMP3 in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Yang, Yan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xujun; Chen, Sujun; Yang, Yuxin; Huang, Tianhao; Zhao, Tian; Tang, Liang; Su, Bo; Li, Fei; Liu, X. Shirley; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in tumor metastasis. KDM1A is a histone demethylase specific for H3K4me2/me1 demethylation, and has been found to be overexpressed in many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of KDM1A in lung cancer remains unclear. Here, we show that KDM1A promotes cancer metastasis in NSCLC cells by repressing TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3) expression. Consistently with this, overexpression of TIMP3 inhibited MMP2 expression and JNK phosphorylation, both of which are known to be important for cell invasion and migration. Importantly, knockdown of TIMP3 in KDM1A-deficient cells rescued the metastatic capability of NSCLC cells. These findings were also confirmed by pharmacological inhibition assays. We further demonstrate that KDM1A removes H3K4me2 at the promoter of TIMP3, thus repressing the transcription of TIMP3. Finally, high expression of KDM1A and low expression of TIMP3 significantly correlate with a poor prognosis in NSCLC patients. This study establishes a mechanism by which KDM1A promotes cancer metastasis in NSCLC cells, and we suggest that KDM1A may be a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment. PMID:27058897

  4. 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jeremy, Kris P.; Plummer, Zoe E.; Head, David J.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Sanders, Kelly L.; Wallington, Amanda; Storry, Jill R.; Gilsanz, Florinda; Delaunay, Jean; Avent, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein 4.1R is an important component of the red cell membrane skeleton. It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin. Design and Methods Spontaneous and ligation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure on erythrocytes from two patients with 4.1R deficiency were studied, using CD47 glycoprotein and glycophorin C as ligands. We also looked for protein abnormalities in the 4.1R - based multiprotein complex. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly increased in 4.1R-deficient erythrocytes obtained from the two different individuals when ligands to CD47 glycoprotein were bound. Spontaneous phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. 4.1R, glycophorin C and p55 were missing or sharply reduced. Furthermore there was an alteration or deficiency of CD47 glycoprotein and a lack of CD44 glycoprotein. Based on a recent study in 4.1R-deficient mice, we found that there are clear functional differences between interactions of human red cell 4.1R and its murine counterpart. Conclusions Glycophorin C is known to bind 4.1R, and we have defined previously that it also binds CD47. From our evidence, we suggest that 4.1R plays a role in the phosphatidylserine exposure signaling pathway that is of fundamental importance in red cell turnover. The linkage of CD44 to 4.1R may be relevant to this process. PMID:19794081

  5. Deficiency of ADAP/Fyb/SLAP-130 destabilizes SKAP55 in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Norton, Darrell D; Precht, Patricia; Martindale, Jennifer L; Burkhardt, Janis K; Wange, Ronald L

    2005-06-24

    ADAP (adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein) and SKAP55 (Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein of 55 kDa) are T cell adaptors that mediate inside-out signaling from the T cell antigen receptor to integrins, giving rise to increased integrin affinity/avidity and formation of the immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. These two proteins are tightly and constitutively associated with one another, and their ability to interact is required for inside-out signaling. Here we show in an ADAP-deficient Jurkat T cell line that the co-dependence of ADAP and SKAP55 extends beyond their functional and physical interactions and show that SKAP55 protein is unstable in the absence of ADAP. Restoration of ADAP to the ADAP-deficient Jurkat T cell line restores SKAP55 expression by causing a 5-fold decrease in the rate of SKAP55 proteolysis. Inactivation of the Src homology 3 domain of SKAP55, which mediates the association between SKAP55 with ADAP, blocks the protective effect of ADAP. The half-life of SKAP55, in the absence of ADAP, is approximately 15-20 min, increasing to 90 min in the presence of ADAP. This is a remarkably rapid rate of turnover for a signaling protein and suggests the possibility that stimuli that signal for the stabilization of SKAP55 may play an important role in T cell adhesion and conjugate formation.

  6. Detection of biosynthetic intermediates in proteoglycan-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, R.I.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants lacking xylosyltransferase or galactosyltransferase I do not synthesize mature proteoglycans. The authors predicted that the mutants would accumulate biosynthetic intermediates upstream from the block imposed by mutation. Using the fusogenic properties of vesicular stomatitis virus, the authors fused monolayers composed of galactosyltransferase I-deficient cells with virus-infected xylosyltransferase-deficient cells. Immediately following fusion the cells were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ for one hour. Quantification of radioactive products showed that the mutants contained biosynthetically active intermediates that proceeded to mature glycosaminoglycans. The production of glycosaminoglycan was dependent on fusion, and fusion of each mutant to itself did not result in radioactive product. Analysis of the newly made glycosaminoglycans through HPLC anion-exchange chromatography showed that the fused cells synthesized heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate in about the same proportion as wildtype cells. These findings suggest that the mutants accumulate precursors to both families of proteoglycans. They also found that progeny virus from infected CHO cells contain proteoglycans, presumably derived from the plasma membrane. This observation suggests that the virus can be used to isolate intermediates accumulating in the mutants.

  7. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  8. Telomerase Deficiency Causes Alveolar Stem Cell Senescence-associated Low-grade Inflammation in Lungs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruping; Zhang, Kexiong; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Xiaoyin; Wang, Jianqiu; Li, Li; Cong, Yusheng; Ju, Zhenyu; Xu, Dakang; Williams, Bryan R G; Jia, Jihui; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2015-12-25

    Mutations of human telomerase RNA component (TERC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are associated with a subset of lung aging diseases, but the mechanisms by which TERC and TERT participate in lung diseases remain unclear. In this report, we show that knock-out (KO) of the mouse gene Terc or Tert causes pulmonary alveolar stem cell replicative senescence, epithelial impairment, formation of alveolar sacs, and characteristic inflammatory phenotype. Deficiency in TERC or TERT causes a remarkable elevation in various proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, CXCL15 (human IL-8 homolog), IL-10, TNF-α, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2)); decrease in TGF-β1 and TGFβRI receptor in the lungs; and spillover of IL-6 and CXCL15 into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. In addition to increased gene expressions of α-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1α1, suggesting myofibroblast differentiation, TERC deficiency also leads to marked cellular infiltrations of a mononuclear cell population positive for the leukocyte common antigen CD45, low-affinity Fc receptor CD16/CD32, and pattern recognition receptor CD11b in the lungs. Our data demonstrate for the first time that telomerase deficiency triggers alveolar stem cell replicative senescence-associated low-grade inflammation, thereby driving pulmonary premature aging, alveolar sac formation, and fibrotic lesion. PMID:26518879

  9. Dyclonine rescues frataxin deficiency in animal models and buccal cells of patients with Friedreich's ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Scott, Brian D.; McMackin, Marissa Z.; Jasoliya, Mittal; Brown, Brandon; Wulff, Heike; Perlman, Susan L.; Pook, Mark A.; Cortopassi, Gino A.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited deficiency in the mitochondrial protein frataxin (FXN) causes the rare disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA), for which there is no successful treatment. We identified a redox deficiency in FA cells and used this to model the disease. We screened a 1600-compound library to identify existing drugs, which could be of therapeutic benefit. We identified the topical anesthetic dyclonine as protective. Dyclonine increased FXN transcript and FXN protein dose-dependently in FA cells and brains of animal models. Dyclonine also rescued FXN-dependent enzyme deficiencies in the iron–sulfur enzymes, aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase. Dyclonine induces the Nrf2 [nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2] transcription factor, which we show binds an upstream response element in the FXN locus. Additionally, dyclonine also inhibited the activity of histone methyltransferase G9a, known to methylate histone H3K9 to silence FA chromatin. Chronic dosing in a FA mouse model prevented a performance decline in balance beam studies. A human clinical proof-of-concept study was completed in eight FA patients dosed twice daily using a 1% dyclonine rinse for 1 week. Six of the eight patients showed an increase in buccal cell FXN levels, and fold induction was significantly correlated with disease severity. Dyclonine represents a novel therapeutic strategy that can potentially be repurposed for the treatment of FA. PMID:25113747

  10. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  11. Small RNA Profiling Reveals Phosphorus Deficiency as a Contributing Factor in Symptom Expression for Citrus Huanglongbing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Jin, Hailing

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn—a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology. PMID:23292880

  12. Small RNA profiling reveals phosphorus deficiency as a contributing factor in symptom expression for citrus huanglongbing disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Albrecht, Ute; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Wang, Airong; Coffey, Michael D; Girke, Thomas; Wang, Zonghua; Close, Timothy J; Roose, Mikeal; Yokomi, Raymond K; Folimonova, Svetlana; Vidalakis, Georgios; Rouse, Robert; Bowman, Kim D; Jin, Hailing

    2013-03-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus 'Candidatus Liberibacter' (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn-a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology.

  13. Screening for Active Small Molecules in Mitochondrial Complex I Deficient Patient's Fibroblasts, Reveals AICAR as the Most Beneficial Compound

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Sarah; Link, Gabriela; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Saada, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (CI) is a common defect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite major advances in the biochemical and molecular diagnostics and the deciphering of CI structure, function assembly and pathomechanism, there is currently no satisfactory cure for patients with mitochondrial complex I defects. Small molecules provide one feasible therapeutic option, however their use has not been systematically evaluated using a standardized experimental system. In order to evaluate potentially therapeutic compounds, we set up a relatively simple system measuring different parameters using only a small amount of patient's fibroblasts, in glucose free medium, where growth is highly OXPOS dependent. Ten different compounds were screened using fibroblasts derived from seven CI patients, harboring different mutations. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR) was found to be the most beneficial compound improving growth and ATP content while decreasing ROS production. AICAR also increased mitochondrial biogenesis without altering mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ). Fluorescence microscopy data supported increased mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). Other compounds such as; bezafibrate and oltipraz were rated as favorable while polyphenolic phytochemicals (resverastrol, grape seed extract, genistein and epigallocatechin gallate) were found not significant or detrimental. Although the results have to be verified by more thorough investigation of additional OXPHOS parameters, preliminary rapid screening of potential therapeutic compounds in individual patient's fibroblasts could direct and advance personalized medical treatment. PMID:22046392

  14. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  15. An electron-deficient small molecule accessible from sustainable synthesis and building blocks for use as a fullerene alternative in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Seth M; Topple, Jessica M; Payne, Abby-Jo; Sun, Jon-Paul; Hill, Ian G; Welch, Gregory C

    2015-04-27

    An electron-deficient small molecule accessible from sustainable isoindigo and phthalimide building blocks was synthesized via optimized synthetic procedures that incorporate microwave-assisted synthesis and a heterogeneous catalyst for Suzuki coupling, and direct heteroarylation carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. The material was designed as a non-fullerene acceptor with the help of DFT calculations and characterized by optical, electronic, and thermal analysis. Further investigation of the material revealed a differing solid-state morphology with the use of three well-known processing conditions: thermal annealing, solvent vapor annealing and small volume fractions of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) additive. These unique morphologies persist in the active layer blends and have demonstrated a distinct influence on device performance. Organic photovoltaic-bulk heterojunction (OPV-BHJ) devices show an inherently high open circuit voltage (Voc ) with the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) cells reaching 1.0 V with 0.4 v/v % DIO as a processing additive.

  16. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3–15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  17. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  18. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase.

  19. Establishment of HeLa Cell Mutants Deficient in Sphingolipid-Related Genes Using TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components in eukaryotes and have various cellular functions. Recent developments in genome-editing technologies have facilitated gene disruption in various organisms and cell lines. We here show the disruption of various sphingolipid metabolic genes in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A TALEN pair targeting the human CERT gene (alternative name COL4A3BP) encoding a ceramide transport protein induced a loss-of-function phenotype in more than 60% of HeLa cells even though the cell line has a pseudo-triploid karyotype. We have isolated several loss-of-function mutant clones for CERT, UGCG (encoding glucosylceramide synthase), and B4GalT5 (encoding the major lactosylceramide synthase), and also a CERT/UGCG double-deficient clone. Characterization of these clones supported previous proposals that CERT primarily contributes to the synthesis of SM but not GlcCer, and that B4GalT5 is the major LacCer synthase. These newly established sphingolipid-deficient HeLa cell mutants together with our previously established stable transfectants provide a ‘sphingolipid-modified HeLa cell panel,’ which will be useful to elucidate the functions of various sphingolipid species against essentially the same genomic background. PMID:24498430

  20. IgH sequences in common variable immune deficiency reveal altered B cell development and selection**

    PubMed Central

    Roskin, Krishna M.; Simchoni, Noa; Liu, Yi; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Seo, Katie; Hoh, Ramona A.; Pham, Tho; Park, Joon H.; Furman, David; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; James, Judith A.; Nadeau, Kari C.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Boyd, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immune deficiency, affecting ∼1 in 25,000 persons. These patients suffer from impaired antibody responses, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to lymphoid cancers. To explore the cellular basis for these clinical phenotypes, we conducted high-throughput DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements from 93 CVID patients and 105 control subjects and sorted naïve and memory B cells from 13 of the CVID patients and 10 of the control subjects. CVID patients showed abnormal VDJ rearrangement and abnormal formation of complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3). We observed decreased selection against antibodies with long CDR3 regions in memory repertoires and decreased V gene replacement, offering possible mechanisms for increased patient autoreactivity. Our data indicate that patient immunodeficiency might derive both from decreased diversity of the naïve B cell pool and decreased somatic hypermutation in memory repertoires. CVID patients also exhibited abnormal clonal expansion of unmutated B cells relative to controls. Although impaired B cell germinal center activation is commonly viewed as causative in CVID, these data indicate that CVID B cells diverge from controls as early as the pro-B cell stage and suggest possible explanations for the increased incidence of autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and lymphoma CVID patients. PMID:26311730

  1. DNA Methyltransferase protein synthesis is reduced in CXXC finger protein 1-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill S; Palam, Lakshmi R; Tate, Courtney M; Sanford, Jeremy R; Wek, Ronald C; Skalnik, David G

    2009-05-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (CFP1) binds to unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is required for embryogenesis. CFP1 is also a component of the Setd1A and Setd1B histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking CFP1 fail to differentiate, and exhibit a 70% reduction in global genomic cytosine methylation and a 50% reduction in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) protein and activity. This study investigated the underlying mechanism for reduced DNMT1 expression in CFP1-deficient ES cells. DNMT1 transcript levels were significantly elevated in ES cells lacking CFP1, despite the observed reduction in DNMT1 protein levels. To address the posttranscriptional mechanisms by which CFP1 regulates DNMT1 protein activity, pulse/chase analyses were carried out, demonstrating a modest reduction in DNMT1 protein half-life in CFP1-deficient ES cells. Additionally, global protein synthesis was decreased in ES cells lacking CFP1, contributing to a reduction in the synthesis of DNMT1 protein. ES cells lacking CFP1 were found to contain elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF2alpha, and an accompanying reduction in translation initiation as revealed by a lower level of polyribosomes. These results reveal a novel role for CFP1 in the regulation of translation initiation, and indicate that loss of CFP1 function leads to decreased DNMT1 protein synthesis and half-life. PMID:19388845

  2. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  3. Excretion of laccase by sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells. Effects of a copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bligny, R; Gaillard, J; Douce, R

    1986-07-15

    Copper-deprived sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells do not excrete molecules of active laccase in their culture medium. In the range of 2-100 micrograms of copper initially present per litre of nutrient solution, the total laccase activity measured in the cell suspensions at the end of the exponential phase of growth was closely proportional to the amount of added copper. However, copper-deprived cells excreted the laccase apoprotein (laccase without copper) at the same rate as copper-supplied cells excreted the active, copper-containing, laccase. When the culture medium was initially supplied with limiting amounts of copper, the active laccase was excreted until all copper molecules were metabolized. Thereafter, the laccase apoprotein was excreted. Consequently, at the end of the exponential phase of growth, the cell supernatants contained a mixture of apoprotein and copper-containing laccase. After purification and concentration, this mixture of copper-containing laccase (blue) and laccase apoprotein (slightly yellow) showed a yellow-green colour. Under copper-limiting culture conditions an equivalent decrease of Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3 Cu2+ was observed. Addition of copper to copper-deficient enzyme solutions does not result in a recovery of the enzyme activity. However, when added to copper-deficient sycamore-cell suspensions, copper induced a recovery of the excretion of active enzyme, at a normal rate, within about 10 h. The first molecules of active laccase were excreted after 3-4 h.

  4. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity.

  5. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity. PMID:26391810

  6. Apo A-I inhibits foam cell formation in apo E–deficient mice after monocyte adherence to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Dansky, Hayes M.; Charlton, Sherri A.; Barlow, Courtenay B.; Tamminen, Minna; Smith, Jonathan D.; Frank, Joy S.; Breslow, Jan L.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the human apo A-I transgene on the apo E–deficient background increases HDL cholesterol and greatly diminishes fatty streak lesion formation. To examine the mechanism, prelesional events in atherosclerotic plaque development were examined in 6- to 8-week-old apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. A quantitative assessment of subendothelial lipid deposition by freeze-fracture and deep-etch electron microscopy indicated that elevated apo A-I did not affect the distribution or amount of aortic arch subendothelial lipid deposits. Immunohistochemical staining for VCAM-1 demonstrated similar expression on endothelial cells at prelesional aortic branch sites from both apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. Transmission electron microscopy revealed monocytes bound to the aortic arch in mice of both genotypes, and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the area occupied by bound mononuclear cells was unchanged. Serum paraoxonase and aryl esterase activity did not differ between apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. These data suggest that increases in apo A-I and HDL cholesterol inhibit foam cell formation in apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice at a stage following lipid deposition, endothelial activation, and monocyte adherence, without increases in HDL-associated paraoxonase. PMID:10393696

  7. Acetate-mediated growth inhibition in sterol 14alpha-demethylation-deficient cells of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, O; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus thought to be viable in the presence of a deficiency in sterol 14alpha-demethylation. We showed in a strain of this species that the deficiency, caused either by a mutation or by an azole antifungal agent, made the cells susceptible to growth inhibition by acetate included in the culture medium. Studies with a mutant demonstrated that the inhibition was complete at a sodium acetate concentration of 0.24 M (20 g/liter) and was evident even at a pH of 8, the latter result indicating the involvement of acetate ions rather than the undissociated form of acetic acid. In fluconazole-treated cells, sterol profiles determined by thin-layer chromatography revealed that the minimum sterol 14alpha-demethylation-inhibitory concentrations (MDICs) of the drug, thought to be the most important parameter for clinical purposes, were practically identical in the media with and without 0.24 M acetate and were equivalent to the MIC in the acetate-supplemented medium. The acetate-mediated growth inhibition of azole-treated cells was confirmed with two additional strains of C. albicans and four different agents, suggesting the possibility of generalization. From these results, it was surmised that the acetate-containing medium may find use in azole susceptibility testing, for which there is currently no method capable of measuring MDICs directly for those fungi whose viability is not lost as a result of sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency. Additionally, the acetate-supplemented agar medium was found to be useful in detecting reversions from sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency to proficiency. PMID:9869573

  8. Decreased food intake rather than zinc deficiency is associated with changes in plasma leptin, metabolic rate, and activity levels in zinc deficient rats( small star, filled).

    PubMed

    Gaetke, Lisa M.; Frederich, Robert C.; Oz, Helieh S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2002-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that the reduced food intake and poor weight gain in zinc deficient rats is due to: increased plasma leptin concentration, increased physical activity and/or increased metabolic rate. Weanling rats were assigned to three groups: controls fed ad libitum (C), zinc deficient (ZD), and pair-fed controls (PF), and tested in a metabolic chamber and activity monitor at baseline and weekly for four weeks. At the end of the study, all groups were compared for differences in plasma leptin concentrations. ZD and PF animals had markedly reduced food intake and weight gain. ZD had reduced stereotypic and locomotor activity compared to PF animals and both groups demonstrated an abolished peri-nocturnal activity spike and were much less active than controls. This was associated with a reduced total metabolic rate by day 30: ZD (0.73 +/- 0.07 kcal/hr, p = 0.0001) and PF (0.83 +/- 0.06 kcal/hr, p = 0.0001) groups vs. controls (1.82 +/- 0.09 kcal/hr). Plasma leptin concentrations in ZD (1.55 +/- 0.06 &mgr;g/L) were lower than controls (2.01 +/- 0.18 &mgr;g/L, p < 0.03), but neither ZD nor controls were statistically different from PF (1.68 +/- 0.05 &mgr;g/L). Both low leptin concentrations and low metabolic rates in the ZD and PF rats were associated with decreased food intake rather than zinc deficiency. The reduced food intake and poor weight gain observed in zinc deficient rats could not be explained by elevated leptin concentrations, hypermetabolism, or increased activity. Low serum leptin concentrations, hypometabolism, and decreased activity are more likely the result of the anorexia of zinc deficiency.

  9. Oxidant injury of caucasian glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase—deficient red blood cells by phagocytosing leukocytes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Baehner, Robert L.; Nathan, David G.; Castle, William B.

    1971-01-01

    Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency of red blood cells (RBC) may develop sudden hemolytic anemia during infection. Since phagocytizing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are known to generate hydrogen peroxide, we explored the influence of this oxidant product of PMN on juxtaposed G6PD-deficient and normal RBC. The oxidant stress induced by phagocytosis depleted G6PD-deficient RBC of reduced glutathione (GSH) and this was associated with rapid removal of these cells from the circulation by the liver and spleen. No such effect was observed on normal RBC. Phagocytizing chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) PMN which lack hydrogen peroxide generation, failed to diminish GSH level in G6PD-deficient RBC. Thus, PMN can pose as a source of oxidant damage to G6PD-deficient RBC due to hydrogen peroxide generated during phagocytosis. PMID:5129301

  10. Argonaute and Argonaute-Bound Small RNAs in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lihong; Wang, Lin; Teng, Feng; Zhou, Lanting; Zhang, Wenjing; Xiao, Juan; Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs are essential for a variety of cellular functions. Argonaute (AGO) proteins are associated with all of the different classes of small RNAs, and are indispensable in small RNA-mediated regulatory pathways. AGO proteins have been identified in various types of stem cells in diverse species from plants and animals. This review article highlights recent progress on how AGO proteins and AGO-bound small RNAs regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of distinct stem cell types, including pluripotent, germline, somatic, and cancer stem cells. PMID:26861290

  11. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. PMID:27273469

  12. The response of the metabolic network of the red blood cell to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Lu, Zuhong

    2005-01-01

    The response of the metabolic network of human red blood cell is investigated using the E-Cell simulation system when pyruvate kinase (PK) is deficient. The results that several downstream metabolites of the glycolysis pathway accumulate are in a good agreement with experimental data reported in literatures. This accumulation results in the reaction that phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes reversing its direction. Mathematical analysis to the simulation results shows that the PGK-catalyzing reaction reversing its direction happens simultaneously with an abrupt change of the second derivative of the ATP quantity. PMID:17282332

  13. Germ-cell deficient (gcd), an insertional mutation manifested as infertility in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pellas, T C; Ramachandran, B; Duncan, M; Pan, S S; Marone, M; Chada, K

    1991-10-01

    A genetic analysis is necessary to gain a greater understanding of the complex developmental processes in mammals. Toward this end, an insertional transgenic mouse mutant has been isolated that results in abnormal germ-cell development. This recessive mutation manifests as infertility in both males and females and is specific for the reproductive organs, since all other tissues examined were histologically normal. A developmental analysis of the gonadal tissues demonstrated that the germ cells were specifically depleted as early as day 11.5 of embryonic development, while the various somatic cells were apparently unaffected. Therefore, the mutated locus must play a critical role in the migration/proliferation of primordial germ cells to the genital ridges of developing embryos. In addition, females homozygous for the mutation could potentially be a valuable animal model of a human syndrome, premature ovarian failure. This mutation has been named germ-cell deficient, gcd.

  14. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  15. Histamine H3 receptors regulate vascular permeability changes in the skin of mast cell-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Maria Alejandra; Fujii, Yoko; Sugimoto, Yukio; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Kamei, Chiaki

    2003-11-01

    The participation of histamine H(3) receptors in the regulation of skin vascular permeability changes in mast cell-deficient mice was studied. Although intradermal injection of histamine H(3) antagonists, iodophenpropit and clobenpropit, at a dose of 100 nmol/site caused significant increases in skin vascular permeability in both mast cell-deficient (WBB6F1 W/W(v)) and wild-type (WBB6F1 +/+) mice, this response was significantly lower in mast cell-deficient mice than in the wild-type controls. Histamine also caused dose-related increases in skin vascular permeability in both wild-type and mast cell-deficient mice. Significant effects were observed at doses of 10 and 100 nmol/site, and no significant difference in skin vascular permeability was observed between mast cell-deficient and wild-type mice. However, histamine contents of dorsal skin in mast cell-deficient mice were significantly lower than in wild-type mice. In addition, the H(1) antagonists diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine and the NK(1) antagonists, L-732,138 and L-733,060, were able to antagonize H(3) antagonist-induced skin vascular permeability. These results indicated that blockade of H(3) receptors by H(3) antagonists induce skin vascular permeability through mast cell-dependent mechanisms. In addition, histamine and, to a lesser extent substance P are involved in the reaction.

  16. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot.

  17. Endo-Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Deficient for Lysosomal Cystine Transporter Cystinosin

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  18. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  19. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Codony-Servat, Jordi; Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26958490

  1. Postnatal disappearance of type A intercalated cells in carbonic anhydrase II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Brion, L P; Suarez, C; Saenger, P

    2001-06-01

    Despite chronic acidosis, collecting ducts in adult carbonic anhydrase II-deficient (CAD mice) are depleted of intercalated cells, including those of type A, which are acid-secreting cells. We hypothesized that this depletion could occur during postnatal development. Principal cells were identified by immunofluorescence using an antibody to rat aquaporin-2 (AQP-2), and type A intercalated cells using an antibody specific for anion exchanger (AE1). In CAD mice the proportion of AQP2-positive cells, normal at 11 days, increased progressively in the cortical (CCD) and outer medullary collecting duct (OMCD), to reach almost 100% in the OMCD in adults. The percentage of AE1-positive cells in the OMCD of CAD mice decreased by half by 6 weeks of age and further by adulthood. In controls, however, the proportion of AQP2-positive cells and that of AE1-positive cells in the OMCD remained stable after 10 days of age. AE1-positive cells accounted for the majority of intercalated cells in the OMCD. The mechanisms leading to selective postnatal cell depletion in the collecting duct in CAD mice remain to be determined.

  2. CD4+ T Cell Migration into the Cornea is Reduced in CXCL9 Deficient but not CXCL10 Deficient Mice following Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Todd; Farber, Joshua; Luster, Andrew; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The role of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the ocular immune response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection was investigated using mice deficient in either CXCL9 or CXCL10. CXCL10 but not CXCL9 deficient mice showed an increase in sensitivity to ocular virus infection as measured by an elevation in virus titer recovered in the tear film and corneal tissue. The increase in virus was associated with an increase in the expression of the chemokine CCL2 but no significant change in the infiltration of CD4+ T cells or NK cells into the corneal stroma. In contrast, a significant reduction in CD4+ T cell infiltration into the cornea was found in CXCL9 deficient mice following HSV-1 infection consistent with the absence of CXCL9 expression and reduction in expression of other chemokines including CCL3, CCL5, CXCL1, and CXCL10. Collectively, the results suggest a non-redundant role for CXCL9 and CXCL10 in response to ocular HSV-1 infection in terms of controlling virus replication and recruitment of CD4+ T cells into the cornea. PMID:17296171

  3. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  4. Identification of the Paneth cells in chicken small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Li, J; Li, J; Li, R X; Lv, C F; Li, S; Mi, Y L; Zhang, C Q

    2016-07-01

    The Paneth cells are highly specialized cells in the epithelium of the small intestine of many vertebrate species. These cells reside at the base of crypts of the Lieberkühn and contain abundant secretory granules. Previous studies suggesting the existence of Paneth cells in the chicken (Gallus gallus) remained controversial. Here we seek to identify the Paneth cells in the chicken small intestine through morphological examination and specific gene expression. Histological staining and transmission electron microscope confirmed the presence of granulated secretory cells at the base of the crypts in the chicken small intestine. Western blotting experiment also manifested the expression of lysozyme protein, which is specifically secreted by the Paneth cells in the small intestine. Moreover, lysozyme c and lysozyme g mRNAs were expressed in the small intestine of chickens at different ages. Lysozyme c mRNA, in particular, was located at the base of the small intestinal crypts as displayed by in situ hybridization. Collectively, we provide evidences that the Paneth cells indeed exist in the small intestine of the chicken.

  5. Mismatch repair deficiency: a temozolomide resistance factor in medulloblastoma cell lines that is uncommon in primary medulloblastoma tumours

    PubMed Central

    von Bueren, A O; Bacolod, M D; Hagel, C; Heinimann, K; Fedier, A; Kordes, U; Pietsch, T; Koster, J; Grotzer, M A; Friedman, H S; Marra, G; Kool, M; Rutkowski, S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumours are responsive to temozolomide (TMZ) if they are deficient in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mismatch repair (MMR) proficient. Methods: The effect of TMZ on medulloblastoma (MB) cell killing was analysed with clonogenic survival assays. Expression of DNA repair genes and enzymes was investigated using microarrays, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. DNA sequencing and promoter methylation analysis were employed to investigate the cause of loss of the expression of MMR gene MLH1. Results: Temozolomide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity in D425Med (MGMT deficient, MLH1 proficient; IC50=1.7 μℳ), moderate activity against D341Med (MGMT proficient, MLH1 deficient), and DAOY MB cells (MGMT proficient, MLH1 proficient). MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine sensitised DAOY, but not D341Med cells to TMZ. Of 12 MB cell lines, D341Med, D283Med, and 1580WÜ cells exhibited MMR deficiency due to MLH1 promoter hypermethylation. DNA sequencing of these cells provided no evidence for somatic genetic alterations in MLH1. Expression analyses of MMR and MGMT in MB revealed that all patient specimens (n=74; expression array, n=61; immunostaining, n=13) are most likely MMR proficient, whereas some tumours had low MGMT expression levels (according to expression array) or were totally MGMT deficient (3 out of 13 according to immunohistochemistry). Conclusion: A subset of MB may respond to TMZ as some patient specimens are MGMT deficient, and tumours appear to be MMR proficient. PMID:22976800

  6. Inhibition of B-cell death does not restore T-cell-dependent immune responses in CD40-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Jesús; Díez, Miguel A; Muñiz, María; Buelta, Luis; Núñez, Gabriel; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Merino, Ramón

    2003-01-01

    Signalling through CD40 is essential for the development of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses, germinal centres and B-cell memory against T-dependent antigens. In addition, engagement of CD40 in B cells promotes cell survival by inducing the expression of anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family of cell-death regulators. In the present study we analysed whether T-dependent immune responses can be developed in mice deficient in CD40 if the anti-apoptotic activity mediated by the engagement of CD40 in B cells is compensated by the constitutive over-expression of anti-apoptotic genes of the bcl-2 family. We showed that the over-expression of either hbcl-2 or hbcl-xL transgenes in B cells is not sufficient to restore IgG antibody responses and germinal centre formation in CD40-deficient mice. These results indicate that CD40 functions, other than those mediated through survival, are required for the establishment of T-dependent B-cell responses. PMID:12871216

  7. Induced genetic deficiency of the nucleolar organizer in rat kangaroo cells (PTK1) by ultraviolet laser microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Berns, M W

    1983-03-01

    An ultraviolet laser microbeam was used to irradiate one of the two nucleolar organizer regions of PTK1 cells in early prophase. The directed nucleolar deficiency induced by ultraviolet laser irradiation was maintained in the daughter cells through subsequent cell generations. However, the frequent occurrence of spontaneous cell fusion in low density cells following the cloning procedure facilitated a recovery of cells to two or more nucleoli.

  8. Neural tube defects and impaired neural progenitor cell proliferation in Gbeta1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Okae, Hiroaki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known for their roles in signal transduction downstream of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and both Galpha subunits and tightly associated Gbetagamma subunits regulate downstream effector molecules. Compared to Galpha subunits, the physiological roles of individual Gbeta and Ggamma subunits are poorly understood. In this study, we generated mice deficient in the Gbeta1 gene and found that Gbeta1 is required for neural tube closure, neural progenitor cell proliferation, and neonatal development. About 40% Gbeta1(-/-) embryos developed neural tube defects (NTDs) and abnormal actin organization was observed in the basal side of neuroepithelium. In addition, Gbeta1(-/-) embryos without NTDs showed microencephaly and died within 2 days after birth. GPCR agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and cell spreading, which were all found to be regulated by Galphai and Gbetagamma signaling, were abnormal in Gbeta1(-/-) neural progenitor cells. These data indicate that Gbeta1 is required for normal embryonic neurogenesis. PMID:20186915

  9. Small Molecule Suppressors of Drosophila Kinesin Deficiency Rescue Motor Axon Development in a Zebrafish Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gassman, Andrew; Hao, Le T.; Bhoite, Leena; Bradford, Chad L.; Chien, Chi-Bin; Beattie, Christine E.; Manfredi, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common inherited motor neuropathy and the leading hereditary cause of infant mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for the disease, reflecting a need for pharmacologic interventions that restore performance of dysfunctional motor neurons or suppress the consequences of their dysfunction. In a series of assays relevant to motor neuron biology, we explored the activities of a collection of tetrahydroindoles that were reported to alter the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). In Drosophila larvae the compounds suppressed aberrant larval locomotion due to mutations in the Khc and Klc genes, which respectively encode the heavy and light chains of kinesin-1. A representative compound of this class also suppressed the appearance of axonal swellings (alternatively termed axonal spheroids or neuritic beads) in the segmental nerves of the kinesin-deficient Drosophila larvae. Given the importance of kinesin-dependent transport for extension and maintenance of axons and their growth cones, three members of the class were tested for neurotrophic effects on isolated rat spinal motor neurons. Each compound stimulated neurite outgrowth. In addition, consistent with SMA being an axonopathy of motor neurons, the three axonotrophic compounds rescued motor axon development in a zebrafish model of SMA. The results introduce a collection of small molecules as pharmacologic suppressors of SMA-associated phenotypes and nominate specific members of the collection for development as candidate SMA therapeutics. More generally, the results reinforce the perception of SMA as an axonopathy and suggest novel approaches to treating the disease. PMID:24023935

  10. Signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient mouse B lymphoma and human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Shanique K E; Han, Yeming; Liu, Yingying; Kreider, Benjamin Z; Liu, Yan; Grewal, Sukhdeep; Desai, Anand; Baron, Jacqueline; Moore, Carissa R; Luo, Chang; Xie, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bortezomib, a clinical drug for multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, exhibits complex mechanisms of action, which vary depending on the cancer type and the critical genetic alterations of each cancer. Here we investigated the signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in mouse B lymphoma and human MM cells deficient in a new tumor suppressor gene, TRAF3. We found that bortezomib consistently induced up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1) and the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa as well as cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Interestingly, bortezomib induced the activation of NF-κB1 and the accumulation of the oncoprotein c-Myc, but inhibited the activation of NF-κB2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that oridonin (an inhibitor of NF-κB1 and NF-κB2) or AD 198 (a drug targeting c-Myc) drastically potentiated the anti-cancer effects of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient malignant B cells. Taken together, our findings increase the understanding of the mechanisms of action of bortezomib, which would aid the design of novel bortezomib-based combination therapies. Our results also provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of the combinations of bortezomib and oridonin (or other inhibitors of NF-κB1/2) or AD 198 (or other drugs targeting c-Myc) in the treatment of lymphoma and MM, especially in patients containing TRAF3 deletions or relevant mutations. PMID:26740054

  11. BIM Deficiency Protects NOD Mice From Diabetes by Diverting Thymocytes to Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Chee, Jonathan; Jhala, Gaurang; Trivedi, Prerak; Catterall, Tara; Selck, Claudia; Gurzov, Esteban N; Brodnicki, Thomas C; Graham, Kate L; Wali, Jibran A; Zhan, Yifan; Gray, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Allison, Janette; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H

    2015-09-01

    Because regulatory T-cell (Treg) development can be induced by the same agonist self-antigens that induce negative selection, perturbation of apoptosis will affect both negative selection and Treg development. But how the processes of thymocyte deletion versus Treg differentiation bifurcate and their relative importance for tolerance have not been studied in spontaneous organ-specific autoimmune disease. We addressed these questions by removing a critical mediator of thymocyte deletion, BIM, in the NOD mouse model of autoimmune diabetes. Despite substantial defects in the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes, BIM-deficient NOD (NODBim(-/-)) mice developed less insulitis and were protected from diabetes. BIM deficiency did not impair effector T-cell function; however, NODBim(-/-) mice had increased numbers of Tregs, including those specific for proinsulin, in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Increased levels of Nur77, CD5, GITR, and phosphorylated IκB-α in thymocytes from NODBim(-/-) mice suggest that autoreactive cells receiving strong T-cell receptor signals that would normally delete them escape apoptosis and are diverted into the Treg pathway. Paradoxically, in the NOD model, reduced thymic deletion ameliorates autoimmune diabetes by increasing Tregs. Thus, modulating apoptosis may be one of the ways to increase antigen-specific Tregs and prevent autoimmune disease.

  12. BIM Deficiency Protects NOD Mice From Diabetes by Diverting Thymocytes to Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Chee, Jonathan; Jhala, Gaurang; Trivedi, Prerak; Catterall, Tara; Selck, Claudia; Gurzov, Esteban N; Brodnicki, Thomas C; Graham, Kate L; Wali, Jibran A; Zhan, Yifan; Gray, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Allison, Janette; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H

    2015-09-01

    Because regulatory T-cell (Treg) development can be induced by the same agonist self-antigens that induce negative selection, perturbation of apoptosis will affect both negative selection and Treg development. But how the processes of thymocyte deletion versus Treg differentiation bifurcate and their relative importance for tolerance have not been studied in spontaneous organ-specific autoimmune disease. We addressed these questions by removing a critical mediator of thymocyte deletion, BIM, in the NOD mouse model of autoimmune diabetes. Despite substantial defects in the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes, BIM-deficient NOD (NODBim(-/-)) mice developed less insulitis and were protected from diabetes. BIM deficiency did not impair effector T-cell function; however, NODBim(-/-) mice had increased numbers of Tregs, including those specific for proinsulin, in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Increased levels of Nur77, CD5, GITR, and phosphorylated IκB-α in thymocytes from NODBim(-/-) mice suggest that autoreactive cells receiving strong T-cell receptor signals that would normally delete them escape apoptosis and are diverted into the Treg pathway. Paradoxically, in the NOD model, reduced thymic deletion ameliorates autoimmune diabetes by increasing Tregs. Thus, modulating apoptosis may be one of the ways to increase antigen-specific Tregs and prevent autoimmune disease. PMID:25948683

  13. Signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient mouse B lymphoma and human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Shanique K E; Han, Yeming; Liu, Yingying; Kreider, Benjamin Z; Liu, Yan; Grewal, Sukhdeep; Desai, Anand; Baron, Jacqueline; Moore, Carissa R; Luo, Chang; Xie, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bortezomib, a clinical drug for multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, exhibits complex mechanisms of action, which vary depending on the cancer type and the critical genetic alterations of each cancer. Here we investigated the signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in mouse B lymphoma and human MM cells deficient in a new tumor suppressor gene, TRAF3. We found that bortezomib consistently induced up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1) and the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa as well as cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Interestingly, bortezomib induced the activation of NF-κB1 and the accumulation of the oncoprotein c-Myc, but inhibited the activation of NF-κB2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that oridonin (an inhibitor of NF-κB1 and NF-κB2) or AD 198 (a drug targeting c-Myc) drastically potentiated the anti-cancer effects of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient malignant B cells. Taken together, our findings increase the understanding of the mechanisms of action of bortezomib, which would aid the design of novel bortezomib-based combination therapies. Our results also provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of the combinations of bortezomib and oridonin (or other inhibitors of NF-κB1/2) or AD 198 (or other drugs targeting c-Myc) in the treatment of lymphoma and MM, especially in patients containing TRAF3 deletions or relevant mutations.

  14. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans C; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn, tiny invaginations that line the mucosal surface all along the small intestine. Investigations over the past several decades determined that these cells synthesize and secrete substantial quantities of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. More recent studies have determined that these antimicrobial molecules are key mediators of host-microbe interactions, including homeostatic balance with colonizing microbiota and innate immune protection from enteric pathogens. Perhaps more intriguing, Paneth cells secrete factors that help sustain and modulate the epithelial stem and progenitor cells that cohabitate in the crypts and rejuvenate the small intestinal epithelium. Dysfunction of Paneth cell biology contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23398152

  15. Small RNAs break out: the molecular cell biology of mobile small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Sarkies, Peter; Miska, Eric A

    2014-08-01

    Small RNAs that function in a non-cell autonomous manner are becoming increasingly recognized as regulatory molecules with the potential to transmit information between cells, organisms and species. In plants and nematodes, small RNA mobility can be genetically dissected to provide information about the nature of the mobile RNA species, their distribution in the organism and inside cells, as well as the cellular machinery required for mobility, including channel proteins and cellular trafficking factors. Mobile RNAs function in antiviral defence, cell signalling and gene expression regulation, and might also mediate transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. PMID:25053358

  16. Regulatory T-cell depletion in the gut caused by integrin β7 deficiency exacerbates DSS colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H L; Zheng, Y J; Pan, Y D; Xie, C; Sun, H; Zhang, Y H; Yuan, M Y; Song, B L; Chen, J F

    2016-03-01

    Integrin α4β7 controls lymphocyte trafficking into the gut and has essential roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The α4β7-blocking antibody vedolizumab is approved for IBD treatment; however, high dose of vedolizumab aggravates colitis in a small percentage of patients. Herein, we show that integrin β7 deficiency results in colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell depletion and exacerbates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity. In DSS-treated β7-deficient mice, the loss of colonic Treg cells induces excessive macrophage infiltration in the colon via upregulation of colonic epithelial intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and increases proinflammatory cytokine expression, thereby exacerbating DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, reconstitution of the colonic Treg cell population in β7-deficient mice suppresses aberrant innate immune response in the colon and attenuates DSS colitis. Thus, integrin α4β7 is essential for suppression of DSS colitis as it regulates the colonic Treg cell population and innate immunity.

  17. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  18. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sérgio M; Almendinger, Johann; Cabello, Juan; Hengartner, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency. PMID:26872385

  19. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sérgio M; Almendinger, Johann; Cabello, Juan; Hengartner, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency.

  20. Neuropilin 1 deficiency on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells impairs mouse melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Hutzler, Marina; Abel, Simone; Alter, Christina; Stockmann, Christian; Kliche, Stefanie; Albert, Juliane; Sparwasser, Tim; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Buer, Jan; Helfrich, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration of Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells is considered to be a critical step during tumor development and progression. T reg cells supposedly suppress locally an effective anti-tumor immune response within tumor tissues, although the precise mechanism by which T reg cells infiltrate the tumor is still unclear. We provide evidence that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp-1), highly expressed by Foxp3+ T reg cells, regulates the immunological anti-tumor control by guiding T reg cells into the tumor in response to tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We demonstrate for the first time that T cell–specific ablation of Nrp-1 expression results in a significant breakdown in tumor immune escape in various transplantation models and in a spontaneous, endogenously driven melanoma model associated with strongly reduced tumor growth and prolonged tumor-free survival. Strikingly, numbers of tumor-infiltrating Foxp3+ T reg cells were significantly reduced accompanied by enhanced activation of CD8+ T cells within tumors of T cell–specific Nrp-1–deficient mice. This phenotype can be reversed by adoptive transfer of Nrp-1+ T reg cells from wild-type mice. Thus, our data strongly suggest that Nrp-1 acts as a key mediator of Foxp3+ T reg cell infiltration into the tumor site resulting in a dampened anti-tumor immune response and enhanced tumor progression. PMID:23045606

  1. PECAM-1 isoform-specific functions in PECAM-1-deficient brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Terri A; Sheibani, Nader

    2008-03-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is alternatively spliced generating eight isoforms that only differ in the length of their cytoplasmic domain. Multiple isoforms of PECAM-1 are present in the endothelium and their expression levels are regulated during vascular development and angiogenesis. However, the functional significance of PECAM-1 isoforms during these processes remains largely unknown. We recently showed that mouse brain endothelial (bEND) cells prepared from PECAM-1-deficient (PECAM-1-/-) mice differ in their cell adhesive and migratory properties compared to PECAM-1+/+ bEND cells. Here we demonstrate that the restoration of PECAM-1 expression in these cells affects their adhesive and migratory properties in an isoform-specific manner. Expression of Delta14&15 PECAM-1, the predominant isoform present in the mouse endothelium, in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells activated MAPK/ERKs, disrupted adherens junctions, and enhanced cell migration and capillary morphogenesis in Matrigel. In contrast, expression of Delta15 PECAM-1 in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells had minimal effects on their activation of MAPK/ERKs, migration, and capillary morphogenesis. The effects of PECAM-1 on cell adhesive and migratory properties were mediated in an isoform-specific manner, at least in part, through its interactions with intracellular signaling proteins, including SHP-2 and Src. These results suggest that the impact of PECAM-1 on EC adhesion, migration, and capillary morphogenesis is modulated by alternative splicing of its cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18029285

  2. Schwann cell myelination of the myelin deficient rat spinal cord following X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, I.D.; Hammang, J.P.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The myelin-deficient (md) rat is an X-linked myelin mutant that has an abnormality of oligodendrocytes and a severe paucity of myelin throughout the CNS. This lack of myelin makes it an ideal model in which to study the cellular interactions that occur when foreign myelinating cells are induced in the milieu of this nonmyelinated CNS. In this study, Schwann cells were induced in the lumbosacral spinal cord by exposing it to radiation, a technique demonstrated repeatedly in other nonmutant strains of rats. Md rats and their age-matched littermates were irradiated (3,000 to 4,000 R) at 3 days of age and perfused 16-22 days later after pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine. In the md rat, Schwann cell invasion progressed from the area of the spinal cord-nerve root junction and extended into the dorsal columns and adjacent gray matter. Autoradiographic evidence revealed that many of these cells incorporated 3H-thymidine, indicating that they were undergoing proliferation. Ultrastructural observations showed that there was an integration of these intraspinal Schwann cells with the cells normally occurring in this environment, i.e., oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The extent of migration and division of Schwann cells, as well as their interactions with glial cells, were similar to those seen in the nonmutant irradiated littermates. These studies provide conclusive evidence that md rat axons are normal with respect to their ability to provide trophic and mitogenic signals to myelinating cells.

  3. gamma/delta T cell-deficient mice have impaired mucosal immunoglobulin A responses

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mucosal tissues of mice are enriched in T cells that express the gamma/delta T cell receptor. Since the function of these cells remains unclear, we have compared mucosal immune responses in gamma/delta T cell receptor-deficient (TCRdelta-/-) mice versus control mice of the same genetic background. The frequency of intestinal immunoglobulin (Ig) A plasma cells as well as IgA levels in serum, bile, saliva, and fecal samples were markedly reduced in TCRdelta-/- mice. The TCRdelta-/- mice produced much lower levels of IgA antibodies when immunized orally with a vaccine of tetanus toxoid plus cholera toxin as adjuvant. Conversely, the antigen-specific IgM and IgG antibody responses were comparable to orally immunized control mice. Direct assessment of the cells forming antibodies against the tetanus toxoid and cholera toxin antigens indicated that significantly lower numbers of IgA antibody- producing cells were present in the intestinal lamina propria and Peyer's patches of TCRdelta-/- mice compared with the orally immunized control mice. The selective reduction of IgA responses to ingested antigens in the absence of gamma/delta T cells suggests a specialized role for gamma/delta cells in mucosal immunity. PMID:8666951

  4. Vesicular stomatitis virus growth in Drosophila melanogaster cells: G protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wyers, F; Richard-Molard, C; Blondel, D; Dezelee, S

    1980-01-01

    In cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) established a persistent, noncytopathic infection. No inhibition of host protein synthesis occurred even though all cells were initially infected. No defective interfering particles were detected, which would explain the establishment of the carrier state. In studies of the time course of viral protein synthesis in Drosophila cells, N, NS, and M viral polypeptides were readily detected within 1 h of infection. The yield of G protein and one of its precursors; G1, was very low at any time of the virus cycle; the released viruses always contained four to five times less G than those produced by chicken embryo cells, whatever the VSV strain or serotype used for infection and whatever the Drosophila cell line used as host. Actinomycin D added to the cells before infection enhanced VSV growth up to eight times. G and G1 synthesis increased much more than that of the other viral proteins when the cells were pretreated with the drug; nevertheless, the released viruses exhibited the same deficiency in G protein as the VSV released from untreated cells. Host cell control on both G-protein maturation process and synthesis at traduction level is discussed in relation to G biological properties.

  5. Spontaneous slow replication fork progression elicits mitosis alterations in homologous recombination-deficient mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Magdalou, Indiana; Barascu, Aurélia; Técher, Hervé; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2014-01-14

    Homologous recombination deficient (HR(-)) mammalian cells spontaneously display reduced replication fork (RF) movement and mitotic extra centrosomes. We show here that these cells present a complex mitotic phenotype, including prolonged metaphase arrest, anaphase bridges, and multipolar segregations. We then asked whether the replication and the mitotic phenotypes are interdependent. First, we determined low doses of hydroxyurea that did not affect the cell cycle distribution or activate CHK1 phosphorylation but did slow the replication fork movement of wild-type cells to the same level than in HR(-) cells. Remarkably, these low hydroxyurea doses generated the same mitotic defects (and to the same extent) in wild-type cells as observed in unchallenged HR(-) cells. Reciprocally, supplying nucleotide precursors to HR(-) cells suppressed both their replication deceleration and mitotic extra centrosome phenotypes. Therefore, subtle replication stress that escapes to surveillance pathways and, thus, fails to prevent cells from entering mitosis alters metaphase progression and centrosome number, resulting in multipolar mitosis. Importantly, multipolar mitosis results in global unbalanced chromosome segregation involving the whole genome, even fully replicated chromosomes. These data highlight the cross-talk between chromosome replication and segregation, and the importance of HR at the interface of these two processes for protection against general genome instability.

  6. Metformin represses cancer cells via alternate pathways in N-cadherin expressing vs. N-cadherin deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rongbin; Wang, Zongwei; Wu, Shulin; Zhuo, Yangjia; Otsetov, Aleksandar G; Cai, Chao; Zhong, Weide; Wu, Chin-Lee; Olumi, Aria F

    2015-10-01

    Metformin has emerged as a potential anticancer agent. Here, we demonstrate that metformin plays an anti-tumor role via repressing N-cadherin, independent of AMPK, in wild-type N-cadherin cancer cells. Ectopic-expression of N-cadherin develops metformin-resistant cancer cells, while suppression of N-cadherin sensitizes cancer to metformin. Manipulation of AMPK expression does not alter sensitivity of cancer to metformin. We show that NF-kappaB is a downstream molecule of N-cadherin and metformin regulates NF-kappaB signaling via suppressing N-cadherin. Moreover, we also suggest that TWIST1 is an upstream molecule of N-cadherin/NF-kappaB signaling and manipulation of TWIST1 expression changes the sensitivity of cancer cells to metformin. In contrast to the cells that express N-cadherin, in N-cadherin deficient cells, metformin plays an anti-tumor role via activation of AMPK. Ectopic expression of N-cadherin makes cancer more resistant to metformin. Therefore, we suggest that metformin's anti-cancer therapeutic effect is mediated through different molecular mechanism in wild-type vs. deficient N-cadherin cancer cells. At last, we selected 49 out of 984 patients' samples with prostatic cancer after radical prostatectomy (selection criteria: Gleason score ≥ 7 and all patients taking metformin) and showed levels of N-cadherin, p65 and AMPK could predict post-surgical recurrence in prostate cancer after treatment of metformin.

  7. Transformation from non-small-cell lung cancer to small-cell lung cancer: molecular drivers and cells of origin.

    PubMed

    Oser, Matthew G; Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The two broad histological subtypes of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the cause of 15% of cases, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of cases and includes adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Although NSCLC and SCLC are commonly thought to be different diseases owing to their distinct biology and genomic abnormalities, the idea that these malignant disorders might share common cells of origin has been gaining support. This idea has been supported by the unexpected findings that a subset of NSCLCs with mutated EGFR return as SCLC when resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops. Additionally, other case reports have described the coexistence of NSCLC and SCLC, further challenging the commonly accepted view of their distinct lineages. Here, we summarise the published clinical observations and biology underlying tumours with combined SCLC and NSCLC histology and cancers that transform from adenocarcinoma to SCLC. We also discuss pre-clinical studies pointing to common potential cells of origin, and speculate how the distinct paths of differentiation are determined by the genomics of each disease.

  8. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle stages in zinc deficient fetal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, M.S.; Rogers, J.M.; Zucker, R.M.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1986-03-05

    The authors are currently studying the effects of Zn deficiency on chromatin structure, DNA synthesis, protein synthesis and cell division in the rat. Here the authors present preliminary results of nuclear DNA measurement by flow cytometry. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a fluorescent probe for total nuclear DNA isolated from Day 18 fetal rat brain. Previously, dams were fed a control (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet), restricted (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) or a Zn deficient (0.5 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) diet. Fetuses were taken at Day 18 of gestation by casaerean section. Whole brain was quickly excised and frozen rapidly in a plastic vial which was subsequently immersed in an alcohol/dry ice bath at -80/sup 0/C. Brain was thawed at 37/sup 0/C in a citrate/DMSO/pH 7.6 buffer and dissociated by several passes through a 26 gauge needle. Nuclei were isolated and stained by incubating in 50 ..mu..g/ml PI, 0.125 ..mu..g/ml RNA-ASE, 0.1% NP-40 at 25/sup 0/C. Zn deficiency resulted in a larger coefficient of variation (CV) for the Go/Gi DNA peak in fetal brain nuclei. The DNA profile of these nuclei is suggestive of a possible block at the Go/Gi-S interphase; restricted fed and ad lib fed controls showed no such blockage.

  9. A Novel SDHA-deficient Renal Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Yakirevich, Evgeny; Ali, Siraj M; Mega, Anthony; McMahon, Caitlin; Brodsky, Alexander S; Ross, Jeffrey S; Allen, Justin; Elvin, Julia A; Safran, Howard; Resnick, Murray B

    2015-06-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an emerging provisional entity included in the 2013 International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification. Most genomic alterations in patients with SDH-deficient RCCs involve the SDHB subunit, and the associated renal tumors have loss of immunohistochemical SDHB expression and distinctive morphologic features. Renal tumors less commonly possess genomic alterations involving the SDHC and SDHD subunits, but no SDHA alterations have as yet been described. Here we identified a novel SDHA homozygous deletion in an aggressive variant of RCC diagnosed initially as unclassified type in a 54-year-old patient. A search for novel actionable mutations by comprehensive genomic profiling based on clinical next-generation sequencing evaluating entire coding regions of 315 cancer-related genes, including all SDH subunits, was performed. Sequencing identified a novel 17 kbp homozygous deletion of 9 SDHA exons on chromosome 5p15. SDHA and SDHB immunohistochemistry further confirmed that the homozygous deletion led to the loss of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. Histologically, the tumor had a mixed pattern of high-grade papillary and collecting duct carcinoma and distinctive pale eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions similar to those described in SDHB-deficient RCC. This is the first report that identifies SDHA inactivation in RCC. Additional studies utilizing comprehensive genomic profiling, immunohistochemistry, and careful morphologic evaluation are needed both prospectively and retrospectively to identify the group of RCCs harboring SDHA genomic alterations.

  10. An alkylation-tolerant, mutator human cell line is deficient in strand-specific mismatch repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kat, A.; Thilly, W.G. ); Fang, W.H.; Longley, M.J.; Li, G.M.; Modrich, P. )

    1993-07-15

    The human lymphoblastoid MT1 B-cell line was previously isolated as one of a series of mutant cells able to survive the cytotoxic effects of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). MT1 cells nevertheless remain sensitive to mutagenesis by MNNG and display a mutator phenotype. These phenotypes have been attributed to a single genetic alteration postulated to confer a defect in strand-specific mismatch repair, a proposal that attributes the cytotoxic effect of DNA alkylation in wild-type cells to futile attempts to correct mispairs that arise during replication of alkylated template strands. Our results support this view. MNNG-induced mutations in the HPRT gene of MT1 cells are almost exclusively GC [yields] AT transitions, while spontaneous mutations observed in this mutator cell line are single-nucleotide insertions, transversions, and AT [yields] GC transitions. In vitro assay has demonstrated that the MT1 line is in fact deficient in strand-specific correction of all eight base-base mispairs. This defect, which is manifest at or prior to the excision stage of the reaction, is due to simple deficiency of a required activity because MT1 nuclear extracts can be complemented by a partially purified HeLa fraction to restore in vitro repair. These findings substantiate the idea that strand-specific mismatch repair contributes to alkylation-induced cytotoxicity and imply that this process serves as a barrier to spontaneous transition, transversion, and insertion/deletion mutations in mammalian cells. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. DNA methylation profile of Aire-deficient mouse medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are characterized by ectopic expression of self-antigens during the establishment of central tolerance. The autoimmune regulator (Aire), which is specifically expressed in mTECs, is responsible for the expression of a large repertoire of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) and plays a role in the development of mTECs. However, Aire-deficient mTECs still express TRAs. Moreover, a subset of mTECs, which are considered to be at a stage of terminal differentiation, exists in the Aire-deficient thymus. The phenotype of a specific cell type in a multicellular organism is governed by the epigenetic regulation system. DNA methylation modification is an important component of this system. Every cell or tissue type displays a DNA methylation profile, consisting of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs), and this profile is involved in cell-type-specific genome usage. The aim of this study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of mTECs by using Aire-deficient mTECs as a model. Results We identified the T-DMRs of mTECs (mTEC-T-DMRs) via genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Aire−/− mTECs by comparison with the liver, brain, thymus, and embryonic stem cells. The hypomethylated mTEC-T-DMRs in Aire−/− mTECs were associated with mTEC-specific genes, including Aire, CD80, and Trp63, as well as other genes involved in the RANK signaling pathway. While these mTEC-T-DMRs were also hypomethylated in Aire+/+ mTECs, they were hypermethylated in control thymic stromal cells. We compared the pattern of DNA methylation levels at a total of 55 mTEC-T-DMRs and adjacent regions and found that the DNA methylation status was similar for Aire+/+ and Aire−/− mTECs but distinct from that of athymic cells and tissues. Conclusions These results indicate a unique DNA methylation profile that is independent of Aire in mTECs. This profile is distinct from other cell types in the thymic microenvironment and is

  12. Altered NK Cell Development and Enhanced NK Cell-Mediated Resistance to MCMV in NKG2D-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova, Biljana; Mandarić, Sanja; Antulov, Ronald; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonsson, Helena; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Jonjić, Stipan; Polić, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    Summary NKG2D is a potent activating receptor on NK cells which acts as a molecular sensor for stressed cells expressing NKG2D ligands such as infected or tumor transformed cells. Although NKG2D is expressed on NK cell precursors, its role in NK cell development is still not known. We have generated NKG2D-deficient mice by targeting the Klrk1 locus. Here we provide evidence for an important regulatory role of NKG2D in the development of NK cells. The absence of NKG2D causes faster division of NK cells, perturbation in size of some NK cell subpopulations and their augmented sensitivity to apoptosis. As expected, NKG2D−/− NK cells are less responsive to tumor targets expressing NKG2D ligands. NKG2D−/− mice, however, show an enhanced NK cell-mediated resistance to MCMV infection as a consequence of NK cell dysregulation. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for yet unknown regulatory function of NKG2D in NK cell physiology. PMID:19631564

  13. Oxygen deficiency and salinity affect cell-specific ion concentrations in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Kotula, Lukasz; Clode, Peta L; Striker, Gustavo G; Pedersen, Ole; Läuchli, André; Shabala, Sergey; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen deficiency associated with soil waterlogging adversely impacts root respiration and nutrient acquisition. We investigated the effects of O2 deficiency and salinity (100 mM NaCl) on radial O2 concentrations and cell-specific ion distributions in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Microelectrode profiling measured O2 concentrations across roots in aerated, aerated saline, stagnant or stagnant saline media. X-ray microanalysis at two positions behind the apex determined the cell-specific elemental concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) across roots. Severe O2 deficiency occurred in the stele and apical regions of roots in stagnant solutions. O2 deficiency in the stele reduced the concentrations of K, Na and Cl in the pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells at the subapical region. Near the root apex, Na declined across the cortex in roots from the aerated saline solution but was relatively high in all cell types in roots from the stagnant saline solution. Oxygen deficiency has a substantial impact on cellular ion concentrations in roots. Both pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells are involved in energy-dependent K loading into the xylem and in controlling radial Na and Cl transport. At root tips, accumulation of Na in the outer cell layers likely contributed to reduction of Na in inner cells of the tips.

  14. Triplex structures induce DNA double strand breaks via replication fork collapse in NER deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Adaku, Nneoma; Peart, Natoya; Rogers, Faye A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural alterations in DNA can serve as natural impediments to replication fork stability and progression, resulting in DNA damage and genomic instability. Naturally occurring polypurine mirror repeat sequences in the human genome can create endogenous triplex structures evoking a robust DNA damage response. Failures to recognize or adequately process these genomic lesions can result in loss of genomic integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in the recognition and repair of triplex structures. We demonstrate using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that chromosomal triplexes perturb DNA replication fork progression, eventually resulting in fork collapse and the induction of double strand breaks (DSBs). We find that cells deficient in the NER damage recognition proteins, XPA and XPC, accumulate more DSBs in response to chromosomal triplex formation than NER-proficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that XPC-deficient cells are particularly prone to replication-associated DSBs in the presence of triplexes. In the absence of XPA or XPC, deleterious consequences of triplex-induced genomic instability may be averted by activating apoptosis via dual phosphorylation of the H2AX protein. Our results reveal that damage recognition by XPC and XPA is critical to maintaining replication fork integrity and preventing replication fork collapse in the presence of triplex structures. PMID:27298253

  15. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  16. Identification of ATR-Chk1 pathway inhibitors that selectively target p53-deficient cells without directly suppressing ATR catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Masaoki; Bradner, James E.; Tolliday, Nicola; Thibodeau, Renee; Sloan, Heather; Brummond, Kay M.; Nghiem, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is a barrier to effective treatment that appears to be augmented by p53 functional deficiency in many cancers. In p53-deficient cells where the G1/S checkpoint is compromised, cell viability after DNA damage relies upon intact intra-S and G2/M checkpoints mediated by the ATR and Chk1 kinases. Thus, a logical rationale to sensitize p53-deficient cancers to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is through the use of ATP-competitive inhibitors of ATR or Chk1. To discover small molecules that may act on uncharacterized components of the ATR pathway, we performed a phenotype-based screen of 9,195 compounds for their ability to inhibit hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of Ser345 on Chk1, known to be a critical ATR substrate. This effort led to the identification of four small-molecule compounds, three of which were derived from known bioactive library (anthothecol, dihydrocelastryl, and erysolin) and one of which was a novel synthetic compound termed MARPIN. These compounds all inhibited ATR-selective phosphorylation and sensitized p53-deficient cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these compounds did not inhibit ATR catalytic activity in vitro, unlike typical ATP-competitive inhibitors, but acted in a mechanistically distinct manner to disable ATR-Chk1 function. Our results highlight a set of novel molecular probes to further elucidate druggable mechanisms to improve cancer therapeutic responses produced by DNA-damaging drugs. PMID:25336189

  17. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 confers resistance to chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic treatments in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Tobias; Sahm, Felix; Blaes, Jonas; Osswald, Matthias; Rübmann, Petra; Milford, David; Urban, Severino; Jestaedt, Leonie; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Hertenstein, Anne; Pfenning, Philipp-Niclas; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Wick, Antje; Winkler, Frank; von Deimling, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Weiler, Markus

    2015-10-13

    Loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a prerequisite for tumor cell-specific expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 in glioblastoma defining a subgroup prone to develop evasive resistance towards antiangiogenic treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of human tumor tissues showed VEGFR-2 expression in glioma cells in 19% of specimens examined, mainly in the infiltration zone. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 positivity was restricted to PTEN-deficient tumor specimens. PTEN overexpression reduced VEGFR-2 expression in vitro, as well as knock-down of raptor or rictor. Genetic interference with VEGFR-2 revealed proproliferative, antiinvasive and chemoprotective functions for VEGFR-2 in glioma cells. VEGFR-2-dependent cellular effects were concomitant with activation of 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells, protein kinase B, and N-myc downstream regulated gene 1. Two-photon in vivo microscopy revealed that expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells hampers antiangiogenesis. Bevacizumab induces a proinvasive response in VEGFR-2-positive glioma cells. Patients with PTEN-negative glioblastomas had a shorter survival after initiation of bevacizumab therapy compared with PTEN-positive glioblastomas. Conclusively, expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells indicates an aggressive glioblastoma subgroup developing early resistance to temozolomide or bevacizumab. Loss of PTEN may serve as a biomarker identifying those tumors upfront by routine neuropathological methods.

  18. Induction of thymidine kinase in enzyme-deficient Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, M

    1982-06-01

    Previous work with Chinese hamster cells suggests that thymidine kinase deficiency and loss of potential for plating in HAT medium may arise by a process of mutation coupled with site-specific repression by bromodeoxyuridine at the tk locus. In this study, tk- Chinese hamster cells were exposed to a series of inductors to determine whether revertants for the putative second stage originate by genetic or epigenetic change. Brief exposure to 5-azacytidine resulted in massive conversion to the HAT+ state, and revertants showed levels of thymidine kinase activity intermediate between those of tk- and wild-type cells. By contrast, incidence of HAT+ cells rose only slightly in populations mutagenized with ethyl methanesulfonate. Large increases in frequency of HAT+ cells were obtained by treatment with n-butyrate and L-ethionine, which affect gene expression in other cell systems but have no known mutagenic potential. Induction of HAT+ revertants seems to be mediated by a stable epigenetic shift, which reverses the gradual extinction of thymidine kinase activity in the parent cells. The data support the view that induction in Chinese hamster cells results from changes in DNA methylation patterns, and suggests studies to define the process in molecular terms.

  19. Mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations: insights from studies with DNA repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Palitti, F

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations, studies performed on human syndromes with genomic instability can be fruitful. In this report, the results from studies in our laboratory on the importance of the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway on the induction of chromosomal damage and apoptosis by ultraviolet light (UV) are discussed. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome group B) deficient in TCR showed a dramatic increase in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis following UV treatment. At relatively low UV doses, the induction of chromosomal aberrations preceded the apoptotic process. Chromosomal aberrations probably lead to apoptosis and most of the cells had gone through an S phase after the UV treatment before entering apoptosis. At higher doses of UV, the cells could go into apoptosis already in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in the parental cell line AA8 also resulted in the induction of elevated chromosomal damage and apoptotic response similar to the one observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is responsible for the increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in UV61 cells. Hypersensitivity to the induction of chromosomal damage by inhibitors of antitopoisomerases I and II in Werner's syndrome cells is also discussed in relation to the compromised G2 phase processes involving the Werner protein. PMID:15162020

  20. Analysis and metabolic engineering of lipid-linked oligosaccharides in glycosylation-deficient CHO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Meredith B.; Tomiya, Noboru; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Krag, Sharon S.

    2010-04-23

    Glycosylation-deficient Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines can be used to expand our understanding of N-glycosylation pathways and to study Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, diseases caused by defects in the synthesis of N-glycans. The mammalian N-glycosylation pathway involves the step-wise assembly of sugars onto a dolichol phosphate (P-Dol) carrier, forming a lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO), followed by the transfer of the completed oligosaccharide onto the protein of interest. In order to better understand how deficiencies in this pathway affect the availability of the completed LLO donor for use in N-glycosylation, we used a non-radioactive, HPLC-based assay to examine the intermediates in the LLO synthesis pathway for CHO-K1 cells and for three different glycosylation-deficient CHO cell lines. B4-2-1 cells, which have a mutation in the dolichol phosphate-mannose synthase (DPM2) gene, accumulated LLO with the structure Man{sub 5}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol, while MI8-5 cells, which lack glucosyltransferase I (ALG6) activity, accumulated Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol. CHO-K1 and MI5-4 cells both produced primarily the complete LLO, Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol, though the relative quantity was lower in MI5-4. MI5-4 cells have reduced hexokinase activity which could affect the availability of many of the substrates required for LLO synthesis and, consequently, impair production of the final LLO donor. Increasing hexokinase activity by overexpressing hexokinase II in MI5-4 caused a decrease in the relative quantities of the incomplete LLO intermediates from Man{sub 5}GlcNAc{sub 2}-PP-Dol through Glc{sub 1}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-PP-Dol, and an increase in the relative quantity of the final LLO donor, Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol. This study suggests that metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving LLO availability for use in N-glycosylation.

  1. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer. If lung ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  2. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  3. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  4. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  5. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  6. The CD8+ T cell repertoire in beta 2-microglobulin-deficient mice is biased towards reactivity against self-major histocompatibility class I

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Beta 2-Microglobulin-deficient (beta 2m -/-) mice are reported to lack cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, CD8+ T cells, and the ability to mount MHC class I- specific T cell responses. We have observed that beta 2m -/- mice possess CD8+ T cells that can be induced to perform strong allospecific cytotoxic responses against nonself-MHC class I by in vivo priming. We report that these beta 2m -/- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) differ from those induced in beta 2m-positive littermates in that they cross-react and kill cells expressing self-MHC class I at normal ligand density with beta 2m. beta 2m -/- CTL could even be induced in primary mixed lymphocyte culture by self-MHC class I expressing stimulator cells, whereas allogeneic stimulator cells failed to elicit a response under similar conditions. Cells with a reduced cell surface MHC class I expression were less sensitive, while syngeneic beta 2m -/- cells were resistant to the beta 2m -/- CTL. This antiself-MHC reactivity could not be induced when beta 2m -/- T cells matured in an environment with normal MHC class I expression in bone marrow chimeric mice. Antiself- MHC reactivity was also observed against human peptide loading- deficient cells expressing the appropriate murine class I molecules, suggesting that affinity to self-MHC class I may occur irrespective of peptide content. The results fit with a model where positive and negative selection of CD8+ T cells in beta 2m -/- mice is mediated by low levels of MHC class I free heavy chains. In this model, low ligand density on selecting cells leads to positive selection of rare T cells that bind to low levels of MHC class I free heavy chains, resulting in a very small peripheral CD8+ compartment. Due to low density of the selecting ligand, negative selection does not remove T cells recognizing beta 2m-positive cells expressing self-MHC class I at normal ligand density, which generates a T cell repertoire that would

  7. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. PMID:26211746

  8. Deficient repair of potentially lethal damage in actively growing ataxia telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Sasaki, M.S.

    1984-02-01

    The repair of potentially lethal damage after X rays was studied in exponentially growing normal and ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) strains of human fibroblasts. X-ray killing of all normal strains from six healthy persons was enhanced when cells were treated with hypertonic phosphate-buffered saline immediately after irradiation. This treatment is not toxic to unirradiated cells and demonstrates that ordinarily these cells repair potentially lethal damage. The potentially lethal damage in normal cells is repaired within 1 hr. In contrast, all A-T strains from four A-T patients were completely deficient in their ability to repair potentially lethal damage. Treatment with a hypertonic solution after X irradiation is known to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and to enhance cell killing, as though hypertonicity had induced the A-T state in normal cells. These results support the inference that the increased radiosensitivity of A-T cells can be attributed to some defect in the repair of DNA damage rather than abnormal DNA synthesis following irradiation.

  9. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  10. Extreme Beta-Cell Deficiency in Pancreata of Dogs with Canine Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Emily J.; Lam, Carol J.; Cox, Aaron R.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Van Winkle, Thomas J.; Hess, Rebecka S.; Kushner, Jake A.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of canine diabetes remains poorly understood, in part due to enigmatic clinical features and the lack of detailed histopathology studies. Canine diabetes, similar to human type 1 diabetes, is frequently associated with diabetic ketoacidosis at onset or after insulin omission. However, notable differences exist. Whereas human type 1 diabetes often occurs in children, canine diabetes is typically described in middle age to elderly dogs. Many competing theories have been proposed regarding the underlying cause of canine diabetes, from pancreatic atrophy to chronic pancreatitis to autoimmune mediated β-cell destruction. It remains unclear to what extent β-cell loss contributes to canine diabetes, as precise quantifications of islet morphometry have not been performed. We used high-throughput microscopy and automated image processing to characterize islet histology in a large collection of pancreata of diabetic dogs. Diabetic pancreata displayed a profound reduction in β-cells and islet endocrine cells. Unlike humans, canine non-diabetic islets are largely comprised of β-cells. Very few β-cells remained in islets of diabetic dogs, even in pancreata from new onset cases. Similarly, total islet endocrine cell number was sharply reduced in diabetic dogs. No compensatory proliferation or lymphocyte infiltration was detected. The majority of pancreata had no evidence of pancreatitis. Thus, canine diabetes is associated with extreme β-cell deficiency in both new and longstanding disease. The β-cell predominant composition of canine islets and the near-total absence of β-cells in new onset elderly diabetic dogs strongly implies that similar to human type 1 diabetes, β-cell loss underlies the pathophysiology of canine diabetes. PMID:26057531

  11. A New Fungal Diterpene Induces VDAC1-dependent Apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Han, Junjie; Ben-Hail, Danya; He, Luwei; Li, Baowei; Chen, Ziheng; Wang, Yueying; Yang, Yanlei; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yushan; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Quan

    2015-09-25

    The pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins are considered central to apoptosis, yet apoptosis occurs in their absence. Here, we asked whether the mitochondrial protein VDAC1 mediates apoptosis independently of Bax/Bak. Upon screening a fungal secondary metabolite library for compounds inducing apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we identified cyathin-R, a new cyathane diterpenoid compound able to activate apoptosis in the absence of Bax/Bak via promotion of the VDAC1 oligomerization that mediates cytochrome c release. Diphenylamine-2-carboxilic acid, an inhibitor of VDAC1 conductance and oligomerization, inhibited cyathin-R-induced VDAC1 oligomerization and apoptosis. Similarly, Bcl-2 overexpression conferred resistance to cyathin-R-induced apoptosis and VDAC1 oligomerization. Silencing of VDAC1 expression prevented cyathin-R-induced apoptosis. Finally, cyathin-R effectively attenuated tumor growth and induced apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient cells implanted into a xenograft mouse model. Hence, this study identified a new compound promoting VDAC1-dependent apoptosis as a potential therapeutic option for cancerous cells lacking or presenting inactivated Bax/Bak.

  12. A New Fungal Diterpene Induces VDAC1-dependent Apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Han, Junjie; Ben-Hail, Danya; He, Luwei; Li, Baowei; Chen, Ziheng; Wang, Yueying; Yang, Yanlei; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yushan; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Quan

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins are considered central to apoptosis, yet apoptosis occurs in their absence. Here, we asked whether the mitochondrial protein VDAC1 mediates apoptosis independently of Bax/Bak. Upon screening a fungal secondary metabolite library for compounds inducing apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we identified cyathin-R, a new cyathane diterpenoid compound able to activate apoptosis in the absence of Bax/Bak via promotion of the VDAC1 oligomerization that mediates cytochrome c release. Diphenylamine-2-carboxilic acid, an inhibitor of VDAC1 conductance and oligomerization, inhibited cyathin-R-induced VDAC1 oligomerization and apoptosis. Similarly, Bcl-2 overexpression conferred resistance to cyathin-R-induced apoptosis and VDAC1 oligomerization. Silencing of VDAC1 expression prevented cyathin-R-induced apoptosis. Finally, cyathin-R effectively attenuated tumor growth and induced apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient cells implanted into a xenograft mouse model. Hence, this study identified a new compound promoting VDAC1-dependent apoptosis as a potential therapeutic option for cancerous cells lacking or presenting inactivated Bax/Bak. PMID:26253170

  13. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 −/− mice has been largely attributed to the toxicity of bile acids due to the absence of PC in the bile, the question of whether Mdr2 deficiency per se perturbs biological functions in the cell has been poorly addressed. As Mdr2 is expressed in many cell types, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) derived from Mdr2 −/− embryos to show that deficiency of Mdr2 increases reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. We found that Mdr2 −/− MEFs undergo spontaneous transformation and that Mdr2 −/− mice are more susceptible to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Microarray analysis in Mdr2−/− MEFs and cap analysis of gene expression in Mdr2 −/− HCCs revealed extensively deregulated genes involved in oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Our findings imply a close link between Mdr2 −/−-associated tumorigenesis and perturbation of these biological processes and suggest potential extrahepatic functions of Mdr2/MDR3. PMID:26542370

  14. Analysis of mononuclear cell functions in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Sanada, Y; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1994-08-01

    Lymphocyte functions in cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD, termed BLAD in cattle) were evaluated by lymphocyte markers, blastogenic response, and immunoglobulin concentrations; mononuclear phagocyte functions were assessed by chemotactic and luminol-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) responses to determine the effects of impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 on mononuclear cell functions. Deficient CD18 expression on lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was clearly detected by use of flow cytometric analysis. There were no significant differences in the population of peanut agglutinin (PNA)-positive and surface immunoglobulin-bearing blood lymphocytes from clinically normal cattle and cattle with BLAD, as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Lymphocytes from cattle with BLAD had strong mitogen-induced blastogenic responses, which were greater than those from controls. Adherence of mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was markedly impaired, and their chemotactic responses had diminished values, compared with those of controls. Luminol-dependent CL of mononuclear phagocytes from affected cattle, stimulated by opsonized zymosan, had significantly (P < 0.01) decreased values, compared with those of controls. Concentrations of IgG were markedly increased in serum from cattle with BLAD, compared with those in controls. These results indicated that impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 has marked effects on adhering activity of mononuclear phagocytes, and significantly inhibits CL response of mononuclear phagocytes mediated by inactivated-complement 3b-dependent functions. High selective immunoglobulin concentrations indicated that lymphocytes of B-cell lineage may have normal function. PMID:7978649

  15. Deficiency of serum bactericidal activity against Salmonella typhimurium in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hand, W L; King, N L

    1977-01-01

    Systemic salmonellosis is a recognized complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA). In our initial study of SCA host defences against salmonella, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of serum against Salmonella typhimurium. When compared to controls, sera from eight out of nineteen SCA patients were deficient in bactericidal function. Levels of factor B, haemolytic complement and agglutinating antibody were similar in SCA and control sera. However, abnormalities that might theoretically account for the decreased antibacterial activity were observed in many SCA sera. These abnormal findings included: (a) defective function of the alternative complement pathway (decreased bacterial killing in the presence of Mg EGTA); (b) low serum C3 concentration; and (c) decreased total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), with a resultant increase in per cent saturation of iron-binding capacity. Of these deficiencies only the abnormal alternative pathway function was significantly associated with decreased serum bactericidal activity. A suggested function of serum bactericidal activity is prevention of bacteraemia by susceptible organisms. Thus diminished serum bactericidal capacity may increase the risk of Salmonella bacteraemia in some individuals with sickle cell disease. PMID:342154

  16. Determinants of G quadruplex-induced epigenetic instability in REV1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Davide; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Murat, Pierre; Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Sarkies, Peter; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sale, Julian E

    2014-01-01

    REV1-deficient chicken DT40 cells are compromised in replicating G quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA. This results in localised, stochastic loss of parental chromatin marks and changes in gene expression. We previously proposed that this epigenetic instability arises from G4-induced replication fork stalls disrupting the accurate propagation of chromatin structure through replication. Here, we test this model by showing that a single G4 motif is responsible for the epigenetic instability of the BU-1 locus in REV1-deficient cells, despite its location 3.5 kb from the transcription start site (TSS). The effect of the G4 is dependent on it residing on the leading strand template, but is independent of its in vitro thermal stability. Moving the motif to more than 4 kb from the TSS stabilises expression of the gene. However, loss of histone modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K9/14ac) around the transcription start site correlates with the position of the G4 motif, expression being lost only when the promoter is affected. This supports the idea that processive replication is required to maintain the histone modification pattern and full transcription of this model locus. PMID:25190518

  17. Reduced salivary gland size and increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells in DLK1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Gallastegui, P; Luzuriaga, J; Aurrekoetxea, M; Baladrón, V; Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; García-Ramírez, J J; Laborda, J; Unda, F; Ibarretxe, G

    2016-06-01

    DLK1 (PREF1, pG2, or FA1) is a transmembrane and secreted protein containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats. Dlk1 expression is abundant in many tissues during embryonic and fetal development and is believed to play an important role in the regulation of tissue differentiation and fetal growth. After birth, Dlk1 expression is abolished in most tissues but is possibly reactivated to regulate stem cell activation and responses to injury. We have recently reported that DLK1 regulates many aspects of salivary gland organogenesis. Here, we have extended our studies of the salivary gland phenotype of Dlk1 knock-out mice. We have observed that salivary glands are smaller and weigh significantly less in both Dlk1 knock-out males and females compared with gender and age-matched wild-type mice and regardless of the natural sexual dimorphism in rodent salivary glands. This reduced size correlates with a reduced capacity of Dlk1-deficient mice to secrete saliva after stimulation with pilocarpine. However, histological and ultrastructural analyses of both adult and developing salivary gland tissues have revealed no defects in Dlk1 ((-/-)) mice, indicating that genetic compensation accounts for the relatively mild salivary phenotype in these animals. Finally, despite their lack of severe anomalies, we have found that salivary glands from Dlk1-deficient mice present a higher amount of CK14-positive epithelial progenitors at various developmental stages, suggesting a role for DLK1 in the regulation of salivary epithelial stem cell balance.

  18. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 (-/-) mice has been largely attributed to the toxicity of bile acids due to the absence of PC in the bile, the question of whether Mdr2 deficiency per se perturbs biological functions in the cell has been poorly addressed. As Mdr2 is expressed in many cell types, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) derived from Mdr2 (-/-) embryos to show that deficiency of Mdr2 increases reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. We found that Mdr2 (-/-) MEFs undergo spontaneous transformation and that Mdr2 (-/-) mice are more susceptible to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Microarray analysis in Mdr2-/- MEFs and cap analysis of gene expression in Mdr2 (-/-) HCCs revealed extensively deregulated genes involved in oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Our findings imply a close link between Mdr2 (-/-) -associated tumorigenesis and perturbation of these biological processes and suggest potential extrahepatic functions of Mdr2/MDR3. PMID:26542370

  19. In situ hybridization method for studies of cell wall deficient M. paratuberculosis in tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Hulten, K; Karttunen, T J; El-Zimaity, H M; Naser, S A; Almashhrawi, A; Graham, D Y; El-Zaatari, F A

    2000-12-20

    Cell wall deficient forms of mycobacteria may be important in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis. However, no method has been available to localize this type of organisms in tissue sections. We developed an in situ hybridization method for the demonstration of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis spheroplasts (cell wall deficient forms) in paraffin embedded tissue sections.M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts were prepared by treatment with glycine and lysozyme. Pieces of beef were injected with the prepared spheroplasts. The samples were fixed in buffered formalin and paraffin embedded. A M. paratuberculosis-specific probe derived from the IS900 gene was used. Specificity was controlled by using an irrelevant probe and by hybridizing sections with spheroplasts from other bacteria. Beef samples injected with M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts were the only samples that hybridized with the probe. Beef samples containing acid-fast or spheroplast forms of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis as well as the acid-fast forms of M. paratuberculosis did not hybridize with the probe. Unrelated bacterial controls, i.e. Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli were also negative in the assay. In situ hybridization with the IS900 probe provides a specific way to localize M. paratuberculosis spheroplasts in tissue sections and may be useful for studies of the connection between M. paratuberculosis and Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis. The assay may also be valuable for studies on Johne's diseased animals. PMID:11118736

  20. Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR): sequence-specific modification of genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells by small DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Malgieri, Arianna; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The sequence-specific correction of a mutated gene (e.g., point mutation) by the Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR) method is a highly attractive approach for gene therapy. Small DNA fragments (SDFs) were used in SFHR to modify endogenous genomic DNA in both human and murine cells. The advantage of this gene targeting approach is to maintain the physiologic expression pattern of targeted genes without altering the regulatory sequences (e.g., promoter, enhancer), but the application of this technique requires the knowledge of the sequence to be targeted. In our recent study, an optimized SFHR protocol was used to replace the eGFP mutant sequence in SV-40-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF-SV40), with the wild-type eGFP sequence. Nevertheless in the past, SFHR has been used to correct several mutant genes, each related to a specific genetic disease (e.g., spinal muscular atrophy, cystic fibrosis, severe combined immune deficiency). Several parameters can be modified to optimize the gene modification efficiency, as described in our recent study. In this chapter we describe the main guidelines that should be followed in SFHR application, in order to increase technique efficiency.

  1. Tbet Deficiency Causes T Helper Cell Dependent Airways Eosinophilia and Mucus Hypersecretion in Response to Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Nicholas; Schröder, Armin; Walton, Ross P.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of adaptive immune, particularly T cell, responses to human rhinoviruses (RV) is limited. Memory T cells are thought to be of a primarily T helper 1 type, but both T helper 1 and T helper 2 memory cells have been described, and heightened T helper 2/ lessened T helper 1 responses have been associated with increased RV-induced asthma exacerbation severity. We examined the contribution of T helper 1 cells to RV-induced airways inflammation using mice deficient in the transcription factor T-Box Expressed In T Cells (Tbet), a critical controller of T helper 1 cell differentiation. Using flow cytometry we showed that Tbet deficient mice lacked the T helper 1 response of wild type mice and instead developed mixed T helper 2/T helper 17 responses to RV infection, evidenced by increased numbers of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), and interleukin-13 and interleukin-17A expressing CD4+ T cells in the lung. Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and interleukin-10 expressing T cell numbers were unaffected. Tbet deficient mice also displayed deficiencies in lung Natural Killer, Natural Killer T cell and γδT cell responses, and serum neutralising antibody responses. Tbet deficient mice exhibited pronounced airways eosinophilia and mucus production in response to RV infection that, by utilising a CD4+ cell depleting antibody, were found to be T helper cell dependent. RV induction of T helper 2 and T helper 17 responses may therefore have an important role in directly driving features of allergic airways disease such as eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion during asthma exacerbations. PMID:27683080

  2. Early-onset Purkinje cell dysfunction underlies cerebellar ataxia in peroxisomal multifunctional protein-2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Vanderstuyft, Esther; Malheiro, Ana Rita; Brites, Pedro; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N; Baes, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellar pathologies in peroxisomal diseases underscore that these organelles are required for the normal development and maintenance of the cerebellum, but the mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we investigated the origins of the early-onset coordination impairment in a mouse model with neural selective deficiency of multifunctional protein-2, the central enzyme of peroxisomal β-oxidation. At the age of 4weeks, Nestin-Mfp2(-/-) mice showed impaired motor learning on the accelerating rotarod and underperformed on the balance beam test. The gross morphology of the cerebellum and Purkinje cell arborization were normal. However, electrophysiology revealed a reduced Purkinje cell firing rate, a decreased excitability and an increased membrane capacitance. The distribution of climbing and parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells was immature and was accompanied by an increased spine length. Despite normal myelination, Purkinje cell axon degeneration was evident from the occurrence of axonal swellings containing accumulated organelles. In conclusion, the electrical activity, axonal integrity and wiring of Purkinje cells are exquisitely dependent on intact peroxisomal β-oxidation in neural cells. PMID:27353294

  3. Arginine Starvation Impairs Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in ASS1-Deficient Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyong; Chu, Cheng-Ying; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Xu, Jinghong; Gaur, Shikha; Forman, Henry Jay; Zhang, Hang; Zheng, Shu; Yen, Yun; Huang, Jian; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic response to nutrient starvation and is necessary to clear dysfunctional or damaged organelles, but excessive autophagy can be cytotoxic or cytostatic and contributes to cell death. Depending on the abundance of enzymes involved in molecule biosynthesis, cells can be dependent on uptake of exogenous nutrients to provide these molecules. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and its abundance is reduced in many solid tumors, making them sensitive to external arginine depletion. We demonstrated that prolonged arginine starvation by exposure to ADI-PEG20 (pegylated arginine deiminase) induced autophagy-dependent death of ASS1-deficient breast cancer cells, because these cells are arginine auxotrophs (dependent on uptake of extracellular arginine). Indeed, these breast cancer cells died in culture when exposed to ADI-PEG20 or cultured in the absence of arginine. Arginine starvation induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, which impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity. Furthermore, arginine starvation killed breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro only if they were autophagy-competent. Thus, a key mechanism underlying the lethality induced by prolonged arginine starvation was the cytotoxic autophagy that occurred in response to mitochondrial damage. Last, ASS1 was either low in abundance or absent in more than 60% of 149 random breast cancer bio-samples, suggesting that patients with such tumors could be candidates for arginine starvation therapy. PMID:24692592

  4. Early-onset Purkinje cell dysfunction underlies cerebellar ataxia in peroxisomal multifunctional protein-2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Vanderstuyft, Esther; Malheiro, Ana Rita; Brites, Pedro; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N; Baes, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellar pathologies in peroxisomal diseases underscore that these organelles are required for the normal development and maintenance of the cerebellum, but the mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we investigated the origins of the early-onset coordination impairment in a mouse model with neural selective deficiency of multifunctional protein-2, the central enzyme of peroxisomal β-oxidation. At the age of 4weeks, Nestin-Mfp2(-/-) mice showed impaired motor learning on the accelerating rotarod and underperformed on the balance beam test. The gross morphology of the cerebellum and Purkinje cell arborization were normal. However, electrophysiology revealed a reduced Purkinje cell firing rate, a decreased excitability and an increased membrane capacitance. The distribution of climbing and parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells was immature and was accompanied by an increased spine length. Despite normal myelination, Purkinje cell axon degeneration was evident from the occurrence of axonal swellings containing accumulated organelles. In conclusion, the electrical activity, axonal integrity and wiring of Purkinje cells are exquisitely dependent on intact peroxisomal β-oxidation in neural cells.

  5. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency aggravates hippocampal cell apoptosis and impairs memory performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Mu; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Liao, Bor-Wu; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are growing burdens in modern societies because of increased life expectancy. Most neurodegenerative disorders commonly possess a similar neuropathological feature--the accumulation of abnormal protein aggregates or inclusions (misfolded proteins) in the brain. One of the main functions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to initiate proper protein folding to facilitate protein secretion through the induction of unfolded protein response (UPR). C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) induction has been demonstrated to be a signaling event underlying ER stress-induced cell apoptosis. In this study, we explored the role of CHOP in the hippocampal cell apoptosis and memory performance injury under an induced ER stress condition. Adult male wild type (C57BL/6J) and CHOP knockout (CHOP-/-) mice were intracerebroventricularly injected with tunicamycin. Tunicamycin can induce ER stress and cell apoptosis in mouse hippocampus. Compared with wild type mice, CHOP-/- mice showed an enhanced hippocampal cell apoptosis, worse performance in memory-related behavioral tests, and attenuated IRE-1 expression under tunicamycin treatment. The aggravated cell apoptosis and worse memory performance in CHOP-/- mice might be due to the deficiency of CHOP protein resulted in the impaired adaptive/pathological transcriptional response, the decreased IRE-1 and XBP-1 expressions, and the increased JNK phosphorylation to cope with ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that CHOP may play a protective role in the hippocampal cell apoptosis and impairment of memory performance.

  6. Bcl11a Deficiency Leads to Hematopoietic Stem Cell Defects with an Aging-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Luc, Sidinh; Huang, Jialiang; McEldoon, Jennifer L; Somuncular, Ece; Li, Dan; Rhodes, Claire; Mamoor, Shahan; Hou, Serena; Xu, Jian; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-09-20

    B cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (BCL11A) is a transcription factor and regulator of hemoglobin switching that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for sickle cell disease and thalassemia. In the hematopoietic system, BCL11A is required for B lymphopoiesis, yet its role in other hematopoietic cells, especially hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains elusive. The extensive expression of BCL11A in hematopoiesis implicates context-dependent roles, highlighting the importance of fully characterizing its function as part of ongoing efforts for stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that BCL11A is indispensable for normal HSC function. Bcl11a deficiency results in HSC defects, typically observed in the aging hematopoietic system. We find that downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6), and the ensuing cell-cycle delay, correlate with HSC dysfunction. Our studies define a mechanism for BCL11A in regulation of HSC function and have important implications for the design of therapeutic approaches to targeting BCL11A. PMID:27653684

  7. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  8. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4.

  9. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  10. Hepatitis C virus infection causes iron deficiency in Huh7.5.1 cells.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently develop systemic iron overload, which exacerbates morbidity. Nevertheless, iron inhibits HCV replication in cell culture models and thereby exerts antiviral activity. We hypothesized that the cellular iron status is crucial for the establishment of HCV infection. We show that HCV infection of permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells promotes an iron deficient phenotype. Thus, HCV leads to increased iron regulatory protein (IRP) activity, accumulation of IRP2 and suppression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in the host. These data suggest that HCV regulates cellular iron levels to bypass iron-mediated inhibition in viral replication.

  11. Towards the use of hydrogels in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bernice; Mi, Shengli; Connon, Che J.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal blindness caused by limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a prevailing disorder worldwide. Clinical outcomes for LSCD therapy using amniotic membrane (AM) are unpredictable. Hydrogels can eliminate limitations of standard therapy for LSCD, because they present all the advantages of AM (i.e. biocompatibility, inertness and a biodegradable structure) but unlike AM, they are structurally uniform and can be easily manipulated to alter mechanical and physical properties. Hydrogels can be delivered with minimum trauma to the ocular surface and do not require extensive serological screening before clinical application. The hydrogel structure is also amenable to modifications which direct stem cell fate. In this focussed review we highlight hydrogels as biomaterial substrates which may replace and/or complement AM in the treatment of LSCD. PMID:22846850

  12. PPARδ deficiency disrupts hypoxia-mediated tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunshil; Koo, Jung Eun; Yeon, Sang Hyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ is highly expressed in colon epithelial cells and closely linked to colon carcinogenesis. However, the role of PPARδ in colon cancer cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We found that expression of the tumor-promoting cytokines, IL-8 and VEGF, induced by hypoxia (<1% O2) and deferoxamine (a hypoxia mimetic) was significantly attenuated in PPARδ-deficient HCT116 colon cancer cells. Consequently, PPARδ-knockout colon cancer cells exposed to hypoxia and deferoxamine failed to stimulate endothelial cell vascularization and macrophage migration/proliferation, whereas wild-type cells were able to induce angiogenesis and macrophage activation in response to hypoxic stress. Hypoxic stress induced transcriptional activation of PPARδ, but not its protein expression, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of p300 potentiated deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation, while siRNA knockdown of p300 abolished hypoxia- and deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation. PPARδ associated with p300 upon hypoxic stress as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies. PI3K inhibitors or siRNA knockdown of Akt suppressed the PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxia and deferoxamine in HCT116 cells, leading to decreased expression of IL-8 and VEGF. Collectively, these results reveal that PPARδ is required for hypoxic stress-mediated cytokine expression in colon cancer cells, resulting in promotion of angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. p300 and the PI3K/Akt pathway play a role in the regulation of PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxic stress. Our results demonstrate the positive crosstalk between PPARδ in tumor cells and the hypoxic tumor microenvironment and provide potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer.

  13. Apoptosis Inducing Factor Deficiency Causes Reduced Mitofusion 1 Expression and Patterned Purkinje Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung-Hyuk; Calafiore, Marco; Plane, Jennifer M.; Pleasure, David E.; Deng, Wenbin

    2010-01-01

    Alteration in mitochondrial dynamics has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) plays a key role in multiple cellular and disease processes. Using immunoblotting and flow cytometry analysis with Harlequin mutant mice that have a proviral insertion in the AIF gene, we first revealed that mitofusion 1 (Mfn1), a key mitochondrial fusion protein, is significantly diminished in Purkinje cells of the Harlequin cerebellum. Next, we investigated the cerebellar pathology of Harlequin mice in an age-dependent fashion, and identified a striking process of progressive and patterned Purkinje cell degeneration. Using immunohistochemistry with zebrin II, the most studied compartmentalization marker in the cerebellum, we found that zebrin II-negative Purkinje cells first started to degenerate at 7 months of age. By 11 months of age, almost half of the Purkinje cells were degenerated. Subsequently, most of the Purkinje cells disappeared in the Harlequin cerebellum. The surviving Purkinje cells were concentrated in cerebellar lobules IX and X, where these cells were positive for heat shock protein 25 and resistant to degeneration. We further showed that the patterned Purkinje cell degeneration was dependent on caspase but not poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, and confirmed the marked decrease of Mfn1 in the Harlequin cerebellum. Our results identified a previously unrecognized role of AIF in Purkinje cell degeneration, and revealed that AIF deficiency leads to altered mitochondrial fusion and caspase-dependent cerebellar Purkinje cell loss in Harlequin mice. This study is the first to link AIF and mitochondrial fusion, both of which might play important roles in neurodegeneration. PMID:20974255

  14. Gestational marginal zinc deficiency impaired fetal neural progenitor cell proliferation by disrupting the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Johnathan R; Supasai, Suangsuda; Kha, Jennifer; Vaeth, Brandon M; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Adamo, Ana M; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated if a marginal zinc deficiency during gestation in rats could affect fetal neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation through a down-regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathway. Rats were fed a marginally zinc-deficient or adequate diet from the beginning of gestation until embryonic day (E)19. The proportion of proliferating cells in the E19 fetal ventricular zone was decreased by marginal zinc deficiency. Immunostaining for phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the cerebral cortex was decreased in the marginal zinc fetuses, and this effect was strongest in the ventricular zone. Furthermore, phosphorylation of the upstream mitogen-activated ERK kinases (MEK1/2) was not affected, suggesting that marginal zinc deficiency could have increased ERK-directed phosphatase activity. Similar findings were observed in cultured rat embryonic cortical neurons and in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, in which zinc-deficiency decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting MEK1/2 phosphorylation. Indeed, zinc deficiency increased the activity of the ERK-directed phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in the fetal cortex and IMR-32 cells. Inhibition of PP2A with okadaic acid prevented the decrease in ERK phosphorylation and proliferation of zinc-deficient IMR-32 cells. Together these results demonstrated that decreased zinc availability reduces ERK1/2 signaling and decreased NPC proliferation as a consequence of PP2A activation. Disruption of fetal neurogenesis could underlie irreversible neurobehavioral impairments observed after even marginal zinc nutrition during a critical period of early brain development.

  15. Completely ES cell-derived mice produced by tetraploid complementation using inner cell mass (ICM) deficient blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Duancheng; Saiz, Nestor; Rosenwaks, Zev; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation is often used to produce mice from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by injection of diploid (2n) ESCs into tetraploid (4n) blastocysts (ESC-derived mice). This method has also been adapted to mouse cloning and the derivation of mice from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the tetraploid complementation remains largely unclear. Whether this approach can give rise to completely ES cell-derived mice is an open question, and has not yet been unambiguously proven. Here, we show that mouse tetraploid blastocysts can be classified into two groups, according to the presence or absence of an inner cell mass (ICM). We designate these as type a (presence of ICM at blastocyst stage) or type b (absence of ICM). ESC lines were readily derived from type a blastocysts, suggesting that these embryos retain a pluripotent epiblast compartment; whereas the type b blastocysts possessed very low potential to give rise to ESC lines, suggesting that they had lost the pluripotent epiblast. When the type a blastocysts were used for tetraploid complementation, some of the resulting mice were found to be 2n/4n chimeric; whereas when type b blastocysts were used as hosts, the resulting mice are all completely ES cell-derived, with the newborn pups displaying a high frequency of abdominal hernias. Our results demonstrate that completely ES cell-derived mice can be produced using ICM-deficient 4n blastocysts, and provide evidence that the exclusion of tetraploid cells from the fetus in 2n/4n chimeras can largely be attributed to the formation of ICM-deficient blastocysts.

  16. Alloreactive CD8 T Cell Primed/Memory Responses and Accelerated Graft Rejection in B Cell-Deficient Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haofeng; Shen, Xiu-da; Gao, Feng; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The sensitized patients can develop an accelerated form of graft rejection mediated by humoral and/or T cell-mediated responses, which are resistant to currently used immunosuppression. Methods&Results In our model of fulminant cardiac allograft rejection in sensitized hosts, groups of wild-type (WT) and B cell-deficient (BKO) mice (B6) were challenged with skin grafts (B/c). Alloreactive CD8 T effector (Teff) activation and T memory (Tmem) differentiation during a 60-day follow-up period were reduced in the absence of B cell help. The expression of IL-2Rα, IL-7Rα, and IL-15Rα, which support/program CD8 Teff/Tmem expansion, differentiation, and survival, were selectively decreased in BKO hosts. Unlike in WT, in vivo cytotoxic activity analysis of alloreactive Tmem recall response has revealed decreased donor-type (B/c) but not third-party (C3H) cell lysis in sensitized B cell-deficient hosts. However, such impaired allo-Ag specific Tmem recall function was insufficient to markedly prolong cardiac allograft survival in sensitized BKO recipients. Indeed, despite quantitative and statistically significant differences between both animal groups, the biological impact of decreased CD8 Teff/Tmem activation and function in the sensitization phase was marginal. Indeed, cardiac allografts underwent fulminant rejection in sensitized BKO, albeit with somewhat delayed kinetics. Interestingly, unlike in naïve counterparts, the rejection cascade remained CD154 blockade-resistant, evidenced by comparable kinetics, and intra-graft cytokine gene profiles in MR1 mAb-treated sensitized WT and BKO hosts. Conclusion Although B cells were important for optimal alloreactive CD8 Teff/Tmem function in the sensitization phase, the fulminant rejection of cardiac allografts was B cell-independent, and CD154 blockade-resistant, as in WT hosts. PMID:21427633

  17. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  18. A Cofacially Stacked Electron-Deficient Small Molecule with a High Electron Mobility of over 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in Air.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jin-Hu; Zheng, Yu-Qing; Yao, Ze-Fan; Lei, Ting; Shen, Xingxing; Luo, Xu-Yi; Yu, Zhi-Ao; Zhang, Shi-Ding; Han, Guangchao; Wang, Zhi; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

    2015-12-22

    A strong, electron-deficient small molecule, F4 -BDOPV, has a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level down to -4.44 eV and exhibits cofacial packing in single crystals. These features provide F4 -BDOPV with good ambient stability and large charge-transfer integrals for electrons, leading to a high electron mobility of up to 12.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in air.

  19. PTEN deficiency and mutant p53 confer glucose-addiction to thyroid cancer cells: impact of glucose depletion on cell proliferation, cell survival, autophagy and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Morani, Federica; Phadngam, Suratchanee; Follo, Carlo; Titone, Rossella; Thongrakard, Visa; Galetto, Alessandra; Alabiso, Oscar; Isidoro, Ciro

    2014-07-01

    Proliferating cancer cells oxidize glucose through the glycolytic pathway. Since this metabolism is less profitable in terms of ATP production, cancer cells consume large quantity of glucose, and those that experience insufficient blood supply become glucose-addicted. We have analyzed the response to glucose depletion in WRO and FTC133 follicular thyroid cancer cells, which differ in the expression of two key regulators of the glucose metabolism. WRO cells, which express wild type p53 and PTEN, showed a higher rate of cell proliferation and were much less sensitive to glucose-depletion than FTC133 cells, which are PTEN null and express mutant p53. Glucose depletion slowed-down the autophagy flux in FTC133 cells, not in WRO cells. In a wound-healing assay, WRO cells were shown to migrate faster than FTC133 cells. Glucose depletion slowed down the cell migration rate, and these effects were more evident in FTC133 cells. Genetic silencing of either wild-type PTEN or p53 in WRO cells resulted in increased uptake of glucose, whereas the ectopic expression of PTEN in FTC133 cells resulted in diminished glucose uptake. In conclusion, compared to WRO, FTC133 cells were higher glucose up-taker and consumer. These data do not support the general contention that cancer cells lacking PTEN or expressing the mutant p53R273H are more aggressive and prone to better face glucose depletion. We propose that concurrent PTEN deficiency and mutant p53 leads to a glucose-addiction state that renders the cancer cell more sensitive to glucose restriction. The present observation substantiates the view that glucose-restriction may be an adjuvant strategy to combat these tumours. PMID:25221641

  20. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M.; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Daley, George Q.; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of TLR3 immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE) 1–3. We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non hematopoietic central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of IFN-β and/or IFN-γ1 in response to poly(I:C) stimulation was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-γ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele demonstrated that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was further rescued by treatment with exogenous IFN-α/β, but not IFN-γ1.Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3 pathway deficiencies. PMID:23103873

  1. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Daley, George Q; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2012-11-29

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE). We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non-haematopoietic CNS-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and/or IFN-λ1 in response to stimulation by the dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-λ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele showed that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was rescued further by treatment with exogenous IFN-α or IFN-β ( IFN-α/β) but not IFN-λ1. Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3-pathway deficiencies.

  2. Small Buccal Fat Pad Cells Have High Osteogenic Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Tsurumachi, Niina; Akita, Daisuke; Kano, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Taro; Toriumi, Taku; Kazama, Tomohiko; Oki, Yoshinao; Tamura, Yoko; Tonogi, Morio; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Honda, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have mesenchymal stem cells' (MSCs) characteristics. Generally, mature adipocytes are 60-110 μm in diameter; however, association between adipocyte size and dedifferentiation efficiency is still unknown. This study, therefore, investigated the dedifferentiation efficiency of adipocytes based on cell diameter. Buccal fat pad was harvested from five human donors and dissociated by collagenase digestion. After exclusion of unwanted stromal cells by centrifugation, floating adipocytes were collected and their size distribution was analyzed. The floating adipocytes were then separated into two groups depending on cell size using 40- and 100-μm nylon mesh filters: cell diameters less than 40 μm (small adipocytes: S-adipocytes) and cell diameters of 40-100 μm (large adipocytes: L-adipocytes). Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of adipocyte dedifferentiation and then characterized the resultant DFAT cells. The S-adipocytes showed a higher capacity to dedifferentiate into DFAT cells (S-DFAT cells) compared to the L-adipocytes (L-DFAT cells). The S-DFAT cells also showed a relatively higher proportion of CD146-positive cells than L-DFAT cells, and exhibited more osteogenic differentiation ability based on the alkaline phosphatase activity and amount of calcium deposition. These results suggested that the S- and L-DFAT cells had distinct characteristics, and that the higher dedifferentiation potential of S-adipocytes compared to L-adipocytes gives the former group an advantage in yielding DFAT cells.

  3. Mesenteric lymph nodes contribute to proinflammatory Th17-cell generation during inflammation of the small intestine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Nobu; Yamaki, Satoshi; Sun, Shu-Lan; Asao, Atsuko; Okuyama, Yuko; So, Takanori; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ishii, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    cells of the small intestine, including Th17 cells, are critically involved in host protection from microbial infection, and also contribute to the pathogenesis of small bowel inflammatory disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) play important roles in gut-tropic T-cell generation, although it is still unclear if MLNs are involved in the pathogenesis of small intestine inflammation. To address this issue, we analyzed the roles of both MLNs and Peyer's patches (PPs) by evaluating MLN- or PP-deficient mice in an experimental model of small intestine inflammation, induced by CD3-specific mAb injection. Interestingly, MLNs, but not PPs, were essential for the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, in particular the accumulation and infiltration of CD4(+) T-cell populations, including Th17 cells, from the blood. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell accumulation was dependent on the function of the α4 β7 integrin. Furthermore, MLN removal led to a significantly reduced number of peripheral α4 β7 (+) CD4(+) effector memory T cells under normal conditions, suggesting that MLNs may play a role in maintaining the number of gut-tropic CD4(+) effector memory T cells circulating in the blood. Taken together, the present study highlights the important role of MLNs in contributing to the pathogenesis of small intestine inflammation.

  4. Defective bone repair in mast cell deficient mice with c-Kit loss of function.

    PubMed

    Behrends, D A; Cheng, L; Sullivan, M B; Wang, M H; Roby, G B; Zayed, N; Gao, C; Henderson, J E; Martineau, P A

    2014-01-01

    KitW-sh mice carry an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding the receptor for stem cell factor, which is expressed at high levels on the surface of haematopoietic precursor cells. The mutation results in mast cell deficiency, a variety of defects in innate immunity and poorly defined abnormalities in bone. The present study was designed to characterise healing of a cortical window defect in skeletally mature KitW-sh mice using high-resolution micro computed tomographic imaging and histological analyses. The cortical bone defect healed completely in all wild type mice but failed to heal in about half of the KitW-sh mice by 12 weeks post-operative. Defective healing was associated with premature and excessive expression of TRAP positive cells embedded in fibrous marrow but with little change in ALP activity. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed reduced CD34 positive vascular endothelial cells and F4/80 positive macrophages at 1 and 2 weeks post-operative. Impaired bone healing in the KitW-sh mice was therefore attributed to altered catabolic activity, impaired re-vascularisation and compromised replacement of woven with compact bone. PMID:25284141

  5. Ca(2+) signalling in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for cystinosin.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Elmonem, Mohamed A; Bongaerts, Inge; Luyten, Tomas; Missiaen, Ludwig; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Levtchenko, Elena N; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-10-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CTNS gene coding for the lysosomal cystine transporter, cystinosin. Recent studies have demonstrated that, apart from cystine accumulation in the lysosomes, cystinosin-deficient cells, especially renal proximal tubular epithelial cells are characterized by abnormal vesicle trafficking and endocytosis, possible lysosomal dysfunction and perturbed intracellular signalling cascades. It is therefore possible that Ca(2+) signalling is disturbed in cystinosis, as it has been demonstrated for other disorders associated with lysosomal dysfunction, such as Gaucher, Niemann-Pick type C and Alzheimer's diseases. In this study we investigated ATP-induced, IP3-induced and lysosomal Ca(2+) release in human proximal tubular epithelial cells derived from control and cystinotic patients. No major dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics was found, although ATP-induced Ca(2+) release appeared slightly sensitized in cystinotic cells compared to control cells. Hence, these subtle changes in Ca(2+) signals elicited by agonists may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. Impairment of dendritic cell functions in patients with adaptor protein-3 complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prandini, Alberto; Salvi, Valentina; Colombo, Francesca; Moratto, Daniele; Lorenzi, Luisa; Vermi, William; De Francesco, Maria Antonia; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Porta, Fulvio; Plebani, Alessandro; Facchetti, Fabio; Sozzani, Silvano; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-06-30

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) is a primary immunodeficiency due to adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex deficiency. HPS2 patients present neutropenia, partial albinism, and impaired lysosomal vesicles formation in hematopoietic cells. Given the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the immune response, we studied monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in two HPS2 siblings. Mature HPS2 moDCs showed impaired expression of CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP), low levels of MIP1-β/CCL4, MIG/CXCL9, and severe defect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) secretion. DCs in lymph-node biopsies from the same patients showed a diffuse cytoplasm reactivity in a large fraction of DC-LAMP(+) cells, instead of the classical dot-like stain. In addition, analysis of pDC-related functions of blood-circulating mononuclear cells revealed reduced interferon-α secretion in response to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), whereas granzyme-B induction upon IL-3/IL-10 stimulation was normal. Finally, T-cell costimulatory activity, as measured by mixed lymphocyte reaction assay, was lower in patients, suggesting that function and maturation of DCs is abnormal in patients with HPS2. PMID:27207797

  7. Impairment of dendritic cell functions in patients with adaptor protein-3 complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prandini, Alberto; Salvi, Valentina; Colombo, Francesca; Moratto, Daniele; Lorenzi, Luisa; Vermi, William; De Francesco, Maria Antonia; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Porta, Fulvio; Plebani, Alessandro; Facchetti, Fabio; Sozzani, Silvano; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-06-30

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) is a primary immunodeficiency due to adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex deficiency. HPS2 patients present neutropenia, partial albinism, and impaired lysosomal vesicles formation in hematopoietic cells. Given the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the immune response, we studied monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in two HPS2 siblings. Mature HPS2 moDCs showed impaired expression of CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP), low levels of MIP1-β/CCL4, MIG/CXCL9, and severe defect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) secretion. DCs in lymph-node biopsies from the same patients showed a diffuse cytoplasm reactivity in a large fraction of DC-LAMP(+) cells, instead of the classical dot-like stain. In addition, analysis of pDC-related functions of blood-circulating mononuclear cells revealed reduced interferon-α secretion in response to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), whereas granzyme-B induction upon IL-3/IL-10 stimulation was normal. Finally, T-cell costimulatory activity, as measured by mixed lymphocyte reaction assay, was lower in patients, suggesting that function and maturation of DCs is abnormal in patients with HPS2.

  8. The Elephant and the Blind Men: Making Sense of PARP Inhibitors in Homologous Recombination Deficient Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Silvana B.; Patel, Anand G.; Hurley, Rachel M.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is an important component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as a regulator of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of HR-deficient cells with PARP inhibitors results in stalled and collapsed replication forks. Consequently, HR-deficient cells are extremely sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Several explanations have been advanced to explain this so-called synthetic lethality between HR deficiency and PARP inhibition: (i) reduction of BER activity leading to enhanced DNA double-strand breaks, which accumulate in the absence of HR; (ii) trapping of inhibited PARP1 at sites of DNA damage, which prevents access of other repair proteins; (iii) failure to initiate HR by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-dependent BRCA1 recruitment; and (iv) activation of the NHEJ pathway, which selectively induces error-prone repair in HR-deficient cells. Here we review evidence regarding these various explanations for the ability of PARP inhibitors to selectively kill HR-deficient cancer cells and discuss their potential implications. PMID:24062981

  9. Niacin deficiency causes oxidative stress in rat bone marrow cells but not through decreased NADPH or glutathione status.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kitty; Sham, Heidi; Hui, Evon; Kirkland, James B

    2008-11-01

    Niacin (vitamin B(3)), in the form of NADPH, is required for the regeneration of glutathione (GSH), which is the substrate of GSH peroxidase. In this study, we examined the effect of dietary niacin deficiency on protein and DNA oxidation in bone marrow cells of Long-Evans rats. Western blotting was used to measure 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-reactive protein carbonyl products, and the Biotrin OxyDNA method was used to measure 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The levels of both protein carbonyls and 8-oxodG were increased by 50% in niacin-deficient bone marrow cells. To examine whether this oxidant damage involves altered metabolism of pyridine nucleotides and glutathione, both oxidized and reduced forms of pyridine nucleotides (NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+), NADPH) and glutathione (GSSG and GSH) were quantified in total and nucleated bone marrow cells. NAD and NADP(+) levels were decreased 80% and 22%, respectively, by niacin deficiency. NADPH and GSH were not depleted by niacin deficiency, showing that oxidant injury was not due directly to impairment of this pathway. Oxidative stress, of uncertain etiology, may play a role in the observed genomic instability and sensitivity to leukemogenesis in bone marrow cells during niacin deficiency.

  10. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Upregulates Peroxisomal Fatty Acid Oxidation and Inhibits Apoptotic Cell Death in Abcd1-Deficient Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Pujol, Aurora; Baarine, Mauhamad; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1) and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs) (1 and 3) in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2) proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid) leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD. PMID:23923017

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz TG, Hamilton GC. Anemia, polycythemia, and white blood cell disorders. In: Marx ...

  12. In situ cell-by-cell imaging and analysis of small cell populations by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Patt, Joseph M; Vertes, Akos

    2011-04-15

    Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as a tool to determine the distribution of proteins, lipids, and metabolites in tissues. The existing imaging methods, however, mostly rely on predefined rectangular grids for sampling that ignore the natural cellular organization of the tissue. Here we demonstrate that laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS can be utilized for in situ cell-by-cell imaging of plant tissues. The cell-by-cell molecular image of the metabolite cyanidin, the ion responsible for purple pigmentation in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, correlated well with the color of cells in the tissue. Chemical imaging using single-cells as voxels reflects the spatial distribution of biochemical differences within a tissue without the distortion stemming from sampling multiple cells within the laser focal spot. Microsampling by laser ablation also has the benefit of enabling the analysis of very small cell populations for biochemical heterogeneity. For example, with a ∼30 μm ablation spot we were able to analyze 3-4 achlorophyllous cells within an oil gland on a sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaf. To explore cell-to-cell variations within and between tissues, multivariate statistical analysis on LAESI-MS data from epidermal cells of an A. cepa bulb and a C. aurantium leaf and from human buccal epithelial cell populations was performed using the method of orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The OPLS-DA analysis of mass spectra, containing over 300 peaks each, provided guidance in identifying a small number of metabolites most responsible for the variance between the cell populations. These metabolites can be viewed as promising candidates for biomarkers that, however, require further verification. PMID:21388149

  13. Glomerulonephritis after hematopoietic cell transplantation: IgA nephropathy with increased excretion of galactose-deficient IgA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Susie L; Colvin, Gerald A; Rifai, Abdalla; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Esparza, Alfredo; Farooqi, Shahida; Julian, Bruce A

    2010-05-01

    We report the development of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) following full myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in two patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched sibling donors, unrelated to active or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Both recipients had elevated urinary levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, and one donor-recipient pair had elevated serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. We propose that IgAN developed after bone marrow transplantation due to a non-graft-versus-host-disease-related multi-hit process associated with glomerular deposition of galactose-deficient IgA1. These two cases provide unique insight into the kinetics of overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1 and its glomerular deposition and consequential renal injury in IgAN.

  14. Putrescine Alleviates Iron Deficiency via NO-Dependent Reutilization of Root Cell-Wall Fe in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wang, Bin; Song, Wen Feng; Zheng, Shao Jian; Shen, Ren Fang

    2016-01-01

    Plants challenged with abiotic stress show enhanced polyamines levels. Here, we show that the polyamine putrescine (Put) plays an important role to alleviate Fe deficiency. The adc2-1 mutant, which is defective in Put biosynthesis, was hypersensitive to Fe deficiency compared with wild type (Col-1 of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). Exogenous Put decreased the Fe bound to root cell wall, especially to hemicellulose, and increased root and shoot soluble Fe content, thus alleviating the Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, exogenous Put induced the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) under both Fe-sufficient (+Fe) and Fe-deficient (-Fe) conditions, although the ferric-chelate reductase (FCR) activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were induced only under -Fe treatment. The alleviation of Fe deficiency by Put was diminished in the hemicellulose-level decreased mutant-xth31 and in the noa1 and nia1nia2 mutants, in which the endogenous NO levels are reduced, indicating that both NO and hemicellulose are involved in Put-mediated alleviation of Fe deficiency. However, the FCR activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were still up-regulated under -Fe+Put treatment compared with -Fe treatment in xth31, and Put-induced cell wall Fe remobilization was abolished in noa1 and nia1nia2, indicating that Put-regulated cell wall Fe reutilization is dependent on NO. From our results, we conclude that Put is involved in the remobilization of Fe from root cell wall hemicellulose in a process dependent on NO accumulation under Fe-deficient condition in Arabidopsis. PMID:26578707

  15. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  16. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4+ T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage. PMID:26792955

  17. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4(+) T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage. PMID:26792955

  18. Enhanced mucosal permeability and nitric oxide synthase activity in jejunum of mast cell deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, S; Grisham, M; Russell, J; Granger, D

    1997-01-01

    Background—Recent reports have described a modulating influence of nitric oxide (NO) on intestinal mucosal permeability and have implicated a role for mast cells in this NO mediated process. 
Aims—To assess further the contribution of mast cells to the mucosal permeability changes elicited by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), using mast cell deficient (W/WV) and mast cell replete mice (+/+). 
Methods—Chromium-51 EDTA clearance (from blood to jejunal lumen), jejunal NOS and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, and plasma nitrate/nitrite levels were monitored. 
Results—The increased EDTA clearance elicited by intraluminal L-NAME in W/WV mice (4.4-fold) was significantly greater than the response observed in control (+/+) mice (1.8-fold). The exacerbated response in W/Wv mice was greatly attenuated by pretreatment with either dexamethasone (1.3-fold) or the selective inducible NOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine (1.4-fold), and partially attenuated by the mast cell stabiliser, lodoxamide (2.9-fold). Jejunal inducible NOS activity was significantly higher in W/WV than in +/+ mice, while jejunal MPO was lower in W/WV mice than in +/+ mice, suggesting that the higher inducible NOS in W/WV does not result from the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the gut. The higher inducible NOS activity in the jejunum of W/WV was significantly reduced by dexamethasone treatment. 
Conclusions—Our results suggest that mast cells normally serve to inhibit inducible NOS activity tonically in the gut and that inhibitors of NOS elicit a larger permeability response when this tonic inhibitory influence is released by mast cell depletion. 

 Keywords: aminoguanidine; c-kit; dexamethasone; epithelium; neutrophils PMID:9414970

  19. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by ∼50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed. PMID:18661517

  20. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Tawnya L; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J

    2008-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is underexpressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by approximately 50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed.

  1. Sugar transport regulation: comparative characterization of the effect of NADH CoQ reductase deficiency in two cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Germinario, R J; Continelli, L; Pratt, S

    2000-11-01

    In this report, we have characterized the upregulation of glucose transport in two different respiration-deficient fibroblast cell cultures. We have demonstrated that glucose transport increases in respiration-deficient cells as measured by 2 deoxy D-glucose transport and is readily observed in both the WG750 human and G14 Chinese hamster fibroblast respiration-deficient cell lines when compared with the MCH55 normal human and V79 parental Chinese hamster cell lines, respectively. Using subcellular fractionation techniques, the GLUT 1 glucose transporter was found located predominantly in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction of the human and hamster cell lines. In human cells, the expression of the GLUT 1 glucose transporter was elevated three-fold in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction of the WG750 respiration-deficient mutant cells. In the Chinese hamster cell lines, the respiration-deficient G14 cells exhibited no such GLUT 1 glucose transporter elevation in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction, yet expressed a >2-fold increase in glucose transport. Furthermore, the G14 cells had a similar content of GLUT 1 glucose transporter in the plasma membrane fraction when compared with the V79 parental cell line. Using Western blot analysis, the GLUT 1 glucose transporter in G14 cells exhibited a different mobility on a polyacrylamide gel when compared with the mobility of the GLUT 1 glucose transporter of the V79 cell line. This differential mobility of the glucose transporters in the hamster cells appeared to be related to glycosylation differences of the glucose transporters. Although normal human and hamster cell lines exhibited significant increases in insulin-stimulated sugar transport (P < 0.05), the two respective respiration-deficient cell lines exhibited no significant increases in insulin-stimulated sugar transport (P > 0.05). Additionally, the expression of the GLUT 1 mRNA in the human WG750 mutant cells was elevated when compared with GLUT 1 mRNA in

  2. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26749524

  3. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, Joseph; Matcher, Stephen; MacNeil, Sheila; Sangwan, Virender S.

    2016-04-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells are continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. In the event that the cornea is damaged and the limbal stem cell population is severely reduced, this condition known as Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and can lead to blindness. There are numerous treatments but most have high long term failure rates. Most treatment methods include the transplantation of limbal stem cells into damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region and regenerating at healthy corneal epithelium. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images. A bespoke OCT has been built to investigate the trajectories of these limbal stem cells after transplantation to see whether if they do repopulate the damaged limbus or not. In the experimentation magneto-labelling was used to track the limbal stem cells. For the magneto-labelling a mixture of limbal stem cells and cornea epithelium are cultured with super paramagnetic iron (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) for 24hours, to allow for uptake. The cells are then transplanted onto the denuded cornea. The transplanted cell mixture with the encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles is actuated with an external magnetic field 0.08T leading to a phase modulation on the signal. A Phase sensitive Magneto-motive OCT is used to locate the transplanted cells. The location of the cells with embed SPIOs were located both in 2D and 3D.

  4. Evaluation of Small Molecules as Front Cell Donor Materials for High-Efficiency Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wan, Xiangjian; Liu, Feng; Kan, Bin; Li, Miaomiao; Feng, Huanran; Zhang, Hongtao; Russell, Thomas P; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Three small molecules as front cell donors for tandem cells are thoroughly evaluated and a high power conversion efficiency of 11.47% is achieved, which demonstrates that the oligomer-like small molecules offer a good choice for high-performance tandem solar cells.

  5. Evaluation of Small Molecules as Front Cell Donor Materials for High-Efficiency Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wan, Xiangjian; Liu, Feng; Kan, Bin; Li, Miaomiao; Feng, Huanran; Zhang, Hongtao; Russell, Thomas P; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Three small molecules as front cell donors for tandem cells are thoroughly evaluated and a high power conversion efficiency of 11.47% is achieved, which demonstrates that the oligomer-like small molecules offer a good choice for high-performance tandem solar cells. PMID:27214707

  6. [Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Inoue, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody that has recently been approved in Japan, and has shown high response rates and more favorable safety profiles in 2 phase III clinical trials. Accordingly, immune checkpoint therapy has now been included as a new standard treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. These immune checkpoints are receptors expressed on T cells that regulate the immune response. The PD-1/PD-L1 signal inhibits cytotoxic T lymphocyte proliferation and survival, induces apoptosis of infiltrative T cells, and increases the amount of regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, severe immune-related adverse event(irAE)have been observed, including enterocolitis, neuropathies, and endocrinopathies. There are different management approaches to irAEs with conventional cytotoxic drugs. This article reviews the available data regarding immune checkpoint therapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27306803

  7. Ganglioside GM1 Deficiency in Effector T Cells From NOD Mice Induces Resistance to Regulatory T-Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gusheng; Lu, Zi-Hua; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Ledeen, Robert W.; Bleich, David

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To detect GM1 deficiency and determine its role in effector T cells (Teffs) from NOD mice in establishing resistance to regulatory T-cell (Treg) suppression. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CD4+ and CD8+ Teffs were isolated from spleens of prediabetic NOD mice for comparison with similar cells from Balb/c, C57BL/6, and NOR mice. GM1 was quantified with thin-layer chromatography for total cellular GM1 and flow cytometry for cell-surface GM1. Suppression of Teff proliferation was determined by application of GM1 cross-linking agents or coculturing with Tregs. Calcium influx in Teffs was quantified using fura-2. RESULTS Resting and activated CD4+ and CD8+ Teffs of NOD mice contained significantly less GM1 than Teffs from the other three mouse strains tested. After activation, NOD Teffs resisted suppression by Tregs or GM1 cross-linking agents in contrast to robust suppression of Balb/c Teffs; this was reversed by preincubation of NOD Teffs with GM1. NOD Teffs also showed attenuated Ca2+ influx via transient receptor potential channel 5 (TRPC5) channels induced by GM1 cross-linking, and this, too, was reversed by elevation of Teff GM1. CONCLUSIONS GM1 deficiency occurs in NOD Teffs and contributes importantly to failed suppression, which is rectified by increasing Teff GM1. Such elevation also reverses subthreshold Ca2+ influx via TRPC5 channels, an essential aspect of suppression. Our results also support a critical role for galectin-1 as a GM1 cross-linking counter-receptor that fittingly is upregulated and released by Tregs during activation. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which pathogenic Teffs evade regulatory suppression, thereby leading to autoimmune β-cell destruction and type 1 diabetes. PMID:21788572

  8. B-less: a strain of profoundly B cell-deficient mice expressing a human lambda transgene

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have created several transgenic mouse strains that bear the human lambda light chain gene driven by its own promoter and a mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer. The transgene is expressed in many tissues, with particularly high levels of expression in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. One of these transgenic lines, B-less, displays a dramatic phenotype characterized by an acute susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections. Analysis of this strain shows it to be profoundly deficient in both immature (pre-B) and mature B cells, as well as in circulating immunoglobulin. The pre-B and B cell defects are cell autonomous, as judged by cell culture and bone marrow graft chimeras. Despite this B cell deficiency, the T cell lineage appears grossly normal as assessed by flow cytometric analysis and by its response to mitogen stimulation. Since an independently derived transgenic strain bearing the same human lambda construct displays a partial B-less phenotype, it is likely that the B lineage deficiency is due to a dominant effect of transgene expression rather than to the insertional perturbation of an endogenous mouse gene. It is interesting that the deficiency phenotype is fully expressed in the FVB/N genetic background, but is suppressed in F1 hybrids formed between the FVB/N and C57BL/6 inbred strains. Evidently, there are one or more dominant genetic suppressors of B-less in the C57BL/6 genome. PMID:1314882

  9. Mechanistic Models Predict Efficacy of CCR5-Deficient Stem Cell Transplants in HIV Patient Populations.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, I; Gabhann, F Mac

    2016-02-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) effectively suppresses viral load in HIV-infected individuals, but it is not a cure. Bone marrow transplants using HIV-resistant stem cells have renewed hope that cure is achievable but key questions remain e.g., what percentage of stem cells must be HIV-resistant to achieve cure?. As few patients have undergone transplants, we built a mechanistic model of HIV/AIDS to approach this problem. The model includes major players of infection, reproduces the complete course of the disease, and simulates crucial components of clinical treatments, such as cART, irradiation, host recovery, gene augmentation, and donor chimerism. Using clinical data from 172 cART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, we created virtual populations to predict performance of CCR5-deficient stem-cell therapies and explore interpatient variability. We validated our model against a published clinical study of CCR5-modified T-cell therapy. Our model predicted that donor chimerism must exceed 75% to achieve 90% probability of cure across patient populations.

  10. Mechanistic Models Predict Efficacy of CCR5-Deficient Stem Cell Transplants in HIV Patient Populations.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, I; Gabhann, F Mac

    2016-02-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) effectively suppresses viral load in HIV-infected individuals, but it is not a cure. Bone marrow transplants using HIV-resistant stem cells have renewed hope that cure is achievable but key questions remain e.g., what percentage of stem cells must be HIV-resistant to achieve cure?. As few patients have undergone transplants, we built a mechanistic model of HIV/AIDS to approach this problem. The model includes major players of infection, reproduces the complete course of the disease, and simulates crucial components of clinical treatments, such as cART, irradiation, host recovery, gene augmentation, and donor chimerism. Using clinical data from 172 cART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, we created virtual populations to predict performance of CCR5-deficient stem-cell therapies and explore interpatient variability. We validated our model against a published clinical study of CCR5-modified T-cell therapy. Our model predicted that donor chimerism must exceed 75% to achieve 90% probability of cure across patient populations. PMID:26933519

  11. Deficiency of HIV-Gag-specific T cells in early childhood correlates with poor viral containment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, SiHong; Dunkley-Thompson, Jacqueline; Tang, YanHua; Macklin, Eric A.; Steel-Duncan, Julianne; Singh-Minott, Indira; Ryland, Elizabeth G.; Smikle, Monica; Walker, Bruce D.; Christie, Celia D.C.; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2009-01-01

    Perinatal HIV infection is characterized by a sustained high-level viremia and a high risk of rapid progression to AIDS, indicating a failure of immunologic containment of the virus. We hypothesized that age-related differences in the specificity or function of HIV-specific T cells may influence HIV RNA levels and clinical outcome following perinatal infection. Here we define the HIV epitopes targeted by 76 pediatric subjects (47 HIV-infected and 29 HIV-exposed but uninfected), and assessed the ability of HIV-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells to degranulate and produce IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2. No responses were detected among HIV-uninfected infants, while responses among infected subjects increased in magnitude and breadth with age. Gag-specific responses were uncommon during early infancy, and their frequency was significantly lower among children younger than 24 months old (p=0.014). Importantly, Gag responders exhibited significantly lower HIV RNA levels than nonresponders (logVL 5.8 vs. 5.0; p=0.005). Both the total and Gag-specific T cell frequency correlated inversely with viral load after correction for age, whereas no relationship with targeting of other viral proteins was observed. Functional assessment of HIV-specific T cells by multiparameter flow cytometry revealed that polyfunctional CD8 cells were less prevalent in children before 24 months of age, and that HIV-specific CD4 cell responses were of universally low frequency among antiretroviral-naïve children and absent in young infants. These cross-sectional data suggest that qualitative differences in the CD8 response, combined with a deficiency of HIV-specific CD4 cells, may contribute to the inability of young infants to limit replication of HIV. PMID:19018003

  12. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  13. Pathogenesis of autoimmunity in alphabeta T cell-deficient lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, S L; Cappadona, J; McNiff, J M; Madaio, M P; Owen, M J; Hayday, A C; Craft, J

    1998-01-01

    Murine lupus in MRL mice has been strongly attributed to alphabeta T cell-dependent mechanisms. Non-alphabeta T cell-dependent mechanisms, such as gammadelta T cells, have been shown to drive antibody and autoantibody production, but they have not been considered capable of inducing end-organ disease. Here, we have expanded upon the findings of such previous work by examining the mechanism and extent of end-organ disease attainable via gammadelta T cells and/or non-alphabeta T cell-dependent mechanisms, assessing two prototypical lupus lesions, renal and skin disease, in TCR alpha -/- MRL mice that possessed either functional or defective Fas antigen (Fas + or lpr). Observed to 1 year of age, TCR alpha -/- MRL mice developed disease characterized by increased mortality, overt renal disease and skin lesions. While delayed in onset and/or reduced in severity compared with TCR alpha +/+ MRL/lpr animals, renal and skin lesions in alphabeta T cell-deficient animals were clearly increased in severity compared with age-matched control non-autoimmune mice. In contrast to TCR alpha +/+ MRL mice, whose disease reflected pan-isotype immune complex deposition with significant complement fixation, renal disease in TCR alpha -/- MRL animals reflected predominantly IgG1 immune complex deposition, with poor complement fixation. Thus, this study demonstrates conclusively that non-alphabeta T cell-dependent mechanisms can induce renal and skin injury in murine lupus, but at least in the kidney, only via humoral autoimmunity of a relatively non-pathological isotype which results in the delayed onset of end-organ damage.

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.

    PubMed

    Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Aksu, Gamze; Bozcuk, Hakan; Pestereli, Elif; Simsek, Tayup

    2008-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix accounts for 1-3% of all cervix cancers. It is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. To date, no effective treatment protocol has been determined. Surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been used either alone or in combination. Recent data suggests that survival in patients with early staged small cell carcinoma of the cervix is better with surgery combined with chemo-radiotherapy. Here, we presented two patients with stage IB1 small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. For both patients, definitive surgery was performed with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Subsequently, they were treated with pelvic external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy with concurrent cisplatin based chemotherapy. They were alive with no evidence of disease at 91 and 65 months, respectively.

  15. The Effect of Iron Deficiency on Osmotic Sensitivity of Red Blood Cells from Neonatal Rats and Their Mothers.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashimi, L Mossa; Gambling, Lorraine; McArdle, H J

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency during pregnancy has many effects on both the mother and her developing foetus. These can be both short and long term. One effect is an alteration in fatty acid metabolism and we hypothesised that these changes may result in alterations in membrane function and structure. In order to test this hypothesis, we measured osmotic sensitivity in red blood cells isolated from neonates and their mothers at different times following birth. We fed female rats control or iron-deficient diets for 4 weeks prior to mating and kept them on the same diet until term. At that time, we returned one group of deficient dams to the control diet. The others were kept on the same diet. We showed that iron deficiency results in a decrease in osmotic sensitivity in the mothers but not in their neonates. Returning the dams to the control diet resulted in a return of their red cell osmotic sensitivity to control levels. In the neonates, there was no recovery in haematocrit or in any other parameter, though they did not get any worse, in contrast to the pups being suckled by deficient mothers. The data show two things. The first is that following birth, the mother restores her own iron stores at the expense of the pups, and secondly, there are differences in properties and sensitivities between red cells from mothers and their neonates. This latter observation cannot be explained by differences in the membrane fatty acid profiles, which were not significantly different.

  16. Salinity-Dependent Impacts of ProQ, Prc, and Spr Deficiencies on Escherichia coli Cell Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Craig H.; Culham, Doreen E.; Marom, David

    2014-01-01

    ProQ is a cytoplasmic protein with RNA chaperone activities that reside in FinO- and Hfq-like domains. Lesions at proQ decrease the level of the osmoregulatory glycine betaine transporter ProP. Lesions at proQ eliminated ProQ and Prc, the periplasmic protease encoded by the downstream gene prc. They dramatically slowed the growth of Escherichia coli populations and altered the morphologies of E. coli cells in high-salinity medium. ProQ and Prc deficiencies were associated with different phenotypes. ProQ-deficient bacteria were elongated unless glycine betaine was provided. High-salinity cultures of Prc-deficient bacteria included spherical cells with an enlarged periplasm and an eccentric nucleoid. The nucleoid-containing compartment was bounded by the cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan. This phenotype was not evident in bacteria cultivated at low or moderate salinity, nor was it associated with murein lipoprotein (Lpp) deficiency, and it differed from those elicited by the MreB inhibitor A-22 or the FtsI inhibitor aztreonam at low or high salinity. It was suppressed by deletion of spr, which encodes one of three murein hydrolases that are redundantly essential for enlargement of the murein sacculus. Prc deficiency may alter bacterial morphology by impairing control of Spr activity at high salinity. ProQ and Prc deficiencies lowered the ProP activity of bacteria cultivated at moderate salinity by approximately 70% and 30%, respectively, but did not affect other osmoregulatory functions. The effects of ProQ and Prc deficiencies on ProP activity are indirect, reflecting their roles in the maintenance of cell structure. PMID:24443528

  17. Cardioprotective role of vitamin D receptor in circulating endothelial cells of ApoE-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Liao, Wang; Yi, Zhuwen; Xiang, Wei; He, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the key course of coronary heart disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of vitamin D receptor on serum 1,25-(OH)2D levels, lipid profiles, nitric oxide expression, apoptosis-related gene Bcl-2, fas protein levels, in ApoE-deficient mice. The proliferation activity of VDR-RNAi transfected endothelial cells was decreased, the ability of apoptosis was increased, nitric oxide concentration was decreased and eNOS protein level was significantly reduced. VDR-RNAi induced lipid metabolism abnormality, reduced eNOS and ApoE levels, promoted lipid peroxidation, damaged the endothelial function and accelerated the process of atheroscleros. Together, our data presented a novel role for VDR in the pathogenesis process of atheroscleros by up regulating eNOS protein expression which could lay a solid foundation of VDR-specific activator treatment for coronary artery disease. PMID:26131079

  18. Reduced salivary gland size and increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells in DLK1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Gallastegui, P; Luzuriaga, J; Aurrekoetxea, M; Baladrón, V; Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; García-Ramírez, J J; Laborda, J; Unda, F; Ibarretxe, G

    2016-06-01

    DLK1 (PREF1, pG2, or FA1) is a transmembrane and secreted protein containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats. Dlk1 expression is abundant in many tissues during embryonic and fetal development and is believed to play an important role in the regulation of tissue differentiation and fetal growth. After birth, Dlk1 expression is abolished in most tissues but is possibly reactivated to regulate stem cell activation and responses to injury. We have recently reported that DLK1 regulates many aspects of salivary gland organogenesis. Here, we have extended our studies of the salivary gland phenotype of Dlk1 knock-out mice. We have observed that salivary glands are smaller and weigh significantly less in both Dlk1 knock-out males and females compared with gender and age-matched wild-type mice and regardless of the natural sexual dimorphism in rodent salivary glands. This reduced size correlates with a reduced capacity of Dlk1-deficient mice to secrete saliva after stimulation with pilocarpine. However, histological and ultrastructural analyses of both adult and developing salivary gland tissues have revealed no defects in Dlk1 ((-/-)) mice, indicating that genetic compensation accounts for the relatively mild salivary phenotype in these animals. Finally, despite their lack of severe anomalies, we have found that salivary glands from Dlk1-deficient mice present a higher amount of CK14-positive epithelial progenitors at various developmental stages, suggesting a role for DLK1 in the regulation of salivary epithelial stem cell balance. PMID:26711912

  19. Imaging tumour cell heterogeneity following cell transplantation into optically clear immune-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Tenente, Inês M.; Hayes, Madeline N.; Garcia, Elaine G.; Torres Yordán, Nora; Bourque, Caitlin; He, Shuning; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Look, A. Thomas; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers contain a wide diversity of cell types that are defined by differentiation states, genetic mutations and altered epigenetic programmes that impart functional diversity to individual cells. Elevated tumour cell heterogeneity is linked with progression, therapy resistance and relapse. Yet, imaging of tumour cell heterogeneity and the hallmarks of cancer has been a technical and biological challenge. Here we develop optically clear immune-compromised rag2E450fs (casper) zebrafish for optimized cell transplantation and direct visualization of fluorescently labelled cancer cells at single-cell resolution. Tumour engraftment permits dynamic imaging of neovascularization, niche partitioning of tumour-propagating cells in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, emergence of clonal dominance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and tumour evolution resulting in elevated growth and metastasis in BRAFV600E-driven melanoma. Cell transplantation approaches using optically clear immune-compromised zebrafish provide unique opportunities to uncover biology underlying cancer and to dynamically visualize cancer processes at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:26790525

  20. Arginine deiminase PEG20 inhibits growth of small cell lung cancers lacking expression of argininosuccinate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M P; Jungbluth, A A; Wu, B-W; Bomalaski, J; Old, L J; Ritter, G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some cancers have been shown to lack expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), an enzyme required for the synthesis of arginine and a possible biomarker of sensitivity to arginine deprivation. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a microbial enzyme capable of efficiently depleting peripheral blood arginine. Methods: Argininosuccinate synthetase expression was assessed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), with expression also assessed in a panel of 10 human SCLC by qRT-PCR and western blot. Proliferation assays and analyses of apoptosis and autophagy assessed the effect of pegylated ADI (ADI-PEG20) in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of ADI-PEG20 was determined in mice bearing SCLC xenografts. Results: Approximately 45% of SCLC tumours and 50% of cell lines assessed were negative for ASS. Argininosuccinate synthetase-deficient SCLC cells demonstrated sensitivity to ADI-PEG20, which was associated with the induction of autophagy and caspase-independent cell death. Arginine deiminase-PEG20 treatment of ASS-negative SCLC xenografts caused significant, dose-dependent inhibition of tumour growth of both small and established tumours. Conclusion: These results suggest a role for ADI-PEG20 in the treatment of SCLC, and a clinical trial exploring this therapeutic approach in patients with ASS-negative SCLC by IHC has now been initiated. PMID:22134507

  1. Alterations in the thymocyte phenotype of EphB-deficient mice largely affect the double negative cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, David; Muñoz, Juan José; García-Ceca, Javier; Cejalvo, Teresa; Jiménez, Eva; Zapata, Agustín

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we have analysed the phenotype of EphB2 and/or EphB3 deficient thymocytes confirming and extending previous studies on the role of this family of molecules in T-cell differentiation. In all mutant thymuses statistically significant reduced cell contents were observed. This reduction of thymic cellularity correlated with increased proportions of apoptotic cells, largely both double negative (DN; CD4− CD8−) and double positive (CD4+ CD8+) cells, and decreased proportions of DN cycling cells. Adult deficient thymuses also showed increased proportions of DN cells but not significant variations in the percentages of other thymocyte subsets. In absolute terms, the thymocyte number decreased significantly in all thymocyte compartments from the DN3 (CD44− CD25+) cell stage onward, without variations in the numbers of both DN1 (CD44+ CD25−) and DN2 (CD44+ CD25+) cells. Remarkably, all these changes also occurred from the 15-day fetal EphB2 and/or EphB3 deficient mice, suggesting that adult phenotype results from the gradual accumulations of defects appearing early in the thymus ontogeny. As a reflection of thymus condition, a reduction in the number of T lymphocytes occurred in the peripheral blood and mesenteric lymph nodes, but not in spleen, maintaining the proportions of T-cell subsets defined by CD4/CD8 marker expression, in all cases. PMID:18397270

  2. Autophagy-deficiency in hepatic progenitor cells leads to the defects of stemness and enhances susceptibility to neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Hu, Lei; Ge, Ruiliang; Yang, Lixue; Liu, Kai; Li, Yunyun; Sun, Yanfu; Wang, Kui

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved and lysosome-dependent degradation process which assists in cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Although previous reports have shown that deletion of the essential autophagy gene disturbs stem cell maintenance in some cell types such as hematopoietic and neural cells, it remains unclear how autophagy-deficiency influences hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here we report that Atg5-deficiency in HPCs delays HPC-mediated rat liver regeneration in vivo. In vitro researches further demonstrate that loss of autophagy decreases the abilities of colony and spheroid formations, and disrupts the induction of hepatic differentiation in HPCs. Meanwhile, autophagy-deficiency increases the accumulations of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA damage repair in HPCs. Moreover, in both diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and CCl4 models, autophagy-deficiency accelerates neoplastic transformation of HPCs. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance and reduces susceptibility to neoplastic transformation in HPCs.

  3. Behavior of osteoblast-like cells on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite ceramics composed of particles with different shapes and sizes.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Uno, Yuika; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In designing the biomaterials, it is important to control their surface morphologies, because they affect the interactions between the materials and cells. We previously reported that porous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics composed of rod-like particles had advantages over sintered porous HA ceramics; however, the effects of the surface morphology of calcium-deficient HA ceramics on cell behavior have remained unclear. Using a hydrothermal process, we successfully prepared porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics with different surface morphologies, composed of plate-like particles of 200-300, 500-800 nm, or 2-3 μm in width and rod-like particles of 1 or 3-5 μm in width, respectively. The effects of these surface morphologies on the behavior of osteoblast-like cells were examined. Although the numbers of cells adhered to the ceramic specimens did not differ significantly among the specimens, the proliferation rates of cells on the ceramics decreased with decreasing particle size. Our results reveal that controlling the surface morphology that is governed by particle shape and size is important for designing porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics.

  4. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  5. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikai, K.; Danno, K.; Horio, T.; Narumiya, S.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on the skin was investigated in (WB-W/+) X (C57BL/6J-Wv/+)F1-W/Wv mice, which are genetically deficient in tissue mast cells. Their congenic littermates (+/+) and normal albino mice (ICR or BALB/c) were used as controls. Mice were irradiated with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB and the increment of ear thickness was measured before and 6, 12, and 24 h after irradiation. Ear swelling in W/Wv mice at 12 and 24 h after irradiation was significantly smaller than that in +/+ and ICR mice. In contrast, the number of sunburn cells formed 24 h after UVB irradiation (200 or 500 mJ/cm2) was similar in W/Wv, +/+ and ICR mice. On the other hand, when mice were treated with 8-methoxy-psoralen (0.5%) plus UVA irradiation (4 J/cm2) (topical PUVA), ears of W/Wv and BALB/c mice, which were both white in color, were thickened similarly 72 h after treatment, but less swelling was observed in +/+ mice, which were black in skin color. The amount of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in ears, determined by radioimmunoassay specific for PGD2, was elevated 3-fold in +/+ and ICR mice at 3 h after irradiation with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB in comparison with basal level without irradiation. However, such elevation was not observed in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in UVB-induced inflammation, and PGs from mast cells are responsible at least in part for the development of this reaction. However, neither mast cells nor PGs contribute to the sunburn cell formation and ear swelling response by PUVA treatment.

  6. Vpu-Deficient HIV Strains Stimulate Innate Immune Signaling Responses in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Fleming, Lamar; McNevin, John; Hladik, Florian; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Acute virus infection induces a cell-intrinsic innate immune response comprising our first line of immunity to limit virus replication and spread, but viruses have developed strategies to overcome these defenses. HIV-1 is a major public health problem; however, the virus-host interactions that regulate innate immune defenses against HIV-1 are not fully defined. We have recently identified the viral protein Vpu to be a key determinant responsible for HIV-1 targeting and degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a central transcription factor driving host cell innate immunity. IRF3 plays a major role in pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Here we interrogate the cellular responses to target cell infection with Vpu-deficient HIV-1 strains. Remarkably, in the absence of Vpu, HIV-1 triggers a potent intracellular innate immune response that suppresses infection. Thus, HIV-1 can be recognized by PRRs within the host cell to trigger an innate immune response, and this response is unmasked only in the absence of Vpu. Vpu modulation of IRF3 therefore prevents virus induction of specific innate defense programs that could otherwise limit infection. These observations show that HIV-1 can indeed be recognized as a pathogen in infected cells and provide a novel and effective platform for defining the native innate immune programs of target cells of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22647704

  7. Uncoupling between Phenotypic Senescence and Cell Cycle Arrest in Aging p21-Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dulić, Vjekoslav; Beney, Georges-Edouard; Frebourg, Guillaume; Drullinger, Linda F.; Stein, Gretchen H.

    2000-01-01

    Irreversible G1 arrest in senescent human fibroblasts is mediated by two inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), p21Cip1/SDI1/WAF1 and p16Ink4A. To determine the physiological and molecular events that specifically require p21, we studied senescence in human diploid fibroblasts expressing the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene, which confers low p21 levels via enhanced p53 degradation. We show that in late-passage E6 cells, high Cdk activity drives the cell cycle, but population expansion is slowed down by crisis-like events, probably owing to defective cell cycle checkpoints. At the end of lifespan, terminal-passage E6 cells exhibited several aspects of the senescent phenotype and accumulated unphosphorylated pRb and p16. However, both replication and cyclin-Cdk2 kinase activity were still not blocked, demonstrating that phenotypic and replicative senescence are uncoupled in the absence of normal p21 levels. At this stage, E6 cells also failed to upregulate p27 and inactivate cyclin-Cdk complexes in response to serum deprivation. Eventually, irreversible G1 arrest occurred coincident with inactivation of cyclin E-Cdk2 owing to association with p21. Similarly, when p21−/− mouse embryo fibroblasts reached the end of their lifespan, they had the appearance of senescent cells yet, in contrast to their wild-type counterparts, they were deficient in downregulating bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, cyclin E- and cyclin A-Cdk2 activity, and inhibiting pRb hyperphosphorylation. These data support the model that the critical event ensuring G1 arrest in senescence is p21-dependent Cdk inactivation, while other aspects of senescent phenotype appear to occur independently of p21. PMID:10958672

  8. Analysis of cell mechanics in single vinculin-deficient cells using a magnetic tweezer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alenghat, F. J.; Fabry, B.; Tsai, K. Y.; Goldmann, W. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic tweezer was constructed to apply controlled tensional forces (10 pN to greater than 1 nN) to transmembrane receptors via bound ligand-coated microbeadswhile optically measuring lateral bead displacements within individual cells. Use of this system with wild-type F9 embryonic carcinoma cells and cells from a vinculin knockout mouse F9 Vin (-/-) revealed much larger differences in the stiffness of the transmembrane integrin linkages to the cytoskeleton than previously reported using related techniques that measured average mechanical properties of large cell populations. The mechanical properties measured varied widely among cells, exhibiting an approximately log-normal distribution. The median lateral bead displacement was 2-fold larger in F9 Vin (-/-) cells compared to wild-type cells whereas the arithmetic mean displacement only increased by 37%. We conclude that vinculin serves a greater mechanical role in cells than previously reported and that this magnetic tweezer device may be useful for probing the molecular basis of cell mechanics within single cells. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus p53 pathway restoration is associated with depletion of p53-deficient or mutant p53-expressing putative colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Catherine; Zhang, Xiang M; Tavaluc, Raluca T; Hart, Lori S; Dicker, David T; Wang, Wenge; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2009-11-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that rare populations of tumor-initiating cells may be resistant to therapy, lead to tumor relapse and contribute to poor prognosis for cancer patients. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of p53 pathway restoration in p53-deficient tumor cell populations using small molecules including ellipticine or its derivatives. We now establish a single cell p53-regulated green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-reporter system in human DLD1 colon tumor cells expressing mutant p53 protein. We use these p53-EGFP reporter DLD1 cells to investigate the status of p53 transcriptional activity in putative colon cancer stem cell populations following exposure to p53 pathway-restoring drugs and/or classical chemotherapy. We demonstrate induction of p53-specific EGFP reporter fluorescence following overexpression of p53 family member p73 by an Adenovirus vector. We further show that p53-reporter activity is induced in DLD1 putative cancer stem cell side-populations analyzed by their Hoechst dye efflux properties following treatment with the p53 pathway restoring drug ellipticine. Combination of ellipticine with the cytotoxic agent 5-fluorouracil resulted in increased cytotoxicity as compared to either agent alone and this was associated with depletion of putative cancer stem cell populations as compared with 5-FU alone treatment. Our results support the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of mutant p53 in putative cancer stem cells as well as the potential to enhance cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:19923910

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  11. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Disorders of B cells and helper T cells in the pathogenesis of the immunoglobulin deficiency of patients with ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, T A; Broder, S; Goldman, C K; Frost, K; Korsmeyer, S J; Medici, M A

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the immunoglobulin deficiency of 20 patients with ataxia telangiectasia was studied using an in vitro immunoglobulin biosynthesis system. 10 patients had no detectable IgA in their serum as assessed by radial diffusion in agar and 3 had a reduced serum IgA concentration. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 17 of the patients and 17 normal controls were cultured with pokeweed mitogen for 12 d and the immunoglobulin in the supernatants measured. The immunoglobulin synthesis was below the lower limit of the normal 95% confidence interval for IgM in 5 patients, for IgG in 8, and for IgA in 14. The mononuclear cells from 9 of the 10 patients with a serum IgA concentration less than 0.1 mg/ml failed to synthesize IgA in vitro. None of the patients manifested excessive suppressor cell activity. All patients had reduced but measurable helper T cell activity for immunoglobulin synthesis by co-cultured normal pokeweed mitogen-stimulated B cells (geometric mean 22% of normal). Furthermore, the addition of normal irradiated T cells to patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells led to an augmentation of IgM synthesis in 15 of 17 and to increased IgG synthesis in 9 of the 17 patients studied, including 9 of the 12 patients who had synthesized IgG before the addition of the irradiated T cells. In addition, IgA synthesis was increased in all eight patients examined that had serum IgA concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/ml. These studies suggest that a helper T cell defect contributes to the diminished immunoglobulin synthesis. However, a helper T cell defect does not appear to be the sole cause since there was no IgA synthesis by the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 of the 10 patients with a profoundly reduced serum IgA even when co-cultured with normal T cells. Furthermore, the cells of the nine patients with profoundly reduced IgA levels examined also failed to produce IgA when stimulated with the relatively helper T cell-independent polyclonal

  13. Development of small polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Paganin, V.A.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Gonzalez, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has been one of the most studied fuel cell systems, because of several advantages for transportation applications. Research involve fundamental aspects related to the water transport and the fuel cell reactions, the practical aspects related to the optimization of the structure and operational conditions of gas diffusion electrodes, and technological aspects related to water management and the engineering of operational sized fuel cell modules. In many of these works it is observed that very satisfactory results regarding the performance of low catalyst loading electrodes (0.15 to 0.4 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}) have been obtained in single cells. However, the use of such electrodes is not yet being considered for building fuel cell stacks and, although not usually mentioned, fuel cell modules are assembled employing electrodes presenting catalyst loadings in the range of 2 to 4 mgPt cm{sup -2}. In this work the results on the research and development of small polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks employing low catalyst loading electrodes are described. The systems include the assembly of single cells, 6-cell and 21-cell modules. Testing of the stacks was conducted in a specially designed test station employing non-pressurized H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} reactants and measuring the individual and the overall cell voltage versus current characteristics under several operational conditions for the system.

  14. Proteogenomic analysis reveals unanticipated adaptations of colorectal tumor cells to deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Halvey, Patrick J.; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Jing; Bhat, Ajaz A.; Dhawan, Punita; Li, Ming; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A growing body of genomic data on human cancers poses the critical question of how genomic variations translate to cancer phenotypes. We employed standardized shotgun proteomics and targeted protein quantitation platforms to analyze a panel of 10 colon cancer cell lines differing by mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In addition, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to enable detection of protein sequence variants from the proteomic data. Biological replicate cultures yielded highly consistent proteomic inventories with a cumulative total of 6,513 protein groups with a protein FDR of 3.17% across all cell lines. Networks of co-expressed proteins with differential expression based on MMR status revealed impact on protein folding, turnover and transport, on cellular metabolism and on DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. Analysis of variant amino acid sequences suggested higher stability of proteins affected by naturally occurring germline polymorphisms than of proteins affected by somatic protein sequence changes. The data provide evidence for multi-system adaptation to MMR deficiency with a stress response that targets misfolded proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Enrichment analysis suggested epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RKO cells, as evidenced by increased mobility and invasion properties compared to SW480. The observed proteomic profiles demonstrate previously unknown consequences of altered DNA repair and provide an expanded basis for mechanistic interpretation of MMR phenotypes. PMID:24247723

  15. Reconstitution of a Secondary Cell Wall in a Secondary Cell Wall-Deficient Arabidopsis Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals. PMID:25535195

  16. Reconstitution of a secondary cell wall in a secondary cell wall-deficient Arabidopsis mutant.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-02-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals.

  17. Mutation of the Traj18 gene segment using TALENs to generate Natural Killer T cell deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing; Bedel, Romain; Krovi, S. Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Zhang, Bicheng; Gross, James; Gapin, Laurent; Matsuda, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that have been implicated in both promoting and suppressing a multitude of immune responses. In mice, iNKT cells express T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) comprising a unique TCRα rearrangement between the Trav11 and Traj18 gene segments. When paired with certain Trbv TCRβ chains, these TCRs recognize lipid antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecule, CD1d. Until recently, the sole model of iNKT deficiency targeted the Jα18, which is absolutely required to form the TCR with the appropriate antigenic specificity. However, these mice were demonstrated to have a large reduction in TCR repertoire diversity, which could confound results arising from studies using these mice. Here, we have created a new NKT-deficient mouse strain using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology to only disrupt the expression of Jα18, leaving the remaining Jα repertoire unperturbed. We confirm that these mice lack iNKT cells and do not respond to lipid antigen stimulation while the development of conventional T cells, regulatory T cells, and type Ib NKT cells is normal. This new mouse strain will serve as a new model of iNKT cell deficiency to facilitate our understanding of iNKT biology. PMID:27256918

  18. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  19. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. Material/Methods A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. Results In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  20. DUSP4 deficiency caused by promoter hypermethylation drives JNK signaling and tumor cell survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Corina A.; Robinson, Mark D.; Scheifinger, Nicole A.; Müller, Sebastian; Cogliatti, Sergio; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes is an important driver of human carcinogenesis. We have combined genome-wide DNA methylation analyses and gene expression profiling after pharmacological DNA demethylation with functional screening to identify novel tumor suppressors in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We find that a CpG island in the promoter of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP4 is aberrantly methylated in nodal and extranodal DLBCL, irrespective of ABC or GCB subtype, resulting in loss of DUSP4 expression in 75% of >200 examined cases. The DUSP4 genomic locus is further deleted in up to 13% of aggressive B cell lymphomas, and the lack of DUSP4 is a negative prognostic factor in three independent cohorts of DLBCL patients. Ectopic expression of wild-type DUSP4, but not of a phosphatase-deficient mutant, dephosphorylates c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induces apoptosis in DLBCL cells. Pharmacological or dominant-negative JNK inhibition restricts DLBCL survival in vitro and in vivo and synergizes strongly with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. Our results indicate that DLBCL cells depend on JNK signaling for survival. This finding provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of JNK inhibitors in DLBCL, ideally in synthetic lethal combinations with inhibitors of chronic active B cell receptor signaling. PMID:25847947

  1. Targeted gene correction of α1-antitrypsin deficiency in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kosuke; Rashid, S. Tamir; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Varela, Ignacio; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Miranda, Elena; Ordóñez, Adriana; Hannan, Nick; Rouhani, Foad Jafari; Darche, Sylvie; Alexander, Graeme; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Fusaki, Noemi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Holmes, Michael C.; Di Santo, James P.; Lomas, David A.; Bradley, Allan; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) represent a unique opportunity for regenerative medicine since they offer the prospect of generating unlimited quantities of cells for autologous transplantation as a novel treatment for a broad range of disorders1,2,3,4. However, the use of hIPSCs in the context of genetically inherited human disease will require correction of disease-causing mutations in a manner that is fully compatible with clinical applications3,5. The methods currently available, such as homologous recombination, lack the necessary efficiency and also leave residual sequences in the targeted genome6. Therefore, the development of new approaches to edit the mammalian genome is a prerequisite to delivering the clinical promise of hIPSCs. Here, we show that a combination of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs)7 and piggyBac8,9 technology in hIPSCs can achieve bi-allelic correction of a point mutation (Glu342Lys) in the α1-antitrypsin (A1AT, also called SERPINA1) gene that is responsible for α1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD). Genetic correction of hIPSCs restored the structure and function of A1AT in subsequently derived liver cells in vitro and in vivo. This approach is significantly more efficient than any other gene targeting technology that is currently available and crucially prevents contamination of the host genome with residual non-human sequences. Our results provide the first proof of principle for the potential of combining hIPSCs with genetic correction to generate clinically relevant cells for autologous cell-based therapies. PMID:21993621

  2. Mesotheliomas with small cell features: report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Nelson G

    2012-05-01

    Mesotheliomas with small cell morphology are rare and only one study of such cases has been published. As a result of their rare occurrence, some investigators have cast doubt on the existence of such a histologic variant of mesothelioma. This investigator reports a series of eight cases of epithelioid mesothelioma with small cell features, all of which originated in the pleura. Seven of the patients were men and one was a woman. Four patients had a history of asbestos exposure. Histologically, four of the mesotheliomas were epithelioid and four biphasic. The proportion of small cells seen in these cases constituted 80 to 100% of the tumor included in the biopsy material and 15 to 20% of the tumor present in the pneumonectomy specimens. Immunoreactivity for calretinin, keratin 5/6, keratin 7, pan-keratin, WT1, podoplanin, and mesothelin was seen in all cases tested for these markers. All of the cases were negative for MOC-31, Ber-EP4, CEA, CD15, TAG-72, TTF-1, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD99, and desmin. The mean survival of the six patients for whom this information was available was 8.2 months. It is important for pathologists to be aware that mesotheliomas can present small cell features and, because of this, they can be confused with other malignancies that can exhibit similar morphology. The value of immunohistochemistry in the differential diagnosis of these tumors is discussed.

  3. Advances in simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Guo, Wenge; Li, Ming; Ma, Wentao; Meng, Sen

    2015-02-01

    Recently, more focuses have been put on organic semiconductors because of its advantages, such as its flexibility, ease of fabrication and potential low cost, etc. The reasons we pay highlight on small molecular photovoltaic material are its ease of purification, easy to adjust and determine structure, easy to assemble range units and get high carrier mobility, etc. Simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells before the experiment can help the researchers find relationship between the efficiency and structure parameters, properties of material, estimate the performance of the device, bring the optimization of guidance. Also, the applicability of the model used in simulation can be discussed by comparison with experimental data. This paper summaries principle, structure, progress of numerical simulation on organic small molecular solar cells.

  4. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma B cell-specific deficient mice have an impaired antibody response1

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Murant, Thomas I.; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M.; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative functions and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring and atherosclerosis among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote antibody production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. Here, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development as well as the levels of circulating antigen-specific antibodies during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of antigen-specific antibodies and low numbers of antigen-experienced antibody-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within neither primary nor secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report to show under physiological conditions that PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and antibody production. PMID:23041568

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ B cell-specific-deficient mice have an impaired antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H; Murant, Thomas I; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2012-11-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative functions, and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring, and atherosclerosis, among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow-derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote Ab production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. In this article, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development, as well as the levels of circulating Ag-specific Abs during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of Ag-specific Abs and low numbers of Ag-experienced, Ab-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within primary or secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report, to our knowledge, to show that, under physiological conditions, PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and Ab production.

  7. Retroperitoneal cystic metastasis from a small clear cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Yonese, J; Tsukamoto, T; Maezawa, T; Ishikawa, Y; Fukui, I

    2001-11-01

    A 39-year-old housewife was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a small renal tumor. A 25 x 35 mm cystic mass that had been detected by computerized tomography scan just caudal to the renal hilus proved to be a metastasis from the renal carcinoma of clear cell type. The pathogenesis may have been due to tumor cells obstructing a lymphatic vessel draining the kidney. Cystic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is very rare and this appears to be the second published case in the world.

  8. Small Talk: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    ScienceCinema

    Bassler, Bonnie [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2016-07-12

    Cell-cell communication in bacteria involves the production, release, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to regulate gene expression on a population-wide scale. Processes controlled by quorum sensing are usually ones that are unproductive when undertaken by an individual bacterium but become effective when undertaken by the group. For example, quorum sensing controls bioluminescence, secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and the exchange of DNA. Thus, quorum sensing is a mechanism that allows bacteria to function as multi-cellular organisms. Bacteria make, detect, and integrate information from multiple autoinducers, some of which are used exclusively for intra-species communication while others enable communication between species. Research is now focused on the development of therapies that interfere with quorum sensing to control bacterial virulence.

  9. Small Talk: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bassler, Bonnie

    2008-05-14

    Cell-cell communication in bacteria involves the production, release, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to regulate gene expression on a population-wide scale. Processes controlled by quorum sensing are usually ones that are unproductive when undertaken by an individual bacterium but become effective when undertaken by the group. For example, quorum sensing controls bioluminescence, secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and the exchange of DNA. Thus, quorum sensing is a mechanism that allows bacteria to function as multi-cellular organisms. Bacteria make, detect, and integrate information from multiple autoinducers, some of which are used exclusively for intra-species communication while others enable communication between species. Research is now focused on the development of therapies that interfere with quorum sensing to control bacterial virulence.

  10. Small Talk: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bassler, Bonnie

    2008-12-03

    Cell-cell communication in bacteria involves the production, release, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to regulate gene expression on a population-wide scale. Processes controlled by quorum sensing are usually ones that are unproductive when undertaken by an individual bacterium but become effective when undertaken by the group. For example, quorum sensing controls bioluminescence, secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and the exchange of DNA. Thus, quorum sensing is a mechanism that allows bacteria to function as multi-cellular organisms. Bacteria make, detect, and integrate information from multiple autoinducers, some of which are used exclusively for intra-species communication while others enable communication between species. Research is now focused on the development of therapies that interfere with quorum sensing to control bacterial virulence.

  11. Repair in ribosomal RNA genes is deficient in xeroderma pigmentosum group C and in Cockayne's syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Christians, F C; Hanawalt, P C

    1994-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled DNA repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II but not in ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), which are transcribed by RNA polymerase I. The removal of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from rDNA in repair-proficient human cells has been shown to be slow but detectable and apparently not coupled to transcription. We studied the induction and removal of CPD from rDNA in cultured cells from two repair-deficient human disorders. Primary xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, whether proliferating or nondividing, removed no CPD from either rDNA strand in 24 h post-UV, a result which supports earlier conclusions that XP-C cells lack the general, transcription-independent pathway of nucleotide excision repair. We also observed lower than normal repair of rDNA in Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells from complementation groups A and B. In agreement with previous findings, the repair of both strands of the RNA polymerase II-transcribed dihydrofolate reductase gene was also deficient relative to that of normal cells. This strongly suggests that the defect in CS cells is not limited to a deficiency in a transcription-repair coupling factor. Rather, the defect may interfere with the ability of repair proteins to gain access to all expressed genes. PMID:7512688

  12. Vitamin A Controls the Presence of RORγ+ Innate Lymphoid Cells and Lymphoid Tissue in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Goverse, Gera; Labao-Almeida, Carlos; Ferreira, Manuela; Molenaar, Rosalie; Wahlen, Sigrid; Konijn, Tanja; Koning, Jasper; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-06-15

    Changes in diet and microbiota have determining effects on the function of the mucosal immune system. For example, the active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been described to maintain homeostasis in the intestine by its influence on both lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Additionally, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), important producers of cytokines necessary for intestinal homeostasis, are also influenced by vitamin A in the small intestines. In this study, we show a reduction of both NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets in the small intestine of mice raised on a vitamin A-deficient diet. Additionally, the percentages of IL-22-producing ILCs were reduced in the absence of dietary vitamin A. Conversely, mice receiving additional RA had a specific increase in the NCR(-) ILC3 subset, which contains the lymphoid tissue inducer cells. The dependence of lymphoid tissue inducer cells on vitamin A was furthermore illustrated by impaired development of enteric lymphoid tissues in vitamin A-deficient mice. These effects were a direct consequence of ILC-intrinsic RA signaling, because retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt-Cre × RARα-DN mice had reduced numbers of NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets within the small intestine. However, lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected in these mice nor was the formation of enteric lymphoid tissue, demonstrating that the onset of RA signaling might take place before retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt is expressed on lymphoid tissue inducer cells. Taken together, our data show an important role for vitamin A in controlling innate lymphoid cells and, consequently, postnatal formed lymphoid tissues within the small intestines.

  13. Small Portable PEM Fuel Cell Systems for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Oxygen-Hydrogen PEM-based fuel cell systems are being examined as a portable power source alternative in addition to advanced battery technology. Fuel cell power systems have been used by the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle programs. These systems have not been portable, but have been integral parts of their spacecraft, and have used reactants from a separate cryogenic supply. These systems typically have been higher in power. They also have had significant ancillary equipment sections that perform the pumping of reactants and coolant through the fuel cell stack and the separation of the product water from the unused reactant streams. The design of small portable fuel cell systems will be a significant departure from these previous designs. These smaller designs will have very limited ancillary equipment, relying on passive techniques for reactant and thermal management, and the reactant storage will be an integral part of the fuel cell system. An analysis of the mass and volume for small portable fuel cell systems was done to evaluate and quantify areas of technological improvement. A review of current fuel cell technology as well as reactant storage and management technology was completed to validate the analysis and to identify technology challenges

  14. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amie L; Joyce, Kellie; Xie, Hong; Falank, Carolyne; Hinz, John M; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation. PMID:24561002

  15. Thin and small form factor cells : simulated behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Clews, Peggy Jane; Pluym, Tammy; Grubbs, Robert K.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Zubia, David; Young, Ralph Watson; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul James

    2010-07-01

    Thin and small form factor cells have been researched lately by several research groups around the world due to possible lower assembly costs and reduced material consumption with higher efficiencies. Given the popularity of these devices, it is important to have detailed information about the behavior of these devices. Simulation of fabrication processes and device performance reveals some of the advantages and behavior of solar cells that are thin and small. Three main effects were studied: the effect of surface recombination on the optimum thickness, efficiency, and current density, the effect of contact distance on the efficiency for thin cells, and lastly the effect of surface recombination on the grams per Watt-peak. Results show that high efficiency can be obtained in thin devices if they are well-passivated and the distance between contacts is short. Furthermore, the ratio of grams per Watt-peak is greatly reduced as the device is thinned.

  16. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark; Phoon, Chee Wee; Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Seng, Eng Khuan; Guo, Xu Ming; Tan, Cherine Mei Fong; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Lee, Joel Mun Kin

    2014-01-01

    A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo. PMID:24647085

  17. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee; Jeong, Seon-Young; Yun, Jeanho

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  18. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-01-01

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876179

  19. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-10-15

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. PMID:8876179

  20. Thiamine deficiency promotes T cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: the involvement of CCL2.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhe; Fan, Zhiqin; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Ronghuan; Yang, Haihua; Zhou, Chenghua; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease that results from the interplay between environmental factors and a susceptible genetic background. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been widely used to investigate the mechanisms underlying MS pathogenesis. Chemokines, such as CCL2, are involved in the development of EAE. We have previously shown that thiamine deficiency (TD) induced CCL2 in neurons. We hypothesized that TD may affect the pathogenesis of EAE. In this study, EAE was induced in C57BL/6J mice by the injection of myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein (MOG) peptides 35-55 with or without TD. TD aggravated the development of EAE, which was indicated by clinical scores and pathologic alterations in the spinal cord. TD also accelerated the development of EAE in an adoptive transfer EAE model. TD caused microglial activation and a drastic increase (up 140%) in leukocyte infiltration in the spinal cord of the EAE mice; specifically, TD increased Th1 and Th17 cells. TD upregulated the expression of CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Cells in peripheral lymph node and spleen isolated from MOG-primed TD mice showed much stronger proliferative responses to MOG. CCL2 stimulated the proliferation and migration of T lymphocytes in vitro. Our results suggested that TD exacerbated the development of EAE through activating CCL2 and inducing pathologic inflammation.

  1. NK cells infiltrating a MHC class I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma display impaired cytotoxic activity toward autologous tumor cells associated with altered NK cell-triggering receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Maux Chansac, Béatrice; Moretta, Alessandro; Vergnon, Isabelle; Opolon, Paule; Lécluse, Yann; Grunenwald, Dominique; Kubin, Marek; Soria, Jean-Charles; Chouaib, Salem; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2005-11-01

    NK cells are able to discriminate between normal cells and cells that have lost MHC class I (MHC-I) molecule expression as a result of tumor transformation. This function is the outcome of the capacity of inhibitory NK receptors to block cytotoxicity upon interaction with their MHC-I ligands expressed on target cells. To investigate the role of human NK cells and their various receptors in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, we have isolated several NK cell clones from lymphocytes infiltrating an adenocarcinoma lacking beta2-microglobulin expression. Unexpectedly, although these clones expressed NKG2D and mediated a strong cytolytic activity toward K562, Daudi and allogeneic MHC-class I+ carcinoma cells, they were unable to lyse the autologous MHC-I- tumor cell line. This defect was associated with alterations in the expression of natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) by NK cells and the NKG2D ligands, MHC-I-related chain A, MHC-I-related chain B, and UL16 binding protein 1, and the ICAM-1 by tumor cells. In contrast, the carcinoma cell line was partially sensitive to allogeneic healthy donor NK cells expressing high levels of NCR. Indeed, this lysis was inhibited by anti-NCR and anti-NKG2D mAbs, suggesting that both receptors are required for the induced killing. The present study indicates that the MHC-I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma had developed mechanisms of escape from the innate immune response based on down-regulation of NCR and ligands required for target cell recognition.

  2. Bilateral adrenal EBV-associated smooth muscle tumors in a child with a natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachel K.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Fraser, Robert; Schmit, Pierre; Morash, Barb; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Orange, Jordan S.

    2012-01-01

    EBV-associated smooth muscle tumors are found in immunocompromised patients, most commonly HIV/AIDS. We present a 12-year-old girl with the first documented case of EBV-related smooth muscle tumors in the presence of a rare classic NK cell deficiency. This sheds light on the role of NK cells in controlling EBV-related smooth muscle tumors. PMID:22427204

  3. Cell Proliferation and Motility Are Inhibited by G1 Phase Arrest in 15-kDa Selenoprotein-Deficient Chang Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jeyoung; Huh, Jang Hoe; Na, Ji-Woon; Lu, Qiao; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tobe, Ryuta; Tsuji, Petra A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2015-01-01

    The 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) is a selenoprotein residing in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and implicated in quality control of protein folding. Herein, we established an inducible RNAi cell line that targets Sep15 mRNA in Chang liver cells. RNAi-induced Sep15 deficiency led to inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas cell growth was resumed after removal of the knockdown inducer. Sep15-deficient cells were arrested at the G1 phase by upregulating p21 and p27, and these cells were also characterized by ER stress. In addition, Sep15 deficiency led to the relocation of focal adhesions to the periphery of the cell basement and to the decrease of the migratory and invasive ability. All these changes were reversible depending on Sep15 status. Rescuing the knockdown state by expressing a silent mutant Sep15 mRNA that is resistant to siRNA also reversed the phenotypic changes. Our results suggest that SEP15 plays important roles in the regulation of the G1 phase during the cell cycle as well as in cell motility in Chang liver cells, and that this selenoprotein offers a novel functional link between the cell cycle and cell motility. PMID:25728752

  4. Ultrasonographic thickening of the muscularis propria in feline small intestinal small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Daniaux, Lise A; Laurenson, Michele P; Marks, Stanley L; Moore, Peter F; Taylor, Sandra L; Chen, Rachel X; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2014-02-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma in the cat. More recently, an ultrasonographic pattern associated with feline small cell T-cell gastrointestinal lymphoma has been recognized as a diffuse thickening of the muscularis propria of the small intestine. This pattern is also described with feline inflammatory bowel disease. To evaluate the similarities between the diseases, we quantified the thickness of the muscularis propria layer in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 14 cats affected by small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and 19 healthy cats. We found a significantly increased thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma and IBD compared with healthy cats. The mean thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma or IBD was twice the thickness of that of healthy cats, and was the major contributor to significant overall bowel wall thickening in the duodenum and jejunum. A muscularis to submucosa ratio >1 is indicative of an abnormal bowel segment. Colic lymph nodes in cats with lymphoma were increased in size compared with healthy cats. In cats with gastrointestinal lymphoma and histologic transmural infiltration of the small intestines, colic or jejunal lymph nodes were rounded, increased in size and hypoechoic.

  5. Stem cells and small molecule screening: haploid embryonic stem cells as a new tool.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bi; Li, Wei; Wang, Liu; Liu, Zhong-hua; Zhao, Xiao-yang

    2013-06-01

    Stem cells can both self-renew and differentiate into various cell types under certain conditions, which makes them a good model for development and disease studies. Recently, chemical approaches have been widely applied in stem cell biology by promoting stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and somatic cell reprogramming using specific small molecules. Conversely, stem cells and their derivatives also provide an efficient and robust platform for small molecule and drug screening. Here, we review the current research and applications of small molecules that modulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation and improve reprogramming, as well as the applications that use stem cells as a tool for small molecule screening. Moreover, we introduce the recent advance in haploid embryonic stem cells research. Haploid embryonic stem cells maintain haploidy and stable growth over extensive passages, possess the ability to differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo, and contribute to the germlines of chimeras when injected into blastocysts. Androgenetic haploid stem cells can also be used in place of sperm to produce fertile progeny after intracytoplasmic injection into mature oocytes. Such characteristics demonstrate that haploid stem cells are a new approach for genetic studies at both the cellular and animal levels and that they are a valuable platform for future small molecule screening.

  6. Pancreatic β-Cell Death due to Pdx-1 Deficiency Requires Multi-BH Domain Protein Bax but Not Bak*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juan; Mao, Li-qun; Polonsky, Kenneth S.; Ren, De-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes develops in Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice due to an increase in β-cell death leading to reduced β-cell mass and decreased insulin secretion. Knockdown of Pdx1 gene expression in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells induced apoptotic cell death with an increase in Bax activation and knockdown of Bax reduced apoptotic β-cell death. In Pdx1 haploinsufficient mice, Bax ablation in β-cells increased β-cell mass, decreased the number of TUNEL positive cells and improved glucose tolerance after glucose challenge. These changes were not observed with Bak ablation in Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice. These results suggest that Bax mediates β-cell apoptosis in Pdx1-deficient diabetes. PMID:27137932

  7. Pancreatic β-Cell Death due to Pdx-1 Deficiency Requires Multi-BH Domain Protein Bax but Not Bak.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Mao, Li-Qun; Polonsky, Kenneth S; Ren, De-Cheng

    2016-06-24

    Diabetes develops in Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice due to an increase in β-cell death leading to reduced β-cell mass and decreased insulin secretion. Knockdown of Pdx1 gene expression in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells induced apoptotic cell death with an increase in Bax activation and knockdown of Bax reduced apoptotic β-cell death. In Pdx1 haploinsufficient mice, Bax ablation in β-cells increased β-cell mass, decreased the number of TUNEL positive cells and improved glucose tolerance after glucose challenge. These changes were not observed with Bak ablation in Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice. These results suggest that Bax mediates β-cell apoptosis in Pdx1-deficient diabetes.

  8. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Radiosensitization by PARP Inhibition in DNA Repair Proficient and Deficient Tumor Cells: Proliferative Recovery in Senescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Moureq; Sharma, Khushboo; Saleh, Tareq; Povirk, Lawrence F; Hendrickson, Eric A; Gewirtz, David A

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy continues to be a primary modality in the treatment of cancer. In addition to promoting apoptosis, radiation-induced DNA damage can promote autophagy and senescence, both of which can theoretically function to prolong tumor survival. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that autophagy and/or senescence could be permissive for DNA repair, thereby facilitating tumor cell recovery from radiation-induced growth arrest and/or cell death. In addition, studies were designed to elucidate the involvement of autophagy and senescence in radiosensitization by PARP inhibitors and the re-emergence of a proliferating tumor cell population. In the context of this work, the relationship between radiation-induced autophagy and senescence was also determined. Studies were performed using DNA repair-proficient HCT116 colon carcinoma cells and a repair-deficient ligase IV(-/-) isogenic cell line. Exposure to radiation promoted a parallel induction of autophagy and senescence that was strongly correlated with the extent of persistent H2AX phosphorylation in both cell lines, however, inhibition of autophagy failed to suppress senescence, indicating that the two responses were dissociable. Exposure to radiation resulted in a transient arrest in the HCT116 cells while arrest was prolonged in the ligase IV(-/-) cells, however, both cell lines ultimately recovered proliferative function, which may reflect maintenance of DNA repair capacity. The PARP inhibitors, olaparib and niraparib, increased the extent of persistent DNA damage induced by radiation exposure as well as the extent of both autophagy and senescence. Neither cell line underwent significant apoptosis by radiation exposure alone or in the presence of the PARP inhibitors. Inhibition of autophagy failed to attenuate radiosensitization, indicating that autophagy was not involved in the action of the PARP inhibitors. As with radiation alone, despite sensitization by PARP inhibition, proliferative recovery was evident

  10. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the U.S. Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in 7 isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  11. Ultraviolet-B induced hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinomas in the cornea of XPA-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    De Vries, A; Gorgels, T G; Berg, R J; Jansen, G H; Van Steeg, H

    1998-07-01

    In Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) patients, due to a defective repair of UV-induced DNA damage, neoplastic changes occur in sunlight-exposed areas of the skin and eyes. There are seven complementation groups in XP (XP-A to XP-G). Recently, we have generated XPA-deficient mice (group-A XP) by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. In order to evaluate UV-B sensitivity, XPA-deficient mice (n = 20), wild type (n = 7) and heterozygous mice (n = 13) were exposed to low daily doses of UV-B for 14 weeks at a cumulative dose of 22 kj m-2 (250-400 nm). For a period of 32 weeks, the mice were checked twice a week for the development of pathology. The UV-B treatment induced eye abnormalities in the XPA-deficient mice. Initially, photophobia was noticed, followed by a loss of transparency of the cornea, eventually affecting nearly all XPA-deficient mice (19 out of 20). In 12 out of 19 mice, the pathology progressed to give eye protrusion. Histology of these eyes showed hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinomas of the corneal epithelium. No eye-lesions were found in control (wild-type and heterozygous) mice that were exposed to the same UV-B dose. The corneal abnormalities found in the XPA-deficient mice appear to be similar to those found in human XP patients. These results confirm the role of the functional XPA gene in protecting the cornea from pathology by UV-B irradiation. In addition, they suggest that the XPA-deficient mouse is a suitable animal model for the study of XPA ocular disorders. PMID:9702178

  12. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  13. Methyl Donor Deficiency Affects Fetal Programming of Gastric Ghrelin Cell Organization and Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid–Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (−28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth. PMID:19948829

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells model personalized variations in liver disease due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tafaleng, Edgar N.; Chakraborty, Souvik; Han, Bing; Hale, Pamela; Wu, Wanquan; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.; Wilson, Andrew A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Nagaya, Masaki; Strom, Stephen C.; Chowdhury, Jayanta R.; Stolz, Donna B.; Perlmutter, David H.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    In the classical form of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD), aberrant intracellular accumulation of misfolded mutant α1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ) in hepatocytes causes hepatic damage by a gain-of-function, “proteotoxic” mechanism. While some ATD patients develop severe liver disease that necessitates liver transplantation, others with the same genetic defect completely escape this clinical phenotype. We investigated whether induced pluripotent stem cells (iPScs) from ATD individuals with or without severe liver disease could model these personalized variations in hepatic disease phenotypes. Patient-specific iPScs were generated from ATD patients and controls and differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) having many characteristics of hepatocytes. Pulse-chase and endoglycosidase H analysis demonstrate that the iHeps recapitulate the abnormal accumulation and processing of the ATZ molecule compared to the wild type AT molecule. Measurements of the fate of intracellular ATZ show a marked delay in the rate of ATZ degradation in iHeps from severe liver disease patients compared to those from no liver disease patients. Transmission electron microscopy showed dilated rER in iHeps from all individuals with ATD, not in controls, but globular inclusions that are partially covered with ribosomes were observed only in iHeps from individuals with severe liver disease. Conclusion These results provide definitive validation that iHeps model the individual disease phenotypes of ATD patients with more rapid degradation of misfolded ATZ and lack of globular inclusions in cells from patients who have escaped liver disease. The results support the concept that “proteostasis” mechanisms, such as intracellular degradation pathways, play a role in observed variations in clinical phenotype and show that iPScs can potentially be used to facilitate predictions of disease susceptibility for more precise and timely application of therapeutic strategies. PMID:25690322

  15. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  16. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  17. Role of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma in β-cell death in Pdx1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ren, Decheng; Sun, Juan; Wang, Changzheng; Ye, Honggang; Mao, Liqun; Cheng, Emily H; Bell, Graeme I; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) are associated with diabetes in humans. Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice develop diabetes due to an increase in β-cell death leading to reduced β-cell mass. For definition of the molecular link between Pdx1 deficiency and β-cell death, Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice in which the genes for the BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma had been ablated were studied on a high-fat diet. Compared with Pdx1(+/-) mice, animals haploinsufficient for both Pdx1 and Bim or Puma genes showed improved glucose tolerance, enhanced β-cell mass, and reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells in islets. These results suggest that Bim and Puma ablation improves β-cell survival in Pdx1(+/-) mice. For exploration of the mechanisms responsible for these findings, Pdx1 gene expression was knocked down in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells resulting in apoptotic cell death that was found to be associated with increased expression of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma. If the upregulation of Bim and Puma that occurs during Pdx1 suppression was prevented, apoptotic β-cell death was reduced in vitro. These results suggest that Bim and Puma play an important role in β-cell apoptosis in Pdx1-deficient diabetes.

  18. Investigating B Cell Development, Natural and Primary Antibody Responses in Ly-6A/Sca-1 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Michelle; Spencer, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Ly-6A/Stem cell antigen-1 (Ly-6A/Sca-1) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed on many cell types including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and early lymphoid-specific progenitors. Ly-6A/Sca-1 is expressed on CD4+ T cells and plays a role in regulating cellular responses to foreign antigens. The role of Ly-6A/Sca-1 in primary antibody responses has not been defined. To investigate whether Ly-6A/Sca-1 functions in humoral immunity, we first injected Ly-6A/Sca-1-deficient and wild-type control mice with chicken ovalbumin (c-Ova) protein mixed with an adjuvant. We then assessed the ability of the mice to generate a primary antibody response against cOva. We further examined the development of B cells and circulating antibody isotypes in non-immunized Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice to determine if Ly6A/Sca-1 functions in development irrespective of antigen-specific immune activation. Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-deficient mice did not show any significant changes in the number of B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-/- mice have significantly elevated serum levels of IgA with λ light chains compared to wild type controls. B cell clusters with high reactivity to anti-IgA λ monoclonal antibody were detected in the lamina propria of the gut, though this was not observed in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Despite these differences, the Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice generated a similar primary antibody response when compared to the wild-type mice. In summary, we conclude that the primary antibody response to cOva antigen is similar in Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient and sufficient mice. In addition, we report significantly higher expression of the immunoglobulin λ light chain by B cells in lamina propria of Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice when compared to the wild-type control. PMID:27322740

  19. Investigating B Cell Development, Natural and Primary Antibody Responses in Ly-6A/Sca-1 Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morgan A; DeWolf, Sean; Vacharathit, Vimvara; Yim, Michelle; Spencer, Stacey; Bamezai, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Ly-6A/Stem cell antigen-1 (Ly-6A/Sca-1) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed on many cell types including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and early lymphoid-specific progenitors. Ly-6A/Sca-1 is expressed on CD4+ T cells and plays a role in regulating cellular responses to foreign antigens. The role of Ly-6A/Sca-1 in primary antibody responses has not been defined. To investigate whether Ly-6A/Sca-1 functions in humoral immunity, we first injected Ly-6A/Sca-1-deficient and wild-type control mice with chicken ovalbumin (c-Ova) protein mixed with an adjuvant. We then assessed the ability of the mice to generate a primary antibody response against cOva. We further examined the development of B cells and circulating antibody isotypes in non-immunized Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice to determine if Ly6A/Sca-1 functions in development irrespective of antigen-specific immune activation. Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-deficient mice did not show any significant changes in the number of B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-/- mice have significantly elevated serum levels of IgA with λ light chains compared to wild type controls. B cell clusters with high reactivity to anti-IgA λ monoclonal antibody were detected in the lamina propria of the gut, though this was not observed in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Despite these differences, the Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice generated a similar primary antibody response when compared to the wild-type mice. In summary, we conclude that the primary antibody response to cOva antigen is similar in Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient and sufficient mice. In addition, we report significantly higher expression of the immunoglobulin λ light chain by B cells in lamina propria of Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice when compared to the wild-type control.

  20. A delay prior to mitotic entry triggers caspase 8-dependent cell death in p53-deficient Hela and HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Victoria C; Plooster, Melissa; Leung, Jessica C; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin/Oncoprotein 18, a microtubule destabilizing protein, is required for survival of p53-deficient cells. Stathmin-depleted cells are slower to enter mitosis, but whether delayed mitotic entry triggers cell death or whether stathmin has a separate pro-survival function was unknown. To test these possibilities, we abrogated the cell cycle delay by inhibiting Wee1 in synchronized, stathmin-depleted cells and found that apoptosis was reduced to control levels. Synchronized cells treated with a 4 hour pulse of inhibitors to CDK1 or both Aurora A and PLK1 delayed mitotic entry and apoptosis was triggered only in p53-deficient cells. We did not detect mitotic defects downstream of the delayed mitotic entry, indicating that cell death is activated by a mechanism distinct from those activated by prolonged mitotic arrest. Cell death is triggered by initiator caspase 8, based on its cleavage to the active form and by rescue of viability after caspase 8 depletion or treatment with a caspase 8 inhibitor. In contrast, initiator caspase 9, activated by prolonged mitotic arrest, is not activated and is not required for apoptosis under our experimental conditions. P53 upregulates expression of cFLIPL, a protein that blocks caspase 8 activation. cFLIPL levels are lower in cells lacking p53 and these levels are reduced to a greater extent after stathmin depletion. Expression of FLAG-tagged cFLIPL in p53-deficient cells rescues them from apoptosis triggered by stathmin depletion or CDK1 inhibition during G2. These data indicate that a cell cycle delay in G2 activates caspase 8 to initiate apoptosis specifically in p53-deficient cells.

  1. Group IVA phospholipase A(2) deficiency prevents CCl4-induced hepatic cell death through the enhancement of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Kanai, Shiho; Tanaka, Kikuko; Kawashita, Eri; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-02-26

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which generates arachidonate, plays a role in inflammation. IVA-PLA2-deficiency reduced hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte cell death in mice that received a single dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) without any inhibitory effects on CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation. An immunoblot analysis of extracts from wild-type mouse- and IVA-PLA2 KO mouse-derived primary hepatocytes that transiently expressed microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3) revealed a higher amount of LC3-II, a typical index of autophagosome formation, in IVA-PLA2-deficient cells, suggesting the enhancement of constitutive autophagy. IVA-PLA2 may promote CCl4-induced cell death through the suppression of constitutive autophagy in hepatocytes.

  2. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  3. The small GTPase Rac1 regulates auditory hair cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M.; Sipe, Conor W.; Géléoc, Gwenaëllle S.G.; Lu, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Morphogenesis of sensory hair cells, in particular their mechanotransduction organelle, the stereociliary bundle, requires highly organized remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. The roles of Rho family small GTPases during this process remain unknown. Here we show that deletion of Rac1 in the otic epithelium resulted in severe defects in cochlear epithelial morphogenesis. The mutant cochlea was severely shortened with a reduced number of auditory hair cells and cellular organization of the auditory sensory epithelium was abnormal. Rac1 mutant hair cells also displayed defects in planar cell polarity and morphogenesis of the stereociliary bundle, including bundle fragmentation or deformation, and mispositioning or absence of the kinocilium. We further demonstrate that a Rac-PAK signaling pathway mediates kinocilium-stereocilia interactions and is required for cohesion of the stereociliary bundle. Together, these results reveal a critical function of Rac1 in morphogenesis of the auditory sensory epithelium and stereociliary bundle. PMID:20016102

  4. Slow mitochondrial repair of 5'-AMP renders mtDNA susceptible to damage in APTX deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-08-10

    Aborted DNA ligation events in eukaryotic cells can generate 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA termini that can be removed from DNA by aprataxin (APTX). Mutations in APTX cause an inherited human disease syndrome characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia with ocular motor apraxia (AOA1). APTX is found in the nuclei and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. Depletion of APTX causes mitochondrial dysfunction and renders the mitochondrial genome, but not the nuclear genome susceptible to damage. The biochemical processes that link APTX deficiency to mitochondrial dysfunction have not been well elucidated. Here, we monitored the repair of 5'-AMP DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts from human APTX(+/+) and APTX(-/-) cells. The efficiency of repair of 5'-AMP DNA was much lower in mitochondrial than in nuclear protein extracts, and resulted in persistent DNA repair intermediates in APTX deficient cells. Moreover, the removal of 5'-AMP from DNA was significantly slower in the mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines and mouse tissues compared with their corresponding nuclear extracts. These results suggest that, contrary to nuclear DNA repair, mitochondrial DNA repair is not able to compensate for APTX deficiency resulting in the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage.

  5. The Oxidative Stress Responsive Transcription Factor Pap1 Confers DNA Damage Resistance on Checkpoint-Deficient Fission Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belfield, Carrie; Queenan, Craig; Rao, Hui; Kitamura, Kenji; Walworth, Nancy C.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells invoke mechanisms to promote survival when confronted with cellular stress or damage to the genome. The protein kinase Chk1 is an integral and conserved component of the DNA damage response pathway. Mutation or inhibition of Chk1 results in mitotic death when cells are exposed to DNA damage. Oxidative stress activates a pathway that results in nuclear accumulation of the bZIP transcription factor Pap1. We report the novel finding that fission yeast Pap1 confers resistance to drug- and non-drug-induced DNA damage even when the DNA damage checkpoint is compromised. Multi-copy expression of Pap1 restores growth to chk1-deficient cells exposed to camptothecin or hydroxyurea. Unexpectedly, increased Pap1 expression also promotes survival of chk1-deficient cells with mutations in genes encoding DNA ligase (cdc17) or DNA polymerase δ (cdc6), but not DNA replication initiation mutants. The ability of Pap1 to confer resistance to DNA damage was not specific to chk1 mutants, as it also improved survival of rad1- and rad9-deficient cells in the presence of CPT. To confer resistance to DNA damage Pap1 must localize to the nucleus and be transcriptionally active. PMID:24587136

  6. Slow mitochondrial repair of 5'-AMP renders mtDNA susceptible to damage in APTX deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-01-01

    Aborted DNA ligation events in eukaryotic cells can generate 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA termini that can be removed from DNA by aprataxin (APTX). Mutations in APTX cause an inherited human disease syndrome characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia with ocular motor apraxia (AOA1). APTX is found in the nuclei and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. Depletion of APTX causes mitochondrial dysfunction and renders the mitochondrial genome, but not the nuclear genome susceptible to damage. The biochemical processes that link APTX deficiency to mitochondrial dysfunction have not been well elucidated. Here, we monitored the repair of 5'-AMP DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts from human APTX(+/+) and APTX(-/-) cells. The efficiency of repair of 5'-AMP DNA was much lower in mitochondrial than in nuclear protein extracts, and resulted in persistent DNA repair intermediates in APTX deficient cells. Moreover, the removal of 5'-AMP from DNA was significantly slower in the mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines and mouse tissues compared with their corresponding nuclear extracts. These results suggest that, contrary to nuclear DNA repair, mitochondrial DNA repair is not able to compensate for APTX deficiency resulting in the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage. PMID:26256098

  7. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Biogas powering a small tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniforth, J.; Kendall, K.

    Biogas has been used to power a small tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). It was demonstrated that biogas could provide power equivalent to hydrogen, even when the methane content was reduced below the value at which normal combustion could occur. The carbon dioxide content of biogas was especially beneficial because it aided the internal reforming process. But carbon deposition was a problem unless air was added to the biogas before it entered the cell. When air was premixed, the biogas was comparable with than hydrogen in the power produced. However, a problem was the variability of biogas samples. Of the three types tested, only one produced a consistent power output.

  9. Demsoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor: a Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Moeinadin; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Moeini Aghtaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Nikpour, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is a rare variant of sarcoma with a highly aggressive behavior. It usually affects abdominal cavity and has a male predominance. Its correct diagnosis and treatment is sophisticated and requires an experienced multidisciplinary team. Hereby we present a 25 yr old man from Kerman Province in 2013 with abdominal mass and ascites who underwent sonography guided percutaneous needle biopsy which was misleading and inconclusive for diagnosis. Thus an open biopsy was fulfilled which revealed solid nests of small round cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm surrounded by a desmoplastic stroma suggestive for DSCRT. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive immunohitochemical reaction for cytokeratin, desmin and neuron specific enolase (NSE).Ultimately the patient underwent chemotherapy on the basis of P6 protocol without surgical debulking. Diagnosis and treatment of DSCRT could be a dilemma due to its rarity, various clinicopathologic mimickers and lack of a consensus about its management. PMID:27799974

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl-induced VCAM-1 expression is attenuated in aortic endothelial cells isolated from caveolin-1 deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sung Gu; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal; Smart, Eric; Hennig, Bernhard

    2010-07-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is a critical mediator for adhesion and uptake of monocytes across the endothelium in the early stages of atherosclerosis development. The upregulation of VCAM-1 by PCBs may be dependent on functional membrane domains called caveolae. Caveolae are particularly abundant in endothelial cell membranes and involved in trafficking and signal transduction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of caveolae in PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs) isolated from caveolin-1-deficient mice and background C57BL/6 mice were treated with coplanar PCBs, such as PCB77 and PCB126. In addition, siRNA gene silencing technique was used to knockdown caveolin-1 in porcine vascular endothelial cells. In MAECs with functional caveolae, VCAM-1 protein levels were increased after exposure to both coplanar PCBs, whereas expression levels of VCAM-1 were not significantly altered in cells deficient of caveolin-1. Furthermore, PCB-induced monocyte adhesion was attenuated in caveolin-1-deficient MAECs. Similarly, siRNA silencing of caveolin-1 in porcine endothelial cells confirmed the caveolin-1-dependent VCAM-1 expression. Treatment of cells with PCB77 and PCB126 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), and pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 diminished the observed PCB-induced increase in monocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that coplanar PCBs induce adhesion molecule expression, such as VCAM-1, in endothelial cells, and that this response is regulated by caveolin-1 and functional caveolae. Our data demonstrate a critical role of functional caveolae in the activation and dysfunction of endothelial cells by coplanar PCBs.

  11. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  12. Primary small cell undifferentiated (neuroendocrine) carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shetty, Premalatha

    2014-01-01

    Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC) of the paranasal sinuses is an extremely rare and distinctive tumor with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, SNECs originating in the head and neck region have been reported to be highly aggressive and to have a poor prognosis. This report describes a patient with a maxillary sinus SNEC who was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24639904

  13. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  14. Gallbladder small cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Toshiyuki; Haraguchi, Masashi; Irie, Junji; Yoshimoto, Tomoko; Uehara, Ryohei; Ito, Shinichiro; Tokai, Hirotaka; Noda, Kazumasa; Tada, Nobuhiro; Hirabaru, Masataka; Inoue, Keiji; Minami, Shigeki; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-12-01

    Gallbladder small cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises only 0.5 % of all gallbladder cancer and consists of aggressive tumors with poor survival outcomes against current treatments. These tumors are most common in elderly females, particularly those with cholecystolithiasis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with gallbladder small cell carcinoma. The patient had intermittent right upper quadrant abdominal pain and was admitted to our hospital due to suspected acute cholecystitis. She regularly received medical treatment for diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. On initial laboratory evaluation, the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were markedly elevated. She underwent computed tomography (CT) for screening. CT images showed a thick-walled gallbladder containing multiple stones and multiple 3-cm-sized round nodular lesions, which were suggestive of metastatic lymph nodes. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage was performed, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of enlarged lymph nodes resulted in a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. However, we could not identify the primary lesion before the surgery because of no decisive factors. We performed cholecystectomy because there was a possibility of cholecystitis recurrence risk and also partial liver resection because we suspected tumor invasion. The final pathological diagnosis was neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder, small cell type. The tumor stage was IVb, T3aN1M1. The patient died 13 weeks after the surgery. In the present paper, we review the current available English-language literature of gallbladder SCC.

  15. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use