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  1. Acute myeloid leukemia ontogeny is defined by distinct somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Grauman, Peter V.; Shareef, Sarah; Allen, Steven L.; Pigneux, Arnaud; Wetzler, Meir; Stuart, Robert K.; Erba, Harry P.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Lindeman, Neal; Steensma, David P.; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can develop after an antecedent myeloid malignancy (secondary AML [s-AML]), after leukemogenic therapy (therapy-related AML [t-AML]), or without an identifiable prodrome or known exposure (de novo AML). The genetic basis of these distinct pathways of AML development has not been determined. We performed targeted mutational analysis of 194 patients with rigorously defined s-AML or t-AML and 105 unselected AML patients. The presence of a mutation in SRSF2, SF3B1, U2AF1, ZRSR2, ASXL1, EZH2, BCOR, or STAG2 was >95% specific for the diagnosis of s-AML. Analysis of serial samples from individual patients revealed that these mutations occur early in leukemogenesis and often persist in clonal remissions. In t-AML and elderly de novo AML populations, these alterations define a distinct genetic subtype that shares clinicopathologic properties with clinically confirmed s-AML and highlights a subset of patients with worse clinical outcomes, including a lower complete remission rate, more frequent reinduction, and decreased event-free survival. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00715637. PMID:25550361

  2. Distinct transcriptomes define rostral and caudal serotonin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Christi J.; Hendricks, Timothy J.; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Lily; Lu, Pengcheng; Leahy, Patrick; Fox, Stephanie; Maeno, Hiroshi; Deneris, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular architecture of developing serotonin (5HT) neurons is poorly understood yet its determination is likely to be essential for elucidating functional heterogeneity of these cells and the contribution of serotonergic dysfunction to disease pathogenesis. Here, we describe the purification of postmitotic embryonic 5HT neurons by flow cytometry for whole genome microarray expression profiling of this unitary monoaminergic neuron type. Our studies identified significantly enriched expression of hundreds of unique genes in 5HT neurons thus providing an abundance of new serotonergic markers. Furthermore, we identified several hundred transcripts encoding homeodomain, axon guidance, cell adhesion, intracellular signaling, ion transport, and imprinted genes associated with various neurodevelopmental disorders that were differentially enriched in developing rostral and caudal 5HT neurons. These findings suggested a homeodomain code that distinguishes rostral and caudal 5HT neurons. Indeed, verification studies demonstrated that Hmx homeodomain and Hox gene expression defined an Hmx+ rostral subtype and Hox+ caudal subtype. Expression of engrailed genes in a subset of 5HT neurons in the rostral domain further distinguished two subtypes defined as Hmx+En+ and Hmx+En-. The differential enrichment of gene sets for different canonical pathways and gene ontology categories provided additional evidence for heterogeneity between rostral and caudal 5HT neurons. These findings demonstrate a deep transcriptome and biological pathway duality for neurons that give rise to the ascending and descending serotonergic subsystems. Our databases provide a rich, clinically relevant, resource for definition of 5HT neuron subtypes and elucidation of the genetic networks required for serotonergic function. PMID:20071532

  3. Distinct clinical phenotypes of airways disease defined by cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, M; Travers, J; Shirtcliffe, P M; Marsh, S E; Williams, M V; Nowitz, M R; Aldington, S; Beasley, R

    2009-10-01

    Airways disease is currently classified using diagnostic labels such as asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The current definitions of these classifications may not reflect the phenotypes of airways disease in the community, which may have differing disease processes, clinical features or responses to treatment. The aim of the present study was to use cluster analysis to explore clinical phenotypes in a community population with airways disease. A random population sample of 25-75-yr-old adults underwent detailed investigation, including a clinical questionnaire, pulmonary function tests, nitric oxide measurements, blood tests and chest computed tomography. Cluster analysis was performed on the subgroup with current respiratory symptoms or obstructive spirometric results. Subjects with a complete dataset (n = 175) were included in the cluster analysis. Five clusters were identified with the following characteristics: cluster 1: severe and markedly variable airflow obstruction with features of atopic asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema; cluster 2: features of emphysema alone; cluster 3: atopic asthma with eosinophilic airways inflammation; cluster 4: mild airflow obstruction without other dominant phenotypic features; and cluster 5: chronic bronchitis in nonsmokers. Five distinct clinical phenotypes of airflow obstruction were identified. If confirmed in other populations, these findings may form the basis of a modified taxonomy for the disorders of airways obstruction.

  4. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  5. Recurrent somatic mutations in POLR2A define a distinct subset of meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Victoria E; Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Bai, Hanwen; Youngblood, Mark W; Lee, Tong Ihn; Baranoski, Jacob F; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Abraham, Brian J; Weintraub, Abraham S; Hnisz, Denes; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Durán, Daniel; Goldmann, Johanna E; Schramm, Johannes; Goldbrunner, Roland; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase II mediates the transcription of all protein-coding genes in eukaryotic cells, a process that is fundamental to life. Genomic mutations altering this enzyme have not previously been linked to any pathology in humans, which is a testament to its indispensable role in cell biology. On the basis of a combination of next-generation genomic analyses of 775 meningiomas, we report that recurrent somatic p.Gln403Lys or p.Leu438_His439del mutations in POLR2A, which encodes the catalytic subunit of RNA polymerase II (ref. 1), hijack this essential enzyme and drive neoplasia. POLR2A mutant tumors show dysregulation of key meningeal identity genes2, 3, including WNT6 and ZIC1/ZIC4. In addition to mutations in POLR2A, NF2, SMARCB1, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, PIK3CA, and SMO4, 5, 6, 7, 8, we also report somatic mutations in AKT3, PIK3R1, PRKAR1A, and SUFU in meningiomas. Our results identify a role for essential transcriptional machinery in driving tumorigenesis and define mutually exclusive meningioma subgroups with distinct clinical and pathological features. PMID:27548314

  6. Opioid receptors: distinct roles in mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of opioid receptors in pain and addiction have been extensively studied, but their function in mood disorders has received less attention. Accumulating evidence from animal research reveal that mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors (MORs, DORs and KORs, respectively) exert highly distinct controls over mood-related processes. DOR agonists and KOR antagonists have promising antidepressant potential, whereas the risk-benefit ratio of currently available MOR agonists as antidepressants remain difficult to evaluate, in addition to their inherent abuse liability. At present, both human and animal studies have mainly examined MORs in the etiology of depressive disorders, and future studies will address delta and kappa receptor function in established and emerging neurobiological aspects of depression, including neurogenesis, neurodevelopment and social behaviors. PMID:23219016

  7. VgrG and PAAR Proteins Define Distinct Versions of a Functional Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Guo, Manman; De Cesare, Virginia; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread among bacterial pathogens and acts as an effective weapon against competitor bacteria and eukaryotic hosts by delivering toxic effector proteins directly into target cells. The T6SS utilises a bacteriophage-like contractile machinery to expel a puncturing device based on a tube of Hcp topped with a VgrG spike, which can be extended by a final tip from a PAAR domain-containing protein. Effector proteins are believed to be delivered by specifically associating with particular Hcp, VgrG or PAAR proteins, either covalently (‘specialised’) or non-covalently (‘cargo’ effectors). Here we used the T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens, together with integratecd genetic, proteomic and biochemical approaches, to elucidate the role of specific VgrG and PAAR homologues in T6SS function and effector specificity, revealing new aspects and unexpected subtleties in effector delivery by the T6SS. We identified effectors, both cargo and specialised, absolutely dependent on a particular VgrG for delivery to target cells, and discovered that other cargo effectors can show a preference for a particular VgrG. The presence of at least one PAAR protein was found to be essential for T6SS function, consistent with designation as a ‘core’ T6SS component. We showed that specific VgrG-PAAR combinations are required to assemble a functional T6SS and that the three distinct VgrG-PAAR assemblies in S. marcescens exhibit distinct effector specificity and efficiency. Unexpectedly, we discovered that two different PAAR-containing Rhs proteins can functionally pair with the same VgrG protein. Showing that accessory EagR proteins are involved in these interactions, native VgrG-Rhs-EagR complexes were isolated and specific interactions between EagR and cognate Rhs proteins identified. This study defines an essential yet flexible role for PAAR proteins in the T6SS and highlights the existence of distinct versions of the

  8. Defining Role in the New Classroom Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Interviews with four teachers, one parent, one assistant, and two ancillary helpers found that classroom teams possess little structure with minimal role definition. Participants erect defenses against the lack of definition and use a process termed "fraternity" to get along with one another and camouflage uncertainties and tensions. (SK)

  9. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver Eb; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-09-30

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota.

  10. Genes expressed in the brain define three distinct neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nef, P; Oneyser, C; Alliod, C; Couturier, S; Ballivet, M

    1988-01-01

    Four genes encode the related protein subunits that assemble to form the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) at the motor endplate of vertebrates. We have isolated from the chicken genome four additional members of the same gene family whose protein products, termed alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4 and n alpha (non-alpha) probably define three distinct neuronal nAChR subtypes. The neuronal nAChR genes have identical structures consisting of six protein-coding exons and specify proteins that are best aligned with the chicken endplate alpha subunit, whose gene we have also characterized. mRNA transcripts encoding alpha 4 and n alpha are abundant in embryonic and in adult avian brain, whereas alpha 2 and alpha 3 transcripts are much scarcer. The same set of neuronal genes probably exists in all vertebrates since their counterparts have also been identified in the rat genome. Images PMID:3267226

  11. Molecular classification defines 4 prognostically distinct glioma groups irrespective of diagnosis and grade.

    PubMed

    Mur, Pilar; Mollejo, Manuela; Hernández-Iglesias, Teresa; de Lope, Ángel Rodríguez; Castresana, Javier S; García, Juan F; Fiaño, Concepción; Ribalta, Teresa; Rey, Juan A; Meléndez, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    According to World Health Organization criteria, diffuse gliomas are divided into several histological subtypes, including astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and oligoastrocytomas, and 4 malignancy grades (I-IV). Molecular alterations, such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) mutation or 1p/19q loss, are found in these tumors but are not included in the current classification system. Recently, mutation of α thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene and its loss of expression have been reported in infiltrating gliomas. We evaluated ATRX protein expression in 272 gliomas and its association with molecular and clinical features. Loss of ATRX expression was more common in tumors with an astrocytic component (astrocytomas II/III, 46.4%; oligoastrocytomas, 47.5%) but was uncommon in oligodendrogliomas (7.3%) and glioblastomas (0.9%). In astrocytic tumors, loss of ATRX expression was significantly associated with longer overall survival. Remarkably, on the basis of IDH mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and ATRX expression, our study defined 4 molecularly and prognostically different groups of gliomas, showing the relevance of ATRX expression as a new marker for refining the molecular classification of gliomas and for distinguishing clinically distinct prognostic subgroups of patients.

  12. Distinct yet overlapping roles of Rab GTPases on synaptic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pavlos, Nathan J

    2011-01-01

    Exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs) is one of the most intensely studied membrane trafficking pathways. It is governed by sets of conserved proteins including Rab GTPases. Long considered to define the identity and composition of a subcellular organelle, it has become increasingly evident that multiple Rabs co-exist on intracellular compartments, each contributing to its membrane organization and specialised function. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that at least 11 distinct Rab proteins co-exist on highly purified SVs. These include Rabs involved in exocytosis (Rab3a/b/c and Rab27b) and intermediates of SV recycling such as early endosomes (Rab4, Rab5, Rab10, Rab11b and Rab14). Interestingly, we found that while two of these proteins, namely Rab3a and Rab27b, exhibited differential cycling dynamics on SV membranes; they played complementary roles during Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release. The implications of these findings in the SV trafficking cycle are discussed. PMID:21776405

  13. Reliability, Dimensionality, and Internal Consistency as Defined by Cronbach: Distinct Albeit Related Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Ernest C.; Davison, Mark L.; Liou, Pey-Yan; Love, Quintin U.

    2015-01-01

    This article uses definitions provided by Cronbach in his seminal paper for coefficient a to show the concepts of reliability, dimensionality, and internal consistency are distinct but interrelated. The article begins with a critique of the definition of reliability and then explores mathematical properties of Cronbach's a. Internal consistency…

  14. Distinct T cell signatures define subsets of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark C.; Pierson, Emily R.; Spieker, Andrew J.; Nielsen, A. Scott; Posso, Sylvia; Kita, Mariko; Buckner, Jane H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated T cell responses to myelin proteins in the blood of healthy controls and 2 groups of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who exhibited lesions either predominantly in the brain or predominantly in the spinal cord in order to assess whether distinct neuroinflammatory patterns were associated with different myelin protein–specific T cell effector function profiles and whether these profiles differed from healthy controls. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from patients with brain-predominant RRMS, patients with spinal cord–predominant RRMS, and age-matched healthy controls and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays to quantify interferon gamma–secreting (Th1) and interleukin 17–secreting (Th17) cells responding directly ex vivo to myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Results: Although MBP and MOG elicited different responses, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had spinal cord–predominant lesions exhibited significantly higher Th17:Th1 ratios in response to both MBP and MOG compared to patients with brain-predominant MS. Incorporating the cytokine responses to both antigens into logistic regression models showed that these cytokine responses were able to provide good discrimination between patients with distinct neuroinflammatory patterns. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the localization of lesions within the brain vs the spinal cord in patients with MS is associated with different effector T cell responses to myelin proteins. Further investigation of the relationship between T cell effector function, antigen specificities, and lesion sites may reveal features of pathogenic pathways that are distinct to patients with different neuroinflammatory patterns. PMID:27606354

  15. Multi-gene phylogenies define Ceratocystiopsis and Grosmannia distinct from Ophiostoma

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, Renate D.; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; Jacobs, Karin; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Wingfield, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Ophiostoma species have diverse morphological features and are found in a large variety of ecological niches. Many different classification schemes have been applied to these fungi in the past based on teleomorph and anamorph features. More recently, studies based on DNA sequence comparisions have shown that Ophiostoma consists of different phylogenetic groups, but the data have not been sufficient to define clear monophyletic lineages represented by practical taxonomic units. We used DNA sequence data from combined partial nuclear LSU and β-tubulin genes to consider the phylogenetic relationships of 50 Ophiostoma species, representing all the major morphological groups in the genus. Our data showed three well-supported, monophyletic lineages in Ophiostoma. Species with Leptographium anamorphs grouped together and to accommodate these species the teleomorph-genus Grosmannia (type species G. penicillata), including 27 species and 24 new combinations, is re-instated. Another well-defined lineage includes species that are cycloheximide-sensitive with short perithecial necks, falcate ascospores and Hyalorhinocladiella anamorphs. For these species, the teleomorph-genus Ceratocystiopsis (type species O. minuta), including 11 species and three new combinations, is re-instated. A third group of species with either Sporothrix or Pesotum anamorphs includes species from various ecological niches such as Protea infructescences in South Africa. This group also includes O. piliferum, the type species of Ophiostoma, and these species are retained in that genus. Ophiostoma is redefined to reflect the changes resulting from new combinations in Grosmannia and Ceratocystiopsis. Our data have revealed additional lineages in Ophiostoma linked to morphological characters. However, these species are retained in Ophiostoma until further data for a larger number of species can be obtained to confirm monophyly of the apparent lineages. PMID:18490973

  16. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  17. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  18. Mutational signatures in esophageal adenocarcinoma define etiologically distinct subgroups with therapeutic relevance.

    PubMed

    Secrier, Maria; Li, Xiaodun; de Silva, Nadeera; Eldridge, Matthew D; Contino, Gianmarco; Bornschein, Jan; MacRae, Shona; Grehan, Nicola; O'Donovan, Maria; Miremadi, Ahmad; Yang, Tsun-Po; Bower, Lawrence; Chettouh, Hamza; Crawte, Jason; Galeano-Dalmau, Núria; Grabowska, Anna; Saunders, John; Underwood, Tim; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P; Nutzinger, Barbara; Achilleos, Achilleas; Edwards, Paul A W; Lynch, Andy G; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has a poor outcome, and targeted therapy trials have thus far been disappointing owing to a lack of robust stratification methods. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 129 cases demonstrated that this is a heterogeneous cancer dominated by copy number alterations with frequent large-scale rearrangements. Co-amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and/or downstream mitogenic activation is almost ubiquitous; thus tailored combination RTK inhibitor (RTKi) therapy might be required, as we demonstrate in vitro. However, mutational signatures showed three distinct molecular subtypes with potential therapeutic relevance, which we verified in an independent cohort (n = 87): (i) enrichment for BRCA signature with prevalent defects in the homologous recombination pathway; (ii) dominant T>G mutational pattern associated with a high mutational load and neoantigen burden; and (iii) C>A/T mutational pattern with evidence of an aging imprint. These subtypes could be ascertained using a clinically applicable sequencing strategy (low coverage) as a basis for therapy selection.

  19. Brief reports: A distinct DNA methylation signature defines breast cancer stem cells and predicts cancer outcome.

    PubMed

    El Helou, Rita; Wicinski, Julien; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, Jose; Finetti, Pascal; Bertucci, François; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Ginestier, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Self-renewal and differentiation are two epigenetic programs that regulate stem cells fate. Dysregulation of these two programs leads to the development of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent evidence suggests that CSCs are relatively resistant to conventional therapies and responsible for metastasis formation. Deciphering these processes will help understand oncogenesis and allow the development of new targeted therapies. Here, we have used a whole genome promoter microarray to establish the DNA methylation portraits of breast cancer stem cells (bCSCs) and non-bCSCs. A total of 68 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were more hypomethylated in bCSCs than in non-bCSCs. Using a differentiation assay we demonstrated that DMRs are rapidly hypermethylated within the first 6 hours following induction of CSC differentiation whereas the cells reached the steady-state within 6 days, suggesting that these DMRs are linked to early CSC epigenetic regulation. These DMRs were significantly enriched in genes coding for TGF-β signaling-related proteins. Interestingly, DMRs hypomethylation was correlated to an overexpression of TGF-β signaling genes in a series of 109 breast tumors. Moreover, patients with tumors harboring the bCSC DMRs signature had a worse prognosis than those with non-bCSC DMRs signature. Our results show that bCSCs have a distinct DNA methylation landscape with TGF-β signaling as a key epigenetic regulator of bCSCs differentiation.

  20. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  1. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Loges, Niki T.; Klinkenbusch, Judith A.; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A.; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)–left–right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP–left–right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  2. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  3. Role of Distinct Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Fionda, Cinzia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the prototypic member of innate lymphoid cells, are important effectors of anticancer immune response. These cells can survey and control tumor initiation due to their capability to recognize and kill malignant cells and to regulate the adaptive immune response via cytokines and chemokines release. However, several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK cells associated with advanced disease can have profound functional defects and display protumor activity. This evidence indicates that NK cell behavior undergoes crucial alterations during cancer progression. Moreover, a further level of complexity is due to the extensive heterogeneity and plasticity of these lymphocytes, implying that different NK cell subsets, endowed with specific phenotypic and functional features, may be involved and play distinct roles in the tumor context. Accordingly, many studies reported the enrichment of selective NK cell subsets within tumor tissue, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. A malignant microenvironment can significantly impact NK cell activity, by recruiting specific subpopulations and/or influencing their developmental programming or the acquisition of a mature phenotype; in particular, neoplastic, stroma and immune cells, or tumor-derived factors take part in these processes. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recently acquired knowledge on the possible contribution of distinct NK cell subsets in the control and/or progression of solid and hematological malignancies. Moreover, we will address emerging evidence regarding the role of different components of tumor microenvironment on shaping NK cell response. PMID:28360915

  4. deep-orange and carnation define distinct stages in late endosomal biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sriram, V; Krishnan, K S; Mayor, Satyajit

    2003-05-12

    Endosomal degradation is severely impaired in primary hemocytes from larvae of eye color mutants of Drosophila. Using high resolution imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy in these cells, products of eye color genes, deep-orange (dor) and carnation (car), are localized to large multivesicular Rab7-positive late endosomes containing Golgi-derived enzymes. These structures mature into small sized Dor-negative, Car-positive structures, which subsequently fuse to form tubular lysosomes. Defective endosomal degradation in mutant alleles of dor results from a failure of Golgi-derived vesicles to fuse with morphologically arrested Rab7-positive large sized endosomes, which are, however, normally acidified and mature with wild-type kinetics. This locates the site of Dor function to fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the large Rab7-positive endocytic compartments. In contrast, endosomal degradation is not considerably affected in car1 mutant; fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles and maturation of large sized endosomes is normal. However, removal of Dor from small sized Car-positive endosomes is slowed, and subsequent fusion with tubular lysosomes is abolished. Overexpression of Dor in car1 mutant aggravates this defect, implicating Car in the removal of Dor from endosomes. This suggests that, in addition to an independent role in fusion with tubular lysosomes, the Sec1p homologue, Car, regulates Dor function.

  5. Role of motor unit structure in defining function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monti, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor units, defined as a motoneuron and all of its associated muscle fibers, are the basic functional units of skeletal muscle. Their activity represents the final output of the central nervous system, and their role in motor control has been widely studied. However, there has been relatively little work focused on the mechanical significance of recruiting variable numbers of motor units during different motor tasks. This review focuses on factors ranging from molecular to macroanatomical components that influence the mechanical output of a motor unit in the context of the whole muscle. These factors range from the mechanical properties of different muscle fiber types to the unique morphology of the muscle fibers constituting a motor unit of a given type and to the arrangement of those motor unit fibers in three dimensions within the muscle. We suggest that as a result of the integration of multiple levels of structural and physiological levels of organization, unique mechanical properties of motor units are likely to emerge. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. New Mecyclothorax spp. (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini) define Mont Mauru, eastern Tahiti Nui, as a distinct area of endemism

    PubMed Central

    Liebherr, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Seven species of Mecyclothorax Sharp precinctive to Mont Mauru, Tahiti, Society Islands are newly described: Mecyclothorax tutei sp. n., Mecyclothorax tihotii sp. n., Mecyclothorax putaputa sp. n., Mecyclothorax toretore sp. n., Mecyclothorax anaana sp. n., Mecyclothorax pirihao sp. n., and Mecyclothorax poro sp. n. These seven constitute the first representative Mecyclothorax species recorded from Mauru, and their geographic restriction to this isolated massif defines it as a distinct area of endemism along the highly dissected eastern versant of the Tahiti Nui volcano. Each of the new species has a closest relative on another massif of Tahiti Nui, supporting speciation associated with vicariance caused by extensive erosional valley formation, especially the development of Papenoo Valley. Comparison of the known elevational distributions of the new discoveries on Mont Mauru to the elevational diversity profile of the comparatively well-sampled Mont Marau, northwest Tahiti Nui, suggests that numerous Mecyclothorax species remain to be discovered in higher-elevation habitats of Mont Mauru. PMID:23166465

  7. Expanding Opportunities for Urban Minorities: Housing's Role, Broadly Defined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schermer, George; And Others

    Recognizing the broad range of social and economic limitations associated with residential segregation, the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations initiated a research program to define the extent of these problems and to advance strategies for dealing with them. The initial phase of the project commissioned research papers which were reviewed and…

  8. Defining the characteristics of the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Eve, Lisa

    The role of the nurse practitioner (NP) has recently expanded and is now recognised in a range of health care delivery settings including primary care. In addition, the last few years have seen a proliferation of use of the NP title. This article outlines a set of competencies that aim to bring clarity to the role.

  9. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Atack, John M; Beacham, Ifor R; Jennings, Michael P

    2013-07-05

    Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  10. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Atack, John M.; Beacham, Ifor R.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Escherichia coli contains two L-asparaginase isozymes with distinct localization, kinetics and regulation. •Mutant strains were used to examine the roles of these enzymes in L-asparagine utilization. •We report that L-asparaginase II permits growth on asparagine and glycerol under anaerobic conditions. •We propose that this enzyme is the first step in a co-regulated pathway leading to fumarate. •The pathway is regulated by anaerobiosis and cAMP and provides a terminal elector acceptor. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  11. Case study: factors in defining the nurse informatics specialist role.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations, consultant groups, vendor companies, and academic institutions feel the challenge to enhance user experiences with information systems. To meet this challenge, organizations and companies are looking to better understand and utilize a variety of informatics roles to further marketing, business, or healthcare goals. Nursing is one practice area that can support the successful integration of information systems development, implementation, support, and user experience. However, the definition and development of such a role or position has met with mixed success. This article explores some of the issues and influences related to the role's development. The issues, impacts, and influences have been identified based on healthcare business assessment, job description analysis, employment and project evaluations, and professional standards set by the American Nurses Association.

  12. Defining the Curriculum: The Role of the Publisher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorimer, Rowland

    Concentration on the role of educators in curriculum development has ignored the power of the producer/publishers. Canada's elhi (elementary/high school) publishing is dominated by very large multinational publishers. Learning materials in language arts, social studies, and science reflect the business interests of the multinational publishers in…

  13. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection.

  14. Defining New Roles for Scientific Professional Organizations in Society?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Byrne, J.

    2007-12-01

    The obfuscation of authentic science information in North America has reached epidemic proportions. The global warming debate is a classic example - there are a virtual unanimity and overwhelming evidence from scientific community that the Earth is warming rapidly and humans are an important cause, but there is confusion in the media and the public, partly as a result of disinformation campaigns by greenhouse gas polluters. Should the role of scientists in informing the public change in response to this? What should be the role of scientific societies, such as the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, or the American Association for the Advancement of Science? Should we continue doing what we are doing, or be more proactive in using new technology to educate the public on important scientific issues? Should we devote resources to television advertisements? Should we support ads in the print media? This talk will discuss the pros and cons of individual and group actions in making the case in public for science, and suggest some new directions.

  15. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  16. Defining the role of salt bridges in protein stability.

    PubMed

    Jelesarov, Ilian; Karshikoff, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Although the energetic balance of forces stabilizing proteins has been established qualitatively over the last decades, quantification of the energetic contribution of particular interactions still poses serious problems. The reasons are the strong cooperativity and the interdependence ofnoncovalent interactions. Salt bridges are a typical example. One expects that ionizable side chains frequently form ion pairs in innumerable crystal structures. Since electrostatic attraction between opposite charges is strong per se, salt bridges can intuitively be regarded as an important factor stabilizing the native structure. Is that really so? In this chapter we critically reassess the available methods to delineate the role ofelectrostatic interactions and salt bridges to protein stability, and discuss the progress and the obstacles in this endeavor. The basic problem is that formation of salt bridges depends on the ionization properties of the participating groups, which is significantly influenced by the protein environment. Furthermore, salt bridges experience thermal fluctuations, continuously break and re-form, and their lifespan in solution is governed by the flexibility of the protein. Finally, electrostatic interactions are long-range and might be significant in the unfolded state, thus seriously influencing the energetic profile. Elimination of salt bridges by protonation/deprotonation at extreme pH or by mutation provides only rough energetic estimates, since there is no way to account for the nonadditive response of the protein moiety. From what we know so far, the strength of electrostatic interactions is strongly context-dependent, yet it is unlikely that salt bridges are dominant factors governing protein stability. Nevertheless, proteins from thermophiles and hyperthermophiles exhibit more, and frequently networked, salt bridges than proteins from the mesophilic counterparts. Increasing the thermal (not the thermodynamic) stability of proteins by optimization

  17. Distinct Wnt signaling pathways have opposing roles in appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L; Weidinger, Gilbert; Riehle, Kimberly J; Hubbert, Charlotte; Major, Michael B; Fausto, Nelson; Moon, Randall T

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, lower vertebrates have a remarkable capacity to regenerate complex structures damaged by injury or disease. This process, termed epimorphic regeneration, involves progenitor cells created through the reprogramming of differentiated cells or through the activation of resident stem cells. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates progenitor cell fate and proliferation during embryonic development and stem cell function in adults, but its functional involvement in epimorphic regeneration has not been addressed. Using transgenic fish lines, we show that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in the regenerating zebrafish tail fin and is required for formation and subsequent proliferation of the progenitor cells of the blastema. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling appears to act upstream of FGF signaling, which has recently been found to be essential for fin regeneration. Intriguingly, increased Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is sufficient to augment regeneration, as tail fins regenerate faster in fish heterozygous for a loss-of-function mutation in axin1, a negative regulator of the pathway. Likewise, activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling by overexpression of wnt8 increases proliferation of progenitor cells in the regenerating fin. By contrast, overexpression of wnt5b (pipetail) reduces expression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, impairs proliferation of progenitors and inhibits fin regeneration. Importantly, fin regeneration is accelerated in wnt5b mutant fish. These data suggest that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes regeneration, whereas a distinct pathway activated by wnt5b acts in a negative-feedback loop to limit regeneration.

  18. Studies of meiosis disclose distinct roles of cohesion in the core centromere and pericentromeric regions.

    PubMed

    Sakuno, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    During meiosis, a single round of genome duplication is followed by two sequential rounds of chromosome segregation. Through this process, a diploid parent cell generates gametes with a haploid set of chromosomes. A characteristic of meiotic chromosome segregation is a stepwise loss of sister chromatid cohesion along chromosomal arms and at centromeres. Whereas arm cohesion plays an important role in ensuring homologue disjunction at meiosis I, persisting cohesion at pericentromeric regions throughout meiosis I is essential for the faithful equational segregation of sisters in the following meiosis II, similar to mitosis. A widely conserved pericentromeric protein called shugoshin, which associates with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), plays a critical role in this protection of cohesin. Another key aspect of meiosis I is the establishment of monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to spindle microtubules. Cohesion or physical linkage at the core centromeres, where kinetochores assemble, may conjoin sister kinetochores, leading to monopolar attachment. A meiosis-specific kinetochore factor such as fission yeast Moa1 or budding yeast monopolin contributes to this regulation. We propose that cohesion at the core centromere and pericentromeric regions plays distinct roles, especially in defining the orientation of kinetochores.

  19. The distinctive role of executive functions in implicit emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Arcangeli, Margherita; Wantzen, Prany; Zalla, Tiziana; Lemaire, Stéphane; Dokic, Jérôme; Pelletier, Jérôme; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-02-01

    Several theoretical models stress the role of executive functions in emotion regulation (ER). However, most of the previous studies on ER employed explicit regulatory strategies that could have engaged executive functions, beyond regulatory processes per se. Recently, there has been renewed interest in implicit forms of ER, believed to be closer to daily-life requirements. While various studies have shown that implicit and explicit ER engage partially overlapping neurocognitive processes, the contribution of different executive functions in implicit ER has not been investigated. In the present study, we presented participants with negatively valenced pictures of varying emotional intensity preceded by short texts describing them as either fictional or real. This manipulation was meant to induce a spontaneous emotional down-regulation. We recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) and subjective reports of emotion arousal. Executive functions (updating, switching, and inhibition) were also assessed. No difference was found between the fictional and real condition on EDA. A diminished self-reported arousal was observed, however, when pictures were described as fictional for high- and mild-intensity material, but not for neutral material. The amount of down-regulation in the fictional condition was found to be predicted by interindividual variability in updating performances, but not by the other measures of executive functions, suggesting its implication even in implicit forms of ER. The relationship between down-regulation and updating was significant only for high-intensity material. We discuss the role of updating in relation to the consciousness of one's emotional state.

  20. DNA methylation in small cell lung cancer defines distinct disease subtypes and correlates with high expression of EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, John T.; Gardner, Eric E.; Connis, Nick; Moreira, Andre L.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Hann, Christine L.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by early metastasis, rapid development of resistance to chemotherapy, and genetic instability. This study profiles DNA methylation in SCLC, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) and cell lines at single nucleotide resolution. DNA methylation patterns of primary samples are distinct from those of cell lines, while PDXs maintain a pattern closely consistent with primary samples. Clustering of DNA methylation and gene expression of primary SCLC revealed distinct disease subtypes among histologically indistinguishable primary patient samples with similar genetic alterations. SCLC is notable for dense clustering of high-level methylation in discrete promoter CpG islands, in a pattern clearly distinct from other lung cancers and strongly correlated with high expression of the E2F target and histone methyltransferase gene EZH2. Pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2 in a SCLC PDX markedly inhibited tumor growth. PMID:25746006

  1. DNA methylation in small cell lung cancer defines distinct disease subtypes and correlates with high expression of EZH2.

    PubMed

    Poirier, J T; Gardner, E E; Connis, N; Moreira, A L; de Stanchina, E; Hann, C L; Rudin, C M

    2015-11-26

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by early metastasis, rapid development of resistance to chemotherapy and genetic instability. This study profiles DNA methylation in SCLC, patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and cell lines at single-nucleotide resolution. DNA methylation patterns of primary samples are distinct from those of cell lines, whereas PDX maintain a pattern closely consistent with primary samples. Clustering of DNA methylation and gene expression of primary SCLC revealed distinct disease subtypes among histologically indistinguishable primary patient samples with similar genetic alterations. SCLC is notable for dense clustering of high-level methylation in discrete promoter CpG islands, in a pattern clearly distinct from other lung cancers and strongly correlated with high expression of the E2F target and histone methyltransferase gene EZH2. Pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2 in a SCLC PDX markedly inhibited tumor growth.

  2. Elucidating distinct roles for NF1 in melanomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Ophélia; Johnson, Bryan; Hollstein, Pablo; Frederick, Dennie T.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Bronson, Roderick T.; McMahon, Martin; Granter, Scott; Flaherty, Keith; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Marais, Richard; Cichowski, Karen

    2013-01-01

    BRAF mutations play a well-established role in melanomagenesis; however, without additional genetic alterations tumor development is restricted by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). Here we show that mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cooperate with BRAF mutations in melanomagenesis by preventing OIS. In a genetically engineered mouse model, Nf1 mutations suppress Braf-induced senescence, promote melanocyte hyperproliferation, and enhance melanoma development. Nf1 mutations function by deregulating both PI3K and ERK pathways. As such, Nf1/Braf mutant tumors are resistant to BRAF inhibitors but are sensitive to combined MEK/mTOR inhibition. Importantly, NF1 is mutated or suppressed in human melanomas that harbor concurrent BRAF mutations, NF1 ablation decreases the sensitivity of melanoma cell lines to BRAF inhibitors, and NF1 is lost in tumors from patients following treatment with these agents. Collectively, these studies provide mechanistic insight into how NF1 cooperates with BRAF mutations in melanoma and demonstrate that NF1-inactivation may impact responses to targeted therapies. PMID:23171796

  3. Elucidating distinct roles for NF1 in melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Ophélia; Johnson, Bryan; Hollstein, Pablo; Frederick, Dennie T; Cooper, Zachary A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Bronson, Roderick T; McMahon, Martin; Granter, Scott; Flaherty, Keith; Wargo, Jennifer A; Marais, Richard; Cichowski, Karen

    2013-03-01

    BRAF mutations play a well-established role in melanomagenesis; however, without additional genetic alterations, tumor development is restricted by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). Here, we show that mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cooperate with BRAF mutations in melanomagenesis by preventing OIS. In a genetically engineered mouse model, Nf1 mutations suppress Braf-induced senescence, promote melanocyte hyperproliferation, and enhance melanoma development. Nf1 mutations function by deregulating both phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways. As such, Nf1/Braf-mutant tumors are resistant to BRAF inhibitors but are sensitive to combined inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase and mTOR. Importantly, NF1 is mutated or suppressed in human melanomas that harbor concurrent BRAF mutations, NF1 ablation decreases the sensitivity of melanoma cell lines to BRAF inhibitors, and NF1 is lost in tumors from patients following treatment with these agents. Collectively, these studies provide mechanistic insight into how NF1 cooperates with BRAF mutations in melanoma and show that NF1/neurofibromin inactivation may have an impact on responses to targeted therapies.

  4. Distinct Roles for Intracellular and Extracellular Lipids in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sowmya; Nieh, Albert H.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Davis, Christine A.; Tosello-Trampont, Annie-Carole; Elich, Tedd D.; Breazeale, Steven D.; Ward, Eric; Anderson, Richard J.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Hahn, Young S.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a chronic liver disease that contributes to progressive metabolic dysfunction. Infection of hepatocytes by hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in reprogramming of hepatic and serum lipids. However, the specific contribution of these distinct pools of lipids to HCV infection remains ill defined. In this study, we investigated the role of hepatic lipogenesis in HCV infection by targeting the rate-limiting step in this pathway, which is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) enzymes. Using two structurally unrelated ACC inhibitors, we determined that blockade of lipogenesis resulted in reduced viral replication, assembly, and release. Supplementing exogenous lipids to cells treated with ACC inhibitors rescued HCV assembly with no effect on viral replication and release. Intriguingly, loss of viral RNA was not recapitulated at the protein level and addition of 2-bromopalmitate, a competitive inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, mirrored the effects of ACC inhibitors on reduced viral RNA without a concurrent loss in protein expression. These correlative results suggest that newly synthesized lipids may have a role in protein palmitoylation during HCV infection. PMID:27280294

  5. IDH1/2 mutation status combined with Ki-67 labeling index defines distinct prognostic groups in glioma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ailiang; Hu, Qi; Liu, Yanwei; Wang, Zheng; Cui, Xiaoming; Li, Rui; Yan, Wei; You, Yongping

    2015-10-06

    The current World Health Organization (WHO) classification of human gliomas is mainly based on morphology. However, it has limitations in prognostic prediction. We examined whether combining isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1/2 mutation status with the Ki-67 labeling index would improve the definition of prognostically distinct entities. We investigated the correlation of Ki-67 expression with IDH1/2 mutation status and their impact on clinical outcome in 703 gliomas. Low Ki-67 expression closely overlapped with IDH1/2 mutation in our cohort (P < 0.0001). Patients with IDH1/2 mutation survived significantly longer than patients with wild-type IDH1/2 did (P < 0.0001); higher Ki-67 expression was associated with shorter progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.0001). IDH1/2 combined with Ki-67 was used to re-classify glioma patients into five groups. IDH1/2 mutant patients with low and moderate Ki-67 expression (Group1) had the best prognosis, whereas patients with wild-type IDH1/2 and high Ki-67 expression (Group5) had the worst prognosis (Median OS = 1527 vs. 355 days, P < 0.0001). To summarize, our new classification model distinguishes biologically distinct subgroups and provides prognostic information regardless of the conventional WHO grade. Classification based on IDH1/2 mutation status and Ki-67 expression level could be more convenient for clinical application and guide personalized treatment in malignant gliomas.

  6. Expression Profiling of Macrophages Reveals Multiple Populations with Distinct Biological Roles in an Immunocompetent Orthotopic Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; De, Subhajyoti; Yadav, Vinod K.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.M.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent an important component of the tumor microenvironment and play a complex role in cancer progression. These cells are characterized by a high degree of plasticity, and alter their phenotype in response to local environmental cues. While the M1/M2 classification of macrophages has been widely used, the complexity of macrophage phenotypes has not been well studied, particularly in lung cancer. In this study we employed an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung adenocarcinoma in which murine lung cancer cells are directly implanted into the left lobe of syngeneic mice. Using multi-marker flow cytometry, we defined and recovered several distinct populations of monocytes/macrophages from tumors at different stages of progression. We used RNA-seq transcriptional profiling to define distinct features of each population and determine how they change during tumor progression. We defined an alveolar resident macrophage population that does not change in number and expresses multiple genes related to lipid metabolism and lipid signaling. We also defined a population of tumor-associated macrophages that increase dramatically with tumor, and selectively expresses a panel of chemokine genes. A third population, which resembles tumor-associated monocytes, expresses a large number of genes involved in matrix remodeling. By correlating transcriptional profiles with clinically prognostic genes, we show that specific monocyte/macrophage populations are enriched in genes that predict outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma, implicating these subpopulations as critical determinants of patient survival. Our data underscore the complexity of monocytes/macrophages in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest that distinct populations play specific roles in tumor progression. PMID:26873985

  7. Intraluminal brachytherapy in oesophageal cancer: defining its role and introducing the technique

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav

    2014-01-01

    Intraluminal brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of oesophageal tumours. This article aims to define this role in the curative as well as in the palliative treatment settings drawing on data from the literature, and also emphasizing its potential for harm when used inexpertly. It also provides a short introduction to practical aspects of the treatment procedure and treatment planning. PMID:25097567

  8. Structural and haemostatic features of pharmaceutical heparins from different animal sources: challenges to define thresholds separating distinct drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Ana M. F.; Santos, Gustavo R. C.; Capillé, Nina V.; Piquet, Adriana A.; Glauser, Bianca F.; Pereira, Mariana S.; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Heparins extracted from different animal sources have been conventionally considered effective anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents despite of their pharmacological dissimilarities. We performed herein a systematic analysis on the physicochemical properties, disaccharide composition, in vitro anticoagulant potency and in vivo antithrombotic and bleeding effects of several batches of pharmaceutical grade heparins obtained from porcine intestine, bovine intestine and bovine lung. Each of these three heparin types unambiguously presented differences in their chemical structures, physicochemical properties and/or haemostatic effects. We also prepared derivatives of these heparins with similar molecular weight differing exclusively in their disaccharide composition. The derivatives from porcine intestinal and bovine lung heparins were structurally more similar with each other and hence presented close anticoagulant activities whereas the derivative from bovine intestinal heparin had a higher proportion of 6-desulfated α-glucosamine units and about half anticoagulant activity. Our findings reasonably indicate that pharmaceutical preparations of heparin from different animal sources constitute distinct drugs, thus requiring specific regulatory rules and therapeutic evaluations. PMID:27752111

  9. Genetic profiling by single-nucleotide polymorphism-based array analysis defines three distinct subtypes of orbital meningioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mosier, Stacy; Safneck, Janice; Salomao, Diva R; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Gocke, Christopher D; Batista, Denise A S; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-03-01

    Orbital meningiomas can be classified as primary optic nerve sheath (ON) meningiomas, primary intraorbital ectopic (Ob) meningiomas and spheno-orbital (Sph-Ob) meningiomas based on anatomic site. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based array analysis with the Illumina 300K platform was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 orbital meningiomas (5 ON, 4 Ob and 10 Sph-Ob meningiomas). Tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I except for two grade II meningiomas, and one was NF2-associated. We found genomic alterations in 68% (13 of 19) of orbital meningiomas. Sph-Ob tumors frequently exhibited monosomy 22/22q loss (70%; 7/10) and deletion of chromosome 1p, 6q and 19p (50% each; 5/10). Among genetic alterations, loss of chromosome 1p and 6q were more frequent in clinically progressive tumors. Chromosome 22q loss also was detected in the majority of Ob meningiomas (75%; 3/4) but was infrequent in ON meningiomas (20%; 1/5). In general, Ob tumors had fewer chromosome alterations than Sph-Ob and ON tumors. Unlike Sph-Ob meningiomas, most of the Ob and ON meningiomas did not progress even after incomplete excision, although follow-up was limited in some cases. Our study suggests that ON, Ob and Sph-Ob meningiomas are three molecularly distinct entities. Our results also suggest that molecular subclassification may have prognostic implications.

  10. Characterization of two distinct antigens expressed on either resting or activated human B cells as defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kokai, Y; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    Two antigen systems (L29 & L30) expressed on two distinct human B cell subpopulations were identified by using BL1-4D6 and TB3-7D5 monoclonal antibodies, respectively. L29 was expressed on approximately one-third of B cells in human lymphoid tissues. These B cells associated with L29 were large activated B cells located in the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles. L30, on the other hand, existed on approximately two-thirds of B cells mainly located in the mantle zone of lymphoid follicles, most of which also expressed IgM and IgD on their cell membrane. In addition, L30 was shared on mature granulocytes. With the use of polyclonal activators such as pokeweek mitogen (PWM) and protein A-bearing staphylococci (SAC), L29 antigen was inducible on PWM- or SAC-stimulated B cells in correspondence with the emergence of Tac and T10 antigens of these B cells. In contrast, L30 antigen on the B cells stimulated by the polyclonal activators was decreased in its expression and was finally lost from these B cells. Although none of L29 and L30 was expressed on normal, non-activated human thymus and peripheral T cells, L29 but not L30 was expressed on concanavalin A-activated T cells. Immunochemical studies showed that L30 consist of a single polypeptide with mol. wt of 40,000. L29 antigen is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3527505

  11. Distinct roles for IT and IH in controlling the frequency and timing of rebound spike responses

    PubMed Central

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Tadayonnejad, Reza; Mehaffey, W Hamish; Molineux, Michael L; Turner, Ray W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability for neurons to generate rebound bursts following inhibitory synaptic input relies on ion channels that respond in a unique fashion to hyperpolarization. Inward currents provided by T-type calcium channels (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated HCN channels (IH) increase in availability upon hyperpolarization, allowing for a rebound depolarization after a period of inhibition. Although rebound responses have long been recognized in deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) neurons, the actual extent to which IT and IH contribute to rebound spike output following physiological levels of membrane hyperpolarization has not been clearly established. The current study used recordings and simulations of large diameter cells of the in vitro rat DCN slice preparation to define the roles for IT and IH in a rebound response. We find that physiological levels of hyperpolarization make only small proportions of the total IT and IH available, but that these are sufficient to make substantial contributions to a rebound response. At least 50% of the early phase of the rebound spike frequency increase is generated by an IT-mediated depolarization. An additional frequency increase is provided by IH in reducing the time constant and thus the extent of IT inactivation as the membrane returns from a hyperpolarized state to the resting level. An IH-mediated depolarization creates an inverse voltage-first spike latency relationship and produces a 35% increase in the precision of the first spike latency of a rebound. IT and IH can thus be activated by physiologically relevant stimuli and have distinct roles in the frequency, timing and precision of rebound responses. PMID:21969455

  12. Distinct developmental profile of lower-body adipose tissue defines resistance against obesity-associated metabolic complications.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, Katherine E; Nicholson, George; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos N; McQuaid, Siobhán E; Valet, Philippe; Frayn, Keith N; Denton, Nathan; Min, Josine L; Zondervan, Krina T; Fleckner, Jan; McCarthy, Mark I; Holmes, Chris C; Karpe, Fredrik

    2014-11-01

    Upper- and lower-body fat depots exhibit opposing associations with obesity-related metabolic disease. We defined the relationship between DEXA-quantified fat depots and diabetes/cardiovascular risk factors in a healthy population-based cohort (n = 3,399). Gynoid fat mass correlated negatively with insulin resistance after total fat mass adjustment, whereas the opposite was seen for abdominal fat. Paired transcriptomic analysis of gluteal subcutaneous adipose tissue (GSAT) and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT) was performed across the BMI spectrum (n = 49; 21.4-45.5 kg/m(2)). In both depots, energy-generating metabolic genes were negatively associated and inflammatory genes were positively associated with obesity. However, associations were significantly weaker in GSAT. At the systemic level, arteriovenous release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (n = 34) was lower from GSAT than ASAT. Isolated preadipocytes retained a depot-specific transcriptional "memory" of embryonic developmental genes and exhibited differential promoter DNA methylation of selected genes (HOTAIR, TBX5) between GSAT and ASAT. Short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing identified TBX5 as a regulator of preadipocyte proliferation and adipogenic differentiation in ASAT. In conclusion, intrinsic differences in the expression of developmental genes in regional adipocytes provide a mechanistic basis for diversity in adipose tissue (AT) function. The less inflammatory nature of lower-body AT offers insight into the opposing metabolic disease risk associations between upper- and lower-body obesity.

  13. Use of HCA in Subproteome-immunization and Screening of Hybridoma Supernatants to Define Distinct Antibody Binding Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Szafran, Adam T.; Mancini, Maureen G.; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Edwards, Dean P.; Mancini, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the properties and functions of complex biological systems depends upon knowing the proteins present and the interactions between them. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have given us greater insights into the participating proteomes, however, monoclonal antibodies remain key to understanding the structures, functions, locations and macromolecular interactions of the involved proteins. The traditional single immunogen method to produce monoclonal antibodies using hybridoma technology are time, resource and cost intensive, limiting the number of reagents that are available. Using a high content analysis screening approach, we have developed a method in which a complex mixture of proteins (e.g., subproteome) is used to generate a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to a subproteome located in a defined subcellular compartment such as the nucleus. The immunofluorescent images in the primary hybridoma screen are analyzed using an automated processing approach and classified using a recursive partitioning forest classification model derived from images obtained from the Human Protein Atlas. Using an ammonium sulfate purified nuclear matrix fraction as an example of reverse proteomics, we identified 866 hybridoma supernatants with a positive immunofluorescent signal. Of those, 402 produced a nuclear signal from which patterns similar to known nuclear matrix associated proteins were identified. Detailed here is our method, the analysis techniques, and a discussion of the application to further in vivo antibody production. PMID:26521976

  14. BRAF-V600E expression in precursor versus differentiated dendritic cells defines clinically distinct LCH risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Berres, Marie-Luise; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Peters, Tricia; Price, Jeremy; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Salmon, Hélène; Idoyaga, Juliana; Ruzo, Albert; Lupo, Philip J.; Hicks, M. John; Shih, Albert; Simko, Stephen J.; Abhyankar, Harshal; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Leboeuf, Marylene; Beltrão, Monique; Lira, Sérgio A.; Heym, Kenneth M.; Clausen, Björn E.; Bigley, Venetia; Collin, Matthew; Manz, Markus G.; McClain, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal disorder with elusive etiology, characterized by the accumulation of CD207+ dendritic cells (DCs) in inflammatory lesions. Recurrent BRAF-V600E mutations have been reported in LCH. In this study, lesions from 100 patients were genotyped, and 64% carried the BRAF-V600E mutation within infiltrating CD207+ DCs. BRAF-V600E expression in tissue DCs did not define specific clinical risk groups but was associated with increased risk of recurrence. Strikingly, we found that patients with active, high-risk LCH also carried BRAF-V600E in circulating CD11c+ and CD14+ fractions and in bone marrow (BM) CD34+ hematopoietic cell progenitors, whereas the mutation was restricted to lesional CD207+ DC in low-risk LCH patients. Importantly, BRAF-V600E expression in DCs was sufficient to drive LCH-like disease in mice. Consistent with our findings in humans, expression of BRAF-V600E in BM DC progenitors recapitulated many features of the human high-risk LCH, whereas BRAF-V600E expression in differentiated DCs more closely resembled low-risk LCH. We therefore propose classification of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and hypothesize that high-risk LCH arises from somatic mutation of a hematopoietic progenitor, whereas low-risk disease arises from somatic mutation of tissue-restricted precursor DCs. PMID:24638167

  15. Distinct ATOH1 and Neurog3 requirements define tuft cells as a new secretory cell type in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Gerbe, François; van Es, Johan H.; Makrini, Leila; Brulin, Bénédicte; Mellitzer, Georg; Robine, Sylvie; Romagnolo, Béatrice; Shroyer, Noah F.; Bourgaux, Jean-François; Pignodel, Christine; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The unique morphology of tuft cells was first revealed by electron microscopy analyses in several endoderm-derived epithelia. Here, we explore the relationship of these cells with the other cell types of the intestinal epithelium and describe the first marker signature allowing their unambiguous identification. We demonstrate that although mature tuft cells express DCLK1, a putative marker of quiescent stem cells, they are post-mitotic, short lived, derive from Lgr5-expressing epithelial stem cells, and are found in mouse and human tumors. We show that whereas the ATOH1/MATH1 transcription factor is essential for their differentiation, Neurog3, SOX9, GFI1, and SPDEF are dispensable, which distinguishes these cells from enteroendocrine, Paneth, and goblet cells, and raises from three to four the number of secretory cell types in the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we show that tuft cells are the main source of endogenous intestinal opioids and are the only epithelial cells that express cyclooxygenase enzymes, suggesting important roles for these cells in the intestinal epithelium physiopathology. PMID:21383077

  16. Leading Charters: How Charter School Administrators Define Their Roles and Their Ability to Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick Michael, II; Peak, Charity

    2013-01-01

    Charter schools have been studied from numerous perspectives. One topic that remains under-researched, however, is charter school leadership. Therefore, we examine how charter administrators define their leadership roles and their ability to lead. Results indicate that charter principals see three primary functions in their leadership--building…

  17. oskar RNA plays multiple noncoding roles to support oogenesis and maintain integrity of the germline/soma distinction

    PubMed Central

    Kanke, Matt; Jambor, Helena; Reich, John; Marches, Brittany; Gstir, Ronald; Ryu, Young Hee; Ephrussi, Anne; Macdonald, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila oskar (osk) mRNA is unusual in that it has both coding and noncoding functions. As an mRNA, osk encodes a protein required for embryonic patterning and germ cell formation. Independent of that function, the absence of osk mRNA disrupts formation of the karyosome and blocks progression through oogenesis. Here we show that loss of osk mRNA also affects the distribution of regulatory proteins, relaxing their association with large RNPs within the germline, and allowing them to accumulate in the somatic follicle cells. This and other noncoding functions of the osk mRNA are mediated by multiple sequence elements with distinct roles. One role, provided by numerous binding sites in two distinct regions of the osk 3′ UTR, is to sequester the translational regulator Bruno (Bru), which itself controls translation of osk mRNA. This defines a novel regulatory circuit, with Bru restricting the activity of osk, and osk in turn restricting the activity of Bru. Other functional elements, which do not bind Bru and are positioned close to the 3′ end of the RNA, act in the oocyte and are essential. Despite the different roles played by the different types of elements contributing to RNA function, mutation of any leads to accumulation of the germline regulatory factors in the follicle cells. PMID:25862242

  18. oskar RNA plays multiple noncoding roles to support oogenesis and maintain integrity of the germline/soma distinction.

    PubMed

    Kanke, Matt; Jambor, Helena; Reich, John; Marches, Brittany; Gstir, Ronald; Ryu, Young Hee; Ephrussi, Anne; Macdonald, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    The Drosophila oskar (osk) mRNA is unusual in that it has both coding and noncoding functions. As an mRNA, osk encodes a protein required for embryonic patterning and germ cell formation. Independent of that function, the absence of osk mRNA disrupts formation of the karyosome and blocks progression through oogenesis. Here we show that loss of osk mRNA also affects the distribution of regulatory proteins, relaxing their association with large RNPs within the germline, and allowing them to accumulate in the somatic follicle cells. This and other noncoding functions of the osk mRNA are mediated by multiple sequence elements with distinct roles. One role, provided by numerous binding sites in two distinct regions of the osk 3' UTR, is to sequester the translational regulator Bruno (Bru), which itself controls translation of osk mRNA. This defines a novel regulatory circuit, with Bru restricting the activity of osk, and osk in turn restricting the activity of Bru. Other functional elements, which do not bind Bru and are positioned close to the 3' end of the RNA, act in the oocyte and are essential. Despite the different roles played by the different types of elements contributing to RNA function, mutation of any leads to accumulation of the germline regulatory factors in the follicle cells.

  19. Early- and late-born parvalbumin basket cell subpopulations exhibiting distinct regulation and roles in learning.

    PubMed

    Donato, Flavio; Chowdhury, Ananya; Lahr, Maria; Caroni, Pico

    2015-02-18

    Brain networks can support learning by promoting acquisition of task-relevant information or by adhering to validated rules, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Upon learning, local inhibitory parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks can switch to opposite configurations that either favor or interfere with further learning, but how this opposite plasticity is induced and relates to distinct learning requirements has remained unclear. Here, we show that PV Basket cells consist of hitherto unrecognized subpopulations, with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, input connectivities, output target neurons, and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons was recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons was recruited in new information acquisition. This involved regulation of early-born neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation.

  20. The roles of shared vs. distinctive conceptual features in lexical access.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Harrison E; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary models of spoken word production assume conceptual feature sharing determines the speed with which objects are named in categorically-related contexts. However, statistical models of concept representation have also identified a role for feature distinctiveness, i.e., features that identify a single concept and serve to distinguish it quickly from other similar concepts. In three experiments we investigated whether distinctive features might explain reports of counter-intuitive semantic facilitation effects in the picture word interference (PWI) paradigm. In Experiment 1, categorically-related distractors matched in terms of semantic similarity ratings (e.g., zebra and pony) and manipulated with respect to feature distinctiveness (e.g., a zebra has stripes unlike other equine species) elicited interference effects of comparable magnitude. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the role of feature distinctiveness with respect to reports of facilitated naming with part-whole distractor-target relations (e.g., a hump is a distinguishing part of a CAMEL, whereas knee is not, vs. an unrelated part such as plug). Related part distractors did not influence target picture naming latencies significantly when the part denoted by the related distractor was not visible in the target picture (whether distinctive or not; Experiment 2). When the part denoted by the related distractor was visible in the target picture, non-distinctive part distractors slowed target naming significantly at SOA of -150 ms (Experiment 3). Thus, our results show that semantic interference does occur for part-whole distractor-target relations in PWI, but only when distractors denote features shared with the target and other category exemplars. We discuss the implications of these results for some recently developed, novel accounts of lexical access in spoken word production.

  1. The Arf6 GTPase-activating Proteins ARAP2 and ACAP1 Define Distinct Endosomal Compartments That Regulate Integrin α5β1 Traffic*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Luo, Ruibai; Jian, Xiaoying; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Arf6 and the Arf6 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) ACAP1 are established regulators of integrin traffic important to cell adhesion and migration. However, the function of Arf6 with ACAP1 cannot explain the range of Arf6 effects on integrin-based structures. We propose that Arf6 has different functions determined, in part, by the associated Arf GAP. We tested this idea by comparing the Arf6 GAPs ARAP2 and ACAP1. We found that ARAP2 and ACAP1 had opposing effects on apparent integrin β1 internalization. ARAP2 knockdown slowed, whereas ACAP1 knockdown accelerated, integrin β1 internalization. Integrin β1 association with adaptor protein containing a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and leucine zipper motif (APPL)-positive endosomes and EEA1-positive endosomes was affected by ARAP2 knockdown and depended on ARAP2 GAP activity. ARAP2 formed a complex with APPL1 and colocalized with Arf6 and APPL in a compartment distinct from the Arf6/ACAP1 tubular recycling endosome. In addition, although ACAP1 and ARAP2 each colocalized with Arf6, they did not colocalize with each other and had opposing effects on focal adhesions (FAs). ARAP2 overexpression promoted large FAs, but ACAP1 overexpression reduced FAs. Taken together, the data support a model in which Arf6 has at least two sites of opposing action defined by distinct Arf6 GAPs. PMID:25225293

  2. Nonconformity defines the self: the role of minority opinion status in self-concept clarity.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kimberly Rios; Wheeler, S Christian

    2010-03-01

    Drawing on distinctiveness and social identity theories, the present studies tested whether minority opinion holders would have a more clearly defined sense of self than majority opinion holders. In Study 1, participants who were induced to believe that they held a minority opinion on a controversial issue had higher subsequent self-concept clarity scores than did those who were induced to believe that they held a majority opinion, controlling for self-esteem. Furthermore, the relationship between minority opinion status and self-concept clarity was strongest among participants whose opinions were highly expressive of their values (Studies 2 and 3), as well as among participants who identified strongly with the group in which they were a minority (Study 3). Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  3. Local Circuits of V1 Layer 4B Neurons Projecting to V2 Thick Stripes Define Distinct Cell Classes and Avoid Cytochrome Oxidase Blobs.

    PubMed

    Yarch, Jeff; Federer, Frederick; Angelucci, Alessandra

    2017-01-11

    Decades of anatomical studies on the primate primary visual cortex (V1) have led to a detailed diagram of V1 intrinsic circuitry, but this diagram lacks information about the output targets of V1 cells. Understanding how V1 local processing relates to downstream processing requires identification of neuronal populations defined by their output targets. In primates, V1 layers (L)2/3 and 4B send segregated projections to distinct cytochrome oxidase (CO) stripes in area V2: neurons in CO blob columns project to thin stripes while neurons outside blob columns project to thick and pale stripes, suggesting functional specialization of V1-to-V2 CO streams. However, the conventional diagram of V1 shows all L4B neurons, regardless of their soma location in blob or interblob columns, as projecting selectively to CO blobs in L2/3, suggesting convergence of blob/interblob information in L2/3 blobs and, possibly, some V2 stripes. However, it is unclear whether all L4B projection neurons show similar local circuitries. Using viral-mediated circuit tracing, we have identified the local circuits of L4B neurons projecting to V2 thick stripes in macaque. Consistent with previous studies, we found the somata of this L4B subpopulation to reside predominantly outside blob columns; however, unlike previous descriptions of local L4B circuits, these cells consistently projected outside CO blob columns in all layers. Thus, the local circuits of these L4B output neurons, just like their extrinsic projections to V2, preserve CO streams. Moreover, the intra-V1 laminar patterns of axonal projections identify two distinct neuron classes within this L4B subpopulation, including a rare novel neuron type, suggestive of two functionally specialized output channels.

  4. Quantifying the relative roles of selective and neutral processes in defining eukaryotic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Morrison-Whittle, Peter; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the relative contributions of different processes that regulate microbial communities, which are crucial components of both natural and agricultural ecosystems. The contributions of selective and neutral processes in defining community composition are often confounded in field studies because as one moves through space, environments also change. Managed ecosystems provide an excellent opportunity to control for this and evaluate the relative strength of these processes by minimising differences between comparable niches separated at different geographic scales. We use next-generation sequencing to characterize the variance in fungal communities inhabiting adjacent fruit, soil and bark in comparable vineyards across 1000 kms in New Zealand. By compartmentalizing community variation, we reveal that niche explains at least four times more community variance than geographic location. We go beyond merely demonstrating that different communities are found in both different niches and locations by quantifying the forces that define these patterns. Overall, selection unsurprisingly predominantly shapes these microbial communities, but we show the balance of neutral processes also have a significant role in defining community assemblage in eukaryotic microbes. PMID:25756681

  5. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S; Jones, D Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca(2+), are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca(2+) at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions.

  6. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca2+, are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca2+ at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions. PMID:23650602

  7. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-11-05

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis.

  8. Distinct roles of synapsin I and synapsin II during neuronal development.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, A.; Chin, L. S.; Li, L.; Lanier, L. M.; Kosik, K. S.; Greengard, P.

    1998-01-01

    The synapsins are a family of neuron-specific proteins, associated with the cytoplasmic surface of synaptic vesicles, which have been shown to regulate neurotransmitter release in mature synapses and to accelerate development of the nervous system. Using neuronal cultures from mice lacking synapsin I, synapsin II, or both synapsins I and II, we have now found that synapsin I and synapsin II play distinct roles in neuronal development. Deletion of synapsin II, but not synapsin I, greatly retarded axon formation. Conversely, deletion of synapsin I, but not synapsin II, greatly retarded synapse formation. Remarkably, the deletion of both synapsins led to partial restoration of the wild phenotype. The results suggest that the synapsins play separate but coordinated developmental roles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:9513186

  9. The A- and B-type cyclins of Drosophila are accumulated and destroyed in temporally distinct events that define separable phases of the G2-M transition.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, W G; Gonzalez, C; Maldonado-Codina, G; Glover, D M

    1990-01-01

    We show that the sequence of Drosophila cyclin B has greater identity with B-type cyclins from other animal phyla than with Drosophila cyclin A, suggesting that the two cyclins have distinct roles that have been maintained in evolution. Cyclin A is not detectable in unfertilized eggs and is present at low levels prior to cellularization of the syncytial embryo. In contrast, the levels of cyclin B remain uniformly high throughout these developmental stages. In cells within cellularized embryos and the larval brain, cyclin A accumulates to peak levels in prophase and is degraded throughout the period in which chromosomes are becoming aligned on the metaphase plate. The degradation of cyclin B, on the other hand, does not occur until the metaphase-anaphase transition. In cells arrested at c-metaphase by treating with microtubule destabilizing drugs to prevent spindle formation, cyclin A has been degraded in the arrested cells, whereas cyclin B is maintained at high levels. These observations suggest that cyclin A has a role in the G2-M transition that is independent of spindle formation, and that entry into anaphase is a key requirement for the degradation of cyclin B. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2142452

  10. Two distinct roles of the yorkie/yap gene during homeostasis in the planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byulnim; An, Yang; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2015-04-01

    Adult planarians possess somatic pluripotent stem cells called neoblasts that give rise to all missing cell types during regeneration and homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that the Yorkie (Yki)/Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator family plays an important role in the regulation of tissue growth during development and regeneration, and therefore we investigated the role of a planarian yki-related gene (termed Djyki) during regeneration and homeostasis of the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica. We found that knockdown of the function of Djyki by RNA interference (RNAi) downregulated neoblast proliferation and caused regeneration defects after amputation. In addition, Djyki RNAi caused edema during homeostasis. These seemingly distinct defects induced by Djyki RNAi were rescued by simultaneous RNAi of a planarian mats-related gene (termed Djmats), suggesting an important role of Djmats in the negative regulation of Djyki, in accordance with the conservation of the functional relationship of these two genes during the course of evolution. Interestingly, Djyki RNAi did not prevent normal protonephridial structure, suggesting that Djyki RNAi induced the edema phenotype without affecting the excretory system. Further analyses revealed that increased expression of the D. japonica gene DjaquaporinA (DjaqpA), which belongs to a large gene family that encodes a water channel protein for the regulation of transcellular water flow, promoted the induction of edema, but not defects in neoblast dynamics, in Djyki(RNAi) animals. Thus, we conclude that Djyki plays two distinct roles in the regulation of active proliferation of stem cells and in osmotic water transport across the body surface in D. japonica.

  11. Distinct roles of the intraparietal sulcus and temporoparietal junction in attentional capture from distractor features: An individual differences approach.

    PubMed

    Painter, David R; Dux, Paul E; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-07-01

    Setting attention for an elementary visual feature, such as color or motion, results in greater spatial attentional "capture" from items with target compared with distractor features. Thus, capture is contingent on feature-based control settings. Neuroimaging studies suggest that this contingent attentional capture involves interactions between dorsal and ventral frontoparietal networks. To examine the distinct causal influences of these networks on contingent capture, we applied continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to alter neural excitability within the dorsal intraparietal sulcus (IPS), the ventral temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and a control site, visual area MT. Participants undertook an attentional capture task before and after stimulation, in which they made speeded responses to color-defined targets that were preceded by spatial cues in the target or distractor color. Cues appeared either at the target location (valid) or at a non-target location (invalid). Reaction times were slower for targets preceded by invalid compared with valid cues, demonstrating spatial attentional capture. Cues with the target color captured attention to a greater extent than those with the distractor color, consistent with contingent capture. Effects of cTBS were not evident at the group level, but emerged instead from analyses of individual differences. Target capture magnitude was positively correlated pre- and post-stimulation for all three cortical sites, suggesting that cTBS did not influence target capture. Conversely, distractor capture was positively correlated pre- and post-stimulation of MT, but uncorrelated for IPS and TPJ, suggesting that stimulation of IPS and TPJ selectively disrupted distractor capture. Additionally, the effects of IPS stimulation were predicted by pre-stimulation attentional capture, whereas the effects of TPJ stimulation were predicted by pre-stimulation distractor suppression. The results are consistent with the existence of distinct neural

  12. Differential localization of Mox-1 and Mox-2 proteins indicates distinct roles during development.

    PubMed

    Candia, A F; Wright, C V

    1996-12-01

    Transcript localizations for Mox genes have implicated this homeobox gene subfamily in the early steps of mesoderm formation. We have extended these studies by determining the protein expression profile of Mox-1 and Mox-2 during mouse development. The time of onset of Mox protein expression has been accurately obtained to provide clues as to their roles during gastrulation. Expression of Mox-1 protein is first detected in the newly formed mesoderm of primitive streak stage mouse embryos (7.5 days post-coitum, d.p.c.). In contrast, Mox-2 protein is first detected at 9.0 d.p.c. in thr already formed somites. Additionally, immunostaining reveals new and distinct areas of Mox expression in the branchial arches and limbs that were not reported in our previous mRNA localization analysis. Mouse Mox-2 antibodies cross-react specifically in similar embryonic tissues in chick indicating the conservation of function of Mox genes in vertebrates. These expression data suggest that the Mox genes function transiently in the formation of mesodermal and mesenchymal derivatives, after their initial specification, but before their overt differentiation. Furthermore, while there appears to be some overlap in protein expression between Mox-1 and Mox-2 during somitogenesis, unique areas of expression indicate several distinct roles for the Mox genes during development.

  13. Identification of entry-level competencies for associate degree radiographers as perceived by primary role definers

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify those competencies needed by Associate Degree Radiographers when they assume employment as entry-level practitioners. A second purpose of the study was to rank order the identified competencies within the role delineations recognized by the Essentials and Guidelines of an Accredited Educational Program for the Radiographer. These role delineations include: radiation protection, exercise discretion and judgment, emergency and life saving techniques, patient care and interpersonal communication, and role as professional member. A third purpose of the study was to examine the degree of consensus on role definition of entry-level competencies needed by Associate Degree Radiographers as perceived by primary role definers (such as employers, employees, and educators), and by other selected variables: age, sex, length of experience in radiologic technology, level of formal education, and place of employment. A major finding of this study was that respondents did not differ significantly in their ranking of entry-level competencies needed by Associate Degree Radiographers when the responses were analyzed according to position, age, sex, length of experience, level of education, or place of employment. Another important finding was that respondents considered all of the 63 competencies as important and needed by Associate Degree Radiographers upon initial employment.A major conclusion and recommendation of this study, in view of the high agreement on the rank ordering of competencies, was that these competencies should be included in a competency-based education model. It was further recommended that a three-way system of communication between employers, employees, and educators be considered in order to pool resources and to increase understanding of each position group's contribution and influence on entry-level Associate Degree Radiographers.

  14. Role of the observer in the scientific process in astrobiology and in defining life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2010-09-01

    The role of the observer in the scientific process has been studied in various contexts, including philosophical. It is notorious that the experiments are theory-loaded, that the observers pick and choose what they consider important based on their scientific and cultural backgrounds, and that the same phenomenon may be studied by different observers from different angles. In this paper we critically review various authors' views of the role of the observer in the scientific process, as they apply to astrobiology. Astrobiology is especially vulnerable to the role of the observer, since it is an interdisciplinary science. Thus, the backgrounds of the observers in the astrobiology field are even more heterogeneous than in the other sciences. The definition of life is also heavily influenced by the observer of life who injects his/her own prejudices in the process of observing and defining life. Such prejudices are often dictated by the state of science, instrumentation, and the science politics at the time, as well as the educational, scientific, cultural and other background of the observer.

  15. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme's conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions.

  16. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-05-14

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme's conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions.

  17. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme’s conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions. PMID:27179464

  18. Distinct roles of AKT isoforms in regulating β1-integrin activity, migration, and invasion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virtakoivu, Reetta; Pellinen, Teijo; Rantala, Juha K.; Perälä, Merja; Ivaska, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    AKT1 and AKT2 kinases have been shown to play opposite roles in breast cancer migration and invasion. In this study, an RNA interference screen for integrin activity inhibitors identified AKT1 as an inhibitor of β1-integrin activity in prostate cancer. Validation experiments investigating all three AKT isoforms demonstrated that, unlike in breast cancer, both AKT1 and AKT2 function as negative regulators of cell migration and invasion in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Down-regulation of AKT1 and AKT2, but not AKT3, induced activation of cell surface β1-integrins and enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion. Silencing of AKT1 and AKT2 also resulted in increased focal adhesion size. Importantly, the mechanisms involved in integrin activity regulation were distinct for the two AKT isoforms. Silencing of AKT1 relieved feedback suppression of the expression and activity of several receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR and MET, with established cross-talk with β1-integrins. Silencing of AKT2, on the other hand, induced up-regulation of the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family, and overexpression of miR-200 was sufficient to induce integrin activity and cell migration in PC3 cells. Taken together, these data define an inhibitory role for both AKT1 and AKT2 in prostate cancer migration and invasion and highlight the cell type–specific actions of AKT kinases in the regulation of cell motility. PMID:22809628

  19. Two Distinct Binding Modes Define the Interaction of Brox with the C-Terminal Tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2012-05-21

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic {alpha} helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an {alpha} helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem {beta}-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a {beta}-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins.

  20. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  1. Distinct transcriptional networks in quiescent myoblasts: a role for Wnt signaling in reversible vs. irreversible arrest.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sindhu; Sreenivas, Prethish; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Reddy, Vatrapu Rami; Shashidhara, Lingadahalli Subrahmanya; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Mylavarapu, Madhavi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Most cells in adult mammals are non-dividing: differentiated cells exit the cell cycle permanently, but stem cells exist in a state of reversible arrest called quiescence. In damaged skeletal muscle, quiescent satellite stem cells re-enter the cell cycle, proliferate and subsequently execute divergent programs to regenerate both post-mitotic myofibers and quiescent stem cells. The molecular basis for these alternative programs of arrest is poorly understood. In this study, we used an established myogenic culture model (C2C12 myoblasts) to generate cells in alternative states of arrest and investigate their global transcriptional profiles. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared G0 myoblasts with post-mitotic myotubes. Our findings define the transcriptional program of quiescent myoblasts in culture and establish that distinct gene expression profiles, especially of tumour suppressor genes and inhibitors of differentiation characterize reversible arrest, distinguishing this state from irreversibly arrested myotubes. We also reveal the existence of a tissue-specific quiescence program by comparing G0 C2C12 myoblasts to isogenic G0 fibroblasts (10T1/2). Intriguingly, in myoblasts but not fibroblasts, quiescence is associated with a signature of Wnt pathway genes. We provide evidence that different levels of signaling via the canonical Wnt pathway characterize distinct cellular states (proliferation vs. quiescence vs. differentiation). Moderate induction of Wnt signaling in quiescence is associated with critical properties such as clonogenic self-renewal. Exogenous Wnt treatment subverts the quiescence program and negatively affects clonogenicity. Finally, we identify two new quiescence-induced regulators of canonical Wnt signaling, Rgs2 and Dkk3, whose induction in G0 is required for clonogenic self-renewal. These results support the concept that active signal-mediated regulation of quiescence contributes to stem cell properties, and have implications for pathological

  2. Distinctive Role of Symbolic Number Sense in Mediating the Mathematical Abilities of Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hiniker, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Despite reports of mathematical talent in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), little is known about basic number processing abilities in affected children. We investigated number sense, the ability to rapidly assess quantity information, in 36 children with ASD and 61 typically developing controls. Numerical acuity was assessed using symbolic (Arabic numerals) as well as non-symbolic (dot array) formats. We found significant impairments in non-symbolic acuity in children with ASD, but symbolic acuity was intact. Symbolic acuity mediated the relationship between non-symbolic acuity and mathematical abilities only in children with ASD, indicating a distinctive role for symbolic number sense in the acquisition of mathematical proficiency in this group. Our findings suggest that symbolic systems may help children with ASD organize imprecise information. PMID:26659551

  3. Two Distinct Roles of Atlantic SSTs in ENSO Variability: North Tropical Atlantic SST and Atlantic Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Jong-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct roles of the Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), namely, the North Tropical Atlantic (NTA) SST and the Atlantic Nino, on the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability are investigated using the observational data from 1980 to 2010 and coupled model experiments. It appears that the NTA SST and the Atlantic Nino can be used as two independent predictors for predicting the development of ENSO events in the following season. Furthermore, they are likely to be linked to different types of El Nino events. Specifically, the NTA SST cooling during February, March, and April contributes to the central Pacific warming at the subsequent winter season, while the negative Atlantic Nino event during June, July, and August contributes to enhancing the eastern Pacific warming. The coupled model experiments support these results. With the aid of a lagged inverse relationship, the statistical forecast using two Atlantic indices can successfully predict various ENSO indices.

  4. Mmp1 and Mmp2 cooperatively induce Drosophila fat body cell dissociation with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qiangqiang; Liu, Yang; Liu, Hanhan; Li, Sheng

    2014-12-18

    During Drosophila metamorphosis, the single-cell layer of fat body tissues gradually dissociates into individual cells. Via a fat body-specific RNAi screen in this study, we found that two matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), Mmp1 and Mmp2, are both required for fat body cell dissociation. As revealed through a series of cellular, biochemical, molecular, and genetic experiments, Mmp1 preferentially cleaves DE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions, while Mmp2 preferentially degrades basement membrane (BM) components and thus destroy cell-BM junctions, resulting in the complete dissociation of the entire fat body tissues into individual cells. Moreover, several genetic interaction experiments demonstrated that the roles of Mmp1 and Mmp2 in this developmental process are cooperative. In conclusion, Mmp1 and Mmp2 induce fat body cell dissociation during Drosophila metamorphosis in a cooperative yet distinct manner, a finding that sheds light on the general mechanisms by which MMPs regulate tissue remodeling in animals.

  5. Crystal structures of the viral protease Npro imply distinct roles for the catalytic water in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zögg, Thomas; Sponring, Michael; Schindler, Sabrina; Koll, Maria; Schneider, Rainer; Brandstetter, Hans; Auer, Bernhard

    2013-06-04

    Npro is a key effector protein of pestiviruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and abolishes host cell antiviral defense mechanisms. Synthesized as the N-terminal part of the viral polyprotein, Npro releases itself via an autoproteolytic cleavage, triggering its immunological functions. However, the mechanisms of its proteolytic action and its immune escape were unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of Npro to 1.25 Å resolution. Structures of pre- and postcleavage intermediates identify three catalytically relevant elements. The trapping of the putative catalytic water reveals its distinct roles as a base, acid, and nucleophile. The presentation of the substrate further explains the enigmatic latency of the protease, ensuring a single in cis cleavage. Additionally, we identified a zinc-free, disulfide-linked conformation of the TRASH motif, an interaction hub of immune factors. The structure opens additional opportunities in utilizing Npro as an autocleaving fusion protein and as a pharmaceutical target.

  6. Optogenetic activation reveals distinct roles of PIP3 and Akt in adipocyte insulin action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingke; Nan, Di; Fan, Jiannan; Bogan, Jonathan S; Toomre, Derek

    2016-05-15

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4; also known as SLC2A4) resides on intracellular vesicles in muscle and adipose cells, and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway plays a major role in GLUT4 translocation; however, a challenge has been to unravel the potentially distinct contributions of PI3K and Akt (of which there are three isoforms, Akt1-Akt3) to overall insulin action. Here, we describe new optogenetic tools based on CRY2 and the N-terminus of CIB1 (CIBN). We used these 'Opto' modules to activate PI3K and Akt selectively in time and space in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We validated these tools using biochemical assays and performed live-cell kinetic analyses of IRAP-pHluorin translocation (IRAP is also known as LNPEP and acts as a surrogate marker for GLUT4 here). Strikingly, Opto-PIP3 largely mimicked the maximal effects of insulin stimulation, whereas Opto-Akt only partially triggered translocation. Conversely, drug-mediated inhibition of Akt only partially dampened the translocation response of Opto-PIP3 In spatial optogenetic studies, focal targeting of Akt to a region of the cell marked the sites where IRAP-pHluorin vesicles fused, supporting the idea that local Akt-mediated signaling regulates exocytosis. Taken together, these results indicate that PI3K and Akt play distinct roles, and that PI3K stimulates Akt-independent pathways that are important for GLUT4 translocation.

  7. Pulmonary collectins play distinct roles in host defense against Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Kojima, Takashi; Gasa, Shinsei; Saito, Atsushi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Takahashi, Motoko; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Sawada, Norimasa; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary collectins, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), play important roles in the innate immunity of the lung. Mycobacterium avium is one of the well-known opportunistic pathogens that can replicate within macrophages. We examined the effects of pulmonary collectins in host defense against M. avium infection achieved via direct interaction between bacteria and collectins. Although both pulmonary collectins bound to M. avium in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, these collectins revealed distinct ligand-binding specificity and biological activities. SP-A and SP-D bound to a methoxy group containing lipid and lipoarabinomannan, respectively. Binding of SP-D but not SP-A resulted in agglutination of M. avium. A chimeric protein with the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D, which chimera revealed a bouquet-like arrangement similar to SP-A, also agglutinated M. avium. The ligand specificity of the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D seems to be necessary for agglutination activity. The binding of SP-A strongly inhibited the growth of M. avium in culture media. Although pulmonary collectins did not increase membrane permeability of M. avium, they attenuated the metabolic rate of the bacteria. Observations under a scanning electron microscope revealed that SP-A almost completely covers bacterial surfaces, whereas SP-D binds to certain areas like scattered dots. These observations suggest that a distinct binding pattern of collectins correlates with the difference of their biological activities. Furthermore, the number of bacteria phagocytosed by macrophages was significantly increased in the presence of SP-D. These data indicate that pulmonary collectins play critical roles in host defense against M. avium.

  8. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-11-15

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca(2+) release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD.

  9. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca2+ release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD. PMID:27845775

  10. Annuity and lump-sum decisions in defined benefit plans: the role of plan rules.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudipto

    2013-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns about workers outliving their retirement savings, a key question-both as a matter of national retirement policy and understanding the potential role of plan design and education in influencing individual decision-making-is how many retiring workers actually choose to annuitize (to take a stream of lifetime income) vs. opting for a lump-sum payment. The key finding of this study is that differences in defined benefit (DB) plan rules or features result in very different annuitization rates in DB plans. In fact, the results show that the rate of annuitization varies directly with the degree to which plan rules restrict the ability to choose a partial or lump-sum distribution. This study shows that annuitization rates vary significantly across these different plan types, which makes any attempt to combine the annuitization rates across these different plan types uninformative. Combining all the plans across the years 2005-2010, workers who made their payout decision between ages 50 and 75 had a minimum job tenure of five years, a minimum account balance of $5,000, and had an annuitization rate of 65.8 percent. But within this group of workers, those who had no plan restrictions on a lump-sum distribution had an annuitization rate of only 27.3 percent. In all the years studied, plans with no lump-sum distribution (LSD) options have the highest annuitization rates, very close to 100 percent. Traditional defined benefit and cash balance plans with no restrictionson LSDs had the lowest annuitization rates. In 2010, the annuitization rate for all plans combined was 65.5 percent, while for plans with no LSD option it was 98.8 percent, but the annuitization rate for defined benefit plans with no restrictions on LSDs was 44.3 percent, while for cash balance plans with no restrictions on LSDs it was 22.3 percent. For older workers across most plan types, annuitization rates increase steadily with account balance, but this is not the case for younger

  11. Notch and VEGF pathways play distinct but complementary roles in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis is a validated strategy to treat cancer, with efficacy in controlling both primary tumor growth and metastasis. The role of the Notch family of proteins in tumor angiogenesis is still emerging, but recent data suggest that Notch signaling may function in the physiologic response to loss of VEGF signaling, and thus participate in tumor adaptation to VEGF inhibitors. Methods We asked whether combining Notch and VEGF blockade would enhance suppression of tumor angiogenesis and growth, using the NGP neuroblastoma model. NGP tumors were engineered to express a Notch1 decoy construct, which restricts Notch signaling, and then treated with either the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab or vehicle. Results Combining Notch and VEGF blockade led to blood vessel regression, increasing endothelial cell apoptosis and disrupting pericyte coverage of endothelial cells. Combined Notch and VEGF blockade did not affect tumor weight, but did additively reduce tumor viability. Conclusions Our results indicate that Notch and VEGF pathways play distinct but complementary roles in tumor angiogenesis, and show that concurrent blockade disrupts primary tumor vasculature and viability further than inhibition of either pathway alone. PMID:24066611

  12. Late adolescent girls' relationships with parents and romantic partner: the distinct role of mothers and fathers.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Miri; Mayseless, Ofra

    2008-12-01

    The distinct role of mothers and fathers in shaping the quality of relationships with romantic partner was explored. One hundred and twenty 17-year old girls were observed during their senior year in high school with each of their parents during a Revealed differences task [Allen, J. P., Hauser, S. T., Bell, K. L., Boykin, K. A., & Tate, D. C. (1994). Autonomy and relatedness coding system manual, version 2.01. Unpublished manual] and filled out questionnaires pertaining to their relationships with romantic partners. A year and a half later (7 months after conscription to compulsory military service) they again filled out questionnaires. Whereas self-reports did not distinguish between relations with mothers and fathers observational data revealed that relationships with each parent are associated with somewhat different aspects of the romantic relationship. Better quality of relationship with mother was associated with delays in the girl's entrance into sexual romantic relationships, and with better quality of romantic relationship concurrently whereas better quality of relationship with father was associated with better quality of romantic relationship once they are formed concurrently and longitudinally. The findings highlight the central role that mothers and fathers play in shaping the quality of the romantic relationships that late adolescent girls form and underscore the importance of using observational data as well as questionnaire data.

  13. Separate and distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue, lingual tissue and taste papilla development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Grosse, Ann S.; Iwatsuki, Ken; Mishina, Yuji; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Although canonical Wnt signaling is known to regulate taste papilla induction and numbers, roles for noncanonical Wnt pathways in tongue and taste papilla development have not been explored. With mutant mice and whole tongue organ cultures we demonstrate that Wnt5a protein and message are within anterior tongue mesenchyme across embryo stages from the initiation of tongue formation, through papilla placode appearance and taste papilla development. The Wnt5a mutant tongue is severely shortened, with an ankyloglossia, and lingual mesenchyme is disorganized. However, fungiform papilla morphology, number and innervation are preserved, as is expression of the papilla marker, Shh. These data demonstrate that the genetic regulation for tongue size and shape can be separated from that directing lingual papilla development. Preserved number of papillae in a shortened tongue results in an increased density of fungiform papillae in the mutant tongues. In tongue organ cultures, exogenous Wnt5a profoundly suppresses papilla formation and simultaneously decreases canonical Wnt signaling as measured by the TOPGAL reporter. These findings suggest that Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling to dictate papilla number and spacing. In all, distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue size, fungiform papilla patterning and development are shown and a necessary balance between non-canonical and canonical Wnt paths in regulating tongue growth and fungiform papillae is proposed in a model, through the Ror2 receptor. PMID:22024319

  14. Histone deacetylases play distinct roles in telomeric VSG expression site silencing in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-Ping; Kawahara, Taemi; Horn, David

    2010-09-01

    African trypanosomes evade the host immune response through antigenic variation, which is achieved by periodically expressing different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). VSG expression is monoallelic such that only one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs) is transcribed at a time. Epigenetic regulation is involved in VSG control but our understanding of the mechanisms involved remains incomplete. Histone deacetylases are potential drug targets for diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Here, using recombinant expression we show that the essential Trypanosoma brucei deacetylases, DAC1 (class I) and DAC3 (class II) display histone deacetylase activity. Both DAC1 and DAC3 are nuclear proteins in the bloodstream stage parasite, while only DAC3 remains concentrated in the nucleus in insect-stage cells. Consistent with developmentally regulated localization, DAC1 antagonizes SIR2rp1-dependent telomeric silencing only in the bloodstream form, indicating a conserved role in the control of silent chromatin domains. In contrast, DAC3 is specifically required for silencing at VSG ES promoters in both bloodstream and insect-stage cells. We conclude that DAC1 and DAC3 play distinct roles in subtelomeric gene silencing and that DAC3 represents the first readily druggable target linked to VSG ES control in the African trypanosome.

  15. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Timothy R; Loeff, Luuk; Westra, Edze R; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J J; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-04-02

    Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses-interference and priming-remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets.

  16. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  17. Distinct roles for lateral and medial anterior prefrontal cortex in contextual recollection.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jon S; Gilbert, Sam J; Owen, Adrian M; Fletcher, Paul C; Burgess, Paul W

    2005-07-01

    A key feature of human recollection is the ability to remember details of the context in which events were experienced, as well as details of the events themselves. Previous studies have implicated a number of regions of prefrontal cortex in contextual recollection, but the role of anterior prefrontal cortex has so far resisted detailed characterization. We used event-related functional MRI (fMRI) to contrast recollection of two forms of contextual information: 1) decisions one had previously made about stimuli (task memory) and 2) which of two temporally distinct lists those stimuli had been presented in (list memory). In addition, a retrieval cue manipulation permitted evaluation of the stage of the retrieval process in which the activated regions might be involved. The results indicated that anterior prefrontal cortex responded significantly more during recollection of task than list context details. Furthermore, activation profiles for lateral and medial aspects of anterior prefrontal cortex suggested differing roles in recollection. Lateral regions seem to be more involved in the early retrieval specification stages of recollection, with medial regions contributing to later stages (e.g., monitoring and verification).

  18. The Splice Isoforms of the Drosophila Ecdysis Triggering Hormone Receptor Have Developmentally Distinct Roles

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Feici; Mena, Wilson; Shi, Jonathan; Park, Dongkook; Diao, Fengqiu; Taghert, Paul; Ewer, John; White, Benjamin H.

    2016-01-01

    To grow, insects must periodically shed their exoskeletons. This process, called ecdysis, is initiated by the endocrine release of Ecdysis Trigger Hormone (ETH) and has been extensively studied as a model for understanding the hormonal control of behavior. Understanding how ETH regulates ecdysis behavior, however, has been impeded by limited knowledge of the hormone’s neuronal targets. An alternatively spliced gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (ETHR) that is activated by ETH has been identified, and several lines of evidence support a role in ecdysis for its A-isoform. The function of a second ETHR isoform (ETHRB) remains unknown. Here we use the recently introduced “Trojan exon” technique to simultaneously mutate the ETHR gene and gain genetic access to the neurons that express its two isoforms. We show that ETHRA and ETHRB are expressed in largely distinct subsets of neurons and that ETHRA- but not ETHRB-expressing neurons are required for ecdysis at all developmental stages. However, both genetic and neuronal manipulations indicate an essential role for ETHRB at pupal and adult, but not larval, ecdysis. We also identify several functionally important subsets of ETHR-expressing neurons including one that coexpresses the peptide Leucokinin and regulates fluid balance to facilitate ecdysis at the pupal stage. The general strategy presented here of using a receptor gene as an entry point for genetic and neuronal manipulations should be useful in establishing patterns of functional connectivity in other hormonally regulated networks. PMID:26534952

  19. Re-defining the Unique Roles for Eosinophils in Allergic Respiratory Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of eosinophils in the progression and resolution of allergic respiratory inflammation is poorly defined despite the commonality of their presence and in some cases their use as a biomarker for disease severity and/or symptom control. However, this ambiguity belies the wealth of insights that have recently been gained through the use of eosinophil-deficient/attenuated strains of mice that have demonstrated novel immunoregulatory and remodeling/repair functions for these cells in the lung following allergen provocation. Specifically, studies of eosinophil-deficient mice suggest that eosinophils contribute to events occurring in the lungs following allergen provocation at several key moments: (i) The initiating phase of events leading to Th2-polarized pulmonary inflammation, (ii) The suppression Th1/Th17 pathways in lung draining lymph nodes, (iii) The recruitment of effector Th2 T cells to the lung, and finally (iv) Mechanisms of inflammatory resolution that re-establish pulmonary homeostasis. These suggested functions have recently been confirmed and expanded upon using allergen provocation of an inducible eosinophil-deficient strain of mice (iPHIL) that demonstrated an eosinophil-dependent mechanism(s) leading to Th2 dominated immune responses in the presence of eosinophils in contrast to neutrophilic as well as mixed Th1/Th17/Th2 variant phenotypes in the absence of eosinophils. These findings highlighted that eosinophils are not exclusively downstream mediators controlled by T cells, dendritic cells (DC), and/or innate lymphocytic cells (ILC2). Instead, eosinophils appear to be more aptly described as significant contributors in complex interrelated pathways that lead to pulmonary inflammation and subsequently promote resolution and the re-establishment of homeostatic baseline. In this review we summarize and put into the context the evolving hypotheses that are now expanding our understanding of the roles eosinophils likely have in the lung

  20. Re-defining the unique roles for eosinophils in allergic respiratory inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, E A; Lee, N A; Lee, J J

    2014-09-01

    The role of eosinophils in the progression and resolution of allergic respiratory inflammation is poorly defined despite the commonality of their presence and in some cases their use as a biomarker for disease severity and/or symptom control. However, this ambiguity belies the wealth of insights that have recently been gained through the use of eosinophil-deficient/attenuated strains of mice that have demonstrated novel immunoregulatory and remodelling/repair functions for these cells in the lung following allergen provocation. Specifically, studies of eosinophil-deficient mice suggest that eosinophils contribute to events occurring in the lungs following allergen provocation at several key moments: (i) the initiating phase of events leading to Th2-polarized pulmonary inflammation, (ii) the suppression Th1/Th17 pathways in lung-draining lymph nodes, (iii) the recruitment of effector Th2 T cells to the lung, and finally, (iv) mechanisms of inflammatory resolution that re-establish pulmonary homoeostasis. These suggested functions have recently been confirmed and expanded upon using allergen provocation of an inducible eosinophil-deficient strain of mice (iPHIL) that demonstrated an eosinophil-dependent mechanism(s) leading to Th2 dominated immune responses in the presence of eosinophils in contrast to neutrophilic as well as mixed Th1/Th17/Th2 variant phenotypes in the absence of eosinophils. These findings highlighted that eosinophils are not exclusively downstream mediators controlled by T cells, dendritic cells (DC) and/or innate lymphocytic cells (ILC2). Instead, eosinophils appear to be more aptly described as significant contributors in complex interrelated pathways that lead to pulmonary inflammation and subsequently promote resolution and the re-establishment of homoeostatic baseline. In this review, we summarize and put into the context the evolving hypotheses that are now expanding our understanding of the roles eosinophils likely have in the lung

  1. The C. elegans Connectome Consists of Homogenous Circuits with Defined Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Azulay, Aharon; Zaslaver, Alon

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of systems neuroscience is to decipher the structure-function relationship in neural networks. Here we study network functionality in light of the common-neighbor-rule (CNR) in which a pair of neurons is more likely to be connected the more common neighbors it shares. Focusing on the fully-mapped neural network of C. elegans worms, we establish that the CNR is an emerging property in this connectome. Moreover, sets of common neighbors form homogenous structures that appear in defined layers of the network. Simulations of signal propagation reveal their potential functional roles: signal amplification and short-term memory at the sensory/inter-neuron layer, and synchronized activity at the motoneuron layer supporting coordinated movement. A coarse-grained view of the neural network based on homogenous connected sets alone reveals a simple modular network architecture that is intuitive to understand. These findings provide a novel framework for analyzing larger, more complex, connectomes once these become available. PMID:27606684

  2. Distinct Roles for Interfacial Hydration in Site-Specific DNA Recognition by ETS-Family Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Xhani, Suela; Esaki, Shingo; Huang, Kenneth; Erlitzki, Noa; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-03-15

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. Unlike other ETS homologs, such as Ets-1, DNA recognition by PU.1 is highly sensitive to its osmotic environment due to excess interfacial hydration in the complex. To interrogate interfacial hydration in the two homologs, we mutated a highly conserved tyrosine residue, which is exclusively engaged in coordinating a well-defined water contact between the protein and DNA among ETS proteins, to phenylalanine. The loss of this water-mediated contact blunted the osmotic sensitivity of PU.1/DNA binding, but did not alter binding under normo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that PU.1 has evolved to maximize osmotic sensitivity. The homologous mutation in Ets-1, which was minimally sensitive to osmotic stress due to a sparsely hydrated interface, reduced DNA-binding affinity at normal osmolality but the complex became stabilized by osmotic stress. Molecular dynamics simulations of wildtype and mutant PU.1 and Ets-1 in their free and DNA-bound states, which recapitulated experimental features of the proteins, showed that abrogation of this tyrosine-mediated water contact perturbed the Ets-1/DNA complex not through disruption of interfacial hydration, but by inhibiting local dynamics induced specifically in the bound state. Thus, a configurationally identical water-mediated contact plays mechanistically distinct roles in mediating DNA recognition by structurally homologous ETS transcription factors.

  3. The role of self-other distinction in understanding others' mental and emotional states: neurocognitive mechanisms in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Steinbeis, Nikolaus

    2016-01-19

    Social interactions come with the fundamental problem of trying to understand others' mental and affective states while under the overpowering influence of one's own concurrent thoughts and feelings. The ability to distinguish between simultaneous representations of others' current experiences as well as our own is crucial to navigate our complex social environments successfully. The developmental building blocks of this ability and how this is given rise to by functional and structural brain development remains poorly understood. In this review, I outline some of the key findings on the role of self-other distinction in understanding others' mental as well as emotional states in children and adults. I will begin by clarifying the crucial role for self-other distinction in avoiding egocentric attributions of one's own cognitive as well as affective states to others in adults and outline the underlying neural circuitry in overcoming such egocentricity. This will provide the basis for a discussion of the emergence of self-other distinction in early childhood as well as developmental changes therein throughout childhood and into adulthood. I will demonstrate that self-other distinction of cognitive and emotional states is already dissociable early in development. Concomitantly, I will show that processes of self-other distinction in cognitive and affective domains rely on adjacent but distinct neural circuitry each with unique connectivity profiles, presumably related to the nature of the distinction that needs to be made.

  4. Components of the Engulfment Machinery Have Distinct Roles in Corpse Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Tracy L.; Joudi, Tony F.; Timmons, Allison K.; Taylor, Jeffrey D.; Habib, Corey S.; Peterson, Jeanne S.; Emmanuel, Shanan; Franc, Nathalie C.; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Billions of cells die in our bodies on a daily basis and are engulfed by phagocytes. Engulfment, or phagocytosis, can be broken down into five basic steps: attraction of the phagocyte, recognition of the dying cell, internalization, phagosome maturation, and acidification. In this study, we focus on the last two steps, which can collectively be considered corpse processing, in which the engulfed material is degraded. We use the Drosophila ovarian follicle cells as a model for engulfment of apoptotic cells by epithelial cells. We show that engulfed material is processed using the canonical corpse processing pathway involving the small GTPases Rab5 and Rab7. The phagocytic receptor Draper is present on the phagocytic cup and on nascent, phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P)- and Rab7-positive phagosomes, whereas integrins are maintained on the cell surface during engulfment. Due to the difference in subcellular localization, we investigated the role of Draper, integrins, and downstream signaling components in corpse processing. We found that some proteins were required for internalization only, while others had defects in corpse processing as well. This suggests that several of the core engulfment proteins are required for distinct steps of engulfment. We also performed double mutant analysis and found that combined loss of draper and αPS3 still resulted in a small number of engulfed vesicles. Therefore, we investigated another known engulfment receptor, Crq. We found that loss of all three receptors did not inhibit engulfment any further, suggesting that Crq does not play a role in engulfment by the follicle cells. A more complete understanding of how the engulfment and corpse processing machinery interact may enable better understanding and treatment of diseases associated with defects in engulfment by epithelial cells. PMID:27347682

  5. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Craik, Charles S.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events. PMID:27006500

  6. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Knudsen, Giselle M; Craik, Charles S; Wells, James A

    2016-04-05

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events.

  7. GDP-mannose transporter paralogues play distinct roles in polarized growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Hayes, Loretta; Hill, Terry W; Loprete, Darlene M; Gordon, Barbara S; Groover, Chassidy J; Johnson, Laura R; Martin, Stuart A

    2010-01-01

    GDP-mannose transporters (GMT) carry GDP-mannose nucleotide sugars from the cytosol across the Golgi apparatus membrane for use as substrates in protein glycosylation in plants, animals and fungi. Genomes of some fungal species, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contain only one gene encoding a GMT, while others, including Aspergillus nidulans, contain two (gmtA and gmtB). We previously showed that cell wall integrity and normal hyphal morphogenesis in A. nidulans depend upon the function of GmtA and that GmtA localizes to a Golgi-like compartment. Cells bearing the calI11 mutation in gmtA also have reduced cell surface mannosylation. Here we show that GmtB colocalizes with GmtA, suggesting that the role of GmtB is similar to that of GmtA, although the respective transcript levels differ during spore germination and early development. Transcript levels of gmtB are high in ungerminated spores and remain so throughout the first 16 h of germination. In contrast, transcript levels of gmrtA are negligible in ungerminated spores but increase to levels comparable to those of gmtB during germination. These observations suggest that although GmtA and GmtB reside within the same subcellular compartments, they nevertheless perform distinct functions at different stages of development.

  8. Distinct Roles of Chromatin Insulator Proteins in Control of the Drosophila Bithorax Complex.

    PubMed

    Savitsky, Mikhail; Kim, Maria; Kravchuk, Oksana; Schwartz, Yuri B

    2016-02-01

    Chromatin insulators are remarkable regulatory elements that can bring distant genomic sites together and block unscheduled enhancer-promoter communications. Insulators act via associated insulator proteins of two classes: sequence-specific DNA binding factors and "bridging" proteins. The latter are required to mediate interactions between distant insulator elements. Chromatin insulators are critical for correct expression of complex loci; however, their mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we use the Drosophila bithorax complex as a model to investigate the roles of the bridging proteins Cp190 and Mod(mdg4). The bithorax complex consists of three evolutionarily conserved homeotic genes Ubx, abd-A, and Abd-B, which specify anterior-posterior identity of the last thoracic and all abdominal segments of the fly. Looking at effects of CTCF, mod(mdg4), and Cp190 mutations on expression of the bithorax complex genes, we provide the first functional evidence that Mod(mdg4) acts in concert with the DNA binding insulator protein CTCF. We find that Mod(mdg4) and Cp190 are not redundant and may have distinct functional properties. We, for the first time, demonstrate that Cp190 is critical for correct regulation of the bithorax complex and show that Cp190 is required at an exceptionally strong Fub insulator to partition the bithorax complex into two topological domains.

  9. Distinctive roles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hyperlipidemic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Chang, Ming-Chu; Tung, Chien-Chih; Wei, Shu-Chen; Wong, Jau-Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how the saturated and unsaturated fatty acid composition influences the susceptibility of developing acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Primary pancreatic acinar cells were treated with low and high concentrations of different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ signal and the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured after treatment. RESULTS: Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations, including oleic acid, linoleic acid, palmitoleic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid, induced a persistent rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at low concentrations and saturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, stearic acid, and triglycerides, at low and high concentrations were unable to induce a rise in Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations but not saturated fatty acids induced intra-acinar cell trypsin activation and cell damage and increased PKC expression. CONCLUSION: At sufficiently high concentrations, unsaturated fatty acids were able to induce acinar cells injury and promote the development of pancreatitis. Unsaturated fatty acids may play a distinctive role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis through the activation of PKC family members. PMID:26327761

  10. CRMP1 and CRMP2 have synergistic but distinct roles in dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Hiroko; Nakai, Shiori; Ohkubo, Wataru; Yamashita, Naoya; Nakamura, Fumio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Jitsuki-Takahashi, Aoi; Nakamura, Haruko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Akase, Tomoko; Kolattukudy, Pappachan; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-09-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 2, CRMP2, has been identified as an intracellular signaling mediator for Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A). CRMP2 plays a key role in axon guidance, dendritic morphogenesis, and cell polarization. It has been also implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the in vivo functions of CRMP2 remain unknown. We generated CRMP2 gene-deficient (crmp2(-/-) ) mice. The crmp2(-/-) mice showed irregular development of dendritic spines in cortical neurons. The density of dendritic spines was reduced in the cortical layer V pyramidal neurons of crmp2(-/-) mice as well as in those of sema3A(-/-) and crmp1(-/-) mice. However, no abnormality was found in dendritic patterning in crmp2(-/-) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. The level of CRMP1 was increased in crmp2(-/-) , but the level of CRMP2 was not altered in crmp1(-/-) compared to WT cortical brain lysates. Dendritic spine density and branching were reduced in double-heterozygous sema3A(+/-) ;crmp2(+/-) and sema3A(+/-) ;crmp1(+/-) mice. The phenotypic defects had no genetic interaction between crmp1 and crmp2. These findings suggest that both CRMP1 and CRMP2 mediate Sema3A signaling to regulate dendritic spine maturation and patterning, but through overlapping and distinct signaling pathways.

  11. Distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the action of DDT and pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Frank D; Du, Yuzhe; Tolinski, Josh; Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav channels) are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system and are the primary targets of the insecticides DDT and pyrethroids. In Drosophila melanogaster, besides the canonical Nav channel, Para (also called DmNav), there is a sodium channel-like cation channel called DSC1 (Drosophila sodium channel 1). Temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations in DmNav (para(ts)) confer resistance to DDT and pyrethroids, whereas DSC1 knockout flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to pyrethroids. To further define the roles and interaction of DmNav and DSC1 channels in DDT and pyrethroid neurotoxicology, we generated a DmNav/DSC1 double mutant line by introducing a para(ts1) allele (carrying the I265N mutation) into a DSC1 knockout line. We confirmed that the I265N mutation reduced the sensitivity to two pyrethroids, permethrin and deltamethrin of a DmNav variant expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Computer modeling predicts that the I265N mutation confers pyrethroid resistance by allosterically altering the second pyrethroid receptor site on the DmNav channel. Furthermore, we found that I265N-mediated pyrethroid resistance in para(ts1) mutant flies was almost completely abolished in para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies. Unexpectedly, however, the DSC1 knockout flies were less sensitive to DDT, compared to the control flies (w(1118A)), and the para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies were even more resistant to DDT compared to the DSC1 knockout or para(ts1) mutant. Our findings revealed distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the neurotoxicology of DDT vs. pyrethroids and implicate the exciting possibility of using DSC1 channel blockers or modifiers in the management of pyrethroid resistance.

  12. Distinct Roles of the DmNav and DSC1 Channels in the Action of DDT and Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Du, Yuzhe; Tolinski, Josh; Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav channels) are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system and are the primary targets of the insecticides DDT and pyrethroids. In Drosophila melanogaster, besides the canonical Nav channel, Para (also called DmNav), there is a sodium channel-like cation channel called DSC1 (Drosophila sodium channel 1). Temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations in DmNav (parats) confer resistance to DDT and pyrethroids, whereas DSC1 knockout flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to pyrethroids. To further define the roles and interaction of DmNav and DSC1 channels in DDT and pyrethroid neurotoxicology, we generated a DmNav/DSC1 double mutant line by introducing a parats1 allele (carrying the I265N mutation) into a DSC1 knockout line. We confirmed that the I265N mutation reduced the sensitivity to two pyrethroids, permethrin and deltamethrin of a DmNav variant expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Computer modeling predicts that the I265N mutation confers pyrethroid resistance by allosterically altering the second pyrethroid receptor site on the DmNav channel. Furthermore, we found that I265N-mediated pyrethroid resistance in parats1 mutant flies was almost completely abolished in parats1;DSC1−/− double mutant flies. Unexpectedly, however, the DSC1 knockout flies were less sensitive to DDT, compared to the control flies (w1118A), and the parats1;DSC1−/− double mutant flies were even more resistant to DDT compared to the DSC1 knockout or parats1 mutant. Our findings revealed distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the neurotoxicology of DDT vs. pyrethroids and implicate the exciting possibility of using DSC1 channel blockers or modifiers in the management of pyrethroid resistance. PMID:25687544

  13. Assembly of RecA-like recombinases: Distinct roles for mediator proteins in mitosis and meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gasior, Stephen L.; Olivares, Heidi; Ear, Uy; Hari, Danielle M.; Weichselbaum, Ralph; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2001-01-01

    Members of the RecA family of recombinases from bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, yeast, and higher eukaryotes function in recombination as higher-order oligomers assembled on tracts of single-strand DNA (ssDNA). Biochemical studies have shown that assembly of recombinase involves accessory factors. These studies have identified a class of proteins, called recombination mediator proteins, that act by promoting assembly of recombinase on ssDNA tracts that are bound by ssDNA-binding protein (ssb). In the absence of mediators, ssb inhibits recombination reactions by competing with recombinase for DNA-binding sites. Here we briefly review mediated recombinase assembly and present results of new in vivo experiments. Immuno-double-staining experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest that Rad51, the eukaryotic recombinase, can assemble at or near sites containing ssb (replication protein A, RPA) during the response to DNA damage, consistent with a need for mediator activity. Correspondingly, mediator gene mutants display defects in Rad51 assembly after DNA damage and during meiosis, although the requirements for assembly are distinct in the two cases. In meiosis, both Rad52 and Rad55/57 are required, whereas either Rad52 or Rad55/57 is sufficient to promote assembly of Rad51 in irradiated mitotic cells. Rad52 promotes normal amounts of Rad51 assembly in the absence of Rad55 at 30°C but not 20°C, accounting for the cold sensitivity of rad55 null mutants. Finally, we show that assembly of Rad51 is induced by radiation during S phase but not during G1, consistent with the role of Rad51 in repairing the spontaneous damage that occurs during DNA replication. PMID:11459983

  14. Distinct Roles for CdtA and CdtC during Intoxication by Cytolethal Distending Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Tamilselvam, Batcha; Spiegelman, Lindsey M.; Son, Sophia B.; Eshraghi, Aria; Blanke, Steven R.; Bradley, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are heterotrimeric protein exotoxins produced by a diverse array of Gram-negative pathogens. The enzymatic subunit, CdtB, possesses DNase and phosphatidylinositol 3-4-5 trisphosphate phosphatase activities that induce host cell cycle arrest, cellular distension and apoptosis. To exert cyclomodulatory and cytotoxic effects CDTs must be taken up from the host cell surface and transported intracellularly in a manner that ultimately results in localization of CdtB to the nucleus. However, the molecular details and mechanism by which CDTs bind to host cells and exploit existing uptake and transport pathways to gain access to the nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we report that CdtA and CdtC subunits of CDTs derived from Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT) and enteropathogenic E. coli (Ec-CDT) are independently sufficient to support intoxication by their respective CdtB subunits. CdtA supported CdtB-mediated killing of T-cells and epithelial cells that was nearly as efficient as that observed with holotoxin. In contrast, the efficiency by which CdtC supported intoxication was dependent on the source of the toxin as well as the target cell type. Further, CdtC was found to alter the subcellular trafficking of Ec-CDT as determined by sensitivity to EGA, an inhibitor of endosomal trafficking, colocalization with markers of early and late endosomes, and the kinetics of DNA damage response. Finally, host cellular cholesterol was found to influence sensitivity to intoxication mediated by Ec-CdtA, revealing a role for cholesterol or cholesterol-rich membrane domains in intoxication mediated by this subunit. In summary, data presented here support a model in which CdtA and CdtC each bind distinct receptors on host cell surfaces that direct alternate intracellular uptake and/or trafficking pathways. PMID:26618479

  15. Distinct Roles for CdtA and CdtC during Intoxication by Cytolethal Distending Toxins.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Shandee D; Huynh, Melanie M; Tamilselvam, Batcha; Spiegelman, Lindsey M; Son, Sophia B; Eshraghi, Aria; Blanke, Steven R; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are heterotrimeric protein exotoxins produced by a diverse array of Gram-negative pathogens. The enzymatic subunit, CdtB, possesses DNase and phosphatidylinositol 3-4-5 trisphosphate phosphatase activities that induce host cell cycle arrest, cellular distension and apoptosis. To exert cyclomodulatory and cytotoxic effects CDTs must be taken up from the host cell surface and transported intracellularly in a manner that ultimately results in localization of CdtB to the nucleus. However, the molecular details and mechanism by which CDTs bind to host cells and exploit existing uptake and transport pathways to gain access to the nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we report that CdtA and CdtC subunits of CDTs derived from Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT) and enteropathogenic E. coli (Ec-CDT) are independently sufficient to support intoxication by their respective CdtB subunits. CdtA supported CdtB-mediated killing of T-cells and epithelial cells that was nearly as efficient as that observed with holotoxin. In contrast, the efficiency by which CdtC supported intoxication was dependent on the source of the toxin as well as the target cell type. Further, CdtC was found to alter the subcellular trafficking of Ec-CDT as determined by sensitivity to EGA, an inhibitor of endosomal trafficking, colocalization with markers of early and late endosomes, and the kinetics of DNA damage response. Finally, host cellular cholesterol was found to influence sensitivity to intoxication mediated by Ec-CdtA, revealing a role for cholesterol or cholesterol-rich membrane domains in intoxication mediated by this subunit. In summary, data presented here support a model in which CdtA and CdtC each bind distinct receptors on host cell surfaces that direct alternate intracellular uptake and/or trafficking pathways.

  16. Defining and Identifying Hard-to-Staff Schools: The Role of School Demographics and Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, Darleen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study makes a distinction between a school having high attrition and one having difficulties in hiring. It does so by exploring the relationship between definitions of hard-to-staff schools, school demographics, and school conditions that are often associated with a school being hard-to-staff. Research Design: The study relies on a…

  17. Tricho- and atrichoblast cell files show distinct PIN2 auxin efflux carrier exploitations and are jointly required for defined auxin-dependent root organ growth.

    PubMed

    Löfke, Christian; Scheuring, David; Dünser, Kai; Schöller, Maria; Luschnig, Christian; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a vital growth regulator in plants. In the root epidermis auxin steers root organ growth. However, the mechanisms that allow adjacent tissues to integrate growth are largely unknown. Here, the focus is on neighbouring epidermal root tissues to assess the integration of auxin-related growth responses. The pharmacologic, genetic, and live-cell imaging approaches reveal that PIN2 auxin efflux carriers are differentially controlled in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. PIN2 proteins show lower abundance at the plasma membrane of trichoblast cells, despite showing higher rates of intracellular trafficking in these cells. The data suggest that PIN2 proteins display distinct cell-type-dependent trafficking rates to the lytic vacuole for degradation. Based on this insight, it is hypothesized that auxin-dependent processes are distinct in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. Moreover, genetic interference with epidermal patterning supports this assumption and suggests that tricho- and atrichoblasts have distinct importance for auxin-sensitive root growth and gravitropic responses.

  18. Distinct roles for Cav2.1–2.3 in activity-dependent synaptic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ricoy, Ulises M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission throughout most of the CNS is steeply dependent on presynaptic calcium influx through the voltage-gated calcium channels Cav2.1–Cav2.3. In addition to triggering exocytosis, this calcium influx also recruits short-term synaptic plasticity. During the complex patterns of presynaptic activity that occur in vivo, several forms of plasticity combine to generate a synaptic output that is dynamic, in which the size of a given excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in response to a given spike depends on the short-term history of presynaptic activity. It remains unclear whether the different Cav2 channels play distinct roles in defining these synaptic dynamics and, if so, under what conditions different Cav2 family members most effectively determine synaptic output. We examined these questions by measuring the effects of calcium channel-selective toxins on synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral synapse in hippocampal slices from adult mice in response to both low-frequency stimulation and complex stimulus trains derived from in vivo recordings. Blockade of Cav2.1 had a greater inhibitory effect on synaptic transmission during low-frequency components of the stimulus train than on synaptic transmission during high-frequency components of the train, indicating that Cav2.1 had a greater fractional contribution to synaptic transmission at low frequencies than at high frequencies. Relative to Cav2.1, Cav2.2 had a disproportionately reduced contribution to synaptic transmission at frequencies >20 Hz, while Cav2.3 had a disproportionately increased contribution to synaptic transmission at frequencies >1 Hz. These activity-dependent effects of different Cav2 family members shape the filtering characteristics of GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition. Thus different Cav2 channels vary in their coupling to synaptic transmission over different frequency ranges, with consequences for the frequency tuning of both synaptic dynamics and

  19. Learning of Syllable-Object Relations by Preverbal Infants: The Role of Temporal Synchrony and Syllable Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogate, Lakshmi J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of temporal synchrony and syllable distinctiveness in preverbal infants' learning of word-object relations was investigated. In Experiment 1, 7- and 8-month-olds (N=64) were habituated under conditions where two "similar-sounding" syllables, /tah/ and /gah/, were spoken simultaneously with the motions of one of two sets of…

  20. Building Turnaround Capacity for Urban School Improvement: The Role of Adaptive Leadership and Defined Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the levels of and relationships between technical leadership, adaptive leadership, and defined autonomy among Denver school leaders along with their combined effects on school growth gains over time. Thirty principals provided complete responses to an online survey that included existing scales for technical leadership,…

  1. Perceived Career Paths and Performance in Moderately Defined Roles: A Study of Project Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carden, Lila; Egan, Toby Marshall; Callahan, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Those working in jobs not clearly defined as professions often rely on organizational signals to formulate reactions regarding their jobs and career futures. Responses from 644 project managers were used to test a hypothesized Path Reaction Performance Model. Findings suggest that the relationship between perceived career path and performance is…

  2. Exploring the Role of Space-Defining Objects in Constructing and Maintaining Imagined Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullally, Sinead L.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been observed that certain objects, when viewed or imagined in isolation, evoke a strong sense of three-dimensional local space surrounding them (space-defining (SD) objects), while others do not (space-ambiguous (SA) objects), and this is associated with engagement of the parahippocampal cortex (PHC). But activation of the PHC is…

  3. Defining a Successful Leadership Pathway: Women in Academia and the Role of Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sheila A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in the literature have demonstrated underrepresentation of women in higher education leadership. Nonetheless, women leaders have achieved success when they received strong institutional support. However, even with supportive institutional policies like family leave, there was a need for mapping a more defined career pathway for aspiring…

  4. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    plan, a pattern of behaviour that mirrors the impulsivity described clinically in some patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate distinct mechanisms for two important facets of human decision making: first, a role for dopamine in memory consolidation, and second, the critical importance of the subthalamic nucleus in successful decision making when multiple pieces of information must be combined. PMID:23114368

  5. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Elizabeth J; Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L

    2012-12-01

    pattern of behaviour that mirrors the impulsivity described clinically in some patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate distinct mechanisms for two important facets of human decision making: first, a role for dopamine in memory consolidation, and second, the critical importance of the subthalamic nucleus in successful decision making when multiple pieces of information must be combined.

  6. How Do Students Define Their Roles and Responsibilities in Online Learning Group Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Karen C.; Morgan, Kari; Cameron, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the processes of group role formation in online class settings. Qualitative analysis was used to code chat logs and discussion threads in six undergraduate Family and Consumer Sciences online courses that required online group projects. Four themes related to the process of group role formation emerged:…

  7. Alternatively spliced type II procollagen mRNAs define distinct populations of cells during vertebral development: differential expression of the amino-propeptide

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage providing structural integrity to the tissue. Type II procollagen can be expressed in two forms by differential splicing of the primary gene transcript. The two mRNAs either include (type IIA) or exclude (type IIB) an exon (exon 2) encoding the major portion of the amino (NH2)-propeptide (Ryan, M. C., and L. J. Sandell. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:10334-10339). The expression of the two procollagens was examined in order to establish a potential functional significance for the two type II procollagen mRNAs. First, to establish whether the two mRNAs are functional, we showed that both mRNAs can be translated and the proteins secreted into the extracellular environment. Both proteins were identified as type II procollagens. Secondly, to test the hypothesis that differential expression of type II procollagens may be a marker for a distinct population of cells, specific procollagen mRNAs were localized in tissue by in situ hybridization to oligonucleotides spanning the exon junctions. Embryonic vertebral column was chosen as a source of tissue undergoing rapid chondrogenesis, allowing the examination of a variety of cell types related to cartilage. In this issue, each procollagen mRNA had a distinct tissue distribution during chondrogenesis with type IIB expressed in chondrocytes and type IIA expressed in cells surrounding cartilage in prechondrocytes. The morphology of the cells expressing the two collagen types was distinct: the cells expressing type IIA are narrow, elongated, and "fibroblastic" in appearance while the cells expressing type IIB are large and round. The expression of type IIB appears to be correlated with abundant synthesis and accumulation of cartilagenous extracellular matrix. The expression of type IIB is spatially correlated with the high level expression of the cartilage proteoglycan, aggrecan, establishing type IIB procollagen and aggrecan as markers for the chondrocyte phenotype. Transcripts of

  8. Defining Cyber and Focusing the Military’s Role in Cyberspace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    fraud; child pornography ; and infringements of copyright and related rights. Unlike cyber crime, the definition of cyber war is not neatly defined or...over electronic media (e.g., child sexual abuse material or incitement to racial hatred); 3) crimes unique to electronic networks (e.g., attacks... child sexual abuse material” only. Second, “computer systems and electronic networks” should replace “electronic communication networks and information

  9. Role of Importance and Distinctiveness of Semantic Features in People with Aphasia: A Replication Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason-Baughman, Mary Beth; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that people with aphasia have incomplete lexical-semantic representations with decreased low-importance distinctive (LID) feature knowledge. In addition, decreased LID feature knowledge correlates with ability to discriminate among semantically related words. The current study seeks to replicate and extend previous…

  10. The role of petrology in defining volcanic hazards and designing monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. E.; Turner, M. B.; Price, R. C.; Cronin, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Petrology is the study of magmatic systems; physical volcanology investigates processes of eruption. Physical volcanology provides the pre-eminent underpinning of the practical business of defining hazard scenarios, planning mitigation and designing monitoring strategies. Recent research in a variety of volcanic settings has demonstrated an important link between the petrologic processes that at a fundamental level drive the behavior of volcanoes and the processes that determine the eruptive style of a volcano. Together these define the hazards that arise from volcanic eruptions. Petrological studies of volcanoes are typically based on a study of lava because coherent rock is less vulnerable to weathering and alteration and is more durable in the geological record. Pyroclastic materials are commonly friable and glassy, are more easily eroded, and are more difficult to use in the analytical techniques that have become the staple basis of petrological studies. However, pyroclastic materials represent a complementary but different part of the magmatic story and it is only by integrating both effusive and explosive components of an eruption sequence that a complete picture of the behavior of the system feeding a volcano can be gained. Andesitic strato-cones are made up of a cone-building facies consisting mainly of primary magmatic products and usually dominated by lava flows because pyroclastic material is easily eroded from the slopes of a steep cone. The surrounding ring plain facies includes primary pyroclastic deposits but is typically dominated by redistributed material in the form of debris flow and lahar deposits together with reworked fluvial material. The deposits of each of these two facies are assembled on different time scales and they contain different aspects of the record of the evolution of the magmatic system that gave rise to them. An important practical consequence of this is that different parts of the geochemical record of the system can occur in

  11. Distinct H3F3A and H3F3B driver variants define chondroblastoma and giant cell tumour of bone

    PubMed Central

    Presneau, Nadège; Scheipl, Susanne; Pillay, Nischalan; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Cooke, Susanna L; Gundem, Gunes; Davies, Helen; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Martin, Sancha; McLaren, Stuart; Goodie, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Butler, Adam; Teague, Jon W; Halai, Dina; Khatri, Bhavisha; Myklebost, Ola; Baumhoer, Daniel; Jundt, Gernot; Hamoudi, Rifat; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2013-01-01

    It is recognised that some mutated cancer genes contribute to the development of many cancer types whilst others are cancer-type specific. Amongst genes that affect multiple cancer classes, mutations are usually similar in the different cancer types. Here, however, we observed exquisite tumour-type specificity of different histone 3.3 driver mutations. In 73/77 (95%) cases of chondroblastoma we found K36M mutations predominantly in H3F3B, which is one of two genes encoding histone 3.3. By contrast, 92% (49/53) of giant cell tumours of bone harboured histone 3.3 variants exclusively in H3F3A, which were G34W or, in one case, G34L. The mutations were restricted to the stromal cell population and not detected in osteoclasts or their precursors. In the context of previously reported H3F3A K27M and G34R/V mutations of childhood brain tumours, a remarkable picture of tumour-type specificity of histone 3.3 mutations emerges, indicating distinct functions of histone 3.3 residues, mutations and genes. PMID:24162739

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif defines a distinct class of α/β epoxide hydrolases utilizing a His/Tyr ring-opening pair.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Madden, Dean R

    2012-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that secretes a multitude of virulence factors during the course of infection. Among these is Cif, an epoxide hydrolase (EH) that reduces the functional localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in epithelial cells. In addition to being the first reported EH virulence factor, Cif possesses unique sequence deviations from canonical EH motifs. Foremost among these is the substitution of a histidine for the first epoxide ring-opening tyrosine in the active site. To test the functional equivalence of Tyr and His side chains at this position, we have generated the mutant Cif-H177Y. Structural analysis confirms that both the WT His and mutant Tyr side chains can be accommodated without large-scale conformational changes. However, the Tyr mutant is functionally inactive. Based on a detailed analysis of the structure of the Tyr mutant, it appears that Cif's main-chain conformation imposes a functional requirement for a His at this position. Comparison with canonical EH structures reveals additional conformational differences, which are coupled to divergent sequence characteristics. When used to probe the genomes of other opportunistic pathogens, these sequence-structure criteria uncover candidate sequences that appear to form a distinct subfamily of Cif-like epoxide hydrolases characterized by a conserved His/Tyr ring-opening pair.

  13. Four Leadership Teams Define Their Roles Within Organizational and Political Structures To Improve Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrispeels, Janet H.; Martin, Kathleen J.

    2002-01-01

    Using dual conceptual lenses of open-systems and micropolitics, investigates how four middle-school teams engage with their colleagues to construct an identity, assume leadership roles, and situate themselves in their schools. Findings suggest that teams and educational leaders need to recognize the influence of existing organizational structures…

  14. Defining and Activating the Role of Department Chair as Instructional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Carolyn; Salisbury, Jason

    2013-01-01

    With strong connection to schoolwide policy and vision and to the realities of the daily life of teachers and students, the department chair is uniquely positioned to play an important role in advancing instructional effectiveness (Printy, 2008; Weller, 2001). This article provides an in-depth look at the efforts of three urban comprehensive high…

  15. On the roles of distinctiveness and semantic expectancies in episodic encoding of emotional words.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Siri-Maria; Potts, Geoffrey F; Donchin, Emanuel

    2015-12-01

    We examined the factors that contribute to enhanced recall for emotionally arousing words by analyzing behavioral performance, the P300 as an index of distinctiveness, and the N400 as an index of semantic expectancy violation in a modified Von Restorff paradigm. While their EEG was recorded, participants studied three list types (1) neutral words including one emotionally arousing isolate (either positive or negative), (2) arousing, negative words including one neutral isolate, or (3) arousing, positive words including one neutral isolate. Immediately after each list, free recall was tested. Negative, but not positive, words exhibited enhanced recall when presented as isolates in lists of neutral words and elicited a larger P300 for subsequently recalled than not-recalled words. This suggests that arousing, negative words stand out and that their distinctiveness contributes to their superior recall. Positive valence had an enhancing effect on recall only when the list contained mostly other positive words. Neutral isolates placed in either positive or negative lists elicited an N400, suggesting that semantic expectations developed in emotional word lists regardless of valence. However, semantic relatedness appeared to more strongly contribute to recall for positive than negative words. Our results suggest that distinctiveness and semantic relatedness contribute to episodic encoding of arousing words, but the impact of each factor depends on both a word's valence and its context.

  16. Experimental Approaches for Defining Functional Roles of Microbes in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten O.A.; Degnan, Patrick H.; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    The complex and intimate relationship between humans and their gut microbial communities is becoming less obscure, due in part to large-scale gut microbial genome-sequencing projects and culture-independent surveys of the composition and gene content of these communities. These studies build upon, and are complemented by, experimental efforts to define underlying mechanisms of host-microbe interactions in simplified model systems. This review highlights the intersection of these approaches. Experimental studies now leverage the advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing that have driven the explosion of microbial genome and community profiling projects, and the loss-of-function and gain-of-function strategies long employed in model organisms are now being extended to microbial genes, species, and communities from the human gut. These developments promise to deepen our understanding of human gut host–microbiota relationships and are readily applicable to other host-associated and free-living microbial communities. PMID:24024637

  17. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Hanscom, David A; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach.

  18. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hanscom, David A.; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach. PMID:26682100

  19. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Ignatenko, Natalia A.; Gerner, Eugene W.; Besselsen, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:21712957

  20. Peer review, basic research, and engineering: Defining a role for QA professionals in basic research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-02-01

    Within the context of doing basic research, this paper seeks to answer four major questions: (1) What is the authority structure of science. (2) What is peer review. (3) Where is the interface between basic physics research and standard engineering. and (4) Given the conclusions to the first three questions, what is the role of the QA professional in a basic research environment like Fermilab. 23 refs.

  1. New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Carol S.; Jacobson, Susan

    2002-01-01

    The roles of academic health sciences librarians are continually evolving as librarians initiate new programs and services in response to developments in computer technology and user demands. However, statistics currently collected by libraries do not accurately reflect or measure these new roles. It is essential for librarians to document, measure, and evaluate these new activities to continue to meet the needs of users and to ensure the viability of their professional role. To determine what new measures should be compiled, the authors examined current statistics, user demands, professional literature, and current activities of librarians as reported in abstracts of poster sessions at Medical Library Association annual meetings. Three new categories of services to be measured are proposed. The first, consultation, groups activities such as quality filtering and individual point-of-need instruction. The second, outreach, includes activities such as working as liaisons, participating in grand rounds or morning report, and providing continuing education. The third area, Web authoring, encompasses activities such as designing Web pages, creating online tutorials, and developing new products. Adding these three measures to those already being collected will provide a more accurate and complete depiction of the services offered by academic health sciences librarians. PMID:11999174

  2. Arabidopsis mutant analysis and gene regulation define a nonredundant role for glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen assimilation.

    PubMed

    Melo-Oliveira, R; Oliveira, I C; Coruzzi, G M

    1996-05-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is ubiquitous to all organisms, yet its role in higher plants remains enigmatic. To better understand the role of GDH in plant nitrogen metabolism, we have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant (gdh1-1) defective in one of two GDH gene products and have studied GDH1 gene expression. GDH1 mRNA accumulates to highest levels in dark-adapted or sucrose-starved plants, and light or sucrose treatment each repress GDH1 mRNA accumulation. These results suggest that the GDH1 gene product functions in the direction of glutamate catabolism under carbon-limiting conditions. Low levels of GDH1 mRNA present in leaves of light-grown plants can be induced by exogenously supplied ammonia. Under such conditions of carbon and ammonia excess, GDH1 may function in the direction of glutamate biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis gdh-deficient mutant allele gdh1-1 cosegregates with the GDH1 gene and behaves as a recessive mutation. The gdh1-1 mutant displays a conditional phenotype in that seedling growth is specifically retarded on media containing exogenously supplied inorganic nitrogen. These results suggest that GDH1 plays a nonredundant role in ammonia assimilation under conditions of inorganic nitrogen excess. This notion is further supported by the fact that the levels of mRNA for GDH1 and chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) are reciprocally regulated by light.

  3. Plant and Bacterial Symbiotic Mutants Define Three Transcriptionally Distinct Stages in the Development of the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis1

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Raka Mustaphi; Long, Sharon Rugel

    2004-01-01

    In the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis, the plant undergoes a series of developmental changes simultaneously, creating a root nodule and allowing bacterial entry and differentiation. Our studies of plant genes reveal novel transcriptional regulation during the establishment of the symbiosis and identify molecular markers that distinguish classes of plant and bacterial symbiotic mutants. We have identified three symbiotically regulated plant genes encoding a β,1–3 endoglucanase (MtBGLU1), a lectin (MtLEC4), and a cysteine-containing protein (MtN31). MtBGLU1 is down-regulated in the plant 24 h after exposure to the bacterial signal, Nod factor. The non-nodulating plant mutant dmi1 is defective in the ability to down-regulate MtBGLU1. MtLEC4 and MtN31 are induced 1 and 2 weeks after bacterial inoculation, respectively. We examined the regulation of these two genes and three previously identified genes (MtCAM1, ENOD2, and MtLB1) in plant symbiotic mutants and wild-type plants inoculated with bacterial symbiotic mutants. Plant (bit1, rit1, and Mtsym1) and bacterial (exoA and exoH) mutants with defects in the initial stages of invasion are unable to induce MtLEC4, MtN31, MtCAM1, ENOD2, and MtLB1. Bacterial mutants (fixJ and nifD) and a subset of plant mutants (dnf2, dnf3, dnf4, dnf6, and dnf7) defective for nitrogen fixation induce the above genes. The bacA bacterial mutant, which senesces upon deposition into plant cells, and two plant mutants with defects in nitrogen fixation (dnf1 and dnf5) induce MtLEC4 and ENOD2 but not MtN31, MtCAM1, or MtLB1. These data suggest the presence of at least three transcriptionally distinct developmental stages during invasion of M. truncatula by S. meliloti. PMID:14739349

  4. Comprehensive assessment of the expression of the SWI/SNF complex defines two distinct prognostic subtypes of ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Taleb, Hisham; Yamaguchi, Ken; Matsumura, Noriomi; Murakami, Ryusuke; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Higasa, Koichiro; Amano, Yasuaki; Abiko, Kaoru; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Hamanishi, Junzo; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Baba, Tsukasa; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the ARID1A tumor-suppressor gene have been frequently identified in ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) cases. BAF250a encoded by ARID1A is a member of the SWI/SNF complex, but the expression and mutation status of other SWI/SNF subunits have not been explored. The current study aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical significance of the SWI/SNF complex subunits, by assessing the expression and mutation status of SWI/SNF subunits, and distinct genomic aberrations associated with their expression. Of 82 CCC specimens, 38 samples presented no BAF250a expression, and 50 samples exhibited the loss of at least one subunit of the SWI/SNF complex. Cases which lack at least one SWI/SNF complex component exhibited significantly more advanced stages, faster growth and stronger nuclear atypia compared with SWI/SNF-positive samples (p<0.05). Although BAF250a expression is not related to poor prognosis, the group presenting the loss of at least one SWI/SNF complex subunit exhibited significantly shorter overall and progression-free survivals (p<0.05). A multivariate analysis suggested that the expression status of the SWI/SNF complex serves as an independent prognostic factor (p<0.005). The cases positive for all SWI/SNF subunits demonstrated significantly greater DNA copy number alterations, such as amplification at chromosomes 8q.24.3 and 20q.13.2-20q.13.33 (including ZNF217) and deletion at chromosomes 13q12.11-13q14.3 (including RB1), 17p13.2-17p13.1 (including TP53) and 19p13.2-19p13.12. In conclusion, the CCCs exhibiting the loss of one or multiple SWI/SNF complex subunits demonstrated aggressive behaviors and poor prognosis, whereas the CCCs with positive expression for all SWI/SNF components presented more copy number alterations and a favorable prognosis. PMID:27340867

  5. Comprehensive assessment of the expression of the SWI/SNF complex defines two distinct prognostic subtypes of ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abou-Taleb, Hisham; Yamaguchi, Ken; Matsumura, Noriomi; Murakami, Ryusuke; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Higasa, Koichiro; Amano, Yasuaki; Abiko, Kaoru; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Hamanishi, Junzo; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Baba, Tsukasa; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2016-08-23

    Somatic mutations in the ARID1A tumor-suppressor gene have been frequently identified in ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) cases. BAF250a encoded by ARID1A is a member of the SWI/SNF complex, but the expression and mutation status of other SWI/SNF subunits have not been explored. The current study aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical significance of the SWI/SNF complex subunits, by assessing the expression and mutation status of SWI/SNF subunits, and distinct genomic aberrations associated with their expression. Of 82 CCC specimens, 38 samples presented no BAF250a expression, and 50 samples exhibited the loss of at least one subunit of the SWI/SNF complex. Cases which lack at least one SWI/SNF complex component exhibited significantly more advanced stages, faster growth and stronger nuclear atypia compared with SWI/SNF-positive samples (p<0.05). Although BAF250a expression is not related to poor prognosis, the group presenting the loss of at least one SWI/SNF complex subunit exhibited significantly shorter overall and progression-free survivals (p<0.05). A multivariate analysis suggested that the expression status of the SWI/SNF complex serves as an independent prognostic factor (p<0.005). The cases positive for all SWI/SNF subunits demonstrated significantly greater DNA copy number alterations, such as amplification at chromosomes 8q.24.3 and 20q.13.2-20q.13.33 (including ZNF217) and deletion at chromosomes 13q12.11-13q14.3 (including RB1), 17p13.2-17p13.1 (including TP53) and 19p13.2-19p13.12. In conclusion, the CCCs exhibiting the loss of one or multiple SWI/SNF complex subunits demonstrated aggressive behaviors and poor prognosis, whereas the CCCs with positive expression for all SWI/SNF components presented more copy number alterations and a favorable prognosis.

  6. Sex and Sex-Role Identification: An Important Distinction for Organizational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gary N.; Butterfield, R. Anthony

    Studies which have investigated males' and females' attitudes and behavior in organizations have yielded apparently contradictory results. In some studies, individuals have followed traditional sex-role stereotypes; in others, they have not. A proposed explanation for these inconsistencies is that sex-role identification is a more important…

  7. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  8. Defining vascular signatures of malignant hepatic masses: role of MDCT with 3D rendering.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-08-01

    Malignant hepatic masses, both primary and metastatic lesions, have characteristic CT appearances and enhancement patterns. Owing to advances in CT resolution, high-quality vascular maps can be generated with 3D rendering tools to aid hepatic mass evaluation. These renderings enable identification of neovascularity, which is critical for distinguishing malignant from benign lesions, and facilitate identification of small hyperenhancing malignant hepatic tumors. In this review, CT features of malignant hepatic masses are discussed in conjunction with a demonstration of the role for 3D vascular mapping.

  9. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  10. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  11. Defining the role of pollutants in the disruption of reproduction in wildlife.

    PubMed Central

    Hose, J E; Guillette, L J

    1995-01-01

    Although chemical exposure has been associated with reduced reproduction in certain North American fish, reptiles, and mammals, definitive cause-and-effect data are lacking in many instances. Because the increasing use and global transport of industrial chemicals pose significant risk to successful reproduction, methods should be developed that can define the geographic extent and magnitude of injury and risk to wildlife. Because industrial chemicals are articles of commerce, information about injury to wildlife has been contentious and too often ineffective in changing societal behavior. The following strategies are advocated for inferring causal relationships. First, a balanced and comprehensive assessment of the data is necessary to determine the geographic extent of exposure and reproductive effects associated with environmental pollution. Initial efforts to document reproductive injury should focus on specific ecosystems in which detrimental effects have been observed, but lack sufficient causal data. Model systems (including experimental mesocosms or field ecosystems) should be identified or designed that can adequately test multigenerational reproductive effects. Mechanistic data from supportive laboratory studies on reproductive toxicity, quantitative structure-activity relationships, and bioaccumulation can be used to predict effects of related pollutants and to determine risk. Such information is essential to prevent future injury to wildlife and to prioritize the numerous remediation decisions facing our society. PMID:7556030

  12. Silver Nanoparticles Alter Zebrafish Development and Larval Behavior: Distinct Roles for Particle Size, Coating and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Christina M.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Badireddy, Appala R.; Padilla, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) act as antibacterials by releasing monovalent silver (Ag+) and are increasingly used in consumer products, thus elevating exposures in human and wildlife populations. In vitro models indicate that AgNPs are likely to be developmental neurotoxicants with actions distinct from those of Ag+. We exposed developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) to Ag+ or AgNPs on days 0–5 post-fertilization and evaluated hatching, morphology, survival and swim bladder inflation. Larval swimming behavior and responses to different lighting conditions were assessed 24 hr after the termination of exposure. Comparisons were made with AgNPs of different sizes and coatings: 10 nm citrate-coated AgNP (AgNP-C), and 10 or 50 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs (AgNP-PVP). Ag+ and AgNP-C delayed hatching to a similar extent but Ag+ was more effective in slowing swim bladder inflation, and elicited greater dysmorphology and mortality. In behavioral assessments, Ag+ exposed fish were hyperresponsive to light changes, whereas AgNP-C exposed fish showed normal responses. Neither of the AgNP-PVPs affected survival or morphology but both evoked significant changes in swimming responses to light in ways that were distinct from Ag+ and each other. The smaller AgNP-PVP caused overall hypoactivity whereas the larger caused hyperactivity. AgNPs are less potent than Ag+ with respect to dysmorphology and loss of viability, but nevertheless produce neurobehavioral effects that highly depend on particle coating and size, rather than just reflecting the release of Ag+. Different AgNP formulations are thus likely to produce distinct patterns of developmental neurotoxicity. PMID:21315816

  13. Understanding animate agents: distinct roles for the social network and mirror system.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Thalia; Milleville, Shawn C; Martin, Alex

    2007-06-01

    How people understand the actions of animate agents has been vigorously debated. This debate has centered on two hypotheses focused on anatomically distinct neural substrates: The mirror-system hypothesis proposes that the understanding of others is achieved via action simulation, and the social-network hypothesis proposes that such understanding is achieved via the integration of critical biological properties (e.g., faces, affect). In this study, we assessed the areas of the brain that were engaged when people interpreted and imagined moving shapes as animate or inanimate. Although observing and imagining the moving shapes engaged the mirror system, only activation of the social network was modulated by animacy.

  14. Defining the Role of the Tension Sensor in the Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Hannah R.; Heo, Yoon-Young; Elmore, Donald E.; Maurer, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations that alter the phenotypic behavior of the Escherichia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) have been identified; however, most of these residues play critical roles in the transition between the closed and open states of the channel and are not directly involved in lipid interactions that transduce the tension response. In this study, we use molecular dynamic simulations to predict critical lipid interacting residues in the closed state of MscS. The physiological role of these residues was then investigated by performing osmotic downshock assays on MscS mutants where the lipid interacting residues were mutated to alanine. These experiments identified seven residues in the first and second transmembrane helices as lipid-sensing residues. The majority of these residues are hydrophobic amino acids located near the extracellular interface of the membrane. All of these residues interact strongly with the lipid bilayer in the closed state of MscS, but do not face the bilayer directly in structures associated with the open and desensitized states of the channel. Thus, the position of these residues relative to the lipid membrane appears related to the ability of the channel to sense tension in its different physiological states. PMID:21767486

  15. Defining functioning categories in axial Spondyloarthritis: the role of the ASAS Health Index.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Marco; Lato, Valentina; Di Matteo, Andrea; Carotti, Marina; Salaffi, Fausto

    2017-01-06

    The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society Health Index (ASAS HI) is an inclusive questionnaire, able to describe the total impairments and restrictions due to axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Considering the relationship between ASAS HI and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS)-CRP, the aim of this study is to establish the ASAS HI cut-off values for functioning categories employing the ASDAS-CRP disease activity states in axSpA patients. ASAS HI and ASDAS-CPR were obtained from 140 consecutive axSpA patients, divided in the four ASDAS-CRP disease activity categories. High and very high disease activity were considered together. The ASAS HI cut-offs were obtained from the arithmetic mean, rounded off to the closest whole number, of the 75th percentile mean value of a lower rank and the 25th percentile mean value of the adjacent higher rank. This approach was applied in the transition from inactive disease and moderate disease activity, and in the transition from moderate disease activity and high/very high disease activity. Twenty-three patients were classified as having inactive disease, 36 were classified as having moderate disease activity, and 81 were in a high/very high disease activity state. Using the approach of the 75th-25th percentile mean values of adjacent disease activity states, the ASAS HI cut-offs resulted: ≤4 to dinstinguish a normal functioning, >4 and ≤8 to distinguish a moderate impairment of functioning, and >8 to distinguish a severe impairment of functioning. ASAS HI seems a reliable tool to define functioning categories in patients with axSpA.

  16. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  17. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinctTIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Campisi, Judith

    2006-11-07

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins, TRF1, TRF2 and POT1, and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. These and two other proteins form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere-maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes exist or function in vivo. Here, we provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. TIN2 ablation by RNA interference caused telomere uncapping and p53-independent cell death in all cells tested. However, we isolated two TIN2 complexes from cell lysates, each selectively sensitive to a TIN2 mutant (TIN2-13, TIN2-15C). In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN215C more than TIN2-13 caused genomic instability and cell death. Thus, TIN2 subcomplexes likely have distinct functions in telomere maintenance, and may provide selective targets for eliminating cells with mutant p53.

  18. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA-binding proteins (telomeric repeat binding factor 1 [TRF1], TRF2, and protector of telomeres 1 [POT1]) and several associated factors. One factor, TRF1-interacting protein 2 (TIN2), binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 subcomplexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13 and TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist and that TIN2-15C–sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53. PMID:18443218

  19. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions.

  20. Rasagiline: defining the role of a novel therapy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stocchi, F

    2006-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a therapy area with considerable unmet needs. The current key targets for PD treatment include the slowing of disease progression, improved control of motor fluctuations in advanced disease and the treatment of non-motor symptoms. In view of such major requirements, it is important to consider how new drug treatments fit into the context of PD therapy, and the practical advantages that they may offer in the management of PD in clinical practice. Rasagiline is a novel, second-generation, irreversible, selective monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor that is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic PD, either as initial monotherapy or as adjunct therapy (with levodopa) for patients experiencing end-of-dose motor fluctuations. This review assesses the outcome from several large-scale clinical studies that have investigated the use of rasagiline in early and advanced PD patient populations and discusses the role of rasagiline within the current scope of PD therapy.

  1. Scleroderma: the role of serum autoantibodies in defining specific clinical phenotypes and organ system involvement

    PubMed Central

    Domsic, Robyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent advances in serologic testing for SSc-associated antibodies with respect to the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Recent findings The importance of SSc antibodies for diagnosis has become increasingly recognized, as evidence by incorporation into the 2013 ACR/EULAR clinical classification criteria for SSc. Two new SSc-associated antibodies and their clinical associations have been described. Multiple cohort studies have reported variable antibody frequency distribution based on geography, but the clinical associations remain much the same. New associations include anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies with gastric antral vascular ectasia, and a temporal association between SSc onset and RNA polymerase III antibodies. Summary The role and associations of SSc-associated antibodies for diagnosis and internal organ involvement is becoming increasingly accepted. PMID:25203118

  2. Defining the Role of Integrin αvβ6 in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, A.; Raghavan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-substratum adhesion. αvβ6 is an epithelial-specific integrin that is a receptor for the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins fibronectin, vitronectin, tenascin and the latency associated peptide (LAP) of TGF-β. Integrin αvβ6 is not expressed in healthy adult epithelia but is upregulated during wound healing and in cancer. αvβ6 has been shown to modulate invasion, inhibit apoptosis, regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and activate TGF-β1. There is increasing evidence, primarily from in vitro studies, that suggest that αvβ6 may actually promote carcinoma progression. In this review we summarize what has been learnt in the past few years about the role of αvβ6 in cancer progression. PMID:19601768

  3. Defining the role of the immune system in cancer treatment: highlights from the Immunochemotherapy Conference.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra

    2011-06-01

    The Immunochemotherapy: Correcting Immune Escape in Cancer meeting was co-organized by George Prendergast (Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, PA, USA), Guido Kroemer (Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute, Paris, France) and Laurence Zitvogel (Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute) in partnership with Abcam. It brought together investigators with a diverse background in immunology, oncology and cancer biology, and offered a forum for discussion of a new vision that acknowledges the role of the host immune system not only in cancer development and progression, but also as a major determinant of response to treatment. An important implication of this vision is that synergy between conventional cytocidal modalities and immune response modifiers is not only possible, but holds the promise to revolutionize cancer treatment. The emerging evidence that was presented in support of this new concept will be summarized in this article.

  4. Defining the Role of Excess Electrons in the Surface Chemistry of TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, N. Aaron; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-04-08

    We have performed a systematic study of the role of excess electrons resulting from points defects such as oxygen vacancies, bridging row hydroxyls, and interstitial Ti species in TiO2 on adsorbed surface species using density functional theory. Strong charge transfer to adsorbates affects significantly their binding and reactivity. Specifically we examined the adsorption and reactivity of O2 in detail. We also present a generalization of these findings for a variety of species by characterizing the Lewis acid/base properties of the surface/adsorbate complex: when the electronegativity of the adsorbate is greater than the surface electronegativity (or work function) charge transfer from the reduced surface to the absorbate occurs. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Defining the Role of ATP Hydrolysis in Mitotic Segregation of Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Ah-Seng, Yoan; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP), together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability. PMID:24367270

  6. Gremlin 2 regulates distinct roles of BMP and Endothelin 1 signaling in dorsoventral patterning of the facial skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Elizabeth; Rippen, Marie; Alexander, Courtney; Schilling, Thomas F.; Crump, J. Gage

    2011-01-01

    Patterning of the upper versus lower face involves generating distinct pre-skeletal identities along the dorsoventral (DV) axes of the pharyngeal arches. Whereas previous studies have shown roles for BMPs, Endothelin 1 (Edn1) and Jagged1b-Notch2 in DV patterning of the facial skeleton, how these pathways are integrated to generate different skeletal fates has remained unclear. Here, we show that BMP and Edn1 signaling have distinct roles in development of the ventral and intermediate skeletons, respectively, of the zebrafish face. Using transgenic gain-of-function approaches and cell-autonomy experiments, we find that BMPs strongly promote hand2 and msxe expression in ventral skeletal precursors, while Edn1 promotes the expression of nkx3.2 and three Dlx genes (dlx3b, dlx5a and dlx6a) in intermediate precursors. Furthermore, Edn1 and Jagged1b pattern the intermediate and dorsal facial skeletons in part by inducing the BMP antagonist Gremlin 2 (Grem2), which restricts BMP activity to the ventral-most face. We therefore propose a model in which later cross-inhibitory interactions between BMP and Edn1 signaling, in part mediated by Grem2, separate an initially homogenous ventral region into distinct ventral and intermediate skeletal precursor domains. PMID:22031546

  7. Defining the Role of the MHC in Autoimmunity: A Review and Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Michelle M. A.; Stevens, Christine R.; Walsh, Emily C.; De Jager, Philip L.; Goyette, Philippe; Plenge, Robert M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Rioux, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most extensively studied regions in the human genome because of the association of variants at this locus with autoimmune, infectious, and inflammatory diseases. However, identification of causal variants within the MHC for the majority of these diseases has remained difficult due to the great variability and extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) that exists among alleles throughout this locus, coupled with inadequate study design whereby only a limited subset of about 20 from a total of approximately 250 genes have been studied in small cohorts of predominantly European origin. We have performed a review and pooled analysis of the past 30 years of research on the role of the MHC in six genetically complex disease traits – multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes (T1D), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) – in order to consolidate and evaluate the current literature regarding MHC genetics in these common autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We corroborate established MHC disease associations and identify predisposing variants that previously have not been appreciated. Furthermore, we find a number of interesting commonalities and differences across diseases that implicate both general and disease-specific pathogenetic mechanisms in autoimmunity. PMID:18437207

  8. Crossing boundaries, re-defining care: the role of the critical care outreach team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Dillon, Ann

    2002-05-01

    There is clear indication that both government and professional policy in the United Kingdom supports a radical change in the role of healthcare practitioners, with a move towards a patient-focused service delivered by clinical teams working effectively together. Recent health service imperatives driving the agenda for flexible clinical teams have occurred simultaneously with an increased public and political awareness of deficits in availability of critical care services. Against this policy backdrop, working across professional and organizational boundaries is fundamental to supporting quality service improvements. In the acute care sector, the development of critical care outreach teams is an innovation that seeks to challenge the traditional support available for sick ward patients. Activity data and observations from the first 6-month evaluation of two critical care outreach teams identify the need for clinical support and education offered by critical care practitioners to ward-based teams. The experiences from such flexible clinical teams provides a foundation from which to explore key issues for intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary working across clinical areas and organizational boundaries. Adopting innovative approaches to care delivery, such as critical care outreach teams, can enable clinical teams and NHS trusts to work together to improve the quality of care for acutely ill patients, support clinical practitioners working with this client group, and develop proactive service planning.

  9. Defining the role of omics in assessing ecosystem health: Perspectives from the Canadian environmental monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Paulina A; Feswick, April; Isaacs, Meghan A; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reviews and studies continue to describe omics technologies as the next generation of tools for environmental monitoring, while cautioning that there are limitations and obstacles to overcome. However, omics has not yet transitioned into national environmental monitoring programs designed to assess ecosystem health. Using the example of the Canadian Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program, the authors describe the steps that would be required for omics technologies to be included in such an established program. These steps include baseline collection of omics endpoints across different species and sites to generate a range of what is biologically normal within a particular ecosystem. Natural individual variability in the omes is not adequately characterized and is often not measured in the field, but is a key component to an environmental monitoring program, to determine the critical effect size or action threshold for management. Omics endpoints must develop a level of standardization, consistency, and rigor that will allow interpretation of the relevance of changes across broader scales. To date, population-level consequences of routinely measured endpoints such as reduced gonad size or intersex in fish is not entirely clear, and the significance of genome-wide molecular, proteome, or metabolic changes on organism or population health is further removed from the levels of ecological change traditionally managed. The present review is not intended to dismiss the idea that omics will play a future role in large-scale environmental monitoring studies, but rather outlines the necessary actions for its inclusion in regulatory monitoring programs focused on assessing ecosystem health.

  10. The role of metabolism (and the microbiome) in defining the clinical efficacy of dietary flavonoids1

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Aedín; Minihane, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    At a population level, there is growing evidence of the beneficial effects of dietary flavonoids on health. However, there is extensive heterogeneity in the response to increased intake, which is likely mediated via wide interindividual variability in flavonoid absorption and metabolism. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized by phase I and phase II metabolism (which occur predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract and liver) and colonic microbial metabolism. A number of factors, including age, sex, and genotype, may affect these metabolic processes. In addition, food composition and flavonoid source are likely to affect bioavailability, and emerging data suggest a critical role for the microbiome. This review will focus on the current knowledge for the main subclasses of flavonoids, including anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and flavanones, for which there is growing evidence from prospective studies of beneficial effects on health. The identification of key factors that govern metabolism and an understanding of how the differential capacity to metabolize these bioactive compounds affect health outcomes will help establish how to optimize intakes of flavonoids for health benefits and in specific subgroups. We identify research areas that need to be addressed to further understand important determinants of flavonoid bioavailability and metabolism and to advance the knowledge base that is required to move toward the development of dietary guidelines and recommendations for flavonoids and flavonoid-rich foods. PMID:27881391

  11. The pleasures and pains of distinct self-construals: the role of interdependence in regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Lee, A Y; Aaker, J L; Gardner, W L

    2000-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory distinguishes between self-regulatory processes that focus on promotion and prevention strategies for goal pursuit. Five studies provide support for the hypothesis that these strategies differ for individuals with distinct self-construals. Specifically, individuals with a dominant independent self-construal were predicted to place more emphasis on promotion-focused information, and those with a dominant interdependent self-construal on prevention-focused information. Support for this hypothesis was obtained for participants who scored high versus low on the Self-Construal Scale, participants who were presented with an independent versus interdependent situation, and participants from a Western versus Eastern culture. The influence of interdependence on regulatory focus was observed in both importance ratings of information and affective responses consistent with promotion or prevention focus.

  12. Distinct roles of cadherin-6 and E-cadherin in tubulogenesis and lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liwei; Liu, Fengming; Hansen, Steen H; Ter Beest, Martin B A; Zegers, Mirjam M P

    2011-06-15

    Classic cadherins are important regulators of tissue morphogenesis. The predominant cadherin in epithelial cells, E-cadherin, has been extensively studied because of its critical role in normal epithelial development and carcinogenesis. Epithelial cells may also coexpress other cadherins, but their roles are less clear. The Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line has been a popular mammalian model to investigate the role of E-cadherin in epithelial polarization and tubulogenesis. However, MDCK cells also express relatively high levels of cadherin-6, and it is unclear whether the functions of this cadherin are redundant to those of E-cadherin. We investigate the specific roles of both cadherins using a knockdown approach. Although we find that both cadherins are able to form adherens junctions at the basolateral surface, we show that they have specific and mutually exclusive roles in epithelial morphogenesis. Specifically, we find that cadherin-6 functions as an inhibitor of tubulogenesis, whereas E-cadherin is required for lumen formation. Ablation of cadherin-6 leads to the spontaneous formation of tubules, which depends on increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. In contrast, loss of E-cadherin inhibits lumen formation by a mechanism independent of PI3K.

  13. Strategies for coping with work-family conflict: the distinctive relationships of gender role ideology.

    PubMed

    Somech, Anit; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2007-01-01

    Study 1, with 266 employed parents, identified 8 coping strategies: super at home, good enough at home, delegation at home, priorities at home, super at work, good enough at work, delegation at work, and priorities at work. Study 2, with 679 employed parents, demonstrated a moderating effect of sex and gender role ideology in the relationship between coping strategy and work-family conflict. Specifically, the relationships between coping strategies (i.e., good enough at home, good enough at work, and delegation at work) and work interference with family were moderated by sex and gender role ideology. Regarding family interference with work, the relationships between coping strategies (i.e., good enough at home and good enough at work, delegation at home and delegation at work, and priorities at home) and family interference with work were moderated by sex and gender role ideology.

  14. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered.

  15. Defining the role of albumin infusion in cirrhosis-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Ornekian, Vahram; Kao, Liyo; Butch, Anthony W; Kurtz, Ira

    2014-07-15

    The presence of negatively charged, impermeant proteins in the plasma space alters the distribution of diffusible ions in the plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) compartments to preserve electroneutrality and is known as Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. In patients with hypoalbuminemia due to underlying cirrhosis, the decrease in the plasma water albumin concentration ([Alb-]pw) would be expected to result in a decrease in the plasma water sodium concentration ([Na+]pw) due to an alteration in the distribution of Na+ between the plasma and ISF. In addition, cirrhosis-associated hyponatremia may be due to the renal diluting defect resulting from the intravascular volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses and overdiuresis and/or decreased effective circulatory volume secondary to splanchnic vasodilatation. Therefore, albumin infusion may result in correction of the hyponatremia in cirrhotic patients either by modulating the Gibbs-Donnan effect due to hypoalbuminemia or by restoring intravascular volume in patients with intravascular volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses and overdiuresis. However, the differential role of albumin infusion in modulating the [Na+]pw in these patients has not previously been analyzed quantitatively. In the present study, we developed an in vitro assay system to examine for the first time the quantitative effect of changes in albumin concentration on the distribution of Na+ between two compartments separated by a membrane that allows the free diffusion of Na+. Our findings demonstrated that changes in [Alb-]pw are linearly related to changes in [Na+]pw as predicted by Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. However, based on our findings, we predict that the improvement in cirrhosis-associated hyponatremia due to intravascular volume depletion results predominantly from the restoration of intravascular volume rather than alterations in Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium.

  16. Natural allelic variation defines a role for ATMYC1: trichome cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Symonds, V Vaughan; Hatlestad, Greg; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-06-01

    The molecular nature of biological variation is not well understood. Indeed, many questions persist regarding the types of molecular changes and the classes of genes that underlie morphological variation within and among species. Here we have taken a candidate gene approach based on previous mapping results to identify the gene and ultimately a polymorphism that underlies a trichome density QTL in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that natural allelic variation in the transcription factor ATMYC1 alters trichome density in A. thaliana; this is the first reported function for ATMYC1. Using site-directed mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid experiments, we demonstrate that a single amino acid replacement in ATMYC1, discovered in four ecotypes, eliminates known protein-protein interactions in the trichome initiation pathway. Additionally, in a broad screen for molecular variation at ATMYC1, including 72 A. thaliana ecotypes, a high-frequency block of variation was detected that results in >10% amino acid replacement within one of the eight exons of the gene. This sequence variation harbors a strong signal of divergent selection but has no measurable effect on trichome density. Homologs of ATMYC1 are pleiotropic, however, so this block of variation may be the result of natural selection having acted on another trait, while maintaining the trichome density role of the gene. These results show that ATMYC1 is an important source of variation for epidermal traits in A. thaliana and indicate that the transcription factors that make up the TTG1 genetic pathway generally may be important sources of epidermal variation in plants.

  17. Inverse coupling in leak and voltage-activated K+ channel gates underlies distinct roles in electrical signaling.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abu, Yuval; Zhou, Yufeng; Zilberberg, Noam; Yifrach, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-activated (Kv) and leak (K(2P)) K(+) channels have key, yet distinct, roles in electrical signaling in the nervous system. Here we examine how differences in the operation of the activation and slow inactivation pore gates of Kv and K(2P) channels underlie their unique roles in electrical signaling. We report that (i) leak K(+) channels possess a lower activation gate, (ii) the activation gate is an important determinant controlling the conformational stability of the K(+) channel pore, (iii) the lower activation and upper slow inactivation gates of leak channels cross-talk and (iv) unlike Kv channels, where the two gates are negatively coupled, these two gates are positively coupled in K(2P) channels. Our results demonstrate how basic thermodynamic properties of the K(+) channel pore, particularly conformational stability and coupling between gates, underlie the specialized roles of Kv and K(2P) channel families in electrical signaling.

  18. Distinct roles of TRP channels in auditory transduction and amplification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Brendan P; Baker, Allison E; Gaudry, Quentin; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Wilson, Rachel I

    2013-01-09

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. Here, we develop a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically defined population of auditory receptor cells. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of sound-evoked motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction in auditory receptor cells. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  19. Extensive cargo identification reveals distinct biological roles of the 12 importin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Morinaka, Yuriko; Imai, Kenichiro; Kose, Shingo; Horton, Paul; Imamoto, Naoko

    2017-01-01

    Vast numbers of proteins are transported into and out of the nuclei by approximately 20 species of importin-β family nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors. However, the significance of the multiple parallel transport pathways that the receptors constitute is poorly understood because only limited numbers of cargo proteins have been reported. Here, we identified cargo proteins specific to the 12 species of human import receptors with a high-throughput method that employs stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture, an in vitro reconstituted transport system, and quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified cargoes illuminated the manner of cargo allocation to the receptors. The redundancies of the receptors vary widely depending on the cargo protein. Cargoes of the same receptor are functionally related to one another, and the predominant protein groups in the cargo cohorts differ among the receptors. Thus, the receptors are linked to distinct biological processes by the nature of their cargoes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21184.001 PMID:28117667

  20. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkó, M. Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans. PMID:26469632

  1. Contribution of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction in insulin resistance: Distinct or interrelated roles?

    PubMed

    Rieusset, J

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulate numerous cellular processes, and are critical contributors to cellular and whole-body homoeostasis. More important, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress are both closely associated with hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, thereby playing crucial roles in altered glucose homoeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The accumulated evidence also suggests a potential interrelationship between alterations in both types of organelles, as mitochondrial dysfunction could participate in activation of the unfolded protein response, whereas ER stress could influence mitochondrial function. The fact that mitochondria and the ER are physically and functionally interconnected via mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) supports their interrelated roles in the pathophysiology of T2DM. However, the mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress, and its relevance to the control of glucose homoeostasis, are still unknown. This review evaluates the involvement of mitochondria and ER independently in the development of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as their potential roles in the disruption of organelle crosstalk at MAM interfaces in the alteration of insulin signalling.

  2. Distinct roles of light-activated channels TRP and TRPL in photoreceptors of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Saari, Paulus; French, Andrew S; Torkkeli, Päivi H; Liu, Hongxia; Immonen, Esa-Ville; Frolov, Roman V

    2017-04-03

    Electrophysiological studies in Drosophila melanogaster and Periplaneta americana have found that the receptor current in their microvillar photoreceptors is generated by two light-activated cationic channels, TRP (transient receptor potential) and TRPL (TRP-like), each having distinct properties. However, the relative contribution of the two channel types to sensory information coding by photoreceptors remains unclear. We recently showed that, in contrast to the diurnal Drosophila in which TRP is the principal phototransduction channel, photoreceptors of the nocturnal P. americana strongly depend on TRPL. Here, we perform a functional analysis, using patch-clamp and intracellular recordings, of P. americana photoreceptors after RNA interference to knock down TRP (TRPkd) and TRPL (TRPLkd). Several functional properties were changed in both knockdown phenotypes: cell membrane capacitance was reduced 1.7-fold, light sensitivity was greatly reduced, and amplitudes of sustained light-induced currents and voltage responses decreased more than twofold over the entire range of light intensities. The information rate (IR) was tested using a Gaussian white-noise modulated light stimulus and was lower in TRPkd photoreceptors (28 ± 21 bits/s) than in controls (52 ± 13 bits/s) because of high levels of bump noise. In contrast, although signal amplitudes were smaller than in controls, the mean IR of TRPLkd photoreceptors was unchanged at 54 ± 29 bits/s(1) because of proportionally lower noise. We conclude that TRPL channels provide high-gain/high-noise transduction, suitable for vision in dim light, whereas transduction by TRP channels is relatively low-gain/low-noise and allows better information transfer in bright light.

  3. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  4. Distinct roles of left inferior frontal regions that explain individual differences in second language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kuniyoshi L; Nauchi, Arihito; Tatsuno, Yoshinori; Hirano, Kazuyoshi; Muraishi, Yukimasa; Kimura, Masakazu; Bostwick, Mike; Yusa, Noriaki

    2009-08-01

    Second language (L2) acquisition is more susceptible to environmental and idiosyncratic factors than first language acquisition. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging for L2 learners of different ages of first exposure (mean: 12.6 and 5.6 years) in a formal school environment, and compared the cortical activations involved in processing English sentences containing either syntactic or spelling errors, where the testing ages and task performances of both groups were matched. We found novel activation patterns in two regions of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) that correlated differentially with the performances of the late and early learners. Specifically, activations of the dorsal and ventral triangular part (F3t) of the left IFG correlated positively with the accuracy of the syntactic task for the late learners, whereas activations of the left ventral F3t correlated negatively with the accuracy for the early learners. In contrast, other cortical regions exhibited differential correlation patterns with the reaction times (RTs) of the syntactic task. Namely, activations of the orbital part (F3O) of the left IFG, as well as those of the left angular gyrus, correlated positively with the RTs for the late learners, whereas those activations correlated negatively with the RTs for the early learners. Moreover, the task-selective activation of the left F3O was maintained for both the late and early learners. These results explain individual differences in L2 acquisition, such that the acquisition of linguistic knowledge in L2 is subserved by at least two distinct inferior frontal regions of the left F3t and F3O.

  5. AAA+ proteases and their role in distinct stages along the Vibrio cholerae lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Katharina; Vorkapic, Dina; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Malli, Gerald; Barilich, Benjamin P; Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae has to adapt to different environmental conditions along its lifecycle by means of transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation. This study provides a first comprehensive analysis regarding the contribution of the cytoplasmic AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpP and HslV to distinct features of V. cholerae behaviour, including biofilm formation, motility, cholera toxin expression and colonization fitness in the mouse model. While absence of HslV did not yield to any altered phenotype compared to wildtype, absence of Lon or ClpP resulted in significantly reduced colonization in vivo. In addition, a Δlon deletion mutant showed altered biofilm formation and increased motility, which could be correlated with higher expression of V. cholerae flagella gene class IV. Concordantly, we could show by immunoblot analysis, that Lon is the main protease responsible for proteolytic control of FliA, which is required for class IV flagella gene transcription, but also downregulates virulence gene expression. FliA becomes highly sensitive to proteolytic degradation in absence of its anti-sigma factor FlgM, a scenario reported to occur during mucosal penetration due to FlgM secretion through the broken flagellum. Our results confirm that the high stability of FliA in the absence of Lon results in less cholera toxin and toxin corgulated pilus production under virulence gene inducing conditions and in the presence of a damaged flagellum. Thus, the data presented herein provide a molecular explanation on how V. cholerae can achieve full expression of virulence genes during early stages of colonization, despite FliA getting liberated from the anti-sigma factor FlgM.

  6. Distinct Roles of SOM and VIP Interneurons during Cortical Up States

    PubMed Central

    Neske, Garrett T.; Connors, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    During cortical network activity, recurrent synaptic excitation among pyramidal neurons is approximately balanced by synaptic inhibition, which is provided by a vast diversity of inhibitory interneurons. The relative contributions of different interneuron subtypes to inhibitory tone during cortical network activity is not well-understood. We previously showed that many of the major interneuron subtypes in mouse barrel cortex are highly active during Up states (Neske et al., 2015); while fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells were the most active interneuron subtype, many non-fast-spiking (NFS), PV-negative interneurons were as active or more active than neighboring pyramidal cells. This suggests that the NFS cells could play a role in maintaining or modulating Up states. Here, using optogenetic techniques, we further dissected the functional roles during Up states of two major NFS, PV-negative interneuron subtypes: somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive cells. We found that while pyramidal cell excitability during Up states significantly increased when SOM cells were optogenetically silenced, VIP cells did not influence pyramidal cell excitability either upon optogenetic silencing or activation. VIP cells failed to contribute to Up states despite their ability to inhibit SOM cells strongly. We suggest that the contribution of VIP cells to the excitability of pyramidal cells may vary with cortical state. PMID:27507936

  7. The Drosophila Helicase Maleless (MLE) is Implicated in Functions Distinct From its Role in Dosage Compensation*

    PubMed Central

    Cugusi, Simona; Kallappagoudar, Satish; Ling, Huiping; Lucchesi, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind or remodel single or double-stranded nucleic acids, and that participate in a vast array of metabolic pathways. The ATP-dependent DEXH-box RNA/DNA helicase MLE was first identified as a core member of the chromatin remodeling MSL complex, responsible for dosage compensation in Drosophila males. Although this complex does not assemble in females, MLE is present. Given the multiplicity of functions attributed to its mammalian ortholog RNA helicase A, we have carried out an analysis for the purpose of determining whether MLE displays the same diversity. We have identified a number of different proteins that associate with MLE, implicating its role in specific pathways. We have documented this association in selected examples that include the spliceosome complex, heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins involved in RNA Processing and in Heterochromatin Protein 1 deposition, and the NuRD complex. PMID:25776889

  8. Actin cap associated focal adhesions and their distinct role in cellular mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Khatau, Shyam B.; Feng, Yunfeng; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The ability for cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments plays a critical role in development, immune responses, and cancer metastasis. Here we identify a small subset of focal adhesions that terminate fibers in the actin cap, a highly ordered filamentous actin structure that is anchored to the top of the nucleus by the LINC complexes; these differ from conventional focal adhesions in morphology, subcellular organization, movements, turnover dynamics, and response to biochemical stimuli. Actin cap associated focal adhesions (ACAFAs) dominate cell mechanosensing over a wide range of matrix stiffness, an ACAFA-specific function regulated by actomyosin contractility in the actin cap, while conventional focal adhesions are restrictively involved in mechanosensing for extremely soft substrates. These results establish the perinuclear actin cap and associated ACAFAs as major mediators of cellular mechanosensing and a critical element of the physical pathway that transduce mechanical cues all the way to the nucleus. PMID:22870384

  9. Distinct Roles of Myosins in Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphal Growth and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M.; Richards, Amber D.; Asfaw, Yohannes G.; Juvvadi, Praveen R.

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are a family of actin-based motor proteins found in many organisms and are categorized into classes based on their structures. Class II and V myosins are known to be important for critical cellular processes, including cytokinesis, endocytosis, exocytosis, and organelle trafficking, in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. However, the roles of myosins in the growth and virulence of the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are unknown. We constructed single- and double-deletion strains of the class II and class V myosins in A. fumigatus and found that while the class II myosin (myoB) is dispensable for growth, the class V myosin (myoE) is required for proper hyphal extension; deletion of myoE resulted in hyperbranching and loss of hyphal polarity. Both myoB and myoE are necessary for proper septation, conidiation, and conidial germination, but only myoB is required for conidial viability. Infection with the ΔmyoE strain in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella model and also in a persistently immunosuppressed murine model of invasive aspergillosis resulted in hypovirulence, while analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and cellular infiltration were similar compared to those of the wild-type strain. The ΔmyoE strain showed fungal growth in the murine lung, while the ΔmyoB strain exhibited little fungal burden, most likely due to the reduced conidial viability. These results show, for the first time, the important role these cytoskeletal components play in the growth of and disease caused by a known pathogen, prompting future studies to understand their regulation and potential targeting for novel antifungal therapies. PMID:26953327

  10. Distinct Roles of Meiosis-Specific Cohesin Complexes in Mammalian Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Uddipta; Hempel, Kai; Llano, Elena; Pendas, Alberto; Jessberger, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian meiocytes feature four meiosis-specific cohesin proteins in addition to ubiquitous ones, but the roles of the individual cohesin complexes are incompletely understood. To decipher the functions of the two meiosis-specific kleisins, REC8 or RAD21L, together with the only meiosis-specific SMC protein SMC1β, we generated Smc1β-/-Rec8-/- and Smc1β-/-Rad21L-/- mouse mutants. Analysis of spermatocyte chromosomes revealed that besides SMC1β complexes, SMC1α/RAD21 and to a small extent SMC1α/REC8 contribute to chromosome axis length. Removal of SMC1β and RAD21L almost completely abolishes all chromosome axes. The sex chromosomes do not pair in single or double mutants, and autosomal synapsis is impaired in all mutants. Super resolution microscopy revealed synapsis-associated SYCP1 aberrantly deposited between sister chromatids and on single chromatids in Smc1β-/-Rad21L-/- cells. All mutants show telomere length reduction and structural disruptions, while wild-type telomeres feature a circular TRF2 structure reminiscent of t-loops. There is no loss of centromeric cohesion in both double mutants at leptonema/early zygonema, indicating that, at least in the mutant backgrounds, an SMC1α/RAD21 complex provides centromeric cohesion at this early stage. Thus, in early prophase I the most prominent roles of the meiosis-specific cohesins are in axis-related features such as axis length, synapsis and telomere integrity rather than centromeric cohesion. PMID:27792785

  11. Two distinct roles of the yorkie/yap gene during homeostasis in the planarian Dugesia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byulnim; An, Yang; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Adult planarians possess somatic pluripotent stem cells called neoblasts that give rise to all missing cell types during regeneration and homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that the Yorkie (Yki)/Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator family plays an important role in the regulation of tissue growth during development and regeneration, and therefore we investigated the role of a planarian yki-related gene (termed Djyki) during regeneration and homeostasis of the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica. We found that knockdown of the function of Djyki by RNA interference (RNAi) downregulated neoblast proliferation and caused regeneration defects after amputation. In addition, Djyki RNAi caused edema during homeostasis. These seemingly distinct defects induced by Djyki RNAi were rescued by simultaneous RNAi of a planarian mats-related gene (termed Djmats), suggesting an important role of Djmats in the negative regulation of Djyki, in accordance with the conservation of the functional relationship of these two genes during the course of evolution. Interestingly, Djyki RNAi did not prevent normal protonephridial structure, suggesting that Djyki RNAi induced the edema phenotype without affecting the excretory system. Further analyses revealed that increased expression of the D. japonica gene DjaquaporinA (DjaqpA), which belongs to a large gene family that encodes a water channel protein for the regulation of transcellular water flow, promoted the induction of edema, but not defects in neoblast dynamics, in Djyki(RNAi) animals. Thus, we conclude that Djyki plays two distinct roles in the regulation of active proliferation of stem cells and in osmotic water transport across the body surface in D. japonica. PMID:25708270

  12. Biochemical properties of nematode O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase paralogs imply their distinct roles in hydrogen sulfide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vozdek, Roman; Hnízda, Aleš; Krijt, Jakub; Será, Leona; Kožich, Viktor

    2013-12-01

    O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyases (OAS-TLs) play a pivotal role in a sulfur assimilation pathway incorporating sulfide into amino acids in microorganisms and plants, however, these enzymes have not been found in the animal kingdom. Interestingly, the genome of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans contains three expressed genes predicted to encode OAS-TL orthologs (cysl-1-cysl-3), and a related pseudogene (cysl-4); these genes play different roles in resistance to hypoxia, hydrogen sulfide and cyanide. To get an insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms we purified the three recombinant worm OAS-TL proteins, and we determined their enzymatic activities, substrate binding affinities, quaternary structures and the conformations of their active site shapes. We show that the nematode OAS-TL orthologs can bind O-acetylserine and catalyze the canonical reaction although this ligand may more likely serve as a competitive inhibitor to natural substrates instead of being a substrate for sulfur assimilation. In addition, we propose that S-sulfocysteine may be a novel endogenous substrate for these proteins. However, we observed that the three OAS-TL proteins are conformationally different and exhibit distinct substrate specificity. Based on the available evidences we propose the following model: CYSL-1 interacts with EGL-9 and activates HIF-1 that upregulates expression of genes detoxifying sulfide and cyanide, the CYSL-2 acts as a cyanoalanine synthase in the cyanide detoxification pathway and simultaneously produces hydrogen sulfide, while the role of CYSL-3 remains unclear although it exhibits sulfhydrylase activity in vitro. All these data indicate that C. elegans OAS-TL paralogs have distinct cellular functions and may play different roles in maintaining hydrogen sulfide homeostasis.

  13. The vexing problem of defining the meaning, role and measurement of values in treatment decision-making.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram

    2014-03-01

    Two international movements, evidence-based medicine (EBM) and shared decision-making (SDM) have grappled for some time with issues related to defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in their respective models of treatment decision-making. In this article, we identify and describe unresolved problems in the way that each movement addresses these issues. The starting point for this discussion is that at least two essential ingredients are needed for treatment decision-making: research information about treatment options and their potential benefits and risks; and the values/preferences of participants in the decision-making process. Both the EBM and SDM movements have encountered difficulties in defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision-making. In the EBM model of practice, there is no clear and consistent definition of patient values/preferences and no guidance is provided on how to integrate these into an EBM model of practice. Methods advocated to measure patient values are also problematic. Within the SDM movement, patient values/preferences tend to be defined and measured in a restrictive and reductionist way as patient preferences for treatment options or attributes of options, while broader underlying value structures are ignored. In both models of practice, the meaning and expected role of physician values in decision-making are unclear. Values clarification exercises embedded in patient decision aids are suggested by SDM advocates to identify and communicate patient values/preferences for different treatment outcomes. Such exercises have the potential to impose a particular decision-making theory and/or process onto patients, which can change the way they think about and process information, potentially impeding them from making decisions that are consistent with their true values. The tasks of clarifying the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision

  14. A distinct role of the queen in coordinated workload and soil distribution in eusocial naked mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Inada, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how group members achieve collective decision-making, by considering individual intrinsic behavioural rules and behavioural mechanisms for maintaining social integration. Using a simulated burrow environment, we investigated the behavioural rules of coordinated workload for soil distribution in a eusocial mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We tested two predictions regarding a distinct role of the queen, a socially dominant individual in the caste system: the presence of a queen would increase the workload of other caste individuals, and the cues by a queen would affect the soil distribution. In experiment 1, we placed four individuals of various castes from the same colony into an experimental burrow. Workers exhibited the highest frequency of workload compared to other castes. The presence of a queen activated the workload by other individuals. Individuals showed a consistent workload in a particular direction so as to bias the soil distribution. These results suggest that individuals have a consensus on soil distribution and that the queen plays a distinct role. In experiment 2, we placed the odour of a queen in one of four cells and observed its effect on other individuals' workload and soil distribution. Relative to other cells, individuals frequently dug in the queen cell so the amount of soil in the queen cell decreased. These results suggest that queen odour is an important cue in coordinated workload and soil distribution in this species.

  15. A Distributed Neural Network Model for the Distinct Roles of Medial and Lateral HVC in Zebra Finch Song Production.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Daniel; Wu, Wei; Hyson, Richard L; Johnson, Frank; Bertram, Richard

    2017-04-05

    Male zebra finches produce a song consisting of a canonical sequence of syllables, learned from a tutor and repeated throughout its adult life. Much of the neural circuitry responsible for this behavior is located in the cortical premotor region HVC (acronym is name). In a recent study from our lab, we found that partial bilateral ablation of the medial portion of HVC has effects on the song that are qualitatively different from those of bilateral ablation of the lateral portion. In this report we describe a neural network organization that can explain these data, and in so doing suggests key roles for other brain nuclei in the production of song. We also suggest that syllables and the gaps between them are each coded separately by neural chains within HVC, and that the timing mechanisms for syllables and gaps are distinct. The design principles underlying this model assign distinct roles for medial and lateral HVC circuitry that explain the data on medial and lateral ablations. In addition, despite the fact that the neural coding of song sequence is distributed among several brain nuclei in our model, it accounts for data showing that cooling of HVC stretches syllables uniformly and to a greater extent than gaps. Finally, the model made unanticipated predictions about details of the effects of medial and lateral HVC ablations that were then confirmed by reanalysis of these previously acquired behavioral data.

  16. Two Plasmodium 6-Cys family-related proteins have distinct and critical roles in liver-stage development.

    PubMed

    Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; Ploemen, Ivo H J; Sajid, Mohammed; Lin, Jing-wen; Vos, Martijn W; Dinmohamed, Avinash G; Inaoka, Daniel K; Rijpma, Sanna R; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Kiełbasa, Szymon M; Scheltinga, Fay; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Klop, Onny; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Kita, Kiyoshi; Gego, Audrey; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; Hoffman, Stephen L; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Khan, Shahid M

    2014-05-01

    The 10 Plasmodium 6-Cys proteins have critical roles throughout parasite development and are targets for antimalaria vaccination strategies. We analyzed the conserved 6-cysteine domain of this family and show that only the last 4 positionally conserved cysteine residues are diagnostic for this domain and identified 4 additional "6-Cys family-related" proteins. Two of these, sequestrin and B9, are critical to Plasmodium liver-stage development. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays show that B9 is translationally repressed in sporozoites and is expressed after hepatocyte invasion where it localizes to the parasite plasma membrane. Mutants lacking B9 expression in the rodent malaria parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii and the human parasite P. falciparum developmentally arrest in hepatocytes. P. berghei mutants arrest in the livers of BALB/c (100%) and C57BL6 mice (>99.9%), and in cultures of Huh7 human-hepatoma cell line. Similarly, P. falciparum mutants while fully infectious to primary human hepatocytes abort development 3 d after infection. This growth arrest is associated with a compromised parasitophorous vacuole membrane a phenotype similar to, but distinct from, mutants lacking the 6-Cys sporozoite proteins P52 and P36. Our results show that 6-Cys proteins have critical but distinct roles in establishment and maintenance of a parasitophorous vacuole and subsequent liver-stage development.

  17. A Distinct Role of the Queen in Coordinated Workload and Soil Distribution in Eusocial Naked Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Inada, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H.; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how group members achieve collective decision-making, by considering individual intrinsic behavioural rules and behavioural mechanisms for maintaining social integration. Using a simulated burrow environment, we investigated the behavioural rules of coordinated workload for soil distribution in a eusocial mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We tested two predictions regarding a distinct role of the queen, a socially dominant individual in the caste system: the presence of a queen would increase the workload of other caste individuals, and the cues by a queen would affect the soil distribution. In experiment 1, we placed four individuals of various castes from the same colony into an experimental burrow. Workers exhibited the highest frequency of workload compared to other castes. The presence of a queen activated the workload by other individuals. Individuals showed a consistent workload in a particular direction so as to bias the soil distribution. These results suggest that individuals have a consensus on soil distribution and that the queen plays a distinct role. In experiment 2, we placed the odour of a queen in one of four cells and observed its effect on other individuals’ workload and soil distribution. Relative to other cells, individuals frequently dug in the queen cell so the amount of soil in the queen cell decreased. These results suggest that queen odour is an important cue in coordinated workload and soil distribution in this species. PMID:22957085

  18. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19236.001 PMID:27805570

  19. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-11-02

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively.

  20. The distinct role of performing euthanasia on depression and suicide in veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lily; Crane, Monique F; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2014-04-01

    Veterinarians are more likely to experience mood disorders and suicide than other occupational groups (Fritschi, Morrison, Shirangi & Day, 2009; Platt, Hawton, Simkin, & Mellanby, 2010). The performance of euthanasia has been implicated as contributing determinately to the prevalence of suicide risk and psychological distress in veterinarians (Bartram & Baldwin, 2008, 2010). In contrast, the application of psychological approaches would suggest a possible protective role for euthanasia administration. This paper is the first to investigate the association between euthanasia-administration frequency and depressed mood and suicide risk. A cross-sectional survey sampled 540 Australia-registered veterinarians (63.8% women), ranging in age from 23 to 74. Results revealed that the administration of objectionable euthanasia (i.e., euthanasia that the veterinarian disagreed with) was not related to our mental health variables. In contrast, overall euthanasia frequency had a weak positive linear relationship with depression. Moreover, overall euthanasia frequency moderated the impact of depression on suicide risk. The nature of this moderation suggested that average frequency per week of performing euthanasia attenuated the relationship between depressed mood and suicide risk. The implications of these findings and directions for further research are discussed.

  1. The Vpr protein from HIV-1: distinct roles along the viral life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Erwann; Benichou, Serge

    2005-01-01

    The genomes of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) encode the gag, pol and env genes and contain at least six supplementary open reading frames termed tat, rev, nef, vif, vpr, vpx and vpu. While the tat and rev genes encode regulatory proteins absolutely required for virus replication, nef, vif, vpr, vpx and vpu encode for small proteins referred to "auxiliary" (or "accessory"), since their expression is usually dispensable for virus growth in many in vitro systems. However, these auxiliary proteins are essential for viral replication and pathogenesis in vivo. The two vpr- and vpx-related genes are found only in members of the HIV-2/SIVsm/SIVmac group, whereas primate lentiviruses from other lineages (HIV-1, SIVcpz, SIVagm, SIVmnd and SIVsyk) contain a single vpr gene. In this review, we will mainly focus on vpr from HIV-1 and discuss the most recent developments in our understanding of Vpr functions and its role during the virus replication cycle. PMID:15725353

  2. Distinct roles of bulbar muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in olfactory discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Devore, Sasha; de Almeida, Licurgo; Linster, Christiane

    2014-08-20

    The olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex receive dense cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain. Cholinergic modulation within the piriform cortex has long been proposed to serve important functions in olfactory learning and memory. We here investigate how olfactory discrimination learning is regulated by cholinergic modulation of the OB inputs to the piriform cortex. We examined rats' performance on a two-alternative choice odor discrimination task following local, bilateral blockade of cholinergic nicotinic and/or muscarinic receptors in the OB. Results demonstrate that acquisition, but not recall, of novel discrimination problems is impaired following blockade of OB cholinergic receptors, although the relative contribution of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors depends on task difficulty. Blocking muscarinic receptors impairs learning for nearly all odor sets, whereas blocking nicotinic receptors only affects performance for perceptually similar odors. This pattern of behavioral effects is consistent with predictions from a model of cholinergic modulation in the OB and piriform cortex (de Almeida et al., 2013). Model simulations suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic receptors may serve complementary roles in regulating coherence and sparseness of the OB network output, which in turn differentially regulate the strength and overlap in cortical odor representations. Overall, our results suggest that muscarinic receptor blockade results in a bona fide learning impairment that may arise because cortical neurons are activated less often. Behavioral impairment following nicotinic receptor blockade may not be due to the inability of the cortex to learn, but rather arises because the cortex is unable to resolve highly overlapping input patterns.

  3. Distinct roles of phenol-soluble modulins in spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on wet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L; Becher, Dörte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Dreisbach, Annette

    2013-02-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at identifying factors used by S. aureus cells to spread over wet surfaces, starting either from planktonic or biofilm-associated states. Through proteomics analyses we pinpoint phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) as prime facilitators of the spreading process. To dissect the roles of the eight PSMs produced by S. aureus, these peptides were chemically synthesized and tested in spreading assays with different psm mutant strains. The results show that PSMα3 and PSMγ are the strongest facilitators of spreading both for planktonic cells and cells in catheter-associated biofilms. Compared to the six other PSMs of S. aureus, PSMα3 and PSMγ combine strong surfactant activities with a relatively low overall hydropathicity. Importantly, we show that PSM-mediated motility of S. aureus facilitates the rapid colonization of wet surfaces next to catheters and the colonization of fresh meat.

  4. Distinct roles of visual, parietal, and frontal motor cortices in memory-guided sensorimotor decisions

    PubMed Central

    Goard, Michael J; Pho, Gerald N; Woodson, Jonathan; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Mapping specific sensory features to future motor actions is a crucial capability of mammalian nervous systems. We investigated the role of visual (V1), posterior parietal (PPC), and frontal motor (fMC) cortices for sensorimotor mapping in mice during performance of a memory-guided visual discrimination task. Large-scale calcium imaging revealed that V1, PPC, and fMC neurons exhibited heterogeneous responses spanning all task epochs (stimulus, delay, response). Population analyses demonstrated unique encoding of stimulus identity and behavioral choice information across regions, with V1 encoding stimulus, fMC encoding choice even early in the trial, and PPC multiplexing the two variables. Optogenetic inhibition during behavior revealed that all regions were necessary during the stimulus epoch, but only fMC was required during the delay and response epochs. Stimulus identity can thus be rapidly transformed into behavioral choice, requiring V1, PPC, and fMC during the transformation period, but only fMC for maintaining the choice in memory prior to execution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13764.001 PMID:27490481

  5. Distinct roles of DKK1 and DKK2 in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongryeol; Jung, Hyei Yoon; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong Young; Yoo, Ji-Young; Yun, Chae-Ok; Min, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Young-Myoung; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is essential for tumor invasive growth and metastasis, and generates abnormal vascular structures unlike developmental neovessel formation. To reduce tumor vascular abnormalities such as leakage and perivascular cell coverage deficiency that limit cancer therapy effectiveness, novel therapeutic approaches focus on vessel normalization. We have previously shown that Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a Wnt antagonist, inhibits and its homolog DKK2 enhances, angiogenesis in normal tissues. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DKK1 and DKK2 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice with adenovirus expressing DKK1 significantly reduced tumor growth but DKK2 increased growth compared with controls. Similar pattern of tumor growth was observed in endothelial-specific DKK1 and DKK2 transgenic mice. Interestingly, tumor vascular density and perfusion were significantly decreased by DKK1 but increased by DKK2. Moreover, coverage of blood vessels by pericytes was reduced by DKK1, while DKK2 increased it. We further observed that DKK1 diminished retinal vessel density and increased avascular area in an in vivo murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, whereas DKK2 showed opposite results. These findings demonstrate that DKK1 and DKK2 have differential roles in normalization and functionality of tumor blood vessels, in addition to angiogenesis.

  6. Opposing roles for distinct LINC complexes in regulation of the small GTPase RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Ketan; May, Christopher K.; Rogers, Anna; Carroll, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and transduce force from dynamic cytoskeletal networks to the nuclear lamina. Here we show that LINC complexes also signal from the nuclear envelope to critical regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, we find that LINC complexes that contain the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun2 promote focal adhesion assembly by activating the small GTPase RhoA. A key effector in this process is the transcription factor/coactivator complex composed of SRF/Mkl1. A constitutively active form of SRF/Mkl1 was not sufficient to induce focal adhesion assembly in cells lacking Sun2, however, suggesting that LINC complexes support RhoA activity through a transcription-independent mechanism. Strikingly, we also find that the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun1 antagonizes Sun2 LINC complexes and inhibits RhoA activation and focal adhesion assembly. Thus different LINC complexes have opposing roles in the transcription-independent control of the actin cytoskeleton through the small GTPase RhoA. PMID:28035049

  7. Distinct roles of ppGpp and DksA in Legionella pneumophila differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dalebroux, Zachary D.; Yagi, Brian F.; Sahr, Tobias; Buchrieser, Carmen; Swanson, Michele S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY To transit between hosts, intracellular Legionella pneumophila transform into a motile, infectious, transmissive state. Here we exploit the pathogen’s life cycle to examine how guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and DksA cooperate to govern bacterial differentiation. Transcriptional profiling revealed that during transmission alarmone accumulation increases the mRNA for flagellar and Type IV-secretion components, secreted host effectors, and regulators, and decreases transcripts for translation, membrane modification and ATP synthesis machinery. DksA is critical for differentiation, since mutants are defective for stationary phase survival, flagellar gene activation, lysosome avoidance, and macrophage cytotoxicity. The roles of ppGpp and DksA depend on the context. For macrophage transmission, ppGpp is essential, whereas DksA is dispensable, indicating ppGpp can act autonomously. In broth, DksA promotes differentiation when ppGpp levels increase, or during fatty acid stress, as judged by flaA expression and evasion of degradation by macrophages. For flagella morphogenesis, DksA is required for basal fliA (σ28) promoter activity. When alarmone levels increase, DksA cooperates with ppGpp to generate a pulse of Class II rod RNA or to amplify the Class III sigma factor and Class IV flagellin RNAs. Thus, DksA responds to the level of ppGpp and other stress signals to coordinate L. pneumophila differentiation. PMID:20199605

  8. PAFAH Ib Phospholipase A2 Subunits Have Distinct Roles in Maintaining Golgi Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Marie E.; Brown, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies showed that the phospholipase subunits of Platelet Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase (PAFAH) Ib, α1 and α2, partially localize to the Golgi complex and regulate its structure and function. Using siRNA knockdown of individual subunits, we find that α1 and α2 perform overlapping and unique roles in regulating Golgi morphology, assembly, and secretory cargo trafficking. Knockdown of either α1 or α2 reduced secretion of soluble proteins, but neither single knockdown reduced secretion to the same degree as knockdown of both. Knockdown of α1 or α2 inhibited reassembly of an intact Golgi complex to the same extent as knockdown of both. Transport of VSV-G was slowed but at different steps in the secretory pathway: reduction of α1 slowed trans Golgi network to plasma membrane transport, whereas α2 loss reduced endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi trafficking. Similarly, knockdown of either subunit alone disrupted the Golgi complex but with markedly different morphologies. Finally, knockdown of α1, or double knockdown of α1 and α2, resulted in a significant redistribution of kinase dead protein kinase D from the Golgi to the plasma membrane, whereas loss of α2 alone had no such effect. These studies reveal an unexpected complexity in the regulation of Golgi structure and function by PAFAH Ib. PMID:23262398

  9. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  10. Distinct Roles of Phenol-Soluble Modulins in Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on Wet Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L.; Becher, Dörte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L.; Back, Jaap Willem; Dreisbach, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at identifying factors used by S. aureus cells to spread over wet surfaces, starting either from planktonic or biofilm-associated states. Through proteomics analyses we pinpoint phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) as prime facilitators of the spreading process. To dissect the roles of the eight PSMs produced by S. aureus, these peptides were chemically synthesized and tested in spreading assays with different psm mutant strains. The results show that PSMα3 and PSMγ are the strongest facilitators of spreading both for planktonic cells and cells in catheter-associated biofilms. Compared to the six other PSMs of S. aureus, PSMα3 and PSMγ combine strong surfactant activities with a relatively low overall hydropathicity. Importantly, we show that PSM-mediated motility of S. aureus facilitates the rapid colonization of wet surfaces next to catheters and the colonization of fresh meat. PMID:23183971

  11. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    decrease in solvation free energy, harnessing the monomer solvation free energy earned during the misfolding. The second step, where a compact dimer structure is formed, is driven by direct protein-protein interactions, but again it is accompanied by an increase in solvation free energy. The increased solvation free energy of the dimer will function as the driving force to recruit another Aβ protein in the approach stage of subsequent oligomerizations. The fluctuating thermodynamics analysis of the misfolding and dimerization of the Aβ protein indicates that the interaction of the protein with surrounding water plays a critical role in protein aggregation. Such a water-centric perspective is further corroborated by demonstrating that, for a large number of Aβ mutants and mutants of other protein systems, the change in the experimental aggregation propensity upon mutation has a significant correlation with the protein solvation free energy change. We also find striking discrimination between the positively and negatively charged residues on the protein surface by surrounding water molecules, which is shown to play a crucial role in determining the protein aggregation propensity. We argue that the protein total charge dictates such striking behavior of the surrounding water molecules. Our results provide new insights for understanding and predicting the protein aggregation propensity, thereby offering novel design principles for producing aggregation-resistant proteins for biotherapeutics.

  12. Distinct role of Tim-3 in systemic lupus erythematosus and clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Guo, Xingqing; Tian, Qingwu; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Tim-3 is considered as one of the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) gene family members, which contributes to the activating or silencing genes, but the mechanism of Tim-3 function in mediating SLE or tumor metastasis has not been well explored. Here, we reported Tim-3 was high expressed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with SLE, detected by RT-PCR, significantly, GATA-3 mRNA expression also increased in patients with SLE, compared with the healthy control groups. The bioinformatics used to detect the TCGA database indicated the abnormal expression of Tim-3 was involved in several different cancer types. Further, the higher expression of Tim-3 in kidney renal clear cell carcinoma TCGA database indicated it was a marker for worse 5-year survival. The high expression of Tim-3 in different ccRCC cell lines was detected in both RNA level and protein level. Further, two kinds of relative Tim-3 siRNAs in ccRCC cell lines inhibit cell migration and invasion in vitro, However, the inhibition could be partially rescued by the additional GATA3 knockdown. Further, the down regulation in the RNA and protein levels of GATA3, and the negative correlation between Tim-3 and GATA3 implied that suppression of downstream GATA3 was an important mechanism by which Tim-3 triggered metastasis in ccRCC cell lines. Together, our experiments reveal the role for Tim-3 in facilitating SLE or invasive potential of ccRCC cells by either activating GATA3 or inhibiting GATA3, suggesting that Tim-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for treating SLE or clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  13. Common and Distinct Roles of Juvenile Hormone Signaling Genes in Metamorphosis of Holometabolous and Hemimetabolous Insects

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly) or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly). In either case juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and Broad-Complex (BR-C) genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C) in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis. PMID:22174880

  14. Spatially distinct regulatory roles for gibberellins in the promotion of flowering of Arabidopsis under long photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Porri, Aimone; Torti, Stefano; Romera-Branchat, Maida; Coupland, George

    2012-06-01

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) contributes to many developmental processes, including the transition to flowering. In Arabidopsis, GA promotes this transition most strongly under environmental conditions such as short days (SDs) when other regulatory pathways that promote flowering are not active. Under SDs, GAs activate transcription of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and LEAFY (LFY) at the shoot meristem, two genes encoding transcription factors involved in flowering. Here, the tissues in which GAs act to promote flowering were tested under different environmental conditions. The enzyme GIBBERELLIN 2 OXIDASE 7 (GA2ox7), which catabolizes active GAs, was overexpressed in most tissues from the viral CaMV 35S promoter, specifically in the vascular tissue from the SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 (SUC2) promoter or in the shoot apical meristem from the KNAT1 promoter. We find that under inductive long days (LDs), GAs are required in the vascular tissue to increase the levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) mRNAs, which encode a systemic signal transported from the leaves to the meristem during floral induction. Similarly, impairing GA signalling in the vascular tissue reduces FT and TSF mRNA levels and delays flowering. In the meristem under inductive LDs, GAs are not required to activate SOC1, as reported under SDs, but for subsequent steps in floral induction, including transcription of genes encoding SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROMOTER LIKE (SPL) transcription factors. Thus, GA has important roles in promoting transcription of FT, TSF and SPL genes during floral induction in response to LDs, and these functions are spatially separated between the leaves and shoot meristem.

  15. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Konopova, Barbora; Smykal, Vlastimil; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly) or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly). In either case juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and Broad-Complex (BR-C) genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C) in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis.

  16. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca2+], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25–2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca2+] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  17. Prepatterning the Drosophila notum: the three genes of the iroquois complex play intrinsically distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ikmi, Aissam; Netter, Sophie; Coen, Dario

    2008-05-15

    The Drosophila thorax exhibits 11 pairs of large sensory organs (macrochaetes) identified by their unique position. Remarkably precise, this pattern provides an excellent model system to study the genetic basis of pattern formation. In imaginal wing discs, the achaete-scute proneural genes are expressed in clusters of cells that prefigure the positions of each macrochaete. The activities of prepatterning genes provide positional cues controlling this expression pattern. The three homeobox genes clustered in the iroquois complex (araucan, caupolican and mirror) are such prepattern genes. mirror is generally characterized as performing functions predominantly different from the other iroquois genes. Conversely, araucan and caupolican are described in previous studies as performing redundant functions in most if not all processes in which they are involved. We have addressed the question of the specific role of each iroquois gene in the prepattern of the notum and we clearly demonstrate that they are intrinsically different in their contribution to this process: caupolican and mirror, but not araucan, are required for the neural patterning of the lateral notum. However, when caupolican and/or mirror expression is reduced, araucan loss of function has an effect on thoracic bristles development. Moreover, the overexpression of araucan is able to rescue caupolican loss of function. We conclude that, although retaining some common functionalities, the Drosophila iroquois genes are in the process of diversification. In addition, caupolican and mirror are required for stripe expression and, therefore, to specify the muscular attachment sites prepattern. Thus, caupolican and mirror may act as common prepattern genes for all structures in the lateral notum.

  18. Mitochondrial thiol oxidase Erv1: both shuttle cysteine residues are required for its function with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ang, Swee Kim; Zhang, Mengqi; Lodi, Tiziana; Lu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Erv1 (essential for respiration and viability 1), is an essential component of the MIA (mitochondrial import and assembly) pathway, playing an important role in the oxidative folding of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins. In the MIA pathway, Mia40, a thiol oxidoreductase with a CPC motif at its active site, oxidizes newly imported substrate proteins. Erv1 a FAD-dependent thiol oxidase, in turn reoxidizes Mia40 via its N-terminal Cys30-Cys33 shuttle disulfide. However, it is unclear how the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 relay electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif to the Erv1 active-site Cys130-Cys133 disulfide. In the present study, using yeast genetic approaches we showed that both shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are required for cell growth. In organelle and in vitro studies confirmed that both shuttle cysteine residues were indeed required for import of MIA pathway substrates and Erv1 enzyme function to oxidize Mia40. Furthermore, our results revealed that the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are functionally distinct. Although Cys33 is essential for forming the intermediate disulfide Cys33-Cys130' and transferring electrons to the redox active-site directly, Cys30 plays two important roles: (i) dominantly interacts and receives electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif; and (ii) resolves the Erv1 Cys33-Cys130 intermediate disulfide. Taken together, we conclude that both shuttle cysteine residues are required for Erv1 function, and play complementary, but distinct, roles to ensure rapid turnover of active Erv1.

  19. Distinctive topologies of partner-switching signaling networks correlate with their physiological roles

    PubMed Central

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Brody, Margaret S.; Price, Chester W.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    principles agree with the known or suspected roles of similar networks in diverse bacteria. PMID:17498739

  20. Distinct Roles for Dectin-1 and TLR4 in the Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Sixto M.; Cowden, Susan; Hsia, Yen-Cheng; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Momany, Michelle; Pearlman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus species are a major worldwide cause of corneal ulcers, resulting in visual impairment and blindness in immunocompetent individuals. To enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of Aspergillus keratitis, we developed a murine model in which red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing A. fumigatus (Af293.1RFP) conidia are injected into the corneal stroma, and disease progression and fungal survival are tracked over time. Using Mafia mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, we demonstrated that the presence of resident corneal macrophages is essential for production of IL-1β and CXCL1/KC, and for recruitment of neutrophils and mononuclear cells into the corneal stroma. We found that β-glucan was highly expressed on germinating conidia and hyphae in the cornea stroma, and that both Dectin-1 and phospho-Syk were up-regulated in infected corneas. Additionally, we show that infected Dectin-1−/− corneas have impaired IL-1β and CXCL1/KC production, resulting in diminished cellular infiltration and fungal clearance compared with control mice, especially during infection with clinical isolates expressing high β-glucan. In contrast to Dectin 1−/− mice, cellular infiltration into infected TLR2−/−, TLR4−/−, and MD-2−/− mice corneas was unimpaired, indicating no role for these receptors in cell recruitment; however, fungal killing was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− mice, but not TLR2−/− or MD-2−/− mice. We also found that TRIF−/− and TIRAP−/− mice exhibited no fungal-killing defects, but that MyD88−/− and IL-1R1−/− mice were unable to regulate fungal growth. In conclusion, these data are consistent with a model in which β-glucan on A.fumigatus germinating conidia activates Dectin-1 on corneal macrophages to produce IL-1β, and CXCL1, which together with IL-1R1/MyD88-dependent activation, results in recruitment of neutrophils to the corneal stroma and TLR4

  1. Distinct roles of D1 and D5 dopamine receptors in motor activity and striatal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Diego; Grande, Cristina; Saulle, Emilia; Martin, Ana B; Gubellini, Paolo; Pavón, Nancy; Pisani, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Moratalla, Rosario; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-09-17

    Stimulation of dopamine (DA) receptors in the striatum is essential for voluntary motor activity and for the generation of plasticity at corticostriatal synapses. In the present study, mice lacking DA D1 receptors have been used to investigate the involvement of the D1-like class (D1 and D5) of DA receptors in locomotion and corticostriatal long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP). Our results suggest that D1 and D5 receptors exert distinct actions on both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and spontaneous motor activity. Accordingly, the ablation of D1 receptors disrupted corticostriatal LTP, whereas pharmacological blockade of D5 receptors prevented LTD. On the other side, genetic ablation of D1 receptors increased locomotor activity, whereas the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 decreased motor activity in both control mice and mice lacking D1 receptors. Endogenous DA stimulated D1 and D5 receptors in distinct subtypes of striatal neurons to induce, respectively, LTP and LTD. In control mice, in fact, LTP was blocked by inhibiting the D1-protein kinase A pathway in the recorded spiny neuron, whereas the striatal nitric oxide-producing interneuron was presumably the neuronal subtype stimulated by D5 receptors during the induction phase of LTD. Understanding the role of DA receptors in striatal function is essential to gain insights into the neural bases of critical brain functions and of dramatic pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction.

  2. Distinct roles for the actin nucleators Arp2/3 and hDia1 during NK-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Boyd; Cooper, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several actin nucleators, including Arp2/3 and various formins, control numerous cytoskeletal-based functions in vivo. Results We investigated the relative roles of these nucleators. As a model system, we used natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, which display a wide range of cytoskeletal-based functions that culminate in the lysis of target cells. NK cells lacking either Arp2/3 or the formin hDia1 were ineffective in target cell lysis, but for distinct reasons. Loss of Arp2/3 function led to defects in cells adhesion and actin assembly at the junction with the target cell (the lytic synapse). In contrast, loss of hDia1 did not disrupt actin assembly at the lytic synapse. Instead, loss of hDia1 led to perturbations in the microtubule cytoskeleton, including the targeting of microtubules to the lytic synapse. Conclusions These studies reveal novel distinctions and relationships among the functions of Arp2/3, formins and microtubules in cells. Notably, a formin mediates the capture of microtubules at the cell periphery. PMID:19913427

  3. Nrf1 and Nrf2 Play Distinct Roles in Activation of Antioxidant Response Element-dependent Genes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuji, Makiko; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Kobayashi, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Hayes, John D.; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Nrf1 is a member of the vertebrate Cap`n'Collar (CNC) transcription factor family that commonly contains a unique basic-leucine zipper domain. Among CNC family members, Nrf2 is known to regulate a battery of antioxidant and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). Although Nrf1 has also been shown to bind the ARE, it is unclear whether it plays a distinct role from Nrf2 in regulating genes with this element. To address this issue in vivo, we generated mice bearing a hepatocyte-specific disruption of the Nrf1 gene. AlthoughNrf2 knock-out mice did not exhibit liver damage when they were maintained in an unstressed condition, hepatocyte-specific deletion of Nrf1 caused liver damage resembling the human disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Gene expression analysis revealed that the disruption of Nrf1 causes stress that activates a number of ARE-driven genes in an Nrf2-dependent manner, indicating that Nrf2 cannot compensate completely for loss of Nrf1 function in the liver. In contrast, expression of metallothionein-1 and -2 (MT1 and MT2) genes, each of which harbors at least one ARE in its regulatory region, was decreased in the Nrf1-null mutant mice. Whereas Nrf1 and Nrf2 bound the MT1 ARE with comparable affinity, Nrf1 preferentially activated the reporter gene expression through the MT1 ARE. This study has, thus, identified the first ARE-dependent gene that relies exclusively on Nrf1, suggesting that it plays a distinct functional role in regulating ARE-driven genes. PMID:18826952

  4. Four Isoforms of Arabidopsis 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase Have Overlapping yet Distinct Roles in Phenylpropanoid Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of lignin, flavonoids, and hydroxycinnamoyl esters share the first three enzymatic steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway. The last shared step is catalyzed by 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), which generates p-coumaroyl CoA and caffeoyl CoA from their respective acids. Four isoforms of 4CL have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that 4CL1, 4CL2, and 4CL4 are more closely related to each other than to 4CL3, suggesting that the two groups may serve different biological functions. Promoter-GUS analysis shows that 4CL1 and 4CL2 are expressed in lignifying cells. In contrast, 4CL3 is expressed in a broad range of cell types, and 4CL3 has acquired a distinct role in flavonoid metabolism. Sinapoylmalate, the major hydroxycinnamoyl ester found in Arabidopsis, is greatly reduced in the 4cl1 4cl3 mutant, showing that 4CL1 and 4CL3 function redundantly in its biosynthesis. 4CL1 accounts for the majority of the total 4CL activity, and loss of 4CL1 leads to reduction in lignin content but no growth defect. The 4cl1 4cl2 and 4cl1 4cl2 4cl3 mutants are both dwarf but do not have further reduced lignin than the 4cl1 mutant, indicating that either 4CL1 or 4CL2 is required for normal plant growth. Although 4CL4 has a limited expression profile, it does make a modest contribution to lignin biosynthesis. Together, these data show that the four isoforms of 4CL in Arabidopsis have overlapping yet distinct roles in phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26491147

  5. Focal uncaging of GABA reveals a temporally defined role for GABAergic inhibition during appetitive associative olfactory conditioning in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-07-16

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two different approaches to activate GABA receptors during appetitive olfactory conditioning in the honeybee. Injection of GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol 20 min before but not 20 min after associative conditioning affects memory performance. These memory deficits were attenuated by additional training sessions. Muscimol has no effect on sensory perception, odor generalization, and nonassociative learning, indicating a specific role of GABA during associative conditioning. We used photolytic uncaging of GABA to identify the GABA-sensitive time window during the short pairing of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) that lasts only seconds. Either uncaging of GABA in the antennal lobes or the mushroom bodies during the CS presentation of the CS-US pairing impairs memory formation, while uncaging GABA during the US phase has no effect on memory. Uncaging GABA during the CS presentation in memory retrieval also has no effect. Thus, in honeybee appetitive olfactory learning GABA specifically interferes with the integration of CS and US during associative conditioning and exerts a modulatory role in memory formation depending on the training strength.

  6. Role of the cytokine environment and cytokine receptor expression on the generation of functionally distinct dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Conti, Lucia; Cardone, Marco; Varano, Barbara; Puddu, Patrizia; Belardelli, Filippo; Gessani, Sandra

    2008-03-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages evolve from a common precursor. However, factors controlling monocyte differentiation toward DC or macrophages are poorly defined. We report that the surface density of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) alpha subunit in human peripheral blood monocytes varies among donors. Although no correlation was found between the extent of GM-CSFR and monocyte differentiation into DC driven by GM-CSF and IL-4, GM-CSFR expression strongly influenced the generation of CD1a(+) dendritic-like cells in the absence of IL-4. CD1a(+) cells generated in the presence of GM-CSF express CD40, CD80, MHC class I and II, DC-SIGN, MR, CCR5, and partially retain CD14 expression. Interestingly, they spontaneously induce the expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) allogeneic T lymphocytes producing IFN-gamma, and migrate toward CCL4 and CCL19. Upon stimulation with TLR ligands, they acquire the phenotypic features of mature DC. In contrast, the allostimulatory capacity is not further increased upon LPS activation. However, by blocking LPS-induced IL-10, a higher T cell proliferative response and IL-12 production were observed. Interestingly, IL-23 secretion was not affected by endogenous IL-10. These results highlight the importance of GM-CSFR expression in monocytes for cytokine-induced DC generation and point to GM-CSF as a direct player in the generation of functionally distinct DC.

  7. P. aeruginosa SGNH Hydrolase-Like Proteins AlgJ and AlgX Have Similar Topology but Separate and Distinct Roles in Alginate Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Patrick J.; Kitova, Elena N.; Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; Little, Dustin J.; Whitney, John C.; Dawson, Karen; Weadge, Joel T.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Codée, Jeroen D. C.; Klassen, John S.; Clarke, Anthony J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The O-acetylation of polysaccharides is a common modification used by pathogenic organisms to protect against external forces. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the anionic, O-acetylated exopolysaccharide alginate during chronic infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients to form the major constituent of a protective biofilm matrix. Four proteins have been implicated in the O-acetylation of alginate, AlgIJF and AlgX. To probe the biological function of AlgJ, we determined its structure to 1.83 Å resolution. AlgJ is a SGNH hydrolase-like protein, which while structurally similar to the N-terminal domain of AlgX exhibits a distinctly different electrostatic surface potential. Consistent with other SGNH hydrolases, we identified a conserved catalytic triad composed of D190, H192 and S288 and demonstrated that AlgJ exhibits acetylesterase activity in vitro. Residues in the AlgJ signature motifs were found to form an extensive network of interactions that are critical for O-acetylation of alginate in vivo. Using two different electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assays we compared the abilities of AlgJ and AlgX to bind and acetylate alginate. Binding studies using defined length polymannuronic acid revealed that AlgJ exhibits either weak or no detectable polymer binding while AlgX binds polymannuronic acid specifically in a length-dependent manner. Additionally, AlgX was capable of utilizing the surrogate acetyl-donor 4-nitrophenyl acetate to catalyze the O-acetylation of polymannuronic acid. Our results, combined with previously published in vivo data, suggest that the annotated O-acetyltransferases AlgJ and AlgX have separate and distinct roles in O-acetylation. Our refined model for alginate acetylation places AlgX as the terminal acetlytransferase and provides a rationale for the variability in the number of proteins required for polysaccharide O-acetylation. PMID:25165982

  8. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulation of envelope-related functions.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi.

  9. MHF1-2/CENP-S-X performs distinct roles in centromere metabolism and genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Osman, Fekret; Feeney, Laura; Lorenz, Alexander; Bryer, Claire; Whitby, Matthew C

    2013-09-11

    The histone-fold proteins Mhf1/CENP-S and Mhf2/CENP-X perform two important functions in vertebrate cells. First, they are components of the constitutive centromere-associated network, aiding kinetochore assembly and function. Second, they work with the FANCM DNA translocase to promote DNA repair. However, it has been unclear whether there is crosstalk between these roles. We show that Mhf1 and Mhf2 in fission yeast, as in vertebrates, serve a dual function, aiding DNA repair/recombination and localizing to centromeres to promote chromosome segregation. Importantly, these functions are distinct, with the former being dependent on their interaction with the FANCM orthologue Fml1 and the latter not. Together with Fml1, they play a second role in aiding chromosome segregation by processing sister chromatid junctions. However, a failure of this activity does not manifest dramatically increased levels of chromosome missegregation due to the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease, which acts as a failsafe to resolve DNA junctions before the end of mitosis.

  10. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  11. MHF1–2/CENP-S-X performs distinct roles in centromere metabolism and genetic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Osman, Fekret; Feeney, Laura; Lorenz, Alexander; Bryer, Claire; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    The histone-fold proteins Mhf1/CENP-S and Mhf2/CENP-X perform two important functions in vertebrate cells. First, they are components of the constitutive centromere-associated network, aiding kinetochore assembly and function. Second, they work with the FANCM DNA translocase to promote DNA repair. However, it has been unclear whether there is crosstalk between these roles. We show that Mhf1 and Mhf2 in fission yeast, as in vertebrates, serve a dual function, aiding DNA repair/recombination and localizing to centromeres to promote chromosome segregation. Importantly, these functions are distinct, with the former being dependent on their interaction with the FANCM orthologue Fml1 and the latter not. Together with Fml1, they play a second role in aiding chromosome segregation by processing sister chromatid junctions. However, a failure of this activity does not manifest dramatically increased levels of chromosome missegregation due to the Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease, which acts as a failsafe to resolve DNA junctions before the end of mitosis. PMID:24026537

  12. Distinct Roles for Lymphotoxin-α and Tumor Necrosis Factor in the Control of Leishmania donovani Infection

    PubMed Central

    Engwerda, Christian R.; Ato, Manabu; Stäger, Simona; Alexander, Clare E.; Stanley, Amanda C.; Kaye, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for the control of visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani. However, the role of the related cytokine lymphotoxin (LT) α in this infection is unknown. Here we report that C57BL/6 mice deficient in TNF (B6.TNF−/−) or LTα (B6.LTα−/−) have increased susceptibility to hepatic L. donovani infection. Furthermore, the outcome of infection in bone marrow chimeric mice is dependent on donor hematopoietic cells, indicating that developmental defects in lymphoid organs were not responsible for increased susceptibility to L. donovani. Although both LTα and TNF regulated the migration of leukocytes into the sinusoidal area of the infected liver, their roles were distinct. LTα was essential for migration of leukocytes from periportal areas, an event consistent with LTα-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1 on liver sinusoid lining cells, whereas TNF was essential for leukocyte recruitment to the liver. During visceral leishmaniasis, both cytokines were produced by radio-resistant cells and by CD4+ T cells. LTα and TNF production by the former was required for granuloma assembly, while production of these cytokines by CD4+ T cells was necessary to control parasite growth. The production of inducible nitric oxide synthase was also found to be deficient in TNF- and LTα-deficient infected mice. These results demonstrate that both LTα and TNF are required for control of L. donovani infection in noncompensatory ways. PMID:15579454

  13. Beyond Antimicrobial Resistance: Evidence for a Distinct Role of the AcrD Efflux Pump in Salmonella Biology

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Michelle M. C.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Newcombe, Jane; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Ivens, Alasdair

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For over 20 years, bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps have been studied because of their impact on resistance to antimicrobials. However, critical questions remain, including why produce efflux pumps under non-antimicrobial treatment conditions, and why have multiple pumps if their only purpose is antimicrobial efflux? Salmonella spp. possess five efflux pump families, including the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps. Notably, the RND efflux pump AcrD has a unique substrate profile, distinct from other Salmonella efflux pumps. Here we show that inactivation of acrD results in a profoundly altered transcriptome and modulation of pathways integral to Salmonella biology. The most significant transcriptome changes were central metabolism related, with additional changes observed in pathogenicity, environmental sensing, and stress response pathway expression. The extent of tricarboxylic acid cycle and fumarate metabolism expression changes led us to hypothesize that acrD inactivation may result in motility defects due to perturbation of metabolite concentrations, such as fumarate, for which a role in motility has been established. Despite minimal detectable changes in flagellar gene expression, we found that an acrD mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate was significantly impaired for swarming motility, which was restored by addition of fumarate. The acrD mutant outcompeted the wild type in fitness experiments. The results of these diverse experiments provide strong evidence that the AcrD efflux pump is not simply a redundant system providing response resilience, but also has distinct physiological functions. Together, these data indicate that the AcrD efflux pump has a significant and previously underappreciated impact on bacterial biology, despite only minor perturbations of antibiotic resistance profiles. PMID:27879336

  14. Beyond Antimicrobial Resistance: Evidence for a Distinct Role of the AcrD Efflux Pump in Salmonella Biology.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Michelle M C; Blair, Jessica M A; La Ragione, Roberto M; Newcombe, Jane; Dwyer, Daniel J; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-11-22

    For over 20 years, bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps have been studied because of their impact on resistance to antimicrobials. However, critical questions remain, including why produce efflux pumps under non-antimicrobial treatment conditions, and why have multiple pumps if their only purpose is antimicrobial efflux? Salmonella spp. possess five efflux pump families, including the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps. Notably, the RND efflux pump AcrD has a unique substrate profile, distinct from other Salmonella efflux pumps. Here we show that inactivation of acrD results in a profoundly altered transcriptome and modulation of pathways integral to Salmonella biology. The most significant transcriptome changes were central metabolism related, with additional changes observed in pathogenicity, environmental sensing, and stress response pathway expression. The extent of tricarboxylic acid cycle and fumarate metabolism expression changes led us to hypothesize that acrD inactivation may result in motility defects due to perturbation of metabolite concentrations, such as fumarate, for which a role in motility has been established. Despite minimal detectable changes in flagellar gene expression, we found that an acrD mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate was significantly impaired for swarming motility, which was restored by addition of fumarate. The acrD mutant outcompeted the wild type in fitness experiments. The results of these diverse experiments provide strong evidence that the AcrD efflux pump is not simply a redundant system providing response resilience, but also has distinct physiological functions. Together, these data indicate that the AcrD efflux pump has a significant and previously underappreciated impact on bacterial biology, despite only minor perturbations of antibiotic resistance profiles.

  15. The Two Na+ Sites in the Human Serotonin Transporter Play Distinct Roles in the Ion Coupling and Electrogenicity of Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sandtner, Walter; Burbach, Nathan; Bulling, Simon; Sitte, Harald H.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6 family of proteins, including the human serotonin transporter (hSERT), utilize Na+, Cl−, and K+ gradients to induce conformational changes necessary for substrate translocation. Dysregulation of ion movement through monoamine transporters has been shown to impact neuronal firing potentials and could play a role in pathophysiologies, such as depression and anxiety. Despite multiple crystal structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic SLC transporters indicating the location of both (or one) conserved Na+-binding sites (termed Na1 and Na2), much remains uncertain in regard to the movements and contributions of these cation-binding sites in the transport process. In this study, we utilize the unique properties of a mutation of hSERT at a single, highly conserved asparagine on TM1 (Asn-101) to provide several lines of evidence demonstrating mechanistically distinct roles for Na1 and Na2. Mutations at Asn-101 alter the cation dependence of the transporter, allowing Ca2+ (but not other cations) to functionally replace Na+ for driving transport and promoting 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-dependent conformational changes. Furthermore, in two-electrode voltage clamp studies in Xenopus oocytes, both Ca2+ and Na+ illicit 5-HT-induced currents in the Asn-101 mutants and reveal that, although Ca2+ promotes substrate-induced current, it does not appear to be the charge carrier during 5-HT transport. These findings, in addition to functional evaluation of Na1 and Na2 site mutants, reveal separate roles for Na1 and Na2 and provide insight into initiation of the translocation process as well as a mechanism whereby the reported SERT stoichiometry can be obtained despite the presence of two putative Na+-binding sites. PMID:24293367

  16. The two Na+ sites in the human serotonin transporter play distinct roles in the ion coupling and electrogenicity of transport.

    PubMed

    Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sandtner, Walter; Burbach, Nathan; Bulling, Simon; Sitte, Harald H; Henry, L Keith

    2014-01-17

    Neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6 family of proteins, including the human serotonin transporter (hSERT), utilize Na(+), Cl(-), and K(+) gradients to induce conformational changes necessary for substrate translocation. Dysregulation of ion movement through monoamine transporters has been shown to impact neuronal firing potentials and could play a role in pathophysiologies, such as depression and anxiety. Despite multiple crystal structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic SLC transporters indicating the location of both (or one) conserved Na(+)-binding sites (termed Na1 and Na2), much remains uncertain in regard to the movements and contributions of these cation-binding sites in the transport process. In this study, we utilize the unique properties of a mutation of hSERT at a single, highly conserved asparagine on TM1 (Asn-101) to provide several lines of evidence demonstrating mechanistically distinct roles for Na1 and Na2. Mutations at Asn-101 alter the cation dependence of the transporter, allowing Ca(2+) (but not other cations) to functionally replace Na(+) for driving transport and promoting 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-dependent conformational changes. Furthermore, in two-electrode voltage clamp studies in Xenopus oocytes, both Ca(2+) and Na(+) illicit 5-HT-induced currents in the Asn-101 mutants and reveal that, although Ca(2+) promotes substrate-induced current, it does not appear to be the charge carrier during 5-HT transport. These findings, in addition to functional evaluation of Na1 and Na2 site mutants, reveal separate roles for Na1 and Na2 and provide insight into initiation of the translocation process as well as a mechanism whereby the reported SERT stoichiometry can be obtained despite the presence of two putative Na(+)-binding sites.

  17. The refolding activity of the yeast heat shock proteins Ssa1 and Ssa2 defines their role in protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Ssa1/2p, members of one of the yeast cytosolic hsp70 subfamilies, have been implicated in the translocation of secretory proteins into the lumen of the ER. The involvement of these hsp70s in translocation was tested directly by examining the effect of immunodepleting Ssa1/2p from yeast cytosol and subsequently testing the cytosol for its ability to support co- and post-translational translocation of prepro-alpha- factor. Depletion of Ssa1/2p had no effect on the efficiency of translocation in this in vitro assay. The system was used to examine the effect of the absence of Ssa1/2p on two other putative hsp70 functions: cotranslational folding of nascent luciferase and refolding of denatured luciferase. Depletion of Ssa1/2p had no effect on the ability of the yeast lysate to synthesize enzymatically active luciferase, but had a dramatic effect on the ability of the lysate to refold chemically denatured luciferase. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the refolding activity of Ssa1/2p in the context of the yeast cytosol, and define refolding activity as a chaperone function specific to Ssa1/2p, aprt from other cytosolic hsp70s. They also suggest that Ssa1/2p do not play a significant role in chaperoning the folding of nascent polypeptides. The implications of these findings for Ssa1/2p activity on their proposed role in the process of translocation are discussed. PMID:8947547

  18. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  19. Transcriptional Control of Dual Transporters Involved in α-Ketoglutarate Utilization Reveals Their Distinct Roles in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wentong; Cai, Xuwang; Yang, Yongwu; Yan, Shigan; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    conditions. Therefore, different transcriptional regulation led to distinct roles played by C5038 and KgtP in KG utilization and fitness in vivo. This study thus potentially expanded our understanding of UPEC pathobiology. PMID:28270808

  20. Ceramide synthases 2, 5, and 6 confer distinct roles in radiation-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Mesicek, Judith; Lee, Hyunmi; Feldman, Taya; Jiang, Xuejun; Skobeleva, Anastasia; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-09-01

    The role of ceramide neo-genesis in cellular stress response signaling is gaining increasing attention with recent progress in elucidating the novel roles and biochemical properties of the ceramide synthase (CerS) enzymes. Selective tissue and subcellular distribution of the six mammalian CerS isoforms, combined with distinct fatty acyl chain length substrate preferences, implicate differential functions of specific ceramide species in cellular signaling. We report here that ionizing radiation (IR) induces de novo synthesis of ceramide to influence HeLa cell apoptosis by specifically activating CerS isoforms 2, 5, and 6 that generate opposing anti- and pro-apoptotic ceramides in mitochondrial membranes. Overexpression of CerS2 resulted in partial protection from IR-induced apoptosis whereas overexpression of CerS5 increased apoptosis in HeLa cells. Knockdown studies determined that CerS2 is responsible for all observable IR-induced C(24:0) CerS activity, and while CerS5 and CerS6 each confer approximately 50% of the C(16:0) CerS baseline synthetic activity, both are required for IR-induced activity. Additionally, co-immunoprecipitation studies suggest that CerS2, 5, and 6 might exist as heterocomplexes in HeLa cells, providing further insight into the regulation of CerS proteins. These data add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating interplay among the CerS proteins in a stress stimulus-, cell type- and subcellular compartment-specific manner.

  1. Most cases of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-uninfected patients in Vietnam are due to a distinct amplified fragment length polymorphism-defined cluster of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii VN1.

    PubMed

    Day, Jeremy N; Hoang, Thu N; Duong, Anh V; Hong, Chau T T; Diep, Pham T; Campbell, James I; Sieu, Tran P M; Hien, Tran T; Bui, Tien; Boni, Maciej F; Lalloo, David G; Carter, Dee; Baker, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy J

    2011-02-01

    Cryptococcal disease most commonly occurs in patients with an underlying immune deficit, most commonly HIV infection, and is due to Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii. Occasionally disease due to this variety occurs in apparently immunocompetent patients. The relationship between strains infecting immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients is not clear. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to characterize the relationship between strains infecting HIV-infected and uninfected patients. Isolates from 51 HIV-uninfected patients and 100 HIV-infected patients with cryptococcal meningitis were compared. C. neoformans var. grubii VNI was responsible for infections in 73% of HIV-uninfected and 100% of HIV-infected patients. AFLP analysis defined two distinct clusters, VNIγ and VNIδ. The majority (84%) of isolates from HIV-uninfected patients were VNIγ, compared with only 38% of isolates from HIV-infected patients (odds ratio, 8.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.04 to 26.6; P < 0.0001). In HIV-uninfected patients, underlying disease was less frequent in those with VNIγ infections. Two clusters of C. neoformans var. grubii VN1 are responsible for the majority of cases of cryptococcal meningitis in Vietnam. The distribution of these clusters differs according to the immune status of the host.

  2. Distinct roles of 1α and 1β heavy chains of the inner arm dynein I1 of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Shiori; Fox, Laura A.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Porter, Mary E.; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Sale, Winfield S.

    2011-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas I1 dynein is a two-headed inner dynein arm important for the regulation of flagellar bending. Here we took advantage of mutant strains lacking either the 1α or 1β motor domain to distinguish the functional role of each motor domain. Single- particle electronic microscopic analysis confirmed that both the I1α and I1β complexes are single headed with similar ringlike, motor domain structures. Despite similarity in structure, however, the I1β complex has severalfold higher ATPase activity and microtubule gliding motility compared to the I1α complex. Moreover, in vivo measurement of microtubule sliding in axonemes revealed that the loss of the 1β motor results in a more severe impairment in motility and failure in regulation of microtubule sliding by the I1 dynein phosphoregulatory mechanism. The data indicate that each I1 motor domain is distinct in function: The I1β motor domain is an effective motor required for wild-type microtubule sliding, whereas the I1α motor domain may be responsible for local restraint of microtubule sliding. PMID:21148301

  3. The Chang'E-1 orbiter plays a distinctive role in China's first successful selenodetic lunar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong; Su, Xiaoli; Huang, Qian; Yan, Jianguo

    2011-12-01

    The first Chinese lunar orbiter Chang'E-1 is a successful mission with many fruitful results obtained in various disciplines. The scientific data acquired by the Chang'E-1 payloads can benefit studies of the lunar origin and evolution, as well as other relevant research areas, after careful validation of the data. Among the new results, the Chang'E-1 selenodetic products are continually uncovering characteristics of the lunar surface, undersurface and inner structure. Successful lunar orbiters such as the Clementine, Lunar Prospector, KAGUYA/SELENE, Chang'E-1, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and GRAIL have been revealing, with increasing clarity, global selenodetic characteristics with state-of-the-art fine resolution and high precision. In particular, the Chang'E-1 plays an important distinctive role in selenodetic exploration through enhancing lunar topography and gravity models. The gravity model has been successfully improved with a factor of two after applying the Chang'E-1 long-wavelength tracking data. Using the new models, some medium-scale lunar surface characteristics such as basins and volcanoes have been identified. Furthermore, the old mascon basins of Bouguer, gravity anomaly and craters have been discovered with the Chang'E-1 selenodetic data.

  4. Distinct roles of N-glycosylation at different sites of corin in cell membrane targeting and ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhou, Tiantian; Peng, Jianhao; Xu, Ping; Dong, Ningzheng; Chen, Shenghan; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-16

    Corin is a membrane-bound protease essential for activating natriuretic peptides and regulating blood pressure. Human corin has 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites in its extracellular domains. It has been shown that N-glycans are required for corin cell surface expression and zymogen activation. It remains unknown, however, how N-glycans at different sites may regulate corin biosynthesis and processing. In this study, we examined corin mutants, in which each of the 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites was mutated individually. By Western analysis of corin proteins in cell lysate and conditioned medium from transfected HEK293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, we found that N-glycosylation at Asn-80 inhibited corin shedding in the juxtamembrane domain. Similarly, N-glycosylation at Asn-231 protected corin from autocleavage in the frizzled-1 domain. Moreover, N-glycosylation at Asn-697 in the scavenger receptor domain and at Asn-1022 in the protease domain is important for corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. We also found that the location of the N-glycosylation site in the protease domain was not critical. N-Glycosylation at Asn-1022 may be switched to different sites to promote corin zymogen activation. Together, our results show that N-glycans at different sites may play distinct roles in regulating the cell membrane targeting, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding of corin.

  5. Distinct roles of the steroid receptor coactivator 1 and of MED1 in retinoid-induced transcription and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Bruno; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-07-21

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are the molecular relays of retinoid action on transcription, cellular differentiation and apoptosis. Transcriptional activation of retinoid-regulated promoters requires the dismissal of corepressors and the recruitment of coactivators to promoter-bound RAR. RARs recruit in vitro a plethora of coactivators whose actual contribution to retinoid-induced transcription is poorly characterized in vivo. Embryonal carcinoma P19 cells, which are highly sensitive to retinoids, were depleted from archetypical coactivators by RNAi. SRC1-deficient P19 cells showed severely compromised retinoid-induced responses, in agreement with the supposed role of SRC1 as a RAR coactivator. Unexpectedly, Med1/TRAP220/DRIP205-depleted cells exhibited an exacerbated response to retinoids, both in terms transcriptional responses and of cellular differentiation. Med1 depletion affected TFIIH and cdk9 detection at the prototypical retinoid-regulated RARbeta2 promoter, and favored a higher RNA polymerase II detection in transcribed regions of the RARbeta2 gene. Furthermore, the nature of the ligand impacted strongly on the ability of RARs to interact with a given coactivator and to activate transcription in intact cells. Thus RAR accomplishes transcriptional activation as a function of the ligand structure, by recruiting regulatory complexes which control distinct molecular events at retinoid-regulated promoters.

  6. Distinct roles for SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes at chromosomal double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Attikum, Haico; Fritsch, Olivier; Gasser, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    INO80 and SWR1 are two closely related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes that share several subunits. Ino80 was reported to be recruited to the HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at the budding yeast mating-type locus, MAT. We find Swr1 similarly recruited in a manner dependent on the phosphorylation of H2A (γH2AX). This is not unique to cleavage at MAT; both Swr1 and Ino80 bind near an induced DSB on chromosome XV. Whereas Swr1 incorporates the histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin at promoters, H2A.Z levels do not increase at DSBs. Instead, H2A.Z, γH2AX and core histones are coordinately removed near the break in an INO80-dependent, but SWR1-independent, manner. Mutations in INO80-specific subunits Arp8 or Nhp10 impair the binding of Mre11 nuclease, yKu80 and ATR-related Mec1 kinase at the DSB, resulting in defective end-processing and checkpoint activation. In contrast, Mre11 binding, end-resection and checkpoint activation were normal in the swr1 strain, but yKu80 loading and error-free end-joining were impaired. Thus, these two related chromatin remodelers have distinct roles in DSB repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:17762868

  7. Temporally distinct roles of ATM and ROS in genotoxic-stress-dependent induction and maintenance of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Nair, Raji R; Bagheri, Meisam; Saini, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-15

    Cells exposed to genotoxic stress induce cellular senescence through a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway regulated by ATM kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that the regulatory roles for ATM kinase and ROS differ during induction and maintenance of cellular senescence. Cells treated with different genotoxic agents were analyzed using specific pathway markers and inhibitors to determine that ATM kinase activation is directly proportional to the dose of the genotoxic stress and that senescence initiation is not dependent on ROS or the p53 status of cells. Cells in which ROS was quenched still activated ATM and initiated the DDR when insulted, and progressed normally to senescence. By contrast, maintenance of a viable senescent state required the presence of ROS as well as activated ATM. Inhibition or removal of either of the components caused cell death in senescent cells, through a deregulated ATM-ROS axis. Overall, our work demonstrates existence of an intricate temporal hierarchy between genotoxic stress, DDR and ROS in cellular senescence. Our model reports the existence of different stages of cellular senescence with distinct regulatory networks.

  8. Mammalian Exo1 encodes both structural and catalytic functions that play distinct roles in essential biological processes.

    PubMed

    Schaetzlein, Sonja; Chahwan, Richard; Avdievich, Elena; Roa, Sergio; Wei, Kaichun; Eoff, Robert L; Sellers, Rani S; Clark, Alan B; Kunkel, Thomas A; Scharff, Matthew D; Edelmann, Winfried

    2013-07-02

    Mammalian Exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is an evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional exonuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, immunoglobulin diversity, meiosis, and telomere maintenance. It has been assumed that EXO1 participates in these processes primarily through its exonuclease activity, but recent studies also suggest that EXO1 has a structural function in the assembly of higher-order protein complexes. To dissect the enzymatic and nonenzymatic roles of EXO1 in the different biological processes in vivo, we generated an EXO1-E109K knockin (Exo1(EK)) mouse expressing a stable exonuclease-deficient protein and, for comparison, a fully EXO1-deficient (Exo1(null)) mouse. In contrast to Exo1(null/null) mice, Exo1(EK/EK) mice retained mismatch repair activity and displayed normal class switch recombination and meiosis. However, both Exo1-mutant lines showed defects in DNA damage response including DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) through DNA end resection, chromosomal stability, and tumor suppression, indicating that the enzymatic function is required for those processes. On a transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53)-null background, the DSBR defect caused by the E109K mutation altered the tumor spectrum but did not affect the overall survival as compared with p53-Exo1(null) mice, whose defects in both DSBR and mismatch repair also compromised survival. The separation of these functions demonstrates the differential requirement for the structural function and nuclease activity of mammalian EXO1 in distinct DNA repair processes and tumorigenesis in vivo.

  9. The eukaryotic translation initiation regulator CDC123 defines a divergent clade of ATP-grasp enzymes with a predicted role in novel protein modifications.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Zhang, Dapeng; Aravind, L

    2015-05-15

    Deciphering the origin of uniquely eukaryotic features of sub-cellular systems, such as the translation apparatus, is critical in reconstructing eukaryogenesis. One such feature is the highly conserved, but poorly understood, eukaryotic protein CDC123, which regulates the abundance of the eukaryotic translation initiation eIF2 complex and binds one of its components eIF2γ. We show that the eukaryotic protein CDC123 defines a novel clade of ATP-grasp enzymes distinguished from all other members of the superfamily by a RAGNYA domain with two conserved lysines (henceforth the R2K clade). Combining the available biochemical and genetic data on CDC123 with the inferred enzymatic function, we propose that the eukaryotic CDC123 proteins are likely to function as ATP-dependent protein-peptide ligases which modify proteins by ribosome-independent addition of an oligopeptide tag. We also show that the CDC123 family emerged first in bacteria where it appears to have diversified along with the two other families of the R2K clade. The bacterial CDC123 family members are of two distinct types, one found as part of type VI secretion systems which deliver polymorphic toxins and the other functioning as potential effectors delivered to amoeboid eukaryotic hosts. Representatives of the latter type have also been independently transferred to phylogenetically unrelated amoeboid eukaryotes and their nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses. Similarly, the two other prokaryotic R2K clade families are also proposed to participate in biological conflicts between bacteriophages and their hosts. These findings add further evidence to the recently proposed hypothesis that the horizontal transfer of enzymatic effectors from the bacterial endosymbionts of the stem eukaryotes played a fundamental role in the emergence of the characteristically eukaryotic regulatory systems and sub-cellular structures.

  10. Transcripts of two ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles

    PubMed Central

    Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Usui, Masami; Sugawara, Chizu; Kanno, Yuri; Sakai, Arisa; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Koji; Morimoto, Yu; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant growth. Tetracyclic hydrocarbon ent-kaurene is a biosynthetic intermediate of GAs, and is converted from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, a common precursor of diterpenoids, via ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CDP) through successive cyclization reactions catalysed by two distinct diterpene synthases, ent-CDP synthase and ent-kaurene synthase. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has two ent-CDP synthase genes, OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. It has been thought that OsCPS1 participates in GA biosynthesis, while OsCPS2 participates in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins, phytocassanes A–E, and oryzalexins A–F. It has been shown previously that loss-of-function OsCPS1 mutants display a severe dwarf phenotype caused by GA deficiency despite possessing another ent-CDP synthase gene, OsCPS2. Here, experiments were performed to account for the non-redundant biological function of OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. Quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) analysis showed that OsCPS2 transcript levels were drastically lower than those of OsCPS1 in the basal parts, including the meristem of the second-leaf sheaths of rice seedlings. qRT–PCR results using tissue samples prepared by laser microdissection suggested that OsCPS1 transcripts mainly localized in vascular bundle tissues, similar to Arabidopsis CPS, which is responsible for GA biosynthesis, whereas OsCPS2 transcripts mainly localized in epidermal cells that address environmental stressors such as pathogen attack. Furthermore, the OsCPS2 transgene under regulation of the OsCPS1 promoter complemented the dwarf phenotype of an OsCPS1 mutant, oscps1-1. The results indicate that transcripts of the two ent-CDP synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles, OsCPS1 for growth and OsCPS2 for defence. PMID:25336684

  11. Transcripts of two ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles.

    PubMed

    Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Usui, Masami; Sugawara, Chizu; Kanno, Yuri; Sakai, Arisa; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Koji; Morimoto, Yu; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant growth. Tetracyclic hydrocarbon ent-kaurene is a biosynthetic intermediate of GAs, and is converted from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, a common precursor of diterpenoids, via ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CDP) through successive cyclization reactions catalysed by two distinct diterpene synthases, ent-CDP synthase and ent-kaurene synthase. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has two ent-CDP synthase genes, OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. It has been thought that OsCPS1 participates in GA biosynthesis, while OsCPS2 participates in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins, phytocassanes A-E, and oryzalexins A-F. It has been shown previously that loss-of-function OsCPS1 mutants display a severe dwarf phenotype caused by GA deficiency despite possessing another ent-CDP synthase gene, OsCPS2. Here, experiments were performed to account for the non-redundant biological function of OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that OsCPS2 transcript levels were drastically lower than those of OsCPS1 in the basal parts, including the meristem of the second-leaf sheaths of rice seedlings. qRT-PCR results using tissue samples prepared by laser microdissection suggested that OsCPS1 transcripts mainly localized in vascular bundle tissues, similar to Arabidopsis CPS, which is responsible for GA biosynthesis, whereas OsCPS2 transcripts mainly localized in epidermal cells that address environmental stressors such as pathogen attack. Furthermore, the OsCPS2 transgene under regulation of the OsCPS1 promoter complemented the dwarf phenotype of an OsCPS1 mutant, oscps1-1. The results indicate that transcripts of the two ent-CDP synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles, OsCPS1 for growth and OsCPS2 for defence.

  12. The Distinct Role of the Amygdala, Superior Colliculus and Pulvinar in Processing of Central and Peripheral Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Inês; Soares, Sandra C.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    pulvinar. Conclusion These results show that subcortical structures containing foveal representations such as the amygdala, pulvinar and superior colliculus play distinct roles in the central and peripheral processing of snake shapes. Our findings suggest multiple phylogenetic fingerprints in the responses of subcortical structures to fear-relevant stimuli. PMID:26075614

  13. Fractionation of an ECM hydrogel into structural and soluble components reveals distinctive roles in regulating macrophage behavior.

    PubMed

    Slivka, P F; Dearth, C L; Keane, T J; Meng, F W; Medberry, C J; Riggio, R T; Reing, J E; Badylak, S F

    2014-08-26

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from mammalian tissues has been utilized to repair damaged or missing tissue and improve healing outcomes. More recently, processing of ECM into hydrogels has expanded the use of these materials to include platforms for 3-dimensional cell culture as well as injectable therapeutics that can be delivered by minimally invasive techniques and fill irregularly shaped cavities. At the cellular level, ECM hydrogels initiate a multifaceted host response that includes recruitment of endogenous stem/progenitor cells, regional angiogenesis, and modulation of the innate immune response. Unfortunately, little is known about the components of the hydrogel that drive these responses. We hypothesized that different components of ECM hydrogels could play distinctive roles in stem cell and macrophage behavior. Utilizing a well-characterized ECM hydrogel derived from urinary bladder matrix (UBM), we separated the soluble and structural components of UBM hydrogel and characterized their biological activity. Perivascular stem cells migrated toward and reduced their proliferation in response to both structural and soluble components of UBM hydrogel. Both components also altered macrophage behavior but with different fingerprints. Soluble components increased phagocytosis with an IL-1RA(high), TNFα(low), IL-1β(low), uPA(low) secretion profile. Structural components decreased phagocytosis with a PGE2(high), PGF2α(high), TNFα(low), IL-1β(low), uPA(low), MMP2(low), MMP9(low), secretion profile. The biologic activity of the soluble components was mediated by Notch and PI3K/Akt signaling, while the biologic activity of the structural components was mediated by integrins and MEK/ERK signaling. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that soluble and structural components of ECM hydrogels contribute to the host response but through different mechanisms.

  14. Distinct Roles of Met and Interacting Proteins on the Expressions of takeout Family Genes in Brown Planthopper

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xinda; Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Yanyun

    2017-01-01

    The takeout family genes encode relatively small proteins that are related to olfaction and are regulated by juvenile hormone (JH). The takeout genes modulate various physiological processes, such as behavioral plasticity in the migratory locust Locusta migraloria and feeding and courtship behaviors in Drosophila. Therefore, to understand the regulatory mechanism of these physiological processes, it is important to study the expressions of the takeout genes that are regulated by JH signaling. We used quantitative real-time PCR (qRTPCR) to study the role of JH signaling in the regulation of the takeout family genes in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (N. lugens) through the application of Juvenile hormone III (JHIII) and the down-regulation of key genes in the JH signaling pathway. The topical application of JHIII induced the expressions of most of the takeout family genes, and their expressions decreased 2 and 3 days after the JHIII application. Down-regulating the brown planthopper JH receptor NlMethoprene-tolerant (NlMet) and its interacting partners, NlTaiman (NlTai) and Nlß-Ftz-F1 (Nlß-Ftz), through RNAi, exhibited distinct effects on the expressions of the takeout family genes. The down-regulation of NlMet and NlKrüppel-homolog 1 (NlKr-h1) increased the expressions of the takeout family genes, while the down-regulation of the Met interacting partners NlTai and Nlß-Ftz decreased the expressions of most of the takeout family genes. This work advanced our understanding of the molecular function and the regulatory mechanism of JH signaling. PMID:28270774

  15. Orexin/Hypocretin and Histamine: Distinct Roles in the Control of Wakefulness Demonstrated Using Knock-Out Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Ouk, Koliane; Guidon, Gérard; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Akaoka, Hidéo; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Franco, Patricia; Haas, Helmut L.; Lin, Jian Sheng

    2009-01-01

    To determine the respective role played by orexin/hypocretin and histamine (HA) neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W), we characterized the behavioral and sleep-wake phenotypes of orexin(Ox) knockout(−/−) mice and compared them with those of histidine-decarboxylase(HDC, HA-synthesizing enzyme)−/−mice. While both mouse strains displayed sleep fragmentation and increased paradoxical sleep(PS), they presented a number of marked differences: 1) The PS-increase in HDC−/−mice was seen during lightness, whereas that in Ox−/−mice occurred during darkness; 2) Contrary to HDC−/−, Ox−/−mice had no W deficiency around lights-off, nor an abnormal EEG and responded to a new environment with increased W; 3) Only Ox−/−, but not HDC−/−mice, displayed narcolepsy and deficient W when faced with motor challenge. Thus, when placed on a wheel, WT, but not littermate Ox−/−mice, voluntarily spent their time in turning it and as a result, remained highly awake; this was accompanied by dense c-fos expression in many areas of their brains, including Ox-neurons in the dorsolateral hypothalamus. The W and motor deficiency of Ox−/−mice was due to the absence of Ox because intraventricular dosing of Ox-A restored their W amount and motor performance whereas SB-334867 (Ox1-receptor antagonist, i.p.) impaired W and locomotion of WT mice during the test. These data indicate that Ox, but not HA, promotes W through enhanced locomotion and suggest that HA and Ox neurons exert a distinct, but complementary and synergistic control of W: the neuropeptide being more involved in its behavioral aspects, whereas the amine is mainly responsible for its qualitative cognitive aspects and cortical-EEG activation. PMID:19923277

  16. Orexin/hypocretin and histamine: distinct roles in the control of wakefulness demonstrated using knock-out mouse models.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Ouk, Koliane; Guidon, Gérard; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Akaoka, Hidéo; Sergeeva, Olga A; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Franco, Patricia; Haas, Helmut L; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-11-18

    To determine the respective role played by orexin/hypocretin and histamine (HA) neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W), we characterized the behavioral and sleep-wake phenotypes of orexin (Ox) knock-out (-/-) mice and compared them with those of histidine-decarboxylase (HDC, HA-synthesizing enzyme)-/- mice. While both mouse strains displayed sleep fragmentation and increased paradoxical sleep (PS), they presented a number of marked differences: (1) the PS increase in HDC(-/-) mice was seen during lightness, whereas that in Ox(-/-) mice occurred during darkness; (2) contrary to HDC(-/-), Ox(-/-) mice had no W deficiency around lights-off, nor an abnormal EEG and responded to a new environment with increased W; (3) only Ox(-/-), but not HDC(-/-) mice, displayed narcolepsy and deficient W when faced with motor challenge. Thus, when placed on a wheel, wild-type (WT), but not littermate Ox(-/-) mice, voluntarily spent their time in turning it and as a result, remained highly awake; this was accompanied by dense c-fos expression in many areas of their brains, including Ox neurons in the dorsolateral hypothalamus. The W and motor deficiency of Ox(-/-) mice was due to the absence of Ox because intraventricular dosing of orexin-A restored their W amount and motor performance whereas SB-334867 (Ox1-receptor antagonist, i.p.) impaired W and locomotion of WT mice during the test. These data indicate that Ox, but not HA, promotes W through enhanced locomotion and suggest that HA and Ox neurons exert a distinct, but complementary and synergistic control of W: the neuropeptide being more involved in its behavioral aspects, whereas the amine is mainly responsible for its qualitative cognitive aspects and cortical EEG activation.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and 4-kinase have distinct roles in intracellular trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masaru; Suda, Yasuyuki; Vernhettes, Samantha; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils in the plant cell wall plays a crucial role in various plant functions such as cell growth, organ formation and defense responses. Cellulose is synthesized by cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) embedded in the plasma membrane (PM), which comprise the cellulose synthases (CESAs). The abundance and localization of CSCs at the PM should be strictly controlled for precise regulation of cellulose deposition, which strongly depends on the membrane trafficking system. However, the mechanism of the intracellular transport of CSCs is still poorly understood. In this study, we explored requirements for phosphoinositides (PIs) in CESA trafficking by analyzing the effects of inhibitors of PI synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA3 (GFP-CESA3). We found that a shift to a sucrose-free condition accelerated re-localization of PM-localized GFP-CESA3 into the periphery of the Golgi apparatus via the clathrin-enriched trans-Golgi network (TGN). Treatment with wortmannin (Wm), an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3- (PI3K) and 4- (PI4K) kinases, and phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a more specific inhibitor for PI4K, inhibited internalization of GFP-CESA3 from the PM. In contrast, treatment with LY294002, which impairs the PI3K activity, did not exert such an inhibitory effect on the sequestration of GFP-CESA3, but caused a predominant accumulation of GFP-CESA3 at the ring-shaped periphery of the Golgi apparatus, resulting in the removal of GFP-CESA3 from the PM. These results indicate that PIs are essential elements for localization and intracellular transport of CESA3 and that PI4K and PI3K are required for distinct steps in secretory and/or endocytic trafficking of CESA3.

  18. Defining quantitative stream disturbance gradients and the additive role of habitat variation to explain macroinvertebrate taxa richness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most studies dealing with the use of ecological indicators and other applied ecological research relies on some definition or concept of what constitutes least-, intermediate- and most-disturbed condition. Currently, most rigorous methodologies designed to define those conditions...

  19. Distinct roles of galactose-1P in galactose-mediated growth arrest of yeast deficient in galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT) and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE).

    PubMed

    Mumma, Jane Odhiambo; Chhay, Juliet S; Ross, Kerry L; Eaton, Jana S; Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2008-02-01

    Galactose is metabolized in humans and other species by the three-enzyme Leloir pathway comprised of galactokinase (GALK), galactose 1-P uridylyltransferase (GALT), and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). Impairment of GALT or GALE in humans results in the potentially lethal disorder galactosemia, and loss of either enzyme in yeast results in galactose-dependent growth arrest of cultures despite the availability of an alternate carbon source. In contrast, loss of GALK in humans is not life-threatening, and in yeast has no impact on the growth of cultures challenged with galactose. Further, the growth of both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast challenged with galactose is rescued by loss of GALK, thereby implicating the GALK reaction product, gal-1P, for a role in the galactose-sensitivity of both strains. However, the nature of that relationship has remained unclear. Here we have developed and applied a doxycycline-repressible allele of galactokinase to define the quantitative relationship between galactokinase activity, gal-1P accumulation, and growth arrest of galactose-challenged GALT or GALE-deficient yeast. Our results demonstrate a clear threshold relationship between gal-1P accumulation and galactose-mediated growth arrest in both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast, however, the threshold for the two strains is distinct. Further, we tested the galactose-sensitivity of yeast double-null for GALT and GALE, and found that although loss of GALT barely changed accumulation of gal-1P, it significantly lowered the accumulation of UDP-gal, and also dramatically rescued growth of the GALE-null cells. Together, these data suggest that while gal-1P alone may account for the galactose-sensitivity of GALT-null cells, other factors, likely to include UDP-gal accumulation, must contribute to the galactose-sensitivity of GALE-null cells.

  20. Distinct Etiological Roles for Myocytes and Motor Neurons in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Firyal; McPhail, Mike; Rao, Pengcheng; Mo, Kaiguo; Halievski, Katherine; Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Monks, D Ashley

    2015-04-22

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion of the androgen receptor (AR) causes Kennedy's disease/spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) through poorly defined cellular mechanisms. Although KD/SBMA has been thought of as a motor neuron disease, recent evidence indicates a key role for skeletal muscle. To resolve which early aspects of the disease can be caused by neurogenic or myogenic mechanisms, we made use of the tet-On and Cre-loxP genetic systems to selectively and acutely express polyQ AR in either motor neurons (NeuroAR) or myocytes (MyoAR) of transgenic mice. After 4 weeks of transgene induction in adulthood, deficits in gross motor function were seen in NeuroAR mice, but not MyoAR mice. Conversely, reduced size of fast glycolytic fibers and alterations in expression of candidate genes were observed only in MyoAR mice. Both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice exhibited reduced oxidative capacity in skeletal muscles, as well as a shift in fast fibers from oxidative to glycolytic. Markers of oxidative stress were increased in the muscle of NeuroAR mice and were reduced in motor neurons of both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice. Despite secondary pathology in skeletal muscle and behavioral deficits, no pathological signs were observed in motor neurons of NeuroAR mice, possibly due to relatively low levels of polyQ AR expression. These results indicate that polyQ AR in motor neurons can produce secondary pathology in muscle. Results also support both neurogenic and myogenic contributions of polyQ AR to several acute aspects of pathology and provide further evidence for disordered cellular respiration in KD/SBMA skeletal muscle.

  1. Systemwide Reform in Districts under Pressure: The Role of Social Networks in Defining, Acquiring, Using, and Diffusing Research Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnigan, Kara S.; Daly, Alan J.; Che, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the way in which low-performing schools and their district define, acquire, use, and diffuse research-based evidence. Design/methodology/approach: The mixed methods case study builds upon the prior research on research evidence and social networks, drawing on social network analyses, survey data and…

  2. Focal Uncaging of GABA Reveals a Temporally Defined Role for GABAergic Inhibition during Appetitive Associative Olfactory Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two…

  3. Dorsal and ventral streams: The distinct role of striatal subregions in the acquisition and performance of goal-directed actions

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Genevra; Leung, Beatrice K.; Balleine, Bernard W.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that distinct neural processes mediate the acquisition and performance of goal-directed instrumental actions. Whereas a cortical-dorsomedial striatal circuit appears critical for the acquisition of goal-directed actions, a cortical-ventral striatal circuit appears to mediate instrumental performance, particularly the motivational control of performance. Here we review evidence that these distinct mechanisms of learning and performance constitute two distinct ‘streams’ controlling instrumental conditioning. From this perspective, the regulation of the interaction between these ‘streams’ becomes a matter of considerable importance. We describe evidence that the basolateral amygdala, which is heavily interconnected with both the dorsal and ventral subregions of the striatum, coordinates this interaction providing input to the final common path to action as a critical component of the limbic-motor interface. PMID:24231424

  4. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  5. The Distinct Roles of Sociometric and Perceived Popularity in Friendship: Implications for Adolescent Depressive Affect and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwack, Scott D.; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the similarities and distinctions between two types of popularity, sociometric and perceived, in their associations with friendship characteristics and how they in turn are related to depressive affect and self-esteem. Among 245 eighth graders, sociometric popularity was associated with a greater…

  6. Hydrocephalus Defined

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrow pathways. CSF is in constant production and absorption; it has a defined pathway from the lateral ... there is an imbalance of production and/or absorption. With most types of hydrocephalus, the fluid gets ...

  7. Distinct Roles of Type I and Type III Interferons in Intestinal Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Rotavirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Da; Feng, Ningguo; Sen, Adrish; Balan, Murugabaskar; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; McElrath, Constance; Smirnov, Sergey V; Peng, Jianya; Yasukawa, Linda L; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E; Greenberg, Harry B; Kotenko, Sergei V

    2016-04-01

    Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct and overlapping contributions of type I and type III IFNs to protection against homologous murine (EW-RV strain) and heterologous (non-murine) simian (RRV strain) rotavirus infections in suckling mice. Experiments demonstrated that murine EW-RV is insensitive to the action of both types of IFNs, and that timely viral clearance depends upon adaptive immune responses. In contrast, both type I and type III IFNs can control replication of the heterologous simian RRV in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and they cooperate to limit extra-intestinal simian RRV replication. Surprisingly, intestinal epithelial cells were sensitive to both IFN types in neonatal mice, although their responsiveness to type I, but not type III IFNs, diminished in adult mice, revealing an unexpected age-dependent change in specific contribution of type I versus type III IFNs to antiviral defenses in the GI tract. Transcriptional analysis revealed that intestinal antiviral responses to RV are triggered through either type of IFN receptor, and are greatly diminished when receptors for both IFN types are lacking. These results also demonstrate a murine host-specific resistance to IFN-mediated antiviral effects by murine EW-RV, but the retention of host efficacy through the cooperative action by type I and type III IFNs in restricting heterologous simian RRV growth and systemic replication in suckling mice. Collectively, our findings revealed a well-orchestrated spatial and temporal tuning of innate antiviral responses in the intestinal tract where two types of IFNs through distinct patterns of their expression and distinct but overlapping sets

  8. State Library Conferences as Professional Development Venues: Unbalanced Support for the AASL-Defined Roles of the School Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreillon, Judi; Cahill, Maria; McKee, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) released new guidelines for school library programs in the summer of 2009. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs (AASL 2009a), hereafter referred to as EL, spells out the five roles that school librarians must practice to empower library users. The purpose of this…

  9. Encoding NF-κB temporal control in response to TNF: distinct roles for the negative regulators IκBα and A20

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Shannon L.; Kearns, Jeffrey D.; Zadorozhnaya, Victoria; Lynch, Candace; O’Dea, Ellen; Boldin, Mark P.; Ma, Averil; Baltimore, David; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    TNF-induced NF-κB activity shows complex temporal regulation whose different phases lead to distinct gene expression programs. Combining experimental studies and mathematical modeling, we identify two temporal amplification steps—one determined by the obligate negative feedback regulator IκBα—that define the duration of the first phase of NF-κB activity. The second phase is defined by A20, whose inducible expression provides for a rheostat function by which other inflammatory stimuli can regulate TNF responses. Our results delineate the nonredundant functions implied by the knockout phenotypes of iκbα and a20, and identify the latter as a signaling cross-talk mediator controlling inflammatory and developmental responses. PMID:18676814

  10. Onset polarity and illness course in bipolar I and II disorders: The predictive role of broadly defined mixed states.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Musetti, Laura; Benedetti, Alessandra; Berti, Benedetta; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-11-01

    Several studies investigating bipolar disorders have shown that polarity of onset can predict differences in symptomatology, course, and prognosis. Frequently, however, research on the topic has examined only bipolar I inpatients and has not included patients with mixed onset. The aim of the present naturalistic study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and illness course of a consecutive sample (407 outpatients, 58.7% with bipolar I (BD-I) and 41.3% with bipolar II (BD-II) disorder) according to polarity of onset: depressive (DP-o); manic/hypomanic (HM-o); or mixed--broadly defined to include agitated depression for BD-II--onset (MX-o). As compared with patients in the other two groups: a) DP-o patients (67.3%) were more frequently affected by BD-II and had lower ratings for psychotic symptoms; b) HM-o patients (17%) had a higher rate of family history for psychosis and a lower rate of suicide attempts; and c) patients in the MX-o group (15.7%) more frequently showed substance abuse and had a higher number of mixed recurrences per year. In the BD-II group, MX-o patients more frequently attempted suicide. The present study's main limitations are those of retrospective assessment of onset polarity and lack of treatment-impact evaluations over illness course. In conclusion, we confirm clinical expression differences in bipolar disorder in function of polarity of onset and underscore the importance of carefully considering broadly defined mixed state when examining polarity of onset. Further investigations are required to confirm the present study's results.

  11. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast: defining the role for skin-sparing mastectomy and autologous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Atalla, Mohamed Anwar; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Grinsell, Damien; Hyett, Anthony; Prakash, Saurabh; Cham, Alvin

    2011-05-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) are uncommon fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, noteworthy for their difficult excisions and high recurrence rates. In the setting of recurrence, there is no consensus in the literature as to the extent of excision or the impact on reconstructive options. Breast-conserving surgery and simple mastectomy have each been described with mixed reports. Despite a shift toward the selective use of skin-sparing mastectomy and nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomy in breast carcinoma, neither the role for these techniques nor the role for breast reconstruction in recurrent PT has been described. A case report is presented demonstrating the utility of skin-sparing mastectomy and autologous breast reconstruction for locally recurrent PT of the breast, with a literature review of management options in this setting presented. The case presented highlights an appropriate setting for autologous microsurgical reconstruction of the breast in recurrent PT. The literature review highlights a lack of any published management consensus, with only the role for mastectomy suggested for recurrent high-grade or malignant lesions. A potential management algorithm is thus presented. Skin-sparing mastectomy, particularly for intermediate-grade lesions, may allow wider resections while enabling aesthetically pleasing reconstructive options without affecting recurrence rates.

  12. Distinct Roles of Type I and Type III Interferons in Intestinal Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Rotavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; McElrath, Constance; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Peng, Jianya; Yasukawa, Linda L.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Kotenko, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct and overlapping contributions of type I and type III IFNs to protection against homologous murine (EW-RV strain) and heterologous (non-murine) simian (RRV strain) rotavirus infections in suckling mice. Experiments demonstrated that murine EW-RV is insensitive to the action of both types of IFNs, and that timely viral clearance depends upon adaptive immune responses. In contrast, both type I and type III IFNs can control replication of the heterologous simian RRV in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and they cooperate to limit extra-intestinal simian RRV replication. Surprisingly, intestinal epithelial cells were sensitive to both IFN types in neonatal mice, although their responsiveness to type I, but not type III IFNs, diminished in adult mice, revealing an unexpected age-dependent change in specific contribution of type I versus type III IFNs to antiviral defenses in the GI tract. Transcriptional analysis revealed that intestinal antiviral responses to RV are triggered through either type of IFN receptor, and are greatly diminished when receptors for both IFN types are lacking. These results also demonstrate a murine host-specific resistance to IFN-mediated antiviral effects by murine EW-RV, but the retention of host efficacy through the cooperative action by type I and type III IFNs in restricting heterologous simian RRV growth and systemic replication in suckling mice. Collectively, our findings revealed a well-orchestrated spatial and temporal tuning of innate antiviral responses in the intestinal tract where two types of IFNs through distinct patterns of their expression and distinct but overlapping sets

  13. Role of inhalation studies with animals in defining human health risks for vehicle and power plant emissions.

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, R O

    1983-01-01

    Automotive vehicles and power plants using fossil fuels emit a complex array of gases and particulate material. The physical and chemical characteristics of these emissions vary markedly between sources and comprise only a portion of the contributors to air pollution exposure of people. Further, it is well recognized that a single form of self-inflicted air pollution, cigarette smoking, is the dominant cause of air pollution-induced disease. These factors minimize our potential for developing an adequate understanding of the health effects of vehicle and power plant emissions by studying only people. The alternative is to use the human data to the extent feasible and complement it with information gained in studies with macromolecules, organelles, cells, tissues and whole animals. Within this context, this paper reviews the use of inhalation studies with animals for defining human health risks of airborne materials, especially particulate materials. The major areas covered are: the fate of inhaled materials, the pathogenesis of disease induced by inhaled materials and long-term animal studies to identify late-occurring effects. Emphasis is placed on the utility of studies in whole animals as integrative models in which the multiple processes such as xenobiotic metabolism, cell injury, repair, transformation and promotion under the influence of many host factors interact in a manner that may not be directly observed in isolated cells or tissues. PMID:6186479

  14. Beyond aflatoxin: four distinct expression patterns and functional roles associated with Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolism gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Georgianna, D. Ryan; Fedorova, Natalie D.; Burroughs, James L.; Dolezal, Andrea L.; Bok, J.; Horowitz-Brown, S.; Woloshuk, Charles P.; Yu, Jiujiang; Keller, Nancy P.; Payne, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Species of Aspergillus produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites, and recent genomic analysis predicts that these species have the capacity to synthesize many more compounds. It has been possible to infer the presence of 55 gene clusters associated with secondary metabolism in A. flavus, however, only three metabolic pathways - aflatoxin, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and aflatrem - have been assigned to these clusters. To gain insight into the regulation of, and infer ecological significance for the 55 secondary metabolite gene clusters predicted in A. flavus, we examined their expression over 28 diverse conditions. Variables included culture media and temperature, fungal development, colonization of developing maize seeds, and misexpression of laeA, a global regulator of secondary metabolism. Hierarchical clustering analysis of expression profiles allowed us to categorize the gene clusters into four distinct clades. Gene clusters for the production of aflatoxins, CPA, and seven other unknown compound(s) were identified as belonging to one clade. To further explore the relationships found by gene expression analysis, aflatoxin and CPA production were quantified under five different cell culture environments known to be conducive or non-conducive for aflatoxin biosynthesis and during colonization of developing maize seeds. Results from these studies showed that secondary metabolism gene clusters have distinctive gene expression profiles. Aflatoxin and CPA were found to have unique regulation but are similar enough that they would be expected to co-occur in substrates colonized with A. flavus. PMID:20447271

  15. Hha has a defined regulatory role that is not dependent upon H-NS or StpA

    PubMed Central

    Solórzano, Carla; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Canals, Rocío; Juárez, Antonio; Paytubi, Sonia; Madrid, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The Hha family of proteins is involved in the regulation of gene expression in enterobacteria by forming complexes with H-NS-like proteins. Whereas several amino acid residues of both proteins participate in the interaction, some of them play a key role. Residue D48 of Hha protein is essential for the interaction with H-NS, thus the D48N substitution in Hha protein abrogates H-NS/Hha interaction. Despite being a paralog of H-NS protein, StpA interacts with HhaD48N with higher affinity than with the wild type Hha protein. To analyze whether Hha is capable of acting independently of H-NS and StpA, we conducted transcriptomic analysis on the hha and stpA deletion strains and the hhaD48N substitution strain of Salmonella Typhimurium using a custom microarray. The results obtained allowed the identification of 120 genes regulated by Hha in an H-NS/StpA-independent manner, 38% of which are horizontally acquired genes. A significant number of the identified genes are involved in functions related to cell motility, iron uptake, and pathogenicity. Thus, motility assays, siderophore detection and intra-macrophage replication assays were performed to confirm the transcriptomic data. Our findings point out the importance of Hha protein as an independent regulator in S. Typhimurium, highlighting a regulatory role on virulence. PMID:26284052

  16. The role of fecundity and reproductive effort in defining life-history strategies of North American freshwater mussels.

    PubMed

    Haag, Wendell R

    2013-08-01

    Selection is expected to optimize reproductive investment resulting in characteristic trade-offs among traits such as brood size, offspring size, somatic maintenance, and lifespan; relative patterns of energy allocation to these functions are important in defining life-history strategies. Freshwater mussels are a diverse and imperiled component of aquatic ecosystems, but little is known about their life-history strategies, particularly patterns of fecundity and reproductive effort. Because mussels have an unusual life cycle in which larvae (glochidia) are obligate parasites on fishes, differences in host relationships are expected to influence patterns of reproductive output among species. I investigated fecundity and reproductive effort (RE) and their relationships to other life-history traits for a taxonomically broad cross section of North American mussel diversity. Annual fecundity of North American mussel species spans nearly four orders of magnitude, ranging from < 2000 to 10 million, but most species have considerably lower fecundity than previous generalizations, which portrayed the group as having uniformly high fecundity (e.g. > 200000). Estimates of RE also were highly variable, ranging among species from 0.06 to 25.4%. Median fecundity and RE differed among phylogenetic groups, but patterns for these two traits differed in several ways. For example, the tribe Anodontini had relatively low median fecundity but had the highest RE of any group. Within and among species, body size was a strong predictor of fecundity and explained a high percentage of variation in fecundity among species. Fecundity showed little relationship to other life-history traits including glochidial size, lifespan, brooding strategies, or host strategies. The only apparent trade-off evident among these traits was the extraordinarily high fecundity of Leptodea, Margaritifera, and Truncilla, which may come at a cost of greatly reduced glochidial size; there was no relationship between

  17. A single domain antibody fragment that recognizes the adaptor ASC defines the role of ASC domains in inflammasome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Lu, Alvin; Chen, Jeff W.; Ruan, Jianbin; Tang, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells assemble inflammasomes in response to infection or cell damage; cytosolic sensors activate pro–caspase-1, indirectly for the most part, via the adaptors ASC and NLRC4. This leads to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and pyroptosis. To explore complex formation under physiological conditions, we generated an alpaca single domain antibody, VHHASC, which specifically recognizes the CARD of human ASC via its type II interface. VHHASC not only impairs ASCCARD interactions in vitro, but also inhibits inflammasome activation in response to NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP triggers when expressed in living cells, highlighting a role of ASC in all three types of inflammasomes. VHHASC leaves the Pyrin domain of ASC functional and stabilizes a filamentous intermediate of inflammasome activation. Incorporation of VHHASC-EGFP into these structures allowed the visualization of endogenous ASCPYD filaments for the first time. These data revealed that cross-linking of ASCPYD filaments via ASCCARD mediates the assembly of ASC foci. PMID:27069117

  18. Does meditation play an integral role in achieving high-level wellness as defined by Travis and Ryan (2004)?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Nicole J

    2011-01-01

    In the emerging discipline of wellness, Travis and Ryan (2004) develop a dynamic theory of wellness that while not explicitly stated takes a systems theory approach to health and wellness. As a result, their theory of wellness resonates with many of the concepts and ideals experienced through a meditation practice. It is with this congruence in mind that the current paper explores whether there is any relationship between meditation and high-level wellness and if meditation techniques play an integral role in helping to achieve enhanced levels of wellness. A wide range of research across disciplines is reviewed, and despite controversies in the methodology employed to test meditation's efficacy, it is readily apparent that numerous benefits or wellness outcomes are derived from a meditation practice. However, it is doubtful that meditation is the only path to deliver high-level wellness, other means exist-some that may be a function of the natural human condition.

  19. Distinct Roles for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR3 in Regulating the Peak Time and Amplitude of the Plant General Stress Response1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Marta; Benn, Geoffrey; Song, Xingshun; Comai, Luca; Franz, Annaliese K.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Drakakaki, Georgia; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-01-01

    To survive environmental challenges, plants have evolved tightly regulated response networks, including a rapid and transient general stress response (GSR), followed by well-studied stress-specific responses. The mechanisms underpinning the GSR have remained elusive, but a functional cis-element, the rapid stress response element (RSRE), is known to confer transcription of GSR genes rapidly (5 min) and transiently (peaking 90–120 min after stress) in vivo. To investigate signal transduction events in the GSR, we used a 4xRSRE:LUCIFERASE reporter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), employing complementary approaches of forward and chemical genetic screens, and identified components regulating peak time versus amplitude of RSRE activity. Specifically, we identified a mutant in CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR3 (CAMTA3) with reduced RSRE activation, verifying this transcription factor’s role in activation of the RSRE-mediated GSR. Furthermore, we isolated a mutant in MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) KINASE KINASE1 (mekk1-5), which displays increased basal and an approximately 60-min earlier peak of wound-induced RSRE activation. The double mekk1/camta3 mutant positioned CAMTA3 downstream of MEKK1 and verified their distinct roles in GSR regulation. mekk1-5 displays programmed cell death and overaccumulates reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid, hallmarks of the hypersensitive response, suggesting that the hypersensitive response may play a role in the RSRE phenotype in this mutant. In addition, chemical inhibition studies suggest that the MAPK network is required for the rapid peak of the RSRE response, distinguishing the impact of chronic (mekk1-5) from transient (chemical inhibition) loss of MAPK signaling. Collectively, these results reveal underlying regulatory components of the plant GSR and further define their distinct roles in the regulation of this key biological process. PMID:25157030

  20. Distinct but overlapping roles of histone acetylase PCAF and of the closely related PCAF-B/GCN5 in mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Teruo; Yamauchi, Jun; Kuwata, Takeshi; Tamura, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Bae, Nancy; Westphal, Heiner; Ozato, Keiko; Nakatani, Yoshihiro

    2000-01-01

    PCAF plays a role in transcriptional activation, cell-cycle arrest, and cell differentiation in cultured cells. PCAF contributes to transcriptional activation by acetylating chromatin and transcription factors through its intrinsic histone acetylase activity. In this report, we present evidence for the in vivo function of PCAF and the closely related PCAF-B/GCN5. Mice lacking PCAF are developmentally normal without a distinct phenotype. In PCAF null-zygous mice, protein levels of PCAF-B/GCN5 are drastically elevated in lung and liver, where PCAF is abundantly expressed in wild-type mice, suggesting that PCAF-B/GCN5 functionally compensates for PCAF. In contrast, animals lacking PCAF-B/GCN5 die between days 9.5 and 11.5 of gestation. Normally, PCAF-B/GCN5 mRNA is expressed at high levels already by day 8, whereas PCAF mRNA is first detected on day 12.5, which may explain, in part, the distinct knockout phenotypes. These results provide evidence that PCAF and PCAF-B/GCN5 play distinct but functionally overlapping roles in embryogenesis. PMID:11027331

  1. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  2. Differential protein-protein interactions of LRRK1 and LRRK2 indicate roles in distinct cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyniers, Lauran; Del Giudice, Maria Grazia; Civiero, Laura; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Beilina, Alexandra; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Li, Yan; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro; Cookson, Mark R.; Baekelandt, Veerle; Greggio, Elisa; Taymans, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies show that LRRK2, and not its closest paralogue LRRK1, is linked to Parkinson’s disease. To gain insight into the molecular and cellular basis of this discrepancy, we searched for LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific cellular processes by identifying their distinct interacting proteins. A protein microarray-based interaction screen was performed with recombinant 3xFlag-LRRK1 and 3xFlag-LRRK2 and, in parallel, co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry was performed from SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines stably expressing 3xFlag-LRRK1 or 3xFlag-LRRK2. We identified a set of LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific as well as common interactors. One of our most prominent findings was that both screens pointed to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) as a LRRK1-specific interactor, while 14-3-3 proteins were LRRK2-specific. This is consistent with phosphosite mapping of LRRK1, revealing phosphosites outside of 14-3-3 consensus binding motifs. To assess the functional relevance of these interactions, SH-SY5Y-LRRK1 and -LRRK2 cell lines were treated with LRRK2 kinase inhibitors that disrupt 14-3-3 binding, or with EGF, an EGF-R agonist. Redistribution of LRRK2, not LRRK1, from diffuse cytoplasmic to filamentous aggregates was observed after inhibitor treatment. Similarly, EGF induced translocation of LRRK1, but not of LRRK2, to endosomes. Our study confirms that LRRK1 and LRRK2 can carry out distinct functions by interacting with different cellular proteins. PMID:24947832

  3. The Role of Noble Gases in Defining the Mean Residence Times of Fluids within Precambrian Crustal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Fellowes, J.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; McDermott, J. M.; Holland, G.; Mabry, J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Brines rich in N2, H2, CH4 and He hosted within Precambrian crustal rocks are known to sustain microbial life [1]. The geological systems containing these brines have the potential to isolate organisms over planetary timescales and so can provide unique insight into the diversity and evolution of terrestrial life [1-3]. Long considered geological outliers, the prevalence of systems containing these ancient, deep fracture waters is only now being revealed. Recent studies demonstrate the Precambrian crust which accounts for ~70% of total crustal surface area has a global hydrogen production comparable to marine systems [2]. In addition to H2-producing reactions (e.g. radiolysis and serpentinization), a diversity of CH4-producing reactions also occur in these systems through both microbial and water-rock interactions [1, 2]. However, the role these Precambrian systems have in global hydrogen and carbon cycles is poorly understood. For this we need good constraints on the origins, residence times and degree of microbial activity of the fluids within these systems as well as the degree of interaction with external systems. Fortunately, noble gases are ideal for this role [1,3]. Previous noble gas analysis of N2, H2, CH4 and He-rich fluid samples collected at 2.4 km depth from a Cu-Zn mine in Timmins, Ontario, identified isolated fracture fluids with the oldest residence times ever observed (>1.1 Ga) [3]. This study has been significantly expanded now to fluids from an even greater depth (3 km) at Timmins, and from two new mines in the Sudbury Basin. Preliminary data from the deeper Timmins level indicate a new closed system with 136Xe/130Xe ratios 93% above modern air values (20% at 2.4 km) and an early atmosphere 124Xe/130Xe signal approaching the age of the host rock (~2.7 Ga) [4]. In comparison, the Sudbury system indicates exchange with an external source, being highly enriched in helium (30% gas volume) but with a low fissiogenic 136Xe/130Xe excess (10-38% above

  4. Ectopic expression in the giant fiber system of Drosophila reveals distinct roles for roundabout (Robo), Robo2, and Robo3 in dendritic guidance and synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Godenschwege, Tanja A; Simpson, Julie H; Shan, Xiaoliang; Bashaw, Greg J; Goodman, Corey S; Murphey, Rodney K

    2002-04-15

    The Roundabout (Robo) receptors have been intensively studied for their role in regulating axon guidance in the embryonic nervous system, whereas a role in dendritic guidance has not been explored. In the adult giant fiber system of Drosophila, we have revealed that ectopic Robo expression can regulate the growth and guidance of specific motor neuron dendrites, whereas Robo2 and Robo3 have no effect. We also show that the effect of Robo on dendritic guidance can be suppressed by Commissureless coexpression. Although we confirmed a role for all three Robo receptors in giant fiber axon guidance, the strong axon guidance alterations caused by overexpression of Robo2 or Robo3 have no effect on synaptic connectivity. In contrast, Robo overexpression in the giant fiber seems to directly interfere with synaptic function. We conclude that axon guidance, dendritic guidance, and synaptogenesis are separable processes and that the different Robo family members affect them distinctly.

  5. Transnational Geographies of Academic Distinction: The Role of Social Capital in the Recognition and Evaluation of "Overseas" Credentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Johanna L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the role of specific and place-based social capital in the recognition and evaluation of international credentials. Whilst research on labour market segmentation has contributed towards an understanding of the spatial variability of the value of human capital, very little attention has been paid to the ways in which the…

  6. Emerging Role of CaV1.2 Channels in Proliferation and Migration in Distinct Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Delgado, Gustavo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-30

    Extensive research is currently underway, seeking better diagnostic methods and treatments and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer, from the role of specific genetic mutations to the intricate biochemical and molecular pathways involved. Because of their role in regulating relevant physiological events such as cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, ion channels have recently been recognized as important elements in cancer initiation and progression. Moreover, it has been reported that pharmacological intervention in ion channel activity might provide protection against diverse types of cancer, and that ion channels could be used as targets to counteract tumor growth, prevent metastasis, and overcome the therapy resistance of tumor cells. In this context, Ca2+ channels have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Specifically, L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition may affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. This review aims to provide insights into the potential role of these channels in cancer cell lines, emphasizing their participation in cell proliferation, migration, and autophagy induction, as well as their potential as rational targets for new cancer therapeutics.

  7. Utilizing Combined Methodologies to Define the Role of Plasma Membrane Delivery During Axon Branching and Neuronal Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Winkle, Cortney C; Hanlin, Christopher C; Gupton, Stephanie L

    2016-03-16

    During neural development, growing axons extend to multiple synaptic partners by elaborating axonal branches. Axon branching is promoted by extracellular guidance cues like netrin-1 and results in dramatic increases to the surface area of the axonal plasma membrane. Netrin-1-dependent axon branching likely involves temporal and spatial control of plasma membrane expansion, the components of which are supplied through exocytic vesicle fusion. These fusion events are preceded by formation of SNARE complexes, comprising a v-SNARE, such as VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), and plasma membrane t-SNAREs, syntaxin-1 and SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25). Detailed herein isa multi-pronged approach used to examine the role of SNARE mediated exocytosis in axon branching. The strength of the combined approach is data acquisition at a range of spatial and temporal resolutions, spanning from the dynamics of single vesicle fusion events in individual neurons to SNARE complex formation and axon branching in populations of cultured neurons. This protocol takes advantage of established biochemical approaches to assay levels of endogenous SNARE complexes and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy of cortical neurons expressing VAMP2 tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP (VAMP2-pHlourin) to identify netrin-1 dependent changes in exocytic activity in individual neurons. To elucidate the timing of netrin-1-dependent branching, time-lapse differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy of single neurons over the order of hours is utilized. Fixed cell immunofluorescence paired with botulinum neurotoxins that cleave SNARE machinery and block exocytosis demonstrates that netrin-1 dependent axon branching requires SNARE-mediated exocytic activity.

  8. Proteomic analysis of colony morphology variants of Burkholderia pseudomallei defines a role for the arginine deiminase system in bacterial survival

    PubMed Central

    Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Trunck, Lily A.; Rholl, Drew A.; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Saiprom, Natnaree; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Korbsrisate, Sunee; Day, Nicholas P.J.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Colony morphology variation of Burkholderia pseudomallei is a notable feature of a proportion of primary clinical cultures from patients with melioidosis. Here, we examined the hypothesis that colony morphology switching results in phenotypic changes associated with enhanced survival under adverse conditions. We generated isogenic colony morphology types II and III from B. pseudomallei strain 153 type I, and compared their protein expression profiles using 2D gel electrophoresis. Numerous proteins were differentially expressed, the most prominent of which were flagellin, arginine deiminase (AD) and carbamate kinase (CK), which were over-expressed in isogenic types II and III compared with parental type I. AD and CK (encoded by arcA and arcC) are components of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) which facilitates acid tolerance. Reverse transcriptase PCR of arcA and arcC mRNA expression confirmed the proteomic results. Transcripts of parental type I strain 153 arcA and arcC were increased in the presence of arginine, in a low oxygen concentration and in acid. Comparison of wild type with arcA and arcC defective mutants demonstrated that the B. pseudomallei ADS was associated with survival in acid, but did not appear to play a role in intracellular survival or replication within the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1. These data provide novel insights into proteomic alterations that occur during the complex process of morphotype switching, and lend support to the idea that this is associated with a fitness advantage in vivo. PMID:22062159

  9. Utilizing Combined Methodologies to Define the Role of Plasma Membrane Delivery During Axon Branching and Neuronal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Cortney C.; Hanlin, Christopher C.; Gupton, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    During neural development, growing axons extend to multiple synaptic partners by elaborating axonal branches. Axon branching is promoted by extracellular guidance cues like netrin-1 and results in dramatic increases to the surface area of the axonal plasma membrane. Netrin-1-dependent axon branching likely involves temporal and spatial control of plasma membrane expansion, the components of which are supplied through exocytic vesicle fusion. These fusion events are preceded by formation of SNARE complexes, comprising a v-SNARE, such as VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), and plasma membrane t-SNAREs, syntaxin-1 and SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25). Detailed herein is a multi-pronged approach used to examine the role of SNARE mediated exocytosis in axon branching. The strength of the combined approach is data acquisition at a range of spatial and temporal resolutions, spanning from the dynamics of single vesicle fusion events in individual neurons to SNARE complex formation and axon branching in populations of cultured neurons. This protocol takes advantage of established biochemical approaches to assay levels of endogenous SNARE complexes and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy of cortical neurons expressing VAMP2 tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP (VAMP2-pHlourin) to identify netrin-1 dependent changes in exocytic activity in individual neurons. To elucidate the timing of netrin-1-dependent branching, time-lapse differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy of single neurons over the order of hours is utilized. Fixed cell immunofluorescence paired with botulinum neurotoxins that cleave SNARE machinery and block exocytosis demonstrates that netrin-1 dependent axon branching requires SNARE-mediated exocytic activity. PMID:27023471

  10. Analytic Hierarchy Process to Define the Most Important Factors and Related Technologies for Empowering Elderly People in Taking an Active Role in their Health.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Gaeta, E; Arredondo, M T; Pecchia, L

    2015-09-01

    Successful management of health conditions in older population is determined by strategic involvement of a professional team of careers and by empowering patients and their caregivers to take over a central role and responsibility in the daily management of condition. Identifying, structuring and ranking the most important needs related to these aspects could pave the way for improved strategies in designing systems and technological solutions supporting user empowerment. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study aiming to elicit these needs. Healthcare professionals, working together in the European and Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) initiative, have defined a set of needs and factors that have been organized in two hierarchies around the concepts of patient activation and proactive and prepared care team, defined in the Chronic Care Model. The two hierarchies have been mapped, by a team of experts in computer science, with technologies and solutions that could facilitate the achievement of the identified needs.

  11. Histone H3 K79 methylation states play distinct roles in UV-induced sister chromatid exchange and cell cycle checkpoint arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rossodivita, Alyssa A.; Boudoures, Anna L.; Mecoli, Jonathan P.; Steenkiste, Elizabeth M.; Karl, Andrea L.; Vines, Eudora M.; Cole, Arron M.; Ansbro, Megan R.; Thompson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications have been shown to contribute to DNA damage repair. Prior studies have suggested that specific H3K79 methylation states play distinct roles in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. To evaluate these observations, we examined the effect of altered H3K79 methylation patterns on UV-induced G1/S checkpoint response and sister chromatid exchange (SCE). We found that the di- and trimethylated states both contribute to activation of the G1/S checkpoint to varying degrees, depending on the synchronization method, although methylation is not required for checkpoint in response to high levels of UV damage. In contrast, UV-induced SCE is largely a product of the trimethylated state, which influences the usage of gene conversion versus popout mechanisms. Regulation of H3K79 methylation by H2BK123 ubiquitylation is important for both checkpoint function and SCE. H3K79 methylation is not required for the repair of double-stranded breaks caused by transient HO endonuclease expression, but does play a modest role in survival from continuous exposure. The overall results provide evidence for the participation of H3K79 methylation in UV-induced recombination repair and checkpoint activation, and further indicate that the di- and trimethylation states play distinct roles in these DNA damage response pathways. PMID:24748660

  12. Evaluative vs. trait representation in intergroup social judgments: distinct roles of anterior temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sam J; Swencionis, Jillian K; Amodio, David M

    2012-12-01

    When interacting with someone from another social group, one's responses may be influenced by both stereotypes and evaluations. Given behavioral results suggesting that stereotypes and evaluative associations operate independently, we used fMRI to test whether these biases are mediated by distinct brain systems. White participants viewed pairs of Black or White faces and judged them based on an evaluation (who would you befriend?) or a stereotype-relevant trait (who is more likely to enjoy athletic activities?). Multi-voxel pattern analysis revealed that a predominantly occipital network represented race in a context-invariant manner. However, lateral orbitofrontal cortex preferentially represented race during friendship judgments, whereas anterior medial prefrontal cortex preferentially represented race during trait judgments. Furthermore, representation of race in left temporal pole correlated with a behavioral measure of evaluative bias during friendship judgments and, independently, a measure of stereotyping during trait judgments. Whereas early sensory regions represent race in an apparently invariant manner, representations in higher-level regions are multi-componential and context-dependent.

  13. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs. PMID:25565321

  14. Subcellular localizations of AS1 and AS2 suggest their common and distinct roles in plant development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Ziyu; Xu, Ben; Li, Hongda; Wang, Lingjian; Dong, Aiwu; Huang, Hai

    2008-07-01

    During leaf organogenesis, a critical step for normal leaf primordium initiation is the repression of the class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. After leaf primordia are formed, they must establish polarity for normal leaf morphogenesis. Recent studies have led to the identification of a number of genes that participate in the class 1 KNOX gene repression and/or the leaf polarity establishment. ASTMMETRIC LEAVES1 and 2 (AS1 and AS2) are two of these genes, which are critical for both of these two processes. As a first step towards understanding the molecular genetic basis of the AS1-AS2 action, we determined the subcellular localizations of the two proteins in both tobacco BY2 cells and Arabidopsis plants, by fusing them to yellow/cyan fluorescent protein (YFP/CFP). Our data showed that AS1 and AS2 alone were predominantly localized in the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm, respectively. The presence of both AS1 and AS2 proteins in the same interphase cell demonstrated their co-localization in both nucleolus and nucleoplasm. In addition, AS1 alone was able to associate with the condensed chromosome in the metaphase cell. Our data suggest that AS1, AS2 and the AS1-AS2 protein complex may have distinct functions, which are all required for normal plant development.

  15. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs.

  16. Distinct roles of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in GABAA receptor blockade-induced enhancement of object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Younghwan; Park, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2014-03-13

    It is well known that the hippocampus plays a role in spatial and contextual memory, and that spatial information is tightly regulated by the hippocampus. However, it is still highly controversial whether the hippocampus plays a role in object recognition memory. In a pilot study, the administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, enhanced memory in the passive avoidance task, but not in the novel object recognition task. In the present study, we hypothesized that these different results are related to the characteristics of each task and the different roles of hippocampus and perirhinal cortex. A region-specific drug-treatment model was employed to clarify the role of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in object recognition memory. After a single habituation in the novel object recognition task, intra-perirhinal cortical injection of bicuculline increased and intra-hippocampal injection decreased the exploration time ratio to novel object. In addition, when animals were repeatedly habituated to the context, intra-perirhinal cortical administration of bicuculline still increased exploration time ratio to novel object, but the effect of intra-hippocampal administration disappeared. Concurrent increases of c-Fos expression and ERK phosphorylation were observed in the perirhinal cortex of the object with context-exposed group either after single or repeated habituation to the context, but no changes were noted in the hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that object recognition memory formation requires the perirhinal cortex but not the hippocampus, and that hippocampal activation interferes with object recognition memory by the information encoding of unfamiliar environment.

  17. Block of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by tetracaine derivatives: role of apolar interactions at two distinct locations

    PubMed Central

    Strassmaier, Timothy; Kirk, Sarah R.; Banerji, Tapasree; Karpen, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    A series of new tetracaine derivatives was synthesized to explore the effects of hydrophobic character on blockade of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. Increasing the hydrophobicity at either of two positions on the tetracaine scaffold, the tertiary amine or the butyl tail, yields blockers with increased potency. However, shape also plays an important role. While gradual increases in length of the butyl tail lead to increased potency, substitution of the butyl tail with branched alkyl or cyclic groups is deleterious. PMID:18055205

  18. Drp2 and Periaxin form Cajal Bands with Dystroglycan but have Distinct Roles in Schwann Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Diane L.; Wu, Lai Man N.; Grove, Matthew; Gillespie, C. Stewart; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Cajal bands are cytoplasmic channels flanked by appositions where the abaxonal surface of Schwann cell myelin apposes and adheres to the overlying plasma membrane. These appositions contain a dystroglycan complex that includes periaxin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (Drp2). Loss of periaxin disrupts appositions and Cajal bands in Schwann cells and causes a severe demyelinating neuropathy in mouse and man. Here we have investigated the role of mouse Drp2 in apposition assembly and Cajal band function and compared it to periaxin. We show that Periaxin and Drp2 are not only both required to form appositions, but they must also interact. Periaxin-Drp2 interaction is also required for Drp2 phosphorylation but phosphorylation is not required for the assembly of appositions. Drp2 loss causes corresponding increases in Dystrophin family members, utrophin and dystrophin Dp116 though dystroglycan remains unchanged. We also show that all dystroglycan complexes in Schwann cells utilise the uncleaved form of β-dystroglycan. Drp2-null Schwann cells have disrupted appositions and Cajal bands, and they undergoe focal hypermyelination and concomitant demyelination. Nevertheless, they do not have the short internodal lengths and associated reduced nerve conduction velocity seen in the absence of periaxin, showing that periaxin regulates Schwann cell elongation independent of its role in the dystroglycan complex. We conclude that the primary role of the dystroglycan complex in appositions is to stabilize and limit the radial growth of myelin. PMID:22764250

  19. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  20. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  1. CD30 expression defines a novel subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with favorable prognosis and distinct gene expression signature: a report from the International DLBCL Rituximab-CHOP Consortium Program Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shimin; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexander; Liu, Wei-min; Miranda, Roberto N.; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkær, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Choi, William W. L.; Han van Krieken, J.; Huang, Qin; Huh, Jooryung; Ai, Weiyun; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J. M.; Zhao, Xiaoying; Winter, Jane N.; Zhang, Mingzhi; Li, Ling; Møller, Michael B.; Piris, Miguel A.; Li, Yong; Go, Ronald S.; Wu, Lin; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Young, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    CD30, originally identified as a cell-surface marker of Reed-Sternberg and Hodgkin cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, is also expressed by several types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including a subset of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the prognostic and biological importance of CD30 expression in DLBCL is unknown. Here we report that CD30 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in a cohort of 903 de novo DLBCL patients. CD30 was expressed in ∼14% of DLBCL patients. Patients with CD30+ DLBCL had superior 5-year overall survival (CD30+, 79% vs CD30–, 59%; P = .001) and progression-free survival (P = .003). The favorable outcome of CD30 expression was maintained in both the germinal center B-cell and activated B-cell subtypes. Gene expression profiling revealed the upregulation of genes encoding negative regulators of nuclear factor κB activation and lymphocyte survival, and downregulation of genes encoding B-cell receptor signaling and proliferation, as well as prominent cytokine and stromal signatures in CD30+ DLBCL patients, suggesting a distinct molecular basis for its favorable outcome. Given the superior prognostic value, unique gene expression signature, and significant value of CD30 as a therapeutic target for brentuximab vedotin in ongoing successful clinical trials, it seems appropriate to consider CD30+ DLBCL as a distinct subgroup of DLBCL. PMID:23343832

  2. Distinct and cooperative roles of mammalian Vg1 homologs GDF1 and GDF3 during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olov; Bertolino, Philippe; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2007-11-15

    Vg1, a member of the TGF-beta superfamily of ligands, has been implicated in the induction of mesoderm, formation of primitive streak, and left-right patterning in Xenopus and chick embryos. In mice, GDF1 and GDF3 - two TGF-beta superfamily ligands that share high sequence identity with Vg1 - have been shown to independently mimic distinct aspects of Vg1's functions. However, the extent to which the developmental processes controlled by GDF1 and GDF3 and the underlying signaling mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved remains unclear. Here we show that phylogenetic and genomic analyses indicate that Gdf1 is the true Vg1 ortholog in mammals. In addition, and similar to GDF1, we find that GDF3 signaling can be mediated by the type I receptor ALK4, type II receptors ActRIIA and ActRIIB, and the co-receptor Cripto to activate Smad-dependent reporter genes. When expressed in heterologous cells, the native forms of either GDF1 or GDF3 were incapable of inducing downstream signaling. This could be circumvented by using chimeric constructs carrying heterologous prodomains, or by co-expression with the Furin pro-protein convertase, indicating poor processing of the native GDF1 and GDF3 precursors. Unexpectedly, co-expression with Nodal - another TGF-beta superfamily ligand involved in mesoderm formation - could also expose the activities of native GDF1 and GDF3, suggesting a potentially novel mode of cooperation between these ligands. Functional complementarity between GDF1 and GDF3 during embryonic development was investigated by analyzing genetic interactions between their corresponding genes. This analysis showed that Gdf1(-/-);Gdf3(-/-) compound mutants are more severely affected than either Gdf1(-/-) or Gdf3(-/-) single mutants, with defects in the formation of anterior visceral endoderm and mesoderm that recapitulate Vg1 loss of function, suggesting that GDF1 and GDF3 together represent the functional mammalian homologs of Vg1.

  3. Distinct roles of deiodinases on the phenotype of Mct8 defect: a comparison of eight different mouse genotypes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiao-Hui; Di Cosmo, Caterina; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Hernandez, Arturo; Van Sande, Jacqueline; St Germain, Donald L; Weiss, Roy E; Galton, Valerie Anne; Refetoff, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    Mice deficient in the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter Mct8 (Mct8KO) have increased 5'-deiodination and impaired TH secretion and excretion. These and other unknown mechanisms result in the low-serum T(4), high T(3), and low rT(3) levels characteristic of Mct8 defects. We investigated to what extent each of the 5'-deiodinases (D1, D2) contributes to the serum TH abnormalities of the Mct8KO by generating mice with all combinations of Mct8 and D1 and/or D2 deficiencies and comparing the resulting eight genotypes. Adding D1 deficiency to that of Mct8 corrected the serum TH abnormalities of Mct8KO mice, normalized brain T(3) content, and reduced the impaired expression of TH-responsive genes. In contrast, Mct8D2KO mice maintained the serum TH abnormalities of Mct8KO mice. However, the serum TSH level increased 27-fold, suggesting a severely impaired hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis. The brain of Mct8D2KO manifested a pattern of more severe impairment of TH action than Mct8KO alone. In triple Mct8D1D2KO mice, the markedly increased serum TH levels produced milder brain defect than that of Mct8D2KO at the expense of more severe liver thyrotoxicosis. Additionally, we observed that mice deficient in D2 had an unexplained marked reduction in the thyroid growth response to TSH. Our studies on these eight genotypes provide a unique insight into the complex interplay of the deiodinases in the Mct8 defect and suggest that D1 contributes to the increased serum T(3) in Mct8 deficiency, whereas D2 mainly functions locally, converting T(4) to T(3) to compensate for distinct cellular TH depletion in Mct8KO mice.

  4. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. A genetic approach to study H2O2 scavenging in fission yeast--distinct roles of peroxiredoxin and catalase.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Esther; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Calvo, Isabel A; Carmona, Mercè; Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-04-01

    The main peroxiredoxin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Tpx1, is important to sustain aerobic growth, and cells lacking this protein are only able to grow on solid plates under anaerobic conditions. We have found that deletion of the gene coding for thioredoxin reductase, trr1, is a suppressor of the sensitivity to aerobic growth of Δtpx1 cells, so that cells lacking both proteins are able to grow on solid plates in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated this suppression effect, and determined that it depends on the presence of catalase, which is constitutively expressed in Δtrr1 cells in a transcription factor Pap1-dependent manner. A complete characterization of the repertoire of hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities in fission yeast suggests that Tpx1 is the only enzyme with sufficient sensitivity for peroxides and cellular abundance as to control the low levels produced during aerobic growth, catalase being the next barrier of detoxification when the steady-state levels of peroxides are increased in Δtpx1 cells. Gpx1, the only glutathione peroxidase encoded by the S. pombe genome, only has a minor secondary role when extracellular peroxides are added. Our study proposes non-overlapping roles for the different hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities of this eukaryotic organism.

  6. Bestatin-based chemical biology strategy reveals distinct roles for malaria M1- and M17-family aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Harbut, Michael B; Velmourougane, Geetha; Dalal, Seema; Reiss, Gilana; Whisstock, James C; Onder, Ozlem; Brisson, Dustin; McGowan, Sheena; Klemba, Michael; Greenbaum, Doron C

    2011-08-23

    Malaria causes worldwide morbidity and mortality, and while chemotherapy remains an excellent means of malaria control, drug-resistant parasites necessitate the discovery of new antimalarials. Peptidases are a promising class of drug targets and perform several important roles during the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocytic life cycle. Herein, we report a multidisciplinary effort combining activity-based protein profiling, biochemical, and peptidomic approaches to functionally analyze two genetically essential P. falciparum metallo-aminopeptidases (MAPs), PfA-M1 and Pf-LAP. Through the synthesis of a suite of activity-based probes (ABPs) based on the general MAP inhibitor scaffold, bestatin, we generated specific ABPs for these two enzymes. Specific inhibition of PfA-M1 caused swelling of the parasite digestive vacuole and prevented proteolysis of hemoglobin (Hb)-derived oligopeptides, likely starving the parasite resulting in death. In contrast, inhibition of Pf-LAP was lethal to parasites early in the life cycle, prior to the onset of Hb degradation suggesting that Pf-LAP has an essential role outside of Hb digestion.

  7. Two Types of Neurons in the Primate Globus Pallidus External Segment Play Distinct Roles in Antisaccade Generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    The globus pallidus external segment (GPe) constitutes part of the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. Because of inhibitory projections from the striatum, most GPe neurons are expected to reduce activity during movements. However, many GPe neurons in fact display increased activity. We previously found that both excitatory and inhibitory responses were modulated during antisaccades, when eyes were directed away from a visual stimulus. To elucidate the roles of these neurons during antisaccades, we examined neuronal activities as monkeys performed antisaccades, prosaccades, and NoGo tasks under 2 conditions. In the Deliberate condition, the task-rule was instructed by color of the fixation point, while in the Immediate condition, it was given by color of the target. Under both conditions, the increase-type neurons exhibited greater activity during antisaccades compared with the other tasks and neuronal activity negatively correlated with saccade latency. The decrease-type neurons also showed greater modulation during antisaccades but their activity was comparable between NoGo and antisaccade trials in the Immediate condition. These results suggest that the increase-type neurons might play a role in facilitating antisaccades, whereas the decrease-type neurons could mediate signals for reflexive saccade suppression. We propose that these GPe neurons are differently involved in basal ganglia pathways.

  8. Quantitative testing critical-taper wedge theory with distinct-element modeling and the role of dynamics in controlling wedge tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther; Suppe, John

    2014-05-01

    Critical-taper wedge mechanics (e.g. Davis, et al. 1983, Dahlen 1990) provides fundamental relationships between the observed tapered geometries of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges and their detachment and wedge strengths. This theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts, much of which has been aided by extensive analog and numerical modeling. The field has grown large, with several thousand papers addressing real-world, analog, and numerical wedges (cf. Buiter 2012). The majority of the insight has been qualitative, but nevertheless quite influential in our current understanding of mountain belts and submarine wedges. In contrast, quantitative applications of wedge theory, either to nature or models, has been rather limited because of the complexity of most wedge equations. It it is easy to become "lost in parameter space" with many strength parameters that are difficult to constrain or have ambiguous meaning, given real-world data and observations. Recently wedge theory has been recast into a very simple form (Suppe 2007; Yeh and Suppe 2014) that provides an unambiguous relationship between the observed covariation of surface slope α with detachment dip β and the wedge W and fault F strengths with few assumptions. In the real world we have limited knowledge of strengths, forces, fluid pressures and earthquake history, or the relationship between strength heterogeneity and structural style, or to what extent the strength of a wedge is an evolving macroscopic property (e.g. folding, imbrications and strain localization) or a material property. The well-defined relationship between wedge taper and global strength makes numerical wedges an ideal tool for the study of compressive mountain belts. In this work: [1] We successfully test this simpler quantitative wedge theory over a very wide range of wedge strengths and structural styles using distinct

  9. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR.

  10. Three-dimensional in vivo analysis of Dictyostelium mounds reveals directional sorting of prestalk cells and defines a role for the myosin II regulatory light chain in prestalk cell sorting and tip protrusion.

    PubMed

    Clow, P A; Chen, T; Chisholm, R L; McNally, J G

    2000-06-01

    During cell sorting in Dictyostelium, we observed that GFP-tagged prestalk cells (ecmAO-expressing cells) moved independently and directionally to form a cluster. This is consistent with a chemotaxis model for cell sorting (and not differential adhesion) in which a long-range signal attracts many of the prestalk cells to the site of cluster formation. Surprisingly, the ecmAO prestalk cluster that we observed was initially found at a random location within the mound of this Ax3 strain, defining an intermediate sorting stage not widely reported in Dictyostelium. The cluster then moved en masse to the top of the mound to produce the classic, apical pattern of ecmAO prestalk cells. Migration of the cluster was also directional, suggesting the presence of another long-range guidance cue. Once at the mound apex, the cluster continued moving upward leading to protrusion of the mound's tip. To investigate the role of the cluster in tip protrusion, we examined ecmAO prestalk-cell sorting in a myosin II regulatory light chain (RLC) null in which tips fail to form. In RLC-null mounds, ecmAO prestalk cells formed an initial cluster that began to move to the mound apex, but then arrested as a vertical column that extended from the mound's apex to its base. Mixing experiments with wild-type cells demonstrated that the RLC-null ecmAO prestalk-cell defect is cell autonomous. These observations define a specific mechanism for myosin's function in tip formation, namely a mechanical role in the upward movement of the ecmAO prestalk cluster. The wild-type data demonstrate that cell sorting can occur in two steps, suggesting that, in this Ax3 strain, spatially and temporally distinct cues may guide prestalk cells first to an initial cluster and then later to the tip.

  11. Chelating agents exert distinct effects on biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus depending on strain background: role for clumping factor B

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nabil M.; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Fowler, Vance G.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of catheter infections, and biofilm formation plays a key role in the pathogenesis. Metal ion chelators inhibit bacterial biofilm formation and viability, making them attractive candidates as components in catheter lock solutions. The goal of this study was to characterize further the effect of chelators on biofilm formation. The effect of the calcium chelators ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trisodium citrate (TSC) on biofilm formation by 30 S. aureus strains was tested. The response to subinhibitory doses of EGTA and TSC varied dramatically depending on strain variation. In some strains, the chelators prevented biofilm formation, in others they had no effect, and they actually enhanced biofilm formation in others. The molecular basis for this phenotypic variability was investigated using two related strains: Newman, in which biofilm formation was inhibited by chelators, and 10833, which formed strong biofilms in the presence of chelators. It was found that deletion of the gene encoding the surface adhesin clumping factor B (clfB) completely eliminated chelator-induced biofilm formation in strain 10833. The role of ClfB in biofilm formation activity in chelators was confirmed in additional strains. It was concluded that biofilm-forming ability varies strikingly depending on strain background, and that ClfB is involved in biofilm formation in the presence EGTA and citrate. These results suggest that subinhibitory doses of chelating agents in catheter lock solutions may actually augment biofilm formation in certain strains of S. aureus, and emphasize the importance of using these agents appropriately so that inhibitory doses are achieved consistently. PMID:22516131

  12. ROS, MAPK/ERK and PKC play distinct roles in EGF-stimulated human corneal cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Huo, Y-N; Chen, W; Zheng, X-X

    2015-11-08

    Cornea is at the outermost surface of eye globe, and it easily receives damage from ultraviolet light exposure, physiology wounding, and infections. It is essential to understand the mechanisms controlling human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell proliferation and wound healing. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) could stimulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types. Therefore, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of EGF on HCE cell proliferation and migration. CCK-8 kit and wound healing experiment were used to investigate HCE cell proliferation and cell migration, respectively. ROS activity was quantified by DCFDA and flow cytometry. Western blot and Q-PCR were performed to examine protein and RNA levels. EGF could promote HCE cell proliferation and migration in both physiology status and UV irradiation conditions, which is used to mimic the disease condition in human corneal epithelial cells. Interestingly, the promotion effect of EGF on HCE cell proliferation is mainly mediated by activated ROS signaling under disease condition. However, the EGF function is mediated by ROS and MAPK/ERK pathway in EGF-treated corneal epithelial cells in physiology status, in which ROS and MAPK/ERK pathway have no mutual influence on the other signaling pathway in EGF-stimulated corneal epithelial cells. We also revealed that MAPK/ERK pathway instead of ROS mediates EGF-stimulated HCE cell migration. Interestingly, we found that PKC proteins were downregulated by EGF in HCE cells that is partially mediated by ROS signaling, while PKC pathway was not involved in EGF-stimulated corneal cell proliferation and migration. EGF promotes human corneal cell proliferation and migration both in physiology and disease conditions, and ROS, MAPK/ERK and PKC pathways play different roles in these processes.

  13. The Dithiol Glutaredoxins of African Trypanosomes Have Distinct Roles and Are Closely Linked to the Unique Trypanothione Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Sevgi; Seidel, Vera; Ziebart, Nicole; Berndt, Carsten; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, possesses two dithiol glutaredoxins (Grx1 and Grx2). Grx1 occurs in the cytosol and catalyzes protein deglutathionylations with kcat/Km-values of up to 2 × 105 m−1 s−1. It accelerates the reduction of ribonucleotide reductase by trypanothione although less efficiently than the parasite tryparedoxin and has low insulin disulfide reductase activity. Despite its classical CPYC active site, Grx1 forms dimeric iron-sulfur complexes with GSH, glutathionylspermidine, or trypanothione as non-protein ligands. Thus, contrary to the generally accepted assumption, replacement of the Pro is not a prerequisite for cluster formation. T. brucei Grx2 shows an unusual CQFC active site, and orthologues occur exclusively in trypanosomatids. Grx2 is enriched in mitoplasts, and fractionated digitonin lysis resulted in a co-elution with cytochrome c, suggesting localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Grx2 catalyzes the reduction of insulin disulfide but not of ribonucleotide reductase and exerts deglutathionylation activity 10-fold lower than that of Grx1. RNA interference against Grx2 caused a growth retardation of procyclic cells consistent with an essential role. Grx1 and Grx2 are constitutively expressed with cellular concentrations of about 2 μm and 200 nm, respectively, in both the mammalian bloodstream and insect procyclic forms. Trypanothione reduces the disulfide form of both proteins with apparent rate constants that are 3 orders of magnitude higher than those with glutathione. Grx1 and, less efficiently, also Grx2 catalyze the reduction of GSSG by trypanothione. Thus, the Grxs play exclusive roles in the trypanothione-based thiol redox metabolism of African trypanosomes. PMID:20826822

  14. Defining GERD.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J

    1999-01-01

    "It is not the death of GERD that I seek, but that it turns from its evil ways and follows the path of righteousness." The reflux world is fully aware of what GERD is and what GERD does. What the world does not know, however, is the answer to the most important yet least asked question surrounding GERD's raison-d'etre: Why is GERD here and why do we have it? What GERD is: abnormal gastric reflux into the esophagus that causes any type of mischief. What GERD does: causes discomfort and/or pain with or without destroying the mucosa; causes stricture or stenosis, preventing food from being swallowed; sets the stage for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; invades the surrounding lands to harass the peaceful oropharyngeal, laryngeal and broncho-pulmonary territories; reminds us that we are not only human, but that we are dust and ashes. Why GERD is here: We propose three separate and distinct etiologies of GERD, and we offer the following three hypotheses to explain why, after 1.5 million years of standing erect, we have evolved into a species (specifically Homosapiens sapiens) that is destined to live with the scourge of GERD. Hypothesis 1: congenital. The antireflux barrier, comprising the smooth-muscled lower esophageal sphincter, the skeletal-muscled right crural diaphragm and the phreno-esophageal ligament does not completely develop due to a developmental anomaly or incomplete gestation. Hypothesis 2: acute trauma: The antireflux barrier in adults suffering acute traumatic injury to the abdomen or chest is permanently disrupted by unexpected forces, such as motor vehicle accidents (with steering wheel crush impact), blows to the abdomen (from activities such as boxing, etc.), heavy lifting or moving (e.g., pianos, refrigerators) or stress positions (e.g., hand stands on parallel gym bars). The trauma creates a hiatal hernia that renders the antireflux mechanism useless and incapable of preventing GERD. Hypothesis 3: chronic trauma: The antireflux barrier

  15. Am I seeing myself, my friend or a stranger? The role of personal familiarity in visual distinction of body identities in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Barbara; Bogler, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2016-10-01

    Several brain regions appear to play a role in representing different body identities. The specific contribution of each of these regions is still unclear, however. Here we investigated which brain areas enable the visual distinction between self and other bodies of different familiarity, and between familiar and unfamiliar other individuals, and moreover, where identity-specific information on the three individuals was encoded. Participants were confronted with standardized headless human body stimuli either showing the participant's own, a personally familiar or an unfamiliar other body, while performing a luminance discrimination task. Employing multivariate pattern analysis, we were able to identify areas that allowed for the distinction of self from personal familiar other bodies within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus. Successful distinction of self from unfamiliar others was possible in the left middle frontal gyrus, the right inferior frontal gyrus, the left pre-supplementary motor area and the right putamen. Personally familiar others could be distinguished from unfamiliar others in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). An analysis of identity-specific information revealed a spatial gradient ranging from inferior posterior to superior anterior portions of the mPFC that was associated with encoding identity-related information for self via familiar to unfamiliar other bodies, respectively. Furthermore, several midline and frontal regions encoded information on more than one identity. The TPJ's role in deviance detection was underlined, as only identity-specific information on unfamiliar others was encoded here. Together, our findings suggest substantial spatial overlap in neural correlates of self and other body representation and thus, support the hypothesis of a socially-related representation of the self.

  16. Acetylation mimics within individual core histone tail domains indicate distinct roles in regulating the stability of higher-order chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome arrays undergo salt-dependent self-association into large oligomers in a process thought to recapitulate essential aspects of higher-order tertiary chromatin structure formation. Lysine acetylation within the core histone tail domains inhibits self-association, an effect likely related to its role in facilitating transcription. As acetylation of specific tail domains may encode distinct functions, we investigated biochemical and self-association properties of model nucleosome arrays containing combinations of native and mutant core histones with lysine-to-glutamine substitutions to mimic acetylation. Acetylation mimics within the tail domains of H2B and H4 caused the largest inhibition of array self-association, while modification of the H3 tail uniquely affected the stability of DNA wrapping within individual nucleosomes. In addition, the effect of acetylation mimics on array self-association is inconsistent with a simple charge neutralization mechanism. For example, acetylation mimics within the H2A tail can have either a positive or negative effect on self-association, dependent upon the acetylation state of the other tails and nucleosomal repeat length. Finally, we demonstrate that glutamine substitutions and lysine acetylation within the H4 tail domain have identical effects on nucleosome array self-association. Our results indicate that acetylation of specific tail domains plays distinct roles in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  17. Role of Human Metapneumovirus, Influenza A Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Causing WHO-Defined Severe Pneumonia in Children in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Bashir, Maaman Zahoor; Aziz, Fatima; Mustafa, Sultan; Zaidi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective The role of respiratory viruses in causing severe, life threatening pneumonia in children in developing countries is not well established. Our study aims to determine the role of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children, aged 6 weeks to 2 years, hospitalized with WHO defined severe pneumonia (tachypnea plus any general danger sign or chest in-drawing) at a public sector hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods This study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011 at Abbassi Shaheed Hospital, a large public tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Children admitted with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled and throat swabs were obtained to detect respiratory viruses using real time RT-PCR. Chest x-rays of all subjects were obtained and independently interpreted by two radiologists to diagnose radiologic pneumonia. Results 169 children were enrolled. HMPV was detected in 24 (14.2%), influenza A virus in 9 (5.3%) and RSV in 30 (17.8%) children admitted with severe pneumonia. Of 9 patients with influenza A, 8 tested positive for H1N1. Viral etiology was found in 18% of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. HMPV infections peaked in February and April, influenza A was prevalent in January, June and November and RSV infections were most prevalent from June to September. Conclusion HMPV, influenza A and RSV are common causes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in hospitalized children in Karachi. Knowledge regarding the viral etiology of pediatric pneumonia and individual viral seasonality can help in the recommendation and implementation of appropriate management strategies. PMID:24058625

  18. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane J Protein C18 Executes a Distinct Role in Promoting Simian Virus 40 Membrane Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Parikshit; Walczak, Christopher Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonenveloped simian virus 40 (SV40) hijacks the three endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-bound J proteins B12, B14, and C18 to escape from the ER into the cytosol en route to successful infection. How C18 controls SV40 ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration is the least understood of these processes. We previously found that SV40 triggers B12 and B14 to reorganize into discrete puncta in the ER membrane called foci, structures postulated to represent the cytosol entry site (C. P. Walczak, M. S. Ravindran, T. Inoue, and B. Tsai, PLoS Pathog 10:e1004007, 2014). We now find that SV40 also recruits C18 to the virus-induced B12/B14 foci. Importantly, the C18 foci harbor membrane penetration-competent SV40, further implicating this structure as the membrane penetration site. Consistent with this, a mutant SV40 that cannot penetrate the ER membrane and promote infection fails to induce C18 foci. C18 also regulates the recruitment of B12/B14 into the foci. In contrast to B14, C18's cytosolic Hsc70-binding J domain, but not the lumenal domain, is essential for its targeting to the foci; this J domain likewise is necessary to support SV40 infection. Knockdown-rescue experiments reveal that C18 executes a role that is not redundant with those of B12/B14 during SV40 infection. Collectively, our data illuminate C18's contribution to SV40 ER membrane penetration, strengthening the idea that SV40-triggered foci are critical for cytosol entry. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses (PyVs) cause devastating human diseases, particularly in immunocompromised patients. As this virus family continues to be a significant human pathogen, clarifying the molecular basis of their cellular entry pathway remains a high priority. To infect cells, PyV traffics from the cell surface to the ER, where it penetrates the ER membrane to reach the cytosol. In the cytosol, the virus moves to the nucleus to cause infection. ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration is a critical yet mysterious infection step. In

  19. Distinct roles of STAT3 and STAT5 in the pathogenesis and targeted therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Frank, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 play important roles in the regulation of mammary gland function during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. Given that STAT3 and STAT5 regulate genes involved in proliferation and survival, it is not surprising that inappropriate activation of STAT3 and STAT5 occurs commonly in breast cancer. Although these proteins are structurally similar, they have divergent and opposing effects on gene expression and cellular phenotype. Notably, when STAT5 and STAT3 are activated simultaneously, STAT5 has a dominant effect, and leads to decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to cell death. Similarly, in breast cancer, activation of both STAT5 and STAT3 is associated with longer patient survival than activation of STAT3 alone. Pharmacological inhibitors of STAT3 and STAT5 are being developed for cancer therapy, though understanding the activation state and functional interaction of STAT3 and STAT5 in a patient's tumor may be critical for the optimal use of this strategy. PMID:23531638

  20. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  1. AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms play distinct roles during breast cancer progression through the regulation of specific downstream proteins

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, Marina; Perrone, María C.; Polo, María L.; Rodriguez, María J.; May, María; Abba, Martín; Lanari, Claudia; Novaro, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms associated with the specific effects of AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms in breast cancer progression. We modulated the abundance of specific AKT isoforms in IBH-6 and T47D human breast cancer cell lines and showed that AKT1 promoted cell proliferation, through S6 and cyclin D1 upregulation, but it inhibited cell migration and invasion through β1-integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) downregulation. In contrast, AKT2 promoted cell migration and invasion through F-actin and vimentin induction. Thus, while overexpression of AKT1 promoted local tumor growth, downregulation of AKT1 or overexpression of AKT2 promoted peritumoral invasion and lung metastasis. Furthermore, we evaluated The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset for invasive breast carcinomas and found that increased AKT2 but not AKT1 mRNA levels correlated with a worse clinical outcome. We conclude that AKT isoforms play specific roles in different steps of breast cancer progression, with AKT1 involved in the local tumor growth and AKT2 involved in the distant tumor dissemination, having AKT2 a poorer prognostic value and consequently being a worthwhile target for therapy. PMID:28287129

  2. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-09-08

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment.

  3. Distinct responses of the low-latitude ionosphere to CME and HSSWS: The role of the IMF Bz oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Zuluaga, J.; Radicella, S. M.; Nava, B.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Mora-Páez, H.; Alazo-Cuartas, K.

    2016-11-01

    In this work an attempt to identify the role of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the response of the ionosphere to different solar phenomena is presented. For this purpose, the day-to-day variability of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) and the main ionospheric disturbances are analyzed during one coronal mass ejection (CME) and two high-speed solar wind streams (HSSWSs). The EIA parameters considered are the zonal electric field and both the strength and position of its northern crest. The disturbances being the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field (PPMEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF) are studied using the magnetic response of their equivalent current systems. In accordance, ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems receivers and magnetometers at geomagnetic low latitudes in the American sector are used. During both phenomena, patterns of PPMEF related to fluctuations of the IMF are observed. Diurnal and semidiurnal magnetic oscillations are found to be likely related to DDEF. Comparisons among the EIA parameters and the DDEF magnetic response exhibit poor relation during the CME in contrast to good relation during the HSSWSs. It is concluded that the response of the low-latitude ionosphere to solar phenomena is largely determined through the oscillation frequency of the IMF Bz by affecting the generation of the PPMEF and DDEF differently. This is seen as an effect of how the energy from the solar wind is transferred into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  4. Task-dependent and distinct roles of the temporoparietal junction and inferior frontal cortex in the control of imitation.

    PubMed

    Hogeveen, Jeremy; Obhi, Sukhvinder S; Banissy, Michael J; Santiesteban, Idalmis; Press, Clare; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-07-01

    The control of neurological networks supporting social cognition is crucially important for social interaction. In particular, the control of imitation is directly linked to interaction quality, with impairments associated with disorders characterized by social difficulties. Previous work suggests inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) are involved in controlling imitation, but the functional roles of these areas remain unclear. Here, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was used to enhance cortical excitability at IFC and the TPJ prior to the completion of three tasks: (i) a naturalistic social interaction during which increased imitation is known to improve rapport, (ii) a choice reaction time task in which imitation needs to be inhibited for successful performance and (iii) a non-imitative control task. Relative to sham stimulation, stimulating IFC improved the context-dependent control of imitation-participants imitated more during the social interaction and less during the imitation inhibition task. In contrast, stimulating the TPJ reduced imitation in the inhibition task without affecting imitation during social interaction. Neither stimulation site affected the non-imitative control task. These data support a model in which IFC modulates imitation directly according to task demands, whereas TPJ controls task-appropriate shifts in attention toward representation of the self or the other, indirectly impacting upon imitation.

  5. Nitrate isotopes unveil distinct seasonal N-sources and the critical role of crop residues in groundwater contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Martine M.; Somers, George; Smirnoff, Anna; Paradis, Daniel; van Bochove, Eric; Liao, Shawna

    2010-02-01

    SummaryGlobally, fertilizers are identified as principle sources of nitrate in waters of intensely cultivated areas. Here this general concept is appraised on a seasonal basis over a two year period, under temperate climatic conditions. Water ( δ2H and δ18O) and nitrate ( δ15N and δ18O) isotopes in surface water and groundwater suggest that freshwater is acting as a transport vector conducting nitrate from agricultural soils to groundwater and ultimately to surface water. Measured nitrate isotopes of organic and inorganic fertilizers and of nitrate in groundwater are used to constrain a conceptual apportionment model quantifying the relative seasonal N contributions in an area of intense potato production. Source inputs differ strongly between the growing (summer and fall) and non-growing (winter and spring) periods. Chemical fertilizers and soil organic matter equally dominate and contribute to the growing period load, whereas soil organic matter dominates the non-growing period load, and accounts for over half of the overall annual nitrogen charge. These findings reveal the magnitude of nitrogen cycling by soil organic matter, and point to the benefits of controlling the timing of its nitrate release from this organic material. We conclude that strategies to attenuate contamination by nitrate in waters of temperate climate row-cropping regions must consider nitrogen cycling by soil organic matter, including the crucial role of crop residues throughout both the growing and non-growing seasons.

  6. Distinct roles of N-acetyl and 5-methoxy groups in the antiproliferative and neuroprotective effects of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Letra-Vilela, Ricardo; Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana María; Rocha, Ana Maia; Martin, Vanesa; Branco-Santos, Joana; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Antolín, Isaac; Rodriguez, Carmen; Herrera, Federico

    2016-10-15

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a highly pleiotropic hormone with antioxidant, antiproliferative, oncolytic and neuroprotective properties. Here, we present evidence that the N-acetyl side chain plays a key role in melatonin's antiproliferative effect in HT22 and sw-1353 cells, but it does so at the expense of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Removal of the N-acetyl group enhances the antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the indole, but it can lead to toxic methamphetamine-like effects in several cell lines. Inhibition of NFkB mimicked melatonin's antiproliferative and antioxidant effects, but not neuroprotection. Our results strongly suggest that neuroprotective and antiproliferative effects of melatonin rely on different parts of the molecule and are likely mediated by different mechanisms. We also predict that melatonin metabolism by target cells could determine whether melatonin inhibits cell proliferation, prevents toxicity or induces cell death (e.g. apoptosis or autophagy). These observations could have important implications for the rational use of melatonin in personalized medicine.

  7. Patient resources in the therapeutic education of haemophiliacs in France: their skills and roles as defined by consensus of a working group.

    PubMed

    Wintz, L; Sannié, T; Ayçaguer, S; Guerois, C; Bernhard, J-P; Valluet, D; Borel-Derlon, A; Guillon, P; Fondanesche, C; Lambert, T; Meunier, S; Alliaume, N; Gagnayre, R

    2010-05-01

    The activities of 'expert patients' or 'patient tutors', who help educate their peers, are gaining recognition in the health care system. This study investigates the role played by such patients in therapeutic education programmes organized by caregivers to validate the role of patients in implementing the therapeutic education of haemophilic patients and to define the skills required for such activities. This study employs the consensus methodology recommended by France's National Authority for Health. The working group includes seven caregivers from Hemophiliac Treatment Centers (HTCs) and three patients from the French Association of Hemophiliacs (FAH). The role of patients in haemophilia education is recognized. Patients participating in the education of their peers are referred to as 'patient resources'. A patient resource should be an adult, a volunteer and live in the same region as his peers. Candidates are chosen by the FAH and the HTCs to serve based on their motivation to facilitate the education of other patients as well as on their psychological and pedagogical aptitudes. A patient resource participates in the conception and administration of therapeutic education programmes. He also mediates between the caregivers and the patients. He ensures that the patients understand the material and are able to apply their knowledge in daily life. His activities are governed by professional ethics. Seven categories of skills were defined, permitting the group to determine precisely which skills are required to function as a patient resource. Supervision of the patients is planned to reinforce reflexive practices in the patients. Evolution of the health care system has led patients to become involved in therapeutic education. This phenomenon calls for a framework to be developed and an evaluation of its eventual effects.

  8. Analysis of origin and protein-protein interaction maps suggests distinct oncogenic role of nuclear EGFR during cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sharip, Ainur; Abdukhakimova, Diyora; Wang, Xiao; Kim, Alexey; Kim, Yevgeniy; Sharip, Aigul; Orakov, Askarbek; Miao, Lixia; Sun, Qinglei; Chen, Yue; Chen, Zhenbang; Xie, Yingqiu

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR usually is localized on plasma membrane to induce progression of many cancers including cancers in children (Bodey et al. In Vivo. 2005, 19:931-41), but it contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) that mediates EGFR nuclear translocation (Lin et al. Nat Cell Biol. 2001, 3:802-8). Here we report that NLS of EGFR has its old evolutionary origin. Protein-protein interaction maps suggests that nEGFR pathways are different from membrane EGFR and EGF is not found in nEGFR network while androgen receptor (AR) is found, which suggests the evolution of prostate cancer, a well-known AR driven cancer, through changes in androgen- or EGF-dependence. Database analysis suggests that nEGFR correlates with the tumor grades especially in prostate cancer patients. Structural predication analysis suggests that NLS can compromise the differential protein binding to EGFR through stretch linkers with evolutionary mutation from N to V. In experiment, elevation of nEGFR but not membrane EGFR was found in castration resistant prostate cancer cells. Finally, systems analysis of NLS and transmembrane domain (TM) suggests that NLS has old origin while NLS neighboring domain of TM has been undergone accelerated evolution. Thus nEGFR has an old origin resembling the cancer evolution but TM may interfere with NLS driven signaling for natural selection of survival to evade NLS induced aggressive cancers. Our data suggest NLS is a dynamic inducer of EGFR oncogenesis during evolution for advanced cancers. Our model provides novel insights into the evolutionary role of NLS of oncogenic kinases in cancers. PMID:28382154

  9. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  10. Tobacco-smoke-inducible human haem oxygenase-1 gene expression: role of distinct transcription factors and reactive oxygen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Favatier, F; Polla, B S

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of eukaryotic cells to a variety of reactive-oxygen-intermediate (ROI)-mediated sources of cellular injury, including heavy metals and UV radiation, induces the expression of heat-shock (HS) and stress-related genes among which is a 32-34 kDa protein identified as inducible haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We previously showed that tobacco smoke (TS), a potent source of oxidants leading to oxidative stress, induces both HS proteins (HSPs) and HO-1 in normal human monocytes. Here we investigated the induction mechanisms of human HO-1 gene expression by TS in the human premonocytic line U937. Northern blotting and flow cytometry revealed a dose- and time-dependent induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein by TS. In order to clarify the role of transacting factors in this induction, electrophoretic mobility-shift analysis was performed with nuclear extracts from control, TS-, cadmium (Cd)- or H(2)O(2)-exposed cells, incubated with consensus elements and binding sites of the promoter region of HO-1[heat-shock factor (HSF), nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1)] and the cadmium-responsive element (CdRE) isolated by Takeda, Ishizawa, Sato, Yoshida and Shibahara [(1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22858-22867]. We report an inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by TS, no effect on AP-1 and a strong activation of CdRE-binding activity, whereas cadmium chelation from TS only partially prevented HO-1 induction. H(2)O(2) also activated the CdRE-binding activity, and pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which replenishes the intracellular levels of GSH, suppressed, in TS-treated cells, both the CdRE-binding activity and the increased HO-1 expression. PMID:11171043

  11. Distinct electrical and chemical connectivity maps in the thalamic reticular nucleus: potential roles in synchronization and sensation.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Huguenard, John R

    2006-08-16

    GABAergic neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (nRt) provide thalamocortical relay neurons with feedback inhibition that influences sensory processing and thalamocortical rhythm generation. Mutual interactions between reticular neurons coordinate oscillatory activities developed within the network during normal sleep and in absence epilepsy, but the chemical versus electrical nature of these connections and their functional influence remain controversial. Here, we investigated the incidence and spatial extent of intra-nRt connectivity in vitro in horizontal and coronal thalamic slices from rat. Laser scanning photostimulation activated presynaptic nRt cells during patch-clamp recordings of postsynaptic neurons. Photolysis of caged glutamate evoked GABAergic IPSCs and/or depolarizing events (spikelets, mediated via electrical coupling) in a large proportion of neurons, thus indicating connectivity with presynaptic cell(s). Synaptic inputs were organized along the major axis of the nucleus in the same orientation as, but commonly exceeding the extent of, dendritic arborization of the postsynaptic neuron. In the anteroposterior (horizontal) plane, chemical connectivity had higher incidence (60% of recorded neurons vs 40% in vertical plane) and longer spatial extent, whereas in the dorsoventral (vertical) plane, electrical coupling dominated (47% incidence vs 37% in horizontal plane) and was more widely distributed. These data demonstrate that both electrical and chemical synapses are prominent within nRt and suggest different roles for the two types of connections. We thus propose that, along the vertical plane, electrical connectivity will promote coordinated rhythmic activity of sleep and/or thalamocortical epilepsy, whereas along the horizontal plane, chemical connectivity will oppose widespread thalamocortical synchronization and modulate sensory throughput.

  12. Distinct roles of oxidative stress and antioxidants in the nucleus dorsalis and red nucleus following spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Gan, Le-Ting; Ng, Yee-Kong

    2005-09-07

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration after the acute central nervous system injury. We reported previously that increased nitric oxide (NO) production following spinal cord hemisection tends to lead to neurodegeneration in neurons of the nucleus dorsalis (ND) that normally lacks expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in opposition to those in the red nucleus (RN) that constitutively expresses nNOS. We wondered whether oxidative stress could be a mechanism underlying this NO involved neurodegeneration. In the present study, we examined oxidative damage evaluated by the presence of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and iron accumulation and expression of putative antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in neurons of the ND and RN after spinal cord hemisection. We found that HNE expression was induced in neurons of the ipsilateral ND from 1 to 14 days following spinal cord hemisection. Concomitantly, iron staining was seen from 7 to 14 days after lesion. HO-1, however, was only transiently induced in ipsilateral ND neurons between 3 and 7 days after lesion. In contrast to the ND neurons, HNE was undetectable and iron level was unaltered in the RN neurons after spinal cord hemisection. HO-1, SOD-Cu/Zn and SOD-Mn were constitutively expressed in RN neurons, and lesion to the spinal cord did not change their expression. These results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the degeneration of the lesioned ND neurons; whereas constitutive antioxidant enzymes may protect the RN neurons from oxidative damage.

  13. Duplication and Evolution of devA-Like Genes in Streptomyces Has Resulted in Distinct Developmental Roles

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Laura C.; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding morphological transformations is essential to elucidating the evolution and developmental biology of many organisms. The Gram-positive soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor has a complex lifecycle which lends itself well to such studies. We recently identified a transcriptional regulator, devA, which is required for correct sporulation in this organism, with mutants forming short, mis-septate aerial hyphae. devA is highly conserved within the Streptomyces genus along with a duplicate copy, devE. Disruption of devE indicates this gene also plays a role in sporulation; however the phenotype of a devE mutant differs from a devA mutant, forming long un-septate aerial hyphae. Transcriptional analysis of devA and devE indicates that they are expressed at different stages of the lifecycle. This suggests that following duplication they have diverged in regulation and function. Analysis of fully sequenced actinomycete genomes shows that devA is found in a single copy in morphologically simpler actinobacteria, suggesting that duplication has lead to increased morphological complexity. Complementation studies with devA from Salinispora, which sporulates but does not form aerial hyphae, indicates the ancestral gene cannot complement devA or devE, suggesting neo-functionalisation has occurred. Analysis of the synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide changes within the devA paralogues suggest subfunctionalisation has occurred as both copies have diverged from the ancestral sequences. Divergence is also asymmetric with a higher level of functional constraint observed in the DNA binding domain compared with the effector binding/oligomerisation domain, suggesting diversification in the substrate specificity of these paralogues has contributed to their evolution. PMID:21998634

  14. Estrogen and progesterone receptors have distinct roles in the establishment of the hyperplastic phenotype in PR-A transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Simian, Marina; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2009-05-11

    Expression of the A and B forms of progesterone receptor (PR) in an appropriate ratio is critical for mammary development. Mammary glands of PR-A transgenic mice, carrying an additional A form of PR as a transgene, exhibit morphological features associated with the development of mammary tumors. Our objective was to determine the roles of estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) in the genesis of mammary hyperplasias/preneoplasias in PR-A transgenics. We subjected PR-A mice to hormonal treatments and analyzed mammary glands for the presence of hyperplasias and used BrdU incorporation to measure proliferation. Quantitative image analysis was carried out to compare levels of latency-associated peptide and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF{beta}1) between PR-A and PR-B transgenics. Basement membrane disruption was examined by immunofluorescence and proteolytic activity by zymography. The hyperplastic phenotype of PR-A transgenics is inhibited by ovariectomy, and is reversed by treatment with E + P. Studies using the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 or antiprogestins RU486 or ZK 98,299 show that the increase in proliferation requires signaling through E/estrogen receptor alpha but is not sufficient to give rise to hyperplasias, whereas signaling through P/PR has little impact on proliferation but is essential for the manifestation of hyperplasias. Increased proliferation is correlated with decreased TGF{beta}1 activation in the PR-A transgenics. Analysis of basement membrane integrity showed loss of laminin-5, collagen III and collagen IV in mammary glands of PR-A mice, which is restored by ovariectomy. Examination of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) showed that total levels of MMP-2 correlate with the steady-state levels of PR, and that areas of laminin-5 loss coincide with those of activation of MMP-2 in PR-A transgenics. Activation of MMP-2 is dependent on treatment with E and P in ovariectomized wild-type mice, but is achieved only by treatment with P in PR-A mice. These data

  15. Transition Coordinators: Define Yourselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asselin, Susan B.; Todd-Allen, Mary; deFur, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Describes a technique that was used successfully to identify the changing roles and responsibilities of special educators as transition coordinators. The Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) model uses people who are currently working in the occupation to define job responsibilities. The duties of a transition coordinator are identified. (CR)

  16. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A.; Greaves, Bradford D.; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC’s tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation–based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function. PMID:26446838

  17. Distinct roles for the RSC and Swi/Snf ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bob; Huang, Jian; Cairns, Bradley R; Laurent, Brehon C

    2005-07-15

    The failure of cells to repair damaged DNA can result in genomic instability and cancer. To efficiently repair chromosomal DNA lesions, the repair machinery must gain access to the damaged DNA in the context of chromatin. Here we report that both the RSC and Swi/Snf ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play key roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, specifically by homologous recombination (HR). RSC and Swi/Snf are each recruited to an in vivo DSB site but with distinct kinetics. We show that Swi/Snf is required earlier, at or preceding the strand invasion step of HR, while RSC is required following synapsis for completion of the recombinational repair event.

  18. SPO14 separation-of-function mutations define unique roles for phospholipase D in secretion and cellular differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, S A; Pettitt, T R; Zhou, C; Wakelam, M J; Engebrecht, J A

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phospholipase D (PLD), encoded by the SPO14 gene, catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine, producing choline and phosphatidic acid. SPO14 is essential for cellular differentiation during meiosis and is required for Golgi function when the normal secretory apparatus is perturbed (Sec14-independent secretion). We isolated specific alleles of SPO14 that support Sec14-independent secretion but not sporulation. Identification of these separation-of-function alleles indicates that the role of PLD in these two physiological processes is distinct. Analyses of the mutants reveal that the corresponding proteins are stable, phosphorylated, catalytically active in vitro, and can localize properly within the cell during meiosis. Surprisingly, the separation-of-function mutations map to the conserved catalytic region of the PLD protein. Choline and phosphatidic acid molecular species profiles during Sec14-independent secretion and meiosis reveal that while strains harboring one of these alleles, spo14S-11, hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine in Sec14-independent secretion, they fail to do so during sporulation or normal vegetative growth. These results demonstrate that Spo14 PLD catalytic activity and cellular function can be differentially regulated at the level of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. PMID:11514437

  19. Defining the roles of the N-terminal region and the helicase activity of RECQ4A in DNA repair and homologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schröpfer, Susan; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2014-02-01

    RecQ helicases are critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. The Arabidopsis RecQ helicase RECQ4A is the functional counterpart of human BLM, which is mutated in the genetic disorder Bloom's syndrome. RECQ4A performs critical roles in regulation of homologous recombination (HR) and DNA repair. Loss of RECQ4A leads to elevated HR frequencies and hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents. Through complementation studies, we were now able to demonstrate that the N-terminal region and the helicase activity of RECQ4A are both essential for the cellular response to replicative stress induced by methyl methanesulfonate and cisplatin. In contrast, loss of helicase activity or deletion of the N-terminus only partially complemented the mutant hyper-recombination phenotype. Furthermore, the helicase-deficient protein lacking its N-terminus did not complement the hyper-recombination phenotype at all. Therefore, RECQ4A seems to possess at least two different and independent sub-functions involved in the suppression of HR. By in vitro analysis, we showed that the helicase core was able to regress an artificial replication fork. Swapping of the terminal regions of RECQ4A with the closely related but functionally distinct helicase RECQ4B indicated that in contrast to the C-terminus, the N-terminus of RECQ4A was required for its specific functions in DNA repair and recombination.

  20. Distinctive Roles of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in Anterior Agranular Insular and Basolateral Amygdala in Reconsolidation of Aversive Memory Associated with Morphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, JianJun; Li, Ming; Sui, Nan

    2016-01-01

    5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza), an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), has been implicated in aversive memory and the function of brain region involved in processing emotion. However, little is known about the role of 5-aza in the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory. In the present study, using the morphine-naloxone induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) model in rats, we injected 5-aza into agranular insular (AI), granular insular (GI), basolateral amygdala (BLA) and central amygdala (CeA) immediately after the memory retrieval and tested the behavioral consequences at 24 h, 7 and 14 days after retrieval test. We found that 5-aza injection into AI disrupted the reconsolidation of morphine-associated withdrawal memory, but 5-aza injection into GI had no impact on the reconsolidation. Meanwhile, 5-aza injection into BLA but not CeA attenuated the withdrawal memory trace 14 days later. However, 5-aza administration to rats, in the absence of memory reactivation, had no effect on morphine-associated withdrawal memory. These findings suggest that 5-aza interferes with the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory, and the roles of insular and amygdala in reconsolidation are distinctive. PMID:27014010

  1. Distinct roles of the pepper pathogen-induced membrane protein gene CaPIMP1 in bacterial disease resistance and oomycete disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Sang Hee; Yi, Seung Yeon; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2008-08-01

    Plant integral membrane proteins have essential roles in diverse internal and external physiological processes as signal receptors or ion transporters. The pepper CaPIMP1 gene encoding a putative integral membrane protein with four transmembrane domains was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with the avirulent strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPIMP1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) fusions localized to the plasma membrane in onion cells, as observed by confocal microscopy. CaPIMP1 was expressed in an organ-specific manner in healthy pepper plants. Infection with Xcv induced differential accumulation of CaPIMP1 transcripts in pepper leaf tissues during compatible and incompatible interactions. The function of CaPIMP1 was examined by using the virus-induced gene silencing technique in pepper plants and by overexpression in Arabidopsis. CaPIMP1-silenced pepper plants were highly susceptible to Xcv infection and expressed lower levels of the defense-related gene CaSAR82A. CaPIMP1 overexpression (CaPIMP1-OX) in transgenic Arabidopsis conferred enhanced resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato infection, accompanied by enhanced AtPDF1.2 gene expression. In contrast, CaPIMP1-OX plants were highly susceptible to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Taken together, we propose that CaPIMP1 plays distinct roles in both bacterial disease resistance and oomycete disease susceptibility.

  2. The Plasmodium serine-type SERA proteases display distinct expression patterns and non-essential in vivo roles during life cycle progression of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Putrianti, Elyzana D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Arnold, Iris; Heussler, Volker T; Matuschewski, Kai; Silvie, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Parasite proteases play key roles in several fundamental steps of the Plasmodium life cycle, including haemoglobin degradation, host cell invasion and parasite egress. Plasmodium exit from infected host cells appears to be mediated by a class of papain-like cysteine proteases called 'serine repeat antigens' (SERAs). A SERA subfamily, represented by Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, contains an atypical active site serine residue instead of a catalytic cysteine. Members of this SERAser subfamily are abundantly expressed in asexual blood stages, rendering them attractive drug and vaccine targets. In this study, we show by antibody localization and in vivo fluorescent tagging with the red fluorescent protein mCherry that the two P. berghei serine-type family members, PbSERA1 and PbSERA2, display differential expression towards the final stages of merozoite formation. Via targeted gene replacement, we generated single and double gene knockouts of the P. berghei SERAser genes. These loss-of-function lines progressed normally through the parasite life cycle, suggesting a specialized, non-vital role for serine-type SERAs in vivo. Parasites lacking PbSERAser showed increased expression of the cysteine-type PbSERA3. Compensatory mechanisms between distinct SERA subfamilies may thus explain the absence of phenotypical defect in SERAser disruptants, and challenge the suitability to develop potent antimalarial drugs based on specific inhibitors of Plasmodium serine-type SERAs.

  3. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  4. The source of inoculum plays a defining role in the development of MEC microbial consortia fed with acetic and propionic acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Vianey; Ilhan, Zehra Esra; Kang, Dae-Wook; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Buitrón, Germán

    2014-07-20

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used as a downstream process to dark fermentation to further capture electron in volatile fatty acids that remain after fermentation, improving this way the viability of the overall process. Acetic and propionic acid are common products of dark fermentation. The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of different initial concentrations of a mixture of acetic and propionic acids on MECs microbial ecology and hydrogen production performance. To link microbial structure and function, we characterized the anode respiring biofilm communities using pyrosequencing and quantitative-PCR. The best hydrogen production rates (265mL/d/Lreactor) were obtained in the first block of experiments by MEC fed with 1500mg/L acetic acid and 250mg/L propionic acid. This reactor presents in the anode biofilm an even distribution of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes and Arcobacter was the dominant genera. The above fact also correlated to the highest electron load among all the reactors. It was evidenced that although defined acetic and propionic acid concentrations fed affected the structure of the microbial consortia that developed at the anode, the initial inoculum played a major role in the development of MEC microbial consortia.

  5. Urinary proteomics can define distinct diagnostic inflammatory arthritis subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Stefan; Porter, Duncan; Paterson, Caron; Hampson, Rosie; Gaya, Daniel; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost; Mullen, William; McInnes, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests applied to inflammatory arthritis lack the necessary specificity to appropriately categorise patients. There is a need for novel approaches to classify patients with these conditions. Herein we explored whether urinary proteomic biomarkers specific for different forms of arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), osteoarthritis (OA)) or chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) can be identified. Fifty subjects per group with RA, PsA, OA or IBD and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. Two-thirds of these populations were randomly selected to serve as a training set, while the remaining one-third was reserved for validation. Sequential comparison of one group to the other four enabled identification of multiple urinary peptides significantly associated with discrete pathological conditions. Classifiers for the five groups were developed and subsequently tested blind in the validation test set. Upon unblinding, the classifiers demonstrated excellent performance, with an area under the curve between 0.90 and 0.97 per group. Identification of the peptide markers pointed to dysregulation of collagen synthesis and inflammation, but also novel inflammatory markers. We conclude that urinary peptide signatures can reliably differentiate between chronic arthropathies and inflammatory conditions with discrete pathogenesis. PMID:28091549

  6. Comparative Analysis of kdp and ktr Mutants Reveals Distinct Roles of the Potassium Transporters in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Shijuku, Toshiaki; Takano, Yousuke; Zulkifli, Lalu; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Tominaga, Akira; Souma, Satoshi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Megumi; Ishiura, Masahiro; Hagemann, Martin; Suzuki, Iwane; Maruyama, Hisataka; Arai, Fumihito

    2014-01-01

    Photoautotrophic bacteria have developed mechanisms to maintain K+ homeostasis under conditions of changing ionic concentrations in the environment. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains genes encoding a well-characterized Ktr-type K+ uptake transporter (Ktr) and a putative ATP-dependent transporter specific for K+ (Kdp). The contributions of each of these K+ transport systems to cellular K+ homeostasis have not yet been defined conclusively. To verify the functionality of Kdp, kdp genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, where Kdp conferred K+ uptake, albeit with lower rates than were conferred by Ktr. An on-chip microfluidic device enabled monitoring of the biphasic initial volume recovery of single Synechocystis cells after hyperosmotic shock. Here, Ktr functioned as the primary K+ uptake system during the first recovery phase, whereas Kdp did not contribute significantly. The expression of the kdp operon in Synechocystis was induced by extracellular K+ depletion. Correspondingly, Kdp-mediated K+ uptake supported Synechocystis cell growth with trace amounts of external potassium. This induction of kdp expression depended on two adjacent genes, hik20 and rre19, encoding a putative two-component system. The circadian expression of kdp and ktr peaked at subjective dawn, which may support the acquisition of K+ required for the regular diurnal photosynthetic metabolism. These results indicate that Kdp contributes to the maintenance of a basal intracellular K+ concentration under conditions of limited K+ in natural environments, whereas Ktr mediates fast potassium movements in the presence of greater K+ availability. Through their distinct activities, both Ktr and Kdp coordinate the responses of Synechocystis to changes in K+ levels under fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:25313394

  7. Transcription Factor STE12α Has Distinct Roles in Morphogenesis, Virulence, and Ecological Fitness of the Primary Pathogenic Yeast Cryptococcus gattii†

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ping; Springer, Deborah J.; Behr, Melissa J.; Samsonoff, William A.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2006-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a primary pathogenic yeast, increasingly important in public health, but factors responsible for its host predilection and geographical distribution remain largely unknown. We have characterized C. gattii STE12α to probe its role in biology and pathogenesis because this transcription factor has been linked to virulence in many human and plant pathogenic fungi. A full-length STE12α gene was cloned by colony hybridization and sequenced using primer walk and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends strategies, and a ste12αΔ gene knockout mutant was created by URA5 insertion at the homologous site. A semiquantitative analysis revealed delayed and poor mating in ste12αΔ mutant; this defect was not reversed by exogenous cyclic AMP. C. gattii parent and mutant strains showed robust haploid fruiting. Among putative virulence factors tested, the laccase transcript and enzymatic activity were down regulated in the ste12αΔ mutant, with diminished production of melanin. However, capsule, superoxide dismutase, phospholipase, and urease were unaffected. Similarly, Ste12 deficiency did not cause any auxotrophy, assimilation defects, or sensitivity to a large panel of chemicals and antifungals. The ste12αΔ mutant was markedly attenuated in virulence in both BALB/c and A/Jcr mice models of meningoencephalitis, and it also exhibited significant in vivo growth reduction and was highly susceptible to in vitro killing by human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes). In tests designed to simulate the C. gattii natural habitat, the ste12αΔ mutant was poorly pigmented on wood agar prepared from two tree species and showed poor survival and multiplication in wood blocks. Thus, STE12α plays distinct roles in C. gattii morphogenesis, virulence, and ecological fitness. PMID:16835451

  8. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  9. Subcellular localization analysis of the closely related Fps/Fes and Fer protein-tyrosine kinases suggests a distinct role for Fps/Fes in vesicular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zirngibl, R; Schulze, D; Mirski, S E; Cole, S P; Greer, P A

    2001-05-15

    The subcellular localizations of the Fps/Fes and closely related Fer cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases were studied using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions and confocal fluorescence microscopy. In contrast to previous reports, neither kinase localized to the nucleus. Fer was diffusely cytoplasmic throughout the cell cycle. Fps/Fes also displayed a diffuse cytoplasmic localization, but in addition it showed distinct accumulations in cytoplasmic vesicles as well as in a perinuclear region consistent with the Golgi. This localization was very similar to that of TGN38, a known marker of the trans Golgi. The localization of Fps/Fes and TGN38 were both perturbed by brefeldin A, a fungal metabolite that disrupts the Golgi apparatus. Fps/Fes was also found to colocalize to various extents with several Rab proteins, which are members of the monomeric G-protein superfamily involved in vesicular transport between specific subcellular compartments. Using Rabs that are involved in endocytosis (Rab5B and Rab7) or exocytosis (Rab1A and Rab3A), we showed that Fps/Fes is localized in both pathways. These results suggest that Fps/Fes may play a general role in the regulation of vesicular trafficking.

  10. Distinct roles of enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) sites in plasmacytoma and osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kunder, Sandra; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2005-04-10

    Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) can be lymphomagenic and bone pathogenic. In this work, the possible roles of two distinct proviral enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding sites in osteopetrosis and tumor induction by B-lymphomagenic Akv1-99 MLV were investigated. Akv1-99 and mutants either with NF1 site 1, NF1 site 2 or both sites disrupted induced tumors (plasma cell proliferations by histopathology) with remarkably similar incidence and mean latency in inbred NMRI mice. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement detection, by Southern analysis, confirmed approximately half of the tumors induced by each virus to be plasmacytomas while the remaining lacked detectable clonally rearranged Ig genes and were considered polyclonal; a demonstration that enhancer NF1 sites are dispensable for plasmacytoma induction by Akv1-99. In contrast, X-ray analysis revealed significant differences in osteopetrosis induction by the four viruses strongly indicating that NF1 site 2 is critical for viral bone pathogenicity, whereas NF1 site 1 is neutral or moderately inhibitory. In conclusion, enhancer NF1 sites are major determinants of osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 without significant influence on viral oncogenicity.

  11. The Adipocyte-Inducible Secreted Phospholipases PLA2G5 and PLA2G2E Play Distinct Roles in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Ushida, Ayako; Isogai, Yuki; Kojima, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Nishito, Yasumasa; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Hara, Shuntaro; Ida, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo; Miyata, Keishi; Oike, Yuichi; Gelb, Michael H.; Murakami, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Summary Metabolic disorders including obesity and insulin resistance have their basis in dysregulated lipid metabolism and low-grade inflammation. In a microarray search of unique lipase-related genes whose expressions are associated with obesity, we found that two secreted phospholipase A2s (sPLA2s), PLA2G5 and PLA2G2E, were robustly induced in adipocytes of obese mice. Analyses of Pla2g5−/− and Pla2g2e−/− mice revealed distinct and previously unrecognized roles of these sPLA2s in diet-induced obesity. PLA2G5 hydrolyzed phosphatidylcholine in fat-overladen low-density lipoprotein to release unsaturated fatty acids, which prevented palmitate-induced M1 macrophage polarization. As such, PLA2G5 tipped the immune balance toward an M2 state, thereby counteracting adipose tissue inflammation, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and obesiy. PLA2G2E altered minor lipoprotein phospholipids, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and moderately facilitated lipid accumulation in adipose tissue and liver. Collectively, the identification of “metabolic sPLA2s” adds this gene family to a growing list of lipolytic enzymes that act as metabolic coordinators. PMID:24910243

  12. Expression patterns suggest that despite considerable functional redundancy, galectin-4 and -6 play distinct roles in normal and damaged mouse digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Houzelstein, Denis; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication.

  13. Expression Patterns Suggest that Despite Considerable Functional Redundancy, Galectin-4 and -6 Play Distinct Roles in Normal and Damaged Mouse Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication. PMID:23360694

  14. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  15. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests.

  16. The role of a parasite-specific allosteric site in the distinctive activation behavior of Eimeria tenella cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Salowe, Scott P; Wiltsie, Judyann; Liberator, Paul A; Donald, Robert G K

    2002-04-02

    A cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was recently identified as an anticoccidial target for the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella [Gurnett, A., Liberator, P. A., Dulski, P., Salowe, S., Donald, R. G. K., Anderson, J., Wiltsie, J., Diaz, C., Harris, G., Chang, B., Darkin-Rattray, S. J., Nare, B., Crumley, T., Blum, P., Misura, A., Tamas, T., Sardana, M., Yuan, J., Biftu, T., and Schmatz, D. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. (in press)]. Unlike the PKGs of higher organisms that have two cGMP binding sites in their regulatory domain, the PKG from Eimeria tenella (Et-PKG) contains three putative cGMP binding sites and has distinctive activation properties, including a very large stimulation by cGMP ( approximately 1000-fold) with significant cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 1.7). During our investigation of Et-PKG activation, we found that 8-substituted cGMP analogues are weak partial activators. For example, 8-NBD-cGMP provides a maximal stimulation of activity of only 20-fold with little evident cooperativity, although cGMP can synergize with the analogue to provide full activation. The results suggest that partial activation is a consequence of restricted binding of 8-NBD-cGMP to a subset of cGMP sites in the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved arginine and glutamate residues in the parasite-specific third cGMP site confirms that this site is an important functional participant in the allosteric regulation of the kinase and that it exhibits very high selectivity against 8-NBD-cGMP. Since the results are consistent with full activation of Et-PKG requiring cyclic nucleotide binding in all three allosteric sites, one role for the additional cGMP site may be to establish a stricter regulatory mechanism for the kinase activity than is present in the PKGs of higher organisms containing only two allosteric sites.

  17. GroES/GroEL and DnaK/DnaJ have distinct roles in stress responses and during cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Susin, Michelle F; Baldini, Regina L; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico; Gomes, Suely L

    2006-12-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of protein molecules are major threats to all living organisms. Therefore, cells have evolved quality control systems for proteins consisting of molecular chaperones and proteases, which prevent protein aggregation by either refolding or degrading misfolded proteins. DnaK/DnaJ and GroES/GroEL are the best-characterized molecular chaperone systems in bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus these chaperone machines are the products of essential genes, which are both induced by heat shock and cell cycle regulated. In this work, we characterized the viabilities of conditional dnaKJ and groESL mutants under different types of environmental stress, as well as under normal physiological conditions. We observed that C. crescentus cells with GroES/EL depleted are quite resistant to heat shock, ethanol, and freezing but are sensitive to oxidative, saline, and osmotic stresses. In contrast, cells with DnaK/J depleted are not affected by the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, NaCl, and sucrose but have a lower survival rate after heat shock, exposure to ethanol, and freezing and are unable to acquire thermotolerance. Cells lacking these chaperones also have morphological defects under normal growth conditions. The absence of GroE proteins results in long, pinched filamentous cells with several Z-rings, whereas cells lacking DnaK/J are only somewhat more elongated than normal predivisional cells, and most of them do not have Z-rings. These findings indicate that there is cell division arrest, which occurs at different stages depending on the chaperone machine affected. Thus, the two chaperone systems have distinct roles in stress responses and during cell cycle progression in C. crescentus.

  18. Grb2 and Shc Adapter Proteins Play Distinct Roles in Neu (ErbB-2)-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis: Implications for Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dankort, David; Maslikowski, Bart; Warner, Neil; Kanno, Nubufumi; Kim, Harold; Wang, Zhixiang; Moran, Michael F.; Oshima, Robert G.; Cardiff, Robert D.; Muller, William J.

    2001-01-01

    Amplification of the Neu (ErbB-2 or HER-2) receptor tyrosine kinase occurs in 20 to 30% of human mammary carcinomas, correlating with a poor clinical prognosis. We have previously demonstrated that four (Y1144 Y1201, Y1227 and Y1253) of the five known Neu autophosphorylation sites can independently mediate transforming signals. The transforming potential of two of these mutants correlates with their capacity to recruit Grb2 directly to Y1144 (YB) or indirectly through Shc to Y1227 (YD). Here, we demonstrate that these transformation-competent neu mutants activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases and stimulate Ets-2-dependent transcription. Although the transforming potential of three of these mutants (YB, YD, and YE) was susceptible to inhibition by Rap1A, a genetic antagonist of Ras, the transforming potential of YC was resistant to inhibition by Rap1A. To further address the significance of these ErbB-2-coupled signaling molecules in induction of mammary cancers, transgenic mice expressing mutant Neu receptors lacking the known autophosphorylation sites (NYPD) or those coupled directly to either Grb2 (YB) or Shc (YD) adapter molecules were derived. In contrast to the NYPD strains, which developed focal mammary tumors after a long latency period with low penetrance, all female mice derived from YB and YD strains rapidly developed mammary tumors. Although female mice from several independent YB or YD lines developed mammary tumors, the YB strains developed lung metastases at substantially higher rates than the YD strains. These observations argue that Grb2 and Shc play important and distinct roles in ErbB-2/Neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:11238891

  19. Distinct roles for transforming growth factor-β2 and tumour necrosis factor-α in immune deviation elicited by hapten-derivatized antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, K H; Niizeki, H; Streilein, J W

    1999-01-01

    The role of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the induction of antigen-specific unresponsiveness was examined, using two functionally distinct murine macrophage hybridomas, #59 and #63 cells. Derivatized with the hapten (dinitrofluorobenzene; DNFB), #59 cells induced contact hypersensitivity (CH) in mice. Hapten-derivatized #63 cells failed to induce CH. Instead, they prevented recipients from acquiring CH when exposed subsequently to a sensitizing dose of the hapten. Similarly, hapten-derivatized #59 cells, pretreated in vitro with transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) lost their capacity to evoke CH, and induced tolerance. Hapten-derivatized #63 cells and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells eliminated CH in mice sensitized to hapten. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of mRNAs for various accessory molecules important in T-cell activation revealed that #63 and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells differed only in their expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA. The latter expressed higher levels of TNF-α mRNA than did untreated #59 cells. As a consequence, #63 and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells, both of which induce tolerance, secrete TNF-α protein unlike untreated #59 cells, which do not induce tolerance to hapten. Since neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibodies abrogated the tolerogenic potential of #63 cells in vivo, we conclude that TGF-β2 equips hapten-bearing APC with the capacity to evoke systemic immune deviation in which CH is selectively silenced. We speculate that one effect of TGF-β2 is to cause APC to up-regulate TNF-α production. In turn, this cytokine biases the functional property of responding hapten-specific T cells in a direction that not only interferes with acquisition, but suppresses induction of CH. PMID:10233718

  20. The Atypical Occurrence of Two Biotin Protein Ligases in Francisella novicida Is Due to Distinct Roles in Virulence and Biotin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Chin, Chui-Yoke; Chakravartty, Vandana; Gao, Rongsui; Crispell, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological function of biotin requires biotin protein ligase activity in order to attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are enzymes involved in central metabolism. The model intracellular pathogen Francisella novicida is unusual in that it encodes two putative biotin protein ligases rather than the usual single enzyme. F. novicida BirA has a ligase domain as well as an N-terminal DNA-binding regulatory domain, similar to the prototypical BirA protein in E. coli. However, the second ligase, which we name BplA, lacks the N-terminal DNA binding motif. It has been unclear why a bacterium would encode these two disparate biotin protein ligases, since F. novicida contains only a single biotinylated protein. In vivo complementation and enzyme assays demonstrated that BirA and BplA are both functional biotin protein ligases, but BplA is a much more efficient enzyme. BirA, but not BplA, regulated transcription of the biotin synthetic operon. Expression of bplA (but not birA) increased significantly during F. novicida infection of macrophages. BplA (but not BirA) was required for bacterial replication within macrophages as well as in mice. These data demonstrate that F. novicida has evolved two distinct enzymes with specific roles; BplA possesses the major ligase activity, whereas BirA acts to regulate and thereby likely prevent wasteful synthesis of biotin. During infection BplA seems primarily employed to maximize the efficiency of biotin utilization without limiting the expression of biotin biosynthetic genes, representing a novel adaptation strategy that may also be used by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:26060274

  1. The family 21 carbohydrate-binding module of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae consists of two sites playing distinct roles in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wei-I; Pai, Tun-Wen; Liu, Shi-Hwei; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Chang, Margaret D.-T.

    2006-01-01

    The starch-hydrolysing enzyme GA (glucoamylase) from Rhizopus oryzae is a commonly used glycoside hydrolase in industry. It consists of a C-terminal catalytic domain and an N-terminal starch-binding domain, which belong to the CBM21 (carbohydrate-binding module, family 21). In the present study, a molecular model of CBM21 from R. oryzae GA (RoGACBM21) was constructed according to PSSC (progressive secondary structure correlation), modified structure-based sequence alignment, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify and characterize potential ligand-binding sites. Our model suggests that RoGACBM21 contains two ligand-binding sites, with Tyr32 and Tyr67 grouped into site I, and Trp47, Tyr83 and Tyr93 grouped into site II. The involvement of these aromatic residues has been validated using chemical modification, UV difference spectroscopy studies, and both qualitative and quantitative binding assays on a series of RoGACBM21 mutants. Our results further reveal that binding sites I and II play distinct roles in ligand binding, the former not only is involved in binding insoluble starch, but also facilitates the binding of RoGACBM21 to long-chain soluble polysaccharides, whereas the latter serves as the major binding site mediating the binding of both soluble polysaccharide and insoluble ligands. In the present study we have for the first time demonstrated that the key ligand-binding residues of RoGACBM21 can be identified and characterized by a combination of novel bioinformatics methodologies in the absence of resolved three-dimensional structural information. PMID:16509822

  2. Analyses of GA20ox- and GID1-over-expressing aspen suggest that gibberellins play two distinct roles in wood formation.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Moritz, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are involved in many aspects of plant development, including shoot growth, flowering and wood formation. Increased levels of bioactive GAs are known to induce xylogenesis and xylem fiber elongation in aspen. However, there is currently little information on the response pathway(s) that mediate GA effects on wood formation. Here we characterize an important element of the GA pathway in hybrid aspen: the GA receptor, GID1. Four orthologs of GID1 were identified in Populus tremula x P. tremuloides (PttGID1.1-1.4). These were functional when expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, and appear to present a degree of sub-functionalization in hybrid aspen. PttGID1.1 and PttGID1.3 were over-expressed in independent lines of hybrid aspen using either the 35S promoter or a xylem-specific promoter (LMX5). The 35S:PttGID1 over-expressors shared several phenotypic traits previously described in 35S:AtGA20ox1 over-expressors, including rapid growth, increased elongation, and increased xylogenesis. However, their xylem fibers were not elongated, unlike those of 35S:AtGA20ox1 plants. Similar differences in the xylem fiber phenotype were observed when PttGID1.1, PttGID1.3 or AtGA20ox1 were expressed under the control of the LMX5 promoter, suggesting either that PttGID1.1 and PttGID1.3 play no role in fiber elongation or that GA homeostasis is strongly controlled when GA signaling is altered. Our data suggest that GAs are required in two distinct wood-formation processes that have tissue-specific signaling pathways: xylogenesis, as mediated by GA signaling in the cambium, and fiber elongation in the developing xylem.

  3. Role of Key Salt Bridges in Thermostability of G. thermodenitrificans EstGtA2: Distinctive Patterns within the New Bacterial Lipolytic Enzyme Family XV

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, David M.; Beauregard, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial lipolytic enzymes were originally classified into eight different families defined by Arpigny and Jaeger (families I-VIII). Recently, the discovery of new lipolytic enzymes allowed for extending the original classification to fourteen families (I-XIV). We previously reported that G. thermodenitrificans EstGtA2 (access no. AEN92268) belonged to a novel group of bacterial lipolytic enzymes. Here we propose a 15th family (family XV) and suggest criteria for the assignation of protein sequences to the N’ subfamily. Five selected salt bridges, hallmarks of the N’ subfamily (E3/R54, E12/R37, E66/R140, D124/K178 and D205/R220) were disrupted in EstGtA2 using a combinatorial alanine-scanning approach. A set of 14 (R/K→A) mutants was produced, including five single, three double, three triple and three quadruple mutants. Despite a high tolerance to non-conservative mutations for folding, all the alanine substitutions were destabilizing (decreasing Tm by 5 to 14°C). A particular combination of four substitutions exceeded this tolerance and prevents the correct folding of EstGtA2, leading to enzyme inactivation. Although other mutants remain active at low temperatures, the accumulation of more than two mutations had a dramatic impact on EstGtA2 activity at high temperatures suggesting an important role of these conserved salt bridge-forming residues in thermostability of lipolytic enzymes from the N’ subfamily. We also identified a particular interloop salt bridge in EstGtA2 (D194/H222), located at position i -2 and i -4 residues from the catalytic Asp and His respectively which is conserved in other related bacterial lipolytic enzymes (families IV and XIII) with high tolerance to mutations and charge reversal. We investigated the role of residue identity at position 222 in controlling stability-pH dependence in EstGtA2. The introduction of a His to Arg mutation led to increase thermostability under alkaline pH. Our results suggest primary targets for

  4. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions.

    PubMed

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions.

  5. MMP20, KLK4, and MMP20/KLK4 double null mice define roles for matrix proteases during dental enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Smith, Charles E; Richardson, Amelia S; Bartlett, John D; Hu, Jan C C; Simmer, James P

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) are secreted proteinases that are essential for proper dental enamel formation. We characterized and compared enamel formed in wild-type, Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice using dissecting and light microscopy, backscattered scanning electron microscopy (bSEM), SEM, microcomputed tomography (μCT), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Following eruption, fractures were observed on Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) molars. Failure of the enamel in the Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) molars was unexpected and suggested that digenic effects could contribute to the etiology of amelogenesis imperfecta in humans. Micro-CT analyses of hemimandibles demonstrated significantly reduced high-density enamel volume in the Mmp20 (-/-) and Klk4 (-/-) mice relative to the wild-type, which was further reduced in Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice. bSEM images of 7-week Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mandibular incisors showed rough, pitted enamel surfaces with numerous indentations and protruding nodules. The Mmp20 (+/-) and Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors showed prominent, evenly spaced, horizontal ridges that were more distinct in Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors relative to Mmp20 (+/-) incisors due to the darkening of the valleys between the ridges. In cross sections, the Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) exhibited three distinct layers. The outer layer exhibited a disturbed elemental composition and an irregular enamel surface covered with nodules. The Mmp20 null enamel was apparently unable to withstand the sheer forces associated with eruption and separated from dentin during development. Cells invaded the cracks and interposed between the dentin and enamel layers. MMP20 and KLK4 serve overlapping and complementary functions to harden enamel by removing protein, but MMP20 potentially serves multiple

  6. The Role of Parieto-Occipital Junction in the Interaction between Dorsal and Ventral Streams in Disparity-Defined Near and Far Space Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological and functional MRI data suggest that two functionally and anatomically dissociable streams of visual processing exist: a ventral perception-related stream and a dorsal action-related stream. However, relatively little is known about how the two streams interact in the intact brain during the production of adaptive behavior. Using functional MRI and a virtual three-dimensional paradigm, we aimed at examining whether the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) acts as an interface for the integration and processing of information between the dorsal and ventral streams in the near and far space processing. Virtual reality three-dimensional near and far space was defined by manipulating binocular disparity, with -68.76 arcmin crossed disparity for near space and +68.76 arcmin uncrossed disparity for near space. Our results showed that the POJ and bilateral superior occipital gyrus (SOG) showed relative increased activity when responded to targets presented in the near space than in the far space, which was independent of the retinotopic and perceived sizes of target. Furthermore, the POJ showed the enhanced functional connectivity with both the dorsal and ventral streams during the far space processing irrespective of target sizes, supporting that the POJ acts as an interface between the dorsal and ventral streams in disparity-defined near and far space processing. In contrast, the bilateral SOG showed the enhanced functional connectivity only with the ventral stream if retinotopic sizes of targets in the near and far spaces were matched, which suggested there was a functional dissociation between the POJ and bilateral SOG. PMID:26999674

  7. Distinct Kinesin-14 mitotic mechanisms in spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Kenny, Katelyn; Seo, Lan; Moyer, Amanda; Allen, Jessica; Paluh, Janet L

    2009-11-01

    Kinesin-like proteins are integral to formation and function of a conserved mitotic spindle apparatus that directs chromosome segregation and precedes cell division. Ubiquitous to the mechanism of spindle assembly and stability are balanced Kinesin-5 promoting and Kinesin-14 opposing forces. Distinct Kinesin-14 roles in bipolarity in eukaryotes have not been shown, but are suggested by gamma-tubulin-based pole interactions that affect establishment and by microtubule cross-linking and sliding that maintain bipolarity and spindle length. Distinct roles also imply specialized functional domains. By cross-species analysis of compatible mechanisms in establishing mitotic bipolarity we demonstrate that Kinesin-14 human HSET (HsHSET) functionally replaces Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pkl1 and its action is similarly blocked by mutation in a Kinesin-14 binding site on gamma-tubulin. Drosophila DmNcd localizes preferentially to bundled interpolar microtubules in fission yeast and does not replace SpPkl1. Analysis of twenty-six Kinesin-14 derivatives, including Tail, Stalk or Neck-Motor chimeras, for spindle localization, spindle assembly and mitotic progression defined critical domains. The Tail of SpPkl1 contains functional elements enabling its role in spindle assembly that are distinct from but transferable to DmNcd, whereas HsHSET function utilizes both Tail and Stalk features. Our analysis is the first to demonstrate distinct mechanisms between SpPkl1 and DmNcd, and reveal that HsHSET shares functional overlap in spindle pole mechanisms.

  8. Ca(2+) and H+ homeostasis in fission yeast: a role of Ca(2+)/H+ exchange and distinct V-H+-ATPases of the secretory pathway organelles.

    PubMed

    Okorokov, L A; Silva, F E; Okorokova Façanha, A L

    2001-09-14

    We determined the H+ and Ca(2+) uptake by fission yeast membranes separated on sucrose gradient and found that (i) Ca(2+) sequestering is due to Ca(2+)/H+ antiporter(s) localized to secretory pathway organelles while Ca(2+)-ATPase activity is not detectable in their membranes; (ii) immunochemically distinct V-H+-ATPases acidify the lumen of the secretory pathway organelles. The data indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and vacuole form a network of Ca(2+) and H+ stores in the single cell, providing favorable conditions for such key processes as protein folding/sorting, membrane fusion, ion homeostasis and Ca(2+) signaling in a differential and local manner.

  9. China English: Its Distinctive Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei-dong; Dai, Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to expound that China English boasting its own distinctive features on the levels of phonology, words, sentences and discourse has been playing an irreplaceable role in intercultural activities, though still in its infancy and in the process of developing and perfecting itself, and it now makes every effort to move towards…

  10. On the road to value co-creation in health care: the role of consumers in defining the destination, planning the journey and sharing the drive.

    PubMed

    Janamian, Tina; Crossland, Lisa; Wells, Leanne

    2016-04-18

    The role of consumers is now extending beyond being passive health care recipients and even active participants in their own care to involvement in innovation and value co-creation in health care - from being "users and choosers" to becoming "makers and shapers" of services. For active dialogue to occur in co-creation, consumers must become equal partners with health care organisations and providers, with the focus on areas of interest to all parties. The use of value co-creation in health care involves embedding the approach across the whole health care system - from the microsystem level to the mesosystem and the entire macrosystem.

  11. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  12. The mitochondrial protein import component, TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17-1, plays a role in defining the timing of germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Law, Simon R; Ivanova, Aneta; van Aken, Olivier; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Uggalla, Vindya; van der Merwe, Margaretha; Duncan, Owen; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James; Murcha, Monika W

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), small gene families encode multiple isoforms for many of the components of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. There are three isoforms of the TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17 (Tim17). Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtTim17-1 is only detectable in dry seed. In this study, two independent transfer DNA insertional mutant lines of tim17-1 exhibited a germination-specific phenotype, showing a significant increase in the rate of germination. Microarray analyses revealed that Attim17-1 displayed alterations in the temporal sequence of transcriptomic events during germination, peaking earlier compared with the wild type. Promoter analysis of AtTim17-1 further identified an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element, which binds ABA-responsive transcription factors, acting to repress the expression of AtTim17-1. Attim17-1 dry seeds contained significantly increased levels of ABA and gibberellin, 2- and 5-fold, respectively. These results support the model that mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated in a tight temporal sequence of events during germination and that altering mitochondrial biogenesis feeds back to alter the germination rate, as evidenced by the altered levels of the master regulatory hormones that define germination.

  13. Drinking Levels Defined

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is A Standard Drink? Drinking Levels Defined Drinking Levels Defined Moderate alcohol consumption: According to the "Dietary ... of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically occurs ...

  14. Analysis of the Yersinia enterocolitica PspBC proteins defines functional domains, essential amino acids and new roles within the phage-shock-protein response.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Erwan; Savitzky, Diana C; Darwin, Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    The Yersinia enterocolitica phage-shock-protein (Psp) stress response system is activated by mislocalized outer-membrane secretin components of protein export systems and is essential for virulence. The cytoplasmic membrane proteins PspB and PspC were proposed to be dual function components of the system, acting both as positive regulators of psp gene expression and to support survival during secretin-induced stress. In this study we have uncoupled the regulatory and physiological functions of PspBC and discovered unexpected new roles, functional domains and essential amino acids. First, we showed that PspB controls PspC concentration by both pre- and post-transcriptional mechanisms. We then screened for PspBC mutants with altered transcriptional regulatory function. Unexpectedly, we identified PspB and PspC mutants that activated psp gene expression in the absence of secretin-induced stress. Together with a subsequent truncation analysis, this revealed that the PspC cytoplasmic domain plays an unforeseen role in negatively regulating psp gene expression. Conversely, mutations within the PspC periplasmic domain abolished its ability to activate psp gene expression. Significantly, PspC mutants unable to activate psp gene expression retained their ability to support survival during secretin-induced stress. These data provide compelling support for the proposal that these two functions are independent.

  15. Genetic dissection defines the roles of elsinochrome Phytotoxin for fungal pathogenesis and conidiation of the citrus pathogen Elsinoë fawcettii.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2008-04-01

    Elsinochrome pigments produced by many phytopathogenic Elsinoë spp. are nonhost-selective toxins which react with oxygen molecules after light activation to produce highly toxic reactive oxygen species. The structures and chemical properties of four derivatives are well known. However, the biological roles of elsinochromes in fungal pathogenesis are poorly understood. Many isolates of Elsinoë fawcettii causing citrus scab are able to produce elsinochromes under axenic conditions. In this article, we report the cloning, expression, and functional characterization of the polyketide synthase-encoding gene, EfPKS1, which we show is required for the production of elsinochromes and fungal pathogenesis. Targeted disruption of EfPKS1 in E.fawcettii completely abrogated elsinochrome production, drastically reduced conidiation, and significantly decreased lesion formation on rough lemon leaves. All mutant phenotypes were restored to the wild type in fungal strains expressing a functional copy of EfPKS1. Accumulation of the EfPKS1 transcript and elsinochromes by a wild-type strain appears to be coordinately regulated by light, nutrients, and pH. The results indicate that the product of EfPKS1 is involved in the biosynthesis of elsinochromes via a fungal polyketide pathway, and that elsinochromes play an important role in fungal pathogenesis.

  16. The Distinctive Role of Romantic Relationships in Moderating the Effects of Early Caregiving on Adult Anxious-Depressed Symptoms over Nine Years

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Jessica E.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Simpson, Jeffry A.; Collins, W. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study tests a model of young adult romantic quality as a moderator of the effects of early caregiving on anxious-depressed symptoms over a nine-year period in adulthood. Participants (n = 93) were a subsample from a longitudinal study of risk and adaptation. Quality of early caregiving was measured using observational data collected at five points in the first four years of life. Young adult romantic relationship quality was assessed from interviews with participants at age 23. Self-report anxious-depressed symptoms were measured at ages 23, 26, and 32. The results indicated that romantic quality moderated early caregiving to predict symptom levels across this period, with evidence for inoculation, amplification, and compensation effects. A discriminant analysis examining young adult work competence as a moderator provided further evidence for the distinctiveness of romantic relationships in changing the association between early caregiving and adult internalizing symptoms. PMID:23880395

  17. The Managerial Roles of Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip Wayne

    This study utilized Mintzberg's taxonomy of managerial roles to examine the roles performed by community college chief academic officers (CAOs). Mintzberg's taxonomy defines managerial roles as a set of behaviors and identifies 10 distinct roles: (1) figurehead; (2) leader; (3) liaison; (4) monitor; (5) disseminator; (6) spokesperson; (7)…

  18. Impact of lymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-02-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND. Analyses of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001-2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan-Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC.

  19. A genome-scale RNAi screen for Oct4 modulators defines a role of the Paf1 complex for embryonic stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Nitzsche, Anja; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; de Vries, Ingrid; Kittler, Ralf; Junqueira, Magno; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Doss, Michael Xavier; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hescheler, Juergen; Iacone, Roberto; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Caldarelli, Antonio; Poser, Ina; Theis, Mirko; Buchholz, Frank

    2009-05-08

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintain self-renewal while ensuring a rapid response to differentiation cues. The identification of genes maintaining ESC identity is important to develop these cells for their potential therapeutic use. Here we report a genome-scale RNAi screen for a global survey of genes affecting ESC identity via alteration of Oct4 expression. Factors with the strongest effect on Oct4 expression included components of the Paf1 complex, a protein complex associated with RNA polymerase II. Using a combination of proteomics, expression profiling, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that the Paf1C binds to promoters of key pluripotency genes, where it is required to maintain a transcriptionally active chromatin structure. The Paf1C is developmentally regulated and blocks ESC differentiation upon overexpression, and the knockdown in ESCs causes expression changes similar to Oct4 or Nanog depletions. We propose that the Paf1C plays an important role in maintaining ESC identity.

  20. Distinct roles for matrix metalloproteinase-2 and alpha4 integrin in autoimmune T cell extravasation and residency in brain parenchyma during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Graesser, D; Mahooti, S; Madri, J A

    2000-09-22

    Expression of alpha4 integrin by auto-reactive T cells is critical for their ability to induce EAE, an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system in mice, used as a model to study human multiple sclerosis. Having previously identified one role for alpha4 integrin in adhesion-mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), an enzyme that degrades the subendothelial basement membrane matrix, we investigated independent roles for MMP-2 and alpha4 integrin during EAE. The data suggest that expression of alpha4 integrin by auto-reactive T cells is important not only in mediating MMP-2 induction to facilitate entry into the CNS, but also plays a role in maintaining residency within the CNS.

  1. Defining the role of a FYVE domain in the localization and activity of a cAMP phosphodiesterase implicated in osmoregulation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotide second messengers are regulated predominantly by a large superfamily of phosphodiesterases. Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes four different phosphodiesterase (PDE) families. One of these PDEs, T. cruzi phosphodiesterase C2 (TcrPDEC2) has been characterized as a FYVE-domain containing protein. Here, we report a novel role for TcrPDEC2 in osmoregulation in T. cruzi and reveal the relevance of its FYVE domain. Our data show that treatment of epimastigotes with TcrPDEC2 inhibitors improves their regulatory volume decrease, whereas cells overexpressing this enzyme are unaffected by the same inhibitors. Consistent with these results, TcrPDEC2 localizes to the contractile vacuole complex, showing strong labeling in the region corresponding to the spongiome. Furthermore, transgenic parasites overexpressing a truncated version of TcrPDEC2 without the FYVE domain show a failure in its targeting to the contractile vacuole complex and a marked decrease in phosphodiesterase activity, supporting the importance of this domain to the localization and activity of TcrPDEC2. Taking together, the results here presented are consistent with the importance of the cyclic AMP signaling pathway in regulatory volume decrease and implicate TcrPDEC2 as a specifically localized phosphodiesterase involved in osmoregulation in T. cruzi. PMID:21166893

  2. Roles of DNA polymerase I in leading and lagging-strand replication defined by a high-resolution mutation footprint of ColE1 plasmid replication.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer M; Simcha, David M; Ericson, Nolan G; Alexander, David L; Marquette, Jacob T; Van Biber, Benjamin P; Troll, Chris J; Karchin, Rachel; Bielas, Jason H; Loeb, Lawrence A; Camps, Manel

    2011-09-01

    DNA polymerase I (pol I) processes RNA primers during lagging-strand synthesis and fills small gaps during DNA repair reactions. However, it is unclear how pol I and pol III work together during replication and repair or how extensive pol I processing of Okazaki fragments is in vivo. Here, we address these questions by analyzing pol I mutations generated through error-prone replication of ColE1 plasmids. The data were obtained by direct sequencing, allowing an accurate determination of the mutation spectrum and distribution. Pol I's mutational footprint suggests: (i) during leading-strand replication pol I is gradually replaced by pol III over at least 1.3 kb; (ii) pol I processing of Okazaki fragments is limited to ∼20 nt and (iii) the size of Okazaki fragments is short (∼250 nt). While based on ColE1 plasmid replication, our findings are likely relevant to other pol I replicative processes such as chromosomal replication and DNA repair, which differ from ColE1 replication mostly at the recruitment steps. This mutation footprinting approach should help establish the role of other prokaryotic or eukaryotic polymerases in vivo, and provides a tool to investigate how sequence topology, DNA damage, or interactions with protein partners may affect the function of individual DNA polymerases.

  3. WW domains of Rsp5p define different functions: determination of roles in fluid phase and uracil permease endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, B; Kamińska, J; Jesionowska, A; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K; Zoładek, T

    2001-01-01

    Rsp5p, ubiquitin-protein ligase, an enzyme of the ubiquitination pathway, contains three WW domains that mediate protein-protein interactions. To determine if these domains adapt Rsp5p to a subset of substrates involved in numerous cellular processes, we generated mutations in individual or combinations of the WW domains. The rsp5-w1, rsp5-w2, and rsp5-w3 mutant alleles complement RSP5 deletions at 30 degrees. Thus, individual WW domains are not essential. Each rsp5-w mutation caused temperature-sensitive growth. Among variants with mutations in multiple WW domains, only rsp5-w1w2 complemented the deletion. Thus, the WW3 domain is sufficient for Rsp5p essential functions. To determine whether rsp5-w mutations affect endocytosis, fluid phase and uracil permease (Fur4p) endocytosis was examined. The WW3 domain is important for both processes. WW2 appears not to be important for fluid phase endocytosis whereas it is important for Fur4p endocytosis. In contrast, the WW1 domain affects fluid phase endocytosis, but it does not appear to function in Fur4p endocytosis. Thus, various WW domains play different roles in the endocytosis of these two substrates. Rsp5p is located in the cytoplasm in a punctate pattern that does not change during the cell cycle. Altering WW domains does not change the location of Rsp5p.

  4. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    PubMed

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  5. Role of the Deposition Precursor Molecules in Defining Oxidation State of Deposited Copper in Surface Reduction Reactions on H-Terminated Si(111) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yichen; Gao, Fei; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-limited deposition reactions leading to the formation of copper nanoparticles on H-terminated Si(111) surface can serve as a model for understanding the role of structure of the deposition precursor molecules in determining the oxidation state of the metal deposited. This study compares three different precursor molecules: Cu(acac)2 (Cu(II) acetylacetonate), Cu(hfac)2, and Cu(hfac)VTMS (Cu(I)-(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)-vinyltrimethylsilane) as copper deposition sources in a process with a controlled oxidation state of copper. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that single-electron reduction governs the deposition of Cu(I) from the first two precursor molecules and that the last of the precursors studied yields predominantly metallic copper. Time-of-fight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and infrared spectroscopy are utilized to interrogate surface species produced. Atomic force microscopy is used to quantify the deposition process and to follow the size distribution of the deposited copper containing nanoparticles. A plausible explanation supported by density functional theory calculations is offered on the basis of the difference in the reaction pathways for Cu(I) and Cu(II) precursors. PMID:27482303

  6. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Connolly, Morgan P; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000.

  7. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Connolly, Morgan P.; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S.; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000. PMID:26659655

  8. Live-cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals the distinct roles of dynamin self-assembly and guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis in the removal of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Yu, Xiaomeng; Margolis, Moran; Liu, Xianghua; Leng, Xiaohong; Etzion, Yael; Zheng, Fei; Lu, Nan; Quiocho, Florante A; Danino, Dganit; Zhou, Zheng

    2010-02-15

    Dynamins are large GTPases that oligomerize along membranes. Dynamin's membrane fission activity is believed to underlie many of its physiological functions in membrane trafficking. Previously, we reported that DYN-1 (Caenorhabditis elegans dynamin) drove the engulfment and degradation of apoptotic cells through promoting the recruitment and fusion of intracellular vesicles to phagocytic cups and phagosomes, an activity distinct from dynamin's well-known membrane fission activity. Here, we have detected the oligomerization of DYN-1 in living C. elegans embryos and identified DYN-1 mutations that abolish DYN-1's oligomerization or GTPase activities. Specifically, abolishing self-assembly destroys DYN-1's association with the surfaces of extending pseudopods and maturing phagosomes, whereas inactivating guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding blocks the dissociation of DYN-1 from these membranes. Abolishing the self-assembly or GTPase activities of DYN-1 leads to common as well as differential phagosomal maturation defects. Whereas both types of mutations cause delays in the transient enrichment of the RAB-5 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces, only the self-assembly mutation but not GTP binding mutation causes failure in recruiting the RAB-7 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces. We propose that during cell corpse removal, dynamin's self-assembly and GTP hydrolysis activities establish a precise dynamic control of DYN-1's transient association to its target membranes and that this control mechanism underlies the dynamic recruitment of downstream effectors to target membranes.

  9. ALL2, a Homologue of ALL1, Has a Distinct Role in Regulating pH Homeostasis in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Bouklas, Tejas; Gupta, Anjali; Varshney, Avanish K.; Orner, Erika P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular fungal pathogen that has a polysaccharide capsule and causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Its capsule, as well as its ability to survive in the acidic environment of the phagolysosome, contributes to the pathogen's resilience in the host environment. Previously, we reported that downregulation of allergen 1 (ALL1) results in the secretion of a shorter, more viscous exopolysaccharide with less branching and structural complexity, as well as altered iron homeostasis. Now, we report on a homologous coregulated gene, allergen 2 (ALL2). ALL2's function was characterized by generating null mutants in C. neoformans. In contrast to ALL1, loss of ALL2 attenuated virulence in the pulmonary infection model. The all2Δ mutant shed a less viscous exopolysaccharide and exhibited higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide than the wild type, and as a result, the all2Δ mutant was more resistant to macrophage-mediated killing. Transcriptome analysis further supported the distinct function of these two genes. Unlike ALL1's involvement in iron homeostasis, we now present data on ALL2's unique function in maintaining intracellular pH in low-pH conditions. Thus, our data highlight that C. neoformans, a human-pathogenic basidiomycete, has evolved a unique set of virulence-associated genes that contributes to its resilience in the human niche. PMID:26597983

  10. Distinct roles for primate caudate dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in visual discrimination learning revealed using shRNA knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Takaji, Masafumi; Takemoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Chihiro; Watakabe, Akiya; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Onoe, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Katsuki; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The striatum plays important motor, associative and cognitive roles in brain functions. However, the rodent dorsolateral (the primate putamen) and dorsomedial (the primate caudate nucleus) striatum are not anatomically separated, making it difficult to distinguish their functions. By contrast, anatomical separation exists between the caudate nucleus and putamen in primates. Here, we successfully decreased dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) or D2R mRNA expression levels selectively in the marmoset caudate using shRNA knockdown techniques, as determined using positron emission tomography imaging with specific D1R and D2R ligands and postmortem in situ hybridization analysis. We then conducted a voxel-based correlation analysis between binding potential values of PET imaging and visual discrimination learning task performance in these genetically modified marmosets to find a critical role for the caudate D2R but no apparent role for the caudate D1R. This latter finding challenges the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying D1R activation in the caudate. PMID:27805010

  11. Human exceptional longevity: transcriptome from centenarians is distinct from septuagenarians and reveals a role of Bcl-xL in successful aging.

    PubMed

    Borras, Consuelo; Abdelaziz, Kheira M; Gambini, Juan; Serna, Eva; Inglés, Marta; de la Fuente, Monica; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander; Sanchís, Paula; Belenguer, Angel; Errigo, Alessandra; Avellana, Juan-Antonio; Barettino, Ana; Lloret-Fernández, Carla; Flames, Nuria; Pes, Gianni; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Viña, Jose

    2016-10-28

    Centenarians not only enjoy an extraordinary aging, but also show a compression of morbidity. Using functional transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) we identified 1721 mRNAs differentially expressed by centenarians when compared with septuagenarians and young people. Sub-network analysis led us to identify Bcl-xL as an important gene up-regulated in centenarians. It is involved in the control of apoptosis, cellular damage protection and also in modulation of immune response, all associated to healthy aging. Indeed, centenarians display lower plasma cytochrome C levels, higher mitochondrial membrane potential and also less cellular damage accumulation than septuagenarians. Leukocyte chemotaxis and NK cell activity are significantly impaired in septuagenarians compared with young people whereas centenarians maintain them. To further ascertain the functional role of Bcl-xL in cellular aging, we found that lymphocytes from septuagenarians transduced with Bcl-xL display a reduction in senescent-related markers. Finally, to demonstrate the role of Bcl-xL in longevity at the organism level, C. elegans bearing a gain of function mutation in the Bcl-xL ortholog ced-9, showed a significant increase in mean and maximal life span. These results show that mRNA expression in centenarians is unique and reveals that Bcl-xL plays an important role in exceptional aging.

  12. The β and γ subunits play distinct functional roles in the α2βγ heterotetramer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yabing; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase existing as the α2βγ heterotetramer, catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle, and is allosterically regulated by citrate, ADP and ATP. To explore the functional roles of the regulatory β and γ subunits, we systematically characterized the enzymatic properties of the holoenzyme and the composing αβ and αγ heterodimers in the absence and presence of regulators. The biochemical and mutagenesis data show that αβ and αγ alone have considerable basal activity but the full activity of α2βγ requires the assembly and cooperative function of both heterodimers. α2βγ and αγ can be activated by citrate or/and ADP, whereas αβ cannot. The binding of citrate or/and ADP decreases the S0.5,isocitrate and thus enhances the catalytic efficiencies of the enzymes, and the two activators can act independently or synergistically. Moreover, ATP can activate α2βγ and αγ at low concentration and inhibit the enzymes at high concentration, but has only inhibitory effect on αβ. Furthermore, the allosteric activation of α2βγ is through the γ subunit not the β subunit. These results demonstrate that the γ subunit plays regulatory role to activate the holoenzyme, and the β subunit the structural role to facilitate the assembly of the holoenzyme.

  13. Distinct role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in oval cell- mediated liver regeneration and inflammation-associated hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Xi; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Cang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and TNF receptor-1(TNFR1) have been shown to involve in oval cell proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. However, their role in these processes is still unclear. In the present study, by using hepatocytes-specific DDB1 deletion mouse models, we explored the role and mechanism of IL6, TNFα and TNFR1 in oval cell proliferation and HCC development in the context of inflammation, which is the common features of HCC pathogenesis in humans. Our results showed that IL6 promotes oval cell proliferation and liver regeneration, while TNFα/TNFR1 does not affect this process. Deletion of IL6 accelerates HCC development and increases tumor burden. The number of natural killer(NK) cells is significantly decreased in tumors without IL6, implying that IL6 suppresses HCC by NK cells. In contrast to IL6, TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway promotes HCC development, and deletion of TNFR1 reduced tumor incidence. Increased apoptosis, compensatory proliferation and activation of MAPK/MEK/ERK cascade contribute to the oncogenic function of TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway. Intriguingly, deletion of TNFα accelerates tumor development, which shows divergent roles of TNFα and TNFR1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27556180

  14. A role for the Fizzy/Cdc20 family of proteins in activation of the APC/C distinct from substrate recruitment.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yuu; Baxter, Joanne E; Fry, Andrew M; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-21

    The Fizzy/Cdc20 family of proteins are essential activators of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. However, apart from the well-established role of the C-terminal WD40 domain in substrate recognition, the precise roles of the activators remain elusive. Here we show that Nek2A, which directly binds the APC/C, can be ubiquitylated and destroyed in Fizzy/Cdc20-depleted Xenopus egg extracts when only the N-terminal domain of Fizzy/Cdc20 (N-Cdc20) is added. This activity is dependent upon the C box and is conserved in the alternative activator, Fizzy-related/Cdh1. In contrast, canonical substrates such as cyclin B and securin require both the N-terminal and WD40 domains, unless N-Cdc20 is fused to substrates when the WD40 domain becomes dispensable. Furthermore, in Cdc20-depleted cells, N-Cdc20 can facilitate Nek2A destruction in a C box-dependent manner. Our results reveal a role for the N-terminal domain of the Fizzy/Cdc20 family of activators in triggering substrate ubiquitylation by the APC/C.

  15. Human exceptional longevity: transcriptome from centenarians is distinct from septuagenarians and reveals a role of Bcl-xL in successful aging

    PubMed Central

    Borras, Consuelo; M. Abdelaziz, Kheira; Gambini, Juan; Serna, Eva; Inglés, Marta; de la Fuente, Monica; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander; Sanchís, Paula; Belenguer, Angel; Errigo, Alessandra; Avellana, Juan- Antonio; Barettino, Ana; Lloret-Fernández, Carla; Flames, Nuria; Pes, Gianni; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Centenarians not only enjoy an extraordinary aging, but also show a compression of morbidity. Using functional transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) we identified 1721 mRNAs differentially expressed by centenarians when compared with septuagenarians and young people. Sub-network analysis led us to identify Bcl - xL as an important gene up-regulated in centenarians. It is involved in the control of apoptosis, cellular damage protection and also in modulation of immune response, all associated to healthy aging. Indeed, centenarians display lower plasma cytochrome C levels, higher mitochondrial membrane potential and also less cellular damage accumulation than septuagenarians. Leukocyte chemotaxis and NK cell activity are significantly impaired in septuagenarians compared with young people whereas centenarians maintain them. To further ascertain the functional role of Bcl- xL in cellular aging, we found that lymphocytes from septuagenarians transduced with Bcl-xL display a reduction in senescent-related markers. Finally, to demonstrate the role of BcL-xL in longevity at the organism level, C. elegans bearing a gain of function mutation in the BcL-xL ortholog ced-9, showed a significant increase in mean and maximal life span. These results show that mRNA expression in centenarians is unique and reveals that BcL- xL plays an important role in exceptional aging. PMID:27794564

  16. The β and γ subunits play distinct functional roles in the α2βγ heterotetramer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yabing; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase existing as the α2βγ heterotetramer, catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle, and is allosterically regulated by citrate, ADP and ATP. To explore the functional roles of the regulatory β and γ subunits, we systematically characterized the enzymatic properties of the holoenzyme and the composing αβ and αγ heterodimers in the absence and presence of regulators. The biochemical and mutagenesis data show that αβ and αγ alone have considerable basal activity but the full activity of α2βγ requires the assembly and cooperative function of both heterodimers. α2βγ and αγ can be activated by citrate or/and ADP, whereas αβ cannot. The binding of citrate or/and ADP decreases the S0.5,isocitrate and thus enhances the catalytic efficiencies of the enzymes, and the two activators can act independently or synergistically. Moreover, ATP can activate α2βγ and αγ at low concentration and inhibit the enzymes at high concentration, but has only inhibitory effect on αβ. Furthermore, the allosteric activation of α2βγ is through the γ subunit not the β subunit. These results demonstrate that the γ subunit plays regulatory role to activate the holoenzyme, and the β subunit the structural role to facilitate the assembly of the holoenzyme. PMID:28139779

  17. Parametrically defined differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Zhurov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear ordinary differential equations defined parametrically by two relations. It proposes techniques to reduce such equations, of the first or second order, to standard systems of ordinary differential equations. It obtains the general solution to some classes of nonlinear parametrically defined ODEs dependent on arbitrary functions. It outlines procedures for the numerical solution of the Cauchy problem for parametrically defined differential equations.

  18. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  19. Compartmentalized oxidative stress in dopaminergic cell death induced by pesticides and complex I inhibitors: Distinct roles of superoxide anion and superoxide dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Pickett, Chillian; Sumin, Li; Jones, Jocelyn; Chen, Han; Webb, Brian; Choi, Jae; Zhou, You; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons induced by the parkinsonian toxins paraquat, rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) is associated with oxidative stress. However, controversial reports exist regarding the source/compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and its exact role in cell death. We aimed to determine in detail the role of superoxide anion (O2•−), oxidative stress and their subcellular compartmentalization in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Oxidative stress and ROS formation was determined in the cytosol, intermembrane (IMS) and mitochondrial matrix compartments, using dihydroethidine derivatives, the redox sensor roGFP, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Paraquat induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in both the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix prior to cell death. MPP+ and rotenone primarily induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in the mitochondrial matrix. No oxidative stress was detected at the level of the IMS. In contrast to previous studies, overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) had no effect on ROS steady state levels, lipid peroxidation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP+ or rotenone. In contrast, paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death were selectively reduced by MnSOD overexpression, but not by CuZnSOD or manganese-porphyrins. However, MnSOD also failed to prevent ΔΨm loss. Finally, paraquat, but not MPP+ or rotenone, induced the transcriptional activation the redox-sensitive antioxidant response elements (ARE) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). These results demonstrate a selective role of mitochondrial O2•− in dopaminergic cell death induced by paraquat, and show that toxicity induced by the complex I inhibitors rotenone and MPP+ does not depend directly on mitochondrial O2•− formation. PMID:23602909

  20. Distinct roles for miR-1 and miR-133a in the proliferation and differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prakash K; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shields, Lauren; Hyde, Greg; Yuan, Bingbing; Shepherd, Christopher J; Shipley, Janet; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in the pediatric population. As this tumor has an undifferentiated myogenic phenotype, agents that promote differentiation hold particular promise as part of a novel therapeutic approach to combat this type of cancer. In this report, we focus on the contribution of two microRNAs (miRNAs) in rhabdomyosarcomas. Levels of miR-1 and miR-133a are drastically reduced in representative cell lines from each major rhabdomyosarcoma subtype (embryonal and alveolar). Introduction of miR-1 and miR-133a into an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma-derived cell line is cytostatic, thereby suggesting a tumor suppressor-like role for these myogenic miRNAs. Transcriptional profiling of cells after miR-1 and miR-133a expression reveals that miR-1 (but not miR-133a) exerts a strong promyogenic influence on these poorly differentiated tumor cells. We identify mRNAs that are down-regulated by these miRNAs and propose roles for miR-1 and miR-133a in repressing isoforms of genes that are normally not expressed in muscle. Finally, we show that mRNA targets of miR-1 and miR-133a are up-regulated in rhabdomyosarcomas, suggesting a causative role for these miRNAs in the development of rhabdomyosarcomas. More important, these results point to the promise of enhancing rhabdomyosarcoma therapy using miRNAs as agents that mediate cytostasis and promote muscle differentiation.

  1. The differential characterization of GPR55 receptor in human peripheral blood reveals a distinctive expression in monocytes and NK cells and a proinflammatory role in these innate cells.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Lanuti, Mirko; De Bardi, Marco; Battistini, Luca; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by endogenous, plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids. Recent studies reported a broad tissue distribution for GPR55 and found prominent roles for this receptor in inflammatory pain, gut and bone physiology, as well as cancer. However, little is known about the expression and function of GPR55 in immune cells. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 in different human innate and adaptive immune populations using polychromatic flow cytometry and we found that monocytes and NK cells expressed remarkable levels of this receptor compared to several cells of adaptive immunity. GPR55 activation by the specific agonist O-1602 boosted IL-12 and TNF-α production, and decreased endocytic activity, in LPS-activated monocytes. In addition, it increased CD69 activation marker expression, granzyme B and CD107a-dependent cytotoxicity and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in NK cells activated by both IL-2 and IL-12. These over-stimulatory effects of GPR55 were antagonized by its selective antagonist cannabidiol. Altogether, our data thus unveil a proinflammatory role for GPR55 in innate immunity that may be important for the design of new immune therapeutic strategies.

  2. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 plays distinct roles at the mRNA entry and exit channels of the ribosomal preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Beznosková, Petra; Vlčkova, Vladislava; Chiu, Wen-Ling; Zhou, Fujun; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is a central player in recruitment of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) to mRNA. We probed the effects on mRNA recruitment of a library of S. cerevisiae eIF3 functional variants spanning its 5 essential subunits using an in vitro-reconstituted system. Mutations throughout eIF3 disrupt its interaction with the PIC and diminish its ability to accelerate recruitment to a native yeast mRNA. Alterations to the eIF3a CTD and eIF3b/i/g significantly slow mRNA recruitment, and mutations within eIF3b/i/g destabilize eIF2•GTP•Met-tRNAi binding to the PIC. Using model mRNAs lacking contacts with the 40S entry or exit channels, we uncovered a critical role for eIF3 requiring the eIF3a NTD, in stabilizing mRNA interactions at the exit channel, and an ancillary role at the entry channel requiring residues of the eIF3a CTD. These functions are redundant: defects at each channel can be rescued by filling the other channel with mRNA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20934.001 PMID:27782884

  3. Role of hypoxia and HIF2α in development of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and chromaffin cell tumours with distinct catecholamine phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Qin, Nan; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia has wide-ranging impact in normal physiology and disease processes. This stimulus evokes changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors termed hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that affect numerous processes: angiogenesis, cell survival, cellular metabolism, stem cell self- renewal and multipotency, migration, invasiveness and metastatic progression in tumour cells. Over the past decade increasing numbers of reports have emerged documenting differential roles of HIF1α and HIF2α in these processes. In cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage both HIFs differentially mediate influences of hypoxia on catecholamine synthesis and secretion, but HIF2α signalling has particularly prominent functions in regulating developmental processes of growth and differentiation. This article discusses the role of HIF2α and HIF1α in the context of the development, phenotypic features and functions of chromaffin cells. Moreover, current knowledge about tumour formation in cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage, leading to catecholamine producing pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, is analysed in the light of the HIF2α signalling network. PMID:24054150

  4. Distinct roles of autophagy-dependent and -independent functions of FIP200 revealed by generation and analysis of a mutant knock-in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Wang, Chenran; Yeo, Syn; Liang, Chun-Chi; Okamoto, Takako; Sun, Shaogang; Wen, Jian; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process controlled through a set of essential autophagy genes (Atgs). However, there is increasing evidence that most, if not all, Atgs also possess functions independent of their requirement in canonical autophagy, making it difficult to distinguish the contributions of autophagy-dependent or -independent functions of a particular Atg to various biological processes. To distinguish these functions for FIP200 (FAK family-interacting protein of 200 kDa), an Atg in autophagy induction, we examined FIP200 interaction with its autophagy partner, Atg13. We found that residues 582–585 (LQFL) in FIP200 are required for interaction with Atg13, and mutation of these residues to AAAA (designated the FIP200-4A mutant) abolished its canonical autophagy function in vitro. Furthermore, we created a FIP200-4A mutant knock-in mouse model and found that specifically blocking FIP200 interaction with Atg13 abolishes autophagy in vivo, providing direct support for the essential role of the ULK1/Atg13/FIP200/Atg101 complex in the process beyond previous studies relying on the complete knockout of individual components. Analysis of the new mouse model showed that nonautophagic functions of FIP200 are sufficient to fully support embryogenesis by maintaining a protective role in TNFα-induced apoptosis. However, FIP200-mediated canonical autophagy is required to support neonatal survival and tumor cell growth. These studies provide the first genetic evidence linking an Atg's autophagy and nonautophagic functions to different biological processes in vivo. PMID:27013233

  5. Event-related repetitive TMS reveals distinct, critical roles for right OFA and bilateral posterior STS in judging the sex and trustworthiness of faces.

    PubMed

    Dzhelyova, Milena P; Ellison, Amanda; Atkinson, Anthony P

    2011-10-01

    Judging the sex of faces relies on cues related to facial morphology and spatial relations between features, whereas judging the trustworthiness of faces relies on both structural and expressive cues that signal affective valence. The right occipital face area (OFA) processes structural cues and has been associated with sex judgments, whereas the posterior STS processes changeable facial cues related to muscle movements and is activated when observers judge trustworthiness. It is commonly supposed that the STS receives inputs from the OFA, yet it is unknown whether these regions have functionally dissociable, critical roles in sex and trustworthiness judgments. We addressed this issue using event-related, fMRI-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Twelve healthy volunteers judged the sex of individually presented faces and, in a separate session, whether those same faces were trustworthy or not. Relative to sham stimulation, RTs were significantly longer for sex judgments when rTMS was delivered over the right OFA but not the right or left STS, and for trustworthiness judgments on male but not female faces when rTMS was delivered over the right STS or left STS but not the right OFA. Nonetheless, an analysis of the RT distributions revealed a possible critical role also for the right OFA in trustworthiness judgments, limited to faces with longer RTs, perhaps reflecting the later, ancillary use of structural cues related to the sex of the face. On the whole, our findings provide evidence that evaluations of the trustworthiness and sex of faces rely on functionally dissociable cortical regions.

  6. Separate Ionotropic and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Functions in Depotentiation vs. LTP: A Distinct Role for Group1 mGluR Subtypes and NMDARs

    PubMed Central

    Latif-Hernandez, Amira; Faldini, Enrico; Ahmed, Tariq; Balschun, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Depotentiation (DP) is a mechanism by which synapses that have recently undergone long-term potentiation (LTP) can reverse their synaptic strengthening within a short time-window after LTP induction. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were shown to be involved in different forms of LTP and long-term depression (LTD), but little is known about their roles in DP. Here, we generated DP by applying low-frequency stimulation (LFS) at 5 Hz after LTP had been induced by a single train of theta-burst-stimulation (TBS). While application of LFS for 2 min (DP2′) generated only a short-lasting DP that was independent of the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and group 1 mGluRs, LFS given for 8 min (DP8′) induced a robust DP that was maintained for at least 2 h. This strong form of DP was contingent on NMDAR activation. Interestingly, DP8′ appears to include a metabotropic NMDAR function because it was blocked by the competitive NMDAR antagonist D-AP5 but not by the use-dependent inhibitor MK-801 or high Mg2+. Furthermore, DP8′ was enhanced by application of the mGluR1 antagonist (YM 298198, 1 μM). The mGluR5 antagonist 2-Methyl-6(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP, 40 μM), in contrast, failed to affect it. The induction of LTP, in turn, was NMDAR dependent (as tested with D-AP5), and blocked by MPEP but not by YM 298198. These results indicate a functional dissociation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in two related and consecutively induced types of NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity (LTP → DP) with far-reaching consequences for their role in plasticity and learning under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:27872582

  7. Distinct roles for the N- and C-terminal regions in the cytotoxicity of pierisin-1, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin from cabbage butterfly, against mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Kono, Takuo; Tanaka, Noriaki; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    Pierisin-1 is an 850-aa cytotoxic protein found in the cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and has been suggested to consist of an N-terminal region with ADP-ribosyltransferase domain and of a C-terminal region that might have a receptor-binding domain. To elucidate the role of each region, we investigated the functions of various fragments of pierisin-1. In vitro expressed polypeptide consisting of amino acid residues 1–233 or 234–850 of pierisin-1 alone did not show cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. However, the presence of both polypeptides in the culture medium showed some of the original cytotoxic activity. Introduction of the N-terminal polypeptide alone by electroporation also induced cell death in HeLa cells, and even in the mouse melanoma MEB4 cells insensitive to pierisin-1. Thus, the N-terminal region has a principal role in the cytotoxicity of pierisin-1 inside mammalian cells. Analyses of incorporated pierisin-1 indicated that the entire protein, regardless of whether it consisted of a single polypeptide or two separate N- and C-terminal polypeptides, was incorporated into HeLa cells. However, neither of the terminal polypeptides was incorporated when each polypeptide was present separately. These findings indicate that the C-terminal region is important for the incorporation of pierisin-1. Moreover, presence of receptor for pierisin-1 in the lipid fraction of cell membrane was suggested. The cytotoxic effects of pierisin-1 were enhanced by previous treatment with trypsin, producing “nicked” pierisin-1. Generation of the N-terminal fragment in HeLa cells was detected after application of intact entire molecule of pierisin-1. From the above observations, it is suggested that after incorporation of pierisin-1 into the cell by interaction of its C-terminal region with the receptor in the cell membrane, the entire protein is cleaved into the N- and C-terminal fragments with intracellular protease, and the N-terminal fragment

  8. Bone marrow-derived macrophages distinct from tissue-resident macrophages play a pivotal role in Concanavalin A-induced murine liver injury via CCR9 axis

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Takeru; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Chu, Po-sung; Teratani, Toshiaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Fukuchi, Yumi; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Miyake, Rei; Katayama, Tadashi; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism how heterogeneous hepatic macrophage (Mφ) subsets fulfill diverse functions in health and disease has not been elucidated. We recently reported that CCR9+ inflammatory Mφs play a critical role in the course of acute liver injury. To clarify the origin and differentiation of CCR9+Mφs, we used a unique partial bone marrow (BM) chimera model with liver shielding for maintaining hepatic resident Mφs. First, irradiated mice developed less liver injury with less Mφs accumulation by Concanavalin A (Con A) regardless of liver shielding. In mice receiving further BM transplantation, CD11blowF4/80high hepatic-resident Mφs were not replaced by transplanted donors under steady state, while under inflammatory state by Con A, CCR9+Mφs were firmly replaced by donors, indicating that CCR9+Mφs originate from BM, but not from hepatic-resident cells. Regarding the mechanism of differentiation and proliferation, EdU+CCR9+Mφs with a proliferative potential were detected specifically in the inflamed liver, and in vitro study revealed that BM-derived CD11b+ cells co-cultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or stimulated with retinoic acids could acquire CCR9 with antigen-presenting ability. Collectively, our study demonstrates that inflammatory Mφs originate from BM and became locally differentiated and proliferated by interaction with HSCs via CCR9 axis during acute liver injury. PMID:27725760

  9. Microarrays reveal distinct gene signatures in the thymus of seropositive and seronegative myasthenia gravis patients and the role of CC chemokine ligand 21 in thymic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Cizeron-Clairac, Géraldine; Bismuth, Jacky; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2006-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mainly caused by antiacetylcholine receptor autoantibodies (seropositive (SP) disease) or by Abs against unknown autoantigenic target(s) (seronegative (SN) disease). Thymectomy is usually beneficial although thymic hyperplasia with ectopic germinal centers is mainly observed in SP MG. To understand the role of thymus in the disease process, we compared the thymic transcriptome of non-MG adults to those of SP patients with a low or high degree of hyperplasia or SN patients. Surprisingly, an overexpression of MHC class II, Ig, and B cell marker genes is observed in SP but also SN MG patients. Moreover, we demonstrate an overexpression of CXCL13 in all MG thymuses leading probably to the generalized B cell infiltration. However, we find different chemotactic properties for MG subgroups and, especially, a specific overexpression of CCL21 in hyperplastic thymuses triggering most likely ectopic germinal center development. Besides, SN patients present a peculiar signature with an abnormal expression of genes involved in muscle development and synaptic transmission, but also genes implicated in host response, suggesting that viral infection might be related to SN MG. Altogether, these results underline differential pathogenic mechanisms in the thymus of SP and SN MG and propose new research areas.

  10. Analysis of Drosophila p8 and p52 mutants reveals distinct roles for the maintenance of TFIIH stability and male germ cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Becerra, Grisel; Juárez, Mandy; Valadez-Graham, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is activated by factors that interact within complex machinery to initiate transcription. An important component of this machinery is the DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH. Mutations in TFIIH result in three human syndromes: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Transcription and DNA repair defects have been linked to some clinical features of these syndromes. However, how mutations in TFIIH affect specific developmental programmes, allowing organisms to develop with particular phenotypes, is not well understood. Here, we show that mutations in the p52 and p8 subunits of TFIIH have a moderate effect on the gene expression programme in the Drosophila testis, causing germ cell differentiation arrest in meiosis, but no Polycomb enrichment at the promoter of the affected differentiation genes, supporting recent data that disagree with the current Polycomb-mediated repression model for regulating gene expression in the testis. Moreover, we found that TFIIH stability is not compromised in p8 subunit-depleted testes that show transcriptional defects, highlighting the role of p8 in transcription. Therefore, this study reveals how defects in TFIIH affect a specific cell differentiation programme and contributes to understanding the specific syndrome manifestations in TFIIH-afflicted patients. PMID:27805905

  11. Superoxide dismutases and glutaredoxins have a distinct role in the response of Candida albicans to oxidative stress generated by the chemical compounds menadione and diamide.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão; da Silva, Walicyranison Plinio

    2012-12-01

    To cope with oxidative stress, Candida albicans possesses several enzymes involved in a number of biological processes, including superoxide dismutases (Sods) and glutaredoxins (Grxs). The resistance of C. albicans to reactive oxygen species is thought to act as a virulence factor. Genes such as SOD1 and GRX2, which encode for a Sod and Grx, respectively, in C. albicans are widely recognised to be important for pathogenesis. We generated a double mutant, Δgrx2/sod1, for both genes. This strain is very defective in hyphae formation and is susceptible to killing by neutrophils. When exposed to two compounds that generate reactive oxygen species, the double null mutant was susceptible to menadione and resistant to diamide. The reintegration of the SOD1 gene in the null mutant led to recovery in resistance to menadione, whereas reintegration of the GRX2 gene made the null mutant sensitive to diamide. Despite having two different roles in the responses to oxidative stress generated by chemical compounds, GRX2 and SOD1 are important for C. albicans pathogenesis because the double mutant Δgrx2/sod1 was very susceptible to neutrophil killing and was defective in hyphae formation in addition to having a lower virulence in an animal model of systemic infection.

  12. Overlapping and distinct roles of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-glucose 4-epimerases in galactose metabolism and the synthesis of galactose-containing cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mark J; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Cerone, Robert P; Baptista, Stefanie D; Campoli, Paolo V; Choe, Se-In; Kravtsov, Ilia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Creuzenet, Carole; Liu, Hong; Berghuis, Albert M; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Filler, Scott G; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C

    2014-01-17

    The cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus contains two galactose-containing polysaccharides, galactomannan and galactosaminogalactan, whose biosynthetic pathways are not well understood. The A. fumigatus genome contains three genes encoding putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerases, uge3, uge4, and uge5. We undertook this study to elucidate the function of these epimerases. We found that uge4 is minimally expressed and is not required for the synthesis of galactose-containing exopolysaccharides or galactose metabolism. Uge5 is the dominant UDP-glucose 4-epimerase in A. fumigatus and is essential for normal growth in galactose-based medium. Uge5 is required for synthesis of the galactofuranose (Galf) component of galactomannan and contributes galactose to the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Uge3 can mediate production of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and is required for the production of galactosaminogalactan but not galactomannan. In the absence of Uge5, Uge3 activity is sufficient for growth on galactose and the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan containing lower levels of galactose but not the synthesis of Galf. A double deletion of uge5 and uge3 blocked growth on galactose and synthesis of both Galf and galactosaminogalactan. This study is the first survey of glucose epimerases in A. fumigatus and contributes to our understanding of the role of these enzymes in metabolism and cell wall synthesis.

  13. Defining the DOD Role in National Cybersecurity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    national campaign promoting cybersecurity awareness and digital literacy ; build a digital workforce for the 21st century. 7F8 5 The second goal is...security; enforcement of immigration laws; and resilience to disasters. Furthermore, through partnership with the DOD, a secure cyberspace supporting the...countries of the former Soviet Union but operating in Europe , the Middle East, Africa and Latin America 24F25, are increasingly involved in

  14. Distinct roles of short and long thymic stromal lymphopoietin isoforms in house dust mite-induced asthmatic airway epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hangming; Hu, Yahui; Liu, Laiyu; Zou, Mengchen; Huang, Chaowen; Luo, Lishan; Yu, Changhui; Wan, Xuan; Zhao, Haijin; Chen, JiaLong; Xie, Zhefan; Le, Yanqing; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Loss of airway epithelial integrity contributes significantly to asthma pathogenesis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) may have dual immunoregulatory roles. In inflammatory disorders of the bowel, the long isoform of TSLP (lfTSLP) promotes inflammation while the short isoform (sfTSLP) inhibits inflammation. We hypothesize that lfTSLP contributes to house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway epithelial barrier dysfunction and that synthetic sfTSLP can prevent these effects. In vitro, airway epithelial barrier function was assessed by monitoring transepithelial electrical resistance, fluorescent-dextran permeability, and distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. In vivo, BALB/c mice were exposed to HDM by nasal inhalation for 5 consecutive days per week to establish an asthma model. sfTSLP and 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) were administered 1 h before HDM exposure. After 8 weeks, animal lung function tests and pathological staining were performed to evaluate asthma progression. We found that HDM and lfTSLP impaired barrier function. Treatment with sfTSLP and 1,25D3 prevented HDM-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption. Moreover, sfTSLP and 1,25D3 treatment ameliorated HDM-induced asthma in mice. Our data emphasize the importance of the different expression patterns and biological properties of sfTSLP and lfTSLP. Moreover, our results indicate that sfTSLP and 1,25D3 may serve as novel therapeutic agents for individualized treatment of asthma. PMID:27996052

  15. The distinct role of medium spiny neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the D₂/A₂A receptor interaction in the striatum: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Tantucci, Michela; Costa, Cinzia; Borsini, Franco; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-02-02

    A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists are currently under investigation as potential therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect is still unclear. A functional antagonism exists between A(2A) adenosine and D(2) dopamine (DA) receptors that are coexpressed in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect pathway. Since this interaction could also occur in other neuronal subtypes, we have analyzed the pharmacological modulation of this relationship in murine MSNs of the direct and indirect pathways as well in striatal cholinergic interneurons. Under physiological conditions, endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) play a major role in the inhibitory effect on striatal glutamatergic transmission exerted by the concomitant activation of D(2) DA receptors and blockade of A(2A) receptors in both D(2)- and D(1)-expressing striatal MSNs. In experimental models of PD, the inhibition of striatal glutamatergic activity exerted by D(2) receptor activation did not require the concomitant inhibition of A(2A) receptors, while it was still dependent on the activation of CB(1) receptors in both D(2)- and D(1)-expressing MSNs. Interestingly, the antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors blocked the effects of D(2)/A(2A) receptor modulation on MSNs. Moreover, in cholinergic interneurons we found coexpression of D(2) and A(2A) receptors and a reduction of the firing frequency exerted by the same pharmacological agents that reduced excitatory transmission in MSNs. This evidence supports the hypothesis that striatal cholinergic interneurons, projecting to virtually all MSN subtypes, are involved in the D(2)/A(2A) and endocannabinoid-mediated effects observed on both subpopulations of MSNs in physiological conditions and in experimental PD.

  16. Biochemical and mutagenic analysis of I-CreII reveals distinct but important roles for both the H-N-H and GIY-YIG motifs

    PubMed Central

    Corina, Laura E.; Qiu, Weihua; Desai, Ami; Herrin, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Homing endonucleases typically contain one of four conserved catalytic motifs, and other elements that confer tight DNA binding. I-CreII, which catalyzes homing of the Cr.psbA4 intron, is unusual in containing two potential catalytic motifs, H-N-H and GIY-YIG. Previously, we showed that cleavage by I-CreII leaves ends (2-nt 3′ overhangs) that are characteristic of GIY-YIG endonucleases, yet it has a relaxed metal requirement like H-N-H enzymes. Here we show that I-CreII can bind DNA without an added metal ion, and that it binds as a monomer, akin to GIY-YIG enzymes. Moreover, cleavage of supercoiled DNA, and estimates of strand-specific cleavage rates, suggest that I-CreII uses a sequential cleavage mechanism. Alanine substitution of a number of residues in the GIY-YIG motif, however, did not block cleavage activity, although DNA binding was substantially reduced in several variants. Substitution of conserved histidines in the H-N-H motif resulted in variants that did not promote DNA cleavage, but retained high-affinity DNA binding—thus identifying it as the catalytic motif. Unlike the non-specific H-N-H colicins, however; substitution of the conserved asparagine substantially reduced DNA binding (though not the ability to promote cleavage). These results indicate that, in I-CreII, two catalytic motifs have evolved to play important roles in specific DNA binding. The data also indicate that only the H-N-H motif has retained catalytic ability. PMID:19651876

  17. Distinct roles for Sema3A, Sema3F, and an unidentified trophic factor in controlling the advance of geniculate axons to gustatory lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vilbig, Ryan; Cosmano, Jason; Giger, Roman; Rochlin, M William

    2004-12-01

    Geniculate ganglion axons arrive in the lingual mesenchyme on embryonic day 13 (E13), 3-4 days before penetrating fungiform papilla epithelium (E17). This latency may result from chemorepulsion by epithelial Sema3A (Dillon et al. (2004) Journal of Comparative Neurology 470, 13-24), or Sema3F, which we report is also expressed in this epithelium. Sema3A and Sema3F repelled or suppressed geniculate neurite outgrowth, respectively, and these effects were stage and neurotrophic factor dependent. BDNF-stimulated outgrowth is repelled by Sema3A until E17, but insensitive to Sema3F from E16. NT-4-stimulated neurite outgrowth is sensitive to Sema3A and Sema3F through E18, but NT-4 has not been detected in E15-18 tongue. E15-18 tongue explants did not exhibit net chemorepulsion of geniculate neurites, but the ability of tongue explants to support geniculate neurite outgrowth fluctuates: E12-13 (Rochlin et al. (2000), Journal of Comparative Neurology, 422, 579-593) and E17-18 explants promote and may attract geniculate neurites, but stages corresponding to intralingual arborization do not. The E18 trophic and tropic effects were evident even in the presence of BDNF or NT-4, suggesting that some other factor is responsible. Intrinsic neurite outgrowth capability (without exogenous neurotrophic factors) fluctuated similarly: ganglia deteriorated at E15, but exhibited moderate outgrowth at E18. The chemorepulsion studies are consistent with a role for Sema3A, not Sema3F, in restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium until E17, when axons penetrate the epithelium. The transient inability of tongue explants to promote geniculate neurite outgrowth may signify an alternative mechanism for restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium: limiting trophic factor access.

  18. Distinct roles of two cytoplasmic thioredoxin reductases (Trr1/2) in the redox system involving cysteine synthesis and host infection of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-12-01

    Two thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (Trr1/2) are known to play overlapping roles in the yeast Trx-Trr redox system but are generally unexplored in filamentous fungi, which possess multiple Trx homologues. This study seeks to characterize the functions of Trr1 and Trr2 in Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen, and to probe their Trx partners. Both Trr1 and Trr2 were evidently localized in the cytoplasm of B. bassiana, unlike the two yeast homologues that have been reported to localize in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively. Most of the six trx genes were greatly upregulated at the transcriptional level in the absence of trr1 instead of trr2 in B. bassiana, in which the trr1/2 double deletion failed in many attempts. Deletion of trr1 resulted in increased Trx activity, severe cysteine auxotrophy, and drastically reduced activities of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases under normal or oxidative conditions despite little change in catalase activity. Such changes disappeared in the absence of trr2 and were completely restored by complementation of trr1/2 or overexpression of trx1/6 in the Δtrr1 mutant, but were not restored at all by overexpression of trx2/3/4/5 or trr2 in the same mutant. All of these mutants exhibited similar trends of changes in the antioxidant response, conidiation, germination, thermotolerance, UV-B resistance, and virulence. Taken together, the findings indicate that Trr1 could reduce Trx2-5 and hence dominate the intracellular redox state, profoundly affecting the potential of B. bassiana against arthropod pests. Trr2 could reduce Trx1/6 but function only in the absence of Trr1.

  19. Distinct Roles of the Repeat-Containing Regions and Effector Domains of the Vibrio vulnificus Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-Toxin (MARTX) Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Sik; Gavin, Hannah E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio vulnificus is a seafood-borne pathogen that destroys the intestinal epithelium, leading to rapid bacterial dissemination and death. The most important virulence factor is the multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin comprised of effector domains in the center region flanked by long repeat-containing regions which are well conserved among MARTX toxins and predicted to translocate effector domains. Here, we examined the role of the repeat-containing regions using a modified V. vulnificus MARTX (MARTXVv) toxin generated by replacing all the internal effector domains with β-lactamase (Bla). Bla activity was detected in secretions from the bacterium and also in the cytosol of intoxicated epithelial cells. The modified MARTXVv toxin without effector domains retained its necrotic activity but lost its cell-rounding activity. Further, deletion of the carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing region blocked toxin secretion from the bacterium. Deletion of the amino-terminal repeat-containing region had no effect on secretion but completely abolished translocation and necrosis. Neither secretion nor translocation was affected by enzymatically inactivating the cysteine protease domain of the toxin. These data demonstrate that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing regions of the MARTXVv toxin are necessary and sufficient for the delivery of effector domains and epithelial cell lysis in vitro but that effector domains are required for other cytopathic functions. Furthermore, Ca2+-dependent secretion of the modified MARTXVv toxin suggests that nonclassical RTX-like repeats found in the carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing region are functionally similar to classical RTX repeats found in other RTX proteins. PMID:25827415

  20. Distinct roles of TRAF6 at early and late stages of muscle pathology in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Sato, Shuichi; Choi, Yongwon; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-03-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disorder caused by loss of functional dystrophin protein. Accumulating evidence suggests that the deficiency of dystrophin leads to aberrant activation of many signaling pathways which contribute to disease progression. However, the proximal signaling events leading to the activation of various pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle remain less clear. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein which acts as a signaling intermediate for several receptor-mediated signaling events leading to the context-dependent activation of a number of signaling pathways. TRAF6 is also an E3 ubiquitin ligase and an important regulator of autophagy. However, the role of TRAF6 in pathogenesis of DMD remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the levels and activity of TRAF6 are increased in skeletal muscle of mdx (a mouse model of DMD) mice. Targeted deletion of TRAF6 improves muscle strength and reduces fiber necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and the activation of proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in 7-week-old mdx mice. Ablation of TRAF6 also increases satellite cells proliferation and myofiber regeneration in young mdx mice. Intriguingly, ablation of TRAF6 exacerbates muscle injury and increases fibrosis in 9-month-old mdx mice. TRAF6 inhibition reduces the markers of autophagy and Akt signaling in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice. Collectively, our study suggests that while the inhibition of TRAF6 improves muscle structure and function in young mdx mice, its continued inhibition causes more severe myopathy at later stages of disease progression potentially through repressing autophagy.

  1. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  2. Distinct catalytic activity and in vivo roles of the ExoIII and EndoIV AP endonucleases from Sulfolobus islandicus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhou; Huang, Qihong; Ni, Jinfeng; Shen, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    AP endonuclease cleaves the phosphodiester bond 5'- to the AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites and is one of the major enzymes involved in base excision repair. So far, the properties of several archaeal AP endonuclease homologues have been characterized in vitro, but little is known about their functions in vivo. Herein, we report on the biochemical and genetic analysis of two AP endonucleases, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Both SisExoIII and SisEndoIV exhibit AP endonuclease activity, but neither of them has 3'-5' exonuclease activity. SisExoIII and SisEndoIV have similar K M values on the substrate containing an AP site, but the latter cleaves the AP substrate at a dramatically higher catalytic rate than the former. Unlike other AP endonucleases identified in archaea, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV do not exhibit any cleavage activity on DNA having oxidative damage (8-oxo-dG) or uracil. Genetic analysis revealed that neither gene is essential for cell viability, and the growth of ∆SiRe_2666 (endoIV), ∆SiRe_0100 (exoIII), and ∆SiRe_0100∆SiRe_2666 is not affected under normal growth conditions. However, ∆SiRe_2666 exhibits higher sensitivity to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) than ∆SiRe_0100. Over-expression of SiRe_0100 can partially complement the sensitivity of ∆SiRe_2666 to MMS, suggesting a backup role of SisExoIII in AP site processing in vivo. Intriguingly, over-expression of SisEndoIV renders the strain more sensitive to MMS than the control. Taken together, we conclude that SisEndoIV, but not SisExoIII, is the main AP endonuclease that participates directly in base excision repair in S. islandicus.

  3. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values.

  4. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  5. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  6. Defined by Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriola, Sonya; Murphy, Katy

    2010-01-01

    Undocumented students are a population defined by limitations. Their lack of legal residency and any supporting paperwork (e.g., Social Security number, government issued identification) renders them essentially invisible to the American and state governments. They cannot legally work. In many states, they cannot legally drive. After the age of…

  7. Defining the Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Patte, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" presents articles that discuss, respectively, defining the language arts, an agenda for English, the benefits of two languages, a new teacher (presently teaching English in a foreign country) looking ahead, and the Shaker Fellowships awarded by the school district in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Articles in the…

  8. On Defining Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  9. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  10. Expression of the T-cell surface molecule CD2 and an epitope-loss CD2 mutant to define the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, B E; Peterson, A; Barbosa, J; Seed, B; Burakoff, S J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of the CD2-lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) interaction in T-cell activation, we have expressed a cDNA encoding the human CD2 molecule in a murine antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Expression of the CD2 molecule greatly enhances T-cell responsiveness to antigen; this enhancement is inhibited by anti-CD2 and anti-LFA-3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CD2+ hybridomas produce interleukin 2 in response to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs 9.6 and 9-1 and, in the presence of mAb 9-1, to sheep erythrocytes or to the LFA-3 antigen. Furthermore, hybridomas expressing a mutant CD2 molecule that has lost mAb 9.6 binding do not exhibit the enhanced response to antigen or the ability to respond to LFA-3 plus mAb 9-1, but these hybridomas retain the ability to respond to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs. The role of the CD2-LFA-3 interaction in T-cell activation and the potential for other physiologic ligands for CD2 are discussed. PMID:2448792

  11. Defining Dynamic Route Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelinski, Shannon; Jastrzebski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes a method for defining route structure from flight tracks. Dynamically generated route structures could be useful in guiding dynamic airspace configuration and helping controllers retain situational awareness under dynamically changing traffic conditions. Individual merge and diverge intersections between pairs of flights are identified, clustered, and grouped into nodes of a route structure network. Links are placed between nodes to represent major traffic flows. A parametric analysis determined the algorithm input parameters producing route structures of current day flight plans that are closest to todays airway structure. These parameters are then used to define and analyze the dynamic route structure over the course of a day for current day flight paths. Route structures are also compared between current day flight paths and more user preferred paths such as great circle and weather avoidance routing.

  12. Defining and Diagnosing Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that encompasses infections of many different types and severity. Not surprisingly, it has confounded most attempts to apply a single definition, which has also limited the ability to develop a set of reliable diagnostic criteria. It is perhaps best defined as the different clinical syndromes produced by an immune response to infection that causes harm to the body beyond that of the local effects of the infection.

  13. Defining functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Calleja, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications.During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc.The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a) food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome); and b) epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome). These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones) are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a) epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity) or pain; b) postprandial heaviness; and c) early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn). All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the other hand

  14. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  15. On Defining Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumble, Greville

    1989-01-01

    Reviews past definitions of distance education and offers a new five-part definition of the concept. Topics discussed include the roles of the teachers and students; physical separation of teachers and learners; the influence of an educational organization; communication between teachers and students; and the use of technical media. (22…

  16. Defining the University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Janet

    1978-01-01

    Reports discussion at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) on such topics as overproduction, government support, "on demand" publishing, profitability, library photocopying, and selection in library acquisitions, as they relate to the roles of librarians and publishers. (JPF)

  17. Distinct roles of Drosophila cacophony and Dmca1D Ca2+ channels in synaptic homeostasis: Genetic interactions with slowpoke Ca2+-activated BK channels in presynaptic excitability and postsynaptic response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and its feedback regulation by Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels is critical in Ca2+-dependent cellular processes, including synaptic transmission, growth and homeostasis. Here we report differential roles of cacophony (CaV2) and Dmca1D (CaV1) Ca2+ channels in synaptic transmission and in synaptic homeostatic regulations induced by slowpoke (slo) BK channel mutations. At Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), a well-established homeostatic mechanism of transmitter release enhancement is triggered by experimentally suppressing postsynaptic receptor response. In contrast, a distinct homeostatic adjustment is induced by slo mutations. To compensate for the loss of BK channel control presynaptic Sh K+ current is upregulated to suppress transmitter release, coupled with a reduction in quantal size. We demonstrate contrasting effects of cac and Dmca1D channels in decreasing transmitter release and muscle excitability, respectively, consistent with their predominant pre- vs. post-synaptic localization. Antibody staining indicated reduced postsynaptic GluRII receptor subunit density and altered ratio of GluRII A and B subunits in slo NMJs, leading to quantal size reduction. Such slo-triggered modifications were suppressed in cac;;slo larvae, correlated with a quantal size reversion to normal in double mutants, indicating a role of cac Ca2+ channels in slo-triggered homeostatic processes. In Dmca1D;slo double mutants, the quantal size and quantal content were not drastically different from those of slo, although Dmca1D suppressed the slo-induced satellite bouton overgrowth. Taken together, cac and Dmca1D Ca2+ channels differentially contribute to functional and structural aspects of slo-induced synaptic modifications. PMID:23959639

  18. Distinctive expression patterns and roles of the miRNA393/TIR1 homolog module in regulating flag leaf inclination and primary and crown root growth in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongwu; Xie, Yakun; Guo, Fu; Han, Ning; Ma, Shengyun; Zeng, Zhanghui; Wang, Junhui; Yang, Yinong; Zhu, Muyuan

    2012-10-01

    • MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of auxin signaling components plays a critical role in plant development. miRNA expression and functional diversity contribute to the complexity of regulatory networks of miRNA/target modules. • This study functionally characterizes two members of the rice (Oryza sativa) miR393 family and their target genes, OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 (AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX), the two closest homologs of Arabidopsis TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 (TIR1). • We found that the miR393 family members possess distinctive expression patterns, with miR393a expressed mainly in the crown and lateral root primordia, as well as the coleoptile tip, and miR393b expressed in the shoot apical meristem. Transgenic plants overexpressing miR393a/b displayed a severe phenotype with hallmarks of altered auxin signaling, mainly including enlarged flag leaf inclination and altered primary and crown root growth. Furthermore, OsAFB2- and OsTIR1-suppressed lines exhibited increased inclination of flag leaves at the booting stage, resembling miR393-overexpressing plants. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 interact with OsIAA1. • Expression diversification of miRNA393 implies the potential role of miRNA regulation during species evolution. The conserved mechanisms of the miR393/target module indicate the fundamental importance of the miR393-mediated regulation of auxin signal transduction in rice.

  19. Paleontological evidence for defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnosky, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Paleontological criteria formed the basis for defining most of the geological eras, periods, epochs, and ages that are commonly recognized. By the same token, the Anthropocene can be defined by paleontological distinctiveness in accordance with commonly accepted biostratigraphic and biochronologic practice. Here I focus on the utility of defining the Anthropocene by the distinctive fossils (or potential fossils of the future) that have accumulated and are accumulating in the sedimentary record. I discuss what kinds of biostratrigraphic criteria would be of most use in recognizing the Anthropocene's base and temporal extent, including pros and cons of definitions based on range zones, interval zones, lineage zones, assemblage zones, and abundance zones, as well as implications for potential reference sections. Key paleontological criteria useful in formally defining the Anthropocene as a geological epoch include (1) anthropogenic trace fossils such as buildings, roads, plastics, etc; (2) abundance zones based on remains of domesticated species and humans; and (3) assemblage zones based on species transported around the globe by people. The magnitude of paleontologically-recognizable changes that have occurred since humans became the dominant species on Earth is at least as great as the paleontological differences that distinguish other Cenozoic epochs, and supports recognition of the Anthropocene as a formal stratigraphic unit.

  20. Defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  1. Energy Velocity Defined by Brillouin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hiroyuki; Hosono, Toshio

    The physical meaning of the energy velocity in lossy Lorentz media is clarified. First, two expressions for the energy velocity, one by Brillouin and another by Diener, are examined. We show that, while Diener's is disqualified, Brillouin's is acceptable as energy velocity. Secondly, we show that the signal velocity defined by Brillouin and Baerwald is exactly identical with the Brillouin's energy velocity. Thirdly, by using triangle-modulated harmonic wave, we show that the superluminal group velocity plays its role as a revelator only after the arrival of the signal traveling at the subluminal energy velocity. In short, nothing moves at the group velocity, and every frequency component of a signal propagates at its own energy velocity.

  2. Education and Training: Is There Any Longer a Useful Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul; Laurent, John

    1990-01-01

    Although education and training were distinct concepts when Taylorism dominated the workplace, it is no longer appropriate to separate them. Today's highly competitive environment requires the education of a flexible, multiskilled workforce, not training for narrowly defined employment tasks. (SK)

  3. Defining equity in health

    PubMed Central

    Braveman, P; Gruskin, S

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: To propose a definition of health equity to guide operationalisation and measurement, and to discuss the practical importance of clarity in defining this concept. Design: Conceptual discussion. Setting, Patients/Participants, and Main results: not applicable. Conclusions: For the purposes of measurement and operationalisation, equity in health is the absence of systematic disparities in health (or in the major social determinants of health) between groups with different levels of underlying social advantage/disadvantage—that is, wealth, power, or prestige. Inequities in health systematically put groups of people who are already socially disadvantaged (for example, by virtue of being poor, female, and/or members of a disenfranchised racial, ethnic, or religious group) at further disadvantage with respect to their health; health is essential to wellbeing and to overcoming other effects of social disadvantage. Equity is an ethical principle; it also is consonant with and closely related to human rights principles. The proposed definition of equity supports operationalisation of the right to the highest attainable standard of health as indicated by the health status of the most socially advantaged group. Assessing health equity requires comparing health and its social determinants between more and less advantaged social groups. These comparisons are essential to assess whether national and international policies are leading toward or away from greater social justice in health. PMID:12646539

  4. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  5. Defining hypercalciuria in nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Charles Y.C.; Sakhaee, Khashayar; Moe, Orson W.; Poindexter, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The classic definition of hypercalciuria, an upper normal limit of 200 mg/day, is based on a constant diet restricted in calcium, sodium, and animal protein; however, random diet data challenge this. Here our retrospective study determined the validity of the classic definition of hypercalciuria by comparing data from 39 publications analyzing urinary calcium excretion on a constant restricted diet and testing whether hypercalciuria could be defined when extraneous dietary influences were controlled. These papers encompassed 300 non-stone-forming patients, 208 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria type I (presumed due to high intestinal calcium absorption), and 234 stone formers without absorptive hypercalciuria; all evaluated on a constant restricted diet. In non-stone formers, the mean urinary calcium was well below 200 mg/day, and the mean for all patients was 127±46 mg/day with an upper limit of 219 mg/day. In absorptive hypercalciuria type I, the mean urinary calcium significantly exceeded 200 mg/day in all studies with a combined mean of 259±55 mg/day. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed the optimal cutoff point for urinary calcium excretion was 172 mg/day on a restricted diet, a value that approximates the traditional limit of 200 mg/day. Thus, on a restricted diet, a clear demarcation was seen between urinary calcium excretion of kidney stone formers with absorptive hypercalciuria type I and normal individuals. When dietary variables are controlled, the classic definition of hypercalciuria of nephrolithiasis appears valid. PMID:21775970

  6. Defining life: the virus viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism-the virus-producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  7. Resolvin D2 is a potent endogenous inhibitor for transient receptor potential subtype V1/A1, inflammatory pain, and spinal cord synaptic plasticity in mice: distinct roles of resolvin D1, D2, and E1.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kyu; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Lü, Ning; Serhan, Charles N; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-12-14

    Inflammatory pain such as arthritic pain is typically treated with opioids and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors with well known side effects. Transient receptor potential subtype vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyryn 1 (TRPA1) contribute importantly to the genesis of inflammatory pain via both peripheral mechanisms (peripheral sensitization) and spinal cord mechanisms (central sensitization). Although these TRP channels have been intensively studied, little is known about their endogenous inhibitors. Recent studies have demonstrated that the endogenous lipid mediators resolvins (RvE1 and RvD1), derived from ω-3 unsaturated fatty acids, are potent inhibitors for inflammatory pain, without noticeable side effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resolvins' distinct analgesic actions in mice are unclear. RvD2 is a novel family member of resolvins. Here we report that RvD2 is a remarkably potent inhibitor of TRPV1 (IC(50) = 0.1 nm) and TRPA1 (IC(50) = 2 nm) in primary sensory neurons, whereas RvE1 and RvD1 selectively inhibited TRPV1 (IC(50) = 1 nm) and TRPA1 (IC(50) = 9 nm), respectively. Accordingly, RvD2, RvE1, and RvD1 differentially regulated TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonist-elicited acute pain and spinal cord synaptic plasticity [spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) frequency increase]. RvD2 also abolished inflammation-induced sEPSC increases (frequency and amplitude), without affecting basal synaptic transmission. Intrathecal administration of RvD2 at very low doses (0.01-1 ng) prevented formalin-induced spontaneous pain. Intrathecal RvD2 also reversed adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain without altering baseline pain and motor function. Finally, intrathecal RvD2 reversed C-fiber stimulation-evoked long-term potentiation in the spinal cord. Our findings suggest distinct roles of resolvins in regulating TRP channels and identify RvD2 as a potent endogenous inhibitor for TRPV1/TRPA1 and inflammatory pain.

  8. Defining dermal adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Ryan R; Jahoda, Colin A B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Watt, Fiona M; Horsley, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Here, we explore the evolution and development of skin-associated adipose tissue with the goal of establishing nomenclature for this tissue. Underlying the reticular dermis, a thick layer of adipocytes exists that encases mature hair follicles in rodents and humans. The association of lipid-filled cells with the skin is found in many invertebrate and vertebrate species. Historically, this layer of adipocytes has been termed subcutaneous adipose, hypodermis and subcutis. Recent data have revealed a common precursor for dermal fibroblasts and intradermal adipocytes during development. Furthermore, the development of adipocytes in the skin is independent from that of subcutaneous adipose tissue development. Finally, the role of adipocytes has been shown to be relevant for epidermal homoeostasis during hair follicle regeneration and wound healing. Thus, we propose a refined nomenclature for the cells and adipose tissue underlying the reticular dermis as intradermal adipocytes and dermal white adipose tissue, respectively.

  9. Neurobehavioral Perspectives on the Distinction between Fear and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusini, Jennifer N.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the…

  10. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  11. Defining the nociceptor transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Matthew; Crow, Megan; Richards, Natalie; Davey, Gareth I. J.; Levine, Emma; Kelleher, Jayne H.; Agley, Chibeza C.; Denk, Franziska; Harridge, Stephen D. R.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased “omics” techniques, such as next generation RNA-sequencing, can provide entirely novel insights into biological systems. However, cellular heterogeneity presents a significant barrier to analysis and interpretation of these datasets. The neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are an important model for studies of neuronal injury, regeneration and pain. The majority of investigators utilize a dissociated preparation of whole ganglia when studying cellular and molecular function. We demonstrate that the standard methods for producing these preparations gives a 10%-neuronal mixture of cells, with the remainder of cells constituting satellite glia and other non-neuronal cell types. Using a novel application of magnetic purification, we consistently obtain over 95% pure, viable neurons from adult tissue, significantly enriched for small diameter nociceptors expressing the voltage gated ion channel Nav1.8. Using genome-wide RNA-sequencing we compare the currently used (10% neuronal) and pure (95% nociceptor) preparations and find 920 genes enriched. This gives an unprecedented insight into the molecular composition of small nociceptive neurons in the DRG, potentially altering the interpretation of previous studies performed at the tissue level, and indicating a number of novel markers of this widely-studied population of cells. We anticipate that the ease of use, affordability and speed of this technique will see it become widely adopted, delivering a greatly improved capacity to study the roles of nociceptors in health and disease. PMID:25426020

  12. Amino Acids in the Basic Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus ZEBRA Protein Play Distinct Roles in DNA Binding, Activation of Early Lytic Gene Expression, and Promotion of Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Heston, Lee; El-Guindy, Ayman; Countryman, Jill; Dela Cruz, Charles; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2006-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) drives the viral lytic cycle cascade. The capacity of ZEBRA to recognize specific DNA sequences resides in amino acids 178 to 194, a region in which 9 of 17 residues are either lysine or arginine. To define the basic domain residues essential for activity, a series of 46 single-amino-acid-substitution mutants were examined for their ability to bind ZIIIB DNA, a high-affinity ZEBRA binding site, and for their capacity to activate early and late EBV lytic cycle gene expression. DNA binding was obligatory for the protein to activate the lytic cascade. Nineteen mutants that failed to bind DNA were unable to disrupt latency. A single acidic replacement of a basic amino acid destroyed DNA binding and the biologic activity of the protein. Four mutants that bound weakly to DNA were defective at stimulating the expression of Rta, the essential first target of ZEBRA in lytic cycle activation. Four amino acids, R183, A185, C189, and R190, are likely to contact ZIIIB DNA specifically, since alanine or valine substitutions at these positions drastically weakened or eliminated DNA binding. Twenty-three mutants were proficient in binding to ZIIIB DNA. Some DNA binding-proficient mutants were refractory to supershift by BZ-1 monoclonal antibody (epitope amino acids 214 to 230), likely as the result of the increased solubility of the mutants. Mutants competent to bind DNA could be separated into four functional groups: the wild-type group (eight mutants), a group defective at activating Rta (five mutants, all with mutations at the S186 site), a group defective at activating EA-D (three mutants with the R179A, S186T, and K192A mutations), and a group specifically defective at activating late gene expression (seven mutants). Three late mutants, with a Y180A, Y180E, or K188A mutation, were defective at stimulating EBV DNA replication. This catalogue of point mutants reveals that basic domain amino acids play distinct functions in binding

  13. Mechanistic characterization of the 5′-triphosphate-dependent activation of PKR: Lack of 5′-end nucleobase specificity, evidence for a distinct triphosphate binding site, and a critical role for the dsRBD

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Hull, Chelsea M.; Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is activated by RNA to phosphorylate eIF-2α, inhibiting translation initiation. Long dsRNA activates PKR via interactions with the dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). Weakly structured RNA also activates PKR and does so in a 5′-triphosphate (ppp)–dependent fashion, however relatively little is known about this pathway. We used a mutant T7 RNA polymerase to incorporate all four triphosphate-containing nucleotides into the first position of a largely single-stranded RNA and found absence of selectivity, in that all four transcripts activate PKR. Recognition of 5′-triphosphate, but not the nucleobase at the 5′-most position, makes this RNA-mediated innate immune response sensitive to a broad array of viruses. PKR was neither activated in the presence of γ-GTP nor recognized NTPs other than ATP in activation competition and ITC binding assays. This indicates that the binding site for ATP is selective, which contrasts with the site for the 5′ end of ppp-ssRNA. Activation experiments reveal that short dsRNAs compete with 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin for activation, and likewise gel-shift assays reveal that activating 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin compete with short dsRNAs for binding to PKR's dsRBD. The dsRBD thus plays a critical role in the activation of PKR by ppp-ssRNA and even heparin. At the same time, cross-linking experiments indicate that ppp-ssRNA interacts with PKR outside of the dsRBD as well. Overall, 5′-triphosphate-containing, weakly structured RNAs activate PKR via interactions with both the dsRBD and a distinct triphosphate binding site that lacks 5′-nucleobase specificity, allowing the innate immune response to provide broad-spectrum protection from pathogens. PMID:22912486

  14. Conceptual Distinctions amongst Generics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; Khemlani, Sangeet; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Glucksberg, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Generic sentences (e.g., bare plural sentences such as "dogs have four legs" and "mosquitoes carry malaria") are used to talk about "kinds" of things. Three experiments investigated the conceptual foundations of generics as well as claims within the formal semantic approaches to generics concerning the roles of prevalence, cue validity and…

  15. Defining the cortical visual systems: "what", "where", and "how"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creem, S. H.; Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The visual system historically has been defined as consisting of at least two broad subsystems subserving object and spatial vision. These visual processing streams have been organized both structurally as two distinct pathways in the brain, and functionally for the types of tasks that they mediate. The classic definition by Ungerleider and Mishkin labeled a ventral "what" stream to process object information and a dorsal "where" stream to process spatial information. More recently, Goodale and Milner redefined the two visual systems with a focus on the different ways in which visual information is transformed for different goals. They relabeled the dorsal stream as a "how" system for transforming visual information using an egocentric frame of reference in preparation for direct action. This paper reviews recent research from psychophysics, neurophysiology, neuropsychology and neuroimaging to define the roles of the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams. We discuss a possible solution that allows for both "where" and "how" systems that are functionally and structurally organized within the posterior parietal lobe.

  16. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  17. Distinct roles of P(II)-like signal transmitter proteins and amtB in regulation of nif gene expression, nitrogenase activity, and posttranslational modification of NifH in Azoarcus sp. strain BH72.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dietmar E; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2002-04-01

    P(II)-like signal transmitter proteins, found in Bacteria, Archaea, and plants, are known to mediate control of carbon and nitrogen assimilation. They indirectly regulate the activity of key metabolic enzymes and transcription factors by protein-protein interactions with signal transduction proteins. Many Proteobacteria harbor two paralogous P(II)-like proteins, GlnB and GlnK, whereas a novel third P(II) paralogue (GlnY) was recently identified in Azoarcus sp. strain BH72, a diazotrophic endophyte of grasses. In the present study, evidence was obtained that the P(II)-like proteins have distinct roles in mediating nitrogen and oxygen control of nif gene transcription and nitrogenase activity. Full repression of nif gene transcription in the presence of a combined nitrogen source or high oxygen concentrations was observed in wild-type and glnB and glnK knockout mutants, revealing that GlnB and GlnK can complement each other in mediating the repression. In contrast, in a glnBK double mutant strain in the presence of only GlnY, nif gene transcription was still detectable, albeit at a lower level, on nitrate or 20% oxygen. As another level of control, nitrogenase activity was regulated by at least three types of mechanisms in strain BH72: covalent modification of dinitrogenase reductase (NifH), probably by ADP-ribosylation, and two other, unknown means. Functional inactivation upon ammonium addition (switch-off) required the putative high-affinity ammonium transporter AmtB and GlnK, but not GlnB or GlnY. Functional inactivation in response to anaerobiosis did not depend on AmtB, GlnK, or GlnB. In contrast, covalent modification of NifH required both GlnB and GlnK and AmtB as response to ammonium addition, whereas it required either GlnB or GlnK and not AmtB when cells were shifted to anaerobiosis. In a glnBK double mutant expressing only GlnY, NifH modification was completely abolished, further revealing functional differences between the three P(II) paralogues.

  18. Defining the Stimulus - A Memoir

    PubMed Central

    Terrace, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The eminent psychophysicist, S. S. Stevens, once remarked that, “the basic problem of psychology was the definition of the stimulus” (Stevens, 1951, p. 46). By expanding the traditional definition of the stimulus, the study of animal learning has metamorphosed into animal cognition. The main impetus for that change was the recognition that it is often necessary to postulate a representation between the traditional S and R of learning theory. Representations allow a subject to re-present a stimulus it learned previously that is currently absent. Thus, in delayed-matching-to-sample, one has to assume that a subject responds to a representation of the sample during test if it responds correctly. Other examples, to name but a few, include concept formation, spatial memory, serial memory, learning a numerical rule, imitation and metacognition. Whereas a representation used to be regarded as a mentalistic phenomenon that was unworthy of scientific inquiry, it can now be operationally defined. To accommodate representations, the traditional discriminative stimulus has to be expanded to allow for the role of representations. The resulting composite can account for a significantly larger portion of the variance of performance measures than the exteroceptive stimulus could by itself. PMID:19969047

  19. An Algorithm for Defining Somatization in Children

    PubMed Central

    Postilnik, Inna; Eisman, Howard D.; Price, Rebecca; Fogel, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Defining somatization in pediatric populations presents a unique challenge, because DSM-IV somatization criteria may be inadequate for identifying a child with somatization. Two approaches exist. Child somatization has frequently been rooted in a questionnaire model, focusing on child or parent responses to assess how well a child conforms to a specific mental health profile. Others use a medical diagnosis model, designating a child with somatization as those for whom a limited number of medical measures have failed to reveal a pathological source of symptoms. Method We incorporate concepts based upon a literature review from January 1994 to June 2005 of PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL on classification and diagnosis of somatization in children ages 6 to 12. Our goal is to understand in depth the topic and suggest a way to better understand and classify somatization in children. Results We incorporate an integrative approach toward defining child somatization and propose an algorithm to step-by-step classify children with somatic symptoms into three distinct groups: sick, somatizers, and well. This approach includes information from self-report questionnaire, physician questionnaire, and the child’s medical chart. Conclusion This new algorithm suggests an approach for differentiating primary care pediatric clinic visitors into three distinct groups. Although used in clinical practice, empirical validation is necessary to further validate this algorithm. PMID:18392196

  20. Synthesis of Well-Defined Copper "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes and Their Use as Catalysts for a "Click Reaction": A Multistep Experiment that Emphasizes the Role of Catalysis in Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ison, Elon A.; Ison, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A multistep experiment for an advanced synthesis lab course that incorporates topics in organic-inorganic synthesis and catalysis and highlights green chemistry principles was developed. Students synthesized two "N"-heterocyclic carbene ligands, used them to prepare two well-defined copper(I) complexes and subsequently utilized the complexes as…

  1. Clarifying and Defining Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shubert, Joseph F., Ed.; Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents articles which, in some way, help to clarify and define library services. It is hoped that this clarification in library service will serve to secure the resources libraries need to serve the people of New York. The following articles are presented: (1) Introduction: "Clarifying and Defining Library Services" (Joseph…

  2. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical…

  3. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  4. Development of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Peggy L.

    Since the beginning of man's awareness of his language capabilities and language structure, he has assumed that speech is composed of discrete entities. The linguist attempts to establish a model of the workings of these distinctive sounds in a language. Utilizing an historical basis for discussion, this general survey of the distinctive feature…

  5. A Behavioral Approach in Defining and Teaching Educational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolly, John P.

    Behaviorists define the purpose of educational psychology as that of teaching teachers to predict, control, and modify classroom behavior. This conceptualization is contrasted with the approach which views educational psychology as a comprehensive content area emphasizing information rather than skills. A basic distinction between behaviorists and…

  6. The Problem of Defining Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubar, David

    1981-01-01

    The major philosophical issues surrounding the concept of intelligence are reviewed with respect to the problems surrounding the process of defining and developing artificial intelligence (AI) in computers. Various current definitions and problems with these definitions are presented. (MP)

  7. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  8. Dysregulation of MS risk genes and pathways at distinct stages of disease

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sundararajan; Di Dario, Marco; Russo, Alessandra; Menon, Ramesh; Brini, Elena; Romeo, Marzia; Sangalli, Francesca; Costa, Gloria Dalla; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Radaelli, Marta; Moiola, Lucia; Cantarella, Daniela; Medico, Enzo; Martino, Gianvito; Furlan, Roberto; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To perform systematic transcriptomic analysis of multiple sclerosis (MS) risk genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with distinct MS stages and describe the pathways characterized by dysregulated gene expressions. Methods: We monitored gene expression levels in PBMCs from 3 independent cohorts for a total of 297 cases (including clinically isolated syndromes (CIS), relapsing-remitting MS, primary and secondary progressive MS) and 96 healthy controls by distinct microarray platforms and quantitative PCR. Differential expression and pathway analyses for distinct MS stages were defined and validated by literature mining. Results: Genes located in the vicinity of MS risk variants displayed altered expression in peripheral blood at distinct stages of MS compared with the healthy population. The frequency of dysregulation was significantly higher than expected in CIS and progressive forms of MS. Pathway analysis for each MS stage–specific gene list showed that dysregulated genes contributed to pathogenic processes with scientific evidence in MS. Conclusions: Systematic gene expression analysis in PBMCs highlighted selective dysregulation of MS susceptibility genes playing a role in novel and well-known pathogenic pathways. PMID:28349074

  9. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Ahlberg, J; Glaros, A G; Kato, T; Koyano, K; Lavigne, G J; de Leeuw, R; Manfredini, D; Svensson, P; Winocur, E

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined bruxism as a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterised by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible. Bruxism has two distinct circadian manifestations: it can occur during sleep (indicated as sleep bruxism) or during wakefulness (indicated as awake bruxism). For the operationalisation of this definition, the expert group proposes a diagnostic grading system of 'possible', 'probable' and 'definite' sleep or awake bruxism. The proposed definition and grading system are suggested for clinical and research purposes in all relevant dental and medical domains.

  10. Co-localised Raman and force spectroscopy reveal the roles of hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions in defining the mechanical properties of diphenylalanine nano- and micro-tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinjab, Faris; Bondakov, Georgi; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-06-23

    An integrated atomic force and polarized Raman microscope were used to measure the elastic properties of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and micro-tubes and to obtain quantitative information regarding the inter-molecular interactions that define their mechanical properties. For individual tubes, co-localised force spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements allowed the calculation of the Young's and shear moduli (25 ± 5 GPa and 0.28 ± 0.05 GPa, respectively) and the contribution of hydrogen bonding network to the Young's modulus (∼17.6 GPa). The π-π interactions between the phenyl rings, dominated by T-type arrangements, were estimated based on previously published X-ray data to only 0.20 GPa. These results provide experimental evidence obtained from individual FF tubes that the network of H-bonds dominates the elastic properties of the FF tubes.

  11. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  12. Impaired intracellular trafficking defines early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Benjamin H M; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Spillantini, Maria-Grazia; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious and incurable neurodegenerative disease, and represents a significant cost to individuals, carers, and ageing societies. It is defined at post-mortem by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra together with the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. We examine here the role of α-synuclein and other cellular transport proteins implicated in PD and how their aberrant activity may be compounded by the unique anatomy of the dopaminergic neuron. This review uses multiple lines of evidence from genetic studies, human tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and refined animal models to argue that prodromal PD can be defined as a disease of impaired intracellular trafficking. Dysfunction of the dopaminergic synapse heralds trafficking impairment.

  13. Neurobehavioral perspectives on the distinction between fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Perusini, Jennifer N.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the neurobiological literature. A strong distinction should specify the difference in conditions that lead to fear versus anxiety. Additionally, fear and anxiety should generate distinct sets of behaviors. Ideally, the two states should be supported by distinguishable neuroanatomical circuits. Such a conceptualization would be consistent with the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoc). The majority of neurobiological approaches to the fear versus anxiety distinction fail to differentiate the two states in terms of behavior, often using the exact same behavioral measures as indicators. Of the two that do, only Predatory Imminence Theory provides a distinction both in terms of cause and effect. Indeed, that approach provides a ready distinction of anxiety, fear, and panic in terms of both antecedent conditions and response selection rules. Additionally, it appeals to distinct neural circuits to generate these modes of action. PMID:26286652

  14. Defined by Word and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2010-01-01

    In the author's art class, she found that many of her students in an intro art class have some technical skill, but lack the ability to think conceptually. Her goal was to create an innovative project that combined design, painting, and sculpture into a compact unit that asked students how they define themselves. In the process of answering this…

  15. Defining and Measuring Psychomotor Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi

    2007-01-01

    Psychomotor performance is fundamental to human existence. It is important in many real world activities and nowadays psychomotor tests are used in several fields of industry, army, and medical sciences in employee selection. This article tries to define psychomotor activity by introducing some psychomotor theories. Furthermore the…

  16. Defining "Folklore" in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falke, Anne

    Folklore, a body of traditional beliefs of a people conveyed orally or by means of custom, is very much alive, involves all people, and is not the study of popular culture. In studying folklore, the principal tasks of the folklorist have been defined as determining definition, classification, source (the folk), origin (who composed folklore),…

  17. Critical role of bevacizumab scheduling in combination with pre-surgical chemo-radiotherapy in MRI-defined high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer: results of the branch trial

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, Antonio; Pecori, Biagio; Bianco, Franco; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Romano, Carmela; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Pietro; Leone, Alessandra; Botti, Gerardo; Petrillo, Antonella; Caracò, Corradina; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo R.; Muto, Paolo; Romano, Giovanni; Comella, Pasquale; Budillon, Alfredo; Delrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that an intensified preoperative regimen including oxaliplatin plus raltitrexed and 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (OXATOM/FUFA) during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy produced promising results in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preclinical evidence suggests that the scheduling of bevacizumab may be crucial to optimize its combination with chemo-radiotherapy. Patients and methods This non-randomized, non-comparative, phase II study was conducted in MRI-defined high-risk LARC. Patients received three biweekly cycles of OXATOM/FUFA during RT. Bevacizumab was given 2 weeks before the start of chemo-radiotherapy, and on the same day of chemotherapy for 3 cycles (concomitant-schedule A) or 4 days prior to the first and second cycle of chemotherapy (sequential-schedule B). Primary end point was pathological complete tumor regression (TRG1) rate. Results The accrual for the concomitant-schedule was early terminated because the number of TRG1 (2 out of 16 patients) was statistically inconsistent with the hypothesis of activity (30%) to be tested. Conversely, the endpoint was reached with the sequential-schedule and the final TRG1 rate among 46 enrolled patients was 50% (95% CI 35%–65%). Neutropenia was the most common grade ≥3 toxicity with both schedules, but it was less pronounced with the sequential than concomitant-schedule (30% vs. 44%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8/15 (53%) and 13/46 (28%) patients in schedule A and B, respectively. At 5 year follow-up the probability of PFS and OS was 80% (95%CI, 66%–89%) and 85% (95%CI, 69%–93%), respectively, for the sequential-schedule. Conclusions These results highlights the relevance of bevacizumab scheduling to optimize its combination with preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in the management of LARC. PMID:26320185

  18. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang, Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; Katsanis, J S; Lee, Jeong-A; Lewis, Gladius; Lovell, Nigel H; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Morales, George G; Matis, Timothy; Matthews, Judith T; Mazur, Lukasz; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Oommen, K J; Ormand, Kevin; Rohde, Tarald; Sánchez-Morillo, Daniel; Sanz-Calcedo, Justo García; Sawan, Mohamad; Shen, Chwan-Li; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Su, Chao-Ton; Sun, Lilly; Sun, Mingui; Sun, Yi; Tewolde, Senay N; Williams, Eric A; Yan, Chongjun; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term "Healthcare Engineering" has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of "Healthcare Engineering" remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  19. Distinct Nrf2 Signaling Mechanisms of Fumaric Acid Esters and Their Role in Neuroprotection against 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine-Induced Experimental Parkinson's-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Manuj; Ammal Kaidery, Navneet; Yang, Lichuan; Calingasan, Noel; Smirnova, Natalya; Gaisin, Arsen; Gaisina, Irina N.; Gazaryan, Irina; Hushpulian, Dmitry M.; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Bollag, Wendy B.; Morgan, John C.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Beal, M. Flint

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to neurotherapeutics involves activating the nuclear-factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element signaling, which regulates expression of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective genes. Tecfidera, a putative Nrf2 activator, is an oral formulation of dimethylfumarate (DMF) used to treat multiple sclerosis. We compared the effects of DMF and its bioactive metabolite monomethylfumarate (MMF) on Nrf2 signaling and their ability to block 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced experimental Parkinson's disease (PD). We show that in vitro DMF and MMF activate the Nrf2 pathway via S-alkylation of the Nrf2 inhibitor Keap1 and by causing nuclear exit of the Nrf2 repressor Bach1. Nrf2 activation by DMF but not MMF was associated with depletion of glutathione, decreased cell viability, and inhibition of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolysis rates in a dose-dependent manner, whereas MMF increased these activities in vitro. However, both DMF and MMF upregulated mitochondrial biogenesis in vitro in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Despite the in vitro differences, both DMF and MMF exerted similar neuroprotective effects and blocked MPTP neurotoxicity in wild-type but not in Nrf2 null mice. Our data suggest that DMF and MMF exhibit neuroprotective effects against MPTP neurotoxicity because of their distinct Nrf2-mediated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and mitochondrial functional/biogenetic effects, but MMF does so without depleting glutathione and inhibiting mitochondrial and glycolytic functions. Given that oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are all implicated in PD pathogenesis, our results provide preclinical evidence for the development of MMF rather than DMF as a novel PD therapeutic. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Almost two centuries since its first description by James Parkinson, Parkinson's disease (PD) remains an incurable disease with limited symptomatic treatment. The

  20. Defining Our National Cyberspace Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-17

    invention of the World Wide Web in 19 1989, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers ( ICANN ) (the international organization that...anonymity in cyberspace could be accomplished through the issuing of IP addresses as the Internet transitions from IPv4 to IPv6. ICANN should issue...agreement (MOA) between the U.S. Department of Commerce and ICANN . This new MOA should define which blocks of IP addresses will be used for entities

  1. Wetlands Restoration Definitions and Distinctions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological restoration is a valuable endeavor that has proven very difficult to define. The term indicates that degraded and destroyed natural wetland systems will be reestablished to sites where they once existed. But, what wetland ecosystems are we talki

  2. The adhesive and migratory effects of osteopontin are mediated via distinct cell surface integrins. Role of alpha v beta 3 in smooth muscle cell migration to osteopontin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, L; Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Cheresh, D A; Schwartz, S M; Giachelli, C M

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin is an arginine-glycine-aspartate containing acidic glycoprotein postulated to mediate adhesion, migration, and biomineralization in diverse tissues. The mechanisms explaining this multifunctionality are not well understood, although it is known that one osteopontin receptor is the alpha v beta 3 integrin. In this work, we studied human smooth muscle cells varying in alpha v beta 3 levels to identify additional osteopontin receptors. We report that, in addition to alpha v beta 3, both alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 are osteopontin receptors. Moreover, the presence or absence of alpha v beta 3 on the cell surface altered the adhesive and migratory responses of smooth muscle cells to osteopontin. Adhesion of alpha v beta 3-deficient cell populations to osteopontin was only half that of cells containing alpha v beta 3, and migration toward an osteopontin gradient in the Boyden chamber was dependent on cell surface alpha v beta 3. Although alpha v beta 3-deficient smooth muscle cells were unable to migrate to osteopontin, they did migrate significantly in response to vitronectin and fibronectin. These findings represent the first description of alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 as osteopontin receptors and suggest that, while adhesion to osteopontin is supported by integrins containing beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5, migration in response to osteopontin appears to depend on alpha v beta 3. Thus, interaction with distinct receptors is one mechanism by which osteopontin may initiate multiple functions. Images PMID:7532190

  3. Defining the role of University of Kentucky HealthCare in its medical market--how strategic planning creates the intersection of good public policy and good business practices.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Michael; Lofgren, Richard; Bricker, Timothy; Claypool, Joseph O; Zembrodt, Jim; Perman, Jay; Higdon, Courtney M

    2009-02-01

    In response both to national pressures to reduce costs and improve health care access and outcomes and to local pressures to become a top-20 public research university, the University of Kentucky moved toward an integrated clinical enterprise, UK HealthCare, to create a common vision, shared goals, and an effective decision-making process. The leadership formed the vision and then embarked on a comprehensive and coordinated planning process that addressed financial, clinical, academic, and operational issues. The authors describe in depth the strategic planning process and specifically the definition of UK HealthCare's role in its medical marketplace. They began a rigorous process to assess and develop goals for the clinical programs and followed the progress of these programs through meetings driven by data and attended by the organization's senior leadership. They describe their approach to working with rural and community hospitals throughout central, eastern, and southern Kentucky to support the health care infrastructure of the state. They review the early successes of their strategic approach and describe the lessons they learned. The clinical successes have led to academic gains. The experience of UK HealthCare suggests that good business practices and good public policy are synergistic.

  4. How to define green adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out.

  5. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  6. Distinctiveness Maps for Image Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Tomasi, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    Stereo correspondence is hard because different image features can look alike. We propose a measure for the ambiguity of image points that allows matching distinctive points first and breaks down the matching task into smaller and separate subproblems. Experiments with an algorithm based on this measure demonstrate the ensuing efficiency and low likelihood of incorrect matches.

  7. Analysis of human IL-2/IL-2 receptor beta chain interactions: monoclonal antibody H2-8 and new IL-2 mutants define the critical role of alpha helix-A of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Eckenberg, R; Xu, D; Moreau, J L; Bossus, M; Mazie, J C; Tartar, A; Liu, X Y; Alzari, P M; Bertoglio, J; Theze, J

    1997-07-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) interacts with a receptor (IL-2R) composed of three subunits (IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta and IL-2R gamma). IL-2R beta plays a critical role in signal transduction. An anti-human IL-2 mAb (H2-8) produced after immunization with peptide 1-30 of IL-2 was found to recognize the region occupied by Asp20, at the exposed interface between alpha-helices A and C. Muteins at position 17 and 20 are not recognized by mAb H2-8. mAb H2-8 specifically inhibits the IL-2 proliferation of TS1beta cells which are dependent on the expression of human IL-2R beta chain for IL-2 proliferation. Substitution at internal position Leu17 demonstrates that this position is essential for IL-2 binding and IL-2 bioactivity. New IL-2 mutants at position Asp20 have been analysed. Substitutions Asp --> Asn, Asp --> Lys