Science.gov

Sample records for deflective separation cds

  1. Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection

    DOEpatents

    Hickman, Robert G.

    1978-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

  2. CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The Centre de Donnees de Strasbourg (CDS) is a reference data centre for Astronomy. The CDS services; SIMBAD, Vizier, Aladin and X-Match, provide added value to scientific content in order to support the astronomy research community. Data and information are curated from refereed journals, major surveys, observatories and missions with a strong emphasis on maintaining a high level of quality. The current status and plans of the CDS will be presented, highlighting how the recent innovations of the HiPS (Hierarchical Progressive surveys) and MOC (Multi-Order Coverage map) systems enable the visualisation of hundreds of surveys and data sets, and brings new levels of interoperability between catalogues, surveys images and data cubes.

  3. Clusius-Dickel Separations (CDS): A new look at an old technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The history, applications, and theoretical basis of the CDS technique are reviewed. The advantage to be realized by conduction of CDSs in low-g, space environments are deduced. The results are reported of investigations aimed at further improving CDS efficiencies by altering convective flow patterns. The question of whether multicellular flow or turbulence can introduce a new separation mechanism which would boost separation efficiencies at least an order of magnitude is considered. Results are presented and discussed.

  4. Motion of integrated CdS nanoparticles by phase separation of block copolymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Hanfu; Han, Yanchun

    2007-08-14

    A new method of reversibly moving CdS nanoparticles in the perpendicular direction was developed on the basis of the phase separation of block copolymer brushes. Polystyrene-b-(poly(methyl methacrylate)-co-poly(cadmium dimethacrylate)) (PS-b-(PMMA-co-PCdMA)) brushes were grafted from the silicon wafer by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). By exposing the polymer brushes to H2S gas, PS-b-(PMMA-co-PCdMA) brushes were converted to polystyrene-b-(poly(methyl methacrylate)-co-poly(methacrylic acid)(CdS)) (PS-b-(PMMA-co-PMAA(CdS))) brushes, in which CdS nanoparticles were chemically bonded by the carboxylic groups of PMAA segment. Alternating treatment of the PS-b-(PMMA-co-PMAA(CdS)) brushes by selective solvents for the outer block (a mixed solvent of acetone and ethanol) and the inner PS block (toluene) induced perpendicular phase separation of polymer brushes, which resulted in the reversible lifting and lowering of CdS nanoparticles in the perpendicular direction. The extent of movement can be adjusted by the relative thickness of two blocks of the polymer brushes.

  5. Experimental and theoretical analysis of DEP-based particle deflection for the separation of protein-bound particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Lim, Geon-Gyu; Lee, Hyang-Beom; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical analysis of dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle deflection in a microfluidic channel for the separation of protein-bound particles. A 2D electrode array with widely spaced bars is designed to deflect a particle at the exit of the fluidic channel by negative DEP force. When particles pass through the channel, the particle streams are deflected differently depending on the DEP characteristics of the particles. In this paper, we propose methodologies to characterize the DEP force with the deflection distance using comparative analyses of a simulation and an experiment. The deflection distances of the particles are measured as a function of the ac voltage applied and compared with full 3D simulations. The Clausius-Mossotti (CM) factor of a protein-bound particle is analyzed, based on frequency-dependent deflection distance data measured experimentally, and protein-bound particles are separated from a mixture with nonbound particles in a real application. Two particle groups, 2.3 µm and 6.4 µm polystyrene particles, were used for the simulation and experimental study, and the 6.4 µm diameter particles were selected as an adequate protein-binding substrate for the application of biomolecular detection. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a test target protein. The particle's BSA binding is identified by the change in the particle's deflection distance. In particular, we used 1 wt% BSA as a target protein sample to investigate the deflection of 6.4 µm diameter particles as a function of protein concentration. The frequency-dependent CM factor curves for BSA-bound and nonbound particles are also calculated theoretically. Therefore, this paper shows a model analytic study on the biomolecular detection performance of a fabricated DEP-deflection microsystem. In addition, we present further significant analyses such as calculation of the electrical surface conductance of BSA around a particle, and we trace simulation errors. The

  6. Interactions between CdsD, CdsQ, and CdsL, Three Putative Chlamydophila pneumoniae Type III Secretion Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dustin L.; Stone, Chris B.; Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia and bronchitis and may contribute to atherosclerosis. The developmental cycle of C. pneumoniae includes a morphological transition from an infectious extracellular elementary body (EB) to a noninfectious intracellular reticulate body (RB) that divides by binary fission. The C. pneumoniae genome encodes a type III secretion (T3S) apparatus that may be used to infect eukaryotic cells and to evade the host immune response. In the present study, Cpn0712 (CdsD), Cpn0704 (CdsQ), and Cpn0826 (CdsL), three C. pneumoniae genes encoding yersiniae T3S YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs, respectively, were cloned and expressed as histidine- and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant proteins were used to raise hyper-immune polyclonal antiserum and were used in GST pull-down and copurification assays to identify protein-protein interactions. CdsD was detected in both EB and RB lysates by Western blot analyses, and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated the presence of CdsD within inclusions. Triton X-114 solubilization and phase separation of chlamydial EB proteins indicated that CdsD partitions with cytoplasmic proteins, suggesting it is not an integral membrane protein. GST pull-down assays indicated that recombinant CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL, and copurification assays with chlamydial lysates confirmed that native CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating interactions between YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs of bacterial T3S systems. These novel protein interactions may play important roles in the assembly or function of the chlamydial T3S apparatus. PMID:18281400

  7. Microwave Deflection Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Kobayashi, Herb; Ngo, Phong; Lichtenberg, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Doppler-radar instrument measures small deflections or vibrations of reflecting surface. Acting as interferometric micrometer, instrument includes combination of analog and digital circuits measuring change in phase of radar return due to movement of reflecting surface along signal-propagation path. Includes homodyne Doppler-radar transceiver and digital signal-processing circuitry to measure change in phase shift as target deflects.

  8. The effect of CdS on the charge separation and recombination dynamics in PbS/CdS double-layered quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koki; Ono, Keita; Izuishi, Takuya; Kuwahara, Shota; Katayama, Kenji; Toyoda, Taro; Hayase, Shuzi; Shen, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have attracted much interest due to their theoretical efficiency, predicted to be as high as 44%. However, the energy conversion efficiency of QDSSCs is still a lot lower than the theoretical value, one reason for which is the number of surface defects on the QDs. In order to improve the conversion efficiency, surface passivation of the QDs has been applied to QDSSCs. Studying the mechanism of how the surface passivation influences the photoexcited carrier dynamics is very important. In this paper, we clarify the effects of CdS passivation on electron injection, trapping and recombination in CdS passivated PbS QDSSCs (called PbS/CdS double-layered QDSSCs). We found that electron trapping and recombination can be suppressed effectively, and that the electron injection efficiency can be increased significantly by surface passivation with CdS on PbS QDSSCs. Our findings provide a better understanding of the effects of surface passivation on QDSSCs, which will prove beneficial for making further improvements in the photovoltaic properties of QDSSCs.

  9. Functionalized CdS nanospheres and nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeokjin; Yang, Heesun; Holloway, Paul H.

    2009-12-01

    Functionalized nanoparticles are discussed. Surfaces of CdS:Mn/ZnS core/shell nanospheres (Qdots) were converted from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by growth of a SiO 2 shell. The colloidal dispersion was stabilize by adding a surfactant with a negative surface charge, and a cell-penetrating-peptide, TAT, was attached through a primary amine group. The TAT functionalized Qdots were shown to pass the blood-brain-barrier and luminescence in the infused half of the brain. In addition, nanorods of S 2- rich CdS were synthesized by reaction of excess S with Cd precursors in the presence of ethylene diamine. The photoluminescence (PL) peak from the S 2- rich CdS nanorods was broad with a maximum at ∼710 nm, which was 40 nm longer in wavelength than the PL peak from Cd 2+ rich CdS (∼670 nm) nanorods. The influence of surface electron or hole trap states on the luminescent pathway of CdS nanorods were used to explain these shifts in wavelength. Nanocrystals of Au with ∼2 nm diameters were grown on S 2- rich surfaces of CdS nanorods. Significant quenching of photoluminescence was observed from Au nanocrystals on CdS nanorods due to interfacial charge separation. Charge separation by Au nanocrystals on CdS resulted in enhanced UV photocatalytic degradation of Procion red mix-5B (PRB) dye in aqueous solution.

  10. Burning Your Own CDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of CDs (Compact Disks) for backing up data as an alternative to using floppy disks and explains how to burn, or record, a CD. Topics include differences between CD-R (CD-Recordable) and CD-RW (CD-Rewritable); advantages of CD-R and CD-RW; selecting a CD burner; technology trends; and care of CDs. (LRW)

  11. The Deflection Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, A. H.; Nesvold, E.; van Heerden, E.; Erasmus, N.; Marchis, F.

    2016-12-01

    On 15 February, 2013, a 15 m diameter asteroid entered the Earth's atmosphere over Russia. The resulting shockwave injured nearly 1500 people, and incurred 33 million (USD) in infrastructure damages. The Chelyabinsk meteor served as a forceful demonstration of the threat posed to Earth by the hundreds of potentially hazardous objects (PHOs) that pass near the Earth every year. Although no objects have yet been discovered on an impact course for Earth, an impact is virtually statistically guaranteed at some point in the future. While many impactor deflection technologies have been proposed, humanity has yet to demonstrate the ability to divert an impactor when one is found. Developing and testing any single proposed technology will require significant research time and funding. This leaves open an obvious question - towards which technologies should funding and research be directed, in order to maximize our preparedness for when an impactor is eventually found? To help answer this question, we have created a detailed framework for analyzing various deflection technologies and their effectiveness. Using an n-body integrator (REBOUND), we have simulated the attempted deflections of a population of Earth-impacting objects with a variety of velocity perturbations (∂Vs), and measured the effects that these perturbations had on impact probability. We then mapped the ∂Vs applied in the orbital simulations to the technologies capable of achieving those perturbations, and analyzed which set of technologies would be most effective at preventing a PHO from impacting the earth. As a final step, we used the results of these simulations to train a machine learning algorithm. This algorithm, combined with a simulated PHO population, can predict which technologies are most likely to be needed. The algorithm can also reveal which impactor observables (mass, spin, orbit, etc.) have the greatest effect on the choice of deflection technology. These results can be used as a tool to

  12. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  13. Draft air deflecting device

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, J.E.

    1982-05-18

    A draft air deflecting device is mountable proximate to a window contained in a firebox and serves as a conduit which directs draft air across the inner surface of the window prior to its supporting combustion of the fuel in the firebox. In this respect , the draft air deflecting device is formed as a box which communicates with draft air holes located in the firebox and which includes a forwardly extending lip serving to define a nozzle for both increasing the velocity and directing the incoming draft air across the firebox window. The incoming draft air is thus utilized to cool and to prevent soot, creosote and other particulates from accumulating on the window.

  14. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W. B.; Amer, Nabil M.; Boccara, A. C.; Fournier, D.

    1981-04-15

    The theory for a sensitive spectroscopy based on the photothermal deflection of a laser beam is developed. We consider cw and pulsed cases of both transverse and collinear photothermal deflection spectroscopy for solids, liquids, gases, and thin films. The predictions of the theory are experimentally verified, its implications for imaging and microscopy are given, and the sources of noise are analyzed. The sensitivity and versatility of photothermal deflection spectroscopy are compared with thermal lensing and photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  15. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  16. Real-world injury patterns associated with Hybrid III sternal deflections in frontal crash tests.

    PubMed

    Brumbelow, Matthew L; Farmer, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the peak sternal deflection measurements recorded by the Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropometric test device (ATD) in frontal crash tests and injury and fatality outcomes for drivers in field crashes. ATD sternal deflection data were obtained from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's 64 km/h, 40 percent overlap crashworthiness evaluation tests for vehicles with seat belt crash tensioners, load limiters, and good-rated structure. The National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) was queried for frontal crashes of these vehicles in which the driver was restrained by a seat belt and air bag. Injury probability curves were calculated by frontal crash type using the injuries coded in NASS-CDS and peak ATD sternal deflection data. Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) front-to-front crashes with exactly one driver death were also studied to determine whether the difference in measured sternal deflections for the 2 vehicles was related to the odds of fatality. For center impacts, moderate overlaps, and large overlaps in NASS-CDS, the probability of the driver sustaining an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score ≥ 3 thoracic injury, or any nonextremity AIS ≥ 3 injury, increased with increasing ATD sternal deflection measured in crash tests. For small overlaps, however, these probabilities decreased with increasing deflection. For FARS crashes, the fatally injured driver more often was in the vehicle with the lower measured deflection in crash tests (55 vs. 45%). After controlling for other factors, a 5-mm difference in measured sternal deflections between the 2 vehicles was associated with a fatality odds ratio of 0.762 for the driver in the vehicle with the greater deflection (95% confidence interval = 0.373, 1.449). Restraint systems that reduce peak Hybrid III sternal deflection in a moderate overlap crash test are beneficial in real-world crashes with similar or greater

  17. A Second Life for CDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snoderly, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Cutting a few CDs apart with scissors, the author found that the process created somewhat brittle shards. As a result, she started to paint a few with acrylic, finding to her amazement that the paint gave the CDs a leathery, more manageable texture. Upon further experimentation, she found that if the CDs are painted somewhat translucently in…

  18. A Second Life for CDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snoderly, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Cutting a few CDs apart with scissors, the author found that the process created somewhat brittle shards. As a result, she started to paint a few with acrylic, finding to her amazement that the paint gave the CDs a leathery, more manageable texture. Upon further experimentation, she found that if the CDs are painted somewhat translucently in…

  19. Growth of Au nanocrystals on CdS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heesun

    2006-08-01

    Nanorods of S2- rich CdS were synthesized by a reaction of excess S versus Cd precursors in the presence of ethylene diamine. The photoluminescence (PL) emission from the S2- rich CdS nanorods was broad with a peak at ˜710 nm, which was 40 nm longer in wavelength than the PL peak from Cd2+ rich CdS (˜670 nm) nanorods. The influence of surface electron or hole trap states on the luminescent pathway of CdS nanorods will be discussed to explain these shifts in wavelength. Nanocrystals of Au ˜2 nm in size were grown on S2- rich surfaces of CdS nanorods. Significant luminescence quenching was observed from the Au nanocrystals on the CdS nanorods due to interfacial charge separation. Change separation by the Au nanocrystals on the CdS resulted in enhanced photocatalytic degradation of Procion red mix-5B (PRB) dye in an aqueous solution under UV light irradiation.

  20. Directed energy deflection laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Phillip; Hughes, Gary B.; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Batliner, Payton; Motta, Caio; Griswold, Janelle; Kangas, Miikka; Johansson, Isbella; Alnawakhtha, Yusuf; Prater, Kenyon; Lang, Alex; Madajian, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    We report on laboratory studies of the effectiveness of directed energy planetary defense as a part of the DESTAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) program. DE-STAR [1][5][6] and DE-STARLITE [2][5][6] are directed energy "stand-off" and "stand-on" programs, respectively. These systems consist of a modular array of kilowatt-class lasers powered by photovoltaics, and are capable of heating a spot on the surface of an asteroid to the point of vaporization. Mass ejection, as a plume of evaporated material, creates a reactionary thrust capable of diverting the asteroid's orbit. In a series of papers, we have developed a theoretical basis and described numerical simulations for determining the thrust produced by material evaporating from the surface of an asteroid [1][2][3][4][5][6]. In the DE-STAR concept, the asteroid itself is used as the deflection "propellant". This study presents results of experiments designed to measure the thrust created by evaporation from a laser directed energy spot. We constructed a vacuum chamber to simulate space conditions, and installed a torsion balance that holds an "asteroid" sample. The sample is illuminated with a fiber array laser with flux levels up to 60 MW/m2 which allows us to simulate a mission level flux but on a small scale. We use a separate laser as well as a position sensitive centroid detector to readout the angular motion of the torsion balance and can thus determine the thrust. We compare the measured thrust to the models. Our theoretical models indicate a coupling coefficient well in excess of 100 μN/Woptical, though we assume a more conservative value of 80 μN/Woptical and then degrade this with an optical "encircled energy" efficiency of 0.75 to 60 μN/Woptical in our deflection modeling. Our measurements discussed here yield about 45 μN/Wabsorbed as a reasonable lower limit to the thrust per optical watt absorbed.

  1. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-12-11

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance.

  2. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  3. Heterostructured WS2 -MoS2 Ultrathin Nanosheets Integrated on CdS Nanorods to Promote Charge Separation and Migration and Improve Solar-Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Reddy, D Amaranatha; Park, Hanbit; Ma, Rory; Kumar, D Praveen; Lim, Manho; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-04-10

    Solar-driven photocatalytic hydrogen evolution is important to bring solar-energy-to-fuel energy-conversion processes to reality. However, there is a lack of highly efficient, stable, and non-precious photocatalysts, and catalysts not designed completely with expensive noble metals have remained elusive, which hampers their large-scale industrial application. Herein, for the first time, a highly efficient and stable noble-metal-free CdS/WS2 -MoS2 nanocomposite was designed through a facile hydrothermal approach. When assessed as a photocatalyst for water splitting, the CdS/WS2 -MoS2 nanostructures exhibited remarkable photocatalytic hydrogen-evolution performance and impressive durability. An excellent hydrogen evolution rate of 209.79 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) was achieved under simulated sunlight irradiation, which is higher than the values for CdS/MoS2 (123.31 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) ) and CdS/WS2 nanostructures (169.82 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) ) and the expensive CdS/Pt benchmark catalyst (34.98 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) ). The apparent quantum yield reached 51.4 % at λ=425 nm in 5 h. Furthermore, the obtained hydrogen evolution rate was better than those of several noble-metal-free catalysts reported previously. The observed high rate of hydrogen evolution and remarkable stability may be a result of the ultrafast separation of photogenerated charge carriers and transport between the CdS nanorods and the WS2 -MoS2 nanosheets, which thus increases the number of electrons involved in hydrogen production. The proposed designed strategy is believed to potentially open a door to the design of advanced noble-metal-free photocatalytic materials for efficient solar-driven hydrogen production. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Benchmarking Asteroid-Deflection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Tane; Bruck Syal, Megan; Owen, John Michael; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-10-01

    An asteroid impacting Earth could have devastating consequences. In preparation to deflect or disrupt one before it reaches Earth, it is imperative to have modeling capabilities that adequately simulate the deflection actions. Code validation is key to ensuring full confidence in simulation results used in an asteroid-mitigation plan. We are benchmarking well-known impact experiments using Spheral, an adaptive smoothed-particle hydrodynamics code, to validate our modeling of asteroid deflection. We describe our simulation results, compare them with experimental data, and discuss what we have learned from our work. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-695540

  5. Thin film optical nonlinear waveguides made of Corning 7059 glass doped with CdS microcrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenard, Francois; Jerominek, Hubert; Larochelle, Sophie; Tremblay, Real; Delisle, Claude A.

    1989-03-01

    The technology for the fabrication of semiconductor-doped glass film by co-sputtering of Coming 7059 and a CdS powder or pellet is described. The presence of semiconductor microcrystallites was verified by using Raman spectroscopy. XPS measurements show that CdS content of the films varies from 3 to 20% by weight depending on the kind of target used and the RF power supplied to the sputtering system. Nonlinear coefficient n2 of the films is about 10-10 m2/W. The nonlinearity is probably of thermal origin. All-optical beam deflection experiment based on nonlinear properties of the deposited films is described.

  6. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  7. AIDA: Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Galvez, A.; Carnelli, I.; Michel, P.; Rivkin, A.; Reed, C.

    2012-12-01

    To protect the Earth from a hazardous asteroid impact, various mitigation methods have been proposed, including deflection of the asteroid by a spacecraft impact. AIDA, consisting of two mission elements, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) and the Asteroid Impact Monitoring (AIM) mission, is a demonstration of asteroid deflection. To date, there has been no such demonstration, and there is major uncertainty in the result of a spacecraft impact onto an asteroid, that is, the amount of deflection produced by a given momentum input from the impact. This uncertainty is in part due to unknown physical properties of the asteroid surface, such as porosity and strength, and in part due to poorly understood impact physics such that the momentum carried off by ejecta is highly uncertain. A first mission to demonstrate asteroid deflection would not only be a major step towards gaining the capability to mitigate an asteroid hazard, but in addition it would return unique information on an asteroid's strength, other surface properties, and internal structure. This information return would be highly relevant to future human exploration of asteroids. We report initial results of the AIDA joint mission concept study undertaken by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and ESA with support from NASA centers including Goddard, Johnson and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For AIDA, the DART spacecraft impactor study is coordinated with an ESA study of the AIM mission, which would rendezvous with the same asteroid to measure effects of the impact. Unlike the previous Don Quijote mission study performed by ESA in 2005-2007, DART envisions an impactor spacecraft to intercept the secondary member of a binary near-Earth asteroid. DART includes ground-based observations to measure the deflection independently of the rendezvous spacecraft observations from AIM, which also measures deflection and provides detailed characterization of the target asteroid. The joint mission AIDA

  8. The Seven Habits of Highly Deflective Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle; Chaddock, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    The authors define deflection as a strategy to bounce action or responsibility away from oneself and toward another person, time, or place. Although they contend that deflection occurs in all areas of personal and professional life, the authors limit their focus to the deflective colleague ("collega deflectivus") in academe. In this article, the…

  9. Optical Measurement Of Propfan Deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.; Meyn, Erwin H.; Mehmed, Oral; Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1994-01-01

    Optoelectronic system measures deflections of rotating propfan. In addition to 0.5-mW HeNe lasers, system includes Schottky-barrier photodetectors, neutral-density filters, signal amplifiers, output-signal-recording device, and digitizer. Laser beam passes through plane of rotation of propfan blades. Beam is one of three that measure displacements at different blade sections. Additional laser beam at bottom generates shaft-rotation timing signal.

  10. AIDA: Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew; Michel, Patrick; Ulamec, Stephan; Reed, Cheryl; Galvez, Andres; Carnelli, Ian

    On Feb. 15, 2013, an exceptionally close approach to Earth by the small asteroid 2012 DA14 was eagerly awaited by observers, but another small asteroid impacted Earth over Chelyabinsk, Russia the same day without warning, releasing several hundred kilotons TNT of energy and injuring over 1500 people. These dramatic events remind us of the needs to discover hazardous asteroids and to learn how to mitigate them. The AIDA mission is the first demonstration of a mitigation technique to protect the Earth from a potential asteroid impact, by performing a spacecraft kinetic impact on an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory. We will provide an update on the status of parallel AIDA mission studies supported by ESA and NASA. AIDA is an international collaboration consisting of two independent but mutually supporting missions, one of which is the asteroid kinetic impactor, and the other is the characterization spacecraft which will orbit the asteroid system to monitor the deflection experiment and measure the results. These two missions are the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), which is the kinetic impactor, and the European Space Agency's Asteroid Impact Monitoring (AIM) mission, which is the characterization spacecraft. The target of the AIDA mission will be a binary asteroid, in which DART will target the secondary, smaller member in order to deflect the binary orbit. The resulting period change can be measured to within 10% by ground-based observations. The asteroid deflection will be measured to higher accuracy, and additional results of the DART impact, like the impact crater, will be studied in great detail by the AIM mission. AIDA will return vital data to determine the momentum transfer efficiency of the kinetic impact and key physical properties of the target asteroid. The two mission components of AIDA, DART and AIM, are each independently valuable, but when combined they provide a greatly increased knowledge return. The AIDA mission will combine

  11. AIDA: Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Rivkin, A.; Galvez, A.; Carnelli, I.; Michel, P.; Reed, C.

    2012-10-01

    Near Earth objects are small bodies orbiting the Sun near Earth’s orbit, some of which impact the Earth. The impact of an object as large as 30 m in diameter occurs every few centuries. The impact of such an object would already release an energy of at least a megaton of TNT, and the impact of a larger object, which would occur less often, would be even more hazardous. To protect the Earth from a potential asteroid impact, various mitigation methods have been proposed, including deflection of the asteroid by a spacecraft impact. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) is such an asteroid mitigation mission concept. This mission would be a valuable precursor to human spaceflight to an asteroid, as it would return unique information on an asteroid’s strength and internal structure and would be particularly relevant to a human mission for asteroid mitigation. We report initial results of the AIDA joint mission concept study undertaken by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and ESA with support from NASA centers including Goddard, Johnson and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For AIDA, the DART study is coordinated with an ESA study of an Asteroid Impact Monitoring (AIM) mission, which would rendezvous with the same target. AIDA follows the previous Don Quijote mission study performed by ESA in 2005-2007, with the objective of demonstrating the ability to modify the trajectory of an asteroid and measure the trajectory change. Don Quijote involved an orbiter and an impactor spacecraft, with the orbiter arriving first and measuring the deflection, and with the orbiter making additional characterization measurements. Unlike Don Quijote, DART envisions an impactor spacecraft to intercept the secondary member of a binary near-Earth asteroid, with ground-based observations to measure the deflection as well as additional spacecraft observations from AIM. Low cost mission approaches will be presented.

  12. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  13. Mechanistic interpretation of nondestructive pavement testing deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. S.

    1980-06-01

    A method is proposed for the backcalculation of material properties in flexible pavements based on the interpretation of surface deflection measurements. ILLI-PAVE, a stress dependent finite element pavement model, was used to generate data for developing algorithms and nomographs for deflection basin interpretation. Over 11,000 deflection measurements for 24 different flexible pavement sections were collected and analyzed. Deflections were measured using the Benkelman Beam, the IDOT Road Rater, the Falling Weight Deflectometer, and an accelerometer to measure deflections under moving trucks. Loading mode effects on pavement response were investigated using dynamic and viscous pavement models. The factors controlling the pavement response to different loading modes were explained and identified. Correlations between different devices were developed. The proposed evaluation procedure is illustrated for three different flexible pavements using deflection data collected on several testing dates.

  14. Measurement of Deflection Line on Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Rudolf; Štroner, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Prestressed concrete bridges are very sensitive to the increase in long-term deflections. Reliable forecasts of deflections of bridge structures during construction and durability are crucial for achieving good durability. The main results of measurements are the changes of the deflection line of the bridge structures, which places special demands on the measurement procedure. Results from measurements are very useful for the improvement of mathematical prediction methods of behaviour of long span prestressed concrete structures.

  15. Deflection Control in Rigid Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varunkrishna, Nulu; Jayasankar, R.

    2017-07-01

    The need for modern transportation systems together with the high demand for perpetual pavements under the drastically increasing applied loads has led to a great deal of research on concrete as a pavement material worldwide. This research indeed instigated many modifications in concrete aiming for improving the concrete properties. Pavement Quality Concrete requires higher flexural strength and fewer deflections in hardened state. Fiber reinforcement and latex modification are two reliable approaches serving the required purposes. The concrete made with these two modifications is called Polymer-modified Fiber-reinforced concrete. The present study deals with the usage of polypropylene as fiber and SBR (Styrene Butadiene Rubber) Latex as polymer. M30 grade concrete was modified by replacing cement with two different percentages of fiber (0.5%, 1.0% of weight of cement) and with three different percentages of SBR latex (10%, 15% & 20% of weight of cement).

  16. Laser deflection of space objects -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-04-01

    Lasers provide the two major attributes required for effective deflection of space objects: agility and efficiency. Lasers act instantaneously over long distances with little losses, but deliver energy at modest power levels. Material interceptors provide large impulses, but deliver only a fraction of the mass launched into space at low speeds. The two deflection concepts are compared, as are some important additional applications.

  17. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  18. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  19. Deflection angle in the strong deflection limit in a general asymptotically flat, static, spherically symmetric spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    Gravitational lensing by the light sphere of compact objects like black holes and wormholes will give us information on the compact objects. In this paper, we provide an improved strong deflection limit analysis in a general asymptotically flat, static, spherically symmetric spacetime. The strong deflection limit analysis also works in ultrastatic spacetimes. As an example of an ultrastatic spacetime, we reexamine the deflection angle in the strong deflection limit in an Ellis wormhole spacetime. Using the strong deflection limit, we obtain the deflection angle analytically for the Reissner-Nordström spacetime. The point of the improvement is the definition of a standard variable in the strong deflection limit analysis. We show that the choice of the variable is as important as the choice of the coordinates and we conclude that one should choose a proper variable for a given spacetime.

  20. Effect of layer length on deflection in sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbu, Muthanna A.; AL-Ameri, Riyadh

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on sandwich beams strengthened mechanically by two external steel plates attached to their tension and compression sides with so-called "shear connectors ". This study is based on the individual behaviour of each component of the composite sandwich section (i.e. reinforced concrete beam and upper steel plate and lower steel plate). The approach has been developed to simulate the behaviour of such beams, and is based on neglecting the separation between the three layers; i.e., the deflections are equal in each element through the same section. The differential equations reached were solved analytically. Deflection was calculated by using the approach for several beams, tested in two series, and close agreements were obtained with the experimental values. Furthermore, the interaction efficiency between the three elements in a composite sandwich beam has been considered thoroughly, from which the effect of some parameters, such as plate length upon the behaviour of such beams, were studied.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  2. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  3. Intercalibration of CDS and SUMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluhn, A.; Lang, J.; Schühle, U.; Solanki, S. K.; Wilhelm, K.; Pike, C. D.; Thompson, W. T.; Rüedi, I.; Hollandt, J.; Huber, M. C. E.

    2002-06-01

    The outcome of the Joint Observing Programme (JOP) Intercal-01, which is the intercalibration of the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) instrument (detectors A and B) and the two CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) instruments, the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) and the Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS), is presented. Recent calibration updates of both instruments have been employed, and the results indicate a very good correlation and agreement of the measured radiances within the individual uncertainties.

  4. Large Deflections of Elastic Rectangular Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdolsky, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    It is known that elastic large deflections of thin plates are governed by von Karman nonlinear equations. The analytical solution of these equations in the general case is unfeasible. Samuel Levy, in 1942, showed that large deflections of the rectangular plate can be expressed as a double series of sine-shaped harmonics (deflection harmonics). However, this method gave no way of creating the computer algorithm of solving the problem. The stress function expression taken in the Levy's method must be revised to find the approach that takes into account of all possible products of deflection coefficients. The algorithm of solving the problem for the rectangular plate with an arbitrary aspect ratio under the action of the lateral distributed load is reported in this paper. The approximation of the plate deflection is taken in the form of double series proposed by Samuel Levy. However, the expression for the stress function is presented in the form that incorporates products of deflection coefficients in the explicit form in distinction to the Levy's expression. The number of harmonics in the deflection expression may be arbitrary. The algorithm provides composing the system of governing cubic equations, which includes the deflection coefficients in the explicit form. Solving the equation system is based on using the principle of minimum potential energy. A method of the gradient descent is applied to find the equilibrium state of the plate as the minimum point of the potential energy. A computer program is developed on the basis of the present algorithm. Numerical examples carried out for the plate model with 16 deflection harmonics illustrate the potentialities of the program. The results of solving the examples are presented in the graphical form for the plates with a different aspect ratio and may be used under designing thin-walled elements of airplane and ship structures.

  5. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.47 Deflection...) Use a deflection measuring device with an accuracy of ±.001 inches to measure the deflection of...

  6. AIDA: the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is a joint cooperation between European and US space agencies that consists of two separate and independent spacecraft that will be launched to a binary asteroid system, the near-Earth asteroid Didymos, to assess the possibility of deflecting an asteroid trajectory by using a kinetic impactor. The European Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is under Phase A/B1 study at ESA from March 2015 until summer 2016. AIM is set to rendez-vous with the asteroid system a few months prior to the impact by the US Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft to fully characterize the smaller of the two binary components. AIM is a unique mission as it will be the first time that a spacecraft will investigate the surface, subsurface, and internal properties of a small binary near Earth asteroid. In addition it will perform various important technology demonstrations that can serve other space missions: AIM will release a set of CubeSats in deep space and a lander on the surface of the smaller asteroid and for the first time, deep-space inter-satellite linking will be demonstrated between the main spacecraft, the CubeSats, and the lander, and data will also be transmitted from interplanetary space to Earth by a laser communication system. The knowledge obtained by this mission will have great implications for our understanding of the history of the Solar System. Small asteroids are believed to result from collisions and other processes (e.g., spinup, shaking) that made them what they are now. Having direct information on their surface and internal properties will allow us to understand how these processes work and transform these small bodies as well as, for this particular case, how a binary system forms. So far, our understanding of the collisional process and the validation of numerical simulations of the impact process rely on impact experiments at laboratory scales. With DART, thanks to the characterization of the

  7. Fullerene (C60)/CdS nanocomposite with enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qiang; Hu, Zhuofeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Boyuan; Shen, Zhurui

    2017-05-01

    Herein, the fullerene (C60)/CdS nanocomposite has been fabricated by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. Its photocatatlytic hydrogen (H2) evolution rate and degradation efficiency of Rhodamine B (Rh B) are evaluated under visible light irradiation (λ ≥ 420 nm). The content of C60 has been changed from 0.4 wt% to 8 wt%, and the optimal value for photocatalytic activity is determined to be 0.4 wt%. The H2 evolution rate over this optimal sample reaches 1.73 mmol h-1 g-1 and its apparent degradation rate of Rh B is 0.089 min-1 (degradation efficiency of 97% within 40 min), which is 2.3 times and 1.5 times compared to that of pure CdS reference. Moreover, the photocorrosion of CdS in composite is effectively suppressed, and its photocatalytic activity can be well maintained after three recycles (97.8% retaining for composite vs. 84.4% retaining for CdS). Then, the enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability of C60/CdS nanocomposite are further studied by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. Results show that the C60 species covering on the surface of CdS can efficiently accelerate the separation and transfer of photoexcited charge carriers, which can improve its activity, and reduce the photocorrosion of CdS.

  8. Optical measurement of propeller blade deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1988-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measurement of propeller blade deflections is described and evaluated. It does not depend on the reflectivity of the blade surface but only on its opaqueness. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained using a single light beam generated by a low-power helium-neon laser. Quantitative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured deflections from a static and a high-speed test are compared with available predicted deflections which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  9. Optical measurement of unducted fan blade deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1988-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measuring unducted fan (or propeller) blade deflections is described and evaluated. The measurement does not depend on blade surface reflectivity. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained with a single light beam generated by a low-power, helium-neon laser. Quantitiative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured static deflections from a series of high-speed wind tunnel tests of a counterrotating unducted fan model are compared with available, predicted deflections, which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  10. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  11. Atomic beam deflection in a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.A.; Bharucha, C.; Moore, F.L.

    1993-05-01

    Atomic beam deflection in a quantum field is studied theoretically for the case of an atom passing through the mode of a resonant optical cavity. Deflection probability is calculated for a coupling rate g of order g/2{pi}=1 MHz, which is experimentally feasible in a short optical cavity. Atomic velocities are taken in the range of 1-10 m/s, which can be reached with current cooling and trapping techniques. We calculate deflection for a coherent state with mean photon number , and for a number state. For the parameters studied, the predicted scattering is in an intermediate regime between Raman-Nath and Bragg, but is closer to the former. We find significant deflection probability even for =1, indicating potential for a high level of sensitivity. We report on our progress in the experimental realization of this system with laser cooled sodium atoms as the atomic medium, and directions for future work are indicated.

  12. Optical measurement of unducted fan blade deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1990-10-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measuring unducted fan (or propeller) blade deflections is described and evaluated. The measurement does not depend on blade surface reflectivity. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained with a single light beam generated by a low-power, helium-neon laser. Quantitative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured static deflections from a series of high-speed wind tunnel tests of a counterrotating unducted fan model are compared with available, predicted deflections, which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  13. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  14. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, C.L.; Spector, J.

    1994-12-27

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure is disclosed having a serpentine signal conductor within a channel groove. The channel groove is formed by a serpentine channel in a trough plate and a ground plane. The serpentine signal conductor is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors. A beam interaction trough intersects the channel groove to form a plurality of beam interaction regions wherein an electron beam may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor. 4 figures.

  15. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.L.; Spector, J.

    1994-12-27

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure is disclosed having a serpentine signal conductor within a channel groove. The channel groove is formed by a serpentine channel in a trough plate and a ground plane. The serpentine signal conductor is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors. A beam interaction trough intersects the channel groove to form a plurality of beam interaction regions wherein an electron beam may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor. 4 figures.

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Electron beam deflection, focusing, and collimation by a femtosecond laser lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minogin, V. G.

    2009-11-01

    This work examines spatial separation of femtosecond electron bunches using the ponderomotive potential created by femtosecond laser pulses. It is shown that ponderomotive optical potentials are capable of effectively deflecting, focusing, and collimating narrow femtosecond electron bunches.

  17. Fan Blade Deflection Measurement and Analyses Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, Oral; Janetzke, David C.

    1997-01-01

    Steady deflection measurements were taken of two identical NASA/Pratt & Whitney-designed fan blades while they were rotating in a vacuum in NASA Lewis Research Center's Dynamic Spin Facility. The one-fifth-scale fan blades, which have a tip diameter of 22 in. and a pinroot retention, are of sparshell construction and were unducted for this test. The purpose of the test was to measure the change of the radial deflection of the blade tip and blade angle at selected radial stations along the blade span with respect to rotational speed. The procedure for radial deflection measurement had no precedent and was newly developed for this test. Radial deflection measurements were made to assure adequate tip clearance existed between the fan blades and the duct for a follow-on wind tunnel test. Also, blade angle deflection measurements were desired before pitchsetting parts for the wind tunnel test were finish machined. During the test, laser beams were aimed across the blade path into photodiodes to give signals that were used to determine blade angle change or tip radial deflection. These laser beams were set parallel to the spin axis at selected radial stations.

  18. Deflection Sensors Utilizing Optical Multi-Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Shadi H.; Cada, Michael; Qasymeh, Montasir; Ma, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Deflection sensors have attracted significant attention due to their wide application in pressure and temperature measurements in practical systems. Several techniques have been proposed, studied, and tested to realize optical deflection sensor elements, including Mach-Zehnder (MZI), and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In this work, a novel optical deflection sensor that is comprised of two cascaded optical resonators is proposed and analyzed. The proposed structure is designed to operate in the multi-stable (input to output) regime. As the first resonator is equipped with a movable mirror, which is connected to a diaphragm in order to sense changes in deflection, the second resonator is filled with non-linear material. It is demonstrated that such a structure has a novel memory property, aside from having the ability to yield instant deflection measurements. This novel property is attributed to the non-linear refractive index of the medium of the second resonator. Furthermore, the sensor sensitivity (which is the ratio of the change in the output light intensity to the change in the induced deflection) is enhanced due to the input-output multi-stable behavior of the proposed structure. This device possesses a promising potential for applications in future smart sensors.

  19. Enhanced photoelectrochemical properties of TiO2 nanorod arrays decorated with CdS nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zheng; Liu, Xiangxuan; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Can; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    TiO2 nanorod arrays (TiO2 NRAs) sensitized with CdS nanoparticles were fabricated via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), and TiO2 NRAs were obtained by oxidizing Ti NRAs obtained through oblique angle deposition. The TiO2 NRAs decorated with CdS nanoparticles exhibited excellent photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties under visible light, and the one decorated with 20 SILAR cycles CdS nanoparticles shows the best performance. This can be attributed to the enhanced separation of electrons and holes by forming heterojunctions of CdS nanoparticles and TiO2 NRAs. This provides a promising way to fabricate the material for solar energy conversion and wastewater degradation. PMID:27877718

  20. The CDS Portal: a Unified Way to Access CDS Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, T.; Derriere, S.

    2010-12-01

    The CDS portal is a newly developed Web application, which aims at providing a uniform search interface to CDS services (Simbad, VizieR and Aladin). For a given position or object name, the portal returns a summary of available information and data in the various services. Following the Virtual Observatory (VO) paradigm of shifting the results, not the data, we also provide each user with a private virtual storage space where one can save results obtained from Simbad or VizieR, or upload ones own local table. Stored data can later be reused as inputs to other services, cross-identified or saved in VO-compatible formats. The portal has been built as a lightweight application able to run in any modern browser without the need to install a dedicated plug-in. It relies upon the Google Web Toolkit technology, an open source framework for Web applications, which was helpful in allowing us to reuse or adapt as much as possible existing HTTP services.

  1. Needle deflection estimation: prostate brachytherapy phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Hossein; Hashtrudi-Zaad, Keyvan; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-11-01

    The performance of a fusion-based needle deflection estimation method was experimentally evaluated using prostate brachytherapy phantoms. The accuracy of the needle deflection estimation was determined. The robustness of the approach with variations in needle insertion speed and soft tissue biomechanical properties was investigated. A needle deflection estimation method was developed to determine the amount of needle bending during insertion into deformable tissue by combining a kinematic deflection model with measurements taken from two electromagnetic trackers placed at the tip and the base of the needle. Experimental verification of this method for use in prostate brachytherapy needle insertion procedures was performed. A total of 21 beveled tip, 18 ga, 200 mm needles were manually inserted at various speeds through a template and toward different targets distributed within 3 soft tissue mimicking polyvinyl chloride prostate phantoms of varying stiffness. The tracked positions of both the needle tip and base were recorded, and Kalman filters were applied to fuse the sensory information. The estimation results were validated using ground truth obtained from fluoroscopy images. The manual insertion speed ranged from 8 to 34 mm/s, needle deflection ranged from 5 to 8 mm at an insertion depth of 76 mm, and the elastic modulus of the soft tissue ranged from 50 to 150 kPa. The accuracy and robustness of the estimation method were verified within these ranges. When compared to purely model-based estimation, we observed a reduction in needle tip position estimation error by [Formula: see text] % (mean [Formula: see text] SD) and the cumulative deflection error by [Formula: see text] %. Fusion of electromagnetic sensors demonstrated significant improvement in estimating needle deflection compared to model-based methods. The method has potential clinical applicability in the guidance of needle placement medical interventions, particularly prostate brachytherapy.

  2. An improved equivalent circuit model of a four rod deflecting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R.; Burt, G.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved equivalent circuit model for a four rod deflecting cavity which calculates the frequencies of the first four modes of the cavity as well as the RT/Q for the deflecting mode. Equivalent circuit models of RF cavities give intuition and understanding about how the cavity operates and what changes can be made to modify the frequency, without the need for RF simulations, which can be time-consuming. We parameterise a generic four rod deflecting cavity into a geometry consisting of simple shapes. Equations are derived for the line impedance of the rods and the capacitance between the rods and these are used to calculate the resonant frequency of the deflecting dipole mode as well as the lower order mode and the model is bench-marked against two test cases; the CEBAF separator and the HL-LHC 4-rod LHC crab cavity. CST and the equivalent circuit model agree within 4% for both cavities with the LOM frequency and within 1% for the deflecting frequency. RT/Q differs between the model and CST by 37% for the CEBAF separator and 25% for the HL-LHC 4-rod crab cavity; however this is sufficient for understanding how to optimise the cavity design. The model has then been utilised to suggest a method of separating the modal frequencies in the HL-LHC crab cavity and to suggest design methodologies to optimise the cavity geometries.

  3. The Role of Coronal Holes in CME Deflection in the Lower Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are known to be deflected when ejected near a coronal hole (Gopalswamy et al. 2009). We present results from simulations of CMEs near a coronal hole (CH) using a 3D magnetohydrodymics model - the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We propose magnetic tension and pressure as a cause of the CME deflection from the disturbed magnetic field lines of the simulation coronal hole. The solar wind is driven via Alfven waves and Kolmogorov-like dissipation and surface Alfven wave damping are considered for the dissipation of the waves (Evans et al. 2011). The magnetic field at the inner boundary is specified with synoptic magnetogram data from Carrington Rotation 2029, which corresponds to April 21 to May 18, 2005. CMEs are generated by inserting an out of equilibrium modified Titov-Demoulin flux rope into active region (AR) 0758. Treating the CME as a solid body we calculate the expected deflection from the coronal hole field lines. We compare this value to the actual path of the simulated CMEs for which we define a deflection angle as the difference between the observed path and the radial vector connecting the center of the Sun and the CME launch site. Finally, we generalize the deflection by seeing how it scales with several physical parameters such as CME mass, velocity and the separation of the AR and CH as well as its intensity. We compare our simulated and estimated values with observed deflections (Gopalswamy et. al 2009)

  4. Bending of rectangular plates with large deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    The solution of Von Karman's fundamental equations for large deflections of plates is presented for the case of a simply supported rectangular plate under combined edge compression and lateral loading. Numerical solutions are given for square plates and for rectangular plates with a width-span ratio of 3:1. The effective widths under edge compression are compared with effective widths according to Von Karman, Bengston, Marguerre, and Cox and with experimental results by Ramberg, Mcpherson, and Levy. The deflections of a square plate under lateral pressure are compared with experimental and theoretical results by Kaiser. It is found that the effective widths agree closely with Marguerre's formula and with the experimentally observed values and that the deflections agree with the experimental results and with Kaiser's work.

  5. Base deflection and microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L A; de Goes, M F; Consani, S

    1994-06-01

    The flexural deflections of human dentin, Herculite XR, Dycal, Vidrion F, zinc phosphate base, and combinations of composite-base were determined. The influence of the flexural deflections in the marginal microleakage was also determined for the composite-base combinations. The flexural deflection test for dentin showed no statistically significant differences between the two floor cavity depths studied. There were significant differences among cements when the thickness of the base was 1 mm whereas no differences occurred at 2 mm. The composite-base combinations did not present statistical differences. There were no statistically significant differences in the microleakage levels among loaded and non-loaded specimens; however, dye penetration was visually greater in loaded samples.

  6. Transverse photothermal beam deflection within a solid

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, J.D.; Russo, R.E. )

    1991-07-15

    The mirage effect within a transparent solid substrate was used for monitoring optical absorption of a thin film. Refractive index gradients, which accompany thermal gradients below the film-coated surface, cause a probe laser beam to be deflected. The spectrum of copper, deposited onto a piece of clear acrylic, was recorded by this method of photothermal deflection. The influence of thermally induced mechanical stresses can alter the effective value of the thermo-optic coefficient of the solid, {ital dn}/{ital dT}.

  7. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  8. Compliant Robot Wrist Senses Deflections And Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.; Strempek, Franklin; Premack, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    Precise parts assembled without damage. Goddard Space Flight Center developed compliant wrist that moves in any direction and rotates about any axis in response to applied forces. Deflection calibrated and instrumented so control computer measures degree of deflection and derives magnitude and direction of applied forces and torques. Compliant wrist brings to robots important capabilities humans use in manipulating objects. Helps prevent damage to precise, delicate parts during assembly by robot. Rod lengths, spring stiffnesses, and type of displacement sensor changed to suit different applications.

  9. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Charles L.; Spector, Jerome

    1994-01-01

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

  10. Deflection of large near-earth objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1999-01-11

    The Earth is periodically hit by near Earth objects (NEOs) ranging in size from dust to mountains. The small ones are a useful source of information, but those larger than about 1 km can cause global damage. The requirements for the deflection of NEOs with significant material strength are known reasonably well; however, the strength of large NEOs is not known, so those requirements may not apply. Meteor impacts on the Earth`s atmosphere give some information on strength as a function of object size and composition. This information is used here to show that large, weak objects could also be deflected efficiently, if addressed properly.

  11. CdS nanorod arrays with TiO₂ nano-coating for improved photostability and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangpeng; Zhang, Yulan; Li, Xinjun; Cen, Chaoping

    2014-08-07

    CdS nanorod arrays were grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates via a hydrothermal process and subsequently coated with a TiO2 nanolayer via a vacuum dip-coating process to fabricate a one-dimensional array structured photocatalyst. The TiO2 nanolayer improved the photocatalytic efficiency of CdS nanorod arrays for the degradation of methylene blue due to the effective separation of the electron-hole pairs, and the photocorrosion of CdS nanorod arrays was successfully inhibited.

  12. Web Services and Related Works at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.

    2004-07-01

    Started at CDS in 2002, the work around Web Services is in a full exploitation phase. Several services are now available via SOAP: the Sesame name resolver for Simbad-NED-VizieR, a GLU tag resolver, a UCD resolver, the UCD tag list, Aladin image Access, VizieR catalogue access, etc. A portal is available to publish all information about how to use CDS XML Webservices and also hints on how to start to use XML Web Services (tutorial, links, etc.). Other works around XML Web Services are also ongoing at CDS and are described in this article.

  13. Simplified deflection-coil linearity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    Mask placed over face of image-dissecting photomultiplier tube has precision array of pinholes that permit light to impinge on tube at known points. Signals are fed to deflection coil which sweeps beam across each point without complex operator procedures.

  14. Simplified deflection-coil linearity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    Mask placed over face of image-dissecting photomultiplier tube has precision array of pinholes that permit light to impinge on tube at known points. Signals are fed to deflection coil which sweeps beam across each point without complex operator procedures.

  15. Rural Youth and Anticipatory Goal Deflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Evans W.; And Others

    Race, sex, community size, occupation of major wage earner, father's education, mother's education, and certainty of expectations were the variables used in this study to determine the "anticipatory occupational goal deflection" (AOGD) of urban and rural youth (blacks and whites) in Louisiana. Least squares analysis of variance and other…

  16. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  17. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  18. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean [Yorktown, VA

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  19. Photocatalytic applications with CdS • block copolymer/exfoliated graphene nanoensembles: hydrogen generation and degradation of Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaltsas, T.; Karousis, N.; Pispas, S.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2014-11-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymer poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) (PI-b-PAA) was used to stabilize exfoliated graphene in water, allowing the immobilization of semiconductor CdS nanoparticles forming CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene. Characterization using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy proved the success of the preparation method and revealed the presence of spherical CdS. Moreover, UV-Vis and photoluminescence assays suggested that electronic interactions within CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene exist as evidenced by the significant quenching of the characteristic emission of CdS by exfoliated graphene. Photoillumination of CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, in the presence of ammonium formate as a quencher for the photogenerated holes, resulted in the generation of hydrogen by water splitting, monitored by the reduction of 4-nitroaniline to benzene-1,4-diamine (>80 ± 4% at 20 min; 100% at 24 min), much faster and more efficient compared to when reference CdS • PI-b-PAA was used as the photocatalyst (<30 ± 3% at 20 min; 100% at 240 min). Moreover, Rhodamine B was photocatalytically degraded by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, with fast kinetics under visible light illumination in the presence of air. The enhancement of both photocatalytic processes by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene was rationalized in terms of effective separation of holes and electrons, contrary to reference CdS • PI-b-PAA, in which rapid recombination of the hole-electron pair is inevitable due to the absence of exfoliated graphene as a suitable electron acceptor.

  20. Large beam deflection using cascaded prism array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi-Leung

    2012-04-01

    Endoscopes have been utilize in the medical field to observe the internals of the human body to assist the diagnosis of diseases, such as breathing disorders, internal bleeding, stomach ulcers, and urinary tract infections. Endoscopy is also utilized in the procedure of biopsy for the diagnosis of cancer. Conventional endoscopes suffer from the compromise between overall size and image quality due to the required size of the sensor for acceptable image quality. To overcome the size constraint while maintaining the capture image quality, we propose an electro-optic beam steering device based on thermal-plastic polymer, which has a small foot-print (~5mmx5mm), and can be easily fabricated using conventional hot-embossing and micro-fabrication techniques. The proposed device can be implemented as an imaging device inside endoscopes to allow reduction in the overall system size. In our previous work, a single prism design has been used to amplify the deflection generated by the index change of the thermal-plastic polymer when a voltage is applied; it yields a result of 5.6° deflection. To further amplify the deflection, a new design utilizing a cascading three-prism array has been implemented and a deflection angle to 29.2° is observed. The new design amplifies the beam deflection, while keeping the advantage of simple fabrication made possible by thermal-plastic polymer. Also, a photo-resist based collimator lens array has been added to reduce and provide collimation of the beam for high quality imaging purposes. The collimator is able to collimate the exiting beam at 4 μm diameter for up to 25mm, which potentially allows high resolution image capturing.

  1. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  2. Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission: Kinetic impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Stickle, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ernst, C.; Atchison, J.; Pravec, P.; Richardson, D. C.; AIDA team

    2016-02-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor to deflect an asteroid. AIDA is an international cooperation, consisting of two mission elements: the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous mission. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid and (ii) to measure and characterize the deflection caused by the impact. The AIDA target will be the binary near-Earth asteroid (65803) Didymos, with the deflection experiment to occur in late September, 2022. The DART impact on the secondary member of the binary at 7 km/s is expected to alter the binary orbit period by about 4 minutes, assuming a simple transfer of momentum to the target, and this period change will be measured by Earth-based observatories. The AIM spacecraft will characterize the asteroid target and monitor results of the impact in situ at Didymos. The DART mission is a full-scale kinetic impact to deflect a 150 m diameter asteroid, with known impactor conditions and with target physical properties characterized by the AIM mission. Predictions for the momentum transfer efficiency of kinetic impacts are given for several possible target types of different porosities, using Housen and Holsapple (2011) crater scaling model for impact ejecta mass and velocity distributions. Results are compared to numerical simulation results using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code of Jutzi and Michel (2014) with good agreement. The model also predicts that the ejecta from the DART impact may make Didymos into an active asteroid, forming an ejecta coma that may be observable from Earth-based telescopes. The measurements from AIDA of the momentum transfer from the DART impact, the crater size and morphology, and the evolution of an ejecta coma will

  3. Growth of CdS Nanorods and Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Yang, Fanghong; Yang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Systematic investigations have been done to deposit silver nanoparticles on seeded CdS nanorods. The CdS nanorods were synthesized by using CdS nanocrystals as seeds being indexed to the cubic structure (zinc-blende) and tetradecylphosphonic acid as surfactants to enable preferential growth on the reactive {001} facets. Ostwald ripening process occurred during the growth of CdS nanorods. Ag/CdS heterostructures were obtained through a facile method in which oleylamine was employed as reducing agents under an elevated temperature. Exposing CdS nanorods to Ag+ ions resulted in Ag domains depositing on the tips of the nanorods or defected sites embedding in the nanorod surfaces. Ag domains formed separate nuclei and grew quickly at a high concentration of AgNO3 solution. We further focused on discussing the morphology formation mechanism and optical properties of the heterostructures and the nanorods. The as-synthesized Ag/CdS heterostructures can facilitate charge separation at the metal-semiconductor interface. Herein, it opens up an application possibility of enhancing photocatalytic processes and other devices.

  4. A solvothermal route to CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ujjal K.; Seshadri, Ram; Rao, C. N. R.

    2003-07-01

    A novel solvothermal route for the preparation of organic soluble CdS nanocrystals, involving the reaction of cadmium stearate with sulfur in the presence of tetralin has been described. Tetralin in the presence of S gives H 2S, getting aromatized to naphthalene. By using trioctylphosphineoxide as the capping agent, nanocrystals of 4 nm are obtained. Use of dodecanethiol cap results in 5 nm as well as 10 nm nanocrystals which can be separated readily. The nanocrystals have the cubic zinc blende structure and exhibit blue shifts of the absorption maximum.

  5. Analysis of HOM Properties of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications due to improved properties and compact design geometries. The 499 MHz deflecting cavity proposed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and the 400 MHz crab cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade are two of the major applications. For high current applications the higher order modes must be damped to acceptable levels to eliminate any beam instabilities. The frequencies and R/Q of the HOMs and mode separation are evaluated and compared for different parallel-bar cavity designs.

  6. Deflection Angle and R-Charged Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we consider R-charged black holes with three electrical charges and study deflection angle. We confirmed result of previous study that the black hole charges increased the deflection angle.

  7. System for deflection measurements of floating dry docks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Alexey A.; Pantyushin, Anton V.; Serikova, Mariya G.; Korotaev, Valery V.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we introduce a system for deflection measurement of floating dry docks. The system contains two measurement channels observing opposite directions of the dock. It also includes set of reference marks, an industrial computer and a display. Each channel contains CMOS camera with long focal-length lens. Reference marks are implemented as IR LED arrays with 940 nm working wavelength for better performance within bad weather conditions (e.g. fog, rain, high humidity etc.). In the paper we demonstrate results of an analysis of different optical schemes for coupling the oppositely directed channels of the measurement unit and show that the scheme with two image sensors with separated lenses is an optimal option, because it allows usage of nonequidistant location of reference marks and demonstrates the least value of parasitic shift caused by rotations of the measuring unit. The developed system was tested both on specially-designed setup and in real infrastructure of a floating dry dock. The conducted tests proved that a measuring error of the system is smaller than +/- 1.5 mm within the measurement range of +/- 150 mm when deflection of 100 m dock is measured. Obtained results showed that the system demonstrates an ability to work in a harsh environment including poor weather conditions.

  8. Management of Catalogs at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, G.; Boch, T.; Brouty, M.; Guéhenneux, S.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Ochsenbein, F.; Ocvirk, P.; Perret, E.; Pineau, F.-X.; Simon, A.-C.; Vannier, P.

    2015-04-01

    VizieR (Ochsenbein et al. 2000) provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogs (data tables and associated data) available online and organized in a self-documented database. (There were 11769 catalogs in November 2013.) Indexing the metadata in the VizieR search engine requires the expertise of scientists and documentalists for each catalog ingested. The metadata go into an efficient position search engine that is adapted to big data. (For instance, the GAIA simulation catalog has more than two billion objects). Information in VizieR tables is well described and can be retrieved easily. The search results provide visibility to catalogs with tools and protocols to disseminate data to the Virtual Observatory, thus giving scientists data that is reusable by dedicated tools (e.g. image vizualisation tools). Also, new functionality allows users to extract all photometric data in catalogs for a given position. Finally, it is also through cross-identification tools that the CDS becomes a partner in producing large data sets, such as GAIA.

  9. Interoperability in the CDS services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.; Allen, M.; Bonnarel, F.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.; Egret, D.; Fernique, P.; Ochsenbein, F.; Schaaff, A.; Wenger, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory Project (PI: P. Quinn, ESO) has three Work Areas: Science case (P. Benvenuti, ST-ECF), Interoperability (F. Genova, CDS) and Advanced technologies (A. Lawrence, AstroGrid). The development of an Interoperability prototype, implementing a set of European archives into VizieR and Aladin, in collaboration with all the AVO partners, has been a first-year milestone of the AVO. Interoperability standards are widely discussed in all VO projects, and in the Interoperability Working Group first set by the European OPTICON Network. They are a main topic of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance. Specific developments and customizations have been integrated in SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin. The adopted VOTable standard is used for the exchange of tabular data, and a VOTable parser, able to give rapidly access to tables containing large numbers of objects, has been developed. The categorization of column contents in VizieR tables and catalogues has lead to the definition of the Uniform Content Descriptors (UCDs). The UCDs have proven very powerful for building new functionalities such as checking of table contents, catalogue selection (e.g. finding tables which contain specific information item), filtering (e.g. visualizing, through Aladin, objects of a specific magnitude or colour range) and data transformation and combination (e.g. computing a colour index).

  10. Retrolensing by a wormhole at deflection angles π and 3 π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    The deflection angle of a light ray can be arbitrarily large near a light sphere. The time-symmetrical shape of light curves of a pair of light rays reflected by a light sphere of a lens object does not depend on the details of the lens object. We consider retrolensing light curves of sunlight with deflection angles π and 3 π by an Ellis wormhole, which is the simplest Morris-Thorne wormhole. If an Ellis wormhole with a throat parameter a =1011 km is 100 pc away from an observer and if the Ellis wormhole, the observer, and the Sun are aligned perfectly in this order, the apparent magnitudes of a pair of light rays with deflection angles π and 3 π become 11 and 18, respectively. The two pairs of light rays make a superposed light curve with two separable peaks and they break down time symmetry of a retrolensing light curve. The observation of the two separated peaks of the light curves gives us information on the details of the lens object. If the observer can also separate the pair of the images with the deflection angle π into a double image, he or she can say whether the retrolensing is caused by an Ellis wormhole or a Schwarzschild black hole.

  11. Deflection of polarised radiation - Relative phase delay technique. [photon geodesic motion variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Melnick, G.; Harwit, M.; Sato, T.; Stelzried, C. T.; Jauncey, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the geodesic motion of photons, considering particularly whether oppositely polarized photons fall at the same rate. It is assumed that orthogonally polarized photons would be equally deflected by the gravitational field of a nonrotating mass. Upon the introduction of rotation, the angular momentum of the deflecting source couples to the photon spin through gravitational field action. Thus there arise separate trajectories for orthogonal polarizations. Searching for changes in polarization in a deflected beam is accomplished by a relative phase delay technique. If the beam is split into orthogonal linear polarization, final polarization is elliptical. Experiments have been performed on searching for ellipticity developments in the linearly polarized carrier waves from Helios 1 and 2, and the results are presented.

  12. Dark matter prospects in deflected mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael; Nelson, Brent D. E-mail: b.nelson@neu.edu

    2009-07-01

    The recently introduced deflected mirage mediation (DMM) model is a string-motivated paradigm in which all three of the major supersymmetry-breaking transmission mechanisms are operative. We begin a systematic exploration of the parameter space of this rich model context, paying special attention to the pattern of gaugino masses which arise. In this work we focus on the dark matter phenomenology of the DMM model as such signals are the least influenced by the model-dependent scalar masses. We find that a large portion of the parameter space in which the three mediation mechanisms have a similar effective mass scale of 1 TeV or less will be probed by future direct and indirect detection experiments. Distinguishing deflected mirage mediation from the mirage model without gauge mediation will prove difficult without collider input, though we indicate how gamma ray signals may provide an opportunity for distinguishing between the two paradigms.

  13. Large-deflection theory of curved sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Samuel

    1943-01-01

    Equations are given for the elastic behavior of initially curved sheets in which the deflections are not small in comparison with the thickness, but at the same time small enough to justify the use of simplified formulas for curvature. These equations are solved for the case of a sheet with circular cylindrical shape simply supported along two edges parallel to the axis of the generating cylinder. Numerical results are given for three values of the curvature and for three ratios of buckle length to buckle width. The computations are carried to buckle deflections of about twice the sheet thickness. It was concluded that initial curvature may cause an appreciable increase in the buckling load but that, for edge strains which are several times the buckling strain, the initial curvature causes a negligibly small change in the effective width.

  14. Simplified method for calculating shear deflections of beams.

    Treesearch

    I. Orosz

    1970-01-01

    When one designs with wood, shear deflections can become substantial compared to deflections due to moments, because the modulus of elasticity in bending differs from that in shear by a large amount. This report presents a simplified energy method to calculate shear deflections in bending members. This simplified approach should help designers decide whether or not...

  15. Deflection And Stress In Preloaded Square Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermida, Alfonso

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis yields equations for transverse deflection of, and stresses in, square membrane subject to both uniform transverse load and tension preloads applied uniformly along the edges. Follows energy/virtual-displacement approach. Basic equation expresses strain energy in membrane as double integral, over x and y coordinates of square, of function of longitudinal strains, shear strain, thickness of membrane, and Young's modulus and Poissons's ratio of membrane material.

  16. [Pliability and deflection of diagnostic catheters].

    PubMed

    Pelyhe, Liza; Bognár, Eszter

    2014-09-28

    The cardiac catheter is an intravascular catheter, which is introduced or implanted into the heart for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The catheters may break or king during their introduction and/or removal. The aim of the authors was to study the pliability of two catheters with the same material but different diameters according to the Food and Drug Administration's recommendation. The bending points, diameter decrease, deflection, and their correlation and dependence on the distance from the tip, as well as the influence of the initial diameter of the catheters were determined. The bending of catheters was performed on 9 bending points (120-280 mm from the tip by 20 mm) on 16 gauges with different radius (10-2.5 mm by 0.5 mm). A linear dependency between the diameter decrease and deflection was observed, which was independent from the placement of the measurement in both catheters examined. The larger initial diameter had significant (p = 0.05) greater diameter decrease than the smaller, but the curves characteristic of the diameter decrease and deflection were similar. The applied method seems to be useful for the examination of weak points of cardiac catheters.

  17. Polyhedron tracking and gravity tractor asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummen, N.; Lappas, V.

    2014-11-01

    In the wake of the Chelyabinsk airburst, the defense against hazardous asteroids is becoming a topic of high interest. This work improves the gravity tractor asteroid deflection approach by tracking realistic small body shapes with tilted ion engines. An algorithm for polyhedron tracking was evaluated in a fictitious impact scenario. The simulations suggest a capability increase up to 38.2% with such improved tilting strategies. The long- and short-term effects within polyhedron tracking are illustrated. In particular, the orbital reorientation effect is influential when realistic asteroid shapes and rotations are accounted for. Also analyzed is the subject of altitude profiles, a way to tailor the gravity tractor performance, and to achieve a steering ability within the B-plane. A novel analytical solution for the classic gravity tractor is derived. It removes the simulation need for classic tractor designs to obtain comparable two body model Δv figures. This paper corroborates that the asteroid shape can be exploited for maximum performance. Even a single engine tilt adjustment at the beginning of deflection operations yields more deflection than a fixed preset tilt.

  18. Optical forces through guided light deflections.

    PubMed

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Kelemen, Lóránd; Aabo, Thomas; Ormos, Pál; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Optical trapping and manipulation typically relies on shaping focused light to control the optical force, usually on spherical objects. However, one can also shape the object to control the light deflection arising from the light-matter interaction and, hence, achieve desired optomechanical effects. In this work we look into the object shaping aspect and its potential for controlled optical manipulation. Using a simple bent waveguide as example, our numerical simulations show that the guided deflection of light efficiently converts incident light momentum into optical force with one order-of-magnitude improvement in the efficiency factor relative to a microbead, which is comparable to the improvement expected from orthogonal deflection with a perfect mirror. This improvement is illustrated in proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating the optical manipulation of two-photon polymerized waveguides. Results show that the force on the waveguide exceeds the combined forces on spherical trapping handles. Furthermore, it shows that static illumination can exert a constant force on a moving structure, unlike the position-dependent forces from harmonic potentials in conventional trapping.

  19. Modelling the deflection of rowing oar shafts.

    PubMed

    Laschowski, Brock; Hopkins, Cameron C; de Bruyn, John R; Nolte, Volker

    2017-03-01

    The deflection of rowing oar shafts subjected to a static load was investigated. Two sets of sculling oars of different design stiffness were tested at three different lengths from 2.66 to 2.70 m. Loads up to 201 N were applied to the blade end of the oar shafts, and deflections were measured at six positions along the length of the shafts. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions obtained by modelling the oar shafts as homogenous end-loaded cantilever beams. The results show that the oar shafts are not uniform, in contradiction to the assumed model, but rather are most compliant near the sleeves and up to 80% stiffer towards the blades. The effect of oar shaft stiffness and length on the deflection angle at the blade end of the oar shaft was at most 1.18 ± 0.01°. The measured variation of stiffness along the shaft has implications for boat propulsion and rowing performance.

  20. A comparative study on CdS: PEO and CdS: PMMA nanocomposite solid films

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, S.; Jayakumar, S.; Balaji, R.; Vaideki, K.

    2016-08-15

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles were reinforced in Poly(ethylene Oxide) (PEO) and Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrices by in situ technique. The presence of CdS in PEO and PMMA matrix was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis disclosed the co-ordination of CdS in the matrices. Thermal analysis of the nanocomposites was carried out using Differential Scanning calorimetric studies (DSC). The optical studies using UV–vis spectroscopy were carried out to find the band gap of the materials and the absorption onset. The CdS particle size in the matrices was found by Effective Mass Approximation (EMA) model using the band gap values and was confirmed by TEM studies. The surface trapped emissions of the nanocomposites were observed from the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The distribution of CdS particles in the polymer matrices were presented by Atomic force microscopic studies (AFM).

  1. Biosynthesis and characterization of CdS quantum dots in genetically engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Congcong; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jingpu; Huang, Huaiqing; Xu, Linru; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Xuexun; Fang, Jin; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) through the introduction of foreign genes encoding a CdS binding peptide. The CdS QDs were successfully separated from the bacteria through two methods, lysis and freezing–thawing of cells, and purified with an anion-exchange resin. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were applied to characterize the as-prepared CdS QDs. The effects of reactant concentrations, bacteria incubation times, and reaction times on QD growth were systematically investigated. Our work demonstrates that genetically engineered bacteria can be used to synthesize QDs. The biologically synthesized QDs are expected to be more biocompatible probes in bio-labeling and imaging. PMID:21458508

  2. Observation of trapped-hole diffusion on the surfaces of CdS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utterback, James K.; Grennell, Amanda N.; Wilker, Molly B.; Pearce, Orion M.; Eaves, Joel D.; Dukovic, Gordana

    2016-11-01

    In CdS nanocrystals, photoexcited holes rapidly become trapped at the particle surface. The dynamics of these trapped holes have profound consequences for the photophysics and photochemistry of these materials. Using a combination of transient absorption spectroscopy and theoretical modelling, we demonstrate that trapped holes in CdS nanorods are mobile and execute a random walk at room temperature. In CdS nanorods of non-uniform width, we observe the recombination of spatially separated electrons and trapped holes, which exhibits a t-1/2 power-law decay at long times. A one-dimensional diffusion-annihilation model describes the time-dependence of the recombination over four orders of magnitude in time, from one nanosecond to ten microseconds, with a single adjustable parameter. We propose that diffusive trapped-hole motion is a general phenomenon in CdS nanocrystals, but one that is normally obscured in structures in which the wavefunctions of the electron and trapped hole spatially overlap. This phenomenon has important implications for the oxidation photochemistry of CdS nanocrystals.

  3. Enhancement of Charge Transfer and Quenching of Photoluminescence of Capped CdS Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (Q-dots) of cadmium sulfide (CdS) with three different capping ligands, 1-butanethiol (BT), 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) and benzyl mercaptan (BM) have been investigated. An external electric field of variable strength of 0.2–1.0 MV cm−1 was applied to the sample of capped CdS Q-dots doped in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films. Field-induced changes in optical absorption of capped CdS Q-dots were observed in terms of purely the second-derivative of the absorption spectrum (the Stark shift), indicating an enhancement in electric dipole moment following transition to the first exciton state. The enhancement depends on the shape and size of the Q-dots prepared using different capping ligands. Field induced-change in photoluminescence (PL) reveals similar changes, an enhancement in charge-transfer (CT) character in exciton state. PL of capped CdS Q-dots is significantly quenched in presence of external electric field. The strong field-induced quenching occurs as a result of the increased charge separation resulting exciton dissociation. Thus, understanding the CT character and field-induced PL quenching of CdS Q-dots is important for photovoltaic, LEDs and biological applications. PMID:26166553

  4. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  5. Accurate analytical approximation of asteroid deflection with constant tangential thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, Claudio; Baù, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    We present analytical formulas to estimate the variation of achieved deflection for an Earth-impacting asteroid following a continuous tangential low-thrust deflection strategy. Relatively simple analytical expressions are obtained with the aid of asymptotic theory and the use of Peláez orbital elements set, an approach that is particularly suitable to the asteroid deflection problem and is not limited to small eccentricities. The accuracy of the proposed formulas is evaluated numerically showing negligible error for both early and late deflection campaigns. The results will be of aid in planning future low-thrust asteroid deflection missions.

  6. Small Deflection Energy Analyzer for Energy and Angular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) charged-particle spectrometer for energy and angle distributions responds to a longstanding need to measure the wind velocity vector in Earth s thermosphere, and to obtain the ion-drift vector in the ionosphere. The air and ions above 120 km are endowed with bulk velocities and temperatures just like air near the ground, but with separate spatial and temporal variations. It is important to understand these not only for study of the physics and chemistry of the Sun-Earth connection, but also for spacecraft orbit predictions, and communications through the ionosphere. The SDEA consists of a pair of parallel conducting plates separated by a small distance, with an entrance slit on one end, and an exit slit on the other. A voltage applied to these plates develops an electric field between the plates, and this field deflects ions passing through it. If an ion has too little energy, it will strike one of the plates. If it has too much, it will strike the back wall. An ion with the amount of energy being searched for will have its trajectory bent just enough to exit the back slit. The SDEA units are compact, rectangular, and operate with low voltages. The units can be built up into small arrays. These arrays could be used either to widen the field of view or to sharpen an existing one. This approach can also be used to obtain angular distributions in two planes simultaneously, thus cutting down the ion source power requirements in half. This geometry has enabled a new mass-spectrometer concept that can provide miniaturized mass spectrometers for use in industrial plants, air-pollution monitoring, and noxious-gas detection.

  7. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  8. Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J. R.; De Silva, S. U.

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

  9. Dark matter signals in deflected mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael

    2010-02-10

    We investigate the parameter space of a specific class of model within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) scenario. We look at neutralino properties and compute the thermal relic density as well as interaction rates with xenon direct detection experiments. We find that there are portions of the parameter space which are in line with the current WMAP constraints. Further we find that none of the investigated parameter space is in conflict with current bounds from the Xenon10 experiment and that future large-scale liquid xenon experiments will probe a large portion of the model space.

  10. Electroweak naturalness and deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the question of electroweak naturalness within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) framework for supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The class of DMM models considered are nine-parameter theories that fall within the general classification of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. Our results show that these DMM models have regions of parameter space with very low electroweak fine-tuning, at levels comparable to the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. These parameter regions should be probed extensively in the current LHC run.

  11. Deflection of Propeller Blades While Running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzmayr, R

    1922-01-01

    The forces acting on the blades of a propeller proceed from the mass of the propeller and the resistance of the surrounding medium. The magnitude, direction and point of application of the resultant to the propeller blade is of prime importance for the strength calculation. Since it was obviously impracticable to bring any kind of testing device near the revolving propeller, not so much on account of the element of danger as on account of the resulting considerable disturbance of the air flow, the deflection in both cases was photographically recorded and subsequently measured at leisure.

  12. Deflection Missions for Asteroid 2011 AG5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, Daniel; Landau, Damon; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chodas, Paul; Chesley, Steven; Yeomans, Don; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Sims, Jon

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered asteroid 2011 AG5 currently has a 1-in-500 chance of impacting Earth in 2040. In this paper, we discuss the potential of future observations of the asteroid and their effects on the asteroid's orbital uncertainty. Various kinetic impactor mission scenarios, relying on both conventional chemical as well as solar-electric propulsion, are presented for deflecting the course of the asteroid safely away from Earth. The times for the missions range from pre-keyhole passage (pre-2023), and up to five years prior to the 2040 Earth close approach. We also include a brief discussion on terminal guidance, and contingency options for mission planning.

  13. An innovating method to measure bridge deflection using interference-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Wang, Lutang; Comanici, Maria Iulia

    2012-04-01

    The Vibrofiber sensor is a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between two broad band fiber gratings creating interference fringes. It was introduced three years ago to monitor the vibration and temperature rise of the stator end winding in a power generator.(1) This paper will discuss the use of Vibrofiber to monitor the deflection of the bridge under adverse conditions: wide temperature swings, excess load, strong winds, earth quake, etc. The fringes in these cavity sensors have features like peaks and valleys which are sensitive to temperature and strain. When the bridge becomes overloaded, we are interested in knowing the extent of the deflection. In addition, we might want to locate the cause of the overload. A simple Sagnac FBG interferometer has been invented to provide such diagnostics. A pair of long fibers with such cavity sensors can be installed on the underside of the target bridge segment between two supporting columns. The objective is to monitor the deflection together with any distortion of the bridge deck. Each of the 2 long fiber segments has a pair of cavity sensors, one measures the deflection as a result of the excess strain, and the other measures temperature and provides compensation for the deflection data. An array of cavity sensors with different center wavelengths will be used to support the typical multi-segment bridge structure. The interrogation unit is based on a tunable laser that can hop to different ITU grids. A separate DFB laser will run a grating based Sagnac interferometer, measuring weight in motion, identifying the speed and the make of vehicle in traffic and provide deflection diagnostics. Overloaded trucks and speeding vehicles can be captured and tagged for corrective actions. The interrogation unit is equipped with wireless Ethernet communication enabling the monitoring of many bridges from a central location and similarly warning can be initiated to alert the central traffic control ahead of any problems.

  14. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  15. Analysis of engineering characteristics of pavement deflection trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kerali, H.R.; Lawrance, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes analysis of pavement deflection data collected by the Transport Research Laboratory at two experimental road sites in England during 1960--1985. Measurements of Benkelman beam deflections together with records of traffic loading were taken at 6 to 12 month intervals. The analysis investigates the deflection trend as a function of road base material and thickness. The deflection trend was represented by a negative exponential curve form. Engineering aspects of the curve form were extracted and statistically analyzed. The results obtained focus on the dependency of deflection progression on both road base material and thickness, which are shown to act either jointly or singly, depending on the engineering characteristic of the pavement deflection trend.

  16. Cu doping concentration effect on the physical properties of CdS thin films obtained by the CBD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albor Aguilera, M. L.; Flores Márquez, J. M.; Remolina Millan, A.; Matsumoto Kuwabara, Y.; González Trujillo, M. A.; Hernández Vásquez, C.; Aguilar Hernandez, J. R.; Hernández Pérez, M. A.; Courel-Piedrahita, M.; Madeira, H. T. Yee

    2017-08-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) semiconductors are direct band gap materials; when these types of material are used in solar cells, they provide efficiencies of 22.1% and 12.6%, respectively. Most traditional fabrication methods involve expensive vacuum processes including co-evaporation and sputtering techniques, where films and doping are conducted separately. On the other hand, the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique allows an in situ process. Cu-doped CdS thin films working as a buffer layer on solar cells provide good performing devices and they may be deposited by low cost techniques such as chemical methods. In this work, Cu-doped CdS thin films were deposited using the CBD technique on SnO2:F (FTO) substrates. The elemental analysis and mapping reconstruction were conducted by EDXS. Morphological, optical and electrical properties were studied, and they revealed that Cu doping modified the CdS structure, band-gap value and the electrical properties. Cu-doped CdS films show high resistivity compared to the non-doped CdS. The appropriate parameters of Cu-doped CdS films were determined to obtain an adequate window or buffer layer on CIGS and CZTS photovoltaic solar cells.

  17. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Optical measurement of propeller blade deflections in a spin facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.; Meyn, Erwin H.; Mehmed, Oral; Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical system for measuring propeller blade deflections has been used in the NASA Lewis dynamic spin facility. Deflection of points at the leading and trailing edges of a blade section can be obtained with a narrow light beam from a low power helium-neon laser. A system used to measure these deflections at three spanwise locations is described. Modifications required to operate the lasers in a near-vacuum environment are also discussed.

  19. Scanning Light Sheet Would Measure Deflection Of Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Monteith, James H.; Weisenborn, Michael D.; Franke, John M.; Jordan, Thomas L.

    1992-01-01

    Scanning-light-sheet apparatus designed to measure linear and angular displacement or deflection of structure. Intended specifically to measure deflection of beam-shaped truss structure. Includes conventional low-powered laser, lenses, mounts, single-axis optical scanner, several photodiodes, and electronic controller. Apparatus measures motion of structure and also used to determine positions, deflections, and velocities. Besides use in aerospace field, displacement measurements have many applications in construction-equipment and automotive industries.

  20. Deflection of elastic beam with SMA wires eccentrically inserted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamian, S.; Nik Mohamed, N. A.; Ihsan, A. K. A. Mohd; Ismail, A. E.; Nor, M. K. Mohd; Kamarudin, K. A.; Nor, N. H. Muhd

    2017-08-01

    This research is intended to investigate the ability of shape memory alloys (SMA), through its activation, in generating loads to control beam deflection. An elastic beam is formed by sandwiching eccentrically SMA wires between two elastic plates. SMA wires are activated by electrical current from the power supply. Laser displacement meter (LDM) is used to measures deflection of sample. Results show that the deflection of the beam is dependent on the temperature change. The temperature-deflection response also shows the existence of hysteresis.

  1. Flow visualization and interpretation of visualization data for deflected thrust V/STOL nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, H. C.; Burstadt, P. L.; Johns, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were made for four deflected thrust nozzle models at subsonic speeds. Based on topological rules and the assumption that observed streaks constitute continuous vector fields, available visualization pictures are interpreted and flow patterns on interior surfaces of the nozzles are synthesized. In particular, three dimensional flow structure and separations are discussed. From the synthesized patterns, the overall features of the flow field in a given nozzle can be approximately perceived.

  2. Flow visualization and interpretation of visualization data for deflected thrust V/STOL nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, H. C.; Burstadt, P. L.; Johns, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were made for four deflected thrust nozzle models at subsonic speeds. Based on topological rules and the assumption that observed streaks constitute continuous vector fields, available visualization pictures are interpreted and flow patterns on interior surfaces of the nozzles are synthesized. In particular, three dimensional flow structure and separations are discussed. From the synthesized patterns, the overall features of the flow field in a given nozzle can be approximately perceived. Previously announced in STAR as N84-14147

  3. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    PubMed

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  4. Highly efficient microfluidic sorting device for synchronizing developmental stages of C. elegans based on deflecting electrotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixian; Hu, Rui; Ge, Anle; Hu, Liang; Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-06-07

    C. elegans as a powerful model organism has been widely used in fundamental biological studies. Many of these studies frequently need a large number of different stage-synchronized worms due to the stage-specific features of C. elegans among 4 distinct larval stages and the adult stage. In this work, we present an interesting and cost-effective microfluidic approach to realize simultaneous sorting of C. elegans of different developmental stages by deflecting electrotaxis. The microfluidic device was fabricated using PDMS consisting of symmetric sorting channels with specific angles, which was further hybridized to an agarose plate. While applying an electric field, different stages of C. elegans would crawl to the negative pore with different angles due to their deflecting electrotaxis. Thus, the worms were separated and synchronized by stages. lon-2 mutant was further used to study this electrotactic response and the results indicated that the body size plays a key role in determining the deflecting angle in matured adult worms. In addition to discriminating wild-type hermaphrodites, it could also be employed to sort mutants with abnormal development sizes and males. Therefore, our device provided a versatile and highly efficient platform for sorting C. elegans to meet the requirement of large numbers of different stage-synchronized worms. It can also be further used to investigate the neuronal basis of deflecting electrotaxis in worms.

  5. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available.

  6. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  7. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.

    1998-09-29

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available. 5 figs.

  8. Igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber deflection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the maximum RSRM igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber joint deflection at the crown of the inner joint primary seal. The deflection data was gathered to support igniter inner joint gasket resiliency predictions which led to launch commit criteria temperature determinations. The proximity (deflection) gage holes for the first test (Test No. 1) were incorrectly located; therefore, the test was declared a non-test. Prior to Test No. 2, test article configuration was modified with the correct proximity gage locations. Deflection data were successfully acquired during Test No. 2. However, the proximity gage deflection measurements were adversely affected by temperature increases. Deflections measured after the temperature rise at the proximity gages were considered unreliable. An analysis was performed to predict the maximum deflections based on the reliable data measured before the detectable temperature rise. Deflections to the primary seal crown location were adjusted to correspond to the time of maximum expected operating pressure (2,159 psi) to account for proximity gage bias, and to account for maximum attach and special bolt relaxation. The maximum joint deflection for the igniter inner joint at the crown of the primary seal, accounting for all significant correction factors, was 0.0031 in. (3.1 mil). Since the predicted (0.003 in.) and tested maximum deflection values were sufficiently close, the launch commit criteria was not changed as a result of this test. Data from this test should be used to determine if the igniter inner joint gasket seals are capable of maintaining sealing capability at a joint displacement of (1.4) x (0.0031 in.) = 0.00434 inches. Additional testing should be performed to increase the database on igniter deflections and address launch commit criteria temperatures.

  9. Teach Deflection Concepts with Hacksaw Blades and Rubber Bands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Technology and engineering educators can use a simple hacksaw blade to help students learn about deflection, as that which occurs in a beam. Here the beam is fixed at one end and allowed to deflect in a manner that is easy to see and measure--the hacksaw blade represents a cantilever, an overhanging structure. This simple and very inexpensive…

  10. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.47 Deflection...

  11. Teach Deflection Concepts with Hacksaw Blades and Rubber Bands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Technology and engineering educators can use a simple hacksaw blade to help students learn about deflection, as that which occurs in a beam. Here the beam is fixed at one end and allowed to deflect in a manner that is easy to see and measure--the hacksaw blade represents a cantilever, an overhanging structure. This simple and very inexpensive…

  12. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a highly swept arrow wing configuration with several deflected leading edge concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, G. L., Jr.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of leading edge concepts for minimizing or controlling leading edge flow separation was studied. Emphasis was placed on low speed performance, stability, and control characteristics of configurations with highly swept wings. Simple deflection of the leading edge, a variable camber leading edge system, and a leading edge vortex flow system were among the concepts studied. The data are presented without analysis.

  13. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  14. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection.

  15. Applicability of moire deflection tomography for diagnosing arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yunyun; Song Yang; He Anzhi; Li Zhenhua

    2009-01-20

    The argon arc plasma whose central temperature, 1.90x10{sup 4} K, is used as a practical example for an experiment to research the applicability of moire deflection tomography in arc plasma flow-field diagnosis. The experimental result indicates that moire deflection of the measured argon arc plasma is very small, even smaller than that of a common flame with the maximal temperature of nearly 1.80x10{sup 3} K. The refractive-index gradient in moire deflection tomography mainly contributes to the temperature gradient in essence when the probe wavelength and pressure are certain in plasma diagnosis. The applicable temperature ranges of moire deflection tomography in the argon arc plasma diagnosis are given with the probe wavelength 532 nm at 1 atm in certain measuring error requirements. In a word, the applicable temperature range of moire deflection tomography for arc plasma diagnosis is intimately related to the probe wavelength and the practical measuring requirements.

  16. Study on the causes and methods of influencing concrete deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhou, Xiang; Tang, Jinyu

    2017-09-01

    Under the long-term effect of static load on reinforced concrete beam, the stiffness decreases and the deformation increases with time. Therefore, the calculation of deflection is more complicated. According to the domestic and foreign research results by experiment the flexural deflection of reinforced concrete, creep, age, the thickness of the protective layer, the relative slip, the combination of steel yielding factors of reinforced concrete deflection are summarized, analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional direct measurement of deflection, that by increasing the beam height, increasing the moment of inertia, ncrease prestressed reinforcement ratio, arching, reduce the load, and other measures to reduce the deflection of prestressed construction, improve the reliability of structure.

  17. Mining the CDS Collection: A Learning Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Patricio F.; Ochsenbein, François

    The experiences gained as a result of the CDS/ESO Datamining project are described in this paper as well as a brief outline of the tools developed (described in Ortiz et al. 1998 and Ortiz, 2000). Important issues about datamining and the exchange of information in the context of the Virtual Observatory are described and discussed, emphasizing the need of consistent meta-information for the exchange of data amongst servers and institutions.

  18. Load Deflection Characteristics of Nickel Titanium Initial Archwires

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Hossein; Yasssaei, Sogra; Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud Nilli

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the characteristics of commonly used initial archwires by their load deflection graphs. Materials and Methods: This study tested three wire designs namely copper nickel titanium (CNT), nickel titanium (NiTi), and multi-strand NiTi (MSNT) archwires engaged in passive self-ligating (PSL) brackets, active self-ligating (ASL) brackets or conventional brackets. To evaluate the mechanical characteristics of the specimens, a three-point bending test was performed. The testing machine vertically applied force on the midpoint of the wire between the central incisor and canine teeth to obtain 2 and 4mm of deflection. The force level at maximum deflection and characteristics of plateau (the average plateau load and the plateau length) were recorded. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used at P <0.05 level of significance. Results: Force level at maximum deflection and plateau length were significantly affected by the amount of deflection. The type of archwires and brackets had significant effects on force level at maximum deflection, and plateau length. However, the bracket type had no significant effect on the average plateau force. Conclusion: With any type of brackets in deflections of 2 and 4mm, MSNT wire exerted the lowest while NiTi wire exerted the highest force level at maximum deflection and plateau phase. The force level at maximum deflection and the plateau length increased with raising the amount of primary deflection; however the average plateau force did not change significantly. PMID:27148381

  19. Mission Designs for Demonstrating Gravity Tractor Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Faber, N.; Eggl, S.; Morrison, D.; Clark, A.; Frost, C.; Jaroux, B. A.; Khetawat, V.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity tractor asteroid deflection relies on the gravitational attraction between the target and a nearby spacecraft; using low-thrust propulsion to change the target's trajectory slowly but continuously. Our team, based at the NASA Ames Mission Design Center, prepared designs for a Gravity Tractor Demonstration Mission (GTDM) for the European Commission's NEOShield initiative. We found five asteroids with well-known orbits and opportunities for efficient stand-alone demonstrations in the 2020s. We selected one object, 2000 FJ10, for a detailed design analysis. Our GTDM design has a 4 kW solar-electric propulsion system and launch mass of 1150 kg. For a nominal asteroid mass of 3 x 109 kg and diameter 150 m, and a hovering altitude 125 m above the asteroid's surface, GTDM would change FJ10's semi-major axis by 10 km over 2 years. To measure the deflection clearly and to permit safe hovering by the spacecraft, several months of survey and characterization are required prior to the active tractoring phase of the mission. Accurate tracking is also required after the tractoring phase, to ensure that the asteroid has indeed been deflected as intended. The GTDM design includes both spacecraft and Earth-based observations of FJ10 to verify the deflection. The estimated cost of GTDM is $280 million. Trajectory analysis for GTDM confirmed that the outcome of a deflection of any asteroid depends on when that deflection is performed. Compared to kinetic impactor deflection, the gradual deflection from a gravity tractor produces comparable results for a given total momentum transfer. However, a gravity tractor can have greater flexibility in the direction in which the target asteroid can be deflected. Asteroid deflection scenarios must be modeled carefully on a case-to-case basis. We will review implications of the results of the GTDM study to other proposed gravity tractor demonstrations, such as that included in NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission.

  20. Optimized frequency dependent photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, D.; Cabrera, H.; Toro, J.; Grima, P.; Leal, C.; Villabona, A.; Franko, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the letter the optimization of the experimental setup for photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy is performed by analyzing the influence of its geometrical parameters (detector and sample position, probe beam radius and its waist position etc) on the detected signal. Furthermore, the effects of the fluid’s thermo-optical properties, for optimized geometrical configuration, on the measurement sensitivity and uncertainty determination of sample thermal properties is also studied. The examined sample is a recently developed CuFeInTe3 material. It is seen from the obtained results, that it is a complex problem to choose the proper geometrical configuration as well as sensing fluid to enhance the sensitivity of the method. A signal enhancement is observed at low modulation frequencies by placing the sample in acetonitrile (ACN), while at high modulation frequencies the sensitivity is higher for measurements made in air. For both, detection in air and acetonitrile the determination of CuFeInTe3 thermal properties is performed. The determined values of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are (0.048  ±  0.002)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.6  ±  0.2 W m-1 K-1 and (0.056  ±  0.005)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.8  ±  0.4 W m-1 K-1 for ACN and air, respectively. It is seen, that the determined values agree well within the range of their measurement uncertainties for both cases, although the measurement uncertainty is two times lower for the measurements in ACN providing more accurate results. The analysis is performed by the use of recently developed theoretical description based on the complex geometrical optics. It is also shown, how the presented work fits into the current status of photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy.

  1. On the Role of High Amounts of Mn Element in CdS Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonullu, Meryem Polat; Kose, Salih

    2017-03-01

    CdS and MnS are technologically important semiconducting materials. In this work, due to the limited ability of these materials separately, a detailed characterization of the new samples formed by the combined use of them has been reported. CdS films, with the incorporation of Mn in a wide range of concentrations, have been produced by a low-cost Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis set-up. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) has been used to determine the thicknesses and optical constants ( n, k) of the samples. It has been determined that samples with high amounts of Mn have lower refractive index values. Absorbance spectra have shown additional band edges along with the one belonging to CdS, for samples with Mn concentrations higher than 50 pct. This has been attributed to a phase separation above this limit. Raman spectroscopy analysis which shows additional Raman peaks belonging to MnS phase also supports these findings. Depending on this phase separation, crystalline structure has been deteriorated. Surface properties of the samples have been investigated by SEM and AFM. Elemental analysis has been performed by EDS. Resistivity measurements performed by a four-probe set-up have shown that samples containing high amount of Mn have lower electrical resistivity values.

  2. On the Role of High Amounts of Mn Element in CdS Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonullu, Meryem Polat; Kose, Salih

    2017-01-01

    CdS and MnS are technologically important semiconducting materials. In this work, due to the limited ability of these materials separately, a detailed characterization of the new samples formed by the combined use of them has been reported. CdS films, with the incorporation of Mn in a wide range of concentrations, have been produced by a low-cost Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis set-up. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) has been used to determine the thicknesses and optical constants (n, k) of the samples. It has been determined that samples with high amounts of Mn have lower refractive index values. Absorbance spectra have shown additional band edges along with the one belonging to CdS, for samples with Mn concentrations higher than 50 pct. This has been attributed to a phase separation above this limit. Raman spectroscopy analysis which shows additional Raman peaks belonging to MnS phase also supports these findings. Depending on this phase separation, crystalline structure has been deteriorated. Surface properties of the samples have been investigated by SEM and AFM. Elemental analysis has been performed by EDS. Resistivity measurements performed by a four-probe set-up have shown that samples containing high amount of Mn have lower electrical resistivity values.

  3. In situ self-transformation synthesis of g-C3N4-modified CdS heterostructure with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huogen; Chen, Fengyun; Chen, Feng; Wang, Xuefei

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication of heterojunction photocatalysts with uniform dispersion and strongly coupling interface is one of the main strategies to improve the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor materials. In this study, the heterostructured g-C3N4/CdS photocatalyst with above features was synthesized via a facile in situ high-temperature self-transformation method by using melamine-CdS composites as the precursor. The results showed that g-C3N4 nanoparticles (5-30 nm) are homogeneously grafted on the CdS surface with closely contacted interfaces, resulting in a greatly improved photocatalytic hydrogen-production performance. When the amount of g-C3N4 was 1 wt%, the resultant g-C3N4/CdS showed the highest hydrogen evolution rate (5303 μmol h-1 g-1), which is significantly higher than the pure CdS by a factor of 2.5 times. Considering the obviously enhanced performance of CdS by loading a very limited g-C3N4 (0.1-5 wt%), a possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed, namely, the g-C3N4 works as an effective hole-transfer cocatalyst to promote the rapid transfer of photogenerated holes from the CdS surface, causing the effective separation of photogenerated charges in CdS. Our present work can provide some interesting idea for the reasonable design and preparation of other highly efficient heterojunction photocatalysts.

  4. Method for isotope separation by photodeflection

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1977-01-01

    In the method of separating isotopes wherein a desired isotope species is selectively deflected out of a beam of mixed isotopes by irradiating the beam with a directed beam of light of narrowly defined frequency which is selectively absorbed by the desired species, the improvement comprising irradiating the deflected beam with light from other light sources whose frequencies are selected to cause the depopulation of any metastable excited states.

  5. Improved spatial separation of neutral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienitz, Jens S.; Długołecki, Karol; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    We have developed and experimentally demonstrated an improved electrostatic deflector for the spatial separation of molecules according to their dipole-moment-to-mass ratio. The device features a very open structure that allows for significantly stronger electric fields as well as for stronger deflection without molecules crashing into the device itself. We have demonstrated its performance using the prototypical carbonyl sulfide molecule and we discuss opportunities regarding improved quantum-state-selectivity for complex molecules and the deflection of unpolar molecules.

  6. The Genomic CDS Sandbox: An Assessment Among Domain Experts

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ayesha; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Eilbeck, Karen; Williams, Marc S.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Hoffman, Mark A.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Overby, Casey L.; Shirts, Brian H.; Hoffman, James M.; Welch, Brandon M.

    2016-01-01

    Genomics is a promising tool that is becoming more widely available to improve the care and treatment of individuals. While there is much assertion, genomics will most certainly require the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to be fully realized in the routine clinical setting. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health recently convened an in-person, multi-day meeting on this topic. It was widely recognized that there is a need to promote the innovation and development of resources for genomic CDS such as a CDS sandbox. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a proposed approach for such a genomic CDS sandbox among domain experts and potential users. Survey results indicate a significant interest and desire for a genomic CDS sandbox environment among domain experts. These results will be used to guide the development of a genomic CDS sandbox. PMID:26778834

  7. Separable fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Andrew C.; Ribich, William A.; Marinaccio, Paul J.; Sawaf, Bernard E.

    1987-12-01

    A separable fastener system has a first separable member that includes a series of metal hook sheets disposed in stacked relation that defines an array of hook elements on its broad surface. Each hook sheet is a planar metal member of uniform thickness and has a body portion with a series of hook elements formed along one edge of the body. Each hook element includes a stem portion, a deflecting surface portion, and a latch portion. Metal spacer sheets are disposed between the hook sheets and may be varied in thickness and in number to control the density of the hook elements on the broad surface of the first fastener member. The hook and spacer sheets are secured together in stacked relation. A second fastener member has a surface of complementary engaging elements extending along its broad surface which are releasably interengageable with the hook elements of the first fastener member, the deflecting surfaces of the hook elements of the first fastener member tending to deflect hook engaging portions of the second fastener member and the latch portions of the hook elements of the first fastener member engaging portions of the second fastener member in fastening relation.

  8. Directed energy deflection laboratory measurements of common space based targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Meinhold, Peter; Batliner, Payton; Motta, Caio; Madajian, Jonathan; Mercer, Whitaker; Knowles, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    We report on laboratory studies of the effectiveness of directed energy planetary defense as a part of the DE-STAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) program. DE-STAR and DE-STARLITE are directed energy "stand-off" and "stand-on" programs, respectively. These systems consist of a modular array of kilowatt-class lasers powered by photovoltaics, and are capable of heating a spot on the surface of an asteroid to the point of vaporization. Mass ejection, as a plume of evaporated material, creates a reactionary thrust capable of diverting the asteroid's orbit. In a series of papers, we have developed a theoretical basis and described numerical simulations for determining the thrust produced by material evaporating from the surface of an asteroid. In the DESTAR concept, the asteroid itself is used as the deflection "propellant". This study presents results of experiments designed to measure the thrust created by evaporation from a laser directed energy spot. We constructed a vacuum chamber to simulate space conditions, and installed a torsion balance that holds a common space target sample. The sample is illuminated with a fiber array laser with flux levels up to 60 MW/m2 , which allows us to simulate a mission level flux but on a small scale. We use a separate laser as well as a position sensitive centroid detector to readout the angular motion of the torsion balance and can thus determine the thrust. We compare the measured thrust to the models. Our theoretical models indicate a coupling coefficient well in excess of 100 μN/Woptical, though we assume a more conservative value of 80 μN/Woptical and then degrade this with an optical "encircled energy" efficiency of 0.75 to 60 μN/Woptical in our deflection modeling. Our measurements discussed here yield about 45 μN/Wabsorbed as a reasonable lower limit to the thrust per optical watt absorbed. Results vary depending on the material tested and are limited to measurements of 1 axis, so

  9. Directed Energy Deflection Laboratory Measurements of Asteroids and Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, T.; Lubin, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on laboratory studies of the effectiveness of directed energy planetary and space defense as a part of the DE-STAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) program. DE-STAR [1][5][6] and DE-STARLITE [2][5][6] are directed energy "stand-off" and "stand-on" programs, respectively. These systems consist of a modular array of kilowatt-class lasers powered by photovoltaics, and are capable of heating a spot on the surface of an asteroid to the point of vaporization. Mass ejection, as a plume of evaporated material, creates a reactionary thrust capable of diverting the asteroid's orbit. In a series of papers, we have developed a theoretical basis and described numerical simulations for determining the thrust produced by material evaporating from the surface of an asteroid [1][2][3][4][5][6]. In the DE-STAR concept, the asteroid itself is used as the deflection "propellant". This study presents results of experiments designed to measure the thrust created by evaporation from a laser directed energy spot. We constructed a vacuum chamber to simulate space conditions, and installed a torsion balance that holds an "asteroid" or a space debris sample. The sample is illuminated with a fiber array laser with flux levels up to 60 MW/m2 which allows us to simulate a mission level flux but on a small scale. We use a separate laser as well as a position sensitive centroid detector to readout the angular motion of the torsion balance and can thus determine the thrust. We compare the measured thrust to the models. Our theoretical models indicate a coupling coefficient well in excess of 100 µN/Woptical, though we assume a more conservative value of 80 µN/Woptical and then degrade this with an optical "encircled energy" efficiency of 0.75 to 60 µN/Woptical in our deflection modeling. Our measurements discussed here yield about 60 µN/Wabsorbed as a reasonable lower limit to the thrust per optical watt absorbed.

  10. CdS Nanowires Decorated with Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Chen, Lang; Wang, Fu; Liu, Ying; Chen, Peng; Au, Chak-Tong; Yin, Shuang-Feng

    2016-03-21

    CdS nanowires decorated with ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets were synthesized for the first time by ultrasonic exfoliation by using dimethylformamide as the dispersing agent. An excellent hydrogen evolution rate of 1914 μmol  h(-1) (20 mg catalyst) under visible-light irradiation (λ ≥ 400 nm, ≈ 154 mW cm(-1) ) and an apparent quantum yield of 46.9% at λ=420 nm were achieved over the MoS2 /CdS composite. The presence of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets (rich in active edge sites) on the CdS surface promotes the separation of photogenerated charge carriers and facilitates the surface processes of photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

  11. Ultrasensitive Beam Deflection Measurement via Interferometric Weak Value Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Starling, David J.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the use of an interferometric weak value technique to amplify very small transverse deflections of an optical beam. By entangling the beam's transverse degrees of freedom with the which-path states of a Sagnac interferometer, it is possible to realize an optical amplifier for polarization independent deflections. The theory for the interferometric weak value amplification method is presented along with the experimental results, which are in good agreement. Of particular interest, we measured the angular deflection of a mirror down to 400{+-}200 frad and the linear travel of a piezo actuator down to 14{+-}7 fm.

  12. The Advanced Photon Source pulsed deflecting cavity RF system.

    SciTech Connect

    Cours, A.; DiMonte, N. P.; Smith, T. L.; Waldschmidt, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Deflecting Cavity System for producing short X-ray pulses uses two multi-cell, S-band cavities to apply a deflecting voltage to the stored electron beam ahead of an undulator that supports a beamline utilizing picosecond X-rays. Two additional multi-cell cavities are then used to cancel out the perturbation and restore the electron beam to its nominal orbit. The pulsed rf system driving the deflecting cavities is described. Design tradeoffs are discussed with emphasis on topology considerations and digital control loops making use of sampling technology in a manner consistent with the present state of the art.

  13. Asteroid Deflection Mission Design Considering On-Ground Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Clemens; Lewis, Hugh G.; Atkinson, Peter

    The deflection of an Earth-threatening asteroid requires high transparency of the mission design process. The goal of such a mission is to move the projected point of impact over the face of Earth until the asteroid is on a miss trajectory. During the course of deflection operations, the projected point of impact will match regions that were less affected before alteration of the asteroid’s trajectory. These regions are at risk of sustaining considerable damage if the deflecting spacecraft becomes non-operational. The projected impact point would remain where the deflection mission put it at the time of mission failure. Hence, all regions that are potentially affected by the deflection campaign need to be informed about this risk and should be involved in the mission design process. A mission design compromise will have to be found that is acceptable to all affected parties (Schweickart, 2004). A software tool that assesses the on-ground risk due to deflection missions is under development. It will allow to study the accumulated on-ground risk along the path of the projected impact point. The tool will help determine a deflection mission design that minimizes the on-ground casualty and damage risk due to deflection operations. Currently, the tool is capable of simulating asteroid trajectories through the solar system and considers gravitational forces between solar system bodies. A virtual asteroid may be placed at an arbitrary point in the simulation for analysis and manipulation. Furthermore, the tool determines the asteroid’s point of impact and provides an estimate of the population at risk. Validation has been conducted against the solar system ephemeris catalogue HORIZONS by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Asteroids that are propagated over a period of 15 years show typical position discrepancies of 0.05 Earth radii relative to HORIZONS’ output. Ultimately, results from this research will aid in the identification of requirements for

  14. Beam loading in magnicon deflection cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Gold, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The radio frequency (RF) source for the next linear collider (NLC) is required to generate a power of 1/2--1 GW per tube in a 200-ns pulse, or 100--200 J of energy in a pulse of up to a few {micro}s in duration, at a frequency of 10--20 GHz. A variety of RF sources are under investigation at the present time aimed at fulfilling the needs of the NLC. These include the X-band klystron, Gyroklystron, traveling-wave tube, harmonic convertor, chopper-driven traveling-wave tube, and magnicon. Here, analysis of the beam-deflection cavity interaction in a magnicon is presented and compared with experiment. For a driven cavity a dispersion relation is obtained wherein the interaction modifies the cold-cavity factor and the resonance frequency. In terms of a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit the interaction corresponds to a complex-values beam admittance Y{sub b} in parallel with the cavity admittance. The response of the gain cavities is modified by the same admittance. In a magnicon, Y{sub b} is a sensitive function of the solenoidal focusing magnetic field B{sub 0}, thus providing a convenient means of adjusting the cavity properties in experiments. When the relativistic gyrofrequency is twice the drive frequency, ImY{sub b} = 0 and the beam does not load the cavity. Analytical expressions of the variation of the detuning, instantaneous bandwidth (i.e., loaded quality factor) and gain with B{sub 0} are derived. Simulation results are presented to verify the linear analysis with ideal beams and to illustrate the modifications due to finite beam emittance. Results of the magnicon experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory are examined in the light of the analysis.

  15. Simulations of directed energy comet deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Lubin, Philip M.; Hughes, Gary B.

    2016-09-01

    Earth-crossing asteroids and comets pose a long-term hazard to life and property on Earth. Schemes to mitigate the impact threat have been studied extensively but tend to focus on asteroid diversion while neglecting the possibility of a comet threat. Such schemes often demand physically intercepting the target by spacecraft, a task feasible only for targets identified decades in advance in a restricted range of orbits. A threatening comet is unlikely to satisfy these criteria and so necessitates a fundamentally different approach for diversion. Comets are naturally perturbed from purely gravitational trajectories through solar heating of their surfaces which activates sublimation-driven jets. Artificial heating of a comet, such as by a high-powered laser array in Earth orbit, may supplement natural heating by the Sun to purposefully manipulate its path to avoid an impact. The effectiveness of any particular laser array for a given comet depends on the comet's heating response which varies dramatically depending on factors including nucleus size, orbit and dynamical history. These factors are incorporated into a numerical orbital model using established models of nongravitational perturbations to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of using high-powered laser arrays in Earth orbit or on the ground to deflect a variety of comets. Simulation results suggest that orbital arrays of 500m and 10GW operating for 10 min=d over 1 yr may be adequate for mitigating impacts by comets up to 500m in diameter. Continuously operating ground-based arrays of 100m and 10GW may be similarly effective when appropriately located.

  16. Study on dynamics of photoexcited charge injection and trapping in CdS quantum dots sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanowire array film electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Shan; Cheng, Ke; Yuan, Zhanqiang; Xu, Suyun; Cheng, Gang; Du, Zuliang

    2014-05-19

    The photoexcited electrons transfer dynamics of the CdS quantum dots (QDs) deposited in TiO{sub 2} nanowire array films are studied using surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques. By comparing the SPV results with different thicknesses of QDs layers, we can separate the dynamic characteristics of photoexcited electrons injection and trapping. It is found that the TPV signals of photoexcited electrons trapped in the CdS QDs occur at timescales of about 2 × 10{sup −8} s, which is faster than that of the photoexcited electrons injected from CdS into TiO{sub 2}. More than 90 nm of the thickness of the CdS QDs layer will seriously affect the photoexcited electrons transfer and injection.

  17. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-09

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l-dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction.

  18. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l -dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction.

  19. Possible influences on bullet trajectory deflection in ballistic gelatine.

    PubMed

    Riva, Fabiano; Kerkhoff, Wim; Bolck, Annabel; Mattijssen, Erwin J A T

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the distance to the top and bottom of a gelatine block and to bullet tracks from previously fired shots on a bullet's trajectory, when passing through ballistic gelatine, was studied. No significant difference in deflection was found when trajectories of 9mm Luger bullets, fired at a 3.5cm distance to the top and bottom of a gelatine block and to bullet tracks from previously fired shots, were compared to trajectories of bullets fired 7cm or more away from any of the aforementioned aspects. A surprisingly consistent 6.5° absolute deflection angle was found when these bullets passed through 22.5 to 23.5cm of ballistic gelatine. The projection angle, determined by the direction of the deflection, appeared to be random. The consistent absolute angle, in combination with the random projection angle, resulted in a cone-like deflection pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz.

  1. Limitation of linear colliders from transverse rf deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Offaxis beam trajectories in a linear collider produce transverse wakefield and chromatic effects which cause emittance enlargement. One cause for non-centered trajectories in the accelerating structures is radial rf fields which produce transverse deflections. Static deflections can be compensated by static dipole magnetic fields. However, fluctuations of the rf fields cause variations in the deflections which must be managed or limited. Given the level of fluctuation of the phase and amplitude of an rf system, a limit on the allowable rf deflection can be calculated. Parameters, such as the beam emittance, lattice design, rf wavelength and the initial and final beam energies, influence the tolerances. Two tolerances are calculated: (1) one assumes that the wakefields are completely controlled, and that chromatic effects are the only enlarging mechanism (optimistic), and (2) the other assumes the limit is due to transverse wakefields without the aid of Landau damping (pessimistic).

  2. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, N.J.; Hudson, C.L.

    1992-12-15

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse. 13 figs.

  3. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, Neil J.; Hudson, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse.

  4. Highly enhanced visible light water splitting of CdS by green to blue upconversion.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sundaram; Ngo, Yen-Linh Thi; Sui, Lijun; Kim, Eui Jung; Dang, Dinh Khoi; Chung, Jin Suk; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2017-10-03

    This paper reports a new class of visible light water splitting photocatalysts based on a triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion (UC) process. The TTA-UC core composed of platinum-octaethyl-porphyrin (Pt(OEP)) and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA) can upconvert low energy green light to high energy blue light with a high quantum yield. Using a silica nanocapsule (SNC), the quenching caused by oxygen can be avoided, even in aqueous solutions. The enhancement factor of the photocatalytic activity induced by the UC was estimated to be approximately 3, which indicates that the green to blue UC by the encapsulated Pt(OEP)/DPA can enhance the water splitting activity of CdS significantly. The reduced graphene oxide (rGO) attached to the CdS photocatalyst further enhances the water splitting activity via effective charge separation and suppressed recombination.

  5. A general small-deflection theory for flat sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libove, Charles; Batdorf, S B

    1948-01-01

    A small-deflection theory is developed for the elastic behavior of orthotropic flat plates in which deflections due to shear are taken into account. In this theory, which covers all types of flat sandwich construction, a plate is characterized by seven physical constants (five stiffnesses and two Poisson ratios) of which six are independent. Both the energy expression and the differential equations are developed. Boundary conditions corresponding to simply supported, clamped, and elastically restrained edges are considered.

  6. Comparison of Spinal Needle Deflection in a Ballistic Gel Model

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Ethan; Christolias, George; Visco, Christopher; R. Singh, Jaspal

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain. The success of these procedures depends on the accuracy of needle placement, which is influenced by needle size and shape. Objectives The purpose of this study is to examine and quantify the deviation of commonly used spinal needles based on needle tip design and gauge, using a ballistic gel tissue simulant. Materials and Methods Six needles commonly used in spinal procedures (Quincke, Short Bevel, Chiba, Tuohy, Hustead, Whitacre) were selected for use in this study. Ballistic gel samples were made in molds of two depths, 40mm and 80 mm. Each needle was mounted in a drill press to ensure an accurate needle trajectory. Distance of deflection was recorded for each needle. Results In comparing the mean deflection of 22 gauge needles of all types at 80 mm of depth, deflection was greatest among beveled needles [Short Bevel (9.96 ± 0.77 mm), Quincke (8.89 ± 0.17 mm), Chiba (7.71 ± 1.16 mm)], moderate among epidural needles [Tuohy (7.64 ± 0.16 mm) and least among the pencil-point needles [Whitacre (0.73 ± 0.34 mm)]. Increased gauge (25 g) led to a significant increase in deflection among beveled needles. The direction of deflection was away from the bevel with Quincke, Chiba and Short Beveled needles and toward the bevel of the Tuohy and Hustead needles. Deflection of the Whitacre pencil-point needle was minimal. Conclusions There is clinical utility in knowing the relative deflection of various needle tips. When a procedure requires a needle to be steered around obstacles, or along non-collinear targets, the predictable and large amount of deflection obtained through use of a beveled spinal needle may prove beneficial. PMID:27847693

  7. Comparison of Spinal Needle Deflection in a Ballistic Gel Model.

    PubMed

    Rand, Ethan; Christolias, George; Visco, Christopher; R Singh, Jaspal

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain. The success of these procedures depends on the accuracy of needle placement, which is influenced by needle size and shape. The purpose of this study is to examine and quantify the deviation of commonly used spinal needles based on needle tip design and gauge, using a ballistic gel tissue simulant. Six needles commonly used in spinal procedures (Quincke, Short Bevel, Chiba, Tuohy, Hustead, Whitacre) were selected for use in this study. Ballistic gel samples were made in molds of two depths, 40mm and 80 mm. Each needle was mounted in a drill press to ensure an accurate needle trajectory. Distance of deflection was recorded for each needle. In comparing the mean deflection of 22 gauge needles of all types at 80 mm of depth, deflection was greatest among beveled needles [Short Bevel (9.96 ± 0.77 mm), Quincke (8.89 ± 0.17 mm), Chiba (7.71 ± 1.16 mm)], moderate among epidural needles [Tuohy (7.64 ± 0.16 mm) and least among the pencil-point needles [Whitacre (0.73 ± 0.34 mm)]. Increased gauge (25 g) led to a significant increase in deflection among beveled needles. The direction of deflection was away from the bevel with Quincke, Chiba and Short Beveled needles and toward the bevel of the Tuohy and Hustead needles. Deflection of the Whitacre pencil-point needle was minimal. There is clinical utility in knowing the relative deflection of various needle tips. When a procedure requires a needle to be steered around obstacles, or along non-collinear targets, the predictable and large amount of deflection obtained through use of a beveled spinal needle may prove beneficial.

  8. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Norman W.; Golladay, Steven D.; Crewe, Albert V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations.

  9. Deflection and Rotation of CMEs from Active Region 11158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Christina; Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Yashiro, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    Between 13 and 16 February 2011, a series of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupted from multiple polarity inversion lines within active region 11158. For seven of these CMEs we employ the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) flux rope model to determine the CME trajectory using both Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and coronagraph images. We then use the model called Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT) for nonradial CME dynamics driven by magnetic forces to simulate the deflection and rotation of the seven CMEs. We find good agreement between ForeCAT results and reconstructed CME positions and orientations. The CME deflections range in magnitude between 10^{circ } and 30^{circ}. All CMEs are deflected to the north, but we find variations in the direction of the longitudinal deflection. The rotations range between 5^{circ} and 50^{circ} with both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Three of the CMEs begin with initial positions within 2^{circ} from one another. These three CMEs are all deflected primarily northward, with some minor eastward deflection, and rotate counterclockwise. Their final positions and orientations, however, differ by 20^{circ} and 30^{circ}, respectively. This variation in deflection and rotation results from differences in the CME expansion and radial propagation close to the Sun, as well as from the CME mass. Ultimately, only one of these seven CMEs yielded discernible in situ signatures near Earth, although the active region faced toward Earth throughout the eruptions. We suggest that the differences in the deflection and rotation of the CMEs can explain whether each CME impacted or missed Earth.

  10. Load-Deflection Behavior of Lime-Stabilized Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    CERL study indicated that lime sta- bdization appears "to increase the bearing capacity of the subgrade" for rigid pavements and that the soil...block number) m soil-lime pavement layers pavement load deflection response pavement behavior UJ D" " 20. ABSTRACT fCondnue on rovor«o aide II...neceaaary and Identity by block numbet; The static and dynamic load-deflection response of soil-lime pavement layers was in- vestigated, Soil-lime

  11. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  12. Cantilever deflection associated with hybridization of monomolecular DNA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that specific binding between a ligand and surface immobilized receptor, such as hybridization of single stranded DNA immobilized on a microcantilever surface, leads to cantilever deflection. The binding-induced deflection may be used as a method for detection of biomolecules, such as pathogens and biohazards. Mechanical deformation induced due to hybridization of surface-immobilized DNA strands is a commonly used system to demonstrate the efficacy of microcantilever sensors. To understand the mechanism underlying the cantilever deflections, a theoretical model that incorporates the influence of ligand/receptor complex surface distribution and empirical interchain potential is developed to predict the binding-induced deflections. The cantilever bending induced due to hybridization of DNA strands is predicted for different receptor immobilization densities, hybridization efficiencies, and spatial arrangements. Predicted deflections are compared with experimental reports to validate the modeling assumptions and identify the influence of various components on mechanical deformation. Comparison of numerical predictions and experimental results suggest that, at high immobilization densities, hybridization-induced mechanical deformation is determined, primarily by immobilization density and hybridization efficiency, whereas, at lower immobilization densities, spatial arrangement of hybridized chains need to be considered in determining the cantilever deflection.

  13. Vibration of thermally buckled composite plates with initial deflections using triangular elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, R. C.; Xue, David Y.; Mei, Chuh

    1993-01-01

    A consistent finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of thermal postbuckling and free vibration of thermally buckled thin, laminated composite plates subjected to large temperature change. The influence of moderately large initial imperfections in deflection on the thermal postbuckling deflection and the vibration characteristics of the buckled plate is also investigated. The finite element equations of motion are derived from the principle of virtual work. These equations can be mathematically separated into two sets and solved in sequence. The first set of equations yields the particular solution of static thermal postbuckling deflection, and the second set of equations gives the homogeneous solution of vibration characteristics on the buckled plate. The first set of static equations is solved by using Newton-Raphson iteration method. The tangent stiffness matrix in the final iteration is equal to the total stiffness matrix of the second set of dynamic equations. This feature saves tremendous computation time in comparing with using the conventional approach. The influence of lamination angle, temperature distribution, plate planform of arbitrary shape, and boundary support conditions on postbuckling and vibration behavior are investigated.

  14. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  15. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  16. Thermal Analysis of CDS Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, J. A.; Schmelz, J. T.; Nasraoui, K.; Rightmire, L. A.; Andrews, J. M.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    The coronal loop data used for this analysis was obtained using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory on 2003 January 17 at 14:24:43 UT. We use the Chianti atomic physics database and the hybrid coronal abundances to determine temperatures and densities for positions along several loops. We chose six pixels along each loop as well as background pixels. The intensities of the background pixels are subtracted from each loop pixel to isolate the emission from the loop pixel, and then spectral lines with significant contributions to the loop intensities are selected. The loops were then analyzed with a forward folding process to produce differential emission measure (DEM) curves. Emission measure loci plots and DEM automatic inversions are then used to verify those conclusions. We find different results for each of these loops. One appears to be isothermal at each loop position, and the temperature does not change with height. The second appears to be multithermal at each position and the third seems to be consistent with two DEM spikes, which might indicate that there are two isothermal loops so close together, that they are not resolved by CDS. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by a Hinode subcontract from NASA/SAO as well as NSF ATM-0402729.

  17. Biosynthesis of CdS nanoparticles in banana peel extract.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang Ju; Li, Shuo Hao; Zhang, Yu Cang; Fu, Yun Zhi

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using banana peel extract as a convenient, non-toxic, eco-friendly 'green' capping agent. Cadmium nitrate and sodium sulfide are main reagents. A variety of CdS NPs are prepared through changing reaction conditions (banana extracts, the amount of banana peel extract, solution pH, concentration and reactive temperature). The prepared CdS colloid displays strong fluorescence spectrum. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates the successful formation of CdS NPs. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectrogram indicates the involvement of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the formation of CdS NPs. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) result reveals that the average size of the NPs is around 1.48 nm.

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of impurity precipitates in CdS films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D.S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-03-01

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  20. Optical characterization of CdS nanorods capped with starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J. S.; Pal Majumder, T.; Schick, C.

    2015-05-01

    Well crystalline uniform CdS nanorods were grown by changing the concentration of maize starch. The highly polymeric (branched) structure of starch enhances the growth of CdS nanorods. The average diameter of the nanorods is 20-25 nm while length is of 500-600 nm as verified from SEM and XRD observations. The optical band gaps of the CdS nanorods are varying from 2.66 eV to 2.52 eV depending on concentration of maize starch. The photoluminescence (PL) emission bands are shifted from 526 nm to 529 nm with concentration of maize starch. We have also observed the enhanced PL intensity in CdS nanorods capped with starch. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the significant effect of starch on CdS nanorods.

  1. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.; Kiesling, J.D.

    1963-06-11

    A wave-guide resonator structure is designed for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass, having energies exceeding one billion eiectron volts. The particles referred to are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high energy accelerator. In the resonator a travelling electric wave is produced which travels at the same rate of speed as the unwanted particle which is thus deflected continuously over the length of the resonator. The wanted particle is slightly out of phase with the travelling wave so that over the whole length of the resonator it has a net deflection of substantially zero. The travelling wave is established in a wave guide of rectangular cross section in which stubs are provided to store magnetic wave energy leaving the electric wave energy in the main structure to obtain the desired travelling wave and deflection. The stubs are of such shape and spacing to establish a critical mathemitical relationship. (AEC)

  2. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.

    1962-01-01

    A wave guide resonator structure is described for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass and having energies exceeding one billion electron volts. The particles are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high-energy accelerator. In this wave guide construction, the particles undergo preferential deflection as a result of the presence of an electric field. The boundary conditions established in the resonator are such as to eliminate an interfering magnetic component, and to otherwise phase the electric field to obtain a traveling wave such as one which moves at the same speed as the unwanted particle. The latter undergoes continuous deflection over the whole length of the device and is, therefore, eliminated while the wanted particle is deflected in opposite directions over the length of the resonator and is thus able to enter an exit aperture. (AEC)

  3. Application of CdS quantum dots modified carbon paste electrode for monitoring the process of acetaminophen preparation.

    PubMed

    Pasandideh-Nadamani, M; Omrani, A; Sadeghi-Maleki, M R; Samadi-Maybodi, A

    2016-06-01

    In this research article, a novel, selective, and sensitive modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) using CdS quantum dots (QDs) is presented. The highly stable CdS QDs were successfully synthesized in an in situ process using Na2S2O3 as a precursor and thioglycolic acid as a catalyst and capping agent. The synthesis of CdS QDs was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The synthesized CdS QDs were used for preparation of a modified carbon paste electrode (CdS/CPE). The electrochemical behavior of the electrode toward p-aminophenol (PAP) and acetaminophen (Ac) was studied, and the results demonstrated that the CdS/CPE exhibited good electrocatalytic performance toward PAP and Ac oxidation. The oxidation peak potential of each analyte in the mixture was well separated. As a result, a selective and reliable method was developed for the determination of PAP and Ac simultaneously without any chemical separations. Application of the fabricated electrode for monitoring the process of Ac preparation from PAP was investigated. The obtained results show that CdS/CPE has satisfactory analytical performance; it could be a kind of attractive and promising nanomaterial-based sensor for process monitoring via the electrochemical approach.

  4. Guide Vanes for Deflecting Fluid Currents with Small Loss of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krober, G

    1933-01-01

    The transverse momentum of the deflected air stream to be absorbed is divided between the intermediate and outside walls, so that the pressure increase on each wall is much smaller and the danger of separation is diminished. The formation of secondary vortices is also diminished. By taking as the basis profiles with high c(sub a), such as have proved practically favorable, it is not possible to find a satisfactory form of grid simply on the assumption that the flow is potential. The requirements called for the most uniform possible velocity distribution behind the bend and the smallest possible losses.

  5. The Maximal Deflection on an Ellipse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Dan

    2006-01-01

    At each point of an ellipse one can attach a normal vector and a radial vector, the latter defined as the vector from the center of the ellipse. At the ends of the major and minor axes, the two vectors coincide, but at all other points they are separated by an angle [delta]. What is the maximum value that [delta] can attain, and where does it…

  6. CdS nanoparticles immobilized on porous carbon polyhedrons derived from a metal-organic framework with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity for antibiotic degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cao; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yuancai; Hu, Yongyou

    2017-10-01

    The CdS/MOF-derived porous carbon (MPC) composite as an efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst was prepared through the pyrolysis of ZIF-8 and subsequent growth of CdS. The porous and functionalized MPC enables intimate and discrete growth of CdS nanoparticles. This unique structure not only reduces the bulk recombination owing to nano-size effect of CdS, but also suppresses the surface recombination due to the discrete growth of CdS nanoparticles on MPC polyhedrons, which facilitates electron transfer and charge separation. Moreover, such a composite material possessed good adsorption ability toward the antibiotic pollutants because of the amino-functionalized surface. As a result, the as-prepared CdS/MPC composites showed excellent photocatalytic performance for the antibiotic degradation, significantly improving the photoactivity of CdS. Importantly, the CdS/MPC composite with the CdS loading of 20 wt% exhibited the highest photocatalytic efficiency of approximately 91% and apparent rate constant of 0.024 min-1.

  7. Towards efficient photoinduced charge separation in carbon nanodots and TiO2 composites in the visible region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingye; Qu, Songnan; Ji, Wenyu; Jing, Pengtao; Li, Di; Qin, Li; Cao, Junsheng; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Jialong; Shen, Dezhen

    2015-03-28

    In this work, photoinduced charge separation behaviors in non-long-chain-molecule-functionalized carbon nanodots (CDs) with visible intrinsic absorption (CDs-V) and TiO2 composites were investigated. Efficient photoinduced electron injection from CDs-V to TiO2 with a rate of 8.8 × 10(8) s(-1) and efficiency of 91% was achieved in the CDs-V/TiO2 composites. The CDs-V/TiO2 composites exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation, superior to pure TiO2 and the CDs with the main absorption band in the ultraviolet region and TiO2 composites, which indicated that visible photoinduced electrons and holes in such CDs-V/TiO2 composites could be effectively separated. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results for the CD-sensitized TiO2 solar cells also agreed with efficient photoinduced charge separation between CDs-V and the TiO2 electrode in the visible range. These results demonstrate that non-long-chain-molecule-functionlized CDs with a visible intrinsic absorption band could be appropriate candidates for photosensitizers and offer a new possibility for the development of a well performing CD-based photovoltaic system.

  8. Deflection load characteristics of laser-welded orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Etsuko; Stigall, Garrett; Elshahawy, Waleed; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-07-01

    To compare the deflection load characteristics of homogeneous and heterogeneous joints made by laser welding using various types of orthodontic wires. Four kinds of straight orthodontic rectangular wires (0.017 inch × 0.025 inch) were used: stainless-steel (SS), cobalt-chromium-nickel (Co-Cr-Ni), beta-titanium alloy (β-Ti), and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti). Homogeneous and heterogeneous end-to-end joints (12 mm long each) were made by Nd:YAG laser welding. Two types of welding methods were used: two-point welding and four-point welding. Nonwelded wires were also used as a control. Deflection load (N) was measured by conducting the three-point bending test. The data (n  =  5) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance/Tukey test (P < .05). The deflection loads for control wires measured were as follows: SS: 21.7 ± 0.8 N; Co-Cr-Ni: 20.0 ± 0.3 N; β-Ti: 13.9 ± 1.3 N; and Ni-Ti: 6.6 ± 0.4 N. All of the homogeneously welded specimens showed lower deflection loads compared to corresponding control wires and exhibited higher deflection loads compared to heterogeneously welded combinations. For homogeneous combinations, Co-Cr-Ni/Co-Cr-Ni showed a significantly (P < .05) higher deflection load than those of the remaining homogeneously welded groups. In heterogeneous combinations, SS/Co-Cr-Ni and β-Ti/Ni-Ti showed higher deflection loads than those of the remaining heterogeneously welded combinations (significantly higher for SS/Co-Cr-Ni). Significance (P < .01) was shown for the interaction between the two factors (materials combination and welding method). However, no significant difference in deflection load was found between four-point and two-point welding in each homogeneous or heterogeneous combination. Heterogeneously laser-welded SS/Co-Cr-Ni and β-Ti/Ni-Ti wires provide a deflection load that is comparable to that of homogeneously welded orthodontic wires.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of CME Deflections in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Xuepu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ten CME events viewed by the STEREO twin spacecraft are analyzed to study the deflections of CMEs during their propagation in the corona. Based on the three-dimensional information of the CMEs derived by the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model (Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas in Astrophys. J. 652, 1305, 2006), it is found that the propagation directions of eight CMEs had changed. By applying the theoretical method proposed by Shen et al. ( Solar Phys. 269, 389, 2011) to all the CMEs, we found that the deflections are consistent, in strength and direction, with the gradient of the magnetic energy density. There is a positive correlation between the deflection rate and the strength of the magnetic energy density gradient and a weak anti-correlation between the deflection rate and the CME speed. Our results suggest that the deflections of CMEs are mainly controlled by the background magnetic field and can be quantitatively described by the magnetic energy density gradient (MEDG) model.

  10. Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

  11. Optical caliper with compensation for specimen deflection and method

    DOEpatents

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    An optical non-contact profilometry system and method provided by an optical caliper with matched optical sensors that are arranged conjugate to each other so that the surface profile and thickness of an article can be measured without using a fixed reference surface and while permitting the article to deflect in space within the acquisition range of the optical sensors. The output signals from the two optical sensors are algebraically added to compensate for any such deflection of the article and provide a so compensated signal, the balance and sign of which provides a measurement of the actual thickness of the article at the optical sensors.

  12. Multiplexed Force and Deflection Sensing Shell Membranes for Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yong-Lae; Black, Richard; Moslehi, Behzad; Cutkosky, Mark; Chau, Kelvin

    2012-01-01

    Force sensing is an essential requirement for dexterous robot manipulation, e.g., for extravehicular robots making vehicle repairs. Although strain gauges have been widely used, a new sensing approach is desirable for applications that require greater robustness, design flexibility including a high degree of multiplexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic noise. This invention is a force and deflection sensor a flexible shell formed with an elastomer having passageways formed by apertures in the shell, with an optical fiber having one or more Bragg gratings positioned in the passageways for the measurement of force and deflection.

  13. Nuclear cycler: An incremental approach to the deflection of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Thiry, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces a novel deflection approach based on nuclear explosions: the nuclear cycler. The idea is to combine the effectiveness of nuclear explosions with the controllability and redundancy offered by slow push methods within an incremental deflection strategy. The paper will present an extended model for single nuclear stand-off explosions in the proximity of elongated ellipsoidal asteroids, and a family of natural formation orbits that allows the spacecraft to deploy multiple bombs while being shielded by the asteroid during the detonation.

  14. Optical caliper with compensation for specimen deflection and method

    DOEpatents

    Bernacki, B.E.

    1997-12-09

    An optical non-contact profilometry system and method provided by an optical caliper with matched optical sensors that are arranged conjugate to each other so that the surface profile and thickness of an article can be measured without using a fixed reference surface and while permitting the article to deflect in space within the acquisition range of the optical sensors. The output signals from the two optical sensors are algebraically added to compensate for any such deflection of the article and provide a so compensated signal, the balance and sign of which provides a measurement of the actual thickness of the article at the optical sensors. 2 figs.

  15. Deflection angle of light in an Ellis wormhole geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Koki; Asada, Hideki

    2012-05-01

    We reexamine the light deflection by an Ellis wormhole. The bending angle as a function of the ratio between the impact parameter and the throat radius of the wormhole is obtained in terms of a complete elliptic integral of the first kind. This result immediately yields asymptotic expressions in the weak field approximation. It is shown that an expression for the deflection angle derived (and used) in recent papers is valid at the leading order but it breaks down at the next order because of the nontrivial spacetime topology.

  16. Optimum vibrating beams with stress and deflection constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental frequency of vibration of an Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam of a specified constant volume is maximized subject to the constraint that under a prescribed loading the maximum stress or maximum deflection at any point along the beam axis will not exceed a specified value. In contrast with the inequality constraint which controls the minimum cross-section, the present inequality constraints lead to more meaningful designs. The inequality constraint on stresses is as easily implemented as the minimum cross-section constraint but the inequality constraint on deflection uses a treatment which is an extension of the matrix partitioning technique of prescribing displacements in finite element analysis.

  17. Facile linker free growth of CdS nanoshell on 1-D ZnO: Solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Archana; Sinha, Bhavesh; Chung, Kookchae; More, Anup; Vanalakar, Sharad; Hong, Chang Woo; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Patil, Pramod

    2015-03-01

    One dimensional type-II core/shell heterostructures are widely employed in solar cells because of their adventitious role in both light absorption and charge separation. Here we report a facile two step chemical approach to synthesizing ZnO/CdS core/shell nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorods (ZNR) with a high aspect ratio were grown using a hydrothermal technique where a uniform CdS shell was deposited using a facile, linker free, one pot, Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) based reflux technique for the first time. Though the reflux technique is quite similar to the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD), we obtained more uniform CdS coating and improved solar cell performance with the ZnO/CdS heterostructure compared to CBD-grown ZnO/CdS heterostructures. To obtain a conformal coating of CdS, we optimized the CdS deposition time. Formation of pure phase ZnO/CdS core/shell heterostructure was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth analysis. Improved solar cell performance of 1.23% was obtained for ZnO/CdS core/shell structures with ZnS surface treatment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of CdS coatings and their photocatalytic activities in the degradation of tetracycline antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Uresti, D. B.; Obregón, S.

    2016-11-01

    The photocatalytic activities of CdS coatings formed by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) were evaluated through the photodegradation of an antibiotic, tetracycline. First, CdS nanoparticles were synthesized under microwave irradiation of aqueous solutions containing the cadmium and sulfur precursors at stoichiometric amounts and by using trisodium citrate as stabilizer. Microwave irradiation was carried out in a conventional microwave oven at 2.45 GHz and 1650 W of nominal power, for 60 s. The CdS nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction. Electrophoretic deposition parameters were 300 mV, 600 mV and 900 mV of applied voltage between aluminum plates separated by 1 cm. The fractal dimensions of the surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy and correlated to the morphological and topographic characteristics of the coatings. The photocatalytic activity of the CdS coatings was investigated by means the photodegradation of the tetracycline antibiotic under simulated sunlight irradiation. According to the results, the photoactivity of the coatings directly depends on the concentration of the precursors and the applied voltage during the deposition. The material obtained at 600 mV showed the best photocatalytic behavior, probably due to its physical properties, such as optimum load and suitable aggregate size.

  19. Biologically synthesized fluorescent CdS NPs encapsulated by PHB.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Deepak, Venkataraman; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2011-04-07

    Here an attempt was made to biologically synthesize fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles and to immobilize the synthesized nanoparticles in PHB nanoparticles. The present study uses Brevibacterium casei SRKP2 as a potential producer for the green synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. Biologically synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed using electron microscopy and XRD. The size distribution of the nanoparticles was found to be 10-30 nm followed by which the consequence of time, growth of the organism, pH, concentration of CdCl(2) and Na(2)S on the synthesis of nanoparticles were checked. Enhanced synthesis and fluorescence emission of CdS nanoparticles were achieved at pH 9. The synthesized CdS NPs were immobilized with PHB and were characterized. The fluorescent intensity of the CdS nanoparticles remained unaffected even after immobilization within PHB nanoparticles.

  20. Ferromagnetism in sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in undoped sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures which are synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the sphalerite CdS samples show a spherical-like shape and the wurtzite CdS ones show a flower-like shape, both of which are aggregated by lots of smaller particles. The impurity of the samples has been ruled out by the results of X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetization measurements indicate that all the samples exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism and the saturation magnetization decreases with the increased crystal sizes, revealing that the observed ferromagnetism is defect-related, which is also confirmed by the post-annealing processes. This finding in CdS should be the focus of future electronic and spintronic devices. PMID:23294671

  1. Ordered Mesostructured CdS Nanowire Arrays with Rectifying Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Na; Cheng, Gang; An, Yanqing; Du, Zuliang; Wu, Sixin

    2009-05-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were synthesized by using mesoporous silica as hard template and cadmium xanthate (CdR2) as a single precursor. Upon etching silica, mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were produced with a yield as high as 93 wt%. The nanowire arrays were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, TEM, and SEM. The results show that the CdS products replicated from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 hard template possess highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure and fiber-like morphology, analogous to the mother template. The current-voltage characteristics of CdS nanoarrays are strongly nonlinear and asymmetrical, showing rectifying diode-like behavior.

  2. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm2. The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications. PMID:26965055

  3. The CGC enantiomer separation of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters by using β-cyclodextrin derivatives as chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liu, Feipeng; Mao, Jianyou

    2016-03-17

    Chiral 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters are important intermediates in preparation of enantioenriched 2-arylpropionic acids type Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Enantiomer separation of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters is crucial for evaluation of the asymmetric synthesis efficiency and the enantiomer excess of chiral 2-arylcarboxylic acid derivatives. The capillary gas chromatography (CGC) enantiomer separation of 17 pairs of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters enantiomers was conducted by using seven different β-cyclodextrin derivatives (CDs) as chiral stationary phases. It was found that for the 7 pairs of 2-phenylpropionates enantiomers, CDs with both alkyl and acyl substituents especially 2,6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin exhibited better enantiomer separation abilities than the other CDs examined. For the 7 pairs of 2-(4-substituted phenyl)propionates enantiomers, 2,3,6-tri-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin possessed better enantiomer separation abilities than the other CDs. Among the 3 pairs of 2-phenylbutyrates enantiomers examined, only methyl 2-phenylbutyrate enantiomers could be separated by three CDs among the 7 CDs tested, while enantiomers of ethyl 2-phenylbutyrate and isopropyl 2-phenylbutyrate couldn't be separated by any of the 7 CDs tested. Besides the structures of CDs, the structures of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters including different ester moieties, substituents of phenyl, and different carboxylic acids moieties in 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters also affected the enantiomer separation results greatly. The CGC enantiomer separation results of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters on different CDs are useful for solving the enantiomer separation problem of 2-arylcarboxylic acid esters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.C.; Hudson, C.L.

    1995-07-25

    A new deflection structure which deflects a beam of charged particles, such as an electron beam, includes a serpentine set for transmitting a deflection field, and a shielding frame for housing the serpentine set. The serpentine set includes a vertical serpentine deflection element and a horizontal serpentine deflection element. These deflection elements are identical, and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage, through which the electron beam passes, and is deflected by the deflection field, so as to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame includes a plurality of ground blocks, and forms an internal serpentine trough within these ground blocks, for housing the serpentine set. The deflection structure further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors which are inserted through the shielding frame, and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set. 10 figs.

  5. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathod ray tube deflection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.C.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-10-27

    This invention comprises a new deflection structure which deflects a beam of charged particles, such as an electron beam, includes a serpentine set for transmitting a deflection field, and shielding frame for housing the serpentine set. The serpentine set includes a vertical serpentine deflection element and a horizontal serpentine deflection element. These deflection elements are identical and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage, through which the electron beam passes and is deflected by the deflection field to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame includes a plurality of ground blocks and forms an internal serpentine trough within these ground blocks for housing the serpentine set. The deflection structure further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors which are inserted through the shielding frame and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set.

  6. Deflection of Light by Gravity: A Physical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Joshua B.

    1982-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle relates effects seen by an accelerating observer to those experienced by an observer in a gravitational field, providing an explanation of bending of a light beam by gravity. Because the calculations lead to results one-half the value found experimentally, obtaining the correct light deflection is discussed.…

  7. Mission Design and Optimal Asteroid Deflection for Planetary Defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarli, Bruno V.; Knittel, Jeremy M.; Englander, Jacob A.; Barbee, Brent W.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary defense is a topic of increasing interest for many reasons, which has been mentioned in "Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022". However, perhaps one of the most significant rationales for asteroid studies is the number of close approaches that have been documented recently. A space mission with a planetary defense objective aims to deflect the threatening body as far as possible from Earth. The design of a mission that optimally deflects an asteroid has different challenges: speed, precision, and system trade-off. This work addresses such issues and develops a fast transcription of the problem that can be implemented into an optimization tool, which allows for a broader trade study of different mission concepts with a medium fidelity. Such work is suitable for a mission's preliminary study. It is shown, using the fictitious asteroid impact scenario 2017 PDC, that the complete tool is able to account for the orbit sensitivity to small perturbations and quickly optimize a deflection trajectory. The speed in which the tool operates allows for a trade study between the available hardware. As a result, key deflection dates and mission strategies are identified for the 2017 PDC.

  8. Nonlinear effects in photothermal-optical-beam-deflection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, G. C., Jr.; Spicer, J. B.

    1986-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena have been observed during photothermal-optical-beam-deflection imaging experiments on samples of both high-purity aluminum and aluminum alloys. Evidence for nonlinear optical and thermal effects have been measured. Theoretical models have been developed as aids in understanding the different contrast mechanisms observed in linear and nonlinear photothermal images.

  9. The effect of asteroid topography on surface ablation deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Ablation techniques for deflecting hazardous asteroids deposit energy into the asteroid's surface, causing an effective thrust on the asteroid as the ablating material leaves normal to the surface. Although it has long been recognized that surface topography plays an important role in determining the deflection capabilities, most studies to date have ignored this aspect of the model. This paper focuses on understanding the topography for real asteroid shapes, and how this topography can change the deflection performance of an ablation technique. The near Earth asteroids Golevka, Bennu, and Itokawa are used as the basis for this study, as all three have high-resolution shape models available. This paper shows that naive targeting of an ablation method without accounting for the surface topography can lower the deflection performance by up to 20% in the cases studied in terms of the amount of acceleration applied in the desired direction. If the ablation thrust level is assumed to be 100 N, as used elsewhere in the literature, this misapplication of thrust translates to tens of kilometers per year in decreased semimajor axis change. However, if the ablation method can freely target any visible point on the surface of the asteroid, almost all of this performance can be recovered.

  10. Damping of unwanted modes in SRF deflecting/crabbing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Graeme; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    As deflecting and crab cavities do not use the fundamental acceleration mode for their operation, the spectrum of unwanted modes is significantly different from that of accelerating cavities. The fundamental acceleration mode is now unwanted and can cause energy spread in the beam; in addition this mode frequency is often close to or lower than that of the deflecting mode, making it difficult to damp. This is made more complex in some of the compact crab cavities as there small beampipes often attenuate the fields very sharply. In addition in some crab cavities there can be an orthogonal transverse mode similar to the deflecting mode, known as the same order mode. The degeneracy of these modes must be split by polarising the cavity and if the polarisation is not large enough, dampers should be placed at either an electric or magnetic field null of the crabbing mode to effectively damp the unwanted polarisation. Various concepts for dealing with unwanted modes in various SRF deflecting cavities will be reviewed.

  11. Deflection of Light by Gravity: A Physical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Joshua B.

    1982-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle relates effects seen by an accelerating observer to those experienced by an observer in a gravitational field, providing an explanation of bending of a light beam by gravity. Because the calculations lead to results one-half the value found experimentally, obtaining the correct light deflection is discussed.…

  12. 75 FR 12981 - Eligibility for Commercial Flats Failing Deflection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Eligibility for Commercial Flats Failing Deflection AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service published a proposed rule regarding eligibility for commercial flats failing...

  13. Electro-optical approach to pavement deflection management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rish, Jeff W., III; Adcock, Avery D.; Tuan, Christopher Y.; Baker, Samuel L.; Welker, Hugh W., II; Johnson, Roger F.

    1995-07-01

    A prototype continuous deflection device, referred to as a rolling weight deflectometer (RWD), has been developed as a nondestructive evaluation tool for airfield pavements. The system consists of a rigid trailer equipped with specially designed optical triangulation pavement sensors, a high-speed data acquisition system, and a high-pressure tire/load platform assembly. Pavement sensors are mounted on a rigid box beam equipped with an internal sensor system that corrects, in real time, the relative pavement height position measurements for displacements induced in the beam by mechanical vibrations, changes in temperature, or nonuniform dynamic loads at points where the beam attaches to the frame. The device produces continuous deflection profiles that show pavement response to a moving loaded wheel along the path of travel. These deflection profiles, combined with multiple passes along a lane, provide a far more detailed picture of the pavement structural integrity than has ever before been possible, because existing evaluation tools only produce response information at discrete points. Preliminary results show deflections measured by the RWD are in general agreement with the expected pavement response for various loads. A discussion of the device configuration, preliminary data, and potential as a pavement management tool is presented.

  14. Mission Design and Optimal Asteroid Deflection for Planetary Defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarli, Bruno V.; Knittel, Jeremy M.; Englander, Jacob A.; Barbee, Brent W.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary defense is a topic of increasing interest for many reasons, which has been mentioned in "Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022''. However, perhaps one of the most significant rationales for asteroid studies is the number of close approaches that have been documented recently. A space mission with a planetary defense objective aims to deflect the threatening body as far as possible from Earth. The design of a mission that optimally deflects an asteroid has different challenges: speed, precision, and system trade-off. This work addresses such issues and develops a fast transcription of the problem that can be implemented into an optimization tool, which allows for a broader trade study of different mission concepts with a medium fidelity. Such work is suitable for a mission?s preliminary study. It is shown, using the fictitious asteroid impact scenario 2017 PDC, that the complete tool is able to account for the orbit sensitivity to small perturbations and quickly optimize a deflection trajectory. The speed in which the tool operates allows for a trade study between the available hardware. As a result, key deflection dates and mission strategies are identified for the 2017 PDC.

  15. Charge control switch responsive to cell casing deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A switch structure, adapted for sensing the state-of-charge of a rechargeable cell, includes a contact element which detects cell casing deflection that occurs as a result of an increase in gaseous pressure within the cell when the cell is returned to its fully charged state during a recharging operation.

  16. Visually Controlled Robots For Unpacking And Mounting Television Deflection Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraga, P.; Newcomb, C. V.; Lloyd, P. R.; Humphreys, D. R.; Burnett, D. J.

    1984-10-01

    There are many real factory problems that can be solved by the use of robots equipped with computer vision. Typical of these tasks are the unpacking and assembly of loosely constrained objects. This paper describes a system in which TV deflection units are unpacked from a large carton and mounted onto the necks of picture tubes. The unpacking is performed by a cartesian gantry robot carrying a TV camera equipped with parallel-projection optics. The asso-ciated vision system is used to determine the position of the deflection units in the carton. Once a deflection unit has been unpacked, it is picked up by a PUMA 560 robot and then mounted in a specific orientation onto a picture tube. The mounting system is equipped with three TV cameras to locate the deflection unit and the neck of the tube. The paper describes the structure and operation of both systems, including gray-level picture processing, camera calibration with-out operator intervention, and the use of a general purpose, robot operating system, ROBOS, to control the two tasks.

  17. CdS nanoparticles and the sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacoin, Thierry; Malier, Laurent; Counio, G.; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    1997-10-01

    We present two approaches for the sol-gel synthesis of transparent solids in which CdS nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed. In any case CdS nanocrystals are obtained by precipitation either in reverse micelles or in the presence of a complexing thiol. The grafting of the 4- fluorothiophenol at the surface of the particles leads to highly concentrated colloids in acetone. In a first approach, CdS/silica nanocomposites are prepared introducing this concentrated CdS colloid in a silica sol which contains 3- mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane to ensure the homogeneity of the CdS dispersion. The luminescence properties of the materials are improved by using methyltriethoxysilane instead of tetraethoxysilane as the alkoxide precursor of the silica matrix. Further increase of the luminescence efficiency is also observed if a single Mn2+ ion is present inside the CdS particle. In a second approach, pure CdS nanocrystalline materials (bulk or thin films) are obtained from the sol-gel processing of the concentrated colloids stabilized by 4- fluorothiophenol. The mechanisms driving the aggregation of the particles and the gelation of the system are explicited. Thin films as well as monoliths can be produced. The general principles of this method are not restricted to chalcogenide materials, and should therefore enlarge the applications of the sol-gel proces to other non-oxide materials.

  18. Sigmoidal diagnostics with SOHO/CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Gibson, S. E.; Mason, H. E.; Pike, C. D.; Mandrini, C. H.

    During the third Whole Sun Month Campaign (August 18 - September 14, 1999), the evolution of the active region NOAA 8668 was followed during its meridian passage and at the limb (Sigmoid JOP 106), with simultaneous observations with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and with other instruments, both satellite and ground-based. On August 21st, a small flare, associated with a brightening of the sigmoidal structure, occurred. SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) observations of this small flare are presented. Coronal temperatures and densities of the sigmoid are estimated. High transition region densities (in the range 2.5-7 × 10 11 cm -3), obtained using O IV, are present in the brightenings associated with the flare. At coronal level, high temperatures of at least 8 MK were reached, as shown by strong Fe XIX emission. After this small flare, relatively strong blue-shifts (⋍ 30 km/s) are observed in coronal lines, located at the two ends of a small loop system associated with the sigmoid.

  19. Eccentric superconducting RF cavity separator structure

    DOEpatents

    Aggus, John R.; Giordano, Salvatore T.; Halama, Henry J.

    1976-01-01

    Accelerator apparatus having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects.

  20. Deflections from two types of human surrogates in oblique side impacts.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain time-dependent thoracic and abdominal deflections of an anthropomorphic test device, the WorldSID dummy, in oblique impact using sled tests, and compare with post mortem human subject (PMHS) data. To simulate the oblique loading vector, the load wall was configured such that the thorax and abdominal plates were offset by twenty or thirty degrees. Deflections were obtained from a chestband placed at the middle thoracic level and five internal deflection transducers. Data were compared from the chestband and the transducer located at the same level of the thorax. In addition, data were compared with deflections from similar PMHS tests obtained using chestbands placed at the level of the axilla, xyphoid process, and tenth rib, representing the upper thorax, middle thorax, and abdominal region of the biological specimen. Peak deflections ranged from 30 to 85 mm in the dummy tests. Peak deflections ranged from 60 to 115 mm in PMHS. Under both obliquities, dummy deflection-time histories at the location along the chestband in close proximity to the internal deflection transducer demonstrated similar profiles. However, the peak deflection magnitudes from the chestband were approximately 20 mm greater than those from the internal transducer. Acknowledging that the chestband measures external deflections in contrast to the transducer which records internal ribcage deformations, peak deflections match from the two sensors. Deflection time histories were also similar between the dummy and PMHS in terms of morphology, although thoracic deflection magnitudes from the dummy matched more closely with PMHS than abdominal deflection magnitudes. The dummy deformed in such a way that peak deflections occurred along the lateral vector. This was in contrast to PMHS tests wherein maximum deflections occurred along the antero-lateral direction, suggesting differing deformation responses in the two models. In addition, peak deflections occurred

  1. Deflections from two types of Human Surrogates in Oblique Side Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain time-dependent thoracic and abdominal deflections of an anthropomorphic test device, the WorldSID dummy, in oblique impact using sled tests, and compare with post mortem human subject (PMHS) data. To simulate the oblique loading vector, the load wall was configured such that the thorax and abdominal plates were offset by twenty or thirty degrees. Deflections were obtained from a chestband placed at the middle thoracic level and five internal deflection transducers. Data were compared from the chestband and the transducer located at the same level of the thorax. In addition, data were compared with deflections from similar PMHS tests obtained using chestbands placed at the level of the axilla, xyphoid process, and tenth rib, representing the upper thorax, middle thorax, and abdominal region of the biological specimen. Peak deflections ranged from 30 to 85 mm in the dummy tests. Peak deflections ranged from 60 to 115 mm in PMHS. Under both obliquities, dummy deflection-time histories at the location along the chestband in close proximity to the internal deflection transducer demonstrated similar profiles. However, the peak deflection magnitudes from the chestband were approximately 20 mm greater than those from the internal transducer. Acknowledging that the chestband measures external deflections in contrast to the transducer which records internal ribcage deformations, peak deflections match from the two sensors. Deflection time histories were also similar between the dummy and PMHS in terms of morphology, although thoracic deflection magnitudes from the dummy matched more closely with PMHS than abdominal deflection magnitudes. The dummy deformed in such a way that peak deflections occurred along the lateral vector. This was in contrast to PMHS tests wherein maximum deflections occurred along the antero-lateral direction, suggesting differing deformation responses in the two models. In addition, peak deflections occurred

  2. Constructing 2D layered hybrid CdS nanosheets/MoS2 heterojunctions for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic H2 generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Song; Xie, Jun; Wen, Jiuqing; He, Kelin; Li, Xin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiangchao

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a 2D hybrid CdS nanosheets(NSs)/MoS2 layered heterojunctions were successfully synthesized by a two-step hydrothermal method and subsequent ultrasonic treatment. The results showed that the loading ultrathin MoS2 NSs as co-catalysts could significantly boost the photocatalytic H2-evolution activity of CdS NSs. It is demonstrated that the optimized 2D CdS NSs/MoS2 (1.0 wt%) layered heterojunctions could achieve the highest photocatalytic H2-evolution activity of 1.75 mmol g-1 h-1 from an aqueous solution containing sulfide and sulfite under visible light, which is 2.03 times as high as that of the pristine CdS NSs. It is believed that the deposition of ultrathin MoS2 NSs and intimate 2D-2D coupling interfaces are mainly responsible for the excellent H2-evolution performance of 2D CdS NSs/MoS2 layered heterojunctions, owing to the effectively promoted separation and transportation of charge carriers and the enhanced following surface H2-evolution kinetics. Interestingly, the lactic acid and formic acid have also been demonstrated to be better sacrificial reagents than the Na2S/Na2SO3, for the photocatalytic H2 evolution over the 2D CdS NSs/MoS2 layered heterojunctions. It is hoped that the strategy of 2D-2D interfacical coupling based on CdS NSs can become a general strategy to improve the H2-evolution activity over various kinds of conventional semiconductor NSs.

  3. Optical properties of DNA induced starch capped PbS, CdS and PbS/CdS nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Konwar, R.; Kalita, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Starch capped PbS, CdS and PbS-CdS nanocomposites are conjugated with Calf-Thymus DNA. All the materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The x-ray diffraction patterns of PbS and CdS show that the materials possess polycrystalline having both cubic and hexagonal phases. High resolution transmission electron microscopic results (HRTEM) shows PbS nanoparticles of size 3 nm and that of CdS nanoparticles having average size 4 nm which exhibit tendency of agglomeration. In case of PbS/CdS, it exhibits different types of nanosheets. The UV absorption spectra of all the samples exhibit clear blue-shift with the respective bulk absorption edges. This is attributed to the strong quantum confinement in the materials. The absorption spectra also exhibit increase of the band gaps from 2.25 to 4.35 eV for PbS; 2.25-4.2 eV for CdS with decrease of molarities from 0.1 to 0.001 M as well as conjugated with DNA. The photoluminescence spectra of all PbS, CdS and PbS/CdS composites synthesized at 0.1 M molar concentration show a further blue shift and an enhancement of intensity after conjugation with DNA, but the effect is reversed i.e. occurrence of red shift and reduction of intensity for those having 0.01 M. This is due to the two competing processes of surface passivation as well as stabilization of nanocomposites governed by bio-molecules and that of Dexter energy transfer with the effective charge separation. The result shows the applicability of the materials in development of biological labels and biosensors.

  4. Abyssal Hill Deflections at Pacific-Antarctic Ridge Transform Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croon, M. B.; Cande, S. C.; Stock, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Almost complete shipboard multibeam bathymetry coverage at the Menard and Pitman Fracture Zones allowed us to map abyssal hill deviations along their traces. We compared the mapped abyssal hill deflections to a detailed plate motion model for the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge to test how abyssal hill curvature correlates to changes in plate motion direction, which leads to periods of transtension or transpression. To better understand the range of curvatures, we compared our observations with a model for curved cracks [Pollard and Aydin, 1984]. Spreading centers can be considered as giant cracks. The propagation path of a crack under combined loading can be predicted as a function of the stress ratio between the relative stresses required for spreading at the spreading axis (Mode I loading) and stresses resisting sliding along the transform (Mode II loading). We mapped 124 abyssal hill deflections at Menard Fracture Zone and 113 at Pitman Fracture Zone, respectively. The observations show that the amount of curvature can change rapidly over short periods of time. A high abundance of deflected abyssal hills is expected when a significant adjustment in plate motion direction occurs, which puts stress on the transform fault. This is observed, in particular, at the Pitman Fracture Zone, which experienced significant transtension since chron C5y (9.8 Ma) in response to a 17° clockwise rotation of the spreading direction azimuth. In contrast to the abyssal hill tips, which were deflected in response to the changing stress field when approaching a ridge transform intersection, we also mapped several anomalously curved abyssal hill structures. Such anomalous deflections are expected in oceanic crust formed near ridge transform intersections during periods of transpression [Sonder and Pockalny, 1999]. We mapped 19 anomalous abyssal hill deflections at Menard Fracture Zone between chrons C15o and C7 (34.9 to 24.8 Ma) and 15 at Pitman Fracture Zone between chrons C11y and C6B (30

  5. Experimental and Theoretical Deflections and Natural Frequencies of an Inflatable Fabric Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson

    1961-01-01

    Static and vibration tests were performed on an inflatable square fabric plate supported on all edges. Lateral deflections and natural frequencies showed good agreement with calculations made using a linear small-deflection theory.

  6. Correction of deflection under mask's own weight by bending mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagami, Takashi; Kambayashi, Takashi; Azumi, Minako

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the photomask substrate deflects when the mask is set on the frame and the deflection is an obstacle to light exposure. In this study, we introduce "the bending mask" to cancel out the deflection. The surface of the bending mask has the height distribution in advance to cancel out the deflection, owing to Nikon's accurate polishing technology and Nikon's accurate measurement machine.

  7. Modelling of crack deflection at core junctions in sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andreasen, J. H.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2009-08-01

    The paper treats the problem of crack propagation in sandwich panels with interior core junctions. When a face-core interface crack approaches a trimaterial wedge, as it may occur at a sandwich core junction, two options exist for further crack advance; one is for the interface crack to penetrate the wedge along the face-core interface, and the second is deflection along the core junction interface. Crack deflection is highly relevant and a requirement for the functionality of a newly developed peel stopper for sandwich structures. The physical model presented in this paper enables the quantitative prediction of the ratio of the toughnesses of the two wedge interfaces required to control the crack propagation, and the derived results can be applied directly in future designs of sandwich structures. The solution strategy is based on finite element analysis (FEA), and a realistic engineering practice example of a tri-material composition corresponding to face and core materials is presented.

  8. Deflected Mirage Mediation: A Framework for Generalized Supersymmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2008-11-23

    We present a model of supersymmetry breaking in which the contributions from gravity/modulus, anomaly, and gauge mediation are all comparable. We term this scenario 'deflected mirage mediation', which is a generalization of the KKLT-motivated mirage mediation scenario to include gauge mediated contributions. These contributions deflect the gaugino mass unification scale and alter the pattern of soft parameters at low energies. Competitive gauge-mediated terms can naturally appear within phenomenological models based on the KKLT setup by the stabilization of the gauge singlet field responsible for the masses of the messenger fields. We analyze the renormalization group evolution of the supersymmetry breaking terms and the resulting low energy mass spectra.

  9. Estimation of the deflection of the vertical using gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoussakis, Gerassimos; Korakitis, Romylos; Milas, Paraskevas

    2017-04-01

    We present a method to estimate the deflection of the vertical at a point P on the Earth's physical surface by forming a small network of three points around point P, with known geodetic coordinates (φ, λ, h) and by obtaining gravity measurements at all points. In the first step, the gravity values are used to form the Eötvös matrix of the actual gravity potential W at point P. In the second step, the gravity differences and the components of the Eötvös matrix are used to form a linear system of three algebraic equations with three unknowns, which are the first order partial derivatives of the actual potential W. The solution of the system enables us to determine the components ξ and η of the deflection of the vertical at the chosen point P. Finally, we present a numerical simulation, using several points scattered on a wide area of the Earth's surface.

  10. Ion Beam Deflection (AKA Push-Me/Pull-You)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John

    2013-01-01

    The Ion Beam Deflection provides the following potential advantages over other asteroid deflection systems. Like the gravity tractor, it doesn't require despinning of the asteroid. Unlike the gravity tractor, it provides a significantly higher coupling force that is independent of the asteroid size. The concept could be tested as part of the baseline Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. The thrust and total impulse are entirely within the design of the SEP vehicle. The total impulse is potentially competitive with kinetic impactors and eliminates the need for a second rendezvous spacecraft.?Gridded ion thrusters provide beam divergence angles of a few degrees enabling long stand-off distances from the asteroid. Mitigating control issues. Minimizing back-sputter contamination risks

  11. Ion Beam Deflection (AKA Push-Me/Pull-You)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John

    2013-01-01

    The Ion Beam Deflection provides the following potential advantages over other asteroid deflection systems. Like the gravity tractor, it doesn't require despinning of the asteroid. Unlike the gravity tractor, it provides a significantly higher coupling force that is independent of the asteroid size. The concept could be tested as part of the baseline Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. The thrust and total impulse are entirely within the design of the SEP vehicle. The total impulse is potentially competitive with kinetic impactors and eliminates the need for a second rendezvous spacecraft.?Gridded ion thrusters provide beam divergence angles of a few degrees enabling long stand-off distances from the asteroid. Mitigating control issues. Minimizing back-sputter contamination risks

  12. Evolutionary optimization of deflection missions with fly-by manoeuvre .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, L.; Casalino, L.

    The Earth, as the other celestial bodies in Solar System, is continuously exposed to impact hazard with bodies coming from space. The goal of this study is to find the optimal solution for a PHO (Potentially Hazardous Object) deflection mission with a kinetic impactor. An evolutionary algorithm, which combines the results obtained in parallel by differential evolution (DE), genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO), is employed. Once identified a reference PHO, it has been considered an Earth-Asteroid mission that exploits the high mass of Jupiter to obtain a free velocity change performing a fly-by of the planet. The higher relative velocity at impact involves a higher deflection effect on PHO's trajectory. Spacecraft's direct and retrograde motion has been considered.

  13. Flow visualisation studies on growth of area of deflected jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivadas, V.; Pani, B. S.; Bütefisch, K. A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    Laser light sheet visualisation, coupled with image processing, was utilised to understand the effect of exit geometry on the integral properties of jets in cross flow. The study involved jets emanating from circular and rectangular nozzles of different aspect ratios deflected by a uniform free-stream. The investigation considers incompressible momentum jets with exit Reynolds number in the range of 4400-9200, the velocity ratios being 3.9, 5.9 and 7.8. In contrast to a deflected circular jet, those jets emanating from blunt configurations tend to have higher growth rates initially and are devoid of the horse-shoe or the bound vortex system in their cross section.

  14. Experimental modelling of eddy currents and deflection for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-11-01

    During plasma disruptions in a tokamak fusion reactor, eddy currents are induced in the limiters and other conducting structures surrounding the plasma. Interactions between these currents with the toroidal field causes deflection and stress in the structural components. The structural motion in the strong magnetic field induces additional eddy current opposing the initial eddy current and modifying subsequent structural dynamics. Therefore, the motion and current are coupled and must be solved simultaneously. The coupling between current and deflection in cantilevered beams was investigated experimentally. The beams provide a simple model for the limiter blade of a tokamak fusion reactor. Several test pieces and various magnetic field conditions were employed to study the extend of the coupling effect from weak to strong coupling. Experimental results are compared with analytical predictions.

  15. Fuel burner with air-deflecting object and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, E.P.

    1980-12-16

    There is provided an improved fuel burner of the type having an air blower and blast tube. The improvement involves placement of an air-deflecting object inside the housing of the air blower or in the blast tube. In one embodiment, the object has a v-shaped cross section, and is attached to a gently tapered cylinder; the object can be held in place by inserting it through a hole of appropriate dimension in the air blower or blast tube, and tapping on the exposed end of the tapered cylinder until the latter is engaged in the hole. There is also provided a method of improving a fuel burner by mounting a air-deflecting object of the type described in the air blower housing or in the blast tube.

  16. Subsurface-structure determination using photothermal laser-beam deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, Grover C., Jr.; McDonald, F. Alan

    1982-11-01

    Photothermal imaging using laser-beam deflection is shown to be a successful means of detecting subsurface structure in solids. Experimental data for known and unknown subsurface structures are reported. The existing theory agrees well with data on broad subsurface structures, but small subsurface structures produce signal variations which are better represented by a subsurface thermal contact resistance. The first photothermal-image characterization of a microscopic, unknown subsurface defect is presented.

  17. Tool deflection in the milling of titanium alloy: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebala, W.

    2015-09-01

    Tool deflection strongly influences on the workpiece quality. Author of the paper built a simulation model of the down milling process of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) with a tool made of sintered carbides. Material model consists of strain, strain rate and thermal sensitivity formulations to predict the stress field distribution in the cutting zone. Numerical calculations were experimentally verified on the milling center, equipped with measuring devices: force dynamometer, thermo-vision and high-speed video cameras.

  18. Load deflection characteristics of square and rectangular archwires.

    PubMed

    Arreghini, Angela; Lombardo, Luca; Mollica, Francesco; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    To determine and compare the relative stiffness of a large selection of commonly-used square and rectangular steel, super-tempered steel, NiTi, and TMA orthodontic archwires of various cross-sections, in order to provide the clinician with a useful, easy-to-consult guide to archwire sequence selection. Twenty-four archwires of different cross-section shape, size and material were selected. Each type was subjected to a modified three-point bending test, performed in triplicate using an Instron 4467 dynamometer. Each sample was deflected by 1mm, and the corresponding load recorded. The relative stiffness of each archwire sample was calculated, and samples were compared by material and by cross-section. A considerable difference in resistance to deflection was revealed between all the tested archwires. As expected, the resistance to deflection of archwires of the same cross-section was found to increase with increasing stiffness of their construction material. Specifically, steel archwires can be as much as 8 times stiffer than NiTi archwires of the same shape and cross-section, and super-tempered steel archwires are invariably stiffer than traditional steel versions. Marked differences in resistance to deflection were also found between NiTi archwires made of the same material but with different shape characteristics. In archwires of the same cross-section, steel is always stiffer than TMA and NiTi, and super-tempered steel is always stiffer than conventional steels. In archwires of the same material, the stiffness increases with the cross-section, in particular with its height. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Development of a Displacement Interferometer for Model Deflection Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    AEDC-TR-76-116 THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DISPLACEMENT INTERFEROMETER FOR MODEL DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OFFICE OF THE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR ARNOLD...ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT CENTER AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND ARNOLD AIR FORCE STATION, TENNESSEE 37389 January 1977 Final Report for Period July 1974 - June... AIR FORCE STATION, TENNESSEE 37389 NOTICES When U. S. Government drawings specifications, or other data are used for any purpose other than a

  20. Galvanometer deflection: a precision high-speed system.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, D P; Raamot, J

    1976-06-01

    An X-Y galvanometer deflection system capable of high precision in a random access mode of operation is described. Beam positional information in digitized form is obtained by employing a Ronchi grating with a sophisticated optical detection scheme. This information is used in a control interface to locate the beam to the required precision. The system is characterized by high accuracy at maximum speed and is designed for operation in a variable environment, with particular attention placed on thermal insensitivity.

  1. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65 °F−80...

  2. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65 °F−80...

  3. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65 °F−80...

  4. Deflection and fragmentation of near-earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Harris, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    The collision with earth of near-earth asteroids or comet nuclei poses a potential threat to mankind. Objects about 100 m in diameter could be diverted from an earth-crossing trajectory by the impact of a rocket-launched mass, but for larger bodies nuclear explosions seem to be the only practical means of deflection. Fragmentation of the body by nuclear charges is less efficient or secure.

  5. Compact ExB mass separator for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Hashino, T.; Hirata, F.; Kasuya, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2008-02-15

    A compact ExB mass separator that deflects beam by 30 deg. has been designed and built to prove its principle of operation. The main part of the separator is contained in a shielding box of 11 cm long, 9 cm wide, and 1.5 cm high. An electromagnet of 7 cm pole diameter produced variable magnetic field in the mass separation region instead of a couple of permanent magnets which is to be used in the final design. The experimental result agreed well with the theoretical prediction, and larger mass ions is bent with less magnetic field with the aid of the deflection electric field. The reduction in resolving power for mass separation due to the deflection electric field has been investigated experimentally.

  6. Planetary Defense: Options for Deflection of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Alexander, Reginald; Bonometti, Joseph; Chapman, Jack; Fincher, Sharon; Hopkins, Randall; Kalkstein, Matthew; Philips, Al; Polsgrove, Tara; Statham, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    In FY 2002 a team of engineers and scientists at MSFC conducted a preliminary investigation of the options for deflecting a Near Earth Object (NEO) fiom a collision course with the earth. A general discussion of the current threat facing the earth from NEO s is outlined. A suite of tools were developed to model inbound and outbound trajectories, propulsive options, and assessment of threat. Propulsive options considered included; staged chemical, nuclear ablation and deflagration, mass driver and solar sail concepts. Trajectory tools plotted the outbound course to intercept the NE0 and the deflection requirements to cause the inbound NE0 to miss the earth. Threat assessment tools estimated the number of lives saved over a given time frame by deploying a system capable of deflecting an NE0 of a certain size and velocity. All of these tools were integrated into a routine to find the most effective vehicle for a given mission mass and mission time. Discussion of desired future efforts is given. This work was funded under the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts activity from NASA HQ.

  7. Application of photothermal deflection spectroscopy to electrochemical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, J.D.; McLarnon, F.R.; Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    This dissertation discusses the theory and practice of Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS, which is also known as probe beam deflection spectroscopy, PBDS, probe deflection technique, and mirage effect spectroscopy) with respect to electrochemical systems. Much of the discussion is also relevant to non-electrochemical systems. PDS can measure the optical absorption spectrum of interfaces and concentration gradients in the electrolyte adjacent to the electrode. These measurements can be made on a wide variety of electrode surfaces and can be performed under dynamic conditions. The first three chapters discuss the theory of the phenomena that can be detected by PDS, and the equipment used in a PDS system. A secondary gradient technique'' is proposed, which places the probe beam on the back of an electrode. The results of a numerical model yield a method for determining the offset of the probe beam from the electrode surface based on the frequency response of the PDS signal. The origin and control of noise in the PDS signal are discussed. A majority of the signal noise appears to be acoustic in origin. The electrochemical oxidation of platinum is used to demonstrate that PDS has sub-monolayer sensitivity necessary to study interfacial chemistry. The results allow us to propose a two-reaction oxidation mechanism: the platinum is electrochemically oxidized to form platinum dihydroxide and dehydrated by a non-electrochemical second-order reaction. The final chapter discusses the relation of PDS to similar and competing techniques, and considers possibilities for the future of the technique.

  8. Application of photothermal deflection spectroscopy to electrochemical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, James D.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1992-03-01

    This dissertation discusses the theory and practice of Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS, which is also known as probe beam deflection spectroscopy, PBDS, probe deflection technique, and mirage effect spectroscopy) with respect to electrochemical systems. Much of the discussion is also relevant to non-electrochemical systems. PDS can measure the optical absorption spectrum of interfaces and concentration gradients in the electrolyte adjacent to the electrode. These measurements can be made on a wide variety of electrode surfaces and can be performed under dynamic conditions. The first three chapters discuss the theory of the phenomena that can be detected by PDS, and the equipment used in a PDS system. A ``secondary gradient technique`` is proposed, which places the probe beam on the back of an electrode. The results of a numerical model yield a method for determining the offset of the probe beam from the electrode surface based on the frequency response of the PDS signal. The origin and control of noise in the PDS signal are discussed. A majority of the signal noise appears to be acoustic in origin. The electrochemical oxidation of platinum is used to demonstrate that PDS has sub-monolayer sensitivity necessary to study interfacial chemistry. The results allow us to propose a two-reaction oxidation mechanism: the platinum is electrochemically oxidized to form platinum dihydroxide and dehydrated by a non-electrochemical second-order reaction. The final chapter discusses the relation of PDS to similar and competing techniques, and considers possibilities for the future of the technique.

  9. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and deflections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. The test pieces were copper, aluminum, phosphor bronze, and brass cantilever beams, clamped rigidly at one end with a nonconducting support frame inside the FELIX test volume. The primary data recorded as functions of time were the beam deflection measured with a noncontact electro-optical device, the total eddy current measured with a Rogowski coil and linking through a central hole in the beam, and the material stress extracted from strain gauges. Measurements of stress and deflection were taken at selected positions along the beam. The extent of the coupling effect depends on several factors. These include the size, the electrical and mechanical properties of the beam, segmenting of the beam, the decay rate of the dipole field, and the strength of the solenoid field.

  10. Planetary Defense: Options for Deflection of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Alexander, Reginald; Bonometti, Joseph; Chapman, Jack; Fincher, Sharon; Hopkins, Randall; Kalkstein, Matthew; Philips, Al; Polsgrove, Tara; Statham, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    In FY 2002 a team of engineers and scientists at MSFC conducted a preliminary investigation of the options for deflecting a Near Earth Object (NEO) fiom a collision course with the earth. A general discussion of the current threat facing the earth from NEO s is outlined. A suite of tools were developed to model inbound and outbound trajectories, propulsive options, and assessment of threat. Propulsive options considered included; staged chemical, nuclear ablation and deflagration, mass driver and solar sail concepts. Trajectory tools plotted the outbound course to intercept the NE0 and the deflection requirements to cause the inbound NE0 to miss the earth. Threat assessment tools estimated the number of lives saved over a given time frame by deploying a system capable of deflecting an NE0 of a certain size and velocity. All of these tools were integrated into a routine to find the most effective vehicle for a given mission mass and mission time. Discussion of desired future efforts is given. This work was funded under the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts activity from NASA HQ.

  11. Mechanical radiation detection via sub-Brownian lever deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammig, Mark David

    2005-07-01

    A micromechanical lever that deflects in response to the impacts of charged particles is proposed as a means of improving upon the capabilities of existing radiation detection technology. When a particle strikes an object, momentum is transferred to the impacted body. The resulting body motion can be correlated to the energy of the incident particle. The momentum detector offers promise as a highly discriminating, high-resolution tool for ion sensing. Advances required to successfully realize a spectroscopic capability have been completed; specifically, techniques for reproducibly fabricating micromechanical structures have been optimized, and an instrument that measures miniscule deflections has been developed. Even absent substantial refinement efforts, the novel coupled-cavity optical detector can resolve lever motions on the order of 1--10 picometers. A method by which the Brownian motion of the lever can be stilled has been proven which elicits reductions sufficient to measure heavy-ion impact, the deflections from which may be several orders of magnitude below the thermal vibration amplitude. Using active forcing techniques, the Brownian vibration of the microlevers has been reduced from room temperature (288 K) to sub-Kelvin temperatures, for levers vibrating in air. The mechanical factors that limit the noise reduction magnitude are discussed and methods of surmounting those limitations are identified.

  12. Bio-mimetic optical sensor for structural deflection measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Streeter, Robert W.; Khan, Md. A.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2014-03-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of aviation is a primary goal of NASA aeronautics research. One approach to achieve this goal is to build lighter weight aircraft, which presents complex challenges due to a corresponding increase in structural flexibility. Wing flexibility can adversely affect aircraft performance from the perspective of aerodynamic efficiency and safety. Knowledge of the wing position during flight can aid active control methods designed to mitigate problems due to increased wing flexibility. Current approaches to measuring wing deflection, including strain measurement devices, accelerometers, or GPS solutions, and new technologies such as fiber optic strain sensors, have limitations for their practical application to flexible aircraft control. Hence, it was proposed to use a bio-mimetic optical sensor based on the fly-eye to track wing deflection in real-time. The fly-eye sensor has several advantages over conventional sensors used for this application, including light weight, low power requirements, fast computation, and a small form factor. This paper reports on the fly-eye sensor development and its application to real-time wing deflection measurement.

  13. Simulations of hypervelocity impacts for asteroid deflection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberling, T.; Ferguson, J. M.; Gisler, G. R.; Plesko, C. S.; Weaver, R.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of kinetic-impact deflection of threatening near-earth asteroids will be tested for the first time in the proposed AIDA (Asteroid Impact Deflection Assessment) mission, involving two independent spacecraft, NASAs DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) and ESAs AIM (Asteroid Impact Mission). The impact of the DART spacecraft onto the secondary of the binary asteroid 65803 Didymos, at a speed of 5 to 7 km/s, is expected to alter the mutual orbit by an observable amount. The velocity imparted to the secondary depends on the geometry and dynamics of the impact, and especially on the momentum enhancement factor, conventionally called beta. We use the Los Alamos hydrocodes Rage and Pagosa to estimate beta in laboratory-scale benchmark experiments and in the large-scale asteroid deflection test. Simulations are performed in two- and three-dimensions, using a variety of equations of state and strength models for both the lab-scale and large-scale cases. This work is being performed as part of a systematic benchmarking study for the AIDA mission that includes other hydrocodes.

  14. In situ synthesis of CdS decorated titanate nanosheets with highly efficient visible-light-induced photoactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Fang, Pengfei; Liu, Fuwei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Xinzhao; Lu, Dingze; Li, Delong; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-06-01

    Appropriately dispersed CdS nanoparticles were intimately embedded into titanate nanosheets (TNS) through ion-exchange and in situ sulfurization process. The sheet-like intermediates of titanate during the transforming process into nanotubes were firstly used as substrate for the decoration of CdS nanoparticles, and the synthesis route was achieved by ion-exchange process between titanate precursor and Cd2+ ions solution, and the following sulfuration process by using Na2S solutions. The catalytic activity of the photocatalyst was investigated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. With an optimal Cd/Ti molar ratio of 15%, the CdS/TNS composite exhibits the highest photocatalytic performance, which is approximately 5.4 times greater than that of pure TNS. The mechanism of the separation behavior of the photogenerated charges was also discussed.

  15. Photoelectrochemical properties of chemosynthesized CdS thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, S. B.; Pawar, S. A.; Bhosale, P. N.; Patil, P. S.

    2012-06-01

    Thin film of cadmium sulphide (CdS) consisting cabbage like morphology was chemically synthesized at room temperature from an aqueous alkaline bath onto soda lime glass and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates. The synthesized cabbages of CdS were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD pattern revealed the formation of CdS particles with a cubic crystal structure. SEM micrographs show that the cabbage like morphology is composed of nanopetals. Further, the photoelectochemical (PEC) performance was tested in Na2S-NaOH-S electrolyte which has maximum short circuit current of (Isc) 359μA/cm2.

  16. Optical sensor based on a single CdS nanobelt.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-04-23

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 10⁴, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  17. Optical Sensor Based on a Single CdS Nanobelt

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 104, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions. PMID:24763211

  18. Compact superconducting rf-dipole cavity designs for deflecting and crabbing applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini; Delayen, Jean R.; Castilla, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar design has evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved properties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those applications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cavity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade, and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energy electron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the optimized rf design in terms of rf performance including rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) properties, multipacting and multipole expansion for the above mentioned applications.

  19. Growth and characterization of CdS crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A growth method for the physical vapor transport of compound semiconductors in closed ampoules is described. With the unique techniques applied in the heat treatment of the starting materials and the temperature profiles provided by the three-zone translational furnace, large crystals of CdS have been grown successfully by the method at lower temperatures than previously used. Both unseeded and seeded growth have been investigated. The CdS crystals were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) to study the microstructure and the dislocation etch-pits. The crystals were further characterized by infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) transmission measurements.

  20. The flare of November 29, 1996 observed by SOHO/CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaykowska, A.; Rank, G.; Ruedi, I.; Solanki, S. K.; de Pontieu, B.

    We present flare and post-flare observations obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on November 29, 1996. On this day at around 20:40 UT, an M 1.0/1F flare occurred in the solar active region NOAA 7999 and was accidentally observed by the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), one of the two spectrometers of CDS (Harrison et al., 1995). The data consist of two rasters lasting for 135 minutes each and both cover an area of 4 times 4 arcminutes. The first raster is pointed at the northern part of the active region during the flare whereas the second one covers the southern part of the active region after the main phase of the flare. The observations were part of the Joint Observing Program (JOP) 54 which is aimed at the investigation of scaling laws in coronal loops. Consequently the details of observations such as line list and exposure time weren't convenient for flare observations. In addition a flare can lead to over-exposures, i.e., saturation of the CCD detector pixels, and a burn-in degeneration of the detector in bright lines. Therefore observations of flares with CDS are avoided and the flare from November 29, 1996, is so far the only noteworthy flare observed by CDS. In our case we have remarkable saturation in the chromospheric He I line at 584 AA and the coronal Fe XVI lines at 335 AA and 361 AA, which are formed at an equilibrium temperature of about 2.5 cdot 10^6 K. Another effect of illumination on the CCD detector being too high is that the electron well of each pixel may fill and hence bleed to adjacent pixels. This effect is clearly seen in our data. As the flare occurred, the 2 times 240 arcseconds slit was being rastered across the active region from west to east. We thus have a convolution of spatial and temporal effects which are not easy to separate. However, we have spectral information of each pixel in all lines and exposures which are not saturated. Hence, line parameters

  1. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for a particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection strategy.

  2. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    DOE PAGES

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for amore » particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection

  3. The 2017 Eclipse: Centenary of the Einstein Light Deflection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    August 21st, 2017 will see a total eclipse of the Sun visible in many parts of the United States. Coincidentally this date marks the centenary of the first observational attempt to test Einstein's General Theory of Relativity by measuring gravitational deflection of light by the Sun. This was attempted by the Kodaikanal Observatory in India during the conjunction of Regulus with the Sun in daylight on August 21st, 1917. The observation was attempted at the urging of the amateur German-British astronomer A. F. Lindemann, with his son, F. A. Lindemann, a well-known physicist, who later played a significant role as Churchill's science advisor during World War II. A century later Regulus will once again be in conjunction with the Sun, but by a remarkable coincidence, this will occur during a solar eclipse! Efforts will be made to measure the star deflection during the eclipse and the experiment is contrasted with the famous expeditions of 1919 which were the first to actually measure the light deflection, since the 1917 effort did not meet with success. Although in recent decades there have been efforts made to suggest that the 1919 eclipse team, led by Arthur Stanley Eddington and Sir Frank Watson Dyson, over-interpreted their results in favor of Einstein this talk will argue that such claims are wrong-headed. A close study of their data analysis reveals that they had good grounds for the decisions they made and this conclusion is reinforced by comparison with a modern re-analysis of the plates by the Greenwich Observatory conducted in 1977.

  4. Calibration of scanning tunneling microscope transducers using optical beam deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, G. C., Jr.; McBride, S. E.; Warmack, R. J.; van de Sande, B.

    1989-08-01

    An accurate, sensitive, easily implemented method of calibration of the elastic displacement of piezoelectric transducers used in scanning tunneling microscopes has been developed. The axial displacement for both static and harmonic excitation has been measured using laser beam deflection amplified by an optical magnification system. For harmonic excitation where lock-in amplifier detection can be utilized, displacements as small as 0.03 Å have been measured. Measurements on PZT-5H and PZT-8 transducers over a range of five orders of magnitude in applied voltage demonstrate the power of the method in calibration of displacements from the subangstrom to the nonlinear region with an uncertainty of about 4%.

  5. Direct measurement of Vorticella contraction force by micropipette deflection.

    PubMed

    France, Danielle; Tejada, Jonathan; Matsudaira, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The ciliated protozoan Vorticella convallaria is noted for its exceptionally fast adenosine triphosphate-independent cellular contraction, but direct measurements of contractile force have proven difficult given the length scale, speed, and forces involved. We used high-speed video microscopy to image live Vorticella stalled in midcontraction by deflection of an attached micropipette. Stall forces correlate with both distance contracted and the resting stalk length. Estimated isometric forces range from 95 to 177 nanonewtons (nN), or 1.12 nN·μm(-1) of the stalk. Maximum velocity and work are also proportional to distance contracted. These parameters constrain proposed biochemical/physical models of the contractile mechanism.

  6. Deflected Mirage Mediation: A Phenomenological Framework for Generalized Supersymmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Lisa L.; Kim, Ian-Woo; Ouyang, Peter; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-09-05

    We present a general phenomenological framework for dialing between gravity mediation, gauge mediation, and anomaly mediation. The approach is motivated from recent developments in moduli stabilization, which suggest that gravity mediated terms can be effectively loop suppressed and thus comparable to gauge and anomaly mediated terms. The gauginos exhibit a mirage unification behavior at a ''deflected'' scale, and gluinos are often the lightest colored sparticles. The approach provides a rich setting in which to explore generalized supersymmetry breaking at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Deflected mirage mediation: a phenomenological framework for generalized supersymmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Everett, Lisa L; Kim, Ian-Woo; Ouyang, Peter; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2008-09-05

    We present a general phenomenological framework for dialing between gravity mediation, gauge mediation, and anomaly mediation. The approach is motivated from recent developments in moduli stabilization, which suggest that gravity mediated terms can be effectively loop suppressed and thus comparable to gauge and anomaly mediated terms. The gauginos exhibit a mirage unification behavior at a "deflected" scale, and gluinos are often the lightest colored sparticles. The approach provides a rich setting in which to explore generalized supersymmetry breaking at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Force feedback microscopy based on an optical beam deflection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca

    2014-07-07

    Force feedback microscopy circumvents the jump to contact in atomic force microscopy when using soft cantilevers and quantitatively measures the interaction properties at the nanoscale by simultaneously providing force, force gradient, and dissipation. The force feedback microscope developed so far used an optical cavity to measure the tip displacement. In this Letter, we show that the more conventional optical beam deflection scheme can be used to the same purpose. With this instrument, we have followed the evolution of the Brownian motion of the tip under the influence of a water bridge.

  9. Photothermal deflection in multilayer coatings: modeling and experiment.

    PubMed

    Gallais, Laurent; Commandré, Mireille

    2005-09-01

    A model of the photothermal deflection signal in multilayer coatings is presented that takes into account optical interference effects and heat flow within the stack. Measurements are then taken of high-reflectivity HfO2/SiO2 ultraviolet mirrors made by plasma ion assisted deposition and compared to calculations. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and the model. Using this model for the calibration and the setup described, one can measure absorption in multilayer coatings accurately down to 10(-7) of the incident power.

  10. Reservation information sharing enhancement for deflection routing in OBS network.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghui; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2005-03-07

    The resource contention problem is critical in Just-Enough-Time (JET) based optical burst switching (OBS) networks. Although deflection routing (DR) reduces the contention probability in some degree, it does not give much improvement under heavy traffic load. This paper analyzed the inducement causing contention in OBS networks, and proposed Resource Information Sharing Enhancement (RISE) scheme. Theoretical analysis shows that this scheme achieves shorter length of the detour path than normal DR. We simulated this scheme on both full mesh network and practical 14-node NSFNET. The simulation results show that it gives at best 2 orders magnitude improvement in reducing the burst contention probability over its previous routing approaches.

  11. Self-referenced prism deflection measurement schemes with microradian precision

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Rebecca; Paul, Justin; Bergeson, Scott; Durfee, Dallin S

    2005-08-01

    We have demonstrated several inexpensive methods that can be used to measure the deflection angles of prisms with microradian precision. The methods are self-referenced, where various reversals are used to achieve absolute measurements without the need of a reference prism or any expensive precision components other than the prisms under test. These techniques are based on laser interferometry and have been used in our laboratory to characterize parallel-plate beam splitters, penta prisms, right-angle prisms, and corner cube reflectors using only components typically available in an optics laboratory.

  12. Abrupt fiber taper based Michelson interferometric deflection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhaobing; Yam, Scott S.-H.

    2008-06-01

    A new compact standard single mode fiber Michelson interferometer deflection sensor was proposed, tested and simulated. The new interferometer consists of a symmetrical abrupt 3 dB taper region with a 40 μm waist diameter, a 700 μm length and a 500nm thick gold layer coating. Compared with similar interferometric devices based on long period gratings that need microfabrication technology and photosensitive fibers, the proposed sensor uses a much simplified fabrication process and normal single mode fiber, and has a linear response of 1.1nm/mm.

  13. Henry Cavendish, Johann von Soldner, and the deflection of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1988-05-01

    The gravitational deflection of light based on Newtonian theory and the corpuscular model of light was calculated, but never published, around 1784 by Henry Cavendish, almost 20 years earlier than the first published calculation by Johann Georg von Soldner. The two results are slightly different because, while Cavendish treated a light ray emitted from infinity, von Soldner treated a light ray emitted from the surface of the gravitating body. At the first order of approximation, they agree with each other; both are one-half the value predicted by general relativity and confirmed by experiment.

  14. Optical beam deflection signal from a single microparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Kitamori, Takehiko; Sawada, Tsuguo

    1990-07-01

    The optical beam deflection (OBD) method was applied to the measurement of a single microparticle, and the signal from one resin microparticle of 200-600 μm in diameter could be detected. Based on the frequency characteristics and size dependence of the OBD signal, this method was found to be more sensitive for a smaller particle, and more effective than the photoacoustic method. Theoretical considerations showed that these characteristics were attributable to the enhancement of the temperature field gradient due to the curvature of the microparticle.

  15. Observation of Femtosecond Bunch Length Using a Transverse Deflecting Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huning, M.; Bolzmann, A.; Schlarb, H.; Frisch, J.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.; Rossbach, J.; /Hamburg U.

    2005-12-14

    The design of the VUV-FEL at DESY demands bunch lengths in the order of 50 fs and below. For the diagnostic of such very short bunches a transverse deflecting RF structure (LOLA) has been installed which streaks the beam according to the longitudinal distribution. Tests in the VUV-FEL yielded a rich substructure of the bunches. The most pronounced peak in the has a rms length of approximately 50 fs during FEL operation and below 20 fs FWHM at maximum compression. Depending on the transverse focusing a resolution well below 50 fs was achieved.

  16. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  17. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  18. Ag nanoparticle mediated growth of CdS nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K.; Nuwad, J.; Thinaharan, C.; Dey, G. K.; Pillai, C. G. S.

    2007-06-01

    Catalytic growth of CdS have been carried out on large scale by evaporation of bulk CdS on Ag deposited Si (1 1 1) at atmospheric pressure. The as prepared CdS had wurtzite structure as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. The nanostructures were beltlike with several tens of micrometers length, several micrometers width and few nanometers to tens of nanometers thick as seen by scanning electron microscope and confirmed by TEM studies. The nanobelts were single crystalline in nature and showed reflection corresponding to (1 1 2) and (0 0 2) planes in SAED. The PL studies revealed the green band due to band gap emission and red band due to emission from the surface states. The higher intensity of the defect emission indicated the presence of considerable concentration of surface defects in the as prepared sample. The deposition of CdS could be explained on the basis of catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid mechanism.

  19. Options for Putting CDS/ISIS Databases on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To review the variety of software solutions available for putting CDS/ISIS databases on the internet. To help anyone considering which route to take. Design/methodology/approach: Briefly describes the characteristics, history, origin and availability of each package. Identifies the type of skills required to implement the package and the…

  20. Options for Putting CDS/ISIS Databases on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To review the variety of software solutions available for putting CDS/ISIS databases on the internet. To help anyone considering which route to take. Design/methodology/approach: Briefly describes the characteristics, history, origin and availability of each package. Identifies the type of skills required to implement the package and the…

  1. Thiol surface complexation on growing CdS clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Swayambunathan, V.; Hayes, D.; Schmidt, K.H.; Liao, Y.X.; Meisel, D. )

    1990-05-09

    The growth of small CdS colloidal particles has been initiated by pulse radiolytic release of sulfide from thiol (3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, RSH) in the presence of Cd{sup 2+} ions. The kinetics and stoichiometry of the ensuring reactions were followed by conductivity, absorption spectroscopy, and light-scattering techniques. The final CdS product has been identified by electron diffraction. The formation of Cd-thiolate complexes at the surface of the particles is indicated by conductivity and by energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) results. The rate of formation of CdS clusters is strongly pH dependent due to the pH effect on the stability of Dd{sup 2+}/HS{sup {minus}} complexes. At low pHs (4.0-5.3) the growth mechanism is proposed to be primarily a cluster-molecule process. At this pH range Cd{sup 2+} ions at the CdS particle surface complex with thiolate ions stronger than in the bulk of the solution. The size control of the particles by thiols is proposed to result from a competition of thiolate ions with HS{sup {minus}} ions for cadmium ions at the surface of the growing particles.

  2. THE HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCE WHERE THE DEFLECTIONS AND ROTATIONS OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OCCUR

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the trajectory of a coronal mass ejection (CME), including any deflection from a radial path, and the orientation of its magnetic field is essential for space weather predictions. Kay et al. developed a model, Forecasting a CME’s Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), of CME deflections and rotation due to magnetic forces, not including the effects of reconnection. ForeCAT is able to reproduce the deflection of observed CMEs. The deflecting CMEs tend to show a rapid increase of their angular momentum close to the Sun, followed by little to no increase at farther distances. Here we quantify the distance at which the CME deflection is “determined,” which we define as the distance after which the background solar wind has negligible influence on the total deflection. We consider a wide range in CME masses and radial speeds and determine that the deflection and rotation of these CMEs can be well-described by assuming they propagate with constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙}. The assumption of constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙} yields underestimates of the total deflection at 1 AU of only 1%–5% and underestimates of the rotation of 10%. Since the deflection from magnetic forces is determined by 10 R{sub ⊙}, non-magnetic forces must be responsible for any observed interplanetary deflections or rotations where the CME has increasing angular momentum.

  3. The Intercalibration of SOHO EIT, CDS-NIS, and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2006-05-01

    Using coordinated observations of a quiet coronal region, we study the intercalibration of the CDS and EIT instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). We derive the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution from CDS spectral line intensities and convolve it with EIT and TRACE temperature response functions, calculated with the latest atomic data from the CHIANTI database, to predict count rates in their observing channels. We examine different analysis methods and briefly discuss some more advanced aspects of atomic modeling such as the density dependence of the ionization fractions. We investigate the implications for our study using data from the ADAS database. We find that our CDS DEM can predict the TRACE and EIT 171 and 195 Å channel count rates to within 25%. However, the accuracy of the predictions depends on the ionization fractions and elemental abundances used. The TRACE 284 Å and EIT 284 and 304 Å filter predictions do not agree well with the observations, even after taking the contribution from the optically thick He II 304 Å line to the TRACE 284 Å channel into account. The different CDS DEM solutions we derive using different ionization fractions produce fairly similar results: the majority of the CDS line intensities used are reproduced to within 20% with only around one-fifth reproduced to worse than 50%. However, the comparison provides us with further clues with which to explain the discrepancies found for some lines, and highlights the need for accurate equilibrium ionization balance calculations even at low density.

  4. Acousto-optical deflection-based whole channel scanning for microchip isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J C; Huang, Z; Landers, J P

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a technique amenable to the separation of proteins on a microchip by isoelectric focusing (IEF) with entire channel scanning laser-induced fluorescence detection using acousto-optical deflection (AOD). The ability to use AOD to scan the portions of or the entire length of an IEF separation channel allows for high-speed analysis since the mobilization step is circumvented with this technique. Employing no moving parts eliminates mechanical noise and, not only is there no loss of resolution, AOD scanning can potentially increase resolution. The ability of AOD to provide ultra-fast scanning rates (kHz timescale) allows for real-time imaging of the focusing process. This is demonstrated with the separation of naturally fluorescent proteins using entire channel (total scanning range of 2.4 cm) AOD-mediated scanning laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  5. Deflection of resilient materials for reduction of floor impact sound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong-Mun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many residents living in apartment buildings in Korea have been bothered by noise coming from the houses above. In order to reduce noise pollution, communities are increasingly imposing bylaws, including the limitation of floor impact sound, minimum thickness of floors, and floor soundproofing solutions. This research effort focused specifically on the deflection of resilient materials in the floor sound insulation systems of apartment houses. The experimental program involved conducting twenty-seven material tests and ten sound insulation floating concrete floor specimens. Two main parameters were considered in the experimental investigation: the seven types of resilient materials and the location of the loading point. The structural behavior of sound insulation floor floating was predicted using the Winkler method. The experimental and analytical results indicated that the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor significantly increased with increasing the tangent modulus of resilient material. The deflection of the floating concrete floor loaded at the side of the specimen was much greater than that of the floating concrete floor loaded at the center of the specimen. The Winkler model considering the effect of modulus of resilient materials was able to accurately predict the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor.

  6. Deflection of Resilient Materials for Reduction of Floor Impact Sound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong-Mun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many residents living in apartment buildings in Korea have been bothered by noise coming from the houses above. In order to reduce noise pollution, communities are increasingly imposing bylaws, including the limitation of floor impact sound, minimum thickness of floors, and floor soundproofing solutions. This research effort focused specifically on the deflection of resilient materials in the floor sound insulation systems of apartment houses. The experimental program involved conducting twenty-seven material tests and ten sound insulation floating concrete floor specimens. Two main parameters were considered in the experimental investigation: the seven types of resilient materials and the location of the loading point. The structural behavior of sound insulation floor floating was predicted using the Winkler method. The experimental and analytical results indicated that the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor significantly increased with increasing the tangent modulus of resilient material. The deflection of the floating concrete floor loaded at the side of the specimen was much greater than that of the floating concrete floor loaded at the center of the specimen. The Winkler model considering the effect of modulus of resilient materials was able to accurately predict the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor. PMID:25574491

  7. Mirage models confront the LHC. III. Deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd; Kaufman, Bryan L.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    We complete the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in which modulus-induced soft supersymmetry breaking is sufficiently suppressed in the observable sector so as to be competitive with anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Here we consider deflected "mirage mediation" (DMM), where contributions from gauge mediation are added to those arising from gravity mediation and anomaly mediation. We update previous work that surveyed the rich parameter space of such theories, in light of data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and recent dark matter detection experiments. Constraints arising from LHC superpartner searches at √{s }=8 TeV are considered, and discovery prospects at √{s }=14 TeV are evaluated. We find that deflected mirage mediation generally allows for S U (3 )-charged superpartners of significantly lower mass (given current knowledge of the Higgs mass and neutralino relic density) than was found for the "pure" mirage mediation models of Kachru et al. [Phys. Rev. D 68, 046005 (2003)]. Consequently, discovery prospects are enhanced for many combinations of matter multiplet modular weights. We examine the experimental challenges that will arise due to the prospect of highly compressed spectra in DMM, and the correlation between accessibility at the LHC and discovery prospects at large-scale liquid xenon dark matter detectors.

  8. Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

    2002-11-08

    We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

  9. Distribution of flexural deflection in the worldwide outer rise area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Jun; Lin, Jing-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chin, Shao-Jinn; Chen, Yen-Fu

    2015-04-01

    The outer rise on the fringe of a subduction system is caused by an accreted load on the flexed oceanic lithosphere. The magnitude of the deflection is usually linked to the stress state beard by the oceanic plate. In a coupled subduction zone, the stress is abundantly accumulated across the plate boundary which should affect the flexural properties of the subducted plate. Thus, the variation of the outer rise in shape may reflect the seismogenic characteristics of the subduction system. In this study, we intent to find the correlation between the flexure deflection (Wb) of the outer rise and the subduction zone properties by comparing several slab parameters and the Wb distribution. The estimation of Wb is performed based on the available bathymetry data and the statistic analysis of earthquakes is from the global ISC earthquake catalog for the period of 1900-2015. Our result shows a progressive change of Wb in space, suggesting a robust calculation. The average Wb of worldwise subduction system spreads from 348 to 682 m. No visible distinction in the ranging of Wb was observed for different subduction zones. However, in a weak coupling subduction system, the standard variation of Wb has generally larger value. Relatively large Wb generally occurs in the center of the trench system, whereas small Wb for the two ends of trench. The comparison of Wb and several slab parameters shows that the Wb may be correlated with the maximal magnitude and the number of earthquakes. Otherwise, no clear relationship with other parameters can be obtained.

  10. On-demand beam deflection system for PIXE milliprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltr, J.; Král, J.; Černý, J.; Švejda, J.

    2002-04-01

    Application of an on-demand beam deflection system in PIXE analysis has numerous advantages. The suppression of pile-up is accomplished much better than by using pile-up rejection electronic circuits only. In the case of biological and other sensitive types of samples, it is important to minimize the radiation and thermal load. In the case of samples with very different concentrations, the need for beam current correction between sample analyses is not as critical. An on-demand beam deflection system for the analytical facility at the CTU in Prague has been developed and implemented. A pair of electrodes was inserted in the beam line in front of the target chamber. The electrodes are supplied with positive high voltage up to 1 kV and they are a U-shape cross-section to reduce their beam distortion effect. Temporarily, one of the electrodes is shorted to ground potential. The shorting, by a HEXFET ® transistor, occurs in a period of about 100 ns after the edge of the triggering pulse. A description of the system as well as the results of the tests are presented.

  11. Theory of optical beam deflection for single microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Kitamori, Takehiko; Sawada, Tsuguo

    1991-05-01

    A theory was developed for the optical beam deflection (OBD) signal generated from a single microparticle. From the thermal-diffusion equations, the temperature fields inside and outside the microparticle, which has a two-layer structure, was deduced. A three-dimensional theoretical treatment was established for the deflection signal of the probe beam passing through the temperature field formed by photothermal conversion of the excitation beam energy absorbed by the sample. The proprieties of the theoretical model and its results were confirmed by comparing the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics, probe beam offset dependencies, and particle size dependencies of the OBD signal with the experimental ones for 25-300-μm-radius microparticles. From the theory, the unique particle size dependencies and frequency characteristics of the OBD method for the single microparticle, i.e., higher sensitivity for smaller particles and at high frequencies, were identified as due to the microparticle surface curvature. The optimal experimental conditions in the OBD measurement of the single microparticle were also obtained using theoretical analysis.

  12. Comparison of laser fiber passage in ureteroscopic maximum deflection and their influence on deflection and irrigation: Do we really need the ball tip concept?

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Mohammed; Emiliani, Esteban; Talso, Michele; Servián, Pol; Barreiro, Aaron; Orosa, Andrea; Proietti, Silvia; Traxer, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    To examine laser fiber passage capabilities through flexible ureterorenoscopes (fURSs) and to measure deflections and flow characteristics. For this in vitro study, eight fURSs were examined (Olympus(®) URF-P6, URF-P6, URF-V, URF-V2; Storz(®) Xc and Flex-X2; Richard Wolf(®) Cobra Vision; and Lithovue). Four laser fibers standard 200- and 273-μm (uncleaved and cleaved), sheath-coated and ball-tip fibers were attempted to pass through each fURS while deflected at 120°, 180°, maximum deflection, and maximum deflection with reduced 9-mm radius. Measurements included maximal (up/down) deflections and irrigation flow rates achieved with each fiber. Wolf Cobra Vision demonstrated minimal loss of deflections with mean differences of -2°/0° (p > 0.05) when loaded with the 200-μm fiber. The 273-μm fiber provoked utmost deflections that decline when loaded in Olympus URF-P5: mean differences of -52°/-35° (p < 0.001 for upward deflection). Of overall deflections, sheath-coated fiber induced least insult (p > 0.05), while standard 273-μm fiber incited maximum degradation (p < 0.00001). With few exceptions, sheath-coated and ball-tip fibers passed through all maximally deflected scopes. Uncleaved 200- and 273-μm fibers failed to pass through most maximally deflected fURS. However, cleaving their ends allowed 200- and 273-μm fiber to pass through all angles of deflections expect in the Olympus URF-P5 and Olympus URF-P5 and URF-V, respectively. The irrigation through all fURSs was significantly impaired (p < 0.00001). fURS deflection was least affected by sheath-coated fibers and most affected by the 273-μm fiber. Uncleaved 200- and 273-μm fibers showed least passage capabilities; while removing the ends, the fibers greatly facilitated their passage capabilities as much as the other fibers tested.

  13. Separated Shoulder

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A separated shoulder is an injury to the ligaments that hold your collarbone (clavicle) to your shoulder blade. In a mild separated shoulder, the ligaments ...

  14. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  15. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  16. Use Deflected Trailing Edge to Improve the Aerodynamic Performance and Develop Low Solidity LPT Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Li; Peigang, Yan; Xiangfeng, Wang; Wanjin, Han; Qingchao, Wang

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of improving the aerodynamic performance of low pressure turbine (LPT) blade cascades and developing low solidity LPT blade cascades through deflected trailing edge. A deflected trailing edge improved aerodynamic performance of both LPT blade cascades and low solidity LPT blade cascades. For standard solidity LPT cascades, deflecting the trailing edge can decrease the energy loss coefficient by 20.61 % for a Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000 and freestream turbulence intensities (FSTI) of 1 %. For a low solidity LPT cascade, aerodynamic performance was also improved by deflecting the trailing edge. Solidity of the LPT cascade can be reduced by 12.5 % for blades with a deflected trailing edge without a drop in efficiency. Here, the flow control mechanism surrounding a deflected trailing edge was also revealed.

  17. [Deflection and marginal leakage in cemented MOD inlays under loads parallel to the tooth axis].

    PubMed

    Melchers, H G

    1990-10-01

    Cemented inlays made of a soft and an extra hard gold casting alloy are subjected to load cycling with 50-200 N. The mesiodistal deflection is determined and marginal leakage is shown by dye penetration. Soft alloy inlays deflect significantly more, nearly 50% exhibit dye penetration caused by microleakage. On average, deflection does not occur with the extra hard alloy, dye penetration caused by microleakage takes place among 25% of the inlays only.

  18. Outcomes of clinical decision support (CDS) and correlates of CDS use for home care patients with high medication regimen complexity: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Margaret V.; Feldman, Penny H.; Barrón-Vayá, Yolanda; Peng, Timothy R.; Sridharan, Sridevi; Pezzin, Liliana E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the outcomes of a clinical decision support (CDS) intervention designed for home care patients with high medication regimen complexity (MRC) and to examine the correlates of CDS use and its relationship to patient outcomes. Method The intervention randomized nurses upon identification of an eligible patient. The CDS consisted of a computerized algorithm that identified high MRC patients, electronic clinician alerts, and a care management module. Analyses were completed on full intention to treat and intervention group-only samples. Regression-adjusted outcomes were hospitalization, emergency department use and reduction in MRC. Data sources included health records and administrative data. Results Five hundred nurses were randomized with 7,919 of their patients. Approximately 20% of the intervention group was hospitalized versus 21% in the control group; 16.5% of the intervention group had an emergency department visit versus 16.7% in the control group; and 6% in each group dropped below the high MRC threshold. No statistically significant differences were found in the intention to treat analysis. Eighty-two percent of intervention nurses used the CDS but for only 42% of their patients. Among intervention patients, CDS use (versus non-use) was associated with reduced MRC and hospitalization. CDS use was more likely among older nurses, those with higher study-patient caseload and, marginally, among salaried nurses and those with longer tenure. Significant patient characteristics were clinical conditions, payer, episode length, care continuity and race. Conclusion CDS use was limited, thus negating the impact of the intervention overall. The findings on correlates of CDS use and the relationship between CDS use and positive outcomes suggest that CDS use and outcomes could be enhanced by avoiding very short patient lengths of stay, improving continuity of care, increasing reliance on salaried nurses and/or increasing per diem nurses’ incentives to

  19. The effect of openings on the long term deflection and flexural capacity of laminated veneer lumber (LVL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Matthew L.

    In most residential construction projects, laminated veneer lumber (LVL) beams are used to help support floor systems, and span doorways or garage door openings, amongst other applications. Because of its diverse application, it is not uncommon that openings are drilled through LVL beams to allow for the passage of utilities. This research evaluates the effects these openings have on long term deflection and flexural capacity, and looks to determine if current provisions for openings need to be amended. Two separate tests were conducted to analyze these behaviors. A long term flexural test was completed to determine the relative creep behavior, and an ultimate load test was conducted to determine the failure load under bending. A total of 26 beams (13 total samples) were tested in the long term test, which included beams with 5 different hole patterns loaded to either 50% or 75% of the allowable load set by the manufacturer. Each beam was loaded for over a year, and its midspan deflection and moisture content was monitored periodically. The environmental conditions such as relative humidity and temperature were also carefully monitored to determine if there was a correlation between relative humidity and long term deflection. Seven of the samples from the long term test were used in the ultimate load test, which included a control sample that was loaded to 60% of the predicted ultimate load so that it could continue being used as a control for the long term test. During the ultimate load test the midpsan and quarterspan deflections were recorded using LVDTs, and the total load was monitored via 4 load cells evenly spaced along the sample. This study found that 2" diameter openings placed in the middle third of the beam length and depth do not significantly affect the long term deflection or flexural capacity of LVL beams. However, as the 2" diameter openings are shifted away from the beam centroid, there is an evident decrease in overall performance in terms of

  20. Direct deflection radius measurement of flexible PET substrates by using an optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jiong-Shiun; Li, Po-Wei

    2015-06-10

    The deflection radius is essential in determining residual stress estimations in flexible electronics. However, the literature provides only indirect methods for obtaining a deflection radius. In this study, we present a measurement methodology for directly measuring the deflection radius of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate (a popular substrate of flexible electronics) by using an optical interferometer. A Twyman-Green optical interferometer was established and phase-shifting technology was used to increase the measurement resolution. Five PET substrates with known deflection radii were prepared to verify the measurement precision of the proposed measurement methodology. The results revealed that the error variance of our proposed measurement methodology is smaller than 3.5%.

  1. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Edward C.; Hudson, Charles L.

    1995-01-01

    A new deflection structure (12) which deflects a beam of charged particles, uch as an electron beam (15), includes a serpentine set (20) for transmitting a deflection field, and a shielding frame (25) for housing the serpentine set (20). The serpentine set (20) includes a vertical serpentine deflection element (22) and a horizontal serpentine deflection element (24). These deflection elements (22, 24) are identical, and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage (75), through which the electron beam (15) passes, and is deflected by the deflection field, so as to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame (25) includes a plurality of ground blocks (26, 28, 30, 32), and forms an internal serpentine trough (77) within these ground blocks, for housing the serpentine set (20). The deflection structure (12) further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors (35, 37, 35I, 37I), which are inserted through the shielding frame (25), and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set (20).

  2. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  3. Stable hydrogen generation from vermiculite sensitized by CdS quantum dot photocatalytic splitting of water under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Wenfeng; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2014-06-28

    CdS quantum dot/vermiculite (CdS/VMT) nanocomposites have been synthesized via a facile one-step method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic hydrogen generation activities of these samples were evaluated using Na2S and Na2SO3 as sacrificial reagents in water under visible-light illumination (λ ≥ 420 nm). The most important aspect of this work is the use of natural products (VMT) as host photocatalysts. The effect of CdS content on the rate of visible light photocatalytic hydrogen generation was investigated for different CdS loadings. The synergistic effect of VMT and CdS quantum dots (QDs) leads to efficient separation of the photogenerated charge carriers and, consequently, enhances the visible light photocatalytic hydrogen production activity of the photocatalyst. The CdS/VMT composite with an optimal ratio of 5% exhibits the highest hydrogen evolution rate of 92 μmol h(-1) under visible light irradiation and the highest apparent quantum efficiency of 17.7% at 420 nm. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of the CdS/VMT nanocomposite is proposed and corroborated by photoelectrochemical curves.

  4. Platelike WO3 sensitized with CdS quantum dots heterostructures for photoelectrochemical dynamic sensing of H2O2 based on enzymatic etching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhu; Gao, Chaomin; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2016-11-15

    A platelike tungsten trioxide (WO3) sensitized with CdS quantum dots (QDs) heterojunction is developed for solar-driven, real-time, and selective photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensing of H2O2 in the living cells. The structure is synthesized by hydrothermally growing platelike WO3 on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) and subsequently sensitized with CdS QDs. The as-prepared WO3-CdS QDs heterojunction achieve significant photocurrent enhancement, which is remarkably beneficial for light absorption and charge carrier separation. Based on the enzymatic etching of CdS QDs enables the activation of quenching the charge transfer efficiency, thus leading to sensitive PEC recording of H2O2 level in buffer and cellular environments. The results indicated that the proposed method will pave the way for the development of excellent PEC sensing platform with the quantum dot sensitization. This study could also provide a new train of thought on designing of self-operating photoanode in PEC sensing, promoting the application of semiconductor nanomaterials in photoelectrochemistry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Deflection of light to second order in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sultana, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    We reexamine the deflection of light in conformal Weyl gravity obtained in Sultana and Kazanas (2010), by extending the calculation based on the procedure by Rindler and Ishak, for the bending angle by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution, to second order in M/R, where M is the mass of the source and R is the impact parameter. It has recently been reported in Bhattacharya et al. (JCAP 09 (2010) 004; JCAP 02 (2011) 028), that when this calculation is done to second order, the term γr in the Mannheim-Kazanas metric, yields again the paradoxical contribution γR (where the bending angle is proportional to the impact parameter) obtained by standard formalisms appropriate to asymptotically flat spacetimes. We show that no such contribution is obtained for a second order calculation and the effects of the term γr in the metric are again insignificant as reported in our earlier work.

  6. Fabrication and Testing of Deflecting Cavities for APS

    SciTech Connect

    Mammosser, John; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert; Jim, Henry; Katherine, Wilson; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ali, Nassiri; Jim, Kerby; Jeremiah, Holzbauer; Genfa, Wu; Joel, Fuerst; Yawei, Yang; Zenghai, Li

    2013-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (Newport News, Virginia) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has fabricated and tested four first article, 2.8 GHz, deflecting SRF cavities, for Argonne's Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) project. These cavities are unique in many ways including the fabrication techniques in which the cavity cell and waveguides were fabricated. These cavity subcomponents were milled from bulk large grain niobium ingot material directly from 3D CAD files. No forming of sub components was used with the exception of the beam-pipes. The challenging cavity and helium vessel design and fabrication results from the stringent RF performance requirements required by the project and operation in the APS ring. Production challenges and fabrication techniques as well as testing results will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Assessment of Means for Determining Deflection of the Vertical.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    AD-A131 266 ASSESSMENT OF MEANS FOR DETERMINING DEF-LECTION OF THE I/ - VERTICAL( U ) ANALYTIC SCIENCES CORP READING MA HELLER ET AL. AUG 82 TASC-TR...4051-1 ETL-0303 UNCLASSIFIED DAAR7.-2CDT F/ U 8/5 N 7h~EEEhE I lii112.8P 111112.5 I~~j~j~ i.. j32 fj2. 1.25 111.6 MICROCOPY RESOLU11ON TEST CHART NATI,C...ANALYTIC SCIENCES CORPORATION TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Page No. 5. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 5-1 APPENDIX A A-i REFERENCES R-1 vi THE ANALYTIC

  8. Self-contained instrument for measuring subterranean tunnel wall deflection

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, Donald Edgar; Hof, Jr., Peter John

    1978-01-01

    The deflection of a subterranean tunnel is measured with a rod-like, self-contained instrument that is adapted to be inserted into a radially extending bore of the tunnel adjacent an end of the tunnel where the tunnel is being dug. One end of the instrument is anchored at the end of the bore remote from the tunnel wall, while the other end of the intrument is anchored adjacent the end of the wall in proximity to the tunnel wall. The two ends of the instrument are linearly displaceable relative to each other; the displacement is measured by a transducer means mounted on the instrument. Included in the instrument is a data storage means including a paper tape recorder periodically responsive to a parallel binary signal indicative of the measured displacement.

  9. Photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy of a photosensitive polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Dongkyu; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-05-14

    The mechanical and chemical information of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film on a microcantilever were simultaneously acquired by photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy as a function of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectra from the PMMA-coated microcantilever agreed well with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of PMMA on gold-coated silicon wafer. The decreasing intensities of nanomechanical IR peaks represent chemical as well as mechanical information of UV radiation-induced photodegradation processes in the PMMA which cannot be obtained by a conventional FTIR technique. The observed decrease in the resonance frequency of the microcantilever is related to the change in the Young's modulus of the PMMA under UV exposure.

  10. Magnetic Dipole Scattering from Metallic Nanowire for Ultrasensitive Deflection Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zheng; Urbach, H. P.

    2017-08-01

    It is generally believed that when a single metallic nanowire is sufficiently small, it scatters like a point electric dipole. We show theoretically when a metallic nanowire is placed inside specially designed beams, the magnetic dipole contribution along with the electric dipole resonance can lead to unidirectional scattering in the far field, fulfilling Kerker's condition. Remarkably, this far-field unidirectional scattering encodes information that is highly dependent on the nanowire's deflection at a scale much smaller than the wavelength. The special roles of small but essential magnetic response along with the plasmonic resonance are highlighted for this extreme sensitivity as compared with the dielectric counterpart. In addition, the same essential role of the magnetic dipole contribution is also presented for a very small metallic nanosphere.

  11. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  12. Three-dimensional diamagnetic particle deflection in ferrofluid microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Liang, Litao; Zhu, Junjie; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic field-induced particle manipulation is a promising technique for biomicrofluidics applications. It is simple, cheap, and also free of fluid heating issues that accompany other common electric, acoustic, and optical methods. This work presents a fundamental study of diamagnetic particle motion in ferrofluid flows through a rectangular microchannel with a nearby permanent magnet. Due to their negligible magnetization relative to the ferrofluid, diamagnetic particles experience negative magnetophoresis and are repelled away from the magnet. The result is a three-dimensionally focused particle stream flowing near the bottom outer corner of the microchannel that is the farthest to the center of the magnet and hence has the smallest magnetic field. The effects of the particle's relative position to the magnet, particle size, ferrofluid flow rate, and concentration on this three-dimensional diamagnetic particle deflection are systematically studied. The obtained experimental results agree quantitatively with the predictions of a three-dimensional analytical model.

  13. Light deflection by light: Effect of incidence angle and inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-10-01

    We study the angular deflection of the circularly polarized components of a linearly polarized probe field in a weakly birefringent atomic system in tripod configuration. A spatially inhomogeneous control field incident obliquely onto an atomic vapor cell facilitates a large angular divergence between circular components. We show that the angular resolution can be dynamically controlled by optimally choosing the angle of incidence and the transverse profile of the control beam. For instance, by employing a Laguerre-Gaussian profile of the control field, one can impart a large angular divergence to the circular components close to the entry face of the atomic vapor cell. We further demonstrate how such a medium causes the focusing and refocusing of the probe field, thereby acting as a lens with multiple foci. The absorption in the medium remains negligible at resonance due to electromagnetically induced transparency.

  14. Planetary Defense: Options for Deflection of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. B.; Statham, G.; Hopkins, R.; Chapman, J.; White, S.; Bonometti, J.; Alexander, R.; Fincher, S.; Polsgrove, T.; Kalkstein, M.

    2003-01-01

    Several recent near-miss encounters with asteroids and comets have focused attention on the threat of a catastrophic impact with the Earth. This document reviews the historical impact record and current understanding of the number and location of Near Earth Objects (NEO's) to address their impact probability. Various ongoing projects intended to survey and catalog the NEO population are also reviewed. Details are then given of an MSFC-led study, intended to develop and assess various candidate systems for protection of the Earth against NEOs. An existing program, used to model the NE0 threat, was extensively modified and is presented here. Details of various analytical tools, developed to evaluate the performance of proposed technologies for protection against the NEO threat, are also presented. Trajectory tools, developed to model the outbound path a vehicle would take to intercept or rendezvous with a target asteroid or comet, are described. Also, details are given of a tool that was created to model both the un-deflected inbound path of an NE0 as well as the modified, post-deflection, path. The number of possible options available for protection against the NE0 threat was too numerous for them to all be addressed within the study; instead, a representative selection were modeled and evaluated. The major output from this work was a novel process by which the relative effectiveness of different threat mitigation concepts can be evaluated during future, more detailed, studies. In addition, several new or modified mathematical models were developed to analyze various proposed protection systems. A summary of the major lessons learned during this study is presented, as are recommendations for future work. It is hoped that this study will serve to raise the level attention about this very real threat and also demonstrate that successful defense is both possible and practicable, provided appropriate steps are taken.

  15. Current deflection NDE for pipeline inspection and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Rollo; Cawley, Peter; Nagy, Peter B.

    2016-02-01

    Failure of oil and gas pipelines can often be catastrophic, therefore routine inspection for time dependent degradation is essential. In-line inspection is the most common method used; however, this requires the insertion and retrieval of an inspection tool that is propelled by the fluid in the pipe and risks becoming stuck, so alternative methods must often be employed. This work investigates the applicability of a non-destructive evaluation technique for both the detection and growth monitoring of defects, particularly corrosion under insulation. This relies on injecting an electric current along the pipe and indirectly measuring the deflection of current around defects from perturbations in the orthogonal components of the induced magnetic flux density. An array of three orthogonally oriented anisotropic magnetoresistive sensors has been used to measure the magnetic flux density surrounding a 6'' schedule-40 steel pipe carrying 2 A quasi-DC axial current. A finite element model has been developed that predicts the perturbations in magnetic flux density caused by current deflection which has been validated by experimental results. Measurements of the magnetic flux density at 50 mm lift-off from the pipe surface are stable and repeatable to the order of 100 pT which suggests that defect detection or monitoring growth of corrosion-type defects may be possible with a feasible magnitude of injected current. Magnetic signals are additionally incurred by changes in the wall thickness of the pipe due to manufacturing tolerances, and material property variations. If a monitoring scheme using baseline subtraction is employed then the sensitivity to defects can be improved while avoiding false calls.

  16. Planetary Defense From Space: Part 2 (Simple) Asteroid Deflection Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2006-06-01

    A system of two space bases housing missiles for an efficient Planetary Defense of the Earth from asteroids and comets was firstly proposed by this author in 2002. It was then shown that the five Lagrangian points of the Earth Moon system lead naturally to only two unmistakable locations of these two space bases within the sphere of influence of the Earth. These locations are the two Lagrangian points L1 (in between the Earth and the Moon) and L3 (in the direction opposite to the Moon from the Earth). In fact, placing missiles based at L1 and L3 would enable the missiles to deflect the trajectory of incoming asteroids by hitting them orthogonally to their impact trajectory toward the Earth, thus maximizing the deflection at best. It was also shown that confocal conics are the only class of missile trajectories fulfilling this “best orthogonal deflection” requirement. The mathematical theory developed by the author in the years 2002 2004 was just the beginning of a more expanded research program about the Planetary Defense. In fact, while those papers developed the formal Keplerian theory of the Optimal Planetary Defense achievable from the Earth Moon Lagrangian points L1 and L3, this paper is devoted to the proof of a simple “(small) asteroid deflection law” relating directly the following variables to each other:the speed of the arriving asteroid with respect to the Earth (known from the astrometric observations);the asteroid's size and density (also supposed to be known from astronomical observations of various types);the “security radius” of the Earth, that is, the minimal sphere around the Earth outside which we must force the asteroid to fly if we want to be safe on Earth. Typically, we assume the security radius to equal about 10,000 km from the Earth center, but this number might be changed by more refined analyses, especially in the case of “rubble pile” asteroids;the distance from the Earth of the two Lagrangian points L1 and L3 where the

  17. Preliminary Results from Coordinated UVCS-CDS-Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parenti, S.; Bromage, B. J.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Raymond, J. C.; Noci, G.; Bromage, G. E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The June 2000 quadrature between the Sun, Earth, and Ulysses took place with Ulysses at a distance of 3.35 AU from the Sun and at heliocentric latitude 58.2 deg south, in the southeast quadrant. This provided an opportunity to observe the corona close to the Sun with Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS) and, subsequently, to sample the same plasma when it reached Ulysses. Here we focus on simultaneous observations of UVCS and CDS made on June 12, 13, 16 and 17. The UVCS data were acquired at heliocentric altitudes ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 solar radii, using different grating positions, in order to get a wide wavelength range. CDS data consisted of Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) full wavelength rasters of 120" x 150" centered at altitudes up to 1.18 solar radii, together with Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS) 4" x 4" rasters within the same field of view, out to 1.2 solar radii. The radial direction to Ulysses passed through a high latitude streamer, throughout the 4 days of observations, Analysis of the spectra taken by UVCS shows a variation of the element abundances in the streamer over our observing interval: however, because the observations were in slightly different parts of the streamer on different days, the variation could be ascribed either to a temporal or spatial effect. The oxygen abundance, however, seems to increase at the edge of the streamer, as indicated by previous analyses. This suggests the variation may be a function of position within the streamer, rather than a temporal effect. Oxygen abundances measured by SWICS on Ulysses are compared with the CDS and UVCS results to see whether changes measured in situ follow the same pattern.

  18. Preliminary Results from Coordinated UVCS-CDS-Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parenti, S.; Bromage, B. J.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Raymond, J. C.; Noci, G.; Bromage, G. E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The June 2000 quadrature between the Sun, Earth, and Ulysses took place with Ulysses at a distance of 3.35 AU from the Sun and at heliocentric latitude 58.2 deg south, in the southeast quadrant. This provided an opportunity to observe the corona close to the Sun with Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS) and, subsequently, to sample the same plasma when it reached Ulysses. Here we focus on simultaneous observations of UVCS and CDS made on June 12, 13, 16 and 17. The UVCS data were acquired at heliocentric altitudes ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 solar radii, using different grating positions, in order to get a wide wavelength range. CDS data consisted of Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) full wavelength rasters of 120" x 150" centered at altitudes up to 1.18 solar radii, together with Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS) 4" x 4" rasters within the same field of view, out to 1.2 solar radii. The radial direction to Ulysses passed through a high latitude streamer, throughout the 4 days of observations, Analysis of the spectra taken by UVCS shows a variation of the element abundances in the streamer over our observing interval: however, because the observations were in slightly different parts of the streamer on different days, the variation could be ascribed either to a temporal or spatial effect. The oxygen abundance, however, seems to increase at the edge of the streamer, as indicated by previous analyses. This suggests the variation may be a function of position within the streamer, rather than a temporal effect. Oxygen abundances measured by SWICS on Ulysses are compared with the CDS and UVCS results to see whether changes measured in situ follow the same pattern.

  19. SOHO-CDS: Thermal and Density Analysis of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rightmire, Lisa; Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Del Zanna, G.; DeLuca, E. E.; Mason, H. E.

    2007-05-01

    Data was obtained using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The goal of this project is to analyze the data obtained by the CDS instrument in order to determine the behavior of temperature and density of the coronal loop progressing from the foot point and moving up the loop. The loop being analyzed was observed by CDS on 2003 January 17 and the foot point was located at solar coordinates (585,-472) arcsecs. A background pixel and several pixels on the loop were selected. The background pixel intensity was then subtracted from each loop pixel intensity in order to isolate the emission from each loop pixel. The spectral line intensities of each loop pixel were analyzed to determine which spectral lines had any significant contribution to the loop intensity. The predicted and observed intensities of these significant lines were then used to create a differential emission measure (DEM) curve to best fit each loop pixel emission. Comparison of the DEM curves for each loop pixel indicates that the temperature increases and the density decreases, while progressing up the loop. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NSF ATM-0402729 and NASA NNG05GE68G.

  20. Analysis of splitting patterns from Stern-Gerlach magnetic deflection of supersonic molecular beams: application to M J -state-resolved deflection of J=2 atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, C.; Siska, P. E.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of M J -state resolved Stern-Gerlach deflection patterns for the3 P 2 states of noble gas metastable atoms in supersonic beams are analyzed using a modification of the method originally worked out by Otto Stern. Velocity distribution breadth and beam collimation required to resolve the M J states are explored, and the modeling is improved by including variation in the field gradient along the deflected atomic trajectories.

  1. Arc Deflection Length Affected by Transverse Rotating Magnetic Field with Lateral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru; High Current Energy Laboratory (HiCEL) Team

    2016-10-01

    Gas metal arc welding using shielding gas is often used in the welding industry. However, the arc deflection affected by lateral gas is problem because of inappropriate heat transfer. Shielding gas is used in order to prevent the instability affected by the arc deflection. However, the shielding gas causes turbulence, then blowhole of weld defect occurs because the arc affected by the instability is contaminated by the air. Thus, the magnetic field is applied to the arc in order to stabilize the arc using low amount of shielding gas. The method of applying the transverse rotating magnetic field (RMF) to the arc is one of the methods to prevent the arc instability. The RMF drives the arc because of electromagnetic force. The driven arc is considered to be prevented to arc deflection of lateral gas because the arc is restrained by the magnetic field because of the driven arc. In addition, it is assume the RMF prevented to the arc deflection of lateral gas from the multiple directions. In this paper, the arc deflection length affected by the RMF with lateral gas was elucidated in order to know the effect of the RMF for arc stabilization. Specifically, the arc deflection length affected by the magnetic frequency and the magnetic flux density is measured by high speed video camera. As a result, the arc deflection length decreases with increasing magnetic frequency, and the arc deflection length increases with increasing the magnetic flux density.

  2. Evaluation of disparate laser beam deflection technologies by means of number and rate of resolvable spots.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Peter; Hohenstein, Ralph; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a method to objectively evaluate systems of differing beam deflection technologies that commonly are described by disparate technical specifications. Using our new approach based on resolvable spots we will compare commercially available random-access beam deflection technologies, namely galvanometer scanners, piezo scanners, MEMS scanners, acousto-optic deflectors, and electro-optic deflectors.

  3. The buckling of a column on equally spaced deflectional and rotational springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, Bernard; Seide, Paul; Weinberger, Robert A

    1948-01-01

    A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of a column on equally spaced deflectional and rotational springs. Useful charts, which relate deflectional spring stiffness, rotational spring stiffness, and buckling load, are given for columns having two, three, four, and infinite number of spans.

  4. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Dukovic, Gordana; Merkle, Maxwell G.; Nelson, James H.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-08-06

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has been identified as a promising avenue for the conversion of solar energy into environmentally friendly fuels, most notably by the production of hydrogen from water.[1-5] Nanometer-scale materials in particular have attracted considerable scientific attention as the building blocks for light-harvesting applications.[6,7] Their desirable attributes include tunability of the optical properties with size, amenability to relatively inexpensive low-temperature processing, and a high degree of synthetic sophistication leading to increasingly complex and multi-functional architectures. For photocatalysis in particular, the high surface-to-volume ratios in nanoscale materials should lead to an increased availability of carriers for redox reactions on the nanoparticle surface. Recombination of photoexcited carriers directly competes with photocatalytic activity.[3] Charge separation is often achieved with multi-component heterostructures. An early example is the case of TiO2 powders functionalized with Pt and RuO2 particles, where photoexcited electrons are transferred to Pt (the reduction site) and holes to RuO2 (the oxidation site).[8] More recently, many colloidally synthesized nanometer-scale metal-semiconductor heterostructures have been reported.[7,9,10] A majority of these structures are made by thermal methods.[7,10] We have chosen to study photochemical formation of metal-semiconductor heterostructures. The detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in photodeposition of metals on nanometer-scale semiconductors is necessary to enable a high degree of synthetic control. At the same time, because the results of metal deposition can be directly observed by electron microscopy, it can be used to understand how factors such as nanocrystal composition, shape, carrier dynamics, and surface chemistry influence the photochemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. In this communication, we report on the photodeposition of Pt on

  5. Ultrasound-assisted microwave preparation of Ag-doped CdS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Tai, Guo'an; Guo, Wanlin

    2010-03-01

    Ag-doped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by an ultrasound-assisted microwave synthesis method. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal a structural evolution from cubic to hexagonal with increasing molar ratios of Ag(+)/Cd(2+) from 0% to 5%. It shows that the Ag-doped hexagonal CdS nanoparticles are polycrystal. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CdS nanoparticles doping with 5% Ag(+) shows that the doped Ag in CdS is metallic. Simultaneously, the characteristic Raman peaks of the CdS nanoparticles enhance with increasing Ag(+) concentrations. The photocatalytic activity of different Ag-doped samples show a reasonable change due to different ratios of Ag which doped into CdS. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular Synthesis of Luminescent CdS Quantum Dots Using Plant Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovaya, Mariya N.; Burlaka, Olga M.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Blume, Yaroslav B.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study describes a novel method for preparation of water-soluble CdS quantum dots, using bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cell suspension culture. Acting as a stabilizing and capping agent, the suspension cell culture mediates the formation of CdS nanoparticles. These semiconductor nanoparticles were determined by means of an UV-visible spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and XRD. Followed by the electron diffraction analysis of a selected area, transmission electron microscopy indicated the formation of spherical, crystalline CdS ranging in diameter from 3 to 7 nm and showed wurtzite CdS quantum dots. In the present work, the toxic effect of synthesized CdS quantum dots on Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts as a very sensitive model was under study. The results of this research revealed that biologically synthesized CdS nanoparticles in low concentrations did not induce any toxic effects.

  7. Photo current generation in RGO - CdS nanorod thin film device

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Chakrabarty, Sankalpita; Ibrahim, Sk.; Ghosh, Surajit; Pal, Tanusri

    2016-05-23

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) - cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocomposite materials. The reduction of GO, formation of CdS and decoration of CdS onto RGO sheets were done in a one- pot solvothermal process. We have observed that the PL intensity for CdS nanorods remarkably quenched after the attachment of RGO, which established the photo induced charge transformation from the CdS nanorod to RGO sheets through the RGO-CdS interface. The optoelectronic transport properties of our fabricated large area thin film device exhibits excellent photo induced charge generation under simulated solar light illumination. The photo sensitivity of the device increases linearly with the increase of illuminated light intensity. The RGO-CdS composite exhibits enhance photocatalytic dye degradation efficiency in compare to control CdS under simulated solar light illumination.

  8. Replication Checkpoint Kinase Cds1 Regulates Recombinational Repair Protein Rad60

    PubMed Central

    Boddy, Michael N.; Shanahan, Paul; Hayes McDonald, W.; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Noguchi, Eishi; Yates III, John R.; Russell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Genome integrity is protected by Cds1 (Chk2), a checkpoint kinase that stabilizes arrested replication forks. How Cds1 accomplishes this task is unknown. We report that Cds1 interacts with Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair in fission yeast. Cds1 activation triggers Rad60 phosphorylation and nuclear delocalization. A Rad60 mutant that inhibits regulation by Cds1 renders cells specifically sensitive to replication fork arrest. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that Rad60 functions codependently with Smc5 and Smc6, subunits of an SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complex required for recombinational repair. These studies indicate that regulation of Rad60 is an important part of the replication checkpoint response controlled by Cds1. We propose that control of Rad60 regulates recombination events at stalled forks. PMID:12897162

  9. Photo current generation in RGO - CdS nanorod thin film device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Chakrabarty, Sankalpita; Ibrahim, Sk.; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) - cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocomposite materials. The reduction of GO, formation of CdS and decoration of CdS onto RGO sheets were done in a one- pot solvothermal process. We have observed that the PL intensity for CdS nanorods remarkably quenched after the attachment of RGO, which established the photo induced charge transformation from the CdS nanorod to RGO sheets through the RGO-CdS interface. The optoelectronic transport properties of our fabricated large area thin film device exhibits excellent photo induced charge generation under simulated solar light illumination. The photo sensitivity of the device increases linearly with the increase of illuminated light intensity. The RGO-CdS composite exhibits enhance photocatalytic dye degradation efficiency in compare to control CdS under simulated solar light illumination.

  10. Relationship between muscular strength and deflection characteristics of the center of foot pressure during landing after crossover stepping in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yahiko; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Iwanaga, Koichi; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the muscular strength of the lower extremity in a load side and the characteristics of center of foot pressure (COP) during landing after crossover stepping in the elderly. The study population comprised 8 elderly subjects (average age, 75.8+/-8.0 years) and 9 young individuals (average age, 21.6+/-2.5 years). Using a separation-type force plate, we measured the deflection characteristics of the COP; these were defined by the root mean square of positional change (COP-RMS) and the deflection velocity of the COP (COP-Vel) during landing after crossover stepping. Furthermore, we measured the muscular strength of the lower extremity by using a hand-held dynamometer. By using multiple regression analysis, we detected the calculated muscular strength as the independent variable of the deflection characteristics of the COP. Compared to the young group the elderly group showed significantly higher anterior-posterior COP-RMS values (p<0.05) and lower lateral COP-Vel values (p<0.001). In the elderly, the muscular strengths of the tibialis anterior and adductor magnus were detected as a significant independent variable of the anterior-posterior COP-RMS (R(2)=0.85, R(2)=0.76, p<0.01) and lateral COP-Vel (R(2)=0.75, R(2)=0.65, p<0.05), respectively. With regard to the COP deflection characteristics during landing after crossover stepping in the elderly, we recognized the diagnostic character of the anterior-posterior COP-RMS and lateral COP-Vel. Furthermore, it was suggested that the muscular strengths of the tibialis anterior and adductor magnus played a role in regulating the COP deflection characteristics.

  11. Neptunium separations

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    Two procedures for the separation of Np are presented; the first involves separation of /sup 239/Np from irradiated /sup 238/U, and the second involves separation of /sup 237/Np from a solution representing that from a dissolved fuel element.

  12. "I'm Not Mentally Ill": Identity Deflection as a Form of Stigma Resistance.

    PubMed

    Thoits, Peggy A

    2016-06-01

    Mental illness identity deflection refers to rebuffing the idea that one is mentally ill. Predictors of identity deflection and its consequences for well-being were examined for individuals with mental disorders in the National Comorbidity Study-Replication (N = 1,368). Respondents more often deflected a mental illness identity if they had a nonsevere disorder, had low impairment in functioning, had no treatment experience, viewed possible treatment as undesirable, and held multiple social roles, consistent with theory about stigma resistance. Persons who deflected a mental illness identity had lower distress and more positive affect than those who accepted it, even net of disorder severity, impairment level, and treatment experience. Among those who had ever been in treatment, deflection buffered the negative effects of serious impairment but exacerbated the effects of having a severe disorder on well-being, suggesting more complex consequences of formal labeling (greater stigma but helpful services), consistent with previous research.

  13. Effect of Lorentz symmetry breaking on the deflection of light in a cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimet, Jusufi; Izzet, Sakallı; Ali, Övgün

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the Lorentz symmetry breaking effects (LSBE) on the deflection of light by a rotating cosmic string spacetime in the weak limit approximation. We first calculate the deflection angle by a static cosmic string for a fixed spacelike 4-vector case (FSL) with the corresponding effective-string optical metric using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem (GBT). Then, we focus on a more general scenario, namely we calculate the deflection angle by a rotating cosmic string applying the GBT to Randers effective-string metric. We obtain a significant modification in the deflection angle because of the LSBE parameter. We find first and second order correction terms due to the global effective topology which are proportional to the cosmic string and LSBE parameter, respectively. Finally, for a fixed time-like 4-vector (FTL) case, we show that the deflection angle is not affected by LSBE parameter.

  14. Four-dimensional visualization of a small-scale flame based on deflection tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhigang; Zhao, Minmin

    2016-11-01

    Optical computed tomography is an important technique in the visualization and diagnosis of various flow fields. A small-scale diffusion flame was visualized using deflection tomography. A projection sampling system was proposed for deflection tomography to obtain deflectograms with a pair of gratings. Wave-front retrieval was employed for processing the deflectograms to obtain the deflection angles of the rays. This two-dimensional data extraction method expanded the application of deflection tomography and was suitable for the projection extraction of small-scale combustion. Deflection angle revision reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct the temperature distributions in 10 cross sections for each deflectogram in different instants. The flow structure was reconstructed using a visualization toolkit equipped with the marching cube and ray casting algorithms. The performed experiments demonstrated the three-dimensional dynamic visualization of temperature distributions and the flame structures of small-scale diffusion combustion.

  15. Growth and characterization of CdS buffer layers by CBD and MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A.A.; Huang, C.; Li, S.S.

    1999-03-01

    Thin film CdS has been widely used in thin-film photovoltaic devices. The most efficient Cu(In,&hthinsp;Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells reported to date utilized a thin CdS buffer layer prepared by a reactive solution growth technique known as chemical bath deposition (CBD). Considerable effort has been directed to better understand the role and find a replacement for the CBD CdS process in CIGS-based solar cells. We reported a low temperature ({approximately}150&hthinsp;{degree}C) Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) CdS thin film buffer layer process for CIGS absorbers. Many prior studies have reported that CBD CdS contains a mixture of crystal structures. Recent investigations of CBD CdS thin films by ellipsometry suggested a multilayer structure. In this study we compare CdS thin films prepared by CBD and MOCVD and the effects of annealing. TED and XRD are used to characterize the crystal structure, the film microstructure is studied by HRTEM, and the optical properties are studied by Raman and spectrophotometry. All of these characterization techniques reveal superior crystalline film quality for CdS films grown by MOCVD compared to those grown by CBD. Dual Beam Optical Modulation (DBOM) studies showed that the MOCVD and CBD CdS buffer layer processes have nearly the same effect on CIGS absorbers when combined with a cadmium partial electrolyte aqueous dip. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Resonant Raman scattering from CdS nanocrystals enhanced by interstitial Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. Q.; Liu, L. Z.; Xue, H. T.; Wu, X. L.; Shen, J. C.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-02-01

    Different Raman scattering effects are observed from CdS and Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with an average size of 5.1 nm synthesized by the reverse-micelle method. The intensity of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon spectrum acquired from the Mn-doped CdS NCs is more than 20 times larger than that from the undoped CdS NCs. Spectroscopic and theoretical analyses reveal that the enhancement is caused by the interstitial Mn dopants, which decrease the NC surface deformation potential due to the small dielectric constant of the metal resulting in enhanced coupling between the LO phonon and surface plasmon.

  17. GPS deflection monitoring of the West Gate Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raziq, Noor; Collier, Philip

    2007-05-01

    The achievable precision and relatively high sampling rates of currently available GPS receivers are well suited for monitoring the movements of long-span engineering structures where the amplitude of movements is often more than a few centimetres and the frequency of vibrations is low (below 10 Hz). However, engineering structures often offer non-ideal environments for GPS data collection due to high multipath interference and obstructions causing cycle slips in the GPS observations. Also, for many engineering structures such as bridge decks, vertical movements are more pronounced and more structurally critical than horizontal movements. Accuracy of GPS determined positions in the vertical direction is typically two to three times poorer than in the horizontal component. This paper describes the results of a GPS deflection monitoring trial on the West Gate Bridge in Melbourne, Australia. The results are compared to the estimated frequencies and movements from the design of the bridge and previous accelerometer campaigns. The frequency information derived from the GPS results is also compared to frequency data extracted from an accelerometer installed close to a GPS receiver. GPS results agree closely to the historical results and recent accelerometer trials for key modal frequencies. This indicates the suitability of GPS receivers to monitor engineering structures that exhibit smaller movements due to their stiffness and in environments not ideally suited to using GPS.

  18. Moth tails divert bat attack: evolution of acoustic deflection.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Leavell, Brian C; Keener, Adam L; Breinholt, Jesse W; Chadwell, Brad A; McClure, Christopher J W; Hill, Geena M; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2015-03-03

    Adaptations to divert the attacks of visually guided predators have evolved repeatedly in animals. Using high-speed infrared videography, we show that luna moths (Actias luna) generate an acoustic diversion with spinning hindwing tails to deflect echolocating bat attacks away from their body and toward these nonessential appendages. We pit luna moths against big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and demonstrate a survival advantage of ∼ 47% for moths with tails versus those that had their tails removed. The benefit of hindwing tails is equivalent to the advantage conferred to moths by bat-detecting ears. Moth tails lured bat attacks to these wing regions during 55% of interactions between bats and intact luna moths. We analyzed flight kinematics of moths with and without hindwing tails and suggest that tails have a minimal role in flight performance. Using a robust phylogeny, we find that long spatulate tails have independently evolved four times in saturniid moths, further supporting the selective advantage of this anti-bat strategy. Diversionary tactics are perhaps more common than appreciated in predator-prey interactions. Our finding suggests that focusing on the sensory ecologies of key predators will reveal such countermeasures in prey.

  19. Plasma Deflection Test Setup for E-Sail Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Allen; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Wright, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Electronic Sail or E-Sail is a novel propulsion concept based on momentum exchange between fast solar wind protons and the plasma sheath of long positively charged conductors comprising the E-Sail. The effective sail area increases with decreasing plasma density allowing an E-Sail craft to continue to accelerate at predicted ranges well beyond the capabilities of existing electronic or chemical propulsion spacecraft. While negatively charged conductors in plasmas have been extensively studied and flown, the interaction between plasma and a positively charged conductor is not well studied. We present a plasma deflection test method using a differential ion flux probe (DIFP). The DIFP measures the angle and energy of incident ions. The plasma sheath around a charged body can measured by comparing the angular distribution of ions with and without a positively charged test body. These test results will be used to evaluate numerical calculations of expected thrust per unit length of conductor in the solar wind plasma. This work was supported by a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  20. Nuclear Explosives for the Purpose of Deflecting Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Dave

    2001-06-01

    In order to deflect asteroids or comets having a diameter over 1 kilometer, it will be necessary to use nuclear explosives. Nuclear devices which deliver a large fraction of their total yield in the form of neutrons are considerably more effective for producing a velocity change in the target than devices which deliver x-rays or gamma rays. Typical megaton-range nuclear weapons currently deployed are a three-stage design (fission-fusion-fission) which emit most of their energy in the form of x-rays. Certain megaton-range nuclear weapons currently deployed are a two-stage design. These devices are often described as "tactical" or "clean" nuclear weapons. Because of the density of fusion fuel required to give an efficient burn, each neutron produced by the device experiences a large number of collisions before it is able to escape from the device. These collisions remove energy from the neutrons and cause most of the total device energy to be emitted as x-rays. (High-yield devices developed for military purposes have been optimized for maximum yield or for maximum yield subject to some limit on total radioactive isotope emissions. Those devices which have been optimized for radiation, known as "neutron bombs", are in the kiloton range, not the megaton range. If it is necessary to develop megaton-range nuclear explosives which have been optimized for total neutron energy output, then these devices should be developed while experienced bomb designers are still available.)

  1. Moth tails divert bat attack: Evolution of acoustic deflection

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jesse R.; Leavell, Brian C.; Keener, Adam L.; Breinholt, Jesse W.; Chadwell, Brad A.; McClure, Christopher J. W.; Hill, Geena M.; Kawahara, Akito Y.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptations to divert the attacks of visually guided predators have evolved repeatedly in animals. Using high-speed infrared videography, we show that luna moths (Actias luna) generate an acoustic diversion with spinning hindwing tails to deflect echolocating bat attacks away from their body and toward these nonessential appendages. We pit luna moths against big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and demonstrate a survival advantage of ∼47% for moths with tails versus those that had their tails removed. The benefit of hindwing tails is equivalent to the advantage conferred to moths by bat-detecting ears. Moth tails lured bat attacks to these wing regions during 55% of interactions between bats and intact luna moths. We analyzed flight kinematics of moths with and without hindwing tails and suggest that tails have a minimal role in flight performance. Using a robust phylogeny, we find that long spatulate tails have independently evolved four times in saturniid moths, further supporting the selective advantage of this anti-bat strategy. Diversionary tactics are perhaps more common than appreciated in predator–prey interactions. Our finding suggests that focusing on the sensory ecologies of key predators will reveal such countermeasures in prey. PMID:25730869

  2. String formulation of space charge forces in a deflecting bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The force between two moving point charges, because of its inverse square law singularity, cannot be applied directly in the numerical simulation of bunch dynamics; radiative effects make this especially true for short bunches being deflected by magnets. This paper describes a formalism circumventing this restriction in which the basic ingredient is the total force on a point charge comoving with a longitudinally aligned, uniformly charged string. Bunch evolution can then be treated using direct particle-to-particle, intrabeam scattering, with no need for an intermediate, particle-in-cell, step. Electric and magnetic fields do not appear individually in the theory. Since the basic formulas are both exact (in paraxial approximation) and fully relativistic, they are applicable to beams of all particle types and all energies. But the theory is expected to be especially useful for calculating the emittance growth of the ultrashort electron bunches of current interest for energy recovery linacs and free-electron lasers. The theory subsumes coherent synchrotron radiation and centrifugal space charge force. Renormalized, on-axis, longitudinal field components are in excellent agreement with values from Saldin et al. [DESY Report No. DESY-TESLA-FEL-96-14, 1995;

    Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. ANIMAER0168-9002 417, 158 (1998).10.1016/S0168-9002(98)00623-8

  3. Cuspal deflection during polymerisation of composite lutes of ceramic inlays.

    PubMed

    Martin, N; Jedynakiewicz, N M; Williams, D F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the cuspal deflection that occurs in teeth as a result of the dimensional changes of resin-based lutes during polymerisation. Standardised MOD cavities were cut in 15 intact human premolar teeth using a custom paralleling device. A ceramic inlay was machined by the CEREC 2 system for each tooth ensuring an interface width of 50 microns (SD = 17.5) at the cavity margin. The 15 teeth were divided into three groups of five according to the cementation system employed: a microfilled hybrid posterior composite; a compomer restorative; a dual-cure luting composite. The inter-cuspal tooth dimension was recorded continuously with a laser micrometer assembly during a 2 min photoactivation period and a further 30 min post-activation period. A clear overall reduction in tooth dimension was detectable for the first 10 min of polymerisation. The mean changes ranged from -0.02% to -0.06% depending on the nature of the luting material. In addition, all samples exhibited a slight expansion of 0.03% during the time of light-activation. The dimensional changes that teeth experience during the polymerisation of resin-based lutes are clearly detectable. It can be postulated that an increase in the dimensions of the teeth during photoactivation occurs as a result of expansion of the lute due to the thermal energy delivered.

  4. Three-dimensional parabolic equation modeling of mesoscale eddy deflection.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Kevin D; Campbell, Richard L

    2016-02-01

    The impact of mesoscale oceanography, including ocean fronts and eddies, on global scale low-frequency acoustics is examined using a fully three-dimensional parabolic equation model. The narrowband acoustic signal, for frequencies from 2 to 16 Hz, is simulated from a seismic event on the Kerguellen Plateau in the South Indian Ocean to an array of receivers south of Ascension Island in the South Atlantic, a distance of 9100 km. The path was chosen for its relevance to seismic detections from the HA10 Ascension Island station of the International Monitoring System, for its lack of bathymetric interaction, and for the dynamic oceanography encountered as the sound passes the Cape of Good Hope. The acoustic field was propagated through two years (1992 and 1993) of the eddy-permitting ocean state estimation ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II) system. The range of deflection of the back-azimuth was 1.8° with a root-mean-square of 0.34°. The refraction due to mesoscale oceanography could therefore have significant impacts upon localization of distant low-frequency sources, such as seismic or nuclear test events.

  5. Operating Deflection Shapes for the Space Shuttle Partial Stack Rollout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Kappus, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In November of 2003 a rollout test was performed to gain a better understanding of the dynamic environment for the Space Shuttle during transportation from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. This was part of a study evaluating the methodology for including the rollout dynamic loads in the Space Shuttle fatigue life predictions. The rollout test was conducted with a partial stack consisting of the Crawler Transporter, Mobile Launch Platform, and the Solid Rocket Boosters with an interconnecting crossbeam. Instrumentation included over 100 accelerometers. Data was recorded for steady state speeds, start-ups and stops, and ambient wind excitations with the vehicle at idle. This paper will describe the operating deflection shape analysis performed using the measured acceleration response data. The response data for the steady state speed runs were dominated by harmonics of the forcing frequencies, which were proportional to the vehicle speed. Assuming a broadband excitation for the wind, analyses of the data sets with the vehicle at idle were used to estimate the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes. Comparisons of the measured modal properties with numerical predictions are presented.

  6. A simple damage detection indicator using operational deflection shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, R. P. C.; Maia, N. M. M.; Almeida, R. A. B.; Urgueira, A. P. V.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophic structural failure of aircrafts, bridges, buildings and other structures in modern societies has always been of primary concern because of the loss of human lifes and of negative economic impact. The aging of the structures, the growing dependency on their role in our networks of transportation, energy and comunications, the smaller construction tolerances, the bigger power demanded and the media and society awardness to catastrophic events are sufficient motivations for the growing field of structural health monitoring, which aims at assessing the actual condition of a structure and to identify incipient damage. Damage identification can be considered as a two step process, the detection and the diagnosis. The former, and fundamental step, is the confirmation of an efective damage existence. When the response is affirmative, the latter step begins with the diagnosis, and then the questions are: where?, how much?, what type?, when will it fail? In this paper the authors propose a simple method to detect and relatively quantify structural damage by using measured vibrations data, specifically the operational deflections shapes. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are presented to validate the proposed method.

  7. Gravitational and relativistic deflection of X-ray superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-Te; Ahrens, Sven

    2015-03-01

    Einstein predicted that clocks at different altitudes tick at various rates under the influence of gravity. This effect has been observed using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy over an elevation of 22.5 m (ref. 1) or by comparing accurate optical clocks at different heights on a submetre scale. However, challenges remain in finding novel methods for the detection of gravitational and relativistic effects on more compact scales. Here, we investigate a scheme that potentially allows for millimetre- to submillimetre-scale studies of the gravitational redshift by probing a nuclear crystal with X-rays. Also, a rotating crystal can force interacting X-rays to experience inhomogeneous clock tick rates within it. We find that an association of gravitational redshift and special-relativistic time dilation with quantum interference is manifested by a time-dependent deflection of X-rays. The scheme suggests a table-top solution for probing gravitational and special-relativistic effects, which should be within the reach of current experimental technology.

  8. Comet deflection by directed energy: a finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madajian, Jonathan; Griswold, Janelle; Gandra, Anush; Hughes, Gary B.; Zhang, Qicheng; Rupert, Nic; Lubin, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Comets and Asteroids are viable threats to our planet; if these space rocks are smaller than 25 meters, they burn up in the atmosphere, but if they are wider than 25 meters they can cause damage to the impact area. Anything more than one to two kilometers can have worldwide effects, furthermore a mile-wide asteroid travelling at 30,000 miles per hour has the energy equal to a megaton bomb and is very likely to wipe out most of the life on Earth. Residents near Chelyabinsk, Russia experienced the detrimental effects of a collision with a Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) on 15 February 2013 as a 20 m object penetrated the atmosphere above that city. The effective yield from this object was approximately 1/2 Megaton TNT equivalent (Mt), or that of a large strategic warhead. The 1908 Tunguska event, also over Russia, is estimated to have had a yield of approximately 15 Mt and had the potential to kill millions of people had it come down over a large city1. In the face of such danger a planetary defense system is necessary and this paper proposes a design for such a system. DE-STAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) is a phased array laser system that can be used to oblate, deflect and de-spin asteroids and comets.

  9. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheterin vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangential to the catheter tip. The second, referred to the base to tip method, is an approximation that is used when it is not possible to measure the angle of the tangent line. Optical images of the catheter deflection are analyzed using the absolute tip method to quantitatively validate the predicted deflections from the mathematical model. Optical images of the catheter deflection are also analyzed using the base to tip method to quantitatively determine the differences between the absolute tip and base to tip methods. Finally, the optical images are compared to MR images using the base to tip method to determine the accuracy of measuring the catheter deflection using MR. Results: The optical catheter deflection angles measured for both catheter prototypes using the absolute tip method fit very well to the mathematical model (R{sup 2} = 0.91 and 0.86 for each prototype, respectively). It was found that the angles measured using the base to tip method were consistently smaller than those measured using the absolute tip method. The deflection angles measured

  10. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheter in vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangential to the catheter tip. The second, referred to the base to tip method, is an approximation that is used when it is not possible to measure the angle of the tangent line. Optical images of the catheter deflection are analyzed using the absolute tip method to quantitatively validate the predicted deflections from the mathematical model. Optical images of the catheter deflection are also analyzed using the base to tip method to quantitatively determine the differences between the absolute tip and base to tip methods. Finally, the optical images are compared to MR images using the base to tip method to determine the accuracy of measuring the catheter deflection using MR. Results: The optical catheter deflection angles measured for both catheter prototypes using the absolute tip method fit very well to the mathematical model (R2 = 0.91 and 0.86 for each prototype, respectively). It was found that the angles measured using the base to tip method were consistently smaller than those measured using the absolute tip method. The deflection angles measured

  11. Load Deflection of Dow Corning SE 1700 Face Centered Tetragonal Direct Ink Write Materials: Effect of Thickness and Filament Spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Ward; Pearson, Mark A.; Metz, Tom R.

    2016-03-09

    Dow Corning SE 1700 (reinforced polydimethylsiloxane) porous structures were made by direct ink writing (DIW) in a face centered tetragonal (FCT) configuration. The filament diameter was 250 μm. Structures consisting of 4, 8, or 12 layers were fabricated with center-to-center filament spacing (“road width” (RW)) of 475, 500, 525, 550, or 575 μm. Three compressive load-unload cycles to 2000 kPa were performed on four separate areas of each sample; three samples of each thickness and filament spacing were tested. At a given strain during the third loading phase, stress varied inversely with porosity. At 10% strain, the stress was nearly independent of the number of layers (i.e., thickness). At higher strains (20- 40%), the stress was highest for the 4-layer structure; the 8- and 12-layer structures were nearly equivalent suggesting that the load deflection is independent of number of layers above 8 layers. Intra-and inter-sample variability of the load deflection response was higher for thinner and less porous structures.

  12. Chiral Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalcup, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of chiral separations to researchers who are versed in the area of analytical separations but unfamiliar with chiral separations. To researchers who are not familiar with this area, there is currently a bewildering array of commercially available chiral columns, chiral derivatizing reagents, and chiral selectors for approaches that span the range of analytical separation platforms (e.g., high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, supercritical-fluid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis). This review begins with a brief discussion of chirality before examining the general strategies and commonalities among all of the chiral separation techniques. Rather than exhaustively listing all the chiral selectors and applications, this review highlights significant issues and differences between chiral and achiral separations, providing salient examples from specific classes of chiral selectors where appropriate.

  13. Battery separators.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Zhengming John

    2004-10-01

    The ideal battery separator would be infinitesimally thin, offer no resistance to ionic transport in electrolytes, provide infinite resistance to electronic conductivity for isolation of electrodes, be highly tortuous to prevent dendritic growths, and be inert to chemical reactions. Unfortunately, in the real world the ideal case does not exist. Real world separators are electronically insulating membranes whose ionic resistivity is brought to the desired range by manipulating the membranes thickness and porosity. It is clear that no single separator satisfies all the needs of battery designers, and compromises have to be made. It is ultimately the application that decides which separator is most suitable. We hope that this paper will be a useful tool and will help the battery manufacturers in selecting the most appropriate separators for their batteries and respective applications. The information provided is purely technical and does not include other very important parameters, such as cost of production, availability, and long-term stability. There has been a continued demand for thinner battery separators to increase battery power and capacity. This has been especially true for lithiumion batteries used in portable electronics. However, it is very important to ensure the continued safety of batteries, and this is where the role of the separator is greatest. Thus, it is essential to optimize all the components of battery to improve the performance while maintaining the safety of these cells. Separator manufacturers should work along with the battery manufacturers to create the next generation of batteries with increased reliability and performance, but always keeping safety in mind. This paper has attempted to present a comprehensive review of literature on separators used in various batteries. It is evident that a wide variety of separators are available and that they are critical components in batteries. In many cases, the separator is one of the major factors

  14. Water separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. F.; Austin, I. G. (Inventor)

    1964-01-01

    An apparatus for separating liquids from gases or gaseous fluids is described. Features of the apparatus include: (1) the collection and removal of the moisture in the fluid is not dependent upon, or affected by gravity; (2) all the collected water is cyclically drained from the apparatus irrespective of the attitude of the separator; and (3) a fluid actuator is utilized to remove the collected water from the separator.

  15. Laser cooling of CdS nanobelts: thickness matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-08-12

    We report on the thickness dependent laser cooling in CdS nanobelts pumped by a 532 nm green laser. The lowest achievable cooling temperature is found to strongly depend on thickness. No net cooling can be achieved in nanobelts with a thickness below 65 nm due to nearly zero absorption and larger surface nonradiative recombination. While for nanobelts thicker than ~120 nm, the reabsorption effect leads to the reduction of the cooling temperature. Based on the thickness dependent photoconductivity gain, mean emission energy and external quantum efficiency, the modeling of the normalized temperature change suggests a good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Optical absorption enhancement of CdS nanometer crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Yinsheng; Wang, Yujin; Huang, Kai; He, Tianjin; Liu, Fan-Chen

    1994-11-01

    An elementary model and analytical theory on optical absorption enhancement phenomena with decreasing the nanometer crystallite size is proposed by using the effective mass theory of excitons and taking into account the tunneling effect and the frequency change. With decreasing particle size, the confinement imposed on the relative motion of electron—hole pair enhances the oscillator strength, and the change of transition frequency due to the size quantization blue shift weakens the oscillator strength. For larger band gap materials, the former is dominant, thus the absorption coefficient tends to enhancement as the particle size decreases. Good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental absorption coefficient of CdS is achieved.

  17. Surface photovoltage in exciton absorption range in CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morawski, A.; Banisch, R.; Lagowski, J.

    1977-01-01

    The high resolution, intrinsic spectra of surface photovoltage are reported for semiconducting n-type CdS single crystals. At reduced temperatures (120-160 K) the spectra exhibit three sharp maxima due to A, B and C free exciton transitions. Energy positions of these lines and valence band parameters (spin-orbit and crystal field splittings) estimated from surface photovoltage are in good agreement with values obtained by other methods. The excitonic transitions are very sensitive to surface treatment, i.e. polishing, etching, background illumination and surface doping. The mechanism of direct interaction of free excitons with surface states is proposed to explain exciton lines in surface photovoltage.

  18. Deflection determination of concrete structures considering nonlinearity based on long-gauge strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wan; Lv, Kui; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yuchen; Hu, Xiamin; Qu, Qizhong

    2017-10-01

    Deflection determination of concrete structures using distributed long-gauge strain sensors is investigated in this paper. Firstly, the relationship between deflection and distributed long-gauge strain of concrete beams is presented, and the method is independent of external load and takes account of structural nonlinearity. The deflection distribution along the span of a beam-like structure can be predicted from strain response for the whole process of loading (elastic stage, concrete cracking stage and steel yielding stage). Secondly, experiment of a reinforced concrete beam has been conducted to verify the accuracy of the method. Experimental results show that the relative error between the estimated and actual deflection can be controlled within about 5% while the error can reach up to about 70% if structural nonlinearity is not considered. Finally, the influence of error of material parameters and sensor gauge length on deflection estimation has been analyzed. The error of concrete compression strength has a limited influence on deflection prediction while the contribution of tensile concrete should be considered before concrete cracking. The error of area of tensile bars will affect the deflection accuracy after concrete cracking.

  19. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  20. Facile microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of CdS nanocrystals with their photocatalytic activities under visible lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Chonghai; Tian, Xiaobo

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three kinds of CdS nanostructures have been controllably synthesized. • Ethanediamine acts as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. • Three CdS nanostructures display high visible light photocatalytic activities. • Cubic CdS-3 shows superior photocatalytic activity to the other hexagonal CdS. • The growth processes for fabrication of CdS nanocrystals are also discussed. - Abstract: Three kinds of CdS nanostructures, that is, hexagonal nanospheres (CdS-1), hierarchical caterpillar-fungus-like hexagonal nanorods (CdS-2) and hierarchical cubic microspheres (CdS-3), were controllably synthesized by a facile and one-pot microwave-assisted aqueous chemical method using ethanediamine as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results show that CdS-1 is mainly composed of monodispersed hexagonal nanospheres with average diameters of about 100 nm; hexagonal CdS-2 has lengths in the range of 600–800 nm and diameters of 40–60 nm, assembled by nanoparticles about 20 nm in diameter; and CdS-3 is pure cubic microspheres with diameters in the range of 0.8–1.3 μm, aggregated by tiny nanograins with size of 5.8 nm. The band gap energies of CdS products were calculated to be 2.30, 2.31 and 2.24 eV observed from UV–vis DRS for CdS-1, CdS-2 and CdS-3, respectively. PL spectra of CdS samples showed that sphalerite CdS-3 possesses a very weak fluorescence, while wurtzite CdS-2 has a strongest green near-band edge emission (NBE) at 550 nm. The visible light photodegradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B in the presence of CdS photocatalysts illustrates that all of them display high photocatalytic activities. Significantly, the cubic CdS-3 exhibits more excellent photocatalytic

  1. Photocatalytic applications with CdS • block copolymer/exfoliated graphene nanoensembles: hydrogen generation and degradation of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Skaltsas, T; Karousis, N; Pispas, S; Tagmatarchis, N

    2014-11-07

    Amphiphilic block copolymer poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) (PI-b-PAA) was used to stabilize exfoliated graphene in water, allowing the immobilization of semiconductor CdS nanoparticles forming CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene. Characterization using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy proved the success of the preparation method and revealed the presence of spherical CdS. Moreover, UV-Vis and photoluminescence assays suggested that electronic interactions within CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene exist as evidenced by the significant quenching of the characteristic emission of CdS by exfoliated graphene. Photoillumination of CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, in the presence of ammonium formate as a quencher for the photogenerated holes, resulted in the generation of hydrogen by water splitting, monitored by the reduction of 4-nitroaniline to benzene-1,4-diamine (>80 ± 4% at 20 min; 100% at 24 min), much faster and more efficient compared to when reference CdS • PI-b-PAA was used as the photocatalyst (<30 ± 3% at 20 min; 100% at 240 min). Moreover, Rhodamine B was photocatalytically degraded by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, with fast kinetics under visible light illumination in the presence of air. The enhancement of both photocatalytic processes by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene was rationalized in terms of effective separation of holes and electrons, contrary to reference CdS • PI-b-PAA, in which rapid recombination of the hole-electron pair is inevitable due to the absence of exfoliated graphene as a suitable electron acceptor.

  2. Strong deflection limit analysis and gravitational lensing of an Ellis wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Observations of gravitational lenses in strong gravitational fields give us a clue to understanding dark compact objects. In this paper, we extend a method to obtain a deflection angle in a strong deflection limit provided by Bozza [Phys. Rev. D 66, 103001 (2002)] to apply to ultrastatic spacetimes. We also discuss on the order of an error term in the deflection angle. Using the improved method, we consider gravitational lensing by an Ellis wormhole, which is an ultrastatic wormhole of the Morris-Thorne class.

  3. Vibrations of rectangular plates with moderately large initial deflections at elevated temperatures using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element formulation is developed for the free vibration of rectangular plates which are under the influence of moderately large stress-free initial deflections and large thermal deflections. The von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used to account for the thermal deflections. The plates are thin, isotropic, and Hookean in nature. The temperature imposed on the plate is assumed to be constant through the thickness of the plate. Uniform and sinusoidal temperature distributions are studied. The material properties of the plates are temperature-dependent due to the relatively high temperatures imposed on the plates.

  4. Comparative study on the wake deflection behind yawed wind turbine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schottler, Jannik; Mühle, Franz; Bartl, Jan; Peinke, Joachim; Adaramola, Muyiwa S.; Sætran, Lars; Hölling, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In this wind tunnel campaign, detailed wake measurements behind two different model wind turbines in yawed conditions were performed. The wake deflections were quantified by estimating the rotor-averaged available power within the wake. By using two different model wind turbines, the influence of the rotor design and turbine geometry on the wake deflection caused by a yaw misalignment of 30° could be judged. It was found that the wake deflections three rotor diameters downstream were equal while at six rotor diameters downstream insignificant differences were observed. The results compare well with previous experimental and numerical studies.

  5. RF Design of Normal Conducting Deflecting Structures for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Borland, Michael; Waldschmidt, Geoff; /Argonne

    2007-11-07

    Use of normal conducting deflecting structures for production of short x-ray pulses is now under consideration at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS). The structures have to produce up to 4 MV maximum deflection per pair of structures with a 1 kHz repetition rate. At the same time, the structures should not cause deterioration of beam properties in the APS ring. Following these requirements, we proposed 2815 MHz standing wave deflecting structures with heavy wakefield damping. In this paper we discuss design considerations and present our current design.

  6. RF design of normal conducting deflecting structures for the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.; Borland, M.; Waldschmidt, G.; Accelerator Systems Division; SLAC

    2007-08-01

    Use of normal conducting deflecting structures for production of short X-ray pulses is now under consideration at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS). The structures have to produce up to 4 MV maximum deflection per pair of structures with a 1 kHz repetition rate. At the same time, the structures should not cause deterioration of beam properties in the APS ring. Following these requirements, we proposed 2815 MHz standing wave deflecting structures with heavy wakefield damping. In this paper we discuss design considerations and present our current design.

  7. Deflection, spraying, and induced scattering of intense laser beams in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1996-09-01

    Investigations into laser beam spraying, deflection, and induced scattering in plasmas are presented. Recent calculations and experiments on beam spraying due to filamentation are discussed. A simple model is presented for an enhanced beam deflection associated with nearly sonic plasma flow transverse to the beam. This model provides useful insights on the laser beam deflection, its scaling and the importance of self-consistent profile modifications. Finally, some discussion is given of recent experiments demonstrating the interplay between stimulated.Raman and Brillouin scattering.

  8. Deflection of a hyperbaric plasma arc in a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    Results are presented concerning the influence of operating parameters on the susceptibility of the plasma arc to deflection by an externally generated transverse magnetic field. Arc deflection susceptibility is found to increase rapidly with rising ambient pressure and is significantly greater for the free burning TIG arc compared with the weakly constricted (soft) plasma arc. In agreement with previously published work, it has been shown that for small amplitude deflections the arc column behaves in a manner analogous to a solid body. However, above a critical field strength the structure of the column undergoes a significant change characterized by a rapid deterioration in stability; mechanisms for this behavior are discussed.

  9. Quiet eye predicts goaltender success in deflected ice hockey shots.

    PubMed

    Panchuk, Derek; Vickers, Joan N; Hopkins, Will G

    2017-02-01

    In interceptive timing tasks, long quiet eye (QE) durations at the release point, along with early tracking on the object, allow performers to couple their actions to the kinematics of their opponent and regulate their movements based on emergent information from the object's trajectory. We used a mobile eye tracker to record the QE of eight university-level ice hockey goaltenders of an equivalent skill level as they responded to shots that deflected off a board placed to their left or right, resulting in a trajectory with low predictability. QE behaviour was assessed using logistic regression and magnitude-based inference. We found that when QE onset occurred later in the shot (950 ± 580 ms, mean ± SD) there was an increase in the proportion of goals allowed (41% vs. 22%) compared to when QE onset occurred earlier. A shorter QE duration (1260 ± 630 ms) predicted a large increase in the proportion of goals scored (38% vs. 14%). More saves occurred when QE duration (2074 ± 47 ms) was longer. An earlier QE offset (2004 ± 66 ms) also resulted in a large increase in the number of goals allowed (37% vs. 11%) compared to a later offset (2132 ± 41 ms). Since an early, sustained QE duration contributed to a higher percentage of saves, it is important that coaches develop practice activities that challenge the goaltender's ability to fixate the puck early, as well as sustain a long QE fixation on the puck until after it is released from the stick.

  10. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  11. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  12. The Ever-Present Demand for Public Computing Resources. CDS Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Core Data Service (CDS) Spotlight focuses on public computing resources, including lab/cluster workstations in buildings, virtual lab/cluster workstations, kiosks, laptop and tablet checkout programs, and workstation access in unscheduled classrooms. The findings are derived from 758 CDS 2012 participating institutions. A dataset of 529…

  13. Preparation of CdS Nanoparticles by First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Noviello, Thomas; Brooks, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The first year undergraduates use a simple method to synthesize 5-nm CdS nanoparticles in a water-in-oil microemulsion. The quantum size effect, the relationship between colors, optical absorbance, band-gap energy and the CdS particles affected by the formation of micelles are observed.

  14. A new synthesis strategy for chiral CdS nanotubes based on a homochiral MOF template.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xuan; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Caiyun; Su, Hao; Zhang, Jine; Tang, Bo

    2015-04-07

    We describe for the first time a convenient technique to prepare helical CdS nanotubes, with a MOF as the template. The prepared helical CdS nanotubes were remarkably sensitive to D/L-aspartic acid (Asp) and can be used as a potential sensor for enantioselective recognition of D/L-Asp.

  15. White luminescence from CdS nanocrystals under the blue light excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Xiaosong Li, Lan; Li, Mengzhen; Xu, Jianping; Hong, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Trap-rich CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by employing CdSt{sub 2} and sulfur as precursors via thermal decomposition. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to characterize structure, morphology and luminescence properties of CdS nanocrystals (NCs). CdS NCs have a broad emission across 500–700 nm under the excitation of blue light with 460 nm, consequently, white light can be produced by mixing broad emission from CdS NCs excited by blue light, with the remaining blue light. In addition, the broad emission generation is closely and inseparably related to surface defects. Moreover, LaMer model was used to explain the phenomenon that the intensity of the trap emission gradually decreases as the reaction time increases in contrast with that of the band-edge emission. - Graphical abstract: Trap-rich CdS nanocrystals were synthesized. Furthermore, white light is produced by mixing broad emission across 500–700 nm from CdS NCs excited by blue light, in combination with the remaining blue light. - Highlights: • Trap-rich CdS nanocrystals were synthesized. • CdS NCs have a broad emission across 500–700 nm under the excitation of blue light. • White light can be produced by mixing broad emission with the remaining blue light.

  16. Mechanistic aspects of biogenic synthesis of CdS nanoparticles using Bacillus licheniformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. M.; Singh Bhadwal, Akhshay; Singh, Priti; Shrivastav, Archana; Singh, M. P.; Shrivastav, B. R.

    2014-06-01

    A novel eco-friendly effort has been made for the synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using bacterial biomass. Although some articles have been reported on CdS nanoparticles synthesis by bacteria, here we have synthesized CdS nanoparticles using non-pathogenic bacteria Bacillus licheniformis MTCC 9555. UV-Vis spectroscopy was carried out to confirm the formation of CdS nanoparticles; the peak occurring at 368 nm gives the indication of synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the synthesized CdS nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the nanoparticles are found to have a narrow size of 5.1 ± 0.5 nm with spherical morphology. Further, the nanoparticles were examined by energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to identify the presence of elements and confirmed the existence of Cd and S in single nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis exhibited 2θ values corresponding to CdS nanocrystals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) provides the evidence for the presence of proteins as possible biomolecules responsible for the stabilization of the synthesized CdS nanoparticles.

  17. Ultrasonic/surfactant assisted of CdS nano hollow sphere synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rafati, Amir Abbas; Borujeni, Ahmad Reza Afraz; Najafi, Mojgan; Bagheri, Ahmad

    2011-01-15

    CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters ranging from 40 to 150 nm have been synthesized by a surfactant-assisted sonochemical route. The successful vesicle templating indicates that the outer leaflet of the bilayer is the receptive surface in the controlled growth of CdS nanoparticles which provide the unique reactor for the nucleation and mineralization growth of CdS nanoparticles. The CdS nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Structural characterization of hollow CdS nanospheres indicates that these products packed with square subunits having sizes between 5 and 7 nm in diameter. The formation of the hollow nanostructure was explained by a vesicle template mechanism, in which sonication and surfactant play important roles. The band-edge emission and surface luminescence of the CdS nanoparticles were observed. -Research Highlights: {yields} CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters of 40-150 nm were synthesized. {yields} Nanoparticles were characterized by UV/Vis and photoluminescence. {yields} Nanospheres are composed of smaller nanocrystals with the average size of 6.8 nm. {yields} The band gap energy of the CdS nanoparticles is higher than its bulk value.

  18. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  19. Mixed-solvothermal synthesis of CdS micro/nanostructures with optical and ferromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhufeng; Ren, Yinshuan; Han, Lu; Xie, Guoya; Zhong, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Several special CdS micro/nanostructures, including microspheres, microrods, nanorods, nanosheets and nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by a simple solvothermal method using ethylenediamine (EN), ethanolamine (EA) and ethylene glycol (EG) as pure and mixed solvents with different S and Cd sources. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that micro/nanostructures CdS had a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the morphologies of CdS consisted of microrods, microsphere and nanosheets at different preparation conditions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed the CdS consisted of nanoparticles and nanorods at different preparation conditions. The optical properties of the CdS were measured by optical absorption spectroscopy. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measured that the CdS nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization of the CdS nanoparticles was 9.109 (10-3 emu/g). The origin of the CdS nanoparticles with ferromagnetic properties is attributed to structural defects.

  20. The Ever-Present Demand for Public Computing Resources. CDS Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Core Data Service (CDS) Spotlight focuses on public computing resources, including lab/cluster workstations in buildings, virtual lab/cluster workstations, kiosks, laptop and tablet checkout programs, and workstation access in unscheduled classrooms. The findings are derived from 758 CDS 2012 participating institutions. A dataset of 529…

  1. Preparation of CdS Nanoparticles by First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Noviello, Thomas; Brooks, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The first year undergraduates use a simple method to synthesize 5-nm CdS nanoparticles in a water-in-oil microemulsion. The quantum size effect, the relationship between colors, optical absorbance, band-gap energy and the CdS particles affected by the formation of micelles are observed.

  2. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  3. Effects of bacteria on CdS thin films used in technological devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpdoğan, S.; Adıgüzel, A. O.; Sahan, B.; Tunçer, M.; Metin Gubur, H.

    2017-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition method at 70 {}^\\circ \\text{C} considering deposition times ranging from 2 h to 5 h. The optical band gaps of CdS thin films were found to be in the 2.42-2.37 eV range. CdS thin films had uniform spherical nano-size grains which had polycrystalline, hexagonal and cubic phases. The films had a characteristic electrical resistivity of the order of {{10}5} Ω \\text{cm} and n-type conductivity at room condition. CdS thin films were incubated in cultures of B.domonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which exist abundantly in the environment, and form biofilms. SEM images showed that S. aureus and K. pneumonia were detected significantly on the film surfaces with a few of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis cells attached. CdS thin film surface exhibits relatively good resistance to the colonization of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. Optical results showed that the band gap of CdS thin films which interacted with the bacteria is 2.42 \\text{eV} . The crystal structure and electrical properties of CdS thin films were not affected by bacterial adhesion. The antimicrobial effect of CdS nanoparticles was different for different bacterial strains.

  4. TRACE and CDS: JOP 146 Data Analysis Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    Joint Observing Program 146 was designed to collect data on coronal loops using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SoHO and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. These two instruments collectively provide high spatial, temporal and temperature resolution. Calibration of the 171 Å filter on TRACE to spectral line intensities collected by CDS combines these qualities to produce the most detailed data currently available for the solar corona. We have determined an absolute value for the wavelengths of ions in data collected on September 18, 2001. This wavelength was then used to determine the Doppler shifts for many points along a coronal loop. The resulting values for velocity and intensity of Mg IX were then compared to the flux measured by the TRACE 171 Å filter. We find a appreciable correlation between the 171 Å filter and Mg IX. We use this determination to develop method of Differential Emission Measure analysis that provides a DEM for any pixel along a loop at nearly the same instant in time. This is uncharacteristic of DEM curves typically created from CDS data, as these curves are highly time dependant.

  5. Simple and green synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanoparticles and spectroscopic study on the interaction between CdS and zein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dezhi; Zhang, Li; Du, Xian; Wang, Yabo; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2016-09-01

    The present study demonstrates the role of zein molecules in synthesizing CdS nanoassemblies through protein-directed, green synthetic approach. Zein molecules can as capping ligand and stabilizing agent to regulate the nucleation and growth of CdS nanocrystals, and the obtained products are organic-inorganic nanocomposites. The analysis of surface charge and conductivity indicates that strong electrostatic force restricts mobility of ions, which creates a local supersaturation surrounding the binding sites of zein and reduces the activated energy of nucleation. The interaction between Cd2+/CdS and zein molecules was systematically investigated through spectroscopy techniques. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra were used to envisage the binding of the functional groups of zein with the surface of CdS nanoparticles. Ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra results show that Cd2+/CdS might interact with the aromatic amino acids of protein molecules and change its chemical microenvironment. The quantum-confined effect of nanocrystals is confirmed by optical absorption spectrum due to the small size (3-5 nm) of CdS particles. The data of circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicate that the formation of CdS nanocrystals could lead to the conformational change of zein molecules. Moreover, the possible mechanism of CdS nanocrystals growth in zein solution was also discussed. The weak interactions such as Van der Waals, hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds in zein molecules should play a crucial factor in the self-assembly of small nanoparticles.

  6. FTIR, EPMA, Auger, and XPS analysis of impurity precipitates in CdS films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.D.; Rose, D.H.; Niles, D.W.; Swartzlander, A.; Al-Jassim, M.M.

    1997-12-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Films of CdS grown using chemical bath deposition (CBD) generally yield better devices than purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this work, the authors present Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), and secondary ion mass spectroscopic (SIMS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films, and show that these differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. They also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  7. Characterization of single crystalline CdS nanowires synthesized by solvothermal method.

    PubMed

    Hadia, N M A; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires with uniform diameter were prepared by the solvothermal method using ethylenediamine (en) as solvent. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scan electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the products are hexagonal crystals of CdS nanowires with diameter of 28 nm and length up to several micrometres. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) studies indicate the single-crystalline nature of CdS nanowires with an oriented growth along the c-axis direction. The absorption spectrum of the as-prepared CdS nanowires shows an absorption peak of around 485 nm. These CdS nanowires exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) with two distinct emission bands at 502 nm and 696 nm.

  8. Influence of organic ligands on the formation and functional properties of CdS nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. D., Nisha; Navaneethan, M.; Harish, S.; Archana, J.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Aswal, D. K.; Shimomura, M.; Ikeda, H.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of capping agents (Piperazine, Polyvinylpyrrolidone and triton X) on the functional properties of CdS nanostructures have investigated. SEM analysis revealed the formation of different morphologies of CdS nanostructures in the presence of different capping agents. Surface passivation of CdS with polyvinylpyrrolidone and piperazine lead to the formation of CdS nanorods, whereas capping with triton X resulted in the formation of CdS clusters. XRD studies revealed the formation of cubic phase and hexagonal phase with polyvinylpyrrolidone, triton X and piperazine, respectively. Absorption and emission studies revealed that the capping agents play an important role in passivation of the dangling bonds on the nanoparticle surface and greatly influence the optical properties.

  9. Mesoporous structured MIPs@CDs fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2016-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured molecularly imprinted polymers capped carbon dots (M-MIPs@CDs) fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of TNT. The strategy using amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer" for imprinting simplify the imprinting process and provide well recognition sites accessibility. The as-prepared M-MIPs@CDs sensor, using periodic mesoporous silica as imprinting matrix, and amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer", exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward TNT with detection limit of 17nM. The recycling process was sustainable for 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of TNT in soil and water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 88.6-95.7%. The method proposed in this work was proved to be a convenient and practical way to prepare high sensitive and selective fluorescence MIPs@CDs sensors.

  10. Optical properties of colloidal aqueous synthesized 3 mercaptopropionic acid stabilized CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sumanth Kumar, D. Jai Kumar, B.; Mahesh, H.M.

    2016-05-06

    We have explored an easiest and simplest aqueous route to synthesize bright green luminescent CdS QDs using 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a stabilizer in air ambient for solar cell applications. The CdS quantum dots showed a strong quantum confinement effect with good stability, size and excellent photoluminescence. MPA Capping on CdS QDs was confirmed through FTIR. The Optical absorption spectrum revealed the CdS quantum dots are highly transparent in the visible region with absorption peak at 380 nm, confirming the quantum confinement. Photoluminescence showed an emission peak at 525 nm wavelength. The optical band gap energy was found to be 3.19 eV and CdS quantum dots radius calculated using Brus equation is 1.5 nm. The results are presented and discussed in detail.

  11. Shape-controlled synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) and study on the binding of Cd2+/CdS to trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dezhi; Wang, Li; Wang, Yabo; Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qiuxia; He, Bingyu

    2017-07-01

    Protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with different morphology have been synthesized under biomimetic condition using trypsin as capping agent in aqueous medium. The reaction parameters including concentration of trypsin, pH value, reaction time, and temperature have a major influence on the morphology and optical property of CdS NCs. XRD, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), TEM, HRTEM, and EDS characterizations were used to investigate the structure, composition, morphology, and size of as-prepared products. The binding reaction between Cd2+/CdS and trypsin was investigated systematically through various spectroscopic methods. UV-vis, FT-IR, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and conductivity analysis of Cd2+-trypsin suggest that Cd2+ ions could coordinate with the functional groups of trypsin and induce the formation of unfolding and loosening structure in protein molecules, and the change of protein conformation was also verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. This interaction increased local supersaturation of Cd2+ ions around the groups of trypsin and reduced the nucleation activation energy of CdS nuclei, which favored heterogeneous nucleation in trypsin matrix and resulted in the formation of inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The functional integrity of the enzyme conjugated to CdS NCs was studied by monitoring the enzymatic activity of CdS-trypsin conjugates. The fluorescence of CdS NCs is dependent strongly on trypsin which passivates the surface of NCs.

  12. Comparison of electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical calculations with rf test results in rf-dipole deflecting/crabbing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HyeKyoung; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    The current requirements of higher gradients and strict dimensional constraints in the emerging applications have required the designing of compact deflecting and crabbing rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first novel compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance and widely separated higher order modes. The recent tests performed on proof-of-principle designs of the rf-dipole geometry at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in the vertical test area at Jefferson Lab have proven the designs to achieve higher gradients with higher intrinsic quality factors and easily processed multipacting conditions. The cavity characteristics, such as pressure sensitivity and Lorentz force detuning, were studied using ANSYS before the fabrication. These characteristics were measured during the cavity test. The comparison between the simulation and the measurement provides insight how the simulation can be used for design and fabrication of future cavities.

  13. Pressure distributions induced by elevon deflections on swept wings and adjacent end-plate surfaces at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions are presented for regions where three-dimensional separated flow effects are prominent on swept-wing-elevon-end-plate models of 0 degree, 50 degree, and 70 degree sweepback, and with 0 degree, 10 degree, 20 degree, and 30 degree elevon deflections. Surface-oil-flow photographs and pressure distributions on the flat-plate wing, elevon, and end-plate surfaces are presented for numerous geometric variations, including various spacings between the elevon and the end plate, with and without a tip fin. The data, for a free-stream Mach number of 6 and a wing-root-chord Reynolds number of 20 x 10 to the sixth power, reveal considerably larger regions of elevon induced loads on the adjacent end-plate surface than would be anticipated by using inviscid flow analyses.

  14. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  15. Systematic investigation of geometrical parameters’ influence on the appearance of surface deflections in sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinschenk, A.; Volk, W.

    2016-08-01

    Surface deflections occur during springback, which follows deep drawing. They highly affect the visual appearance of outer skin components and are, therefore, undesirable. In this work, the influence of the part geometry on the shaping of surface deflections is investigated. The geometrical parameters of an exemplary component are varied and existing surface deflections are detected. For this, a component consisting of a multiple curved surface with an inserted door handle hollow is used, and AA6016, with a sheet thickness of 1.0 mm, as well as DC06, with a sheet thickness of 0.7 mm, are chosen. After the simulations are performed in AutoForm plus R6 TM , a virtual stone, Three-Point Gauging and the analysis of curvatures of the part before and after springback are used to detect surface deflections.

  16. Offset tolerance of an orbital angular momentum optical communication system with angular deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiao-li; Sang, Hong-qing; Cui, Xiao-Zhou; Chang, Huan; Li, Li; Wu, Guo-hua

    2017-06-01

    This work studied the offset tolerance (OT) with a particular focus on the angular deflection of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) system in free space. We derived an analytical expression of the OT for an angular-deflected Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam via Fourier series (FS) expansion and determined the upper bound of the OT for OAM-multiplexed systems. Next, we analyzed the effects of the beam waist, transmitted distance and OAM state number on the OT numerically. The calculation results indicate that the OT of the deflected beam is inversely proportional to the square root of the OAM number and approximately reciprocal to the propagation distance. Finally, we calculated the bit-error rate (BER) and aggregated capacity of multiplexed systems with different sets of channels. The results confirmed that the estimated upper bound is reasonable, especially for larger mode spacings. This work can provide guidance for the design and optimization of angular-deflected OAM-multiplexed communication systems.

  17. Final Report for LDRD Feasibility Study 11-FS-0015 Feasibility of Asteroid Deflection Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Paul L.

    2011-11-10

    This report is a compilation of material generated in the course of the LDRD feasibility study 11-FS-0015, Feasibility of Asteroid Deflection Investigations. The descriptive material is from the web-based proposal for the project.

  18. The use of a deflectable nose on a missile as a control device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. D.

    1981-05-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been carried out on a blunted ogive-cylinder with a deflectable nose at Mach numbers between 0.8 and 2.0. Although the results are subject to scale effects, it appears that the deflectable nose could find use as a missile control method. The results have been applied to two missile configurations. For a long slender missile the deflectable nose produces non-linear trim curves at subsonic speeds, approaching linearity at supersonic Mach numbers. Nevertheless, worth-while trimmed incidences can be achieved. Although a deflectable nose on a 105 mm shell at subsonic speeds produces only relatively small normal force coefficients at trim, the trim curves are linear. Furthermore, it appears that when used for terminal control significant deviations in shell impact point are attainable.

  19. Paired leaky mode spatial light modulators with a 28° total deflection angle.

    PubMed

    Qaderi, Kamran; Leach, Christopher; Smalley, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    In this Letter, we present a paired set of waveguide spatial light modulators (SLMs) capable of a maximum light deflection nearing 28° for red. This deflection, which is several times larger than the angular sweep of current, state-of-the-art modulators, is made possible by the unilateral, near-collinear waveguide nature of the leaky mode interaction. The ability to double angular output in this way, which is either not possible or not practical in other SLMs, is possible in leaky mode devices, thanks to the absence of zero-order light and the lack of high-order outputs. This combined structure has angular deflection high enough to enable color holographic video monitors that do not require angular magnification. Furthermore, the low cost and high angular deflection of these devices may make it possible to make large arrays for flat-screen video holography.

  20. An oilspill trajectory analysis model with a variable wind deflection angle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Huang, N.E.; Amstutz, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The oilspill trajectory movement algorithm consists of a vector sum of the surface drift component due to wind and the surface current component. In the U.S. Geological Survey oilspill trajectory analysis model, the surface drift component is assumed to be 3.5% of the wind speed and is rotated 20 degrees clockwise to account for Coriolis effects in the Northern Hemisphere. Field and laboratory data suggest, however, that the deflection angle of the surface drift current can be highly variable. An empirical formula, based on field observations and theoretical arguments relating wind speed to deflection angle, was used to calculate a new deflection angle at each time step in the model. Comparisons of oilspill contact probabilities to coastal areas calculated for constant and variable deflection angles showed that the model is insensitive to this changing angle at low wind speeds. At high wind speeds, some statistically significant differences in contact probabilities did appear. ?? 1982.

  1. Mission analysis for the ion beam deflection of fictitious asteroid 2015 PDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, Claudio; Amato, Davide; Cano, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Based on a hypothetical asteroid impact scenario proposed during the 2015 IAA Planetary Defense Conference (PDC), we study the deflection of fictitious asteroid 2015 PDC starting from ephemeris data provided by the conference organizers. A realistic mission scenario is investigated that makes use of an ion beam shepherd spacecraft as a primary deflection technique. The article deals with the design of a low-thrust rendezvous trajectory to the asteroid, the estimation of the propagated covariance ellipsoid and the outcome of an ion beam slow-push deflection starting from three worst case scenarios (impacts in New Delhi, Dhaka and Tehran). Displacing the impact point towards an extremely low-populated, easy-to-evacuate region, as opposed to full deflection, is found to be a more effective mitigation approach. Mission design, technical and political aspects are discussed.

  2. Square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is given for the stresses and deflections of a square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections. Values of the bending stress and membrane stress at the center of the plate and at the midpoint of the edge are given for center deflections up to 1.9 times the plate thickness. The shape of the deflected surface is given for low pressures and for the highest pressure considered. Convergence of solution is considered and it is estimated that the possible error is less than 2 percent. The results are compared with the only previous approximate analysis known to the author and agrees within 5 percent. They are also shown to compare favorably with the known exact solutions for the long rectangular plate and the circular plate.

  3. Square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is given for the stresses and deflections of a square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections. Values of the bending stress and membrane stress at the center of the plate and at the midpoint of the edge are given for center deflections up to 1.9 times the plate thickness. The shape of the deflected surface is given for low pressures and for the highest pressure considered. Convergence of the solution is considered and it is estimated that the possible error is less than 2 percent. The results are compared with the only previous approximate analysis known to the author and agree within 5 percent. They are also shown to compare favorably with the known exact solutions for the long rectangular plate and the circular plate.

  4. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE GREEK TRANSLATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE DEPERSONALIZATION SCALE (CDS).

    PubMed

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C

    2016-10-01

    The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale is meant to capture the frequency and duration of depersonalisation symptoms over the 'last 6 months'. In order to develop a Greek version of CDS scale, the CDS scale was translated in Greek by 2 psychiatrists. Then, the Greek version of CDS scale was back-translated by a person who did not knew the original English version. The back-translated version was reviewed in order to establish whether is consistent with the original English version. After this procedure we administered the Greek version of CDS scale to a sample of 294 Greeks in order to assess the reliability and the validity of the Greek version of scale. The five components solution accounted for 58.204% of the total variation. Initial eigenvalues of the five components were: factor 1=11.555, factor 2=1.564, factor 3=1.356, factor 4=1.247 and factor 5=1.157. Six items did not load on any factor. Correlations between factors were low ranged from 0.134 to 0.314 and no complex variables were found. Cronbach's alpha and Guttman split-half coefficient were used to evaluate interval consistency of CDS scale in 294 individuals. The alpha coefficients and Guttman split-half coefficient of the CDS scale were 0.938 and 0.921, respectively. The test-retest reliability proved to be satisfactory. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the total CDS score was very good and equal to 0,883. The CDS scale correlated highly with the SCL-90 and all subscales (p-value<0.0001). The psychometric strength of CDS - Greek its reliable for its future use, particularly for screening for subjects with possible diagnosis of CDS.

  5. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE GREEK TRANSLATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE DEPERSONALIZATION SCALE (CDS)

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale is meant to capture the frequency and duration of depersonalisation symptoms over the ‘last 6 months’. Methods: In order to develop a Greek version of CDS scale, the CDS scale was translated in Greek by 2 psychiatrists. Then, the Greek version of CDS scale was back-translated by a person who did not knew the original English version. The back-translated version was reviewed in order to establish whether is consistent with the original English version. After this procedure we administered the Greek version of CDS scale to a sample of 294 Greeks in order to assess the reliability and the validity of the Greek version of scale. Results: The five components solution accounted for 58.204% of the total variation. Initial eigenvalues of the five components were: factor 1=11.555, factor 2=1.564, factor 3=1.356, factor 4=1.247 and factor 5=1.157. Six items did not load on any factor. Correlations between factors were low ranged from 0.134 to 0.314 and no complex variables were found. Cronbach’s alpha and Guttman split-half coefficient were used to evaluate interval consistency of CDS scale in 294 individuals. The alpha coefficients and Guttman split-half coefficient of the CDS scale were 0.938 and 0.921, respectively. The test-retest reliability proved to be satisfactory. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the total CDS score was very good and equal to 0,883. The CDS scale correlated highly with the SCL-90 and all subscales (p-value<0.0001). Conclusion: The psychometric strength of CDS – Greek its reliable for its future use, particularly for screening for subjects with possible diagnosis of CDS. PMID:27999491

  6. Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

  7. Dimensional analysis considerations in the engine rotor fragment containment/deflection problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leech, J. W.; Witmer, E. A.; Yeghiayan, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Dimensional analysis techniques are described and applied to the containment/deflection problem of bursting high-rpm rotating parts of turbojet engines. The use of dimensional analysis to select a feasible set of experiments and to determine the important parameters to be varied is presented. The determination of a containment coefficient based on the nondimensionalized parameters is developed for the reduction of experimental data and as an assist to designers of containment/deflection devices.

  8. Small deflection of a class of clamped thin plates using collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worley, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Equations are given for the optimization of a class of two-and three-dimensional structures. The application of existing analytical techniques to the response of thin clamped plates is described. The ratios of deflections to plate thickness are given for uniform transverse loads as well as for uniform plus linearly varying transverse loads. Deflections are presented at angular increments of 5 degrees and at radial increments of 0.1 of the radius.

  9. Solutions of the heat conduction equation in multilayers for photothermal deflection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgahan, William A.; Cole, K. D.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical expressions for temperature and laser beam deflection in multilayer medium is derived using Green function techniques. The approach is based on calculation of the normal component of heat fluxes across the boundaries, from which either the beam deflections or the temperature anywhere in space can be found. A general expression for the measured signals for the case of four-quadrant detection is also presented and compared with previous calculations of detector response for finite probe beams.

  10. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  11. Molecular Aggregates in Stable Aqueous Three-Phase Surfactant Systems and Their use in Producing CdS Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renhao; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous three-phase surfactant systems (A3PS) are important, multicomponent, stable three-phase equilibria with coexisting forms in a common colloid solution, but have been largely ignored regarding further characterization and application. Mixing simple, commercially available, single-tailed anionic/nonionic or anionic/cationic surfactants in water can spontaneously produce stable A3PS with coexisting multiscale self-assembled structures including discs, lamellas, micelles and vesicles. As with conventional aqueous two-phase systems (A2PS), A3PS can be applied in partition and extraction processes. Here, the A3PS was also used as a mild media for one-step synthesis of multiscale CdS nanowires. Particularly, the A3PS does not change and simultaneously separates the CdS nanowires with the comparable size in one phase, which provides a facile strategy for collection of monodisperse nanomaterials. We expect that this present work can expand recognition of A3PS for use in theoretical and applied studies. PMID:23588712

  12. Molecular aggregates in stable aqueous three-phase surfactant systems and their use in producing CdS nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renhao; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous three-phase surfactant systems (A3PS) are important, multicomponent, stable three-phase equilibria with coexisting forms in a common colloid solution, but have been largely ignored regarding further characterization and application. Mixing simple, commercially available, single-tailed anionic/nonionic or anionic/cationic surfactants in water can spontaneously produce stable A3PS with coexisting multiscale self-assembled structures including discs, lamellas, micelles and vesicles. As with conventional aqueous two-phase systems (A2PS), A3PS can be applied in partition and extraction processes. Here, the A3PS was also used as a mild media for one-step synthesis of multiscale CdS nanowires. Particularly, the A3PS does not change and simultaneously separates the CdS nanowires with the comparable size in one phase, which provides a facile strategy for collection of monodisperse nanomaterials. We expect that this present work can expand recognition of A3PS for use in theoretical and applied studies.

  13. Mist separator

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, T.M.

    1984-04-17

    An apparatus for the removal of particulates from a flowing gas stream and a process for its use are provided. A perforated screen separator formed as a plate having parallel rows of perforations formed by pushing alternating strips of the plate material forward and backward from the plane of the plate is used. The perforated screen separator may be used alone or with a fiber bed mist eliminator for increased particulate removal.

  14. Comparison of Theory and Experiment on Aeroacoustic Loads and Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Bourgine, A.; Bonomi, B.

    1999-01-01

    The correlation of acoustic pressure loads induced by a turbulent wake on a nearby structural panel is considered: this problem is relevant to the acoustic fatigue of aircraft, rocket and satellite structures. Both the correlation of acoustic pressure loads and the panel deflections, were measured in an 8-m diameter transonic wind tunnel. Using the measured correlation of acoustic pressures, as an input to a finite-element aeroelastic code, the panel response was reproduced. The latter was also satisfactorily reproduced, using again the aeroelastic code, with input given by a theoretical formula for the correlation of acoustic pressures; the derivation of this formula, and the semi-empirical parameters which appear in it, are included in this paper. The comparison of acoustic responses in aeroacoustic wind tunnels (AWT) and progressive wave tubes (PWT) shows that much work needs to be done to bridge that gap; this is important since the PWT is the standard test means, whereas the AWT is more representative of real flight conditions but also more demanding in resources. Since this may be the first instance of successful modelling of acoustic fatigue, it may be appropriate to list briefly the essential ``positive'' features and associated physical phenomena: (i) a standard aeroelastic structural code can predict acoustic fatigue, provided that the correlation of pressure loads be adequately specified; (ii) the correlation of pressure loads is determined by the interference of acoustic waves, which depends on the exact evaluation of multiple scattering integrals, involving the statistics of random phase shifts; (iii) for the relatively low frequencies (one to a few hundred Hz) of aeroacoustic fatigue, the main cause of random phase effects is scattering by irregular wakes, which are thin on wavelength scale, and appear as partially reflecting rough interfaces. It may also be appropriate to mention some of the ``negative'' features, to which may be attached illusory

  15. Deflecting APOPHIS with a flotilla of solar shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Jean-Yves; Perret, Alain; Boisard, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The possibility to use the photonic pressure from the Sun for acting upon the orbit of a man-made object is well known. What is presented in this paper is the capacity to use a solar sail like vehicle to change the orbit of a small body of the solar system by hovering over its sunlit surface. One of the forces that affect the orbit of small bodies is a tiny but permanent thrust of thermal origin, the intensity and direction of which are directly related to the nature of the soil, the characteristics of the rotation and the physical properties of the body. This effect is known as the Yarkovsky Effect. It concerns mainly hundred meter class asteroids. There are hundred thousands of small bodies of this type. About 10% of them are classified as Near Earth Object and one of them, APOPHIS, is of special interest. APOPHIS has been discovered in 2004. Its diameter is estimated to be 270 m. Its rotation period is around 30 h so the Yarkovsky Effect on its orbit should not be negligible. These parameters and possibly others should be refined in 2012 when this asteroid can be observed again. APOPHIS will make a very close (40,000 km) approach to the Earth in April 2029. Depending on the geometry of its swing-by, it can be placed on an impact orbit to the Earth and present a danger for the future decades. The areas that correspond to such trajectories are called Resonant Orbit Keyholes and are only a few hundred meter wide. From the observation in 2012, it will be possible to determine the magnitude of the Yarkovsky Effect on APOPHIS and to greatly improve the prevision of its 2029 swing-by. If the Yarkovsky Effect is found to be important, cancelling it will be sufficient to avoid any keyhole and prevent any future collision with the Earth. We call Yarkovsky Effect Suppression (YES) this deflection method. This effect can be cancelled by shadowing and cooling down the asteroid with a flotilla of solar shields. This new type of solar sails will have to counter the photonic

  16. Product separator

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  17. Minimum entropy principle-based solar cell operation without a pn-junction and a thin CdS layer to extract the holes from the emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    2016-10-01

    The solar cell does not use a pn-junction to separate electrons from holes, but uses an undoped CdS layer that is p-type inverted when attached to a p-type collector and collects the holes while rejecting the backflow of electrons and thereby prevents junction leakage. The operation of the solar cell is determined by the minimum entropy principle of the cell and its external circuit that determines the electrochemical potential, i.e., the Fermi-level of the base electrode to the operating (maximum power point) voltage. It leaves the Fermi level of the metal electrode of the CdS unchanged, since CdS does not participate in the photo-emf. All photoelectric actions are generated by the holes excited from the light that causes the shift of the quasi-Fermi levels in the generator and supports the diffusion current in operating conditions. It is responsible for the measured solar maximum power current. The open circuit voltage (Voc) can approach its theoretical limit of the band gap of the collector at 0 K and the cell increases the efficiency at AM1 to 21% for a thin-film CdS/CdTe that is given as an example here. However, a series resistance of the CdS forces a limitation of its thickness to preferably below 200 Å to avoid unnecessary reduction in efficiency or Voc. The operation of the CdS solar cell does not involve heated carriers. It is initiated by the field at the CdS/CdTe interface that exceeds 20 kV/cm that is sufficient to cause extraction of holes by the CdS that is inverted to become p-type. Here a strong doubly charged intrinsic donor can cause a negative differential conductivity that switches-on a high-field domain that is stabilized by the minimum entropy principle and permits an efficient transport of the holes from the CdTe to the base electrode. Experimental results of the band model of CdS/CdTe solar cells are given and show that the conduction bands are connected in the dark, where the electron current must be continuous, and the valence bands are

  18. Deflection-Based Structural Loads Estimation From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Lokos, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional techniques in structural load measurement entail the correlation of a known load with strain-gage output from the individual components of a structure or machine. The use of strain gages has proved successful and is considered the standard approach for load measurement. However, remotely measuring aerodynamic loads using deflection measurement systems to determine aeroelastic deformation as a substitute to strain gages may yield lower testing costs while improving aircraft performance through reduced instrumentation weight. This technique was examined using a reliable strain and structural deformation measurement system. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of a deflection-based load estimation, using the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft. Calibration data from ground tests performed on the aircraft were used to derive left wing-root and wing-fold bending-moment and torque load equations based on strain gages, however, for this study, point deflections were used to derive deflection-based load equations. Comparisons between the strain-gage and deflection-based methods are presented. Flight data from the phase-1 active aeroelastic wing flight program were used to validate the deflection-based load estimation method. Flight validation revealed a strong bending-moment correlation and slightly weaker torque correlation. Development of current techniques, and future studies are discussed.

  19. Finite element analysis modeling of pulse-laser excited photothermal deflection (mirage effect) from aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    A finite element analysis method for numerical modeling of the photothermal deflection spectroscopy of aerosols is presented. The models simulate pulse-laser excited photothermal deflection from aerosols collected on a plane surface substrate in air medium. The influence of the aerosol and substrate properties on the transient photothermal deflection signal is examined. We have previously obtained experimental results for photothermal deflection spectrometry of aerosols deposited onto a plate from an impactor system (O. O. Dada and S. E. Bialkowski, Appl. Spectrosc. 62, 1336 (2008)). This paper supports the validity of the experimental results presented in that paper and helps in answering some of the questions raised. The modeling results presented here demonstrate that the (peak) normalized transient temperature change profile and (peak) normalized transient photothermal deflection profile are a good approximation and invariant with number of particles, inter-particle distance, and particulate shape, which suggests that the photothermal deflection signal amplitude may be calibrated linearly with total mass of aerosols and the method could be applied to analysis of complex aerosols.

  20. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C. F.; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally. PMID:26274964

  1. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-08-12

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally.

  2. Large deflection and rotation of Timoshenko beams with frictional end supports under three-point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Kui; Li, Xian-Fang

    2016-08-01

    Three-point bending of a beam is studied based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Large deflection and large rotation of a beam resting on simple supports with friction are calculated for a concentrated force acting at the midspan. Using the Lagrangian kinematic relations, a system of non-linear differential equations are obtained for a prismatic shear-deformable Timoshenko beam. Exact solutions for the deflection, horizontal displacement, and rotation of cross-section are derived analytically. Two deflections of small and large scale exist under three-point bending. The solutions corresponding to linearized model coincide with the well-known solutions to the classical Timoshenko beams. Numerical calculations are carried out to show the effect of the important parameters such as shear rigidity of the beam and the coefficient of friction at the contact position between the beam and supports on the deflection. The load-deflection curves are graphically presented. A comparison of large deflections and large rotations with their classical counterparts and with experimental data is made. The obtained results are useful in safety design of linear and non-linear beams subject to three-point bending.

  3. Experimental Estimating Deflection of a Simple Beam Bridge Model Using Grating Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Chunfeng; Liu, Weiwen; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    A novel three-point method using a grating eddy current absolute position sensor (GECS) for bridge deflection estimation is proposed in this paper. Real spatial positions of the measuring points along the span axis are directly used as relative reference points of each other rather than using any other auxiliary static reference points for measuring devices in a conventional method. Every three adjacent measuring points are defined as a measuring unit and a straight connecting bar with a GECS fixed on the center section of it links the two endpoints. In each measuring unit, the displacement of the mid-measuring point relative to the connecting bar measured by the GECS is defined as the relative deflection. Absolute deflections of each measuring point can be calculated from the relative deflections of all the measuring units directly without any correcting approaches. Principles of the three-point method and displacement measurement of the GECS are introduced in detail. Both static and dynamic experiments have been carried out on a simple beam bridge model, which demonstrate that the three-point deflection estimation method using the GECS is effective and offers a reliable way for bridge deflection estimation, especially for long-term monitoring. PMID:23112583

  4. Effect of acid solutions on plants studied by the optical beam deflection method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liangjiao; Kuboda, Mitsutoshi; Inoue, Tomomi; Wu, Xingzheng

    2013-12-01

    The optical beam deflection method was applied to study the effects of acid solution on both a terrestial and aquatic plants Egeria and Cerastium, which are common aquatic plant and terrestial weed respectively. A probe beam from a He-Ne laser was passed through a vicinity of a leaf of the plants, which were put in culture dishes filled with acid solutions. Deflection signals of the probe beam were monitored and compared for acid solutions with different pH values. The results of Egria showed that the deflection signals changed dramatically when pH values of acid solutions were 2.0 and 3.0, while little at pH of 4.0 and 5.0. For Cerastium when pH were below 3.0, deflection signals changed greatly with time at the begining. After a certain period of time, deflection signals changed little with time. When pH value was above 4.0, deflection signals of Cerastium were still changing with time even after 20 hours. The results suggested that the damage threshold of pH was between 3.0 and 4.0 for both the land and aquatic plants. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Labib, Labib Mohamed; Nabih, Sameh Mahmoud; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite. A total of 40 human premolars were used for cuspal deflection evaluation in this study. Each group was divided into four equal groups according to the type of resin composite and the adhesive used as follows: group A: Using low shrinkable resin composite (silorane) with its adhesive system; group B: Using low shrinkable composite (silorane) with G-bond; group C: Using Filtek Z350 composite with G-bond; and group D: Using Filtek Z350 composite with AdheSE. Cusp deflection was detected using Universal measuring microscope and laser horizontal metroscope. This study was done to investigate the effect of polymerization shrinkage stresses of two resin composite materials (Filtek Z350 and Filtek P90) on cuspal deflection of mesio-occluso-distal restoration. For this study, the extracted non-carious maxillary second premolars were selected. Forty teeth that showed no more than 5% variation in their dimensions were used. A significant increase in cuspal deflection of cavities restored with the methacrylate-based (Filtek Z350) compared with the silorane (P90) resin-based composites was obtained. The change in the organic matrix or materials formulation of the resin composite using silorane has a positive effect on controlling the cusp deflection.

  6. Deflection-Based Aircraft Structural Loads Estimation with Comparison to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Lokos, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional techniques in structural load measurement entail the correlation of a known load with strain-gage output from the individual components of a structure or machine. The use of strain gages has proved successful and is considered the standard approach for load measurement. However, remotely measuring aerodynamic loads using deflection measurement systems to determine aeroelastic deformation as a substitute to strain gages may yield lower testing costs while improving aircraft performance through reduced instrumentation weight. With a reliable strain and structural deformation measurement system this technique was examined. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of a deflection-based load estimation, using the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft. Calibration data from ground tests performed on the aircraft were used to derive left wing-root and wing-fold bending-moment and torque load equations based on strain gages, however, for this study, point deflections were used to derive deflection-based load equations. Comparisons between the strain-gage and deflection-based methods are presented. Flight data from the phase-1 active aeroelastic wing flight program were used to validate the deflection-based load estimation method. Flight validation revealed a strong bending-moment correlation and slightly weaker torque correlation. Development of current techniques, and future studies are discussed.

  7. One dimensional CdS nanowire@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell as high performance photocatalyst for fast degradation of dye pollutants under visible and sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Abbas; Salimi, Abdollah

    2016-10-01

    In this study, one-dimensional CdS nanowires@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell structures (1D CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs) were synthesized by a facile wet chemical-solvothermal method. The different aspects of the properties of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs were surveyed by using a comprehensive range of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and amperometry. The as-prepared nanostructure was applied as an effective photocatalyst for degradation of methyl orange (MO), methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (Rh B) under visible and sunlight irradiation. The results indicated significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs for degradation of MO, MB and Rh B compared to CdS NWs. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enhanced sunlight absorbance and the efficient charge separation of the formed heterostructure between CdS NWs and TiO2. The results showed that MO, Rh B and MB were almost completely degraded after 2, 2 and 3min of exposure to sunlight, respectively; while under visible light irradiation (3W blue LED lamp) the dyes were decomposed with less half degradation rate. The catalytic activity was retained even after three degradation cycles of organic dyes, demonstrating that the proposed nanocomposite can be effectively used as efficient photocatalyst for removal of environmental pollutions caused by organic dyes under sunlight irradiation and it could be an important addition to the field of wastewater treatment. We hope the present study may open a new window of such 1-D semiconductor nanocomposites to be used as visible light photocatalysts in the promising field of organic dyes degradation.

  8. MoS2/reduced graphene oxide hybrid with CdS nanoparticles as a visible light-driven photocatalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-chao; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-yan

    2016-05-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds to aromatic amines using visible light is an attractive process that utilizes sunlight as the energy source for the chemical conversions. Herewith we synthesized a composite material consisting of CdS nanoparticles grown on the surface of MoS2/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid as a novel photocatalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The CdS-MoS2/rGO composite is shown as a high-performance visible light-driven photocatalyst. Even without a noble-metal cocatalyst, the catalyst exhibited a great activity under visible light irradiation for the reduction of 4-NP to much less toxic 4-aminophenol (4-AP) with ammonium formate as the sacrificial agent. Composite CdS-0.03(MoS2/0.01rGO) was found to be the most effective photocatalyst for 4-NP reduction. The high photocatalytic performance is apparently resulted from the synergetic functions of MoS2 and graphene in the composite, i.e. the cocatalysts serve as both the active adsorption sites for 4-NP and electron collectors for the separation of electron-hole pairs generated by CdS nanoparticles. The laboratory results show that the CdS-MoS2/rGO composite is a low-cost and stable photocatalyst for effective reduction and detoxification of nitroaromatic compounds using solar energy.

  9. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  10. ForeCAT - A model for magnetic deflections of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, the Sun explosively releases bubbles of magnetized plasma known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which can produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of CMEs. Decades of observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory, however, no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. We developed a model for CME deflection and rotation from magnetic forces, called Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT). ForeCAT has been designed to run fast enough for large parameter phase space studies, and potentially real-time predictions. ForeCAT reproduces the general trends seen in observed CME deflections. In particular, CMEs deflect toward regions of minimum magnetic energy - frequently the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) on global scales. The background magnetic forces decrease rapidly with distance and quickly become negligible. Most deflections and rotations can be well-described by assuming constant angular momentum beyond 10 Rs. ForeCAT also reproduces individual observed CME deflections - the 2008 December 12, 2008 April 08, and 2010 July 12 CMEs. By determining the reduced chi-squared best fit between the ForeCAT results and the observations we constrain parameters related to the CME and the background solar wind. Additionally, we constrain whether different models for the low corona magnetic backgrounds can produce the observed CME deflection. We explore the space weather of cool M dwarfs (dMs) with surface magnetic field strengths of order kG. dMs have extreme CMEs and flares and close-in habitable zones. We use ForeCAT to explore the deflections corresponding to the range of plausible CME masses and speeds for the dM V374 Peg. The deflection of the dM CMEs exceeds their solar counterparts, and the strong magnetic gradients surrounding the dM's Astrospheric Current Sheet (ACS, analogous to the Sun's HCS) can trap the CMEs that reach it

  11. Polar optical phonons in semiconducting CdS nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, A. I. Belogorokhov, I. A.; Miranda, R. P.; Vasilevskii, M. I.; Gavrilov, S. A.

    2007-02-15

    We have experimentally and theoretically studied IR-active optical phonons, which are spatially confined in the volume of semiconducting CdS nanocrystals of various shapes synthesized in a dielectric matrix (porous aluminum oxide). Within an approach admitting the mixing of all expected types of vibrations, the complete sets of phonon modes are determined for a spherical quantum dot (QD) and a cylindrical quantum wire (QW) in this matrix. Based on these results, the polarizability spectra of QDs and QWs, as well as the effective dielectric function of a composite material containing such nanoparticles, are calculated for the far-IR wavelength range. It is established that the spectrum of the dielectric function exhibits specific features in the region between the transverse and longitudinal optical phonon frequencies of the massive semiconductor material. These features explain the rather unusual structure of the IR spectra of the composite samples studied.

  12. CdS thin film solar cells for terrestrial power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirland, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of very low cost long lived Cu2S/CdS thin film solar cells for large scale energy conversion is reported. Excellent evaporated metal grid patterns were obtained using a specially designed aperture mask. Vacuum evaporated gold and copper grids of 50 lines per inch and 1 micron thickness were adequate electrically for the fine mesh contacting grid. Real time roof top sunlight exposure tests of encapsulated CdS cells showed no loss in output after 5 months. Accelerated life testing of encapsulated cells showed no loss of output power after 6 months of 12 hour dark-12 hour AMI illumination cycles at 40 C, 60 C, 80 C and 100 C temperatures. However, the cells changed their basic parameters, such as series and shunt resistance and junction capacitance.

  13. MIS diode structure in As/+/ implanted CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Structure made by As implantation of carefully prepared high-conductivity CdS surfaces followed by Pt deposition and 450 C anneal display rectifying, although substantially different, I-V characteristics in the dark and during illumination with subband-gap light. Structures prepared in the same way on an unimplanted portion of the substrate have similar I-V characteristics, except that the forward turnover voltage for an illuminated unimplanted diode is much smaller than that for an implanted diode. It is suggested that the charge conduction in both structures is dominated by hole and/or electron tunneling through a metal-semiconductor potential barrier. The tunneling processes appear to be quite sensitive to subband-gap illumination, which causes the dramatic decreases of turnover voltages and apparent series resistances. The difference in turnover voltage appears to be caused by interface states between the Pt electrode and the implanted layer, which suggests a MIS model.

  14. Electronic characteristics of 'real' CdS surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Balestra, C. L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    Photovoltage spectroscopy (including photovoltage inversion and photovoltage quenching) was used to determine the electronic characteristics of real (basal and prismatic) surfaces of CdS. In room atmosphere, surface states with the following positions were found in the cadmium surfaces: Ec - Et equal to 0.05, 0.4, and 0.8 eV, and Ev - Et equal to 0.83 eV. The same surface states were present in the sulfur surfaces, with the exception of those at Ec - Et equal to 0.4 eV. In the prismatic and unetched basal surfaces, states at Ec - Et equal to 1.1 eV were found in addition to all of those found on the cadmium surfaces.

  15. SOHO/CDS and SUMER coordinated observations of coronal streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna; Landi, Enrico; Bromage, B. J. I.

    2002-06-01

    In June 2000 the SOHO and Ulysses satellites reached the quadrature configuration with respect to the Sun. On this occasion the JOP 112 was run, with the aim of studying the coronal and solar wind physical parameters, with particular attention to the element composition. In this paper we present preliminary results from SOHO/SUMER and CDS/NIS data. The two instruments were pointed off-limb and observed the lower solar corona in the Ulysses direction (-58.2 deg in the S-E quadrant). During the period of observations (12-17 June) the observed corona was filled with streamers. From each instrument the electron density, temperature and element composition of the studied areas have been derived. A comparison of the results from the two instruments is then presented.

  16. Radiolytic production and properties of ultrasmall CdS particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.; Swayambunathan, V. ); Micic, O.I.; Nenadovic, M.T.; Meisel, D. )

    1989-06-01

    The radiolytic production of CdS particles from solutions containing cadmium ions and a thiol (3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, RSH) is described. The production of the colloids is initiated by the reaction of solvated electron with the thiol to release HS{sup {minus}} ions. The polynuclear complexes of cadmium with the thiolate form of RSH act as moderators to the growth of the particles and allow reproducible production of practically any predetermined size particles. The complexes at the surface of the particles also stabilize the particles for long periods of time. The particles are strongly fluorescent from size of ca. 8 {angstrom} in radius. Excess electrons in these particles lead to bleaching of the exciton band due to Coulomb screening effects. At higher doses, formation of cadmium atoms leads to increased absorption in the visible range.

  17. Carbon-assisted morphological manipulation of CdS nanostructures and their cathodoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Zhai, Tianyou; Wang Xi; Liao Qing; Ma Ying; Yao, Jiannian

    2009-11-15

    CdS nanostructures with different morphologies and sizes were successfully fabricated through a facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method. Through simply changing the positions of silicon substrates, the temperatures and the effects of carbon in different zones were modified, and thus the morphologies of CdS nanostructures were varied from multipods to nanobrushes to nanocups. These nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement shows that the as-grown CdS nanostructures display different luminescent properties. CdS multipods and nanocups show mainly green emission centered at {approx}496 nm. However, nanobrushes exhibit predominant red emission band peaking at {approx}711 nm. These interesting results show that carbon not only affected the growth process but also influenced the properties of CdS nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: A facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method is explored to synthesize CdS multipods, nanobrushes and nanocups. These CdS nanostructures display very different optical properties.

  18. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weichang; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng

    2014-12-01

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  19. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-09-15

    The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC₅₀ value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  20. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weichang E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  1. EUNIS Underflight Calibrations of CDS, EIT, TRACE, EIS, and EUVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Jess, David B.; Wang, Tongjiang

    2008-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) is a sounding rocket instrument that obtains imaged high-resolution solar spectra. It has now had two successful flights, on 2006 April 12 and 2007 November 16, providing data to support underflight calibrations for a number of orbiting solar experiments on both occasions. A regular part of each campaign is the end-to-end radiometric calibration of the rocket payload carried out at RAL in the UK, using the same facility that provided pre-flight CDS and EIS calibrations. The measurements, traceable to primary radiometric standards, can establish the absolute EUNIS response within a relative uncertainty of 10% over its full longwave bandpass of 300-370A. During each EUNIS flight, coordinated observations are made of overlapping solar locations by all participating space experiments, and identified by subsequent image co-registrations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be applied to these other instruments as well. The calibration transfer is straightforward for wavelengths within the EUNIS LW bandpass, and is extended to other wavelengths by means of a series of 'insensitive' line-ratios, with one line of each pair in the calibrated band and the other in the transfer band. In this way, the EUNIS-06 flight is able to update the radiometric calibrations of CDS NISl (plus 2nd order NIS2 near 2x304A), all four channels of EIT, and the three EUV channels of TRACE. The EUNIS-07 flight will further update those missions, as well as both channels of Hinode/EIT and all four channels of STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI. Future EUNIS flights have been proposed that will continue this underflight calibration service. EUNIS is supported by the NASA Heliophysics Division through its Low Cost Access to Space Program in Solar and Heliospheric Physics.

  2. EUNIS Underflight Calibrations of CDS, EIT, TRACE, EIS, and EUVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Wang, Tongjiang; Rabin, Douglas M.; Jess, David B.

    2008-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) is a sounding rocket instrument that obtains imaged high-resolution solar spectra. It has now had two successful flights, on 2006 April 12 and 2007 November 16, providing data to support underflight calibrations for a number of orbiting solar experiments on both occasions. A regular part of each campaign is the end-to-end radiometric calibration of the rocket payload carried out at RAL in the UK, using the same facility that provided pre-flight CDS and EIS calibrations. The measurements, traceable to primary radiometric standards, can establish the absolute EUNIS response within a total uncertainty of 10% over its full longwave bandpass of 300-370A. During each EUNIS flight, coordinated observations are made of overlapping solar locations by all participating space experiments, and identified by subsequent image co-registrations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be applied to these other instruments as well. The calibration transfer is straightforward for wavelengths within the EUNIS LW bandpass, and is extended to other wavelengths by means of a series of temperature- and density-insensitive line-ratios, with one line of each pair in the calibrated band and the other in the transfer band. In this way, the EUNIS-06 flight is able to update the radiometric calibrations of CDS NISl (and 2nd-order NIS2 near 2x304A), all four channels of EIT, and the three EUV channels of TRACE. The EUNIS-07 flight will further update those missions, as well as both channels of Hinode/EIS and all four channels of STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI. Future EUNIS flights have been proposed that will continue this underflight calibration service. EUNIS is supported by the NASA Heliophysics Division through its Low Cost Access to Space Program in Solar and Heliospheric Physics.

  3. Projection Moire measurement of the deflection of composite plates subject to bird strike impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, A.; Van Paepegem, W.; Harizanova, J.; Moentjens, A.; Degrieck, J.; Sainov, V.

    2007-06-01

    For the new generation aircraft families, the use of fibre-reinforced plastics is considered for the leading edge of the wings. However, this leading edge is very prone to bird strike impact. This paper presents the use of the projection moire technique to measure the out-of-plane deflections of composite plates subject to bird strike. Very strict constraints with regard to: (i) high speed image acquisition, (ii) vibrations of the impact chamber, and (iii) projection and observation angles - complicated substantially the development of the set-up. Moreover, the high frame rates (12000 fps) required a very intensive illumination. In the optimized configuration, a specially designed grating with gradually changing period is projected by means of special Metal Hydride lamps through one of the side windows of the impact chamber onto the composite plate riveted in a steel frame. The digital high speed camera is mounted on the roof of the impact chamber and records through a mirror the object surface with the projected fringe pattern on it. Numerical routines based on Local Fourier Transform were developed to process the digital images, to extract the phase and the out-of-plane displacements. The phase evaluation is possible due to the carrier frequency nature of the projected moire pattern. This carrier frequency allows separation of the unwanted additive and multiplicative fringe pattern components in the frequency domain via the application of a proper mask. The numerical calculations were calibrated for the bird strike of an aluminium plate, where the plastic deformation could be checked after the test.

  4. Model of phase distribution of hydrophobic organic chemicals in cyclodextrin-water-air-solid sorbent systems as a function of salinity, temperature, and the presence of multiple CDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental and other applications of cyclodextrins (CD) often require usage of high concentra- tion aqueous solutions of derivatized CDs. In an effort to reduce the costs, these studies also typically use technical grades where the purity of the CD solution and the degree of substitution has not been reported. Further, this grade of CD often included high levels of salt and it is commonly applied in high salinity systems. The mathematical models for water and air partitioning coefficients of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOC) with CDs that have been used in these studies under-estimate the level of HOC within CDs. This is because those models (1) do not take into account that high concentrations of CDs result in significantly lower levels of water in solution and (2) they do not account for the reduction in HOC aqueous solubility due to the presence of salt. Further, because they have poor knowledge of the CD molar concentration in their solu- tions, it is difficult to draw comparisons between studies. Herein is developed a mathematical model where cyclo- dextrin is treated as a separate phase whose relative volume is calculated from its apparent molar volume in solution and the CD concentration of the solution. The model also accounts for the affects of temperature and the presence of salt in solution through inclusion of modified versions of the Van't Hoff and Setschenow equations. With these capabilities, additional equations have been developed for calculating HOC phase distribution in air-water-CD-solid sorbent systems for a single HOC and between water and CD for a system containing multiple HOCs as well as multiple types of cyclodextrin.

  5. Effect of lateral size and thickness on the electronic structure and optical properties of quasi two-dimensional CdSe and CdS nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sumanta; Song, Zhigang; Fan, W. J.; Zhang, D. H.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of lateral size and vertical thickness of CdSe and CdS nanoplatelets (NPLs) on their electronic structure and optical properties are investigated using an effective-mass envelope function theory based on the 8-band k ṡ p model with valence force field considerations. Volumetrically larger NPLs have lower photon emission energy due to limited quantum confinement, but a greater transition matrix element (TME) due to larger electron-hole wavefunction overlap. The optical gain characteristics depend on several factors such as TME, Fermi factor, carrier density, NPL dimensions, material composition, and dephasing rate. There is a red shift in the peak position, more so with an increase in thickness than lateral size. For an increasing carrier density, the gain spectrum undergoes a slight blue shift due to band filling effect. For a fixed carrier density, the Fermi factor is higher for volumetrically larger NPLs and so is the difference between the quasi-Fermi level separation and the effective bandgap. The transparency injection carrier density (and thus input current density threshold) is dimension dependent and falls for volumetrically larger NPLs, as they can attain the requisite exciton count for transparency with a relatively lower density. Between CdSe and CdS, CdSe has lower emission energy due to smaller bandgap, but a higher TME due to lower effective mass. CdS, however, has a higher so hole contribution due to a lower spin-orbit splitting energy. Both CdSe and CdS NPLs are suitable candidates for short-wavelength LEDs and lasers in the visible spectrum, but CdSe is expected to exhibit better optical performance.

  6. Effect of lateral size and thickness on the electronic structure and optical properties of quasi two-dimensional CdSe and CdS nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumanta; Fan, W. J. Zhang, D. H.; Song, Zhigang

    2016-04-14

    The effect of lateral size and vertical thickness of CdSe and CdS nanoplatelets (NPLs) on their electronic structure and optical properties are investigated using an effective-mass envelope function theory based on the 8-band k ⋅ p model with valence force field considerations. Volumetrically larger NPLs have lower photon emission energy due to limited quantum confinement, but a greater transition matrix element (TME) due to larger electron-hole wavefunction overlap. The optical gain characteristics depend on several factors such as TME, Fermi factor, carrier density, NPL dimensions, material composition, and dephasing rate. There is a red shift in the peak position, more so with an increase in thickness than lateral size. For an increasing carrier density, the gain spectrum undergoes a slight blue shift due to band filling effect. For a fixed carrier density, the Fermi factor is higher for volumetrically larger NPLs and so is the difference between the quasi-Fermi level separation and the effective bandgap. The transparency injection carrier density (and thus input current density threshold) is dimension dependent and falls for volumetrically larger NPLs, as they can attain the requisite exciton count for transparency with a relatively lower density. Between CdSe and CdS, CdSe has lower emission energy due to smaller bandgap, but a higher TME due to lower effective mass. CdS, however, has a higher so hole contribution due to a lower spin-orbit splitting energy. Both CdSe and CdS NPLs are suitable candidates for short-wavelength LEDs and lasers in the visible spectrum, but CdSe is expected to exhibit better optical performance.

  7. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  8. Separator sub

    SciTech Connect

    Hayatdavoudi, A.

    1984-10-09

    Apparatus and methods are disclosed for drilling a well. A separator sub is used to separate a stream of drilling mud into a less dense first portion and more dense second portion. The less dense first portion of the stream of drilling mud is directed downward to a drill bit so that the drilling mud adjacent the drill bit has a density less than an initial density of the stream of drilling mud. The more dense second portion of the stream of drilling mud is ejected into a well annulus with an upward component of velocity and thereby reduces a hydrostatic drilling mud pressure adjacent the drill bit.

  9. Isotopic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1981-03-10

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential.

  10. Effect of organic-ligands on the toxicity profiles of CdS nanoparticles and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Nisha, K D; Navaneethan, M; Dhanalakshmi, B; Saravana Murali, K; Hayakawa, Y; Ponnusamy, S; Muthamizhchelvan, C; Gunasekaran, P

    2015-02-01

    CdS nanoparticles are one among the most promising agents for fluorescent imaging. Hence, it is essential to develop new strategies to overcome the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles. Surface modification is one of the simplest and effective techniques. This paper assesses the effect of surface modification on toxicity of the CdS nanoparticles. Unmodified CdS and surface-modified CdS nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous medium using a wet chemical route at room temperature. The surface modification of the CdS nanoparticles with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and cysteine was confirmed using infrared absorption studies. The diameters of unmodified CdS, PVP-modified CdS, and cysteine-modified CdS nanoparticles were determined using HRTEM. They exhibited luminescence in the range from 500 to 800 nm. The cytotoxic effects of these CdS nanoparticles were investigated in cultures of Vero cells. The results indicated that Vero cell viability was higher for the surface-modified CdS nanoparticles than for the unmodified CdS nanoparticles. The reduction in the toxicity was related to the nature of the capping agents used for the surface modification, and the particle size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of Spacecraft Missions to Test Kinetic Impact for Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Sonia; Barbee, Brent W.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently over 8,000 known near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), and more are being discovered on a continual basis. More than 1,200 of these are classified as Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) because their Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance (MOID) with Earth's orbit is <= 0.05 AU and their estimated diameters are >= 150 m. To date, 178 Earth impact structures have been discovered, indicating that our planet has previously been struck with devastating force by NEAs and will be struck again. Such collisions are aperiodic events and can occur at any time. A variety of techniques have been proposed to defend our planet from NEA impacts by deflecting the incoming asteroid. However, none of these techniques have been tested. Unless rigorous testing is conducted to produce reliable asteroid deflection systems, we will be forced to deploy completely untested -- and therefore unreliable -- deflection missions when a sizable asteroid on a collision course with Earth is discovered. Such missions will have a high probability of failure. We propose to address this problem with a campaign of deflection technology test missions deployed to harmless NEAs. The objective of these missions is to safely evaluate and refine the mission concepts and asteroid deflection system designs. Our current research focuses on the kinetic impactor, one of the simplest proposed asteroid deflection techniques in which a spacecraft is sent to collide with an asteroid at high relative velocity. By deploying test missions in the near future, we can characterize the performance of this deflection technique and resolve any problems inherent to its execution before needing to rely upon it during a true emergency. In this paper we present the methodology and results of our survey, including lists of NEAs for which safe and effective kinetic impactor test missions may be conducted within the next decade. Full mission designs are also presented for the NEAs which offer the best mission opportunities.

  12. DIE Deflection Modeling: Empirical Validation and Tech Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2003-05-28

    This report summarizes computer modeling work that was designed to help understand how the die casting die and machine contribute to parting plane separation during operation. Techniques developed in earlier research (8) were applied to complete a large computational experiment that systematically explored the relationship between the stiffness of the machine platens and key dimensional and structural variables (platen area covered, die thickness, platen thickness, thickness of insert and the location of the die with respect to the platen) describing the die/machine system. The results consistently show that there are many significant interactions among the variables and it is the interactions, more than the individual variables themselves, which determine the performance of the machine/die system. That said, the results consistently show that it is the stiffness of the machine platens that has the largest single impact on die separation.

  13. Preparation and Structural Analysis of CdS Nanoparticle Embedded Polyurethane Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indolia, Ajay Pal; Kumar, Purushottam; Gaur, M. S.

    2011-07-01

    Polymer nanocomposite samples of different weight ratio of CdS were developed by solution embedding of nanoparticles in polyurethane. XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to understand the structural properties of polymer nanocomposite samples. SEM micrograph demonstrates the dispersion of CdS nanoparticles in polymer matrix. It has been observed that crystallinity of PU decreases with increase in concentration of CdS nanoparticles. The XRD data show the characteristic peaks of nanoparticles (i.e.CdS) in nanocomposite samples, which confirm the nanostructure formation in polymer matrix.

  14. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles for photocatalytic application of methyleneblue degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuraj, V.; Umadevi, M.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Kajamuhideen, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of cadmium acetate with thiourea in the presence and absence of methylene blue dye (MB). The nanoparticles were characterized by, XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis. XRD study shows the presence of hexagonal phase for the nanoparticles whereas in case of the bulk samples only the hexagonal phase is observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) showed a strong interaction of methyl groups with CdS nanoparticles. The degradation of methylene blue was analysed using UV-Vis absorbance spectrum. Thus the results authenticate that methylene blue dye influences the structural and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles for photocatalytic application of methyleneblue degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Muthuraj, V.; Umadevi, M.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Kajamuhideen, M. S.

    2014-04-24

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of cadmium acetate with thiourea in the presence and absence of methylene blue dye (MB). The nanoparticles were characterized by, XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis. XRD study shows the presence of hexagonal phase for the nanoparticles whereas in case of the bulk samples only the hexagonal phase is observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) showed a strong interaction of methyl groups with CdS nanoparticles. The degradation of methylene blue was analysed using UV-Vis absorbance spectrum. Thus the results authenticate that methylene blue dye influences the structural and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles.

  16. CdS loaded on coal based activated carbon nanofibers with enhanced photocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jixi; Guo, Mingxi; Jia, Dianzeng; Song, Xianli; Tong, Fenglian

    2016-08-01

    The coal based activated carbon nanofibers (CBACFs) were prepared by electrospinning a mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and acid treated coal. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles loaded on CBACFs were fabricated by solvothermal method. The obtained samples were characterized by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. The results reveal that the CdS nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of CBACFs. The CdS/CBACFs nanocomposites exhibited higher photoactivity for photodegradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation than pure CdS nanoparticles. CBACFs can be used as low cost support materials for the preparation of nanocomposites with high photocatalytic activity.

  17. Preparation and Structural Analysis of CdS Nanoparticle Embedded Polyurethane Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Indolia, Ajay Pal; Kumar, Purushottam; Gaur, M. S.

    2011-07-15

    Polymer nanocomposite samples of different weight ratio of CdS were developed by solution embedding of nanoparticles in polyurethane. XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to understand the structural properties of polymer nanocomposite samples. SEM micrograph demonstrates the dispersion of CdS nanoparticles in polymer matrix. It has been observed that crystallinity of PU decreases with increase in concentration of CdS nanoparticles. The XRD data show the characteristic peaks of nanoparticles (i.e.CdS) in nanocomposite samples, which confirm the nanostructure formation in polymer matrix.

  18. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram, H.; Selvakumar, D.; Jayavel, R.

    2015-06-24

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications.

  19. Plasma separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    This process employs a thermal plasma for the separation and production of oxygen and metals. It is a continuous process that requires no consumables and relies entirely on space resources. The almost complete absence of waste renders it relatively clean. It can be turned on or off without any undesirable side effects or residues. The prime disadvantage is its high power consumption.

  20. SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-10-24

    A process for separating tetravalent plutonium from aqueous solutions and from niobium and zirconium by precipitation on lanthanum oxalate is described. The oxalate ions of the precipitate may be decomposed by heating in the presence of an oxidizing agent, forming a plutonium compound readily soluble in acid. (AEC)

  1. Superior photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of CdS (core)-SiO2 (shell) nanostructures obtained by CdS photoetching and Au deposition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-07-01

    Core-shell morphology of silica (SiO2) coated CdS nanocomposites (SiO2@CdS) of different shapes have been made for better stability, luminescence and photochemical activity of CdS nanoparticles. A thin layer (thickness 1-1.4 nm) of SiO2 shell is deposited over CdS nanorods (CdS-NR) of aspect ratio = 21 and CdS nanospheres (CdS-NS) of size 6-8 nm by alkyl silane agents. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, HR-TEM, BET surface measurement, LB surface film, and absorption and photoluminescence analysis. Photoetching (PE) of CdS core led to blue shift of the absorbance onset of SiO2@CdS-NR along with the appearance of an exciton band at 485 nm due to the quantum confinement effect. Photodissolution of CdS core shifts the band gap energy from initial 2.4 to 2.6 eV for CdS-NR and 2.5 to 2.67 eV for CdS-NS. TEM images reveal the increase in aspect ratio of NR from 21 to 31 and decrease in the spherical core to 2.5 nm from 6-8 nm after PE. Photoetched SiO2@CdS-NC displayed highly intense fluorescence emission (SiO2@CdS-NS > SiO2@CdS-NR) than unetched SiO2@CdS-NC at 488 nm corresponding to band edge position. The Au (0.5 wt.%) deposition onto photoetched SiO2@CdS-NR(PE) composites highly enhanced the fluorescence intensity in comparison to 1 wt.% of Au and Ag loading. SiO2@CdS-NC(PE) displayed improved photocatalytic activity during benzaldehyde photooxidation under UV (125 W, Hg-arc, 10.4 mW/cm2) irradiation. Silica coating onto CdS particles improves the photostability and photoactivity of CdS upon long UV irradiation.

  2. Use of sulfated cyclofructan 6 and sulfated cyclodextrins for the chiral separation of four basic pharmaceuticals by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi Jun; Huang, Ming Xian; Zhang, Yu Ping; Armstrong, Daniel Wayne; Breitbach, Zachary S; Ryoo, Jae Jeong

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated cyclofructan 6 (S-CF6) and sulfated cyclodextrins (S-α-, β-, γ-CDs) are highly selective chiral selectors for the enantioseparation of basic solutes. In this study, S-CF6 was introduced for the enantiomeric separation of four basic pharmaceuticals (including tamsulosin, tiropramide, bupivacaine, and norephedrine) by capillary electrophoresis (CE), and the enantiomeric separation performance was compared with S-α-, β-, γ-CDs. The effects of the chiral selector type, chiral selector concentration, operating voltage, and column temperature were examined and optimized. Excellent resolutions were obtained for all solutes on these chiral selectors.

  3. ``Entangled'' free-induction decay in CdS crystal under two-photon excitation by two crossed laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, A. V.; Lobkov, V. S.; Mitrofanova, T. G.; Shmelyov, A. G.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2012-09-01

    A new method of two-photon excitation of femtosecond signals of ``entangled'' free induction decay (EFID) by two crossed 790-nm laser beams in a CdS crystal at room temperature has been realized for the first time. This ``entangled'' (through the wave vectors) coherent response appears only in the case when the photons involved to the process of two-photon excitation of the sample belong to the different laser beams. This technique allows one to separate the EFID signal from the exciting femtosecond pulses and to vary the response wavelength by varying the angle between their wave vectors. The most optimal case occurs when the angle between the wave vectors of exciting pulses as well as the angle between each of these wave vectors and that of the response is equal to 60°.

  4. Radio Frequency Fragment Separator at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Andreev, V.; Becerril, A.; Doléans, M.; Mantica, P. F.; Ottarson, J.; Schatz, H.; Stoker, J. B.; Vincent, J.

    2009-07-01

    A new device has been designed and built at NSCL which provides additional filtering of radioactive beams produced via projectile fragmentation. The Radio Frequency Fragment Separator (RFFS) uses the time micro structure of the beams accelerated by the cyclotrons to deflect particles according to their time-of-flight, in effect producing a phase filtering. The transverse RF (Radio Frequency) electric field of the RFFS has superior filtering performance compared to other electrostatic devices, such as Wien filters. Such filtering is critical for radioactive beams produced on the neutron-deficient side of the valley of stability, where strong contamination occurs at intermediate energies from 50 to 200 MeV/u.

  5. Science case for the Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM): A component of the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Cheng, A.; Küppers, M.; Pravec, P.; Blum, J.; Delbo, M.; Green, S. F.; Rosenblatt, P.; Tsiganis, K.; Vincent, J. B.; Biele, J.; Ciarletti, V.; Hérique, A.; Ulamec, S.; Carnelli, I.; Galvez, A.; Benner, L.; Naidu, S. P.; Barnouin, O. S.; Richardson, D. C.; Rivkin, A.; Scheirich, P.; Moskovitz, N.; Thirouin, A.; Schwartz, S. R.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Yu, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is a joint cooperation between European and US space agencies that consists of two separate and independent spacecraft that will be launched to a binary asteroid system, the near-Earth asteroid Didymos, to test the kinetic impactor technique to deflect an asteroid. The European Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is set to rendezvous with the asteroid system to fully characterize the smaller of the two binary components a few months prior to the impact by the US Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft. AIM is a unique mission as it will be the first time that a spacecraft will investigate the surface, subsurface, and internal properties of a small binary near-Earth asteroid. In addition it will perform various important technology demonstrations that can serve other space missions. The knowledge obtained by this mission will have great implications for our understanding of the history of the Solar System. Having direct information on the surface and internal properties of small asteroids will allow us to understand how the various processes they undergo work and transform these small bodies as well as, for this particular case, how a binary system forms. Making these measurements from up close and comparing them with ground-based data from telescopes will also allow us to calibrate remote observations and improve our data interpretation of other systems. With DART, thanks to the characterization of the target by AIM, the mission will be the first fully documented impact experiment at asteroid scale, which will include the characterization of the target's properties and the outcome of the impact. AIDA will thus offer a great opportunity to test and refine our understanding and models at the actual scale of an asteroid, and to check whether the current extrapolations of material strength from laboratory-scale targets to the scale of AIDA's target are valid. Moreover, it will offer a first check of the

  6. The effect of cracking on the deflection basin of flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Hadi Mohamed

    Because of the rapid development of hardware and software during the past decade, it is now possible to use an analytical-empirical (or mechanistic) method of structural pavement evaluation on a routine basis. One reason for using this approach is the increased need for pavement maintenance and rehabilitation. To make the right choice from many potentially feasible maintenance and rehabilitation measures, the engineer must base his decision on a rational evaluation of the mechanical properties of the materials in the existing pavement structure. One of the parameters in terms of pavement response are the deflections; these are of interest to this particular study. The Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) has been developed specifically for the purpose of obtaining deflection measurements in order to determine the in-situ elastic moduli. The profile of the deflection at the surface of the pavement is known as the deflection basin, because it resembles a bowl-shaped depression. The magnitude of the deflections and the basin shape are functions of the number of layers making up the pavement cross section, their thicknesses, and their moduli values. A variety of multi-layered linear elastic pavement models are available for use at this present time. A general-purpose finite-element program called ANSYS developed by Swanson Analysis System is very powerful and is capable of solving a layered system such as the pavement. A finite element model was developed to study the effect of the crack on the predicted deflection bowls. A general-purpose finite-element program was used in this study due to its ability to solve this problem and because of the availability of the program. A hypothetical crack problem was assumed and modeled in different ways. The crack depth, crack width, and distance of the crack from the loading point were among the many parameters that were investigated. Considering the shape of the deflection basin, it is very important to study the effect of the

  7. A high frequency sensor for optical beam deflection atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Enning, Raoul; Ziegler, Dominik; Nievergelt, Adrian; Friedlos, Ralph; Venkataramani, Krithika; Stemmer, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel electronic readout for quadrant photodiode based optical beam deflection setups. In our readout, the signals used to calculate the deflections remain as currents, instead of undergoing an immediate conversion to voltages. Bipolar current mirrors are used to perform all mathematical operations at the transistor level, including the signal normalizing division. This method has numerous advantages, leading to significantly simpler designs that avoid large voltage swings and parasitic capacitances. The bandwidth of our readout is solely limited by the capacitance of the quadrant photodiode junctions, making the effective bandwidth a function of the intensity of photocurrents and thus the applied power of the beam deflection laser. Using commercially available components and laser intensities of 1-4 mW we achieved a 3 dB bandwidth of 20 MHz with deflection sensitivities of up to 0.5-1 V/nm and deflection noise levels below 4.5 fm/Hz. Atomic resolution imaging of muscovite mica using FM-AFM in water demonstrates the sensitivity of this novel readout.

  8. Deflection test evaluation of different lots of the same nickel-titanium wire commercial brand

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Murilo Gaby; Lima, Fabrício Viana Pereira; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Rezende, Fernanda Soares; Brandão, Gustavo Antônio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the elastic properties of the load-deflection ratio of orthodontic wires of different lot numbers and the same commercial brand. Methods: A total of 40 nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire segments (Morelli OrtodontiaTM - Sorocaba, SP, Brazil), 0.016-in in diameter were used. Groups were sorted according to lot numbers (lots 1, 2, 3 and 4). 28-mm length segments from the straight portion (ends) of archwires were used. Deflection tests were performed in an EMIC universal testing machine with 5-N load cell at 1 mm/minute speed. Force at deactivation was recorded at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm deflection. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare differences between group means. Results: When comparing the force of groups at the same deflection (3, 2 and 1 mm), during deactivation, no statistical differences were found. Conclusion: There are no changes in the elastic properties of different lots of the same commercial brand; thus, the use of different lots of the orthodontic wires used in this research does not compromise the final outcomes of the load-deflection ratio. PMID:27007760

  9. Control of resonant frequency by currents in graphene: Effect of Dirac field on deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Soodchomshom, Bumned E-mail: fscibns@ku.ac.th

    2014-09-21

    To construct Lagrangian based on plate theory and tight-binding model, deflection-field coupling to Dirac fermions in graphene can be investigated. As have been known, deflection-induced strain may cause an effect on motion of electron, like a pseudo gauge field. In the work, we will investigate the effect of the Dirac field on the motion of the deflection-field in graphene derived from Lagrangian density. Due to the interaction of the deflection- and Dirac-fields, the current-induced surface-tension up to about 4×10⁻³ N/m in graphene membrane is predicted. This result may lead to controllable resonant frequency by currents in graphene. The high resonant frequency is found to be perfectly linearly controlled by both charge and valley currents. Our work reveals the potential of graphene for application of nano-electro-mechanical device and the physics of interaction of electron and deflection-filed in graphene system is investigated.

  10. Aerodynamic performance of a wing with a deflected tip-mounted reverse half-delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Su, Y. Y.

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a tip-mounted 65°-sweep reverse half-delta wing (RHDW), set at different deflections, on the aerodynamic performance of a rectangular NACA 0012 wing was investigated experimentally at Re = 2.45 × 105. This study is a continuation of the work of Lee and Su (Exp Fluids 52(6):1593-1609, 2012) on the passive control of wing tip vortex by the use of a reverse half-delta wing. The present results show that for RHDW deflection with -5° ≤ δ ≤ +15°, the lift was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing δ compared to the baseline wing. The lift increment was accompanied by an increased total drag. For negative RHDW deflection with δ < -5°, the RHDW-induced lift decrement was, however, accompanied by an improved drag. The deflected RHDW also significantly modified and weakened the tip vortex, leading to a persistently lowered lift-induced drag, regardless of its deflection, compared to the baseline wing. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed RHDW-induced phenomenon were also discussed.

  11. Compensations of beamlet deflections for 1 MeV accelerator of ITER NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Mieko; Taniguchi, Masaki; Umeda, Naotaka; Dairaku, Masayuki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Takashi; de Esch, H. P. L.; Grisham, Larry R.; Boilson, Deirdre; Hemsworth, Ronald S.; Tanaka, Masanobu

    2013-02-01

    Compensation methods of beamlet deflections have been studied in a three dimensional (3D) beam analysis using OPERA-3d code for 1 MeV accelerator of the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI). The beamlet deflection is caused by i) magnetic field generated by permanent magnets embedded in the extraction grid (EXG) for electron suppression and ii) space charge repulsion between the beamlets and beam groups. Moreover, the beamlet deflection is caused due to electric field distortion formed by a grid support structure. In order to compensate the beamlet deflections due to i) and ii), an aperture offset of 0.6 mm was applied in the electron suppression grid (ESG) and a metal bar with 3 mm in thickness, so-called a kerb, was attached around the aperture area at the back side of the ESG, respectively. Detailed configuration of the compensation methods was also considered so as to suppress the beam spread due to the electric field distortion and to lower electric field concentrations at the edge of the kerb. For the beamlets near the grid support structure, the beamlet deflection due to the space charge repulsion could be negated due to the electric field distortion formed by the grid support structure.

  12. Feasibility study on a strain based deflection monitoring system for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunghyun; Aihara, Aya; Puntsagdash, Ganbayar; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hiraku; Okuma, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The bending stiffness of the wind turbine blades has decreased due to the trend of wind turbine upsizing. Consequently, the risk of blades breakage by hitting the tower has increased. In order to prevent such incidents, this study proposes a deflection monitoring system that can be installed to already operating wind turbine's blades. The monitoring system is composed of an estimation algorithm to detect blade deflection and a wireless sensor network as a hardware equipment. As for the estimation method for blade deflection, a strain-based estimation algorithm and an objective function for optimal sensor arrangement are proposed. Strain-based estimation algorithm is using a linear correlation between strain and deflections, which can be expressed in a form of a transformation matrix. The objective function includes the terms of strain sensitivity and condition number of the transformation matrix between strain and deflection. In order to calculate the objective function, a simplified experimental model of the blade is constructed by interpolating the mode shape of a blade from modal testing. The interpolation method is effective considering a practical use to operating wind turbines' blades since it is not necessary to establish a finite element model of a blade. On the other hand, a sensor network with wireless connection with an open source hardware is developed. It is installed to a 300 W scale wind turbine and vibration of the blade on operation is investigated.

  13. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  14. Effect of electrical spot welding on load deflection rate of orthodontic wires

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Abrishami, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the methods used for joining metals together is welding, which can be carried out using different techniques such as electric spot welding. This study evaluated the effect of electric spot welding on the load deflection rate of stainless steel and chromium-cobalt orthodontic wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental-laboratory study, load deflection rate of 0.016 × 0.022 inch stainless steel and chromium cobalt wires were evaluated in five groups (n =18): group one: Stainless steel wires, group two: chromium-cobalt wires, group three: stainless steel wires welded to stainless steel wires, group four: Stainless steel wires welded to chromium-cobalt wires, group five: chromium-cobalt wire welded to chromium-cobalt wires. Afterward, the forces induced by the samples in 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 1.5 mm deflection were measured using a universal testing machine. Then mean force measured for each group was compared with other groups. The data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and paired t-test by the SPSS software. The significance level was set as 0.05. Results: The Tukey test showed that there were significant differences between the load deflection rates of welded groups compared to control ones (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Considering the limitation of this study, the electric spot welding process performed on stainless steel and chromium-cobalt wires increased their load deflection rates. PMID:26604957

  15. Measurement and production of electron deflection using a sweeping magnetic device in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Damrongkijudom, N; Oborn, B; Butson, M; Rosenfeld, A

    2006-09-01

    The deflection and removal of high energy electrons produced by a medical linear accelerator has been attained by a Neodymium Iron Boron (NdFeB) permanent magnetic deflector device. This work was performed in an attempt to confirm the theoretical amount of electron deflection which could be produced by a magnetic field for removal of electrons from a clinical x-ray beam. This was performed by monitoring the paths of mostly monoenergetic clinical electron beams (6 MeV to 20 MeV) swept by the magnetic fields using radiographic film and comparing to first order deflection models. Results show that the measured deflection distance for 6 MeV electrons was 18 +/- 6 cm and the calculated deflection distance was 21.3 cm. For 20 MeV electrons, this value was 5 +/- 2 cm for measurement and 5.1 cm for calculation. The magnetic fields produced can thus reduce surface dose in treatment regions of a patient under irradiation by photon beams and we can predict the removal of all electron contaminations up to 6 MeV from a 6 MV photon beam with the radiation field size up to 10 x 10 cm2. The model can also estimate electron contamination still present in the treatment beam at larger field sizes.

  16. Predicting tool operator capacity to react against torque within acceptable handle deflection limits in automotive assembly.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Robert G; Chourasia, Amrish; Fronczak, Frank J; Subedi, Yashpal; Howery, Robert; Yen, Thomas Y; Sesto, Mary E; Irwin, Curtis B

    2016-05-01

    The proportion of tool operators capable of maintaining published psychophysically derived threaded fastener tool handle deflection limits were predicted using a biodynamic tool operator model, interacting with the tool, task and workstation. Tool parameters, including geometry, speed and torque were obtained from the specifications for 35 tools used in an auto assembly plant. Tool mass moments of inertia were measured for these tools using a novel device that engages the tool in a rotating system of known inertia. Task parameters, including fastener target torque and joint properties (soft, medium or hard), were ascertained from the vehicle design specifications. Workstation parameters, including vertical and horizontal distances from the operator were measured using a laser rangefinder for 69 tool installations in the plant. These parameters were entered into the model and tool handle deflection was predicted for each job. While handle deflection for most jobs did not exceed the capacity of 75% females and 99% males, six jobs exceeded the deflection criterion. Those tool installations were examined and modifications in tool speed and operator position improved those jobs within the deflection limits, as predicted by the model. We conclude that biodynamic tool operator models may be useful for identifying stressful tool installations and interventions that bring them within the capacity of most operators.

  17. Near-field optical beam-induced currents in CdTe /CdS solar cells: Direct measurement of enhanced photoresponse at grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S.; Zhang, P.; Gessert, T.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2004-10-01

    Using near-field optical beam induced current, we spatially resolve the photocurrent in polycrystalline CdTe /CdS solar cells, and observe increased photocurrent collection at grain boundaries (relative to the intragrain volume). This observation supports previously reported hypotheses that grain boundaries present a hole-barrier, thereby assisting in charge separation at the grain boundaries in these devices. The results offer compelling evidence, in an actual working-device structure, of the role of grain boundaries in explaining the surprisingly high performance of these highly defected devices.

  18. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  19. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  20. Dust separator

    SciTech Connect

    Borow, H.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a gas filter apparatus for separating solids from a gas stream comprising a housing having a top, base, and side walls defining a chamber, a partition wall extending across the chamber and separating the chamber into an upper compartment and a lower compartment. A gas inlet conveyor tube in the chamber passes downwardly of the partition and into the lower compartment, the portion of the conveyor tube passing through the upper compartment being impervious and the portion of the conveyor tube extending downwardly into the lower compartment being provided with exit means including exit apertures at least in the area of the conveyor tube adjacent the partition wall. The partition wall is provided with openings surrounding the conveyor tube and communicates the lower compartment with the upper compartment. A filter means in the form of filter tubes covers each opening in the partition wall and extends downwardly in the lower compartment and parallel to the conveyor tube, at least one gas outlet communicating with the upper compartment. A suction means is associated with the gas outlet to provide a reduced pressure within the chamber. A discharge means at the base of the housing is associated with the lower compartment for discharging solid matter separated from the gas stream. The solid laden gas is conveyed into the lower compartment downwardly by the conveying tube and the gas of the stream is drawn from the conveyor tube immediately past the partition, through the surrounding filter tubes in order to prevent the formation of counter gas flows to the gravity discharge of the solids being separated from the gas stream.

  1. The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Aluminum-Alloy Propeller Blades Under Normal Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P; Biermann, David

    1938-01-01

    The torsional deflection of the blades of three full-scale aluminum-alloy propellers operating under various loading conditions was measured by a light-beam method. Angular bending deflections were also obtained as an incidental part of the study. The deflection measurements showed that the usual present-day type of propeller blades twisted but a negligible amount under ordinary flight conditions. A maximum deflection of about 1/10 degree was found at a v/nd of 0.3 and a smaller deflection at higher values of v/nd for the station at 0.70 radius. These deflections are much smaller than would be expected from earlier tests, but the light-beam method is considered to be much more accurate than the direct-reading-transit method used in the previous test.

  2. The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Duralumin Propeller Blades under Normal Operating Conditions, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P.; Biermann, David

    1938-01-01

    The torsional deflection of the blades of three full-scale duralumin propellers operating under various loading conditions was measured by a light-beam method. Angular bending deflections were also obtained as an incidental part of the study. The deflection measurements showed that the usual present-day type of propeller blades twisted but a negligible amount under ordinary flight conditions. A maximum deflection of about 1/10th of a degree was found at V/nD of 0.3 and a smaller deflection at higher values of V/nD for the station at 0.70 radius. These deflections are much smaller than would be expected from earlier tests, but the light-beam method is considered to be much more accurate than the direct-reading transit method used in the previous tests.

  3. Separation system

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Leslie S.

    1986-01-01

    A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

  4. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options.

  5. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H2 evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu2MoS4 nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu2MoS4nanosheets. These layered Cu2MoS4 nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H2 production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H2 production rates by using Cu2MoS4 loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  6. Separation and confirmation of showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Hajduková, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Using IAU MDC photographic, IAU MDC CAMS video, SonotaCo video, and EDMOND video databases, we aim to separate all provable annual meteor showers from each of these databases. We intend to reveal the problems inherent in this procedure and answer the question whether the databases are complete and the methods of separation used are reliable. We aim to evaluate the statistical significance of each separated shower. In this respect, we intend to give a list of reliably separated showers rather than a list of the maximum possible number of showers. Methods: To separate the showers, we simultaneously used two methods. The use of two methods enables us to compare their results, and this can indicate the reliability of the methods. To evaluate the statistical significance, we suggest a new method based on the ideas of the break-point method. Results: We give a compilation of the showers from all four databases using both methods. Using the first (second) method, we separated 107 (133) showers, which are in at least one of the databases used. These relatively low numbers are a consequence of discarding any candidate shower with a poor statistical significance. Most of the separated showers were identified as meteor showers from the IAU MDC list of all showers. Many of them were identified as several of the showers in the list. This proves that many showers have been named multiple times with different names. Conclusions: At present, a prevailing share of existing annual showers can be found in the data and confirmed when we use a combination of results from large databases. However, to gain a complete list of showers, we need more-complete meteor databases than the most extensive databases currently are. We also still need a more sophisticated method to separate showers and evaluate their statistical significance. Tables A.1 and A.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. The speed of gravity in general relativity and theoretical interpretation of the Jovian deflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2004-07-01

    According to Einstein, the notions of geodesic, parallel transport (affine connection) and curvature of the spacetime manifold have a pure geometric origin and do not correlate with any electromagnetic concepts. At the same time, curvature is generated by matter which is not affiliated with the spacetime geometric concepts. For this reason, the fundamental constant c entering the geometric and matter sectors of the general theory of relativity has different conceptual meanings. Specifically, the letter c on the left-hand side of the Einstein equations (geometric sector) entering the Christoffel symbols and its time derivatives is the ultimate speed of gravity characterizing the upper limit on the speed of its propagation as well as the maximal rate of change of time derivatives of the metric tensor, that is gravitational field. The letter c on the right-hand side of the Einstein equations (matter sector) is the maximal speed of propagation of any other field rather than gravity. Einstein's general principle of relativity extends his principle of special relativity and equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light in the special theory of relativity but this general principle must be tested experimentally. To this end, we work out the speed of gravity parametrization of the Einstein equations (cg-parametrization) to keep track of the time-dependent effects associated with the geometric sector of general relativity and to separate them from the time-dependent effects of the matter sector. Parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) approximation of the Einstein equations is derived in order to explain the gravitational physics of the Jovian deflection VLBI experiment conducted on 8 September 2002. The post-Newtonian series expansion in the cg-parametrized general relativity is with respect to a small parameter that is proportional to the ratio of the characteristic velocity of the bodies to the speed of propagation of the

  8. An Optimal CDS Construction Algorithm with Activity Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Penumalli, Chakradhar; Palanichamy, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    A new energy efficient optimal Connected Dominating Set (CDS) algorithm with activity scheduling for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) is proposed. This algorithm achieves energy efficiency by minimizing the Broadcast Storm Problem [BSP] and at the same time considering the node's remaining energy. The Connected Dominating Set is widely used as a virtual backbone or spine in mobile ad hoc networks [MANETs] or Wireless Sensor Networks [WSN]. The CDS of a graph representing a network has a significant impact on an efficient design of routing protocol in wireless networks. Here the CDS is a distributed algorithm with activity scheduling based on unit disk graph [UDG]. The node's mobility and residual energy (RE) are considered as parameters in the construction of stable optimal energy efficient CDS. The performance is evaluated at various node densities, various transmission ranges, and mobility rates. The theoretical analysis and simulation results of this algorithm are also presented which yield better results.

  9. Solvothermal synthesis of CdS nanorods: role of basic experimental parameters.

    PubMed

    Datta, Anuja; Kar, Soumitra; Ghatak, Jay; Chaudhuri, Subhadra

    2007-02-01

    CdS nanorods with varying dimensions were synthesized by solvothermal process. It was observed that the anions present with the Cd-salts play an important role in determining the dimensions of the CdS nanorods. The crystalline nature of the sources was found to play a crucial role in determining the phase of the products. The nature of the sulfur source, molar ratio of the precursors, filling fraction of the solvent, and the synthesis temperature play important role in defining the size and shape of the products. By controlling the experimental parameters it was possible to control the dimension of the CdS nanorods within a certain range (diameter of the nanorods could be varied within a wide range from approximately 7 to 100 nm by varying the temperature within 100-250 degrees C). Optical absorption, photoluminescence, and Raman studies of these samples were carried out to characterize the CdS nanorods.

  10. Continuous Microreactor-Assisted Solution Deposition for Scalable Production of CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, Sudhir; Su, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chih-Hung; Paul, Brian; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-06-13

    Solution deposition offers an attractive, low temperature option in the cost effective production of thin film solar cells. Continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition (MASD) was used to produce nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) films on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates with excellent uniformity. We report a novel liquid coating technique using a ceramic rod to efficiently and uniformly apply reactive solution to large substrates (152 mm × 152 mm). This technique represents an inexpensive approach to utilize the MASD on the substrate for uniform growth of CdS films. Nano-crystalline CdS films have been produced from liquid phase at ~90°C, with average thicknesses of 70 nm to 230 nm and with a 5 to 12% thickness variation. The CdS films produced were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-Ray diffraction to demonstrate their suitability to thin-film solar technology.

  11. Far-infrared investigations of the surface modes in CdS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajić, J.; Gilić, M.; Romčević, N.; Romčević, M.; Stanišić, G.; Lazarević, Z.; Joksimović, D.; Yahia, I. S.

    2014-09-01

    The properties of Cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films were investigated by applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) and far-infrared spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared using thermal evaporation technique under a base pressure of 2 × 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply far-infrared spectroscopy to investigate the optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal the existence of a surface optical phonon (SOP) mode at 297 cm-1. For the first time, the dielectric function of CdS thin film is modeled as a mixture of homogenous spherical inclusions in air by the Maxwell-Garnet formula. In the analysis of the far-infrared reflection spectra, a numerical model for calculating the reflectivity coefficient for a system which includes films and substrates has been applied.

  12. Growth and characterization of CdS thin films on polymer substrates for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongseob; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Suho; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    In this work, cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on flexible polymer substrates such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The r.f. magnetron sputtering, which is cost-effective scalable technique, was used for the film deposition. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at different sputtering pressures were investigated. When the CdS film was deposited at lower pressure, the crystallinity and the preferred orientation toward c-axis in hexagonal phase was improved. However, the optical transmittance was reduced as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Compared with the glass substrate, CdS films grown on polymer substrates were exhibited some wore structural and optical characteristics. CdTe thin film solar cell applied to sputtered CdS as a window layer showed a maximum efficiency of 11.6%.

  13. Development of a Higher Fidelity Model for the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made to the ACM model of the CDS, enabling accurate predictions of dynamic operations with fewer assumptions. The model has been utilized to predict how CDS performance would be impacted by changing operating parameters, revealing performance trade-offs and possibilities for improvement. CDS efficiency is driven by the THP coefficient of performance, which in turn is dependent on heat transfer within the system. Based on the remaining limitations of the simulation, priorities for further model development include: center dot Relaxing the assumption of total condensation center dot Incorporating dynamic simulation capability for the buildup of dissolved inert gasses in condensers center dot Examining CDS operation with more complex feeds center dot Extending heat transfer analysis to all surfaces

  14. Structure and property of CdS thin films with different residual chlorine content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Wu, Weibing; Shan, Beibei; Nan, Huilin

    2016-10-01

    Two types of CdS thin films were synthesized via chemical bath deposition (CBD) method from solutions of acetate and chloride, respectively. The structural and photoelectric characteristics of both CdS thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-vis and electrochemical measurements. The pristine films were hexagonal regardless of anion type in CBD solutions. Cl residual was confirmed in the CdS film from the Cl-containing solution. The residual Cl helps to reduce S vacancies and improve the crystallinity during annealing, which is proved by the left shift of peaks in XRD patterns, the increased band gap, and the lower carrier concentration. The present results are significant in choosing suitable anions during the CBD deposition of CdS thin film for improving the device performance of CdTe solar cell.

  15. Mixed-solvothermal synthesis of CdS micro/nanostructures and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shengliang; Zhang, Linfei; Huang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Shangping

    2011-01-01

    Several novel cadmium sulfide (CdS) micro/nanostructures, including cauliflower-like microspheres, football-like microspheres, tower-like microrods, and dendrites were controllably prepared via an oxalic acid-assisted solvothermal route using ethylene glycol (EG) and H2O as pure and mixed solvents with different S sources. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometer (UV). It was found that CdS micro/nanostructures can be selectively obtained by varying the composition of solvent, concentration of oxalic acid, and sulfur sources. UV-vis absorption spectra reveal that their absorption properties are shape-dependent. The possible formation process of the CdS micro/nanostructures was briefly discussed. This route provides a facile way to tune the morphologies of CdS over a wide range.

  16. Photocatalytic efficiency of CdS film synthesized by CBD method

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, Y.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.; Arai, T.; Shinoda, K.

    2006-05-15

    Cadmium Sulfide semiconductor has comparatively small band gap and act as photocatalyst under irradiation of visible light. For practical use, it is convenient to fix the photocatalyst on a substrate as a thin film. In this study, we prepared CdS thin film on Ti substrate by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD). To improve photocatalytic activity, CdS film was annealed and optimum thickness was investigated.

  17. Optical properties of colloidal CdS and ZnS quantum dots nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Afiqah Shafify; Shamsudin, Siti Aisyah

    2016-11-01

    CdS and ZnS nanoparticles are luminescent semiconductors with great properties to be used in biosensors. Both semiconducting nanoparticles were synthesized in distilled water by using the simple colloidal method. Thioglycolic acid (TGA) was used as a stabilizer and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used as a surface modifier. The chemical composition and optical properties of the CdS and ZnS nanoparticles were investigated using Ultra Violet (UV) lamp, UV Spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) Spectroscopy.

  18. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-22

    CdSe nanoparticles nanorods nanostructures photocatalysis semiconductors Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...worldwide. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Title: Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures Author...9rz418n4 Citation: Dukovic, Gordana. (2008). Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures . Lawrence Berkeley National

  19. Novel fabrication of silica nanotube by selective photoetching of CdS nanorod template

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Joong-Ho; Chae, Weon-Sik; Cho, Hyeon Mo; Choi, Moon-Gun; Kim, Yong-Rok . E-mail: yrkim@yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-09-14

    CdS/silica core-shell nanorod was prepared by silica coating over the CdS nanorod template of which the surface was initially capped by (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The silica nanotube with both ends closed was fabricated from the core-shell nanorod by selective photoetching of the core CdS nanorod template with controlled photon energy in the oxygen-saturated aqueous solution including methyl viologen.

  20. Calibration and Correction Method of the Deflection Angle of Rotation Axis Projection on Neutron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhilong; Lin, Qiang; Han, Xu; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Min

    For neutron tomography, reconstruction accuracy greatly relies on exact registration of the projection and the back-projection coordinate system. Since the manufacturing and installing errors of mechanical components make the rotation axis projected in CCD camera deflect a certain angle, a mismatch between the projection coordinate and the detector coordinate will be caused consequently, resulting in obvious artifacts on the reconstructed images. In this paper, a calibration and correction method of the deflection angle of rotation axis projection is proposed to eliminate artifacts on neutron tomography images. First, all the projections among 360° rotation range are superposed together to create an averaged image with a unique symmetry axis. Then by segmentation and principal component analysis on the averaged image, the deflection angle is figured out. The calibrated angle is introduced to the reconstruction algorithm as an extra correction parameter, and artifacts-free images are finally obtained.