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Sample records for deformation induced dislocation

  1. Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2014-05-13

    Bertram Hopkinson was prescient in writing of the importance of better measuring, albeit better understanding, the nature of high rate deformation of materials in general and, in particular, of the importance of heat in initiating detonation of explosives. This report deals with these subjects in terms of post-Hopkinson crystal dislocation mechanics applied to high rate deformations, including impact tests, Hopkinson pressure bar results, Zerilli-Armstrong-type constitutive relations, shock-induced deformations, isentropic compression experiments, mechanical initiation of explosive crystals and shear banding in metals.

  2. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocation reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.

  3. Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The selection of papers presented in this section reflect on themes to be explored at the "Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms" Symposium to be held at the Annual 2009 TMS meeting. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee to give tribute to the evolution of a concept that has formed the basis of our mechanistic understanding of how crystalline solids plastically deform and how they fail.

  4. Dislocation Mechanics of High-Rate Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Ronald W.; Li, Qizhen

    2015-10-01

    Four topics associated with constitutive equation descriptions of rate-dependent metal plastic deformation behavior are reviewed in honor of previous research accomplished on the same issues by Professor Marc Meyers along with colleagues and students, as follow: (1) increasing strength levels attributed to thermally activated dislocation migration at higher loading rates; (2) inhomogeneous adiabatic shear banding; (3) controlling mechanisms of deformation in shock as compared with shock-less isentropic compression experiments and (4) Hall-Petch-based grain size-dependent strain rate sensitivities exhibited by nanopolycrystalline materials. Experimental results are reviewed on the topics for a wide range of metals.

  5. Dislocation Microstructures in Experimentally Deformed wet Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.; Jung, H.; Karato, S.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle is generally considered to be the result of lattice preferred orientations (LPOs) of olivine as a result of mantle flow. Therefore seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle can be used to probe fabrics and therefore flow directions. Jung and Karato (2001) have demonstrated that fabrics developed in experimentally deformed olivine are dependent on H2O fugacity and stress. Fabric type C, which develops at moderate experimental stresses and high H2O fugacities, has [001] subparallel to the slip direction and (100) subparallel to the shear plane. Fabric type B, which develops at high stresses and high H2O fugacities has [001] subparallel to the slip direction and (010) subparallel to the shear plane. To investigate the role of H2O in olivine fabric transitions, we are using high-resolution and conventional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and TEM) to characterize the dislocation microstructures and core structures in experimentally deformed samples of Fabric types B and C. Initial results for Fabric type C (sample JK11 of Jung and Karato, 2001) show a dominance of mixed-character and screw dislocations with Burgers vectors b = [001]. This Burgers vector, combined with the (100) being subparallel to the shear plane, is consistent with the (100)[001] slip system being dominant in the C-type fabric. This slip system, which is of minor importance in dry olivine, may be favored in wet samples by changes in the dislocation core structure. We are currently using HRTEM imaging to characterize the dislocation core structures in deformed samples with type C and type B fabrics.

  6. Dislocation Multiplication in the Early Stage of Deformation in Mo Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L.; Lassila, D.H.

    2000-03-02

    Initial dislocation structure in annealed high-purity Mo single crystals and deformation substructure in a crystal subjected to 1% compression have been examined and studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in order to investigate dislocation multiplication mechanisms in the early stage of plastic deformation. The initial dislocation density is in a range of 10{sup 6} {approx} 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, and the dislocation structure is found to contain many grown-in superjogs along dislocation lines. The dislocation density increases to a range of 10{sup 8} {approx} 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, and the average jog height is also found to increase after compressing for a total strain of 1%. It is proposed that the preexisting jogged screw dislocations can act as (multiple) dislocation multiplication sources when deformed under quasi-static conditions. The jog height can increase by stress-induced jog coalescence, which takes place via the lateral migration (drift) of superjogs driven by unbalanced line-tension partials acting on link segments of unequal lengths. The coalescence of superjogs results in an increase of both link length and jog height. Applied shear stress begins to push each link segment to precede dislocation multiplication when link length and jog height are greater than critical lengths. This ''dynamic'' dislocation multiplication source is suggested to be crucial for the dislocation multiplication in the early stage of plastic deformation in Mo.

  7. Surface dislocation nucleation controlled deformation of Au nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, B.; Kapelle, B.; Volkert, C. A.; Richter, G.

    2014-11-17

    We investigate deformation in high quality Au nanowires under both tension and bending using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Defect evolution is investigated during: (1) tensile deformation of 〈110〉 oriented, initially defect-free, single crystal nanowires with cross-sectional widths between 30 and 300 nm, (2) bending deformation of the same wires, and (3) tensile deformation of wires containing coherent twin boundaries along their lengths. We observe the formation of twins and stacking faults in the single crystal wires under tension, and storage of full dislocations after bending of single crystal wires and after tension of twinned wires. The stress state dependence of the deformation morphology and the formation of stacking faults and twins are not features of bulk Au, where deformation is controlled by dislocation interactions. Instead, we attribute the deformation morphologies to the surface nucleation of either leading or trailing partial dislocations, depending on the Schmid factors, which move through and exit the wires producing stacking faults or full dislocation slip. The presence of obstacles such as neutral planes or twin boundaries hinder the egress of the freshly nucleated dislocations and allow trailing and leading partial dislocations to combine and to be stored as full dislocations in the wires. We infer that the twins and stacking faults often observed in nanoscale Au specimens are not a direct size effect but the result of a size and obstacle dependent transition from dislocation interaction controlled to dislocation nucleation controlled deformation.

  8. Dislocation processes and deformation twinning in nanocrystalline Al.

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakov, V.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S.R.; Gleiter, H.

    2002-01-29

    Using a recently developed, massively parallel molecular-dynamics (MD) code for the simulation of polycrystal plasticity, we analyze for the case of nanocrystalline Al the complex interplay among various dislocation and grain-boundary processes during low-temperature deformation. A unique aspect of this work, arising from our ability to deform to rather large plastic strains and to consider a rather large grain size, is the observation of deformation under very high grain-boundary and dislocation densities, i.e., in a deformation regime where they compete on an equal footing. We are thus able to identify the intra- and intergranular dislocation and grain-boundary processes responsible for the extensive deformation twinning observed in our simulations. This illustrates the ability of this type of simulations to capture novel atomic-level insights into the underlying deformation mechanisms not presently possible experimentally. smaller grain size, mobile dislocations must be nucleated from other sources, such as the GBs or grain junctions.

  9. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocationmore » reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.« less

  10. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trishkina, L.; Cherkasova, T.; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N.; Kozlov, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  11. Second yield via dislocation-induced premelting in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; He, A. M.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    Premelting or virtual melting was proposed previously as an important deformation mechanism for high strain-rate loading. However, two questions remain outstanding: how premelting occurs exactly, and whether it plays a role in plastic deformation independent of, parasitic on, or synergetic with, dislocation motion. By virtue of double-shock compression, our large-scale molecular dynamics simulations reveal two yields in single-crystal copper, with the first yield achieved via dislocation motion, and the second, via dislocation-induced premelting as well. The clean capture of melting during dislocation motion suggests that premelting occurs on slip planes and at their intersections, facilitating gliding and leading to yield together with dislocation motion.

  12. Material yielding and irreversible deformation mediated by dislocation motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, M.-Carmen; Laurson, L.; Alava, M. J.

    2008-08-01

    We study the collective behavior of dislocation assemblies in simplified models of plastic deformation. We first review several numerical results on long range dislocation interactions with simplified dislocation motion constraints. These typically give rise to a yielding transition separating stationary and moving dislocation phases. Furthermore, we discuss the intermittent relaxation of the plastic strain-rate observed around this transition at mesoscopic scales, and how this intermittent behavior gives rise to an average slow power law relaxation in time known in the literature as Andrade’s creep. We analyze the coherent dynamics and the average stress-strain relationship in the steady regime of plastic deformation. In this steady regime, plastic deformation proceeds in the form of plastic avalanches whose size and duration are broadly distributed and statistically characterized. One signature of the time correlations of this heterogeneous collective dislocation dynamics is a power spectrum scaling with frequency as f - a with an exponent α close to 1.5. This feature appears to be peculiar of dislocation and grain boundary motion as has been observed in other physical situations in the vicinity of a yielding transition.

  13. Inelastic deformation and dislocation structure of a nickel alloy - Effects of deformation and thermal histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Page, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic deformation behavior of the cast Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, was investigated using data from step-temperature tensile tests and thermomechanical cyclic tests in the temperature ranges 538-760 C and 760-982 C. The deformation results were correlated with the dislocation structures of deformed specimens, identified by TEM. It was found that, in the 760-982 C temperature range, there are no thermal history effects in the inelastic deformation behavior of B1900 + Hf. In the 538-760 range, anomalous cyclic hardening and, possibly, thermal history effects were observed in thermomechanically deformed alloy, caused by sessile (010) dislocations in the gamma-prime phase.

  14. Ensembles of gliding grain boundary dislocations in ultrafine grained materials produced by severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, A.A.

    1997-10-15

    Severe plastic deformation which is now widely used to produce an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure in metals and alloys necessarily leads to the accumulation of interfacial dislocations which arise due to the incompatibilities of strains of neighbor misorientated areas. The most important result of the dislocation storage at grain boundaries (GBs) and associated internal stresses is the fragmentation which at extremely large strains is usually followed by the formation of a very fine highly misorientated granular structure. After deformation the UFG structure must preserve residual dislocation arrays in GBs, since recovery at room temperature is not enough to provide their annihilation. Recently, a hypothesis has been put forward that the internal stresses induced by these arrays are the origin of a number of fundamental properties of UFG materials different from those of coarse grained ones. The author suggested that, in addition, the nonequilibrium dislocation ensembles in GBs were characterized by disordered distribution of dislocations. Thus, three main sources of internal stresses can exist in UFG materials prepared by severe plastic deformation: (1) disordered sessile EGBD arrays, (2) excess density of sessile EGBDs, that is junction disclinations, and (3) arrays of tangential EGBDs. Each of these components can contribute to the experimentally observed elastic strain, excess GB energy and volume expansion in UFG materials.

  15. Plastic deformation of tubular crystals by dislocation glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Daniel A.; Nelson, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Tubular crystals, two-dimensional lattices wrapped into cylindrical topologies, arise in many contexts, including botany and biofilaments, and in physical systems such as carbon nanotubes. The geometrical principles of botanical phyllotaxis, describing the spiral packings on cylinders commonly found in nature, have found application in all these systems. Several recent studies have examined defects in tubular crystals associated with crystalline packings that must accommodate a fixed tube radius. Here we study the mechanics of tubular crystals with variable tube radius, with dislocations interposed between regions of different phyllotactic packings. Unbinding and separation of dislocation pairs with equal and opposite Burgers vectors allow the growth of one phyllotactic domain at the expense of another. In particular, glide separation of dislocations offers a low-energy mode for plastic deformations of solid tubes in response to external stresses, reconfiguring the lattice step by step. Through theory and simulation, we examine how the tube's radius and helicity affects, and is in turn altered by, the mechanics of dislocation glide. We also discuss how a sufficiently strong bending rigidity can alter or arrest the deformations of tubes with small radii.

  16. Limits of Dislocation-based Deformation of Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follstaedt, David; Knapp, James; Hugo, Richard; Kung, Harriet

    2001-11-01

    How small can metallic grains be and still deform by dislocation glide? This question is critical to understanding the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline Ni and for enhancing yield strength and hardness while maintaining ductility. As grain size is reduced in the micrometer range, the hardness of Ni scales as H = Ho + kd-1/2 in accordance with the dislocation-based Hall-Petch relation; however, below 100-50 nm the observed hardness no longer increases. Theoretical treatments indicate that intergranular types of deformation will replace dislocation motion at a few 10's of nanometers. To probe this limit, we have prepared a nearly ideal Ni material with very fine, uniform grain size and uncontaminated grain boundaries by using pulsed laser deposition. In situ tensile straining in the TEM directly shows dislocation motion in grains as small as 20 nm. Moreover, the material exhibits excellent ductility, consistent with this mechanism. We also find high yield strengths (2.4 GPa) and hardnesses (10 GPa) that agree with extensions of the Hall-Petch mechanism down to 12 nm grain-size. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Stochastically forced dislocation density distribution in plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Aifantis, Elias C

    2016-08-01

    The dynamical evolution of dislocations in plastically deformed metals is controlled by both deterministic factors arising out of applied loads and stochastic effects appearing due to fluctuations of internal stress. Such types of stochastic dislocation processes and the associated spatially inhomogeneous modes lead to randomness in the observed deformation structure. Previous studies have analyzed the role of randomness in such textural evolution, but none of these models have considered the impact of a finite decay time (all previous models assumed instantaneous relaxation which is "unphysical") of the stochastic perturbations in the overall dynamics of the system. The present article bridges this knowledge gap by introducing a colored noise in the form of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise in the analysis of a class of linear and nonlinear Wiener and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes that these structural dislocation dynamics could be mapped on to. Based on an analysis of the relevant Fokker-Planck model, our results show that linear Wiener processes remain unaffected by the second time scale in the problem, but all nonlinear processes, both the Wiener type and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type, scale as a function of the noise decay time τ. The results are expected to ramify existing experimental observations and inspire new numerical and laboratory tests to gain further insight into the competition between deterministic and random effects in modeling plastically deformed samples. PMID:27627278

  18. Stochastically forced dislocation density distribution in plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamical evolution of dislocations in plastically deformed metals is controlled by both deterministic factors arising out of applied loads and stochastic effects appearing due to fluctuations of internal stress. Such types of stochastic dislocation processes and the associated spatially inhomogeneous modes lead to randomness in the observed deformation structure. Previous studies have analyzed the role of randomness in such textural evolution, but none of these models have considered the impact of a finite decay time (all previous models assumed instantaneous relaxation which is "unphysical") of the stochastic perturbations in the overall dynamics of the system. The present article bridges this knowledge gap by introducing a colored noise in the form of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise in the analysis of a class of linear and nonlinear Wiener and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes that these structural dislocation dynamics could be mapped on to. Based on an analysis of the relevant Fokker-Planck model, our results show that linear Wiener processes remain unaffected by the second time scale in the problem, but all nonlinear processes, both the Wiener type and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type, scale as a function of the noise decay time τ . The results are expected to ramify existing experimental observations and inspire new numerical and laboratory tests to gain further insight into the competition between deterministic and random effects in modeling plastically deformed samples.

  19. Local decomposition induced by dislocation motions inside precipitates in an Al-alloy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B.; Zhou, Y. T.; Chen, D.; Ma, X. L.

    2013-01-01

    Dislocations in crystals are linear crystallographic defects, which move in lattice when crystals are plastically deformed. Motion of a partial dislocation may remove or create stacking fault characterized with a partial of a lattice translation vector. Here we report that motion of partial dislocations inside an intermetallic compound result in a local composition deviation from its stoichiometric ratio, which cannot be depicted with any vectors of the primary crystal. Along dislocation slip bands inside the deformed Al2Cu particles, redistribution of Cu and Al atoms leads to a local decomposition and collapse of the original crystal structure. This finding demonstrates that dislocation slip may induce destabilization in complex compounds, which is fundamentally different from that in monometallic crystals. This phenomenon of chemical unmixing of initially homogeneous multicomponent solids induced by dislocation motion might also have important implications for understanding the geologic evolvement of deep-focus peridotites in the Earth. PMID:23301160

  20. Dislocation models of interseismic deformation in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; McCrory, P.; Svarc, J.; Murray, J.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS-derived crustal velocity field of the western United States is used to construct dislocation models in a viscoelastic medium of interseismic crustal deformation. The interseismic velocity field is constrained by 1052 GPS velocity vectors spanning the ???2500-km-long plate boundary zone adjacent to the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone and extending ???1000 km into the plate interior. The GPS data set is compiled from U.S. Geological Survey campaign data, Plate Boundary Observatory data, and the Western U.S. Cordillera velocity field of Bennett et al. (1999). In the context of viscoelastic cycle models of postearthquake deformation, the interseismic velocity field is modeled with a combination of earthquake sources on ???100 known faults plus broadly distributed sources. Models that best explain the observed interseismic velocity field include the contributions of viscoelastic relaxation from faulting near the major plate margins, viscoelastic relaxation from distributed faulting in the plate interior, as well as lateral variations in depth-averaged rigidity in the elastic lithosphere. Resulting rigidity variations are consistent with reduced effective elastic plate thickness in a zone a few tens of kilometers wide surrounding the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Primary deformation characteristics are captured along the entire SAF system, Eastern California Shear Zone, Walker Lane, the Mendocino triple junction, the Cascadia margin, and the plate interior up to ???1000 km from the major plate boundaries.

  1. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mgmore » stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.« less

  2. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mg stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.

  3. High dislocation density of tin induced by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yi-Han; Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-12-15

    A dislocation density of as high as 10{sup 17} /m{sup 2} in a tin strip, as revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, was induced by current stressing at 6.5 x 10{sup 3} A/ cm{sup 2}. The dislocations exist in terms of dislocation line, dislocation loop, and dislocation aggregates. Electron Backscattered Diffraction images reflect that the high dislocation density induced the formation of low deflection angle subgrains, high deflection angle Widmanstätten grains, and recrystallization. The recrystallization gave rise to grain refining.

  4. Dislocation-Twin Boundary Interactions Induced Nanocrystalline via SPD Processing in Bulk Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fucheng; Feng, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhinan; Kang, Jie; Wang, Tiansheng

    2015-03-01

    This report investigated dislocation-twin boundary (TB) interactions that cause the TB to disappear and turn into a high-angle grain boundary (GB). The evolution of the microstructural characteristics of Hadfield steel was shown as a function of severe plastic deformation processing time. Sessile Frank partial dislocations and/or sessile unit dislocations were formed on the TB through possible dislocation reactions. These reactions induced atomic steps on the TB and led to the accumulation of gliding dislocations at the TB, which resulted in the transition from coherent TB to incoherent GB. The factors that affect these interactions were described, and a physical model was established to explain in detail the feasible dislocation reactions at the TB.

  5. Dislocation-twin boundary interactions induced nanocrystalline via SPD processing in bulk metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fucheng; Feng, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhinan; Kang, Jie; Wang, Tiansheng

    2015-01-01

    This report investigated dislocation-twin boundary (TB) interactions that cause the TB to disappear and turn into a high-angle grain boundary (GB). The evolution of the microstructural characteristics of Hadfield steel was shown as a function of severe plastic deformation processing time. Sessile Frank partial dislocations and/or sessile unit dislocations were formed on the TB through possible dislocation reactions. These reactions induced atomic steps on the TB and led to the accumulation of gliding dislocations at the TB, which resulted in the transition from coherent TB to incoherent GB. The factors that affect these interactions were described, and a physical model was established to explain in detail the feasible dislocation reactions at the TB. PMID:25757550

  6. Dislocation-twin boundary interactions induced nanocrystalline via SPD processing in bulk metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fucheng; Feng, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhinan; Kang, Jie; Wang, Tiansheng

    2015-03-11

    This report investigated dislocation-twin boundary (TB) interactions that cause the TB to disappear and turn into a high-angle grain boundary (GB). The evolution of the microstructural characteristics of Hadfield steel was shown as a function of severe plastic deformation processing time. Sessile Frank partial dislocations and/or sessile unit dislocations were formed on the TB through possible dislocation reactions. These reactions induced atomic steps on the TB and led to the accumulation of gliding dislocations at the TB, which resulted in the transition from coherent TB to incoherent GB. The factors that affect these interactions were described, and a physical model was established to explain in detail the feasible dislocation reactions at the TB.

  7. Microstructural evidence for the transition from dislocation creep to dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding in naturally deformed plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Elena A.; Hirth, Greg; John, Barbara E.

    2016-11-01

    We use quantitative microstructural analysis including misorientation analysis based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data to investigate deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed plagioclase in an amphibolite gabbro mylonite. The sample is from lower oceanic crust exposed near the Southwest Indian Ridge, and it has a high ratio of recrystallized matrix grains to porphyroclasts. Microstructures preserved in porphyroclasts suggest that early deformation was achieved principally by dislocation creep with subgrain rotation recrystallization; recrystallized grain (average diameter ∼8 μm) microstructures indicate that subsequent grain boundary sliding (GBS) was active in the continued deformation of the recrystallized matrix. The recrystallized matrix shows four-grain junctions, randomized misorientation axes, and a shift towards higher angles for neighbor-pair misorientations, all indicative of GBS. The matrix grains also exhibit a shape preferred orientation, a weak lattice preferred orientation consistent with slip on multiple slip systems, and intragrain microstructures indicative of dislocation movement. The combination of these microstructures suggest deformation by dislocation-accommodated GBS (DisGBS). Strain localization within the recrystallized matrix was promoted by a transition from grain size insensitive dislocation creep to grain size sensitive GBS, and sustained by the maintenance of a small grain size during superplasticity.

  8. Transitions of Dislocation Glide to Twinning and Shear Transformation in Shock-Deformed Tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L L; Campbell, G H; McNaney, J M

    2009-10-19

    tantalum. The observation of {alpha} {yields} {omega} transition in shock-compressed tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys at {approx}45 GPa in fact reveals the occurrence of a non-equilibrium phase transformation at such a low pressure. We therefore postulated that the equation of state (EOS) based on static thermodynamics, which asserts that the system free energy (G) is a function of volume (V), pressure (P), and temperature (T), i.e., G = F(V, P, T) is insufficient to rationalize the system free energy under dynamic-pressure conditions. Since shear deformation was found to play a crucial role in shock-induced deformation twins and {omega} phase, the density and arrangement of dislocations, which can alter and increase the system free energy, should also be taken into account to rationalize the non-equilibrium phase transformation in shocked tantalum. Typical arrangements of high-density dislocations formed in pure tantalum shocked at {approx}45 GPa are shown in Figs. 1a and 1b. Figure 1a reveals a cellular dislocation structure but no twins or {omega} phase-domains were observed in this region. The formation of low-energy type cellular dislocation structures indicates the occurrence of dynamic-recovery reactions to reduce dislocation density in this region. Figure 1b shows an evenly distributed dislocation structure with a local dislocation density ({rho}) as high as {approx}5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} according to {rho} {approx} 1/l{sup 2}, where l ({approx}4.5 nm) is the spacing between two dislocations. Here shock-induced twin plates and {omega} phase-domains can be readily seen. These observations provide us a clue that dislocation arrangement and density population, which can alter system free energy through the changes of dislocation self-energy (E{sub s}) and dislocation interaction energy (E{sub ij}), are relevant to the occurrence of shock-induced twinning and phase transformation in tantalum. The objective of this paper is to report new results obtained from

  9. Dislocation

    MedlinePlus

    Joint dislocation ... It may be hard to tell a dislocated joint from a broken bone . Both are emergencies that ... to repair a ligament that tears when the joint is dislocated is needed. Injuries to nerves and ...

  10. Surface Rebound of Relativistic Dislocations Directly and Efficiently Initiates Deformation Twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Jie; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Ma, Evan

    2016-10-01

    Under ultrahigh stresses (e.g., under high strain rates or in small-volume metals) deformation twinning (DT) initiates on a very short time scale, indicating strong spatial-temporal correlations in dislocation dynamics. Using atomistic simulations, here we demonstrate that surface rebound of relativistic dislocations directly and efficiently triggers DT under a wide range of laboratory experimental conditions. Because of its stronger temporal correlation, surface rebound sustained relay of partial dislocations is shown to be dominant over the conventional mechanism of thermally activated nucleation of twinning dislocations.

  11. Effect of Mixed Dislocations on Nonlinear Acoustic Responses in Plastic Deformation Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wujun; Xiang, Yanxun; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Zhang, Haiyan

    An analytical model is proposed for describing the influence of mixed dislocation on the acoustic nonlinearity in the plastically deformed materials, which is derived based on the dislocation line energy and variable line tension. Based on the proposed model, the interaction of nonlinear plane longitudinal wave with the plastically deformed materials was simulated in this article. The simulation was validated by the experimental measurement for the satisfactory consistency. Both simulation and experimental results reveal monotonically increasing tendency of the normalized nonlinear parameter with the plastic strain, which is mainly attributed to the dislocation evolution according to microscopic study.

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Study on the Strain Anisotropy and Dislocation Structure of Deformed Lath Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein Nedjad, S.; Hosseini Nasab, F.; Movaghar Garabagh, M. R.; Damadi, S. R.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2011-08-01

    18Ni (300) maraging steel possessing lath martensite structure was deformed by four passes of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at ambient temperature. Line profile analysis (LPA) of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns identified strong strain anisotropy and remarkable increases in the relative fraction of screw dislocations after ECAP. The strain anisotropy was reasonably accounted for by the anisotropy of elastic constants. Domination of screw dislocations in the deformed structure was attributed to the preferred annihilation of edge dislocations in the early stages of deformation along with the difficulties for annihilation of screw dislocations by cross slipping. Cobalt addition was mainly assumed to make cross slipping difficult by reducing stacking-fault energy and favoring short-range ordering.

  13. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Plastic Deformation of Transition Zone Minerals: Effect of Temperature on Dislocation Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbex, S.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle convection is the fundamental process by which the Earth expels its internal heat. It is controlled at the microscopic scale by the motion of crystal defects responsable for plastic deformation at high temperature and pressure conditions of the deep Earth. In this study we focus on dislocations which are usually considered as the most efficient defects contributing to intracrystalline deformation. The influence of temperature is a key parameter in determining the behaviour of dislocations. We propose a model to describe the temperature-dependent mobility of dislocations based on a computational materials science approach, connecting the atomic to the grain scale. This provides elementary knowledge to both interpret seismic anisotropy and to improve geodynamic modelling. Here we focus on plastic deformation of the transition zone minerals wadsleyite and ringwoodite, dominating the boundary separating the upper from the lower mantle, a region over which the viscosity is thought to increase rapidly. Using the Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin model enabled us to select potential glide planes, to predict the dislocation core structures and fundamental properties of both Mg2SiO4 high-pressure polymorphs integrating the non-elastic nature of dislocations from atomic scale based calculations. Macroscopic deformation results from the mobility of these distinct dislocations. High finite mantle temperatures activates unstable double-kink configurations on the dislocation line which allow the dislocation to move under stress. The original contribution of the present work is the formulation of a mobility law for dissociated dislocations as they occur in wadsleyite and ringwoodite. This permits us to predict the critical activation enthalpy required to overcome lattice friction associated to the onset of glide. From this, the effective glide velocities can be derived as a function of stress and temperature leading to the first lower bound estimates of transition zone viscosities

  15. Dislocation-induced chirality of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Baimuratov, Anvar S; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2015-03-11

    Optical activity is a common natural phenomenon, which occurs in individual molecules, biomolecules, biological species, crystalline solids, liquid crystals, and various nanosized objects, leading to numerous important applications in almost every field of modern science and technology. Because this activity can hardly be altered, creation of artificial active media with controllable optical properties is of paramount importance. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically demonstrate that optical activity can be inherent to many semiconductor nanowires, as it is induced by chiral dislocations naturally developing during their growth. By assembling such nanowires in two- or three-dimensional periodic lattices, one can create optically active quantum supercrystals whose activity can be varied in many ways owing to the size quantization of the nanowires' energy spectra. We believe that this research is of particular importance for the future development of semiconducting nanomaterials and their applications in nanotechnology, chemistry, biology, and medicine.

  16. Thermally Induced Dynamics of Dislocations in Graphene at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chuncheng; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Lee, Gun-Do; Yoon, Euijoon; Allen, Christopher S; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-10-27

    Thermally induced dislocation movements are important in understanding the effects of high temperature annealing on modifying the crystal structure. We use an in situ heating holder in an aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy to study the movement of dislocations in suspended monolayer graphene up to 800 °C. Control of temperature enables the differentiation of electron beam induced effects and thermally driven processes. At room temperature, the dynamics of dislocation behavior is driven by the electron beam irradiation at 80 kV; however at higher temperatures, increased movement of the dislocation is observed and provides evidence for the influence of thermal energy to the system. An analysis of the dislocation movement shows both climb and glide processes, including new complex pathways for migration and large nanoscale rapid jumps between fixed positions in the lattice. The improved understanding of the high temperature dislocation movement provides insights into annealing processes in graphene and the behavior of defects with increased heat.

  17. The core structure of basal dislocations in deformed sapphire (alpha-Al₂O₃).

    PubMed

    Heuer, A H; Jia, C L; Lagerlöf, K P D

    2010-11-26

    The atomic structure of dislocation cores is decisive for the understanding of plasticity in crystalline solids. The core structure of dislocations in sapphire introduced by high-temperature plastic deformation has been investigated with the use of the negative spherical-aberration imaging technique. The ability of this technique to discriminate oxygen columns from aluminum (Al) columns, combined with reproduction of subtle contrast features by image simulation, leads to a markedly detailed atomic model of the dislocation cores. The partial dislocations are Al-terminated, with electrical neutrality being achieved because half of the Al columns are missing. These partials also undergo core spreading, which results in random occupancy of both tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated sites, though Al in tetrahedral coordination never occurs in a perfect crystal. Unusual dislocation core structures may be present in other technologically important nonmetallic solids. PMID:21109669

  18. Spatially dependent lattice deformations for dislocations at the edges of graphene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chuncheng; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-01-27

    We show that dislocations located at the edge of graphene cause different lattice deformations to those located in the bulk lattice. When a dislocation is located near an edge, a decrease in the rippling and increase of the in-plane rotation occurs relative to the dislocations in the bulk. The increased in-plane rotation near the edge causes bond rotations at the edge of graphene to reduce the overall strain in the system. Dislocations were highly stable and remained fixed in their position even when located within a few lattice spacings from the edge of graphene. We study this behavior at the atomic level using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. These results show detailed information about the behavior of dislocations in 2D materials and the strain properties that result.

  19. Impact of dislocation cell elastic strain variations on line profiles from deformed copper.

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L. E.; Larson, B. C.; Tischler, J. Z.; Geantil, P.; Kassner, M. E.; Liu, W.; Stoudt, M. R.; NIST; ORNL; Univ. of Southern California

    2008-01-01

    Energy scanned, sub-micrometer X-ray beams were used to obtain diffraction line profiles from individual dislocation cells in copper single crystals deformed in compression. Sub-micrometer depth resolution was provided by translating a wire through the diffracted beams and using triangulation to determine the depths of the diffracting volumes. Connection to classic volume-averaged results was made by adding the line profiles from 52 spatially resolved dislocation cell measurements. The resulting sub profile is smooth and symmetric, in agreement with early assumptions; the mean strain and full width half maximum are consistent with the average of the parameters extracted from the more exact individual dislocation cell measurements.

  20. The Interaction of Dislocations and Radiation-Induced Obstacles at High-Strain Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J A; Wirth, B D; Robach, J; Robertson, I

    2003-07-14

    Improved understanding of the plastic deformation of metals during high strain rate shock loading is key to predicting their resulting material properties. This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics simulations that identify the deformation modes of aluminum over a range of applied shear stresses and examines the interaction between dislocations and irradiation induced obstacles. These simulations show that while super-sonic dislocation motion can occur during impact loading, the finite dimensions of the materials render this motion transient. Larger applied loads do not stabilize supersonic dislocations, but instead lead an alternate deformation mode, namely twinning. Finally, the atomistic mechanisms that underlie the observed changes in the mechanical properties of metals as a function of irradiation are examined. Specifically, simulations of the interactions between moving edge dislocations and nanometer-sized helium bubbles provide insight into increases of the critical shear stresses but also reveal the effect of internal gas pressure on the deformation mode. The information gained in these studies provides fundamental insight into materials behavior, as well as important inputs for multi-scale models of materials deformation.

  1. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; et al

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations inmore » the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  2. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations in the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  3. Dislocation processes in the deformation of nanocrystalline aluminum by molecular-dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakov, V.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S. R.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Gleiter, H.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    2002-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of nanocrystalline materials (that is, polycrystals with a grain size of less than 100 nm) remains controversial. Although it is commonly accepted that the intrinsic deformation behaviour of these materials arises from the interplay between dislocation and grain-boundary processes, little is known about the specific deformation mechanisms. Here we use large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations to elucidate this intricate interplay during room-temperature plastic deformation of model nanocrystalline Al microstructures. We demonstrate that, in contrast to coarse-grained Al, mechanical twinning may play an important role in the deformation behaviour of nanocrystalline Al. Our results illustrate that this type of simulation has now advanced to a level where it provides a powerful new tool for elucidating and quantifying-in a degree of detail not possible experimentally-the atomic-level mechanisms controlling the complex dislocation and grain-boundary processes in heavily deformed materials with a submicrometre grain size.

  4. Dislocation processes in the deformation of nanocrystalline aluminium by molecular-dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Yamakov, Vesselin; Wolf, Dieter; Phillpot, Simon R; Mukherjee, Amiya K; Gleiter, Herbert

    2002-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of nanocrystalline materials (that is, polycrystals with a grain size of less than 100 nm) remains controversial. Although it is commonly accepted that the intrinsic deformation behaviour of these materials arises from the interplay between dislocation and grain-boundary processes, little is known about the specific deformation mechanisms. Here we use large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations to elucidate this intricate interplay during room-temperature plastic deformation of model nanocrystalline Al microstructures. We demonstrate that, in contrast to coarse-grained Al, mechanical twinning may play an important role in the deformation behaviour of nanocrystalline Al. Our results illustrate that this type of simulation has now advanced to a level where it provides a powerful new tool for elucidating and quantifying--in a degree of detail not possible experimentally--the atomic-level mechanisms controlling the complex dislocation and grain-boundary processes in heavily deformed materials with a submicrometre grain size. PMID:12618848

  5. Dislocations

    MedlinePlus

    Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a ... one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, ...

  6. Dislocation generation, slip systems, and dynamic recrystallization in experimentally deformed plagioclase single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stünitz, H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Tullis, J.

    2003-09-01

    Three samples of gem quality plagioclase crystals of An60 were experimentally deformed at 900 °C, 1 GPa confining pressure and strain rates of 7.5-8.7×10 -7 s -1. The starting material is effectively dislocation-free so that all observed defects were introduced during the experiments. Two samples were shortened normal to one of the principal slip planes (010), corresponding to a "hard" orientation, and one sample was deformed with a Schmid factor of 0.45 for the principal slip system [001](010), corresponding to a "soft" orientation. Several slip systems were activated in the "soft" sample: dislocations of the [001](010) and <110>(001) system are about equally abundant, whereas <110>{111} and [101] in (1¯31) to (2¯42) are less common. In the "soft" sample plastic deformation is pervasive and deformation bands are abundant. In the "hard" samples the plastic deformation is concentrated in rims along the sample boundaries. Deformation bands and shear fractures are common. Twinning occurs in close association with fracturing, and the processes are clearly interrelated. Glissile dislocations of all observed slip systems are associated with fractures and deformation bands indicating that deformation bands and fractures are important sites of dislocation generation. Grain boundaries of tiny, defect-free grains in healed fracture zones have migrated subsequent to fracturing. These grains represent former fragments of the fracture process and may act as nuclei for new grains during dynamic recrystallization. Nucleation via small fragments can explain a non-host-controlled orientation of recrystallized grains in plagioclase and possibly in other silicate materials which have been plastically deformed near the semi-brittle to plastic transition.

  7. Computational modelling of mesoscale dislocation patterning and plastic deformation of single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shengxu; El-Azab, Anter

    2015-07-01

    We present a continuum dislocation dynamics model that predicts the formation of dislocation cell structure in single crystals at low strains. The model features a set of kinetic equations of the curl type that govern the space and time evolution of the dislocation density in the crystal. These kinetic equations are coupled to stress equilibrium and deformation kinematics using the eigenstrain approach. A custom finite element method has been developed to solve the coupled system of equations of dislocation kinetics and crystal mechanics. The results show that, in general, dislocations self-organize in patterns under their mutual interactions. However, the famous dislocation cell structure has been found to form only when cross slip is implemented in the model. Cross slip is also found to lower the yield point, increase the hardening rate, and sustain an increase in the dislocation density over the hardening regime. Analysis of the cell structure evolution reveals that the average cell size decreases with the applied stress, which is consistent with the similitude principle.

  8. Description of tantalum deformation behavior by dislocation mechanics based constitutive relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerilli, Frank J.; Armstrong, Ronald W.

    1990-08-01

    Dislocation mechanics based constitutive equation constants are determined for temperature, strain rate, work hardening, and polycrystal grain size influences on the deformation behavior of various tantalum materials. An analysis of the maximum load point strain provides a useful method of determining the work hardening constants. Different athermal stress constants and thermal activation related constants are obtained for certain groupings of the different tantalum materials. The variation are correlated with the annealing history of the materials and related to dislocation model parameters involved in the thermal activation strain rate analysis. Computed tantalum deformation results based on these constants are shown to agree with Gourdin's reported expanding ring test measurements and with the deformed shape of a Taylor cylinder impact test specimen.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy of dislocations in cementite deformed at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussi, A.; Cordier, P.; Ghosh, S.; Garvik, N.; Nzogang, B. C.; Carrez, Ph.; Garruchet, S.

    2016-06-01

    Polycrystalline aggregates of cementite (Fe3C) and (Fe,Ni)3C have been synthesised at 10 GPa and 1250 °C in the multianvil apparatus. Further, deformation of the carbides by stress relaxation has been carried out at temperature of 1250 °C and for 8 h at the same pressure. Dislocations have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. They are of the [1 0 0] and [0 0 1] type, [1 0 0] being the most frequent. [1 0 0] dislocations are dissociated and glide in the (0 1 0) plane. [0 0 1] dislocations glide in (1 0 0) and (0 1 0). Given the plastic anisotropy of cementite, the morphology of the lamellae in pearlitic steels appears to have a major role in the strengthening role played by this phase, since activation of easy slip systems is geometrically inhibited in most cases.

  10. Dislocation-Mediated Deformation in Solid Langmuir Monolayers: Plastic Bending and Tilt Boundary.

    PubMed

    Hatta, E

    2015-09-01

    The shear response of three types of textures (mosaic, striation, and stripe) in 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid solid Langmuir monolayers has been investigated with Brewster angle microscopy. Low temperature mosaic textures respond to an applied stress elastically. Upon the application of shear the change of contrast appears in the form of propagation of fronts roughly perpendicularly to the shear direction within a single domain reversibly, while the domain shape keeps constant since it is presumably frozen kinetically. The striation and stripe textures at high temperatures show a viscoplastic behavior (plastic bending) in its rheological response, being consistent with the formation of a dislocation wall (tilt boundary) through dislocation dynamics (dislocation glide and climb). The stress-induced formation of a tilt boundary provides a manifestation of the collective motion of a number of dislocations.

  11. The role of dislocations in varied olivine deformation mechanisms investigated using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars; Britton, Ben; Wilkinson, Angus

    2016-04-01

    Experimentally-derived flow laws can be used to predict the rheology of rocks deformed under natural conditions only if the same microphysical processes can be demonstrated to control the rate-limiting deformation mechanism in both cases. Olivine rheology may exert a principle control on the strength of the lithosphere, and therefore considerable research effort has been applied to assessing its rheology through experimental, geological, and geophysical approaches. Nonetheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the dominant deformation mechanisms in the upper mantle. This uncertainty arises in large part due to our limited understanding of the fundamental deformation processes associated with each mechanism. Future improvements to microphysical models of distinct deformation mechanisms require new insight into the contributions those fundamental processes to the macroscopic behaviour. The dynamics of dislocations is central to modelling viscous deformation of olivine, but characterisation techniques capable of constraining dislocation types, densities, and distributions over the critical grain to polycrystal length-scales have been lacking. High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), developed and increasingly applied in the material sciences, offers an approach capable of such analyses. HR-EBSD utilises diffraction pattern image cross-correlation to achieve dramatically improved angular resolution (~0.01°) of lattice orientation gradients compared to conventional Hough-based EBSD (~0.5°). This angular resolution allows very low densities (≥ 10^11 m^-2) of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) to be resolved, facilitating analysis of a wide range of dislocation microstructures. We have developed the application of HR-EBSD to olivine and applied it to samples deformed both experimentally and naturally in grain-size sensitive and grain-size insensitive regimes. The results quantitatively highlight variations in the types and

  12. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For amore » single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.« less

  13. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  14. Dislocation decorrelation and relationship to deformation microtwins during creep of a y' precipitate strengthened Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, R. R.; Zhou, N.; Kovarik, Libor; Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J.

    2011-11-01

    The evolution of microtwins during high temperature creep deformation in a strengthened Ni-base superalloy has been investigated through a combination of creep testing, TEM characterization, theoretical modeling and computer simulation. Experimentally, microtwin nucleation sources were identified and their evolution was tracked by characterizing the deformation substructure at different stages of the creep deformation. Initially, deformation is highly localized around stress concentrators such as carbides, borides and serrated grain boundaries, which act as sources of a/2<110> matrix type dislocations. Due to microstructural effects such as fine channels between particles and low matrix stacking fault energies, the a/2<110> matrix dislocations dissociate into a/6<112> Shockley partials, which were commonly observed to be decorrelated from one another, creating extended intrinsic stacking faults in the matrix. As deformation progress further, microtwins form via partial dislocations cooperatively shearing both and phases on adjacent {111} glide planes. The TEM observations lead directly to an analysis of dislocation-precipitate interactions. Through phase field simulations and theoretical analysis based on Orowan looping, the important processes of dislocation dissociation and decorrelation are modeled in detail, providing comprehensive insight into the microstructural features and applied stress conditions that favor the microtwinning deformation mode in strengthened Ni-based superalloys.

  15. Electronic-structure study of an edge dislocation in Aluminum and the role of macroscopic deformations on its energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Mrinal; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Gavini, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    We employed a real-space formulation of orbital-free density functional theory using finite-element basis to study the defect-core and energetics of an edge dislocation in Aluminum. Our study shows that the core-size of a perfect edge dislocation is around ten times the magnitude of the Burgers vector. This finding is contrary to the widely accepted notion that continuum descriptions of dislocation energetics are accurate beyond ∼1-3 Burgers vector from the dislocation line. Consistent with prior electronic-structure studies, we find that the perfect edge dislocation dissociates into two Shockley partials with a partial separation distance of 12.8 Å. Interestingly, our study revealed a significant influence of macroscopic deformations on the core-energy of Shockley partials. We show that this dependence of the core-energy on macroscopic deformations results in an additional force on dislocations, beyond the Peach-Koehler force, that is proportional to strain gradients. Further, we demonstrate that this force from core-effects can be significant and can play an important role in governing the dislocation behavior in regions of inhomogeneous deformations.

  16. Dislocation decorrelation and relationship to deformation microtwins during creep of a precipitate strengthened Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Zhou, Ning; Kovarik, Libor; Shen, Chen; Wang, Yunzhi; Mills, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of microtwins during high temperature creep deformation in a strengthened Ni-base superalloy has been investigated through a combination of creep testing, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), theoretical modeling, and computer simulation. Experimentally, microtwin nucleation sources were identified and their evolution was tracked by characterizing the deformation substructure at different stages of creep deformation. Deformation is highly localized around stress concentrators such as carbides, borides and serrated grain boundaries, which act as sources of a/2<110> matrix-type dislocations. Due to fine channels between particles, coupled with the low matrix stacking fault energy, the a/2<110> matrix dislocations dissociate into a/6<112> Shockley partials, which were commonly observed to be decorrelated from one another, creating extended intrinsic stacking faults in the matrix. Microtwins are common and form via Shockley partial dislocations cooperatively shearing both and phases on adjacent {111} glide planes. The TEM observations lead directly to an analysis of dislocation-precipitate interactions. Through phase field simulations and theoretical analyses based on Orowan looping, the important processes of dislocation dissociation and decorrelation are modeled in detail, providing comprehensive insight into the microstructural features and applied stress conditions that favor the microtwinning deformation mode in strengthened Ni-based superalloys.

  17. Glide Dislocations Dissociation in Inversion Domain Boundaries of Plastically Deformed Aluminium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feregotto, Virginia; Michel, Jean-Pierre

    1996-09-01

    A ten per cent plastic deformation of polycrystalline aluminium nitride, at a temperature ranging from 1500 to 1650 ^{circ}C creates a new kind of intragranular defect. Observed by transmission electron microscopy, the look like torsion subboundaries created by dislocations with 1/3<~ngle11bar{2}0rangle Burgers vectors and so nodes are dissociated into Shockley partials. They are located in the basal plane. In fact, these defects appear only in the plane areas of grown-in defects, the inversion domain boundaries. The formation of these faulted networks is interpreted as being the ultimate stage of the interactions between inversion domain boundaries and glide dislocations. Une déformation plastique de 10 % de nitrure d'aluminium polycristallin, entre 1500 et 1650 ^{circ}C introduit un nouveau type de défauts intragranulaires. Au microscope électronique par transmission, ils apparaissent comme des sous-joints de torsion créés par des dislocations de vecteurs de Burgers 1/3<~ngle11bar{2}0rangle dont les nœuds triples sont dissociés en partielles de Shockley ; ils sont situés dans le plan de base. En fait, ces défauts ne se produisent que sur les parties planes de défauts originels, les parois de domaines d'inversion. La formation de ces réseaux fautés est analysée comme l'ultime stade des interactions entre parois de domaines d'inversion et dislocations de glissement.

  18. Atlantoaxial dislocation adjacent to kyphotic deformity in a case of adult Larsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sushanta K; Deepak, Arsikere N; Salunke, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    Kyphotic deformity is often seen in Larsen syndrome. However, its progress in adults is not clear. The adjacent level compression in these patients adds to the difficulty regarding the level that needs to be operated. A 56-year-old male presented with neck pain and spastic quadriplegia. Radiology showed kyphotic deformity (sequelae of Larsen syndrome) with atlantoaxial dislocation. Cord compression was apparent at both levels but careful evaluation showed C1-2 level compression and some compression below the kyphotic deformity. The kyphotic spine was already fused and the canal diameter was adequate. The adjacent level C1-2 was fused and he improved dramatically. Correction of long-standing kyphotic deformity may not be necessary, as it unlikely to progress because of its tendency to fuse naturally. Rather, the adjacent levels are likely to compress the cord due to excessive stress. A proper clinical history and a thorough radiological examination help the surgeon to make an appropriate decision. PMID:27217658

  19. The definition of recurrent shoulder dislocation in tramadol induced seizure patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei Amroodi, Morteza; Iri, Abdolrazzagh; Akhoondi, Salehe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of recurrent shoulder dislocation in patients taking tramadol has not been studied yet; so, this study aims to study the recurrent shoulder dislocation following tramadol induced seizure. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 205 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation complaints (2 or more) referred to Shafa Orthopedic and Iranmehr hospitals Tehran, Iran, from October 2012 to October 2014 were studied. Data on patient history and physical examination, patient demographic information such as age, sex, age at first dislocation, total number of dislocation, cause of the first dislocation, history of tramadol use, number of dislocation following tramadol induced seizure, history of other drugs use, the dominant hand, involved side, direction of dislocations and greater tuberosity fracture was recorded using a pre-designed questionnaire. Categorical variables were compared by chi-square test and the means were compared with student T-test. Results: In this study, 50 patients (24.4%) suffered from tramadol induced seizures and recurrent shoulder dislocation. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between the number of dislocation and tramadol use (P = 0.02). Recurrent shoulder dislocation following tramadol induced seizure was significantly associated with greater tuberosity fracture of humerus (P = 0.04); in 49 out of 50 patients (98%) dislocation was of anterior type. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that tramadol induced seizure may increase the risk of recurrent shoulder dislocation. Furthermore, the prevalence of greater tuberosity fracture in shoulder dislocation increases following tramadol induced seizure; and anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common type of dislocation following tramadol induced seizure. PMID:26913261

  20. Thermal stress induced dislocation distribution in directional solidification of Si for PV application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiptner, Karolin; Gao, Bing; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji; Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kakimoto, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the limitation of the cast technique for silicon growth and the obstacle to reduce the dislocation density below 103 cm-2. The thermal stress induced dislocation density, independent of other dislocation sources, is determined and the result suggests that local dislocation densities as high as 104 cm-2 are readily introduced alone in the cooling period of the crystal growth. Areas of high residual strain and dislocation densities are identified and presented. The experimental results are correlated with numerical simulation based on a three-dimensional Haasen-Alexander-Sumino (HAS) model. The dislocation introduction is caused by an activation of different slip systems in different ingot areas.

  1. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties and dislocation luminescence of isotopically enriched silicon {sup 29}Si:B

    SciTech Connect

    Koplak, O. V.; Shteynman, E. A.; Tereschenko, A. N.; Morgunov, R. B.

    2015-09-15

    A correlation between the temperature dependences of the D1-line intensity of dislocation luminescence and the magnetic moment of plastically deformed isotopically enriched crystals {sup 29}Si:B is found. It is established that the magnetic susceptibility of the deformed crystals obtained by integration of the spectra of electron spin resonance and the D1-line intensity undergo similar nonmonotonic variations with temperature varying in the range of 20–32 K.

  2. Stochastic dislocation kinetics and fractal structures in deforming metals probed by acoustic emission and surface topography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, A.; Yasnikov, I. S.; Estrin, Y.

    2014-06-21

    We demonstrate that the fractal dimension (FD) of the dislocation population in a deforming material is an important quantitative characteristic of the evolution of the dislocation structure. Thus, we show that peaking of FD signifies a nearing loss of uniformity of plastic flow and the onset of strain localization. Two techniques were employed to determine FD: (i) inspection of surface morphology of the deforming crystal by white light interferometry and (ii) monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) during uniaxial tensile deformation. A connection between the AE characteristics and the fractal dimension determined from surface topography measurements was established. As a common platform for the two methods, the dislocation density evolution in the bulk was used. The relations found made it possible to identify the occurrence of a peak in the median frequency of AE as a harbinger of plastic instability leading to necking. It is suggested that access to the fractal dimension provided by AE measurements and by surface topography analysis makes these techniques important tools for monitoring the evolution of the dislocation structure during plastic deformation—both as stand-alone methods and especially when used in tandem.

  3. Spatial organization of plastic deformation in single crystals with different structure of slip dislocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitsyna, T. S.; Teplyakova, L. A. Koneva, N. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.

    2015-10-27

    It is established that different structure of slip dislocation at the end of the linear hardening stage results in different distribution of dislocation charges in the volume of a single crystal. In the alloy with a near atomic order the slip of single dislocations leads to formation of planar structures—layers with the excess density of dislocations. In the alloy with long-range atomic order the slip of superdislocations brings the formation of the system of parallel rod-like charged dislocation linking.

  4. Ion irradiation induced disappearance of dislocations in a nickel-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. C.; Li, D. H.; Lui, R. D.; Huang, H. F.; Li, J. J.; Lei, G. H.; Huang, Q.; Bao, L. M.; Yan, L.; Zhou, X. T.; Zhu, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Under Xe ion irradiation, the microstructural evolution of a nickel based alloy, Hastelloy N (US N10003), was studied. The intrinsic dislocations are decorated with irradiation induced interstitial loops and/or clusters. Moreover, the intrinsic dislocations density reduces as the irradiation damage increases. The disappearance of the intrinsic dislocations is ascribed to the dislocations climb to the free surface by the absorption of interstitials under the ion irradiation. Moreover, the in situ annealing experiment reveals that the small interstitial loops and/or clusters induced by the ion irradiation are stable below 600 °C.

  5. Initial dislocation structure and dynamic dislocation multiplication in Mo single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Lassila, D H

    2000-03-22

    Initial dislocation structure in annealed high-purity Mo single crystals and deformation substructure in a crystal subjected to 1% compression have been examined and studied in order to investigate dislocation multiplication mechanisms in the early stages of plastic deformation. The initial dislocation density is in a range of 10{sup 6} {approx} 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, and the dislocation structure is found to contain many grown-in superjogs along dislocation lines. The dislocation density increases to a range of 10{sup 8} {approx} 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, and the average jog height is also found to increase after compressing for a total strain of 1%. It is proposed that the preexisting jogged screw dislocations can act as (multiple) dislocation multiplication sources when deformed under quasi-static conditions. Both the jog height and length of link segment (between jogs) can increase by stress-induced jog coalescence, which takes place via the lateral migration (drift) of superjogs driven by unbalanced line-tension partials acting on link segments of unequal lengths. Applied shear stress begins to push each link segment to precede dislocation multiplication when link length and jog height are greater than critical lengths. This dynamic dislocation multiplication source is subsequently verified by direct simulations of dislocation dynamics under stress to be crucial in the early stages of plastic deformation in Mo single crystals.

  6. Post-irradiation plastic deformation in bcc Fe grains investigated by means of 3D dislocation dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaj, K.; Robertson, C.; Fivel, M.

    2015-04-01

    Post-irradiation tensile straining is investigated by means of three-dimensional dislocation dynamics simulations adapted to body centred cubic Fe. Namely, 1 μm Fe grains are strained at various temperatures in the 100-300 K range, in absence and in presence of radiation-induced defect dispersions. The defect-induced hardening is consistent with the disperse barrier effect up to 5 ×1021m-3 loops and is weakly dependent on the straining temperature. The dislocation-loops interaction rate augments with the accumulated plastic strain, loop density and strength; while it is mainly independent of the number of active slip systems and thermally activated screw dislocation mobility. An additional, radiation-induced hardening mechanism known as dislocation "decoration" is also implemented and tested for comparison. Those results show that the plastic flow localisation transition depends on the total yield point rise rather than on the lone, dispersed loop density. The simulation results are then rationalized through an original micro-mechanical model relating the grain-scale stress-strain behaviour to dislocation sub-structure formation and spreading. That model combines strain dependent and strain independent hardening mechanisms, which both contribute to the associated stress-strain response and plastic flow spreading.

  7. A novel unified dislocation density-based model for hot deformation behavior of a nickel-based superalloy under dynamic recrystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Wen, Dong-Xu; Chen, Ming-Song; Chen, Xiao-Min

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel unified dislocation density-based model is presented for characterizing hot deformation behaviors in a nickel-based superalloy under dynamic recrystallization (DRX) conditions. In the Kocks-Mecking model, a new softening item is proposed to represent the impacts of DRX behavior on dislocation density evolution. The grain size evolution and DRX kinetics are incorporated into the developed model. Material parameters of the developed model are calibrated by a derivative-free method of MATLAB software. Comparisons between experimental and predicted results confirm that the developed unified dislocation density-based model can nicely reproduce hot deformation behavior, DRX kinetics, and grain size evolution in wide scope of initial grain size, strain rate, and deformation temperature. Moreover, the developed unified dislocation density-based model is well employed to analyze the time-variant forming processes of the studied superalloy.

  8. Dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding as the major deformation mechanism of olivine in the Earth’s upper mantle

    PubMed Central

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the deformation mechanisms of olivine is important for addressing the dynamic processes in Earth’s upper mantle. It has been thought that dislocation creep is the dominant mechanism because of extrapolated laboratory data on the plasticity of olivine at pressures below 0.5 GPa. However, we found that dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding (DisGBS), rather than dislocation creep, dominates the deformation of olivine under middle and deep upper mantle conditions. We used a deformation-DIA apparatus combined with synchrotron in situ x-ray observations to study the plasticity of olivine aggregates at pressures up to 6.7 GPa (that is, ~200-km depth) and at temperatures between 1273 and 1473 K, which is equivalent to the conditions in the middle region of the upper mantle. The creep strength of olivine deforming by DisGBS is apparently less sensitive to pressure because of the competing pressure-hardening effect of the activation volume and pressure-softening effect of water fugacity. The estimated viscosity of olivine controlled by DisGBS is independent of depth and ranges from 1019.6 to 1020.7 Pa·s throughout the asthenospheric upper mantle with a representative water content (50 to 1000 parts per million H/Si), which is consistent with geophysical viscosity profiles. Because DisGBS is a grain size–sensitive creep mechanism, the evolution of the grain size of olivine is an important process controlling the dynamics of the upper mantle. PMID:26601281

  9. Fields induced by three-dimensional dislocation loops in anisotropic magneto-electro-elastic bimaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xueli; Pan, Ernie; Sangghaleh, Ali

    2013-08-01

    The coupled elastic, electric and magnetic fields produced by an arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional dislocation loop in general anisotropic magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) bimaterials are derived. First, we develop line-integral expressions for the fields induced by a general dislocation loop. Then, we obtain analytical solutions for the fields, including the extended Peach-Koehler force, due to some useful dislocation segments such as straight line and elliptic arc. The present solutions contain the piezoelectric, piezomagnetic and purely elastic solutions as special cases. As numerical examples, the fields induced by a square and an elliptic dislocation loop in MEE bimaterials are studied. Our numerical results show the coupling effects among different fields, along with various interesting features associated with the dislocation and interface.

  10. The breakdown of superlubricity by driving-induced commensurate dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Benassi, A.; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, M.; Vanossi, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of a Frenkel-Kontorova-like model, we address the robustness of the superlubricity phenomenon in an edge-driven system at large scales, highlighting the dynamical mechanisms leading to its failure due to the slider elasticity. The results of the numerical simulations perfectly match the length critical size derived from a parameter-free analytical model. By considering different driving and commensurability interface configurations, we explore the distinctive nature of the transition from superlubric to high-friction sliding states which occurs above the critical size, discovering the occurrence of previously undetected multiple dissipative jumps in the friction force as a function of the slider length. These driving-induced commensurate dislocations in the slider are then characterized in relation to their spatial localization and width, depending on the system parameters. Setting the ground to scale superlubricity up, this investigation provides a novel perspective on friction and nanomanipulation experiments and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing high-tech devices with specific superlow frictional features. PMID:26553308

  11. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal–metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. A dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with our experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts the strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.

  12. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal–metal composites

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. A dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with our experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts themore » strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.« less

  13. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal-metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. In this article, a dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with the experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts the strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.

  14. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  15. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture.

  16. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture. PMID:23828093

  17. Dislocations and deformation microstructure in a B2-ordered Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy.

    PubMed

    Feuerbacher, Michael

    2016-07-19

    High-entropy alloys are multicomponent metallic materials currently attracting high research interest. They display a unique combination of chemical disorder and crystalline long-range order, and due to their attractive properties are promising candidates for technological application. Many high-entropy alloys possess surprisingly high strength, occasionally in combination with high ductility and low density. The mechanisms effecting these attractive mechanical properties are not understood. This study addresses the deformation mechanism of a Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy, which is a two-phase material, consisting of a B2-ordered matrix and disordered body-centred inclusions. We quantitatively analyse the microstructure and dislocations in deformed samples by transmission-electron-microscopic methods including weak-beam imaging and convergent-beam electron diffraction. We find that the deformation process in the B2 phase is dominated by heterogeneous slip of screw dislocations gliding on planes. The dislocations are perfect superdislocations of the B2 lattice and show no dissociation. This indicates that the antiphase-boundary energy in the structure is very high, inhibiting spread of the dislocation core. Along with the observation of a widely extending strain field associated to the dislocations, our results provide a possible explanation for the high strength of this high-entropy alloy as a direct consequence of its dislocation structure.

  18. Dislocations and deformation microstructure in a B2-ordered Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerbacher, Michael

    2016-07-01

    High-entropy alloys are multicomponent metallic materials currently attracting high research interest. They display a unique combination of chemical disorder and crystalline long-range order, and due to their attractive properties are promising candidates for technological application. Many high-entropy alloys possess surprisingly high strength, occasionally in combination with high ductility and low density. The mechanisms effecting these attractive mechanical properties are not understood. This study addresses the deformation mechanism of a Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy, which is a two-phase material, consisting of a B2-ordered matrix and disordered body-centred inclusions. We quantitatively analyse the microstructure and dislocations in deformed samples by transmission-electron-microscopic methods including weak-beam imaging and convergent-beam electron diffraction. We find that the deformation process in the B2 phase is dominated by heterogeneous slip of screw dislocations gliding on planes. The dislocations are perfect superdislocations of the B2 lattice and show no dissociation. This indicates that the antiphase-boundary energy in the structure is very high, inhibiting spread of the dislocation core. Along with the observation of a widely extending strain field associated to the dislocations, our results provide a possible explanation for the high strength of this high-entropy alloy as a direct consequence of its dislocation structure.

  19. Dislocations and deformation microstructure in a B2-ordered Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy

    PubMed Central

    Feuerbacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    High-entropy alloys are multicomponent metallic materials currently attracting high research interest. They display a unique combination of chemical disorder and crystalline long-range order, and due to their attractive properties are promising candidates for technological application. Many high-entropy alloys possess surprisingly high strength, occasionally in combination with high ductility and low density. The mechanisms effecting these attractive mechanical properties are not understood. This study addresses the deformation mechanism of a Al28Co20Cr11Fe15Ni26 high-entropy alloy, which is a two-phase material, consisting of a B2-ordered matrix and disordered body-centred inclusions. We quantitatively analyse the microstructure and dislocations in deformed samples by transmission-electron-microscopic methods including weak-beam imaging and convergent-beam electron diffraction. We find that the deformation process in the B2 phase is dominated by heterogeneous slip of screw dislocations gliding on planes. The dislocations are perfect superdislocations of the B2 lattice and show no dissociation. This indicates that the antiphase-boundary energy in the structure is very high, inhibiting spread of the dislocation core. Along with the observation of a widely extending strain field associated to the dislocations, our results provide a possible explanation for the high strength of this high-entropy alloy as a direct consequence of its dislocation structure. PMID:27430993

  20. Shock-induced deformation of nanocrystalline Al: Characterization with orientation mapping and selected area electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; E, J. C.; Cai, Y.; Zhao, F.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate shock-induced deformation of columnar nanocrystalline Al with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations and implement orientation mapping (OM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) for microstructural analysis. Deformation mechanisms include stacking fault formation, pronounced twinning, dislocation slip, grain boundary (GB) sliding and migration, and lattice or partial grain rotation. GBs and GB triple junctions serve as the nucleation sites for crystal plasticity including twinning and dislocations, due to GB weakening, and stress concentrations. Grains with different orientations exhibit different densities of twins or stacking faults nucleated from GBs. GB migration occurs as a result of differential deformation between two grains across the GB. High strain rates, appropriate grain orientation and GBs contribute to deformation twinning. Upon shock compression, intra-grain dislocation and twinning nucleated from GBs lead to partial grain rotation and the formation of subgrains, while whole grain rotation is not observed. During tension, stress gradients associated with the tensile pulse give rise to intra-grain plasticity and then partial grain rotation. The simulated OM and SAED are useful to describe lattice/grain rotation, the formation of subgrains, GB migration and other microstructures.

  1. Surgical correction of metatarsophalangeal joint dislocation and arthritic deformity: the partial head and plantar condylectomy.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, F D

    1979-01-01

    The partial head and plantar condylectomy has been presented as a procedure indicated in the correction of dislocated metatarsophalangeal joints. Although there may be a number of causes of dislocation, the surgical correction is the same. A skin plasty is useful in preventing a cocked-up toe, and this is performed at the plantar aspect of the base of the toe. A V-osteotomy, or other metatarsal dorsiflectory procedure, is recommended when the neighboring metatarsal is only slightly plantar flexed or greater. This prevents the occurrence of transfer lesions so commonly associated with this procedure. Two case studies have been presented demonstrating successful results when the procedure is performed on both the second and third metatarsophalangeal joints. We contend that the partial head and plantar condylectomy is a valuable procedure in reconstructive surgery of the foot. PMID:263016

  2. Gravitational effects of process-induced dislocations in silicon. [during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Matters pertaining to semiconductor device fabrication were studied in terms of the influence of gravity on the production of dislocations in silicon wafers during thermal cycling in a controlled ambient where no impurities are present and oxidation is minimal. Both n-type and p-type silicon wafers having a diameter of 1.25 in to 1.5 in, with fixed orientation and resistivity values, were used. The surface dislocation densities were measured quantitatively by the Sirtl etch technique. The results show two significant features of the plastic flow phenomenon as it is related to gravitational stress: (1) the density of dislocations generated during a given thermal cycle is directly related to the duration of the cycle; and (2) the duration of the thermal cycle required to produce a given dislocation density is inversely related to the equilibrium temperature. Analysis of the results indicates that gravitational stress is instrumental in process-induced defect generation.

  3. Stress induced roughening of superclimbing dislocation in solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinikava, Darya; Kuklov, Anatoly

    2011-03-01

    We investigate numerically superclimb of dislocation in solid 4 He biased by externally imposed chemical potential μ . The effective action takes into account quantum phase slips in the core superfluid as well as the core displacement in Peierls potential within the Granato-Lücke string model. The bias produces stress on the core and this can result in dislocation roughening. Such roughening is characterized by hysteretic behavior at temperatures (T) below some threshold Thyst . At T >Thyst strongresonantpeaksdevelopinthedislocationdifferentialresponse . Thesepeaksexhibitperiodicbehaviorvs μ, with the period determined by Peierls potential and dislocation length. We explain these effects by thermally assisted tunneling of jog-antijog pairs across the barrier created by Peierls potential and the bias. Since superclimbing is controlled by core superflow, speed of sound along the superfluid core exhibits dip-like features at the peak positions. We propose that this effect is seen in the mass transport experiment. We acknowledge support by NSF, grants PHY1005527 and PHY0653135,and by CUNY, grant 63071-00 41.

  4. Molecular-dynamics simulations of stacking-fault-induced dislocation annihilation in prestrained ultrathin single-crystalline copper films

    SciTech Connect

    Kolluri, Kedarnath; Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2009-05-01

    We report results of large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of dynamic deformation under biaxial tensile strain of prestrained single-crystalline nanometer-scale-thick face-centered cubic (fcc) copper films. Our results show that stacking faults, which are abundantly present in fcc metals, may play a significant role in the dissociation, cross slip, and eventual annihilation of dislocations in small-volume structures of fcc metals. The underlying mechanisms are mediated by interactions within and between extended dislocations that lead to annihilation of Shockley partial dislocations or formation of perfect dislocations. Our findings demonstrate dislocation starvation in small-volume structures with ultrathin film geometry, governed by a mechanism other than dislocation escape to free surfaces, and underline the significant role of geometry in determining the mechanical response of metallic small-volume structures.

  5. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  6. Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Lu, W.; Sun Dai; He, L.L.; Ye, H.Q.

    2010-11-15

    Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The dislocations appearing at the tip of deformation-induced {gamma} plate (DI-{gamma}) and the stacking sequence change of the {alpha}{sub 2} matrix were two key evidences for determining the occurrence of the deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation. Compositional analysis revealed that the product phase of the room-temperature transformation was not standard {gamma} phase; on the contrary, the product phase of the high-temperature transformation was standard {gamma} phase.

  7. Change of deformation characteristics and dislocation substructure of nonferrous metals under influence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagulyaev, D. V.; Konovalov, S. V.; Shlyarov, V. V.; Anuchina, E. A.; Komissarova, I. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    The objects of the study were polycrystalline copper of M00b grade and commercially pure titanium BT1-0. Microindentation was carried out on the samples of titanium BT1-0 in the initial state, immediately after magnetic field exposure of 0.4 T and after certain time intervals. The defect substructure of cooper samples M00b, subjected to loading to failure in the creep mode under the influence of magnetic field of 0.35 T and without it, was investigated by the methods of electron diffraction microscopy. It was revealed that the effect of magnetic field exposure on commercially pure titanium BT1-0 leads to the decrease in microhardness with the subsequent stabilization during the time that depends on the processing parameters. And the effect of the magnetic field exposure on copper during the process of creeping results in the redistribution of dislocation substructure types. Also, there are changes in quantitative characteristics of dislocation substructures.

  8. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the

  9. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. I. Dislocation microstructures in as-received state and at different plastic strains

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R. Yao, Zhongwen

    2015-03-07

    Thin foil dog bone samples prepared from a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy have been deformed by tensile deformation to different plastic strains. The development of slip traces during loading was observed in situ through SEM, revealing that deformation starts preferentially in certain sets of grains during the elastic-plastic transition region. TEM characterization showed that sub-grain boundaries formed during hot rolling consisted of screw 〈a〉 dislocations or screw 〈c〉 and 〈a〉 dislocations. Prismatic 〈a〉 dislocations with large screw or edge components have been identified from the sample with 0.5% plastic strain. Basal 〈a〉 and pyramidal 〈c + a〉 dislocations were found in the sample that had been deformed with 1.5% plastic strain, implying that these dislocations require larger stresses to be activated.

  10. Deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Ti and Ni3Al in austenitic steels at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Shabashov, V. A.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Kozlov, K. A.; Kuznetsov, A. R.; Litvinov, A. V.; Pilyugin, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    An anomalous deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Al and Ni3Ti in the matrix of austenitic Fe-Ni-Al(Ti) alloys has been revealed in experiment at cryogenic temperatures (down to 77 K) under rolling and high pressure torsion. The observed phenomenon is explained as the result of migration of deformation-stipulated interstitial atoms from a particle into the matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. With increasing the temperature of deformation, the dissolution is replaced by the deformation-induced precipitation of the intermetallics, which is accelerated due to a sufficient amount of point defects in the matrix, gained as well in the course of deformation at lower temperatures.

  11. Investigation of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} by electron-beam-induced current and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Jianyong; Ito, Shun; Yi, Wei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2015-03-09

    This paper aims to clarify the electrical activities of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} substrates and the role of dislocations in the resistance switching phenomenon in Pt/SrTiO{sub 3} Schottky contacts. The electrical activities of dislocations have been studied by electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. EBIC has found that dislocations can exhibit dark or bright contrast depending on their character and band bending condition. The character of dislocations has been analysed based on chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy. These data suggested that not all the dislocations contribute to the switching phenomenon. The active dislocations for resistance switching were discussed.

  12. Investigation of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO3 by electron-beam-induced current and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Jianyong; Ito, Shun; Yi, Wei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to clarify the electrical activities of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrates and the role of dislocations in the resistance switching phenomenon in Pt/SrTiO3 Schottky contacts. The electrical activities of dislocations have been studied by electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. EBIC has found that dislocations can exhibit dark or bright contrast depending on their character and band bending condition. The character of dislocations has been analysed based on chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy. These data suggested that not all the dislocations contribute to the switching phenomenon. The active dislocations for resistance switching were discussed.

  13. Role of superposition of dislocation avalanches in the statistics of acoustic emission during plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Lebyodkin, M A; Shashkov, I V; Lebedkina, T A; Mathis, K; Dobron, P; Chmelik, F

    2013-10-01

    Various dynamical systems with many degrees of freedom display avalanche dynamics, which is characterized by scale invariance reflected in power-law statistics. The superposition of avalanche processes in real systems driven at a finite velocity may influence the experimental determination of the underlying power law. The present paper reports results of an investigation of this effect using the example of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying plastic deformation of crystals. Indeed, recent studies of AE did not only prove that the dynamics of crystal defects obeys power-law statistics, but also led to a hypothesis of universality of the scaling law. We examine the sensitivity of the apparent statistics of AE to the parameters applied to individualize AE events. Two different alloys, MgZr and AlMg, both displaying strong AE but characterized by different plasticity mechanisms, are investigated. It is shown that the power-law indices display a good robustness in wide ranges of parameters even in the conditions leading to very strong superposition of AE events, although some deviations from the persistent values are also detected. The totality of the results confirms the scale-invariant character of deformation processes on the scale relevant to AE, but uncovers essential differences between the power-law exponents found for two kinds of alloys.

  14. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  15. Exploring the limit of dislocation based plasticity in nanostructured metals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Hansen, N

    2014-04-01

    A twofold decrease to an unexplored scale of 5 nm was produced in Cu by applying a large sliding load in liquid nitrogen. Statistical and universal scaling analyses of deformation induced high angle boundaries, dislocation boundaries, and individual dislocations observed by high resolution electron microscopy reveal that dislocation processes still dominate. Dislocation based plasticity continues far below the transition suggested by experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, with a limit below 5 nm. Very high strength metals may emerge based on this enhanced structural refinement. PMID:24745438

  16. Silicon based light emitters utilizing radiation from dislocations; electric field induced shift of the dislocation-related luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguirov, T.; Mchedlidze, T.; Kittler, M.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2009-05-01

    Dislocation rich regions can be controllably formed at a certain location inside a silicon wafer. We studied the light emission properties of such regions located in an electric field of a p-n junction under different excitation conditions. It was found that the luminescence spectra of the dislocations are significantly influenced by the presence of the junction. The dislocation-related luminescence peak position appears red-shifted due to the built-in electric field. A suppression of that field by photo-generation of carriers or by applying a forward bias voltage at the junction leads to a gradual decrease in the energy position of the peaks. The dependence of the peak position on the electric field was found to be a quadratic function, similar to that observed for semiconductor nanostructures. We show that the shift of the peak position is due to the Stark effect on dislocation-related excitonic states. The characteristic constant of the shift, obtained by fitting the data with the quadratic Stark effect equation, was 0.0186 meV/(kV/cm) 2. The observed effect opens new possibilities for integration of a silicon based light emitter, combining the radiation from dislocations with a Stark effect based modulator.

  17. Morphology transition of deformation-induced lenticular martensite in Fe-Ni-C alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.M.; Li, D.F.; Xing, Z.S. . Inst. of Metal Research); Gautier, E.; Zhang, J.S.; Simon, A. . Lab. de Science et Genie des Materiaux Metalliques)

    1993-06-01

    The morphology and habit planes of deformation-induced lenticular martensite were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy in Fe-30Ni and Fe-30Ni-0.11C alloys. Transitions in morphology were observed with progressive deformation levels going from lenticular to butterfly martensite for the Fe-30Ni-0.11C alloy. The habit planes changed from (225)[sub f] or (259)[sub f] for the thermal lenticular martensite to (111)[sub f] for the strain-induced martensite. The morphology and crystallography of the small butterfly martensites was also investigated. A change in the orientation relationships from K-S to N-W relations was also observed. These changes were attributed to the contribution of mobile dislocations which modified the shear mode form twinning to slip, and to a plastic accommodation of transformation strains.

  18. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  19. Plasticity of Cu nanoparticles: Dislocation-dendrite-induced strain hardening and a limit for displacive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albe, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plastic behaviour of individual Cu crystallites under nanoextrusion is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Single-crystal Cu fcc nanoparticles are embedded in a spherical force field mimicking the effect of a contracting carbon shell, inducing pressure on the system in the range of gigapascals. The material is extruded from a hole of 1.1–1.6 nm radius under athermal conditions. Simultaneous nucleation of partial dislocations at the extrusion orifice leads to the formation of dislocation dendrites in the particle causing strain hardening and high flow stress of the material. As the extrusion orifice radius is reduced below 1.3 Å we observe a transition from displacive plasticity to solid-state amorphisation. PMID:23616936

  20. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements of hydrogen and deuterium trapping at dislocations in deformed single-crystalline Pd at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Brent J.; JU, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of hydrogen and deuterium trapped at dislocation defects in deformed single-crystalline Pd have been performed at 15, 100, and 200 K at total interstitial solute concentrations of order 10 3. This work supports recent incoherent inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the vibrational density of states of trapped hydrogen under similar concentration-temperature conditions [Heuser et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 214101 (2008)]. The measured net absolute macroscopic differential scattering cross sections have been fitted with a cylindrical form factor representing solute-decorated dislocation line segments. Generally, very little difference in the measured cross sections was observed with temperature for a given solute type, while a significant change was observed between hydrogen- and deuterium-loaded samples. The latter difference is understood within a cross-section model that takes into account the local lattice dilatation associated with solute segregation at dislocations. The application of the model cross section to the net PdH0.0013 SANS response yields an effective trapping radius of R 10 A and dislocation density of d 1010 cm 2. Analysis of the SANS response allowed the local trapped solute concentration ( 0.5 [H]/[Pd]) and volumetric dilatation (/ 1.1) to be determined with the constraint that the system locally satisfies the known lattice expansion of Pd hydride (i.e., Vegard s law).

  1. Dislocation density evolution during high pressure torsion of a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Wang, Y B; Ho, J C; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Ringer, S P; Zhu, Y T; Zhao, Y H; Lavernia, E J

    2009-01-01

    High-pressure torsion (HPT) induced dislocation density evolution in a nanocrystalline Ni-20wt.%Fe alloy was investigated using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Results suggest that the dislocation density evolution is different from that in coarse-grained materials. An HPT process first reduces the dislocation density within nanocrystalline grains and produces a large number of dislocations located at small-angle sub grain boundaries that are formed via grain rotation and coalescence. Continuing the deformation process eliminates the sub grain boundaries but significantly increases the dislocation density in grains. This phenomenon provides an explanation of the mechanical behavior of some nanostructured materials.

  2. Dislocation-obstacle interactions in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Blythe Gore

    Dislocation-obstacle interactions play a significant role in determining the mechanical response of a material. Because higher stresses are needed for dislocations to bypass obstacles, these interactions reduce dislocation mobility and increase the yield strength of a material, as well as improve the work-hardening rate and the resistance to coarsening. The phenomenon of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be advantageous, as in the case of particle-strengthening to increase the creep strength of a material, or disadvantageous, as in embrittlement of a metal due to radiation-induced defects. In order to accelerate the time from development to implementation of a new material, optimize production parameters, and accurately predict the behavior of a material while in service, it is necessary to develop robust material models based on fundamental physical inputs. Through careful experimentation, the nature of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be assessed, allowing key physical parameters to be identified and clarified. These can serve as the basis for developing new and accurate material models. This thesis examines two types of dislocation-obstacle interactions: dislocation-particle interactions during creep deformation, and dislocation-loop interactions during deformation at room temperature. Dislocation-particle interaction studies in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr, Al-4Mg-0.3Sc, and Al-0.3Sc showed that temperature, coherency, and particle size play a role in determining the dominant bypass mechanism, and that interactions are more complex than what is considered in current models. A new mechanism for elevated temperature bypass of particles during creep deformation was revealed, in which dislocations interact directly with the particle-matrix interface, altering the interfacial structure, and affecting subsequent dislocation interactions. These results are discussed in relation to macroscopic behavior in steady-state creep experiments. In addition, dislocation

  3. Parallel Dislocation Simulator

    2006-10-30

    ParaDiS is software capable of simulating the motion, evolution, and interaction of dislocation networks in single crystals using massively parallel computer architectures. The software is capable of outputting the stress-strain response of a single crystal whose plastic deformation is controlled by the dislocation processes.

  4. Dislocation formation in seed crystals induced by feedstock indentation during growth of quasimono crystalline silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trempa, M.; Beier, M.; Reimann, C.; Roßhirth, K.; Friedrich, J.; Löbel, C.; Sylla, L.; Richter, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work the dislocation formation in the seed crystal induced by feedstock indentation during the growth of quasimono (QM) silicon ingots for photovoltaic application was investigated. It could be shown by special laboratory indentation experiments that the formed dislocations propagate up to several millimeters deep into the volume of the seed crystal in dependence on the applied pressure of the feedstock particles on the surface of the seed crystal. Further, it was demonstrated that these dislocations if they were not back-melted during the seeding process grow further into the silicon ingot and drastically reduce its material quality. An estimation of the apparent pressure values in a G5 industrial crucible/feedstock setup reveals that the indentation phenomenon is a critical issue for the industrial production of QM silicon ingots. Therefore, some approaches to avoid/reduce the indentation events were tested with the result, that the most promising solution should be the usage of suitable feedstock particles as coverage of the seed.

  5. Plastic-Strain-Amplitude Dependence of Dislocation Structures in Cyclically Deformed <112>-Oriented Cu-7 at. pct Al Alloy Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. W.; Peng, N.; Wu, X. M.; Wang, Z. G.

    2014-08-01

    Dislocation structures in Cu-7 at. pct Al alloy single crystals cyclically deformed at different plastic strain amplitudes were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and compared with the results of Cu single crystals. It is found that the plastic strain amplitude γ pl has an obvious effect on the slip deformation mode, and consequently on the cyclic hardening behavior of Cu-7 at. pct Al alloy single crystals with an intermediate stacking fault energy. For instance, a high slip planarity ( i.e., only formation of planar-slip bands) contributes to the occurrence of a gentle cyclic hardening with a much lower saturation stress at a low γ pl of 4.5 × 10-4. A mixed planar/wavy-slip mode ( e.g., persistent Lüder's bands/wall-like microstructures) at an intermediate γ pl of 2.2 × 10-3 causes an obvious cyclic hardening up to a comparable saturation stress to that for the Cu single crystal. In contrast, the deformation mode is dominated by wavy slip ( e.g., ill-defined dislocation cells and walls) at the highest γ pl of 7.2 × 10-3, causing that its cyclic hardening curve is quite similar to that for the Cu single crystal; in this case, a slightly higher saturation stress level than that for the Cu single crystal is reached due to the additional solid solution strengthening.

  6. Thermal roughening of GaAs surface by dislocation-induced step-flow sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhundov, I. O.; Kazantsev, D. M.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Alperovich, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal roughening of epitaxial GaAs film surface is studied under anneals at temperatures 700-775 °C in the presence of a saturated Ga-As melt. Surface roughening consists in the formation of spiral “inverted pyramids” on the initially flat surface due to the step-flow sublimation induced by screw dislocations. The observed roughening indicates that, despite the presence of As and Ga vapors provided by the melt, the annealing conditions are shifted from equilibrium towards sublimation.

  7. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  8. Finite element model predictions of static deformation from dislocation sources in a subduction zone: Sensitivities to homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid, and half-space assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Dislocation models can simulate static deformation caused by slip along a fault. These models usually take the form of a dislocation embedded in a homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid half-space (HIPSHS). However, the widely accepted HIPSHS assumptions poorly approximate subduction zone systems of converging oceanic and continental crust. This study uses three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs) that allow for any combination (including none) of the HIPSHS assumptions to compute synthetic Green's functions for displacement. Using the 1995 Mw = 8.0 Jalisco-Colima, Mexico, subduction zone earthquake and associated measurements from a nearby GPS array as an example, FEM-generated synthetic Green's functions are combined with standard linear inverse methods to estimate dislocation distributions along the subduction interface. Loading a forward HIPSHS model with dislocation distributions, estimated from FEMs that sequentially relax the HIPSHS assumptions, yields the sensitivity of predicted displacements to each of the HIPSHS assumptions. For the subduction zone models tested and the specific field situation considered, sensitivities to the individual Poisson-solid, isotropy, and homogeneity assumptions can be substantially greater than GPS. measurement uncertainties. Forward modeling quantifies stress coupling between the Mw = 8.0 earthquake and a nearby Mw = 6.3 earthquake that occurred 63 days later. Coulomb stress changes predicted from static HIPSHS models cannot account for the 63-day lag time between events. Alternatively, an FEM that includes a poroelastic oceanic crust, which allows for postseismic pore fluid pressure recovery, can account for the lag time. The pore fluid pressure recovery rate puts an upper limit of 10-17 m2 on the bulk permeability of the oceanic crust. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Analysis of Obstacle Hardening Models Using Dislocation Dynamics: Application to Irradiation-Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, Cameron; Bertin, Nicolas; Capolungo, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation hardening in -iron represents a critical factor in nuclear reactor design and lifetime prediction. The dispersed barrier hardening, Friedel Kroupa Hirsch (FKH), and Bacon Kocks Scattergood (BKS) models have been proposed to predict hardening caused by dislocation obstacles in metals, but the limits of their applicability have never been investigated for varying defect types, sizes, and densities. In this work, dislocation dynamics calculations of irradiation-induced obstacle hardening in the athermal case were compared to these models for voids, self-interstitial atom (SIA) loops, and a combination of the two types. The BKS model was found to accurately predict hardening due to voids, whereas the FKH model was superior for SIA loops. For both loops and voids, the hardening from a normal distribution of defects was compared to that from the mean size, and was shown to have no statistically significant dependence on the distribution. A mean size approach was also shown to be valid for an asymmetric distribution of voids. A non-linear superposition principle was shown to predict the hardening from the simultaneous presence of voids and SIA loops.

  10. Electron beam induced current imaging of dislocations in Cd0.9Zn0.1Te crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ramesh M.; Muzykov, Peter G.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging of semi-insulating nuclear radiation detector grade cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal is reported in this paper. The correlation of the EBIC results with the results of defect delineating chemical etching suggests that the irregular shaped pattern in the EBIC image is due to agglomerates of dislocations in CZT crystal.

  11. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  12. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  13. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  14. Interaction of a screw dislocation with a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity with interface stresses under anti-plane deformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Schiavone, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We propose an elegant and concise general method for the solution of a problem involving the interaction of a screw dislocation and a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped, elastic inhomogeneity in which the contribution of interface/surface elasticity is incorporated using a version of the Gurtin-Murdoch model. The analytic function inside the arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity is represented in the form of a Faber series. The real periodic function arising from the contribution of the surface mechanics is then expanded as a Fourier series. The resulting system of linear algebraic equations is solved through the use of simple matrix algebra. When the elastic inhomogeneity represents a hole, our solution method simplifies considerably. Furthermore, we undertake an analytical investigation of the challenging problem of a screw dislocation interacting with two closely spaced nano-sized holes of arbitrary shape in the presence of surface stresses. Our solutions quite clearly demonstrate that the induced elastic fields and image force acting on the dislocation are indeed size-dependent. PMID:25294965

  15. Hall Conductivity in the Cosmic Defect and Dislocation Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Yang, Huan-Xiong; Fan, Hua-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Influences of topological defect and dislocation on conductivity behavior of charge carries in external electromagnetic fields are studied. Particularly the quantum Hall effect is investigated in detail. It is found that the nontrivial deformations of spacetime due to topological defect and dislocation produce an electric current at the leading order of perturbation theory. This current then induces a deformation on the Hall conductivity. The corrections on the Hall conductivity depend on the external electric fields, the size of the sample and the momentum of the particle.

  16. The role of <100> edge dislocations in nucleating radiation-induced colloid particles in sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Teutonico, L.J.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical program to investigate the role of dislocations in the nucleation of sodium colloids in irradiated rock salt has been outlined. As the first study in the investigation the interaction of radiation-produced defects with the <001> edge dislocation in rock salt, i.e., the edge dislocation in the principal slip system of NaCl, has been considered. The interaction potential between a symmetric defect and the <001> edge dislocation has been determined on the basis of anisotropic elasticity theory. The potential arises from the interaction between the long-range stress field of the dislocation and the displacements around the point defect. The corresponding flow lines, i.e., the lines along which the defects flow to the dislocation, have also been determined. In general, the flow lines are closed loops passing through the center of the dislocation. One of the novel features introduced by anisotropy is the possibility of open flow lines for certain elastic constant values. Along some of these open flow lines defects are attracted to the dislocation, whereas long others defects are repelled from the dislocation of common plane. 33 refs., 17 figs.

  17. Optically induced switching of nematic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Venkatesh, M.; Dhamayanthi, S.; Parasuraman, E.; Gopi, D.

    2013-12-01

    We consider a two coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) governing the dynamics of the self-focusing of laser light in a nematic liquid crystal system. This paraxial PDE models the interaction between optics and nematic by the propagation of a wave in a nonlinear medium. We invoke the Jacobi elliptic function method to solve the coupled PDE for solitary wave solutions. We establish the essential coupling between optical refraction and nematic deformation and evinces two of the most intriguing of the experimentally observed features undulation and filamentation of the beam. The play role of nematic anisotropy on the stability of the profile of solitons is explored.

  18. Plastic deformation and self diffusion in Y-CSZ single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Deock-Soo.

    1989-01-01

    Plastic deformation of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized cubic ZrO{sub 2} (Y-CSZ) single crystals was studied using the load-interruption technique during compression tests at 1400{degree}C. The crystals were oriented to activate the single slip system, (001)<110>. Slip trace analysis, dislocation etch pits and dislocation structure analysis gave the complete explanation of plastic behavior of this crystal. The very high work-hardening in the microplasticity region resulted from formation of sessile dipoles and loops. The yield drop in this crystal occurred by dislocation multiplication via the activation of secondary dislocation rather than by conventional dislocation multiplication. The plastic deformation continued by activating additional slip systems without appreciable work hardening at 1400{degree}C. Finally in the zero work hardening region, the dislocation nucleation rate was competitive with the annihilation rate keeping the constant dislocation density. The effect of temperature on the plastic deformation of this crystal was studied by compression tests between 1200 and 1500{degree}C. The results were in agreements with that of 1400{degree}C in that similar dislocation structures formed. However, the lower temperatures induced higher dislocation densities due to lower dislocation annihilation. The single crystals were also deformed using the different orientations to activate other slip systems. The effect of strain rate on the plastic deformation was studied at two different strain rates. Plastic deformation of Y-CSZ single crystals is strongly dependent on temperature, strain-rate, and orientation.

  19. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X. H.; Zheng, S. J.; Chen, D.; Jin, Q. Q.; Peng, Z. Z.; Ma, X. L.

    2016-07-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening.

  20. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy.

    PubMed

    Shao, X H; Zheng, S J; Chen, D; Jin, Q Q; Peng, Z Z; Ma, X L

    2016-01-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening.

  1. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, X. H.; Zheng, S. J.; Chen, D.; Jin, Q. Q.; Peng, Z. Z.; Ma, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening. PMID:27435638

  2. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy.

    PubMed

    Shao, X H; Zheng, S J; Chen, D; Jin, Q Q; Peng, Z Z; Ma, X L

    2016-01-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening. PMID:27435638

  3. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  4. Superplastic deformation induced by cyclic hydrogen charging

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schuh, Christopher A.; Dunand, David C.

    2008-05-15

    Deformation under the combined action of external stress and cyclic hydrogen charging/discharging is studied in a model material, titanium. Cyclic charging with hydrogen is carried out at 860 deg. C, which repeatedly triggers the transformation between hydrogen-lean {alpha}-Ti and hydrogen-rich {beta}-Ti. Due to bias from the externally applied tensile stress, the internal mismatch strains produced by this isothermal {alpha}-{beta} transformation accumulate preferentially along the loading axis. These strain increments are linearly proportional to the applied stress, i.e., flow is ideally Newtonian, at small stress levels (below {approx}2 MPa). Therefore, after multiple chemical cycles, a tensile engineering strain of 100% is achieved without fracture, with an average strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, which demonstrates for the first time that superplastic elongations can be achieved by chemical cycling. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure, cycle time, and external stress on the value of the superplastic strain increments is experimentally measured and discussed in light of a diffusional phase transformation model. Special attention is paid to understanding the two contributions to the internal mismatch strains from the phase transformation and lattice swelling.

  5. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  6. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  7. Defect-induced incompatability of elastic strains: dislocations within the Landau theory of martensitic phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Groger, Roman1; Lockman, Turab; Saxena, Avadh

    2008-01-01

    In dislocation-free martensites the components of the elastic strain tensor are constrained by the Saint-Venant compatibility condition which guarantees continuity of the body during external loading. However, in dislocated materials the plastic part of the distortion tensor introduces a displacement mismatch that is removed by elastic relaxation. The elastic strains are then no longer compatible in the sense of the Saint-Venant law and the ensuing incompatibility tensor is shown to be proportional to the gradients of the Nye dislocation density tensor. We demonstrate that the presence of this incompatibility gives rise to an additional long-range contribution in the inhomogeneous part of the Landau energy functional and to the corresponding stress fields. Competition among the local and long-range interactions results in frustration in the evolving order parameter (elastic) texture. We show how the Peach-Koehler forces and stress fields for any distribution of dislocations in arbitrarily anisotropic media can be calculated and employed in a Fokker-Planck dynamics for the dislocation density. This approach represents a self-consistent scheme that yields the evolutions of both the order parameter field and the continuous dislocation density. We illustrate our method by studying the effects of dislocations on microstructure, particularly twinned domain walls, in an Fe-Pd alloy undergoing a martensitic transformation.

  8. Imaging Dyke-Induced Deformation in the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, H.; Rivalta, E.; Wright, T. J.; O'Shea, K.; Hogg, D. C.; Boyle, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    The presence of a dike in Earth's crust can be inferred from a combination of seismological and geodetic techniques. Often, geodetic measurements (e.g. GPS and InSAR) of surface deformation near a dike are inverted for dike parameters using the equations for rectangular tensile dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous half-space, as presented in Okada (1985). Here, we create artificial dikes in the lab and simulate surface geodetic observations. Because the dike parameters are known, or can be directly observed, we are able to test the validity of standard geodetic models for dike injections. A fluid injection into gelatin is analogous to dike ascent driven by magma buoyancy in the crust; gelatin is an elastic medium (Menand and Tait, 2002) and away from the tip of a magma dike, strains are small, suggesting that deformation of the host rock may also be largely elastic (Delaney and Pollard, 1981). Gelatin has been used in several investigations into the propagation of fluid-filled cracks in the Earth's crust, including the shape and velocity of fluid-filled fractures (Takada, 1990; Dahm, 2000), propagation in layered media (Rivalta et al., 2005) and laccolith growth (Johnson and Pollard, 1973), among others. This study focuses on the deformation at the surface caused by this propagation. We seeded the upper surface of a homogeneous gelatin mass with markers and injected some fluid at the bottom of the gelatin container. We recorded the ascent of the resulting buoyancy-driven fluid-filled fracture from above with two camcorders and from the side with an additional camcorder. Surfaces markers were observed by the camcorders and tracked from one frame to the next. 3D positions were determined using photogrammetry after matching the markers. The resultant time series of surface deformation at each marker are analogous to continuous GPS observations from real dikes. The horizontal accuracy obtainable with HD camcorders was about 0.1 mm. We inverted the surface

  9. Texture of Nanocrystalline Nickel: Probing the Lower Size Limit of Dislocation Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Lutker, Katie; Raju, Selva Vennila; Yan, Jinyuan; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Lei, Jialin; Yang, Shizhong; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Mao, Ho-kwang; Williams, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    The size of nanocrystals provides a limitation on dislocation activity and associated stress-induced deformation. Dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is expected to become inactive below a critical particle size, which has been proposed to be between 10 and 30 nanometers according to computer simulations and transmission electron microscopy analysis. However, deformation experiments at high pressure on polycrystalline nickel suggest that dislocation activity is still operative in 3-nanometer crystals. Substantial texturing is observed at pressures above 3.0 gigapascals for 500-nanometer nickel and at greater than 11.0 gigapascals for 20-nanometer nickel. Surprisingly, texturing is also seen in 3-nanometer nickel when compressed above 18.5 gigapascals. The observations of pressure-promoted texturing indicate that under high external pressures, dislocation activity can be extended down to a few-nanometers-length scale.

  10. Compensation of Gravity-Induced Structural Deformations on a Beam- Waveguide Antenna Using a Deformable Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Moore, M.; Rochblatt, D. J.; Veruttipong, W.

    1995-01-01

    At the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) Goldstone Complex, a 34-meter- diameter beam-waveguide antenna, DSS-13, was constructed in 1988-1990 and has become an integral part of an advanced systems program and a test bed for technologies being developed to introduce Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies into the DSN. A method for compensating the gravity- induced structural deformations in this large antenna is presented.

  11. Strain-Induced Deformation in Magnesia-Alumina Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Soo; Lombardo, Stephen J; Winholtz, Robert A

    2008-06-18

    Ceramic beams are induced in situ to form complex shapes at elevated temperature without the application of an external stress. This process has been demonstrated for thin alumina substrates coated with a layer of magnesia. The internal strain causing the substrates to deform at elevated temperature arises as a consequence of strain mismatch accompanying the penetration of the coating into the substrate. The magnitude of the deformation depends on the amount of coating applied, on the thickness of the substrate, on the density of the substrate, and on the temperature. During exposure of the beams to elevated temperature, the magnesia coating reacts with the alumina substrate to form the spinel phase; the resulting volume change accompanying the phase transformation is likely the predominant driving force for deformation.

  12. Understanding Gas-Induced Structural Deformation of ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Ania, Conchi O; García-Pérez, E; Haro, M; Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J J; Valdés-Solís, T; Parra, J B; Calero, S

    2012-05-01

    ZIF-8 is a zeolitic imidazolate framework with very good thermal and chemical stability that opens up many applications that are not feasible by other metal-organic frameowrks (MOFs) and zeolites. Several works report the adsorption properties of ZIF-8 for strategic gases. However, despite the vast experimental corpus of data reported, there seems yet to be a dearth in the understanding of the gas adsorption properties. In this work we provide insights at a molecular level on the mechanisms governing the ZIF-8 structural deformation during molecular adsorption. We demonstrate that the ZIF-8 structural deformation during the adsorption of different molecules at cryogenic temperature goes beyond the gas-induced rotation of the imidazolate linkers. We combine experimental and simulation studies to demonstrate that this deformation is governed by the polarizability and molecular size and shape of the gases, and that the stepped adsorption behavior is defined by the packing arrangement of the guest inside the host. PMID:26288051

  13. Texture developed during deformation of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, M.; Shanta, C.; Asim, T.; Sushil, M.

    2015-04-01

    Automotive industry is currently focusing on using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) due to its high strength and formability for closure applications. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is promising material for this application among other AHSS. The present work is focused on the microstructure development during deformation of TRIP steel sheets. To mimic complex strain path condition during forming of automotive body, Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests were conducted and samples were deformed in servo hydraulic press to find the different strain path. FEM Simulations were done to predict different strain path diagrams and compared with experimental results. There is a significant difference between experimental and simulation results as the existing material models are not applicable for TRIP steels. Micro texture studies were performed on the samples using EBSD and X-RD techniques. It was observed that austenite is transformed to martensite and texture developed during deformation had strong impact on limit strain and strain path.

  14. Mechanisms of deformation-induced trace element migration in zircon resolved by atom probe and correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; van Riessen, Arie; Saxey, David W.; Johnson, Tim E.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Fischer, Sebastian; Prosa, Ty J.; Rice, Katherine P.; Reinhard, David A.; Chen, Yimeng; Olson, David

    2016-12-01

    The widespread use of zircon in geochemical and geochronological studies of crustal rocks is underpinned by an understanding of the processes that may modify its composition. Deformation during tectonic and impact related strain is known to modify zircon trace element compositions, but the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unresolved. Here we combine electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction and atom probe microscopy to investigate trace element migration associated with a ∼20 nm wide, 2° low-angle subgrain boundary formed in zircon during a single, high-strain rate, deformation associated with a bolide impact. The low-angle boundary shows elevated concentrations of both substitutional (Y) and interstitial (Al, Mg and Be) ions. The observed compositional variations reflect a dynamic process associated with the recovery of shock-induced vacancies and dislocations into lower energy low-angle boundaries. Y segregation is linked to the migration and localisation of oxygen vacancies, whilst the interstitial ions migrate in association with dislocations. These data represent the direct nanoscale observation of geologically-instantaneous, trace element migration associated with crystal plasticity of zircon and provide a framework for further understanding mass transfer processes in zircon.

  15. Corrigendum to "Electronic-structure study of an edge dislocation in Aluminum and the role of macroscopic deformations on its energetics" [Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 76 (2015) 260-275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sambit; Iyer, Mrinal; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Gavini, Vikram

    2016-10-01

    The studies reported in Section 3.1 on core size and core energetics were all conducted using finite-element meshes which had discretization errors of under 0.005 eV in the computed dislocation energies (Ed, refer to Eq. (8)). However, we have accidentally used a slightly coarser mesh for the study reported in Section 3.2 on the dependence of the dislocation core energy on macroscopic deformations. This issue came to light recently while conducting a follow-up study on interacting dislocations. Thus, we proceeded to repeat our study reported in Section 3.2 of the article with finite-element meshes that result in discretization errors under 0.005 eV. While the qualitative results reported in Section 3.2 of the manuscript change remain unchanged-i.e. there is a considerable dependence of the dislocation core-energy on macroscopic deformations, and the slopes corresponding to the core-energy dependence on macroscopic strains are non-zero at zero macroscopic strain-there are considerable quantitative changes. The new results are provided in Figs. 1-4 for the various macroscopic strains considered.

  16. Nonlinear resonance-assisted tunneling induced by microcavity deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojeong; Shin, Younghoon; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yang, Juhee; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Noncircular two-dimensional microcavities support directional output and strong confinement of light, making them suitable for various photonics applications. It is now of primary interest to control the interactions among the cavity modes since novel functionality and enhanced light-matter coupling can be realized through intermode interactions. However, the interaction Hamiltonian induced by cavity deformation is basically unknown, limiting practical utilization of intermode interactions. Here we present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling in a deformed two-dimensional microcavity. It is this tunneling mechanism that induces strong inter-mode interactions in mixed phase space as their strength can be directly obtained from a separatrix area in the phase space of intracavity ray dynamics. A selection rule for strong interactions is also found in terms of angular quantum numbers. Our findings, applicable to other physical systems in mixed phase space, make the interaction control more accessible. PMID:25759322

  17. Deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires governed by the sign and magnitude of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Kong, Deli; Xin, Tianjiao; Shu, Xinyu; Zheng, Kun; Xiao, Lirong; Sha, Xuechao; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Ze; Han, Xiaodong; Zou, Jin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires are investigated at the atomic scale with bending strain up to 12.8%. The sign and magnitude of the applied strain are found to govern their deformation mechanisms, in which the dislocation types (full or partial dislocations) can be affected by the sign (tensile or compressive) and magnitude of the applied strain. In the early stages of bending, plastic deformation is controlled by 60° full dislocations. As the bending increases, Lomer dislocations can be frequently observed. When the strain increases to a significant level, 90° partial dislocations induced from the tensile surfaces of the bent nanowires are observed. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effect of the sign and magnitude of the bending strain on the deformation mechanisms in bent Si nanowires.

  18. Dislocation-induced nanoparticle decoration on a GaN nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Qingyun; Huang, Nan; Qiu, Jianhang; Staedler, Thorsten; Liu, Baodan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    GaN nanowires with homoepitaxial decorated GaN nanoparticles on their surface along the radial direction have been synthesized by means of a chemical vapor deposition method. The growth of GaN nanowires is catalyzed by Au particles via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Screw dislocations are generated along the radial direction of the nanowires under slight Zn doping. In contrast to the metal-catalyst-assisted VLS growth, GaN nanoparticles are found to prefer to nucleate and grow at these dislocation sites. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis demonstrates that the GaN nanoparticles possess two types of epitaxial orientation with respect to the corresponding GaN nanowire: (I) [1̅21̅0]np//[1̅21̅0]nw, (0001)np//(0001)nw; (II) [1̅21̅3]np//[12̅10]nw, (101̅0)np//(101̅0)nw. An increased Ga signal in the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) profile lines of the nanowires suggests GaN nanoparticle growth at the edge surface of the wires. All the crystallographic results confirm the importance of the dislocations with respect to the homoepitaxial growth of the GaN nanoparticles. Here, screw dislocations situated on the (0001) plane provide the self-step source to enable nucleation of the GaN nanoparticles.

  19. Atomic-scale configurations of synchroshear-induced deformation twins in the ionic MnS crystal

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Xue, Y. B.; Chen, D.; Wang, Y. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Deformation twinning was thought as impossible in ionic compounds with rock-salt structure due to the charge effect on {111} planes. Here we report the presence and formation mechanism of deformation {111} twins in the rock-salt manganese sulphide (MnS) inclusions embedded in a hot-rolled stainless steel. Based on the atomic-scale mapping under aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, a dislocation-based mechanism involved two synchronized shear on adjacent atomic layers is proposed to describe the dislocation glide and consequently twinning formation. First-principles calculations of the energy barriers for twinning formation in MnS and comparing with that of PbS and MgO indicate the distinct dislocation glide scheme and deformation behaviors for the rock-salt compounds with different ionicities. This study may improve our understanding of the deformation mechanisms of rock-salt crystals and other ionic compounds. PMID:24874022

  20. Shock-induced deformation in wetted particle beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, Bradley J.; Petel, Oren E.; Frost, David L.; Higgins, Andrew J.; Ringuette, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The high-strain-rate response of granular media has received considerable attention due to increasing interest in granular penetration. In the present study, we investigate the response of wetted packed particle beds under varying flyer plate-induced shock loadings. We investigate the critical conditions for the onset of particle deformation in systems of spherical macroscopic glass beads. Resulting particle deformations from the shock compression are characterized using microscopy as well as particle size analysis, and the effects of shock strength are compared. A fracturing response with a bimodal particle distribution is observed, with an increasing shift to the lower particle size range as shock loading is initially increased. As the transmitted shock pressure exceeds 1 GPa, a significant decrease in the mean particle size is observed.

  1. Deformation field of the soft substrate induced by capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. L.; Nie, Z. X.; Jiang, W. G.

    2009-05-01

    Prediction on the deformation of a soft substrate induced by capillary force has been widely paid attention in the broad range of applications, such as metallurgy, material science, astronavigation, micro/nano-technology, etc., which is also a supplementary result to the classical Young's equation. We quantitatively analyzed the deformation of an elastic substrate under capillary force by means of the energy principle and the continuum mechanics method. The actual drop's morphology was investigated and was compared with that calculated based on the classical spherical shape assumption of the droplet. The displacement field of the substrate was obtained, especially, its singularity at the droplet edge was also discussed. The results are beneficial to engineering application and micro/nano-measurement.

  2. Cyclic-loading-induced Accumulation of the Geometrically Necessary Dislocations Near the Grain Boundaries of the Ni-Based Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Ice, Gene E; Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Yee-Lang; Kai, Ji-Jung; Liaw, Peter K

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy is subjected to cyclic loading. The fatigue-induced microstructure is characterized by novel polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and TEM. In-situ neutron strain measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage. Three-dimensional (3D) spatially-resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements demonstrate the development of local texture and formation of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron diffraction and TEM results.

  3. The computation of induced drag with nonplanar and deformed wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Smith, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The classical calculation of inviscid drag, based on far field flow properties, is reexamined with particular attention to the nonlinear effects of wake roll-up. Based on a detailed look at nonlinear, inviscid flow theory, it is concluded that many of the classical, linear results are more general than might have been expected. Departures from the linear theory are identified and design implications are discussed. Results include the following: Wake deformation has little effect on the induced drag of a single element wing, but introduces first order corrections to the induced drag of a multi-element lifting system. Far field Trefftz-plane analysis may be used to estimate the induced drag of lifting systems, even when wake roll-up is considered, but numerical difficulties arise. The implications of several other approximations made in lifting line theory are evaluated by comparison with more refined analyses.

  4. A simultaneous observation of dislocations in 4H-SiC epilayer and n+-substrate by using electron beam induced current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Zhao; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Yukari; Saitoh, Hiroaki; Danno, Katsunori; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kawai, Yoichiro; Shibata, Noriyoshi

    2011-06-01

    With a new structure of Ni/n-SiC/n+-SiC/Al, we have achieved a simultaneous observation of the dislocations in n-SiC epilayer and n+-SiC substrate by electron beam induced current (EBIC). The EBIC images were compared to the results of a depth-controlled wet etching in KOH+Na2O2. It has been found that each type of dislocations has its own signature in EBIC images in terms of the darkness, shape and orientation of the dark contrast. By changing the accelerating voltage of the electron beam, we can also observe the depth dependent presence of each type of dislocations and where and how the dislocation conversion happens.

  5. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  6. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  7. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  8. Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced transformation of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfi, Fahri R.; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced phase transformation of 304 stainless steel under tensile deformation has been studied. Pre-strain with the variation percentage of deformation was applied to the tensile test specimens. Tensile and hardness testing were carried out after pre-strain to study the mechanical properties change. Deformation induced phase transformation was investigated by using X-ray diffraction and optical microscope. XRD study indicates that metastable austenite transforms to martensite due to deformation. The martensite volume fraction increases with the increase in percentage of deformation. The increase in strength and hardness were associated with an increase in the volume fraction of martensite.

  9. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-02-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.

  10. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  11. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  12. Micro-plasticity of surface steps under adhesive contact: Part I—Surface yielding controlled by single-dislocation nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. H.; Shrotriya, P.; Gao, Y. F.; Kim, K.-S.

    2007-03-01

    Mechanics of nano- and meso-scale contacts of rough surfaces is of fundamental importance in understanding deformation and failure mechanisms of a solid surface, and in engineering fabrication and reliability of small surface structures. We present a micro-mechanical dislocation model of contact-induced deformation of a surface step or ledge, as a unit process model to construct a meso-scale model of plastic deformations near and at a rough surface. This paper (Part I) considers onset of contact-induced surface yielding controlled by single-dislocation nucleation from a surface step. The Stroh formalism of anisotropic elasticity and conservation integrals are used to evaluate the driving force on the dislocation. The driving force together with a dislocation nucleation criterion is used to construct a contact-strength map of a surface step in terms of contact pressure, step height, surface adhesion and lattice resistance. Atomistic simulations of atomic surface-step indentation on a gold (1 0 0) surface have been also carried out with the embedded atom method. As predicted by the continuum dislocation model, the atomistic simulations also indicate that surface adhesion plays a significant role in dislocation nucleation processes. Instabilities due to adhesion and dislocation nucleation are evident. The atomistic simulation is used to calibrate the continuum dislocation nucleation criterion, while the continuum dislocation modeling captures the dislocation energetics in the inhomogeneous stress field of the surface-step under contact loading. Results show that dislocations in certain slip planes can be easily nucleated but will stay in equilibrium positions very close to the surface step, while dislocations in some other slip planes easily move away from the surface into the bulk. This phenomenon is called contact-induced near-surface dislocation segregation. As a consequence, we predict the existence of a thin tensile-stress sub-layer adjacent to the surface within

  13. Development of regional liquefaction-induced deformation hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosinski, A.; Knudsen, K.-L.; Wu, J.; Seed, R.B.; Real, C.R.; ,

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes part of a project to assess the feasibility of producing regional (1:24,000-scale) liquefaction hazard maps that are based-on potential liquefaction-induced deformation. The study area is the central Santa Clara Valley, at the south end of San Francisco Bay in Central California. The information collected and used includes: a) detailed Quaternary geological mapping, b) over 650 geotechnical borings, c) probabilistic earthquake shaking information, and d) ground-water levels. Predictions of strain can be made using either empirical formulations or numerical simulations. In this project lateral spread displacements are estimated and new empirical relations to estimate future volumetric and shear strain are used. Geotechnical boring data to are used to: (a) develop isopach maps showing the thickness of sediment thatis likely to liquefy and deform under earthquake shaking; and (b) assess the variability in engineering properties within and between geologic map units. Preliminary results reveal that late Holocene deposits are likely to experience the greatest liquefaction-induced strains, while Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits are likely to experience significantly less horizontal and vertical strain in future earthquakes. Development of maps based on these analyses is feasible.

  14. Deformation-Induced Amorphization of Copper-Titanium Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, Philip Douglas

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu_{35}Ti _{65} and Cu_ {33.3}Ti_{66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi_2 was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering in close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries caused by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of the wear sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plane-view and cross -sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas. Some amorphous phase is

  15. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  16. Formation of Nanostructures in Severely Deformed High-Strength Steel Induced by High-Frequency Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Malet, L.; Gao, H.; Hermans, M. J. M.; Godet, S.; Richardson, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification by the generation of a nanostructured surface layer induced via ultrasonic impact treatment was performed at the weld toe of a welded high-strength quenched and tempered structural steel, S690QL1 (Fe-0.16C-0.2Si-0.87Mn-0.33Cr-0.21Mo (wt pct)). Such high-frequency peening techniques are known to improve the fatigue life of welded components. The nanocrystallized structure as a function of depth from the top-treated surface was characterized via a recently developed automated crystal orientation mapping in transmission electron microscopy. Based on the experimental observations, a grain refinement mechanism induced by plastic deformation during the ultrasonic impact treatment is proposed. It involves the formation of low-angle misoriented lamellae displaying a high density of dislocations followed by the subdivision of microbands into blocks and the resulting formation of polygonal submicronic grains. These submicronic grains further breakdown into nano grains. The results show the presence of retained austenite even after severe surface plastic deformation. The average grain size of the retained austenite and martensite is 17 and 35 nm, respectively. The in-grain deformation mechanisms are different in larger and smaller grains. Larger grains show long-range lattice rotations, while smaller grains show plastic deformation through grain rotation. Also the smaller nano grains exhibit the presence of short-range disorder. Surface nanocrystallization also leads to an increased fraction of low angle and low energy coincident site lattice boundaries especially in the smaller grains ( nm).

  17. Transient luminescence induced by electrical refilling of charge carrier traps of dislocation network at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Anton; Vyvenko, Oleg

    2014-02-21

    Dislocation network (DN) at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface is placed in space charge region (SCR) of a Schottky diode at a depth of about 150 nm from Schottky electrode for simultaneous investigation of its electrical and luminescent properties. Our recently proposed pulsed traps refilling enhanced luminescence (Pulsed-TREL) technique based on the effect of transient luminescence induced by refilling of charge carrier traps with electrical pulses is further developed and used as a tool to establish DN energy levels responsible for D1 band of dislocation-related luminescence in Si (DRL). In present work we do theoretical analysis and simulation of traps refilling kinetics dependence on refilling pulse magnitude (Vp) in two levels model: shallow and deep. The influence of initial charge state of deep level on shallow level occupation-Vp dependence is discussed. Characteristic features predicted by simulations are used for Pulsed-TREL experimental results interpretation. We conclude that only shallow (∼0.1 eV from conduction and valence band) energetic levels in the band gap participate in D1 DRL.

  18. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  19. Cyclic-loading-induced Accumulation of Geometrically Necessary Dislocations Near Grain Boundaries in an Ni-based Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya I.; Ice, Gene E.; Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Yee-Lang; Kai, Ji-Jung; Liaw, Peter K.

    2011-12-14

    In this study, the fatigue-induced microstructure produced in a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy that was subjected to cyclic loading was characterized by polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ neutron-diffraction measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage: cyclic hardening followed by cyclic softening. Three-dimensional spatially resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements find an increase in the density of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron-diffraction and TEM results.

  20. Cyclic-loading-induced accumulation of geometrically necessary dislocations near grain boundaries in a an ni-based superalloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. W.; Barabash, R. I.; Ice, G. I.; Liu, W.; Liu, Y. L.; Kai, J. J.; Liaw, P. K.; Univ.of Tennessee; ORNL; Tsing-Hua Univ.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue-induced microstructure produced in a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy that was subjected to cyclic loading was characterized by polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ neutron-diffraction measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage: cyclic hardening followed by cyclic softening. Three-dimensional spatially resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements find an increase in the density of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron-diffraction and TEM results.

  1. Microdiffraction Analysis of Hierarchical Dislocation Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R.I.; Ice, G.E.

    2007-12-19

    This article describes how x-ray microdiffraction is influenced by the number, kind, and organization of dislocations. Particular attention is placed on micro-Laue diffraction, where polychromatic x-rays are diffracted into characteristic Laue patterns that are sensitive to the dislocation content and arrangement. Diffraction is considered for various stages of plastic deformation. For early stages of plastic deformation with random dislocation spacing, the intensity in reciprocal space is redistributed about Laue spots with a length scale proportional to the number of dislocations within the sample volume and with a characteristic shape that depends on the kinds of dislocations and the momentum transfer vector. Unpaired dislocations that contribute to lattice rotations cause the largest redistribution of scattered intensity. In later stages of plastic deformation, strong interactions between individual dislocations cause them to organize into correlated arrangements. Here again, xray diffraction Laue spots are broadened in proportion to the number of excess (unpaired) dislocations inside the wall and to the total number of unpaired walls, but the broadening can be discontinuous. With microdiffraction it is possible to quantitatively test models of dislocation organization.

  2. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  3. Local decomposition induced by dislocation motions inside tetragonal Al(2)Cu compound: slip system-dependent dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Ma, X L

    2013-11-07

    Dislocations in a crystal are usually classified into several independent slip systems. Motion of a partial dislocation in monometallic crystals may remove or create stacking fault characterized with a partial of a lattice translation vector. However, it is recently known that motion of partial dislocations in complex structure, such as that inside an intermetallic Al2Cu compound, lead to a local composition deviation from its stoichiometric ratio and the resultant structure collapse. Here we report such a local decomposition behaviors are strongly dependent on slip system of dislocations. Under applied external stress, we have studied dislocation motion behaviors in the three independent slip systems of [001](110), [100]() and [110]() within tetragonal Al2Cu crystal by using molecular dynamics method. We found dislocation motions in all these slip systems result in local decomposition but their physical details differ significantly.

  4. Simulation and characterization of laser induced deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yajun

    2006-04-01

    Laser induced deformation processes include laser forming (LF) and laser shock processing. LF is a recently developed and highly flexible thermal forming technique, and laser shock processing is an innovative mechanical process in which shock waves up to 10GPa are generated by a confined laser ablation process. The generated high pressure imparts beneficial residual stress into the surface layer of metal parts as well as shapes thin metal parts. In laser forming, it has been known that microstructural evolution has an important effect on the deformation process, and that the typical thermal cycles in laser forming are much steeper than those in other thermal mechanical processes like welding and hot rolling. In this study, microstructural evolution in laser forming has been investigated, and a thermal-microstructural-mechanical model is developed to predict microstructural changes (phase transformations and recrystallization) and their effects on flow behavior and deformation. Grain structure and phase transformation in heat affected zone (HAZ) is experimentally characterized, and measurement of bending curvature also helps to validate the proposed model. Based on the similar methodology, two different materials have been studied: AISI 1010 low carbon steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In the case of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, the initial phase ratio of Ti-alpha and Ti-beta need to be measured by X-ray diffraction. In laser shock processing, under shock loading solid material behavior is fluidlike and shock-solid interactions play a key role in determining the induced residual stress distributions and the final deformed shape. In this work shock-solid interactions under high pressure and thus high strain rate in laser shock processing are studied and simulated based on conservation's law, equation of state and elastoplasticity of material. A series of carefully controlled experiments, including spatially resolved residual stress measurement by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and

  5. Dislocations and crowdions in two-dimensional crystals. Part III: Plastic deformation of the crystal as a result of defect movement and defect interaction with the field of elastic stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsik, V. D.; Smirnov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    A continuation of the theoretical study of the intrinsic properties of dislocation and crowdion structural defects in 2D crystals [V. D. Natsik and S. N. Smirnov, Fiz. Nizk. Temp. 40, 1366 (2014) and V. D. Natsik and S. N. Smirnov, Fiz. Nizk. Temp. 41, 271 (2015)]. The atomic lattice model of conservative (glide) and non-conservative (climb) defect movement is discussed in detail. It is shown that given a continuum description of the 2D crystal, an individual defect can be examined as a point carrier of plastic deformation, its value being determined by the topological charge, which is compliant with the crystal geometry defect parameters. It is found that the strain rate depends on the rate at which the defect center moves, as well as its topological charge. The elastic forces acting on the dislocation and crowdion centers in the field of applied mechanical stresses, and the forces of elastic interaction between defects, are calculated in terms of the linear theory of elasticity of a 2D crystal. The non-linear effect pertaining to the interaction between defects and bending deformation of the crystalline membrane, which is specific to 2D crystals, is also discussed.

  6. The inhibiting effect of dislocation helices on the stress-induced orientation of S' precipitates in Al–Cu–Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaobin; Deng, Yunlai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xinming

    2015-09-15

    The phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is investigated using a single-crystal of Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg alloy. Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg single-crystal specimens are subjected to stress aging, and the microstructure is analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is restrained owing to the dislocations produced by a higher stress. The effect of dislocations on the oriented precipitates depends on the total length of the intersection lines for precipitate habit planes and dislocation glide planes. This investigation not only provides important insight into solving the anisotropy problem attributed to precipitation strengthening, but also offers a benchmark for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys. - Highlights: • Single crystals of an Al–Cu–Mg alloy were prepared for the investigations. • A phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates was found. • The influence of dislocation helices on precipitation during stress-aging was studied. • Difference of orientation degree of S′ precipitates and θ′ precipitates was explained. • A basis for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys is provided.

  7. AC electric field induced droplet deformation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    PubMed

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Guo, Wei; Leniart, Michael; Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa

    2016-08-01

    We present for the first time an experimental study on the droplet deformation induced by an AC electric field in droplet-based microfluidics. It is found that the deformation of the droplets becomes stronger with increasing electric field intensity and frequency. The measured electric field intensity dependence of the droplet deformation is consistent with an early theoretical prediction for stationary droplets. We also proposed a simple equivalent circuit model to account for the frequency dependence of the droplet deformation. The model well explains our experimental observations. In addition, we found that the droplets can be deformed repeatedly by applying an amplitude modulation (AM) signal. PMID:27173587

  8. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  9. Electric field-induced deformation of polyelectrolyte gels

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    Water-swollen polyelectrolyte gels deform in an electric field. We observed that the sign and magnitude of the deformation is dependent on the nature of the salt bath in which the gel is immersed and electrocuted. These results are compatible with a deformation mechanism based upon creation of ion density gradients by the field which, in turn, creates osmotic pressure gradients within the gel. A consistent interpretation results only if gel mobility is allowed as well as free ion diffusion and migration.

  10. Nonlinear modeling and estimation of slew induced structural deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, T. A. W., III; Karray, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the nonlinear dynamics of a deformable maneuvering multibody system is described, whereby elastic deformation are modeled by restoring forces and dissipative forces at point mass appendages. This model is brought into bilinear form. Estimation of deformations occasioned by rapid slewing maneuvers is carried out by a filter based on a globally equivalent linear model of the bilinear dynamics, and is shown to be an improvement over the extended Kalman filter. To further alleviate the computational burden, the estimated deformation state is propagated between observations by a low dimensional operator spline interpolator of bilinear system Volterra series, which is easily implemented.

  11. Using transverse isotropy to model arbitrary deformation-induced anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    A unifying framework is developed for the analysis of brittle materials. Heretofore diverse classes of models result from different choices for unspecified coefficient and distribution functions in the unified theory. Material response is described in terms of expectation integrals of transverse symmetry tensors. First, a canonical body containing cracks of all the same orientation is argued to possess macroscopic transverse isotropy. An orthogonal basis for the linear subspace consisting of all double-symmetric transversely-isotropic fourth-order tensors associated with a given material vector is introduced and applied to deduce the explicit functional dependence of the compliance of such contrived materials on the shared crack orientation. A principle of superposition of strain rates is used to write the compliance for a more realistic material consisting of cracks of random size and orientation as an expectation integral of the transverse compliance for each orientation times the joint distribution function for the size and orientation. Utilizing an evolving (initially exponential) size- dependence in the joint distribution, the general theory gives unprecedented agreement with measurements of the dynamic response of alumina to impact loading, especially upon release where the calculations predict the development of considerable deformation- induced anisotropy, challenging the conventional notion of shocks as isotropic phenomena.

  12. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were carried out in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (2 mm) to the surface of the cleaved specimen. The dislocation-etch-pit patterns induced by cavitation were examined and compared with that of microhardness indentations. The results revealed that dislocation-etch-pit patterns around hardness indentations contain both screw and edge dislocations, while the etch-pit patterns on the surface exposed to cavitation contain only screw dislocations. During cavitation, deformation occurred in a thin surface layer, accompanied by work-hardening of the ceramic. The row of screw dislocations underwent a stable growth, which was analyzed crystallographically.

  13. Particle-Based Simulation of Shock-Induced Deformation of Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Nakayama, K.

    Shock-induced deformations of solid bodies are of practical interest to those who are concerned with explosive processing of materials, demolition of buildings, precautions against accidental explosions, etc. In order to simulate the shock-induced deformations of solid bodies, a large number of numerical codes based on continuum mechanics, which are called hydrocodes, have been developed so far [1, 2]. When the amount of deformation is relatively small, Lagrangian hydrocodes have been used to simulate the dynamic response of shock-loaded materials. When the deformation is large, Eulerian hydrocodes have been utilized instead. This is because the computational grids distorted along with the deformation of materials in the Lagrangian approach make the simulations either inaccurate or unstable, while the Eulerian approach where grids are fixed in space can handle such large deformations of materials. On the contrary, material interfaces that are precisely defined in the Lagrangian approach are not traced exactly in the Eulerian one.

  14. Deformation behaviour and 6H-LPSO structure formation at nanoindentation in lamellar high Nb containing TiAl alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Xu, X. J.; Peng, C.; Wang, Y. L.; Liang, Y. F.; Shang, S. L.; Liu, Z. K.; Lin, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    Microstructure and deformation mechanisms at a nanoindentation in the lamellar colony of high Nb containing TiAl alloy have been studied using the focused ion beam and the transmission electron microscopy. Considerable deformation twins are observed around the nanoindentation, and a strain gradient is generated. A continuous change in the bending angle of the lamellar structure can be derived, and a strain-induced grain refinement process is observed as various active deformations split the γ grains into subgrains. In addition to all possible deformation mechanisms (ordinary dislocation, super-dislocation and deformation twining) activated due to the heavy plastic deformation, a 6-layer hexagonal (6H) long-period stacking ordered structure is identified for the first time near the contact zone and is thought to be closely related to the glide of partial dislocations.

  15. Response properties of axion insulators and Weyl semimetals driven by screw dislocations and dynamical axion strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the theory of dynamical axion strings emerging from chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals. The chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken by a charge density wave (CDW) order which opens an energy gap and converts the Weyl semimetal into an axion insulator. Indeed, the phase fluctuations of the CDW order parameter act as a dynamical axion field θ (x ⃗,t ) and couple to electromagnetic field via Lθ=θ/(x ⃗,t ) 32 π2 ɛσ τ ν μFσ τFν μ. Additionally, when the axion insulator is coupled to deformations of the background geometry/strain fields via torsional defects, e.g., screw dislocations, there is interesting interplay between the crystal dislocations and dynamical axion strings. For example, the screw dislocation traps axial charge, and there is a Berry phase accumulation when an axion string (which carries axial flux) is braided with a screw dislocation. In addition, a cubic coupling between the axial current and the geometry fields is nonvanishing and indicates a Berry phase accumulation during a particular three-loop braiding procedure where a dislocation loop is braided with another dislocation and they are both threaded by an axion string. We also observe a chiral magnetic effect induced by a screw dislocation density in the absence of a nodal energy imbalance between Weyl points and describe an additional chiral geometric effect and a geometric Witten effect.

  16. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms. PMID:26871192

  17. Mobility Laws in Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V

    2003-10-21

    Prediction of the plastic deformation behavior of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, to establish a statistically representative model of crystal plasticity. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss an important ingredient of this code--the mobility laws dictating the behavior of individual dislocations. They are materials input for DD simulations and are constructed based on the understanding of dislocation motion at the atomistic level.

  18. Dislocation patterning in a two-dimensional continuum theory of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groma, István; Zaiser, Michael; Ispánovity, Péter Dusán

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the spontaneous emergence of dislocation patterns during plastic deformation is a long standing challenge in dislocation theory. During the past decades several phenomenological continuum models of dislocation patterning were proposed, but few of them (if any) are derived from microscopic considerations through systematic and controlled averaging procedures. In this paper we present a two-dimensional continuum theory that is obtained by systematic averaging of the equations of motion of discrete dislocations. It is shown that in the evolution equations of the dislocation densities diffusionlike terms neglected in earlier considerations play a crucial role in the length scale selection of the dislocation density fluctuations. It is also shown that the formulated continuum theory can be derived from an averaged energy functional using the framework of phase field theories. However, in order to account for the flow stress one has in that case to introduce a nontrivial dislocation mobility function, which proves to be crucial for the instability leading to patterning.

  19. Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle at acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joint is an uncommon traumatic injury. The conservative treatments adopted in the past is associated with redislocation dysfunction and deformity. A 41 years old lady with bipolar dislocation of right shoulder is treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation by oblique T-plate at sternoclavicular joint and Kirschner wire stabilization at acromioclavicular joint. The patient showed satisfactory recovery with full range of motion of the right shoulder and normal muscular strength. The case reported in view of rarity and at 2 years followup. PMID:23325981

  20. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  1. Mesoscale modeling of dislocations in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Koslowski, Marisol

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the inelastic deformation of molecular crystals is of fundamental importance to the modeling of the processing of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry as well as to the initiation of detonation in high energy density materials. In this work, we present dislocation dynamics simulations of the deformation of two molecular crystals of interest in the pharmaceutical industry, sucrose and paracetamol. The simulations calculate the yield stress of sucrose and paracetamol in good agreement with experimental observation and predict the anisotropy in the mechanical response observed in these materials. Our results show that dislocation dynamics is an effective tool to study plastic deformation in molecular crystals.

  2. Theory of interacting dislocations on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Paulose, Jayson; Nelson, David R.

    2013-04-01

    We study the mechanics and statistical physics of dislocations interacting on cylinders, motivated by the elongation of rod-shaped bacterial cell walls and cylindrical assemblies of colloidal particles subject to external stresses. The interaction energy and forces between dislocations are solved analytically, and analyzed asymptotically. The results of continuum elastic theory agree well with numerical simulations on finite lattices even for relatively small systems. Isolated dislocations on a cylinder act like grain boundaries. With colloidal crystals in mind, we show that saddle points are created by a Peach-Koehler force on the dislocations in the circumferential direction, causing dislocation pairs to unbind. The thermal nucleation rate of dislocation unbinding is calculated, for an arbitrary mobility tensor and external stress, including the case of a twist-induced Peach-Koehler force along the cylinder axis. Surprisingly rich phenomena arise for dislocations on cylinders, despite their vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  3. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal andmore » also identifies dislocation junctions.« less

  4. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal and also identifies dislocation junctions.

  5. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  6. Monitoring of deformation induced microcracking in polycrystalline NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, A.; Schietinger, B.; Bidlingmaier, T.; Zalkind, H.; Arzt, E.

    1995-08-01

    Microcracking in polycrystalline near-stoichiometric NiAl produced by room temperature plastic deformation under uniaxial compression was investigated by means of optical microscopy, velocity of sound measurements, and acoustic emission monitoring. Results show that strains greater than 2% are required to produce microcrack populations which can be evaluated by microscopical investigation or velocity of sound measurements. However, acoustic emission monitoring during compression testing indicates that microcracking starts at about 0.7% compressive plastic strain which is identical with the typical tensile fracture strain for NiAl. Thus it is concluded that there is little or no stable microcracking prior to failure in tension. Acoustic emission results show also that the process of microcracking does not primarily occur during the applied compressive deformation. A considerable fraction of the microcracking takes place during the quasi-elastic unloading following deformation.

  7. Hot deformation induced defects and performance enhancement in FeSb{sub 2} thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yongzheng; Fu, Chenguang; Zhu, Tiejun E-mail: zhaoxb@zju.edu.cn; Hu, Lipeng; Jiang, Guangyu; Zhao, Xinbing E-mail: zhaoxb@zju.edu.cn; Zhao, Guanghui; Huo, Dexuan

    2013-11-14

    The effect of hot deformation induced defects and texture on thermoelectric properties of FeSb{sub 2} bulk crystals has been investigated. The transport properties of the samples along both parallel and perpendicular direction of pressing were measured from 3 K to 300 K. The results showed that thermal conductivity of the deformed samples was significantly reduced. After twice deformation, the thermal conductivity of the sample along the perpendicular direction of pressing was decreased to 4 W/mK, which was only one third of that before deformation. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed the presence of high density of lattice defects in the deformed samples. The lattice thermal conductivity was analyzed using the Debye-Callaway approximation, and the results showed that the deformation induced lattice imperfections play an important role in enhancing phonon scattering. In addition, both the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient exhibited a weak anisotropy in the deformed samples. The figure of merit ZT of the bulk FeSb{sub 2} was significantly improved from 0.010 to 0.021 after deformation.

  8. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  9. Annealing of deformed olivine single-crystals under 'dry' conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Stephan; Katsura, Tomoo

    2013-04-01

    -pressure assembly so that a particular slip system is activated. The assemblies were compressed to 3 GPa. The shear deformation was conducted at 1600 K. EBSD measurements indicate that the recovered crystals are single crystals and sub-grain formation did not occur in most cases. The second step is to anneal the samples under the same P-T conditions as those of the deformation experiments. Annealing experiments are also performed at ambient pressures at 1600 K. Dislocation density was measured by means of the oxidation decoration technique [3]. The samples were firstly polished and then oxidized at 1200 K for 50 min. The dislocations are preferably oxidized, so that presence of dislocation can be observed using SEM. First Results indicate that the dislocation density decreased by annealing by 1/4 with an annealing period of 10 h for dislocations with b = [001]. References [1] H. Jung and S. I. Karato. Water-induced fabric transitions in olivine. Science, 293(5534):1460-1463, 2001. [2] S. I. Karato, D. C. Rubie, and H. Yan. Dislocation recovery in olivine under deep upper mantle conditions: Implications for creep and diffusion. Journal of Geophysical Research, 98(B6):9761-9768, 1993. [3] D. L. Kohlstedt, C. Goetze, W. B. Durham, and J. V. Sande. New technique for decorating dislocations in olivine. Science, 191(4231):1045-1046, March 1976.

  10. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R.; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-14

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic < a > dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 degrees C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by < a > dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, {01 (1) over bar1}< 0 (1) over bar 12 > twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 degrees C.

  11. Internal stresses, dislocation mobility and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, G.

    1991-06-01

    The description of plastic deformation must take into account individual mechanisms and heterogeneity of plastic strain. Influence of dislocation interaction with forest dislocations and of cross slip are connected with the organization of dipole walls. The latter are described and their development is explained as a consequence of edge effects. Applications are discussed. La description de la déformation plastique doit prendre en compte les interactions individuelles des dislocations et l'hétérogénéité à grande échelle de la déformation plastique. Les interactions des dislocations mobiles avec la forêt de dislocations, le glissement dévié, ont pour effet la création de parois dipolaires. Celles-ci sont décrites et leur développement est appliqué à partir des effets de bord.

  12. Shear-Induced Deformation of Surfactant Multilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Caserta, Sergio; Guida, Vincenzo; Guido, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    Surfactant multilamellar vesicles (SMLVs) play a key role in the formulation of many industrial products, such as detergents, foodstuff, and cosmetics. In this Letter, we present the first quantitative investigation of the flow behavior of single SMLVs in a shearing parallel plate apparatus. We found that SMLVs are deformed and oriented by the action of shear flow while keeping constant volume and exhibit complex dynamic modes (i.e., tumbling, breathing, and tank treading). This behavior can be explained in terms of an excess area (as compared to a sphere of the same volume) and of microstructural defects, which were observed by 3D shape reconstruction through confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the deformation and orientation of SMLVs scale with radius R in analogy with emulsion droplets and elastic capsules (instead of R3, such as in unilamellar vesicles). A possible application of the physical insight provided by this Letter is in the rationale design of processing methods of surfactant-based systems.

  13. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  14. A Unified Material Description for Light Induced Deformation in Azobenzene Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Jonghoon; Oates, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Complex light-matter interactions in azobenzene polymers have limited our understanding of how photoisomerization induces deformation as a function of the underlying polymer network and form of the light excitation. A unified modeling framework is formulated to advance the understanding of surface deformation and bulk deformation of polymer films that are controlled by linear or circularly polarized light or vortex beams. It is shown that dipole forces strongly respond to polarized light in contrast to higher order quadrupole forces that are often used to describe surface relief grating deformation through a field gradient constitutive law. The modeling results and comparisons with a broad range of photomechanical data in the literature suggest that the molecular structure of the azobenzene monomers dramatically influences the photostrictive behavior. The results provide important insight for designing azobenzene monomers within a polymer network to achieve enhanced photo-responsive deformation. PMID:26437598

  15. Microchannel deformations due to solvent-induced PDMS swelling.

    PubMed

    Dangla, Rémi; Gallaire, François; Baroud, Charles N

    2010-11-01

    The compatibility of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels with certain solvents is a well known problem of soft lithography techniques, in particular when it leads to the swelling of the PDMS blocks. However, little is known about the modification of microchannel geometries when they are subjected to swelling solvents. Here, we experimentally measure the deformations of the roof of PDMS microchannels due to such solvents. The dynamics of impregnation of the solvents in PDMS and its relation to volume dilation are first addressed in a model experiment, allowing the precise measurement of the diffusion coefficients of oils in PDMS. When Hexadecane, a swelling solvent, fills a microchannel 1 mm in width and 50 μm in height, we measure that the channel roof bends inwards and takes a parabolic shape with a maximum deformation of 7 μm. The amplitude of the subsidence is found to increase with the channel width, reaching 28 μm for a 2 mm wide test section. On the other hand, perfluorinated oils do not swell the PDMS and the microchannel geometry is not affected by the presence of perfluorodecalin. Finally, we observe that the trajectories of droplets flowing in this microchannel are strongly affected by the deformations: drops carried by swelling oils are pushed towards the edges of the channel while those carried by non-swelling oils remain in the channel center. PMID:20848011

  16. Electric field-induced deformation of polydimethylsiloxane polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, T.; Stubblefield, J.; Ötügen, M. V.

    2012-08-01

    The deformation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) spheres under uniform external electric field was studied experimentally and analytically. In the experiments, ˜1 mm diameter PDMS spheres with base-to-curing-agent mixing ratios of 10:1 and 60:1 were exposed to uniform external electric field with varying magnitudes and poling durations. The spheres elongate along the electric field direction. For a given electric field strength, the sphere deformation is initially a time function but reaches a terminal strain value over a certain time period. This terminal strain value is larger for stronger external electric fields and larger PDMS mixing ratio spheres. At this state, the material is no longer poled and the surface charge distribution remains constant. In the analysis, an expression for the sphere deformation is obtained by modeling the PDMS as a linear elastic solid and solving the Navier equation along with Maxwell's equations for boundary conditions. The analysis takes into account the surface charge distribution and predicts well the experimental trends.

  17. Sound Emission of Rotor Induced Deformations of Generator Casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polifke, W.; Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The casing of large electrical generators can be deformed slightly by the rotor's magnetic field. The sound emission produced by these periodic deformations, which could possibly exceed guaranteed noise emission limits, is analysed analytically and numerically. From the deformation of the casing, the normal velocity of the generator's surface is computed. Taking into account the corresponding symmetry, an analytical solution for the acoustic pressure outside the generator is round in terms of the Hankel function of second order. The normal velocity or the generator surface provides the required boundary condition for the acoustic pressure and determines the magnitude of pressure oscillations. For the numerical simulation, the nonlinear 2D Euler equations are formulated In a perturbation form for low Mach number Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). The spatial derivatives are discretized by the classical sixth-order central interior scheme and a third-order boundary scheme. Spurious high frequency oscillations are damped by a characteristic-based artificial compression method (ACM) filter. The time derivatives are approximated by the classical 4th-order Runge-Kutta method. The numerical results are In excellent agreement with the analytical solution.

  18. Observation of Dislocation Dynamics in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B W; Robertson, I M; Jouiad, M; Lassila, D H; Lee, T C; Birnbaum, H K

    2001-08-21

    Deformation experiments performed in-situ in the transmission electron microscope have led to an increased understanding of dislocation dynamics. To illustrate the capability of this technique two examples will be presented. In the first example, the processes of work hardening in Mo at room temperature will be presented. These studies have improved our understanding of dislocation mobility, dislocation generation, and dislocation-obstacle interactions. In the second example, the interaction of matrix dislocations with grain boundaries will be described. From such studies predictive criteria for slip transfer through grain boundaries have been developed.

  19. Observation of dislocation dynamics in the electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B W; Robertson, I M; Jouiad, M; Lassila, D H; Lee, T C; Birnbaum, H K

    2001-01-17

    Deformation experiments performed in-situ in the transmission electron microscope have led to an increased understanding of dislocation dynamics. To illustrate the capability of this technique two examples will be presented. In the first example, the processes of work hardening in Mo at room temperature will be presented. These studies have improved our understanding of dislocation mobility, dislocation generation, and dislocation-obstacle interactions. In the second example, the interaction of matrix dislocations with grain boundaries will be described. From such studies predictive criteria for slip transfer through grain boundaries have been developed.

  20. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  1. Ultrafast electronic disorder in heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chunlei; Taylor, Antoinette J.

    2000-09-01

    Heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions of gold and silver are studied using 1.55-eV, 120-fs ultrashort laser pulses. The dynamics of the heating process is monitored by measuring the time evolution of the dielectric constants following optical excitation. Intensity-dependent dielectric constants in silver and gold show similarities with the photon-energy-dependent dielectric constants, which is shown to indirectly map out the degree of heat-induced electronic disorder in these noble metals. This observation strongly suggests that the heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions in metals are tied to the electronic disorder and band-structure collapse.

  2. [Observations on the deformability of erythrocytes in pregnancy-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ma, F X

    1989-05-01

    By using a model DXC-300 erythrocyte deformability (ED) test apparatus, we determined the indices of filtration (IF) in 34 cases of pregnancy induced hypertension, 27 normal pregnancies and 36 healthy women as control to reflect the deformability of their erythrocyte. The result showed that the IF of hypertensive pregnant women from 37 to 40 weeks was strikingly higher than that in the control and the ED was much less erythrocyte deformability defects the viscosity of blood, the blood flow, and the microcirculation. Therefore, we think that observations on the erythrocyte deformability may be of value in monitoring hydrokinetic and detecting altered microcirculation. ED may be used as a new index for monitoring pregnancy induced hypertension.

  3. [Observations on the deformability of erythrocytes in pregnancy-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ma, F X

    1989-05-01

    By using a model DXC-300 erythrocyte deformability (ED) test apparatus, we determined the indices of filtration (IF) in 34 cases of pregnancy induced hypertension, 27 normal pregnancies and 36 healthy women as control to reflect the deformability of their erythrocyte. The result showed that the IF of hypertensive pregnant women from 37 to 40 weeks was strikingly higher than that in the control and the ED was much less erythrocyte deformability defects the viscosity of blood, the blood flow, and the microcirculation. Therefore, we think that observations on the erythrocyte deformability may be of value in monitoring hydrokinetic and detecting altered microcirculation. ED may be used as a new index for monitoring pregnancy induced hypertension. PMID:2805937

  4. Identifying triggers for liquefaction-induced soft-sediment deformation in sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Geraint; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-04-01

    Triggers for liquefaction-induced soft-sediment deformation structures in sands include seismic shaking, effects of water waves, rapid sediment accumulation and groundwater movements. Many soft-sediment deformation structures are attributed to a seismic trigger, but the evidence is often variable and inconclusive. Liquefaction and its effects are reviewed in the context of earthquakes, other triggers and experiments. The interpretation of liquefaction-induced soft-sediment deformation structures comprises two key stages: recognising liquefaction as the deformation mechanism, and determining the trigger for liquefaction. The characteristics of sediment that has undergone liquefaction include the pervasive, ductile character of deformation, preservation of stratification, a gradual upward increase in the extent or complexity of deformation, possible water-escape structures in the upper parts of a liquefied horizon, a horizontal upper surface, and a distinctive grain fabric. Approaches to determining the trigger for liquefaction include those based on criteria and those based on the sedimentological and palaeoenvironmental context. Few of the criteria applied to seismic triggers are diagnostic and several are not applicable on the scale of single outcrops. Criteria are poorly developed for non-seismic triggers. A methodology is proposed for analysing soft-sediment deformation structures within their overall sedimentological and palaeoenvironmental context in order to refine and improve criteria for distinguishing the action of 'external' (allogenic) triggers, including earthquakes, from 'internal' (autogenic) triggers.

  5. Predictive Model for Temperature-Induced Deformation of Robot Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonyapak, Pranchalee

    The positioning accuracy and repeatability of a robot are critical for many industrial applications. Drift in repeatability can occur with changes in environmental and internal conditions, such as those seen with temperature-induced deformation. Thermal instability causes dimensional deformation, and a warm-up cycle is typically required to bring the robot to a thermally stable working condition. The elimination of warm-up cycles will ultimately enhance the positioning accuracy of the robots, their productivity, and reduce unnecessary energy consumption. The main objective of this research was to develop a robot controller algorithm that would provide, a priori, compensation for temperature-induced deformation associated with warm-up in robot mechanical systems. The research started at the fundamental stage of gaining insight into the thermal behaviour and corresponding temperature-induced deformation of simplified, i.e., one-dimensional, robot mechanical systems consisting of slender links and heat sources. The systems were studied using concomitant experimental, numerical and analytical models to provide cross-checking of the results. For the experimental model, the deformation was measured by tracking the drift of a laser diode spot across a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera chip. A non-contact measurement system consisting of an infrared camera, a CCD camera and a laser diode was developed to provide high accuracy measurement for the deformation. The numerical model was generated with a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analysis incorporating thermal effects due to conduction and convection. The models were tested with the analytical model that was further extended using a finite difference technique. Once the three models showed excellent agreement, it was possible to develop a controller algorithm. Deformations predicted by the finite difference model were used as input for a validation experiment of the compensation algorithm. Results of the

  6. Dislocations: do you want them moving or in 3D ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Patrick; Boioli, Francesca; Bollinger, Caroline; Idrissi, Hosni; Mussi, Alexandre; Clitton Nzogang, Billy; Schryvers, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Plastic deformation of minerals and rocks can be explained in most cases by the presence of crystal defects. Among those, dislocations represent the most efficient strain-producing actors of deformation. The physics of deformation by dislocations is complex since it is intrinsically multiscale. At the atomic scale, the dislocation core structure controls a fundamental property: their mobility. However, the plastic strain results from the collective behavior of dislocations which can be understood only at the mesoscopic scale. Multiscale numerical modeling has provided a lot of insights on these aspects in the recent years, also in mineral physics. These progress were calling for parallel developments in experiments and characterization. Here we present two studies on dislocations in olivine deformed under lithospheric conditions based in recent developments in transmission electron microscopy. We present plastic deformation experiments performed on olivine in situ, in the transmission electron microscope, at room temperature. The ductile behavior is made possible thanks to the very small size of the specimens (maximum dimension < 5μm) which are prepared by focused ion beam and strained in a special Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) device called push-to-pull (PI 95 TEM PicoIndenter from Hysitron). By performing experiments under constant load, the velocity of [001] screw dislocations has been measured as a function of stress. This mobility law has then been introduced in a Dislocation Dynamics model to determine the stress strain curves. We present also some recent developments on electron tomography of dislocations performed on olivine. The difficulty is here to keep diffraction conditions strictly constant over a wide range of tilt acquisitions. We present some examples obtained by imaging dislocations in weak-beam dark-field using precession electron diffraction. The analysis of dislocation microstructures in 3D is used to characterize dislocations glide

  7. Modeling of porous scaffold deformation induced by medium perfusion.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we tested the possibility of calculating permeability of porous scaffolds utilized in soft tissue engineering using pore size and shape. We validated the results using experimental measured pressure drop and simulations with the inclusion of structural deformation. We prepared Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Chitosan-Gelatin (CG) scaffolds by salt leaching and freeze drying technique, respectively. Micrographs were assessed for pore characteristics and mechanical properties. Porosity for both scaffolds was nearly same but the permeability varied 10-fold. Elastic moduli were 600 and 9 kPa for PCL and CG scaffolds, respectively, while Poisson's ratio was 0.3 for PCL scaffolds and ∼1.0 for CG scaffolds. A flow-through bioreactor accommodating a 10 cm diameter and 0.2 cm thick scaffold was used to determine the pressure-drop at various flow rates. Additionally, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a dynamic mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop matched the simulation results of PCL scaffolds. Simulations were extended to a broad range of permeabilities (10(-10) m(2) to 10(-14) m(2) ), elastic moduli (10-100,000 kPa) and Poisson's ratio (0.1-0.49). The results showed significant deviation in pressure drop due to scaffold deformation compared to rigid scaffold at permeabilities near healthy tissues. Also, considering the scaffold as a nonrigid structure altered the shear stress profile. In summary, scaffold permeability can be calculated using scaffold pore characteristics and deformation could be predicted using CFD simulation. These relationships could potentially be used in monitoring tissue regeneration noninvasively via pressure drop. PMID:24259467

  8. Temporal Effects of Mechanical Loading on Deformation-Induced Damage in Skeletal Muscle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stekelenburg, A.; Strijkers, G. J.; Rijpkema, J. J. M.; Baaijens, F. P. T.; Bader, D. L.; Nicolay, K.; Oomens, C. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading of soft tissues covering bony prominences can cause skeletal muscle damage, ultimately resulting in a severe pressure ulcer termed deep tissue injury. Recently, by means of an experimental-numerical approach, it was shown that local tissue deformations cause tissue damage once a deformation threshold is exceeded. In the present study, the effects of load exposure time and intermittent load relief on the development of deformation-induced muscle damage were investigated. The data showed that a 2 h loading period caused more damage than 10 min loading. Intermittent load reliefs of 2 min during a 2 h loading period had minimal effect on the evolution of skeletal muscle damage. In addition, a local deformation threshold for damage was found, which was similar for each of the loading regimes applied in this study. For short loading periods, these results imply that local tissue deformations determine whether muscle damage will develop and the exposure time influences the amount of tissue damage. Temporary load reliefs were inefficient in reducing deformation-induced damage, but may still influence the development of ischemia-induced damage during longer loading periods. PMID:20232152

  9. Vibration-induced elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lisheng; Hall, John L.; Ye Jun; Yang Tao; Zang Erjun; Li Tianchu

    2006-11-15

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of Fabry-Perot cavities used for state-of-the-art laser stabilization. Elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities with various shapes and mounting methods is quantitatively analyzed using finite-element analysis. We show that with a suitable choice of mounting schemes it is feasible to minimize the susceptibility of the resonator length to vibrational perturbations. This investigation offers detailed information on stable optical cavities that may benefit the development of ultrastable optical local oscillators in optical atomic clocks and precision measurements probing the fundamental laws of physics.

  10. Method to adjust multilayer film stress induced deformation of optics

    DOEpatents

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Montcalm, Claude

    2000-01-01

    A buffer-layer located between a substrate and a multilayer for counteracting stress in the multilayer. Depositing a buffer-layer having a stress of sufficient magnitude and opposite in sign reduces or cancels out deformation in the substrate due to the stress in the multilayer. By providing a buffer-layer between the substrate and the multilayer, a tunable, near-zero net stress results, and hence results in little or no deformation of the substrate, such as an optic for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography tool. Buffer-layers have been deposited, for example, between Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer films and their associated substrate reducing significantly the stress, wherein the magnitude of the stress is less than 100 MPa and respectively near-normal incidence (5.degree.) reflectance of over 60% is obtained at 13.4 nm and 11.4 nm. The present invention is applicable to crystalline and non-crystalline materials, and can be used at ambient temperatures.

  11. The relationship between strain geometry and geometrically necessary dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lars; Wallis, David

    2016-04-01

    The kinematics of past deformations are often a primary goal in structural analyses of strained rocks. Details of the strain geometry, in particular, can help distinguish hypotheses about large-scale tectonic phenomena. Microstructural indicators of strain geometry have been heavily utilized to investigate large-scale kinematics. However, many of the existing techniques require structures for which the initial morphology is known, and those structures must undergo the same deformation as imposed macroscopically. Many deformed rocks do not exhibit such convenient features, and therefore the strain geometry is often difficult (if not impossible) to ascertain. Alternatively, crystallographic textures contain information about the strain geometry, but the influence of strain geometry can be difficult to separate from other environmental factors that might affect slip system activity and therefore the textural evolution. Here we explore the ability for geometrically necessary dislocations to record information about the deformation geometry. It is well known that crystallographic slip due to the motion of dislocations yields macroscopic plastic strain, and the mathematics are established to relate dislocation glide on multiple slip systems to the strain tensor of a crystal. This theoretical description generally assumes that dislocations propagate across the entire crystal. However, at any point during the deformation, dislocations are present that have not fully transected the crystal, existing either as free dislocations or as dislocations organized into substructures like subgrain boundaries. These dislocations can remain in the lattice after deformation if the crystal is quenched sufficiently fast, and we hypothesize that this residual dislocation population can be linked to the plastic strain geometry in a quantitative manner. To test this hypothesis, we use high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction to measure lattice curvatures in experimentally deformed

  12. Deformation-induced changes in hydraulic head during ground-water withdrawal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawal from a confined or semiconfined aquifer causes three-dimensional deformation in the pumped aquifer and in adjacent layers (overlying and underlying aquifers and aquitards). In response to the deformation, hydraulic head in the adjacent layers could rise or fall almost immediately after the start of pumping. This deformation-induced effect suggest that an adjacent layer undergoes horizontal compression and vertical extension when pumping begins. Hydraulic head initially drops in a region near the well and close to the pumped aquifer, but rises outside this region. Magnitude of head change varies from a few centimeters to more than 10 centimeters. Factors that influence the development of deformation-induced effects includes matrix rigidity (shear modulus), the arrangement of aquifer and aquitards, their thicknesses, and proximity to land surface. Induced rise in hydraulic head is prominent in an aquitard that extends from land surface to a shallow pumped aquifer. Induced drop in hydraulic head is likely observed close to the well in an aquifer that is separated from the pumped aquifer by a relatively thin aquitard. Induced effects might last for hours in an aquifer, but could persist for many days in an aquitard. Induced effects are eventually dissipated by fluid flow from regions of higher head to regions of lower head, and by propagation of drawdown from the pumped aquifer into adjacent layers.

  13. Dislocation generation during early stage sintering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, J. E.; Lenel, F. V.; Ansell, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of capillarity-induced stresses on dislocations during early stage sintering. A special version of Hirth's (1963) theoretical calculation procedures modified to describe dislocation nucleation on planes meeting the sintering body's neck surface obliquely is shown to predict plastic flow at stress levels know to exist between micron size metal particles in the early stages of sintering.

  14. Twinning induced nanostructure formation during cryo-deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova, M.; Dyakonov, G.; Zherebtsov, S.; Salishchev, G.; Molodov, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work the influence of cryo-rolling to a true strain ɛ=2.66 on twinning and formation of ultrafine-grained/nanostructure in commercial-purity titanium and Fe-0.3C- 23Mn-1.5Al TWIP steel was quantified using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Different influence of twinning on the kinetics of microstructure refinement and nanostructure formation in titanium and steel was revealed. In titanium twin boundaries during deformation transform into arbitrary high-angle grain boundaries thereby promoting the microstructure refinement to a grain/subgrain size of 80 nm. In steel twinning has less pronounced influence on the microstructure refinement. However, very fine grains/subgrains with the size of 30-50 nm was observed in the microstructure after rolling at 77K to a true thickness strain of 2.66.

  15. Droplet-induced deformation of a polymer microfiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianlin; Sun, Jing; Mei, Yue

    2013-07-01

    Capillary force of a liquid drop embedded in a microfiber has great influence on the mechanics behavior of the microfiber. In this study, we investigated the buckling and finite deformation of a microfiber filled with a droplet. First, the critical load for the buckling of the microfiber was presented under the combined action of the surface tension and Laplace pressure. Both global buckling based on slender rod model and local buckling according to thin shell model has been considered. Then in use of the Mooney-Rivlin model, we calculated the true axial stress of the microfiber, and clearly showed that the microfiber takes a different load carrying capability due to the capillary force. These investigations emphasize the important role of capillary force in microfibers, and the conclusions hold great potentials in micro/nanotechnologies, fabrics, blood vessels, and animal/plant surfaces.

  16. Large-Amplitude Deformation and Bond Breakage in Shock-Induced Reactions of Explosive Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey

    The response of explosive molecules to large-amplitude mechanical deformation plays an important role in shock-induced reactions and the initiation of detonation in explosive materials. In this presentation, the response of a series of explosive molecules (nitromethane, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene [TNT], and 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene [TATB]) to a variety of large-amplitude deformations are examined using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Large-amplitude motions that result in bond breakage are described, and the insights these results provide into both previous experimental observations and previous theoretical predictions of shock-induced reactions are discussed.

  17. Nodal effects in a-iron dislocation mobility in the presence of helium bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N. Naveen; Martinez, E; Dutta, B. K.; Dey, G. K.; Caro, J. A.

    2013-02-13

    Dislocations and dislocation networks act as sinks for irradiation-induced point defects such as vacancies and interstitials, or impurities such as helium. Recently, it has been found that the intersection points of the screw dislocation network formed at twist grain boundaries in Au (experimental) and Cu (simulations) act as nucleation sites for He bubbles, which form an array at the interface [ J. Hetherly, E. Martinez, Z. F. Di, M. Nastasi and A. Caro Scr. Mater. 66 17 (2012)]. The modeling part of that study was based on Monte Carlo algorithms. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations, we have performed shear deformation simulations of small-angle twist grain boundaries in α-iron. We report on the mechanical properties of this interface in pure as well as He-segregated samples. We find that this particular dislocation array in pure Fe is extremely mobile, with a Peierls stress ten times smaller than the value for a single straight screw dislocation, and that He bubbles induce a colossal increase (>50 times) in Peierls stress with respect to the pristine network. We interpret the results in terms of preexisting kinks and no shear transmission across the He bubbles.

  18. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-21

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets’ surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  19. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  20. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under nonhydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    DOE PAGES

    Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Michaels, C. A.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Haberl, Bianca; Cook, Robert F.

    2015-12-17

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique (IIT). The occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were observed. Furthermore, the obtained experimental results are linked with previously published work on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a model for the deformation behavior of a-Si under indentation loading.

  1. Can Stress Relaxation Experiments be Used to Assess Deformation Induced Mobility in Glassy Polymers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropka, Jamie; Long, Kevin

    The observance of an increase in glassy polymer relaxation rates under a mechanical deformation is often referred to as deformation induced mobility (DIM). It has been argued that stress relaxation experiments can provide indirect evidence of this phenomenon. Recently, stress relaxation experiments have been interpreted as demonstrating a mobility decrease with increased deformation when very slow strain rates, 1.2 x 10-5 s-1, are used to apply the deformation. This would suggest against generality of DIM and would have significant implications to constitutive models founded on this principle. Here, a mathematical exercise is performed to evaluate the implications of DIM on stress relaxation response. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Lateral subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Praveen; DuFosse, Julian

    2008-07-01

    Subtalar dislocations are rare in routine orthopedic practice. While many of these dislocations are a result of high-energy injuries such as fall from a height or traffic accidents, it is not uncommon for patients to present after slipping down a few stairs. Two types of dislocation have been described, medial and lateral. The type of dislocation is described according to the position of the foot. In lateral subtalar dislocation the head of talus is found medially and the calcaneus is dislocated laterally. The navicular may lie dorsolateral to the talus. The reverse is true of lateral dislocation. Medial dislocation has been referred to as "basketball foot" due to its preponderance in basketball players.4 The deciding factor is the inverted or everted position of the foot when the force is dissipated through the weak talonavicular and talocalcaneal ligaments. This article presents a case of an adult with lateral subtalar dislocation following a fall.

  3. The equivalence between dislocation pile-ups and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Gao, Q.

    1990-01-01

    Cracks and dislocation pile-ups are equivalent to each other. In this paper, the physical equivalence between cracks and pile-ups is delineated, and the relationshps between crack-extension force, force on the leading dislocation, stress-intensity factor, and dislocation density are reviewed and summarized. These relations make it possible to extend quantitatively the recent advances in the concepts and practices of fracture mechanics to the studies of microfractures and microplastic deformations.

  4. The influence of the dislocation distribution heterogeneity degree on the formation of a non-misoriented dislocation cell substructures in f.c.c. metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, D. N.; Selivanikova, O. V.; Matveev, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocation loops emitted by Frank-Reed source during crossing dislocations of the non-coplanar slip systems are accumulates jogs on the own dislocation line, resulting in the deceleration of the segments of dislocation loops with high jog density. As a result, bending around of the slowed segments the formation of dynamic dipoles in the shear zone occurs. In the present paper we consider formation mechanism of non-misoriented dislocation cell substructure during plastic deformation of f.c.c. metals and conclude that the increase in the degree heterogeneity of dislocation distribution leads to an increase in the jog density and reduce the mean value of arm dynamic dipoles.

  5. Quantum dislocations in solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinikava, Darya

    In this thesis the following problems on properties of solid 4He are considered: (i) the role of long-range interactions in suppression of dislocation roughening at T = 0; (ii) the combined effect of 3He impurities and Peierls potential on shear modulus softening; (iii) the dislocation superclimb and its connection to the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility"; (iv) non-linear dislocation response to the applied stress and stress-induces dislocation roughening as a I-order phase transition in 1D at finite temperature. First we investigate the effect of long-range interactions on the state of edge dislocation at T = 0. Such interactions are induced by elastic forces of the solid. We found that quantum roughening transition of a dislocation at T = 0 is completely suppressed by arbitrarily small long-range interactions between kinks. A heuristic argument is presented and the result has been verified by numerical Monte-Carlo simulations using Worm Algorithm in J-current model. It was shown that the Peierls potential plays a crucial role in explaining the elastic properties of dislocations, namely shear modulus softening phenomenon. The crossover from T = 0 to finite temperatures leads to intrinsic softening of the shear modulus and is solely controlled by kink typical energy. It was demonstrated that the mechanism, involving only the binding of 3He impurities to the dislocations, requires an unrealistically high concentrations of defects (or impurities) in order to explain the shear modulus phenomenon and therefore an inclusion of Peierls potential in consideration is required. Superclimbing dislocations, that is the edge dislocations with the superfluidity along the core, were investigated. The theoretical prediction that superclimb is responsible for the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility" was confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. It was demonstrated that the isochoric compressibility is suppressed at low temperatures. The dependence of

  6. Understanding of edge and screw dislocations in nanostructures by modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, Evgeniya

    The role of the extended dislocation defects in nanostructures only recently began to be explored. In bulk materials, dislocations are modeled only away from their cores within the framework of the continuum mechanics. It is known that applying continuum modeling in the core region leads to divergences. In nanostructures, the core region dominates and new investigation methods are needed. This work contributes to the fundamental understanding of the role of dislocations in important carbon and zinc oxide nanostructures, by using atomistic investigation methods. In quasi-zero-dimensional structures, thesis describes the first attempt to rationalize dislocation processes in carbon nano-onions. Experiments show that carbon nano-onions exhibit an unusual dislocation dynamics with unexpected attraction of outer edge dislocation towards the core. Atomistic calculations combined with rigorous energy analysis attribute this behavior to an unusual inward driving force on the outer edge dislocation associated with a reduction in the number of dangling bonds. Moving on to quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures, we study the stability of screw-dislocated zinc oxide structures in the wurtzite phase with a symmetry-adapted molecular dynamics methodology, which introduces a significant simplification in the simulation domain size by accounting for the helical symmetry explicitly. The goal is to provide the theoretical support for a universal screw-dislocation-driven growth mechanism suggested by recent experiments. Moreover, the effects of axial screw dislocations on the electronic properties in helical zinc oxide nanowires and nanotubes are explored. We demonstrate significant screw-dislocation-induced band gap modifications that originate in the highly distorted cores. Finally, using the same objective technique, we investigate the stability against torsional deformations of quasi-one-dimensional graphene nanoribbons with bare, F-, and OH-saturated armchair edges. The prevalence

  7. Comparison of dislocation density tensor fields derived from discrete dislocation dynamics and crystal plasticity simulations of torsion

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Po, Giacomo; Mandadapu, Kranthi

    2016-02-01

    Accurate simulation of the plastic deformation of ductile metals is important to the design of structures and components to performance and failure criteria. Many techniques exist that address the length scales relevant to deformation processes, including dislocation dynamics (DD), which models the interaction and evolution of discrete dislocation line segments, and crystal plasticity (CP), which incorporates the crystalline nature and restricted motion of dislocations into a higher scale continuous field framework. While these two methods are conceptually related, there have been only nominal efforts focused at the global material response that use DD-generated information to enhance the fidelity of CPmore » models. To ascertain to what degree the predictions of CP are consistent with those of DD, we compare their global and microstructural response in a number of deformation modes. After using nominally homogeneous compression and shear deformation dislocation dynamics simulations to calibrate crystal plasticity ow rule parameters, we compare not only the system-level stress-strain response of prismatic wires in torsion but also the resulting geometrically necessary dislocation density fields. To establish a connection between explicit description of dislocations and the continuum assumed with crystal plasticity simulations we ascertain the minimum length-scale at which meaningful dislocation density fields appear. Furthermore, our results show that, for the case of torsion, that the two material models can produce comparable spatial dislocation density distributions.« less

  8. Thermodynamic forces in single crystals with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Goethem, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    A simple model for the evolution of macroscopic dislocation regions in a single crystal is presented. This model relies on maximal dissipation principle within Kröner's geometric description of the dislocated crystal. Mathematical methods and tools from shape optimization theory provide equilibrium relations at the dislocation front, similarly to previous work achieved on damage modelling (J Comput Phys 33(16):5010-5044, 2011). The deformation state variable is the incompatible strain as related to the dislocation density tensor by a relation involving the Ricci curvature of the crystal underlying elastic metric. The time evolution of the model variables follows from a novel interpretation of the Einstein-Hilbert flow in terms of dislocation microstructure energy. This flow is interpreted as the dissipation of non-conservative dislocations, due to the climb mechanism, modelled by an average effect of mesoscopic dislocations moving normal to their glide planes by adding or removing points defects. The model equations are a fourth-order tensor parabolic equation involving the operator "incompatibility," here appearing as a tensorial counterpart of the scalar Laplacian. This work encompasses and generalizes results previously announced (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:923-927, 2011), with in addition a series of physical interpretations to give a meaning to the newly introduced concepts.

  9. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  10. Laser shock peening effect on the dislocation transitions and grain refinement of Al–Mg–Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Trdan, U.; Skarba, M.; Grum, J.

    2014-11-15

    This paper systematically investigates the effect of laser shock peening without coating parameters on the microstructural evolution, and dislocation configurations induced by ultra-high plastic strains and strain rates. Based on an analysis of optical microscopy, polarized light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy observations and residual stress analysis, the significant influence of laser shock peening parameters due to the effect of plasma generation and shock wave propagation has been confirmed. Although the optical microscopy results revealed no significant microstructural changes after laser shock peening, i.e. no heat effect zone and differences in the distribution of second-phase particles, expressive influence of laser treatment parameters on the laser shock induced craters was confirmed. Moreover, polarized light microscopy results have confirmed the existence of well-defined longish grains up to 455 μm in length in the centre of the plate due to the rolling effect, and randomly oriented smaller grains (20 μm × 50 μm) in the surface due to the static recrystallization effect. Laser shock peening is reflected in an exceptional increase in dislocation density with various configurations, i.e. dislocation lines, dislocation cells, dislocation tangles, and the formation of dense dislocation walls. More importantly, the microstructure is considerably refined due to the effect of strain deformations induced by laser shock peening process. The results have confirmed that dense dislocation structures during ultra-high plastic deformation with the addition of shear bands producing ultra-fine (60–200 nm) and nano-grains (20–50 nm). Furthermore, dislocation density was increased by a factor of 2.5 compared to the untreated material (29 × 10{sup 13} m{sup −2} vs. 12 × 10{sup 13} m{sup −2}). - Highlights: • LSPwC imparts high compressive residual stresses up to − 362 ± 31 MPa. • After LSPwC the microstructure is considerably refined via

  11. Intraoperative measurement of indenter-induced brain deformation: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurement of soft tissue material properties is critical for characterizing its biomechanical behaviors but can be challenging especially for the human brain in vivo. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of inducing and detecting cortical surface deformation intraoperatively for patients undergoing open skull neurosurgeries. A custom diskshaped indenter made of high-density tungsten (diameter of 15 mm with a thickness of 6 mm) was used to induce deformation on the brain cortical surface immediately after dural opening. Before and after placing the indenter, sequences (typically 250 frames at 15 frames-per-second, or ~17 seconds) of high-resolution stereo image pairs were acquired to capture the harmonic motion of the exposed cortical surface as due to blood pressure pulsation and respiration. For each sequence with the first left image serving as a baseline, an optical-flow motion-tracking algorithm was used to detect in-sequence cortical surface deformation. The resulting displacements of the exposed features within the craniotomy were spatially averaged to identify the temporal frames corresponding to motion peak magnitudes. Corresponding image pairs were then selected to reconstruct full-field three-dimensional (3D) cortical surfaces before and after indentation, respectively, from which full 3D displacement fields were obtained by registering their projection images. With one clinical patient case, we illustrate the feasibility of the technique in detecting indenter-induced cortical surface deformation in order to allow subsequent processing to determine material properties of the brain in vivo.

  12. Thermophoretically induced large-scale deformations around microscopic heat centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puljiz, Mate; Orlishausen, Michael; Köhler, Werner; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-05-01

    Selectively heating a microscopic colloidal particle embedded in a soft elastic matrix is a situation of high practical relevance. For instance, during hyperthermic cancer treatment, cell tissue surrounding heated magnetic colloidal particles is destroyed. Experiments on soft elastic polymeric matrices suggest a very long-ranged, non-decaying radial component of the thermophoretically induced displacement fields around the microscopic heat centers. We theoretically confirm this conjecture using a macroscopic hydrodynamic two-fluid description. Both thermophoretic and elastic effects are included in this theory. Indeed, we find that the elasticity of the environment can cause the experimentally observed large-scale radial displacements in the embedding matrix. Additional experiments confirm the central role of elasticity. Finally, a linearly decaying radial component of the displacement field in the experiments is attributed to the finite size of the experimental sample. Similar results are obtained from our theoretical analysis under modified boundary conditions.

  13. Characterization of hydrogen-induced crack initiation in metastable austenitic stainless steels during deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Iijima, T.; Yokogawa, K.

    2010-09-01

    Hydrogen-induced crack initiation in hydrogen-charged metastable austenitic stainless steels during deformation at 295 K is characterized by performing a combined tensile and hydrogen release experiment and scanning probe microscopy. Strain-induced martensite (α') not only provides a path for rapid hydrogen diffusion in austenite (γ) but also promotes crack initiation. Hydrogen rapidly diffuses from α' and accumulates at the boundary between the α'-rich and γ-rich zones during deformation due to the high hydrogen diffusivity and low hydrogen solubility in α', resulting in crack initiation at the boundary between the α'-rich and γ-rich zones. The hydrogen-induced crack initially grows along the boundary between the α'-rich and γ-rich zones and then propagates in the α'-rich zone.

  14. Interface solution for writing-induced nano-deformation of slider body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Bo; Chong, Tow-Chong

    2006-08-01

    Writing-induced nano-deformation of slider body becomes a big concern when the mechanical spacing between the head and disk is continuously reduced to achieve higher magnetic recording areal density. Reduced head-disk spacing increases the risk of head/disk contact and causes the thermal instability in head-disk interface (HDI). This paper reports authors' efforts towards exploration of interface solutions for writing-induced instability in ultra-low head-disk spacing magnetic system. Multi-shallow step structure with optimized rail position is analyzed and a new femto slider with such structure is explored. The results of numerical simulation indicate that the multi-shallow step structure is an effective approach in reducing the flying height change caused by the writing-induced nano-deformation of the slider body.

  15. Thermoplastic deformation of silicon surfaces induced by ultrashort pulsed lasers in submelting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsibidis, G. D.; Stratakis, E.; Aifantis, K. E.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid theoretical model is presented to describe thermoplastic deformation effects on silicon surfaces induced by single and multiple ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation in submelting conditions. An approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation is adopted to describe the laser irradiation process. The evolution of the induced deformation field is described initially by adopting the differential equations of dynamic thermoelasticity while the onset of plastic yielding is described by the von Mises stress. Details of the resulting picometre sized crater, produced by irradiation with a single pulse, are discussed as a function of the imposed conditions and thresholds for the onset of plasticity are computed. Irradiation with multiple pulses leads to ripple formation of nanometre size that originates from the interference of the incident and a surface scattered wave. It is suggested that ultrafast laser induced surface modification in semiconductors is feasible in submelting conditions, and it may act as a precursor of the incubation effects observed at multiple pulse irradiation of materials surfaces.

  16. Odd-parity currents induced by dynamic deformations in graphene-like systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Erhu; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-11-01

    Reduced (3  +  1)-dimensional Dirac systems with inter-pseudo-spin and inter-valley scattering are employed to investigate current responses to (chiral) gauge fields in graphene-like systems. From (chiral) current—(chiral) current correlation functions, we derive the current responses. Except for electric currents induced by external gauge fields, we find the inter-valley scattering can break the topological nature of odd-parity currents. Given the proper conditions, this property can help us realize valley-polarized electric currents. Through the dynamic deformations generating the chiral gauge fields, we find the vortex-like currents while their profiles can be tuned by superposition of some deformations. In particular, we find a more manageable approach to realize the topological electric current by choosing a linear dynamic deformation.

  17. Odd-parity currents induced by dynamic deformations in graphene-like systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Erhu; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-11-16

    Reduced (3  +  1)-dimensional Dirac systems with inter-pseudo-spin and inter-valley scattering are employed to investigate current responses to (chiral) gauge fields in graphene-like systems. From (chiral) current-(chiral) current correlation functions, we derive the current responses. Except for electric currents induced by external gauge fields, we find the inter-valley scattering can break the topological nature of odd-parity currents. Given the proper conditions, this property can help us realize valley-polarized electric currents. Through the dynamic deformations generating the chiral gauge fields, we find the vortex-like currents while their profiles can be tuned by superposition of some deformations. In particular, we find a more manageable approach to realize the topological electric current by choosing a linear dynamic deformation. PMID:27618133

  18. The Use of Ultrasound to Measure Dislocation Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Felipe; Espinoza-González, Rodrigo; Fernández, Henry; Lund, Fernando; Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Dislocations are at the heart of the plastic behavior of materials yet they are very difficult to probe experimentally. Lack of a practical nonintrusive measuring tool for, say, dislocation density, seriously hampers modeling efforts, as there is little guidance from data in the form of quantitative measurements, as opposed to visualizations. Dislocation density can be measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM can directly show the strain field around dislocations, which allows for the counting of the number of dislocations in a micrograph. This procedure is very laborious and local, since samples have to be very small and thin, and is difficult to apply when dislocation densities are high. XRD relies on the broadening of diffraction peaks induced by the loss of crystalline order induced by the dislocations. This broadening can be very small, and finding the dislocation density involves unknown parameters that have to be fitted with the data. Both methods, but especially TEM, are intrusive, in the sense that samples must be especially treated, mechanically and chemically. A nonintrusive method to measure dislocation density would be desirable. This paper reviews recent developments in the theoretical treatment of the interaction of an elastic wave with dislocations that have led to formulae that relate dislocation density to quantities that can be measured with samples of cm size. Experimental results that use resonant ultrasound spectroscopy supporting this assertion are reported, and the outlook for the development of a practical, nonintrusive, method to measure dislocation density is discussed.

  19. Hidden secrets of deformation: Impact-induced compaction within a CV chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, L. V.; Bland, P. A.; Timms, N. E.; Collins, G. S.; Davison, T. M.; Ciesla, F. J.; Benedix, G. K.; Daly, L.; Trimby, P. W.; Yang, L.; Ringer, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    The CV3 Allende is one of the most extensively studied meteorites in worldwide collections. It is currently classified as S1-essentially unshocked-using the classification scheme of Stöffler et al. (1991), however recent modelling suggests the low porosity observed in Allende indicates the body should have undergone compaction-related deformation. In this study, we detail previously undetected evidence of impact through use of Electron Backscatter Diffraction mapping to identify deformation microstructures in chondrules, AOAs and matrix grains. Our results demonstrate that forsterite-rich chondrules commonly preserve crystal-plastic microstructures (particularly at their margins); that low-angle boundaries in deformed matrix grains of olivine have a preferred orientation; and that disparities in deformation occur between chondrules, surrounding and non-adjacent matrix grains. We find heterogeneous compaction effects present throughout the matrix, consistent with a highly porous initial material. Given the spatial distribution of these crystal-plastic deformation microstructures, we suggest that this is evidence that Allende has undergone impact-induced compaction from an initially heterogeneous and porous parent body. We suggest that current shock classifications (Stöffler et al., 1991) relying upon data from chondrule interiors do not constrain the complete shock history of a sample.

  20. Deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic single crystals: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z. Y.; Huang, M. X.

    2015-12-01

    Small-sized crystals generally show deformation behaviour distinct from their bulk counterparts. In addition to dislocation slip, deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic (FCC) single crystals has been reported to follow a different mechanism which involves coherent emission of partial dislocations on successive { 111 } planes from free surface. The present work employed a twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with a low stacking fault energy to systematically investigate the twin evolution in small-sized FCC single crystals. Micrometre-sized single crystal pillars of TWIP steel were fabricated by focus ion beam and then strained to different levels by compression experiments. Detailed transmission electron microscopy characterization was carried out to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the deformation twins, which contribute to most of the plastic strain. Emissions of partial dislocations from free surface (surface sources) and pre-existing perfect dislocations inside the pillar (inner sources) are found as the essential processes for the formation of deformation twins. Accordingly, a physically-based model, which integrates source introduction methods and source activation criterions for partial dislocation emission, is developed to quantitatively predict the twin evolution. The model is able to reproduce the experimental twin evolution, in terms of the total twin formation, the twin morphology and the occurrence of twinning burst.

  1. Roles of deformation and orientation in heavy-ion collisions induced by light deformed nuclei at intermediate energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X. G.; Zhang, G. Q.; Cai, X. Z.; Ma, Y. G.; Guo, W.; Chen, J. G.; Tian, W. D.; Fang, D. Q.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-06-15

    The reaction dynamics of axisymmetric deformed {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg collisions has been investigated systematically by an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. It is found that different deformations and orientations result in apparently different properties of reaction dynamics. We reveal that some observables such as nuclear stopping power (R), multiplicity of fragments, and elliptic flow are very sensitive to the initial deformations and orientations. There exists an eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow in central body-body collisions with different deformations. In addition, the tip-tip and body-body configurations turn out to be two extreme cases in central reaction dynamical process.

  2. NANOSECOND INTERFEROMETRIC STUDIES OF SURFACE DEFORMATIONS OF DIELECTRICS INDUCED BY LASER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. GREENFIELD; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    Transient surface deformations in dielectric materials induced by laser irradiation were investigated with time-resolved interferometry. Deformation images were acquired at various delay times after exposure to single pulses (100 ps at 1.064 {micro}m) on fresh sample regions. Above the ablation threshold, we observe prompt ejection of material and the formation of a single unipolar compressional surface acoustic wave propagating away from the ablation crater. For calcite, no deformation--either transient or permanent--is discernable at laser fluences below the threshold for material ejection. Above and below-threshold behavior was investigated using a phosphate glass sample with substantial near infrared absorption (Schott filter KG3). Below threshold, KG3 exhibits the formation of a small bulge roughly the size of the laser spot that reaches its maximum amplitude by {approx}5 ns. By tens of nanoseconds, the deformations become quite complex and very sensitive to laser fluence. The above-threshold behavior of KG3 combines the ablation-induced surface acoustic wave seen in calcite with the bulge seen below threshold in KG3. A velocity of 2.97 {+-} 0.03 km/s is measured for the KG3 surface acoustic wave, very close to the Rayleigh wave velocity calculated from material elastic parameters. Details of the transient interferometry system will also be given.

  3. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation.

  4. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation. PMID:22007412

  5. Deformation-induced anisotropy of remanent and induced magnetization - implications for interpretation of rock-magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovsky, E.; Machek, M.; Roxerová, Z.; Siemes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Induced and remanent magnetization measurements, e.g. shape of hysteresis loops, FORC diagrams and decomposition of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves, became routine tools in rock-magnetic measurements, interpreted mostly in terms of composition and grain-size distribution of iron oxides. It is assumed that the substances investigate are with respect to these measurements isotropic and single measurement of one sample is sufficient for interpretation. This assumption is valid for powdered samples, but solid rock samples in general behave anisotropically. In our contribution we report on magnetic measurements of hematite ore samples deformed in torsion, which show significant anisotropy of shape of hysteresis loops and IRM acquisition curves; the degree of anisotropy reflecting the degree of deformation. Samples, measured in different directions, showed different shape of hysteresis loop, from regular, which may be interpreted either as randomly oriented multi-domain grains, or with different degree of distortion (wasp-waistedness), reflecting different distribution of contrasting coercivities. Also decomposition of IRM acquisition curves, measured in different direction, yielded different interpretation in terms of relative contributions of components with different coercivities. We interpret this anisotropy as result of deformation, causing preferred orientation of basal planes of hematite. Moreover, the anisotropy is asymmetric. Our results suggest that, at least in deformed rocks containing minerals with high shape and/or magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the effect of anisotropy should be considered and verified before induced and remanent magnetization measurements are interpreted.

  6. Light-induced deformation in a liquid crystal elastomer photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, D.; Johnson, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    Elastomer materials can undergo large, reversible elastic deformation, and offer novel possibilities for coupled optomechanical behavior when light itself is used to induce that deformation. This phenomenology is especially interesting to consider when photonic bandstructure effects and mechanical instabilities are present over the same length scales. Here we investigate a novel, coupled optomechanical material behavior whereby complex deformation, with the potential to occur cyclically, occurs in a soft photonic crystal structure due to a mechanical instability, as a result of constant, uniform illumination by normally incident light. We suppose that the base material for the structure is a material that responds to light by undergoing a microstructural change. Such a behavior is observed, for example, in a liquid crystal elastomer containing azobenzene moieties attached to the liquid crystal main-chains (Finkelmann et al., 2001) transformational strain generated by the effect of localized light energy on the isomerization of the azobenzene moieties can be calculated from an order-parameter based model (Hogan et al., 2002). Under uniform exposure to constant illumination, the interaction between the light, the material, and the deforming structure lead to a complex, reversible deformation sequence. We analyze the electromagnetic energy distribution inside this photonic crystal structure by solving Maxwells equations for the electromagnetic problem of light transmittance using finite element analysis. First, upon contraction of the structure due to isomerization in the uniformly illuminated material, the photonic bandstructure shifts, thereby significantly reducing the average illumination of material within the structure. The locally reduced illumination allows for a relaxation of the strain in some parts of the structure, due to the reversible isomerization at room temperature. Then, as a result of this relaxation, the structure is subjected to uniaxial stress

  7. Pattern formation in a minimal model of continuum dislocation plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The spontaneous emergence of heterogeneous dislocation patterns is a conspicuous feature of plastic deformation and strain hardening of crystalline solids. Despite long-standing efforts in the materials science and physics of defect communities, there is no general consensus regarding the physical mechanism which leads to the formation of dislocation patterns. In order to establish the fundamental mechanism, we formulate an extremely simplified, minimal model to investigate the formation of patterns based on the continuum theory of fluxes of curved dislocations. We demonstrate that strain hardening as embodied in a Taylor-type dislocation density dependence of the flow stress, in conjunction with the structure of the kinematic equations that govern dislocation motion under the action of external stresses, is already sufficient for the formation of dislocation patterns that are consistent with the principle of similitude.

  8. Effect of Friction-Induced Deformation on the Structure, Microhardness, and Wear Resistance of Austenitic Chromium—Nickel Stainless Steel Subjected to Subsequent Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of plastic deformation that occurs in the zone of the sliding friction contact on structural transformations in the 12Kh18N9T austenitic steel subjected to subsequent 1-h oxidation in air at temperatures of 300-800°C, as well as on its wear resistance, has been studied. It has been shown that severe deformation induced by dry sliding friction produces the two-phase nanocrystalline γ + α structure in the surface layer of the steel ~10 μm thick. This structure has the microhardness of 5.2 GPa. Subsequent oxidation of steel at temperatures of 300-500°C leads to an additional increase in the microhardness of its deformed surface layer to the value of 7.0 GPa. This is due to the active saturation of the austenite and the strain-assisted martensite (α') with the oxygen atoms, which diffuse deep into the metal over the boundaries of the γ and α' nanocrystals with an increased rate. The concentration of oxygen in the surface layer of the steel and in wear products reaches 8 wt %. The atoms of the dissolved oxygen efficiently pin dislocations in the γ and α' phases, which enhances the strength and wear resistance of the surface of the 12Kh18N9T steel. The oxidation of steel at temperatures of 550-800°C under a light normal load (98 N) results in the formation of a large number of Fe3O4 (magnetite) nanoparticles, which increase the resistance of the steel to thermal softening and its wear resistance during dry sliding friction in a pair with 40Kh13 steel. Under a heavy normal load (196 N), the toughness of 12Kh18N9T steel and, therefore, the wear resistance of its surface layer decrease due to the presence of the brittle oxide phase.

  9. The Work Softening by Deformation-Induced Disordering and Cold Rolling of 6.5 wt pct Si Steel Thin Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianglong; Li, Haoze; Zhang, Weina; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong; Luo, Zhonghan; Zhang, Fengquan

    2016-09-01

    As-cast strip of 6.5 wt pct Si steel was fabricated by twin-roll strip casting. After hot rolling at 1323 K (1050 °C), thin sheets with the thickness of 0.35 mm were produced by warm rolling at 373 K (100 °C) with rolling reductions of 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 pct. Influence of warm rolling reduction on ductility was investigated by room temperature bending test. The measurement of macro-hardness showed that "work softening" could begin when the warm rolling reduction exceeded 35 pct. The room temperature ductility of the thin sheets gradually increased with the increase of warm rolling reductions, and the plastic deformation during bending began to form when the warm rolling reduction was greater than 45 pct, the 65 pct rolled thin sheet exhibited the maximum plastic deformation of about 0.6 pct during bending at room temperature, with a few small dimples having been observed on the fracture surfaces. B2-ordered domains were formed in the 15, 25, 35, 45, and 55 pct rolled specimens, and their average size decreased with the increase of warm rolling reductions. By contrast, no B2-ordered domain could be found in the 65 pct rolled specimen. It had been observed that large-ordered domains could be split into several small parts by the slip of partial super-dislocations during warm rolling, which led to significant decrease of the order degree to cause the phenomenon of deformation-induced disordering. On the basis of these results, cold rolling schedule was developed to successfully fabricate 0.25-mm-thick sheets with good surface qualities and magnetic properties from warm rolled sheets.

  10. Phonon Drag Dislocations at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1999-10-19

    Phonon drag on dislocations is the dominant process which determines the flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and at very high plastic deformation rates. The dependence of the phonon drag on pressure or density is derived using a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state. The phonon drag is shown to increase nearly linearly with temperature but to decrease with density or pressure. Numerical results are presented for its variation for shock-loaded copper and aluminum. In these cases, density and temperature increase simultaneously, resulting in a more modest net increase in the dislocation drag coefficient. Nevertheless, phonon drag increases by more than an order of magnitude during shock deformations which approach melting. Since the dependencies of elastic moduli and of the phonon drag coefficient on pressure and temperature are fundamentally different, the effect of pressure on the constitutive law for plastic deformation can not simply be accounted for by its effect on the elastic shear modulus.

  11. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  12. Dislocation pileup as a representation of strain accumulation on a strike-slip fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional model of strain accumulation on a vertical transform fault is a discrete screw dislocation in an elastic half-space with the Burgers vector of the dislocation increasing at the rate of relative plate motion. It would be more realistic to replace that discrete dislocation by a dislocation distribution, presumably a pileup in which the individual dislocations are in equilibrium. The length of the pileup depends upon the applied stress and the amount of slip that has occurred at depth. I argue here that the dislocation pileup (the transition on the fault from no slip to slip at the full plate rate) occupies a substantial portion of the lithosphere thickness. A discrete dislocation at an adjustable depth can reproduce the surface deformation profile predicted by a pileup so closely that it will be difficult to distinguish between the two models. The locking depth (dislocation depth) of that discrete dislocation approximation is substantially (???30%) larger than that (depth to top of the pileup) in the pileup model. Thus, in inverting surface deformation data using the discrete dislocation model, the locking depth in the model should not be interpreted as the true locking depth. Although dislocation pileup models should provide a good explanation of the surface deformation near the fault trace, that explanation may not be adequate at greater distances from the fault trace because approximating the expected horizontally distributed deformation at subcrustal depths by uniform slip concentrated on the fault is not justified.

  13. Effect of strain rate and dislocation density on the twinning behavior in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florando, Jeffrey N.; El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Chen, Changqiang; Swift, Damian C.; Barton, Nathan R.; McNaney, James M.; Ramesh, K. T.; Hemker, Kevin J.; Kumar, Mukul

    2016-04-01

    The conditions which affect twinning in tantalum have been investigated across a range of strain rates and initial dislocation densities. Tantalum samples were subjected to a range of strain rates, from 10-4/s to 103/s under uniaxial stress conditions, and under laser-induced shock-loading conditions. In this study, twinning was observed at 77K at strain rates from 1/s to 103/s, and during laser-induced shock experiments. The effect of the initial dislocation density, which was imparted by deforming the material to different amounts of pre-strain, was also studied, and it was shown that twinning is suppressed after a given amount of pre-strain, even as the global stress continues to increase. These results indicate that the conditions for twinning cannot be represented solely by a critical global stress value, but are also dependent on the evolution of the dislocation density. In addition, the analysis shows that if twinning is initiated, the nucleated twins may continue to grow as a function of strain, even as the dislocation density continues to increase.

  14. Surgical hip dislocation: techniques for success.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Sink, Ernest L

    2014-01-01

    Surgical hip dislocation (SHD) is a versatile approach used to address both intra-articular and extra-articular pathology around the hip joint in both pediatric and adult patients. It allows anterior dislocation of the femoral head for direct visualization of the hip joint while preserving femoral head vascularity and minimizing trauma to the abductor musculature. Previously described indications for SHD include femoroacetabular impingement, deformity resulting from Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, periarticular trauma, benign lesions of the hip joint, and osteochondral lesions. In this review, we will describe current surgical techniques, indications, and clinical outcomes for SHD. PMID:25207733

  15. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  16. Simple Model for the Deformation-Induced Relaxation of Glassy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.; Larson, R. G.; Cates, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Glassy polymers show “strain hardening”: at constant extensional load, their flow first accelerates, then arrests. Recent experiments have found this to be accompanied by a striking and unexplained dip in the segmental relaxation time. Here we explain such behavior by combining a minimal model of flow-induced liquefaction of a glass with a description of the stress carried by strained polymers, creating a nonfactorable interplay between aging and strain-induced rejuvenation. Under constant load, liquefaction of segmental motion permits strong flow that creates polymer-borne stress. This slows the deformation enough for the segmental modes to revitrify, causing strain hardening.

  17. Electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F. D.; Feng, J. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Using first principles calculation, we systematically investigate the electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy. It is shown that the optical band gap Eg is remarkably sensitive to the anion displacement μ, resulting from the opposite shifts of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. Meanwhile, the dependence of structural parameters of alloyed compounds on alloy composition x is demonstrated for both cation and anion alloying. The d orbitals of group-III cations are found to be of great importance in the calculation. Abnormal changes in the optical band gap Eg induced by anion alloying are addressed.

  18. Screw dislocation-induced growth spirals as emissive exciton localization centers in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Funato, Mitsuru Banal, Ryan G.; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-15

    Screw dislocations in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells cause growth spirals with an enhanced Ga incorporation, which create potential minima. Although screw dislocations and their surrounding potential minima suggest non-radiative recombination processes within growth spirals, in reality, screw dislocations are not major non-radiative sinks for carriers. Consequently, carriers localized within growth spirals recombine radiatively without being captured by non-radiative recombination centers, resulting in intense emissions from growth spirals.

  19. Theoretical investigations of compositional inhomogeneity around threading dislocations in III-nitride semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Ryohei; Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2016-05-01

    The compositional inhomogeneity of group III elements around threading dislocations in III-nitride semiconductors are theoretically investigated using empirical interatomic potentials and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the calculated atomic arrangements around threading dislocations in Al0.3Ga0.7N and In0.2Ga0.8N depend on the lattice strain around dislocation cores. Consequently, compositional inhomogeneity arises around edge dislocation cores to release the strain induced by dislocation cores. In contrast, the compositional inhomogeneity in screw dislocation is negligible owing to relatively small strain induced by dislocation cores compared with edge dislocation. These results indicate that the strain relief around dislocation cores is decisive in determining the atomic arrangements and resultant compositional inhomogeneity around threading dislocations in III-nitride semiconductor alloys.

  20. Effect of plastic deformation on deuterium retention and release in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, D. Lambrinou, K.; Minov, B.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; Zayachuk, Y.; Bystrov, K.; Dubinko, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-02-28

    The effect of severe plastic deformation on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-flux low-energy plasma (flux ∼ 10{sup 24 }D/m{sup 2}/s, energy ∼ 50 eV, and fluence up to 3 × 10{sup 26 }D/m{sup 2}) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The desorption spectra in both reference and plastically deformed samples were deconvolved into three contributions attributed to the detrapping from dislocations, deuterium-vacancy clusters, and pores, respectively. The plastically induced deformation, resulting in high dislocation density, does not change the positions of the three peaks, but alters their amplitudes as compared to the reference material. The appearance of blisters detected by scanning electron microscopy and the desorption peak attributed to the release from pores (i.e., deuterium bubbles) were suppressed in the plastically deformed samples but only up to a certain fluence. Beyond 5 × 10{sup 25 }D/m{sup 2}, the release from the bubbles in the deformed material is essentially higher than in the reference material. Based on the presented results, we suggest that a dense dislocation network increases the incubation dose needed for the appearance of blisters, associated with deuterium bubbles, by offering numerous nucleation sites for deuterium clusters eventually transforming into deuterium-vacancy clusters by punching out jogs on dislocation lines.

  1. Effect of overall drop deformation on flow-induced coalescence at low capillary numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldessari, Fabio; Leal, L. Gary

    2006-01-01

    Comparison of recent experimental results for flow-induced drop coalescence [H. Yang, C. C. Park, Y. T. Hu et al., "The coalescence of two equal-sized drops in a two-dimensional linear flow," Phys. Fluids13, 1087 (2001)] with existing theory provides the motivation for an examination of the theory. Specifically, for head-on collisions, the experiments show a plateau in the dependence of drainage time versus capillary number at low capillary number that could not be explained by either the existing scaling analysis or the existing thin-film theory of the film drainage process previously described in the pioneering work of Davis and co-workers [S. G. Yiantsios and R. H. Davis, "Close approach and deformation of two viscous drops due to gravity and van der Waals forces," J. Colloid Interface Sci. 144, 412 (1991); R. H. Davis, J. A. Schonberg, and J. M. Rallison, "The lubrication force between two viscous drops," Phys. Fluids A 1, 77 (1989); M. A. Rother, A. Z. Zinchenko, and R. H. Davis, "Buoyancy-driven coalescence of slightly deformable drops," J. Fluid Mech. 346, 117 (1997); S. G. Yiantsios and R. H. Davis, "On the buoyancy-driven motion of a drop towards a rigid surface or a deformable interface," J. Fluid Mech. 217, 547 (1990)]. Both of these results indicate that the existing theories, while fundamentally correct in concept, are incomplete in providing a framework for a comprehensive explanation of the experimental results. In the present paper, we reexamine the thin-film theory of Davis et al. in the low capillary number limit. We find that a quasistatic model in which deformation is localized within the thin film is in general not sufficient to describe the leading-order asymptotic approximation of the flow-induced collision and coalescence of two slightly deformable drops at low capillary number. Instead, the overall deformation induced in the drops by the external flow plays a key role in determining the initial film thickness needed for numerical simulation

  2. Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Yuk Chuen; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common problems encountered in orthopedic practice. However, simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is quite rare. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presented with simultaneous bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a trauma, complicated with a traction injury to the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Conclusions: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. The excessive traction force during closed reduction may lead to nerve palsy. Clear documentation of neurovascular status and adequate imaging before and after a reduction should be performed. PMID:25685749

  3. A TEM Study of Creep Deformation Mechanisms in Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Unocic, Kinga A; Hayes, Robert; Daehn, Glenn; Mills, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study on the evolution of creep deformation substructure in Ni-base superalloy Allvac 718Plus has been performed. Specimens crept at 620 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 690-732 C were examined utilizing diffraction contrast TEM characterization techniques. Creep was interrupted at 1-2.5% strain in order to study the deformation substructure following a limited amount of deformation. The dominant deformation modes at each of the test temperatures were highly planar in nature and involved shearing of the matrix and precipitates on {111} glide planes. In addition, paired a/2<110> dislocations were evident which suggest an antiphase boundary shearing mechanism. Creep induced microtwinning was also observed at the highest creep temperature which was created by identical a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear the matrix and precipitates on consecutive close packed {111} glide planes.

  4. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in angle-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1987-01-01

    Cure-induced uniform temperature change effects on the stresses, axial expansion, and thermally-induced twist of four specific angle-ply tube designs are discussed with a view to the tubes' use as major space structure components. The stresses and deformations in the tubes are studied as a function of the four designs, the off-axis angle, and the single-material and hybrid reinforcing-material construction used. It is found that tube design has a minor influence on the stresses, axial stiffness, and axial thermal expansion characteristics, which are more directly a function of off-axis angle and material selection; tube design is, however, the primary influence in the definition of thermally-induced twist and torsional stiffness characteristics. None of the designs is free of thermally induced twist.

  5. Mechanisms of deformation-induced grain growth of a two-dimensional nanocrystal at different deformation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2014-06-01

    This work discloses the evolution of a two-dimensional nanocrystalline aggregate in the process of shear deformation under the conditions of hydrostatic compression of the material in the deformation-temperature range T = 0.5-0.7 T m. It has been shown that grain growth by the mechanism of mutual rotation with subsequent coalescence is characteristic of deformation temperatures T = 0.6 T m and below, whereas at T = 0.65 and 0.7 T m one of grains with predominant orientation grows at the expense of other grains. In all instances, the growth of the degree of shear deformation leads to the disappearance of all grain boundaries in the calculated cell under consideration.

  6. Continuous deformation versus episodic deformation at high stress - the microstructural record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepmann, C. A.; Stöckhert, B.

    2009-04-01

    The microstructural record of continuous high stress deformation is compared to that of episodic high stress deformation on two examples: 1. Folding of quartz veins in metagreywacke from Pacheco Pass, California, undergoing deformation by dissolution precipitation creep at temperatures of 300 ± 50°C. The microfabric of the folded quartz veins indicates deformation by dislocation creep accompanied by subgrain rotation. The small recrystallized grain size of ~8±6 µm in average implies relatively high differential stresses of a few hundred MPa. The stress concentration in the vein is due to a high contrast in effective viscosities between the single phase material and the polyphase fine-grained host metagreywacke deforming by dissolution precipitation creep. Smoothly curved, but generally not sutured, grain boundaries as well as the small size and a relatively high dislocation density of recrystallized grains suggest that strain-induced grain boundary migration was of minor importance. This is suspected to be a consequence of low strain gradients, which are due to the relative rates of dynamic recovery and continuous dislocation production during climb-controlled creep, at high stress and the given low temperature. Subgrain rotation recrystallization is thus proposed to be characteristic for continuous deformation at high differential stress. 2. Episodic deformation in the middle crust at the tip of a seismic active fault zone. The microfabric of mid-crustal rocks exhumed in tectonically active regions can record episodic high stress deformation at the base of the seismogenic layer. The quartz veins from St. Paul la Roche in the Massif Central, France, are very coarse grained. On the scale of a thin section they are basically single crystalline. However, they show a very heterogeneous microstructure with a system of healed microcracks that are decorated by subgrains and more rarely by small recrystallized grains. Undulating deformation lamellae that do not show a

  7. Dislocation characterization in cold rolled stainless steel using nonlinear ultrasonic techniques: A comprehensive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Xiang, Yanxun

    2013-09-01

    Both dislocation density and character in cold rolled stainless steel cause the change of acoustic nonlinearity. An analytical model considering the different oscillating motion of edge and screw dislocations is presented for the generation of ultrasonic harmonic wave during the process of multiplication and motion of dislocation. Results reveal that the edge dislocation induces stronger acoustic nonlinearity response than screw dislocation. The new model is certified by the application to the cold rolled stainless steel.

  8. A method for reducing pressure-induced deformation in silicone microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Inglis, David W

    2010-01-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS is an excellent material for replica molding, widely used in microfluidics research. Its low elastic modulus, or high deformability, assists its release from challenging molds, such as those with high feature density, high aspect ratios, and even negative sidewalls. However, owing to the same properties, PDMS-based microfluidic devices stretch and change shape when fluid is pushed or pulled through them. This paper shows how severe this change can be and gives a simple method for limiting this change that sacrifices few of the desirable characteristics of PDMS. A thin layer of PDMS between two rigid glass substrates is shown to drastically reduce pressure-induced shape changes while preserving deformability during mold separation and gas permeability. PMID:20697573

  9. Elastic anisotropy and shear-induced atomistic deformation of tetragonal silicon carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhao, Yaru; Zhou, Xinchun; Wei, Qun

    2014-07-14

    First-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features, elastic anisotropy, shear-induced atomistic deformation behaviors, and its electronic origin of the recently proposed superhard t-SiCN. According to the dependences of the elastic modulus on different crystal directions, the t-SiCN exhibits a well-pronounced elastic anisotropy which may impose certain limitations and restrictions on its applications. The further mechanical calculations demonstrated that t-SiCN shows lower elastic moduli and ideal shear strength than those of typical hard substances of TiN and TiC, suggesting that it cannot be intrinsically superhard as claimed in the recent works. We find that the failure modes of t-SiCN at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the breaking of C-C bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  10. Nanoindentation-induced phase transformation and structural deformation of monocrystalline germanium: a molecular dynamics simulation investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the nanoindentation of monocrystalline germanium. The path of phase transformation and distribution of transformed region on different crystallographic orientations were investigated. The results indicate the anisotropic behavior of monocrystalline germanium. The nanoindentation-induced phase transformation from diamond cubic structure to β-tin-Ge was found in the subsurface region beneath the tool when indented on the (010) plane, while direct amorphization was observed in the region right under the indenter when the germanium was loaded along the [101] and [111] directions. The transformed phases extend along the < 110 > slip direction of germanium. The depth and shape of the deformed layers after unloading are quite different according to the crystal orientation of the indentation plane. The study results suggest that phase transformation is the dominant mechanism of deformation of monocrystalline germanium film in nanoindentation. PMID:23947487

  11. Eye-Specific IOP-Induced Displacements and Deformations of Human Lamina Cribrosa

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Ian A.; Grimm, Jonathan L.; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Reid, Korey; Minckler, Don S.; Brown, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To measure high-resolution eye-specific displacements and deformations induced within the human LC microstructure by an acute increase in IOP. Methods. Six eyes from donors aged 23 to 82 were scanned using second harmonic-generated (SHG) imaging at various levels of IOP from 10 to 50 mm Hg. An image registration technique was developed, tested, and used to find the deformation mapping between maximum intensity projection images acquired at low and elevated IOP. The mappings were analyzed to determine the magnitude and distribution of the IOP-induced displacements and deformations and contralateral similarity. Results. Images of the LC were obtained and the registration technique was successful. IOP increases produced substantial, and potentially biologically significant, levels of in-plane LC stretch and compression (reaching 10%–25% medians and 20%–30% 75th percentiles). Deformations were sometimes highly focal and concentrated in regions as small as a few pores. Regions of largest displacement, stretch, compression, and shear did not colocalize. Displacements and strains were not normally distributed. Contralateral eyes did not always have more similar responses to IOP than unrelated eyes. Under elevated IOP, some LC regions were under bi-axial stretch, others under bi-axial compression. Conclusions. We obtained eye-specific measurements of the complex effects of IOP on the LC with unprecedented resolution in uncut and unfixed human eyes. Our technique was robust to electronic and speckle noise. Elevated IOP produced substantial in-plane LC stretch and compression. Further research will explore the effects of IOP on the LC in a three-dimensional framework. PMID:24334450

  12. Lithospheric deformation induced by loading of the Hawaiian Islands and its implications for mantle rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shijie; Watts, A. B.

    2013-11-01

    long-term rheological properties of the lithosphere are fundamental for understanding both surface tectonics and mantle dynamics on Earth. In this study, we have developed 3-D finite element models for computing the load-induced surface deformation and stress for lithosphere and mantle with realistic nonlinear viscoelastic rheology including the frictional sliding, low-temperature plasticity, and high-temperature creep. We have determined the lithospheric deformation and stress due to volcano loading in the Hawaiian Islands region for the last few million years. By comparing model predictions with seismic observations of the depth to the top of oceanic crust and depth dependence of seismicity in the Hawaiian Islands region, we have sought to constrain lithospheric rheology. Our calculations show that the load-induced surface deformation is controlled by low-temperature plasticity and frictional sliding but is insensitive to high-temperature creep. Lithospheric strength predicted from laboratory-derived low-temperature plasticity needs to be reduced significantly, and a frictional coefficient μf ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 is required in order to account for the observations. However, μf = 0.1 weakens the shallow part of the lithosphere so much that it causes the minima in strain rate and stress to occur at too large depths to be consistent with the observed depth distribution of seismicity. Our results therefore suggest a value for μf between 0.25 and 0.7. Finally, the maximum stress that accumulates in the deformed lithosphere beneath the Hawaiian Islands is about 100-200 MPa for models that match the observations, and this stress may be viewed as the largest lithospheric stress on Earth.

  13. Deformation-induced crystallization and associated morphology development of carbon nanotube-PVDF nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mago, Gaurav; Fisher, Frank T; Kalyon, Dilhan M

    2009-05-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a semicrystalline thermoplastic polymer that is of interest for sensor, actuator and biomedical applications because of its piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties, as well as outstanding mechanical and chemical properties. Although it is known that the shear-induced crystallization behavior of nanocomposites can be significantly affected by the presence of nanoparticles, the effects of the incorporation of carbon nanotubes on the deformation-induced crystallization and associated morphology development of PVDF have not been previously investigated. Here the dynamics of the shear-induced crystallization of carbon nanotubes incorporated in PVDF were investigated using simple shear flow. The shear-induced crystallization behavior was affected by the deformation rate, temperature, and the concentration of the carbon nanotubes. Time-dependence of linear viscoelastic properties indicated that the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in PVDF greatly altered the shear-induced crystallization kinetics of PVDF, while no significant changes in crystallization behavior were observed for pure PVDF samples sheared under similar conditions. Upon increase of the concentration of the MWNTs the crystal size of PVDF decreased while its rate of crystallization increased in conjunction with an increase of the beta phase crystallization. Overall, these findings suggest that the shear-induced crystallization of PVDF nanocomposites (and in general flow-induced crystallization effects associated with the thermo-mechanical history experienced by the nanocomposite during processing) should be integral parts of attempts to generate a comprehensive understanding of the development of the microstructural distributions and the coupled ultimate properties of polymer nanocomposites.

  14. Formation of helical dislocations in ammonothermal GaN substrate by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibuchi, Kayo; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kimoto, Yasuji; Nishikawa, Koichi; Kachi, Tetsu

    2016-03-01

    GaN substrate produced by the basic ammonothermal method and an epitaxial layer on the substrate was evaluated using synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy. We revealed that the threading dislocations present in the GaN substrate are deformed into helical dislocations and the generation of the voids by heat treatment in the substrate for the first observation in the GaN crystal. These phenomena are formed by the interactions between the dislocations and vacancies. The helical dislocation was formed in the substrate region, and not in the epitaxial layer region. Furthermore, the evaluation of the influence of the dislocations on the leakage current of Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on the epitaxial layer is discussed. The dislocations did not affect the leakage current characteristics of the epitaxial layer. Our results suggest that the deformation of dislocations in the GaN substrate does not adversely affect the epitaxial layer.

  15. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  16. Simulation of high-temperature superlocalization of plastic deformation in single-crystals of alloys with an L12 superstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'eva, Yu. V.; Fakhrutdinova, Ya. D.; Starenchenko, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The processes of the superlocalization of plastic deformation in L12 alloys have been studied numerically based on a combination of the model of the dislocation kinetics of the deformation-induced and heat-treatment-induced strengthening of an element of a deformable medium with the model of the mechanics of microplastic deformation described in terms of elastoplastic medium. It has been shown that the superlocalization of plastic deformation is determined by the presence of stress concentrators and by the nonmonotonic strengthening of the elements of the deformable medium. The multiple nonmonotonicity of the process of strengthening of the elementary volume of the medium can be responsible for the multiplicity of bands of microplastic localization of deformation.

  17. Electromechanical simulations of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Oxana; Gracie, Robert; Potapenko, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    Improving the reliability of micro-electronic devices depends in part on developing a more in-depth understanding of dislocations because dislocations are barriers to charge carriers. To this end, the quasi-static simulation of discrete dislocations dynamics in materials under mechanical and electrical loads is presented. The simulations are based on the extended finite element method, where dislocations are modelled as internal discontinuities. The strong and weak forms of the boundary value problem for the coupled system are presented. The computation of the Peach-Koehler force using the J-integral is discussed. Examples to illustrate the accuracy of the simulations are presented. The motion of the network of the dislocations under different electrical and mechanical loads is simulated. It was shown that even in weak piezoelectric materials the effect of the electric field on plastic behaviour is significant.

  18. Aluminizing a Ni sheet through severe plastic deformation induced by ball collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romankov, S.; Shchetinin, I. V.; Park, Y. C.

    2015-07-01

    Aluminizing a Ni sheet was performed through severe plastic deformation induced by ball collisions. The Ni sheet was fixed in the center of a mechanically vibrated vial between two connected parts. The balls were loaded into the vial on both sides of the Ni disk. Al disks, which were fixed on the top and the bottom of the vial, served as the sources of Al contamination. During processing, the Ni sheet was subject to intense ball collisions. The Al fragments were transferred and alloyed to the surface of the Ni sheet by these collisions. The combined effects of deformation-induced plastic flow, mechanical intermixing, and grain refinement resulted in the formation of a dense, continuous nanostructured Al layer on the Ni surface on both sides of the sheet. The Al layer consisted of Al grains with an average size of about 40 nm. The Al layer was reinforced with nano-sized Ni flakes that were introduced from the Ni surface during processing. The local amorphization at the Ni/Al interface revealed that the bonding between Ni and Al was formed by mechanical intermixing of atomic layers at the interface. The hardness of the fabricated Al layer was 10 times that of the initial Al plate. The ball collisions destroyed the initial rolling texture of the Ni sheet and induced the formation of the mixed [1 0 0] + [1 1 1] fiber texture. The laminar rolling structure of the Ni was transformed into an ultrafine grain structure.

  19. Bio-inspired dental multilayers: effects of layer architecture on the contact-induced deformation.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Niu, X; Rahbar, N; Soboyejo, W

    2013-02-01

    The ceramic crown structures under occlusal contact are idealized as flat multilayered structures that are deformed under Hertzian contact loading. Those multilayers consist of a crown-like ceramic top layer, an adhesive layer and the dentin-like substrate. Bio-inspired design of the adhesive layer proposed functionally graded multilayers (FGM) that mimic the dentin-enamel junction in natural teeth. This paper examines the effects of FGM layer architecture on the contact-induced deformation of bio-inspired dental multilayers. Finite element modeling was used to explore the effects of thickness and architecture on the contact-induced stresses that are induced in bio-inspired dental multilayers. A layered nanocomposite structure was then fabricated by the sequential rolling of micro-scale nanocomposite materials with local moduli that increase from the side near the soft dentin-like polymer composite foundation to the side near the top ceramic layer. The loading rate dependence of the critical failure loads is shown to be well predicted by a slow crack growth model, which integrates the actual mechanical properties that are obtained from nanoindentation experiments.

  20. Process-induced stress and deformation in thick-section thermosetting composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bogetti, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    The cure and process-induced stress and deformation development in thick-section thermosetting composites is presented. A two-dimensional anisotropic cure simulation analysis is developed to predict temperature and degree of cure distributions within arbitrary cross-sectional geometries as a function of the autoclave temperature history. Correlation between experimentally measured and predicted through-the-thickness temperature profiles in glass/polyester laminates are presented for various arbitrary temperature cure cycle histories. Several typical glass/polyester and graphite/epoxy structural elements of arbitrary cross-section are analyzed. Spatial gradients in degree of cure are shown to be strongly dependent on part geometry, thermal anisotropy, cure kinetics, and the autoclave temperature cure cycle. The cure simulation analysis is coupled to an incremental laminated plate theory model and a quasi-three-dimensional finite element analysis to study the complex relationships between gradients in temperature and degree of cure and process-induced stress and deformation unique to thick sections. Material models are developed to describe composite behavior during cure. Thermal expansion and cure shrinkage contribute to changes in material specific volume and represent important sources of internal loading included in the analysis. The effects of the autoclave temperature cure cycle, laminate thickness, resin shrinkage and laminate stacking sequence on the evolution of processing-induced stress and deformation are presented. Significant macroscopic stresses are shown to develop during the curing process of thick-section laminates. The results presented demonstrate that the mechanics and performance of thick-section thermosets are strongly dependent on processing history.

  1. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under nonhydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, Y. B.; Michaels, C. A.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.; Cook, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique. Quantitative analyses of the generated in situ Raman maps provide unique insight into the phase behavior of as-implanted a-Si. In particular, the occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were measured. The experimental results are linked with previously published papers on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a sequence for the development of deformation of a-Si under indentation loading. The sequence involves three distinct deformation mechanisms of a-Si: (1) reversible deformation, (2) increase in coordination defects (onset of plastic deformation), and (3) phase transformation. Estimated conditions for the occurrence of these mechanisms are given with respect to relevant intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, such as indentation stress, volumetric strain, and bond angle distribution (a measure for the structural order of the amorphous network). The induced volumetric strains are accommodated solely by reversible deformation of the tetrahedral network when exposed to small indentation stresses. At greater indentation stresses, the increased volumetric strains in the tetrahedral network lead to the formation of predominately fivefold coordination defects, which seems to mark the onset of irreversible or plastic deformation of the a-Si thin film. Further increase in the indentation stress appears to initiate the formation of sixfold coordinated atomic arrangements. These sixfold coordinated arrangements may maintain their amorphous tetrahedral structure with a high density of coordination defects or nucleate as a new crystalline

  2. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under non-hydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    PubMed Central

    Gerbig, Y.B; Michaels, C.A.; Bradby, J.E.; Haberl, B.; Cook, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique. Quantitative analyses of the generated in situ Raman maps provide unique, new insight into the phase behavior of as-implanted a-Si. In particular, the occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were measured. The experimental results are linked with previously published work on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a sequence for the development of deformation of a-Si under indentation loading. The sequence involves three distinct deformation mechanisms of a-Si: (1) reversible deformation, (2) increase in coordination defects (onset of plastic deformation), and (3) phase transformation. Estimated conditions for the occurrence of these mechanisms are given with respect to relevant intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, such as indentation stress, volumetric strain, and bond angle distribution (a measure for the structural order of the amorphous network). The induced volumetric strains are accommodated solely by reversible deformation of the tetrahedral network when exposed to small indentation stresses. At greater indentation stresses, the increased volumetric strains in the tetrahedral network lead to the formation of predominately five-fold coordination defects, which seems to mark the onset of irreversible or plastic deformation of the a-Si thin film. Further increase in the indentation stress appears to initiate the formation of six-fold coordinated atomic arrangements. These six-fold coordinated arrangements may maintain their amorphous tetrahedral structure with a high density of coordination defects or nucleate as a new crystalline

  3. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskiy, V. A. Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.

    2014-12-08

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the (111) slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  4. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalskiy, V. A.; Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the {111} slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  5. Visualizing dislocation nucleation by indenting colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Schall, Peter; Cohen, Itai; Weitz, David A; Spaepen, Frans

    2006-03-16

    The formation of dislocations is central to our understanding of yield, work hardening, fracture, and fatigue of crystalline materials. While dislocations have been studied extensively in conventional materials, recent results have shown that colloidal crystals offer a potential model system for visualizing their structure and dynamics directly in real space. Although thermal fluctuations are thought to play a critical role in the nucleation of these defects, it is difficult to observe them directly. Nano-indentation, during which a small tip deforms a crystalline film, is a common tool for introducing dislocations into a small volume that is initially defect-free. Here, we show that an analogue of nano-indentation performed on a colloidal crystal provides direct images of defect formation in real time and on the single particle level, allowing us to probe the effects of thermal fluctuations. We implement a new method to determine the strain tensor of a distorted crystal lattice and we measure the critical dislocation loop size and the rate of dislocation nucleation directly. Using continuum models, we elucidate the relation between thermal fluctuations and the applied strain that governs defect nucleation. Moreover, we estimate that although bond energies between particles are about fifty times larger in atomic systems, the difference in attempt frequencies makes the effects of thermal fluctuations remarkably similar, so that our results are also relevant for atomic crystals.

  6. Quantification of Crack Interaction in Loading-Induced Rock Deformation Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    The coalescence of microcracks into major fractures marks the onset of major damage in rock and induces significant changes in its geotechnical and sealing properties. The interaction between neighbouring fractures affects the deformation process leading to this major failure. This study presents the analysis of load-induced fracture using spatial and temporal patterns of recorded acoustic emission (AE) events to investigate the role of crack interaction during fracturing processes Two methods based on event separation are used to estimate correlation and interaction distances between events. The first method uses the spacing of sequential and non-sequential event pairs, thus, the distance bin where both distributions converge can be interpreted as an upper bound for the interaction distance of correlated events in each of the experiments. The second method compares the distribution of inter-event separation of recorded events with the distribution obtained for a random population of events, quantifying the divergence between both distributions and its variation with time. A positive deviation for a distance range including up to the interaction distance observed in the previous approach indicates spatial clustering and process dominated by interactive events. This deviation is used to quantify the degree of event interaction or degree of non-randomness (NR) during the process. Two load-stress induced fracturing tests, carried out at two different scales, are analysed in this study to investigate the role of crack interaction in the deformation and fracturing process. The first test registered a total of 15,198 AE events from a pillar created between two deposition holes at SKB's Aspö Pillar Stability Experiment. The results show a good correlation between maxima of NR and minima in b-value in the time period immediately preceding and during the development of the observed major damage in form of spalling. The result can be interpreted as an indication of spalling

  7. Deformation-induced nanoscale mixing reactions in Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2013-11-04

    During the repeated cold rolling of Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers, a solid solution forms at the interfaces as nanoscale layer structure with a composition that replicates the overall multilayer composition. The interfacial mixing behavior was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. During deformation induced reaction, the intermixing behavior of the Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers is in contrast to thermally activated diffusion behavior. This distinct behavior can provide new kinetic pathways and offer opportunities for microstructure control that cannot be achieved by thermal processing.

  8. Shock-induced deformation features in terrestrial peridot and lunar dunite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snee, L. W.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystals of terrestrial olivine were experimentally shock-loaded along the 010 line to peak pressures 280, 330, and 440 kbar, and the resulting deformation features were compared to those in olivine from lunar dunite 72415. Recovered fragments were examined to determine the orientation of the planar fractures. With increasing pressure the percentage of pinacoids and prisms decreases, whereas the percentage of bipyramids increases. The complexity of the distribution of bipyramids also increases with increasing pressure. Other shock-induced deformation features, including varying degrees of recrystallization, are found to depend on pressure, as observed by others. Lunar dunite 72415 was examined and found to contain olivine with well-developed shock-deformation features. The relative proportion of pinacoid, prism, and bipyramid planar fractures measured for olivine from 72415 indicates that this rock appears to have undergone shock pressure in the range 330-440 kbar. If this dunite was brought to the surface of the moon as a result of excavation of an Imbrium event-sized impact crater, the shock-pressure range experienced by the sample and the results of cratering calculations suggest that it could have originated no deeper than 50-150 km.

  9. Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka

    2004-01-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

  10. Strange behavior of dislocations of a certain type: Self-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The results of studying the self-locking of dislocations, namely, the transformation of glissile dislocations into blocked dislocations in the absence of an applied stress, are generalized. The existence of selflocking is theoretically grounded and experimentally proved via the observation of dislocation extension along a preferred direction upon loading-free heating after preliminary plastic deformation. The following concept is developed to explain the experimental results: an effective force appears in the case of a two-valley dislocation potential relief; it is proportional to the difference between the valley depths and causes the transformation of a dislocation into an indestructible barrier. The temperature anomaly of yield strength and the dislocation self-locking are shown to have the same nature—a two-valley dislocation potential relief. Both effects were observed in Ni3Al- and TiAl-type intermetallics and a pure metal (magnesium).

  11. A preliminary study on surface ground deformation near shallow foundation induced by strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pei-Syuan; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2016-04-01

    According to investigation of recent earthquakes, ground deformation and surface rupture are used to map the influenced range of the active fault. The zones of horizontal and vertical surface displacements and different features of surface rupture are investigated in the field, for example, the Greendale Fault 2010, MW 7.1 Canterbury earthquake. The buildings near the fault rotated and displaced vertically and horizontally due to the ground deformation. Besides, the propagation of fault trace detoured them because of the higher rigidity. Consequently, it's necessary to explore the ground deformation and mechanism of the foundation induced by strike-slip faulting for the safety issue. Based on previous study from scaled analogue model of strike-slip faulting, the ground deformation is controlled by material properties, depth of soil, and boundary condition. On the condition controlled, the model shows the features of ground deformation in the field. This study presents results from shear box experiment on small-scale soft clay models subjected to strike-slip faulting and placed shallow foundations on it in a 1-g environment. The quantifiable data including sequence of surface rupture, topography and the position of foundation are recorded with increasing faulting. From the result of the experiment, first en echelon R shears appeared. The R shears rotated to a more parallel angle to the trace and cracks pulled apart along them with increasing displacements. Then the P shears crossed the basement fault in the opposite direction appears and linked R shears. Lastly the central shear was Y shears. On the other hand, the development of wider zones of rupture, higher rising surface and larger the crack area on surface developed, with deeper depth of soil. With the depth of 1 cm and half-box displacement 1.2 cm, en echelon R shears appeared and the surface above the fault trace elevated to 1.15 mm (Dv), causing a 1.16 cm-wide zone of ground-surface rupture and deformation

  12. Neglected Posterior Dislocation of Hip in Children - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Kumar, Deepak; Sadana, Ashwani; Dinkar, Karuna Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic dislocation of the hip in children is a rare injury. We report the outcome of 2 patients of neglected hip dislocation which were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by k-wires. Case Report: We treat 2 children both girls (one was of 4 years and other was 7 years of age). In both cases dislocation was unilateral and was not associated with any facture. Both cases were of posterior dislocation. in both cases open reduction and internal fixation was done by k wires. Hip spica was applied post operatively in both cases. The k wire was removed at 3 to 4 weeks. Patients were allowed to bear weight from gradual to full weight bearing after 6 weeks. Conclusion: We conclude that open reduction is a satisfactory treatment for neglected hip dislocation. It prevents not only deformity but also maintains limb length. PMID:27298953

  13. Is the fracto-mechanoluminescence of ZnS:Mn phosphor dominated by charged dislocation mechanism or piezoelectrification mechanism?

    PubMed

    Chandra, B P; Chandra, V K; Jha, Piyush; Pateria, Deepti; Baghel, R N

    2016-02-01

    Mathematical approaches made for both the charged dislocation model and piezoelectrically induced electron bombardment model of fracto-mechanoluminescence (FML), the luminescence induced by fracture of solids, in ZnS:Mn phosphor indicate that the piezoelectrically induced electron bombardment model provides a dominating process for the FML of ZnS phosphors. The concentration of 3000 ppm Mn(2+) is optimal for ML intensity of ZnS:Mn phosphor. The decay time of ML gives the relaxation time of the piston used to deform the sample and the time tm of maximum of ML is controlled by both the relaxation time of the piston and decay time of charges on the newly created surfaces of crystals. As the product of the velocity of dislocations and pinning time of dislocations gives the mean free path of a moving dislocation. Both factors play an important role in the ML excitation of impurity doped II-VI semiconductors. The linear increase of total ML intensity IT with the impact velocity indicates that the damage increases linearly with impact velocity of the load. Thus, the ML measurement can be used remotely to monitor the real-time damage in the structures, and therefore, the ML of ZnS:Mn phosphor has also the potential for a structural health monitoring system.

  14. Deformation mechanisms in a Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yaping; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    The stress-induced phase transformation between C36 and C15 structures in Fe{sub 2}Zr is studied by electron microscopy. Nucleus of transformation is believed to be pre-existing C15 layers in C36 particles. Microstructural evidence for three mechanisms of growth of a new phase were found: Fault accumulation and rearrangement, moving of a individual partial dislocations between two phases, and the migration of microscopic ledges composed of a series of Shockley partials between C36 and C15. Plastic deformation by slip on non-basal planes of C36 caused by indentation is studied.

  15. Internal damping due to dislocation movements induced by thermal expansion mismatch between matrix and particles in metal matrix composites. [Al/SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Girand, C.; Lormand, G.; Fougeres, R.; Vincent, A. )

    1993-05-01

    In metal matrix composites (MMCs), the mechanical 1 of the reinforcement-matrix interface is an important parameter because it governs the load transfer from matrix to particles, from which the mechanical properties of these materials are derived. Therefore, it would be useful to set out an experimental method able to characterize the interface and the adjacent matrix behaviors. Thus, a study has been undertaken by means of internal damping (I.D.) measurements, which are well known to be very sensitive for studying irreversible displacements at the atomic scale. More especially, this investigation is based on the fact that, during cooling of MMC's, stress concentrations originating from differences in coefficients of thermal expansion (C.T.E.) of matrix and particles should induce dislocation movements in the matrix surrounding the reinforcement; that is, local microplastic strains occur. Therefore, during I.D. measurements vs temperature these movements should contribute to MMCs I.D. in a process similar to those involved around first order phase transitions in solids. The aim of this paper is to present, in the case of Al/SiC particulate composites, new developments of this approach that has previously led to promising results in the case of Al-Si alloys.

  16. Microstructures Resulting from Uniaxial Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers rely on the magnetic record preserved in magnetite when investigating magnetic field reversals, reconstructing past tectonic plate locations, and studying changes in the strength of the earth's magnetic field. Despite the extensive use of magnetite in scientific studies, the effects of dislocations on magnetite's remanence and magnetic stability are poorly understood, yet are crucial to understanding how magnetite records and maintains past magnetic field directions and intensities. To begin to address this need, we have studied the dislocation and defect structures in magnetite that form after controlled deformation. We have also measured major hysteresis loops to investigate the changes in remanence and coercivity that result from each of these deformation events. A single magnetite octahedron was cut into roughly equal bar-shaped pieces, and each was deformed uniaxially along a <121> direction at one atmosphere using a variety of temperature and pressure conditions, each selected to fall within the dislocation glide regime. Slices were cut from each deformed bar after deformation and investigated using a transmission electron microscope to characterize the types of deformation structures resulting from each of the temperature-pressure combinations. A variety of deformation structures were observed, especially dislocations and deformation bands. Dislocations were more common in samples deformed below 875°C. Hysteresis loops were measured for each sample with a field direction perpendicular to the deformation axis. Surprisingly, there is no significant difference in the bulk coercivity of a deformed and undeformed piece of magnetite.

  17. The ground deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with an overburden soil layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shaogang; Cai, Yong'en

    2013-12-01

    The surface deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with a thick, overburden soil layer is studied in this paper by the finite element method (FEM). The results show: (a) The maximum slip induced by the buried fault is not located at upper tip of the fault, but below it. (b) The vertical displacement changes remarkably near the fault, forming a fault scarp. With the increase of the soil layer thickness, the height of the scarp is decreased for the same earthquake magnitude. (c) The strong strain zone on the surface is localized near the projection of the fault tip on the ground surface. The horizontal strains in the zone are in tension above the hanging wall and in compression above the foot wall, and the vertical strains in the zone are vice versa, which is favorable for tensileshear, compression-shear fissures above hanging wall and foot wall, respectively.

  18. Understanding the microscopic processes that govern the charge-induced deformation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Koskinen, Pekka; Elsässer, Christian; Moseler, Michael

    2009-10-01

    While carbon nanotubes have technological potential as actuators, the underlying actuation mechanisms remain poorly understood. We calculate charge-induced stresses and strains for electrochemical actuation of carbon nanotubes with different chiralities and defects, using density-functional theory and various tight-binding models. For a given deformation mode the concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals can be redefined depending on the sign of a differential band-structure stress. We use this theoretical framework to analyze orbital contributions to the actuation. These show charge asymmetric behavior which is due to next-nearest-neighbor hopping while Coulombic contributions account for approximately charge-symmetric isotropic deformations. In the typical case of a (10,10) tube strains around 0.1% with 1 nN force along the tube axis are obtained. Defects and functional groups have negligible influence on the actuation. In multiwall tubes we find charge inversion on the inner tubes due to Friedel-type oscillations which could lead to a slight magnification of charge-induced strains. Finally, we consider photoactuation of nanotubes and predict that transitions between van-Hove singularities can be expected to expand the tubes.

  19. Gain reduction in an offset Gregorian antenna due to gravity-induced deformations and its compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, S.; King, L.; Norrod, R.

    A fully-steerable 100-meter radio telescope is under construction at Green Bank, WV and is scheduled for completion in 1995. This telescope, known as the Green Bank Telescope (GET), GET uses a double-offset design where the aperture of the antenna is completely free from blockage. The asymmetric primary reflector is a paraboloid of focal length 60 meters. The telescope uses a Gregorian configuration for frequencies above 1.15 GHz. The asymmetric subreflector is 7.5 meters in diameter. At prime focus the telescope provides continuous coverage in the 290-1230 MHz frequency band. A three-dimensional structure which includes the feed/subreflector support arm has bean carried out. This analysis gives the deformations of the structure induced by gravity as a function of elevation angle. Using this information, a scheme has been worked out to minimize the resultant reduction in beam peak gain by translation of the subreflector. At prime focus, compensation is achieved by translating the feed to track the focus of the best fit parabola. The compensation schemes will work for the slowly varying thermal and gravitational deformations but not for the rapid wind-induced disturbances. The secondary focus compensation scheme is presented.

  20. Magneto-induced large deformation and high-damping performance of a magnetorheological plastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Gong, Xinglong; Xu, Yangguang; Pang, Haoming; Xuan, Shouhu

    2014-10-01

    A magnetorheological plastomer (MRP) is a new kind of soft magneto-sensitive polymeric composite. This work reports on the large magneto-deforming effect and high magneto-damping performance of MRPs under a quasi-statical shearing condition. We demonstrate that an MRP possesses a magnetically sensitive malleability, and its magneto-mechanical behavior can be analytically described by the magneto-enhanced Bingham fluid-like model. The magneto-induced axial stress, which drives the deformation of the MRP with 70 wt % carbonyl iron powder, can be tuned in a large range from nearly 0.0 kPa to 55.4 kPa by an external 662.6 kA m-1 magnetic field. The damping performance of an MRP has a significant correlation with the magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. For an MRP with 60 wt % carbonyl iron powder, the relative magneto-enhanced damping effect can reach as high as 716.2% under a quasi-statically shearing condition. Furthermore, the related physical mechanism is proposed, and we reveal that the magneto-induced, particle-assembled microstructure directs the magneto-mechanical behavior of the MRP.

  1. A Wireless Intracranial Brain Deformation Sensing System for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, S.; Race, N. S.; Kim, A.; Zhang, T.; Shi, R.; Ziaie, B.

    2015-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has been linked to a multitude of delayed-onset neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, but complete understanding of their pathogenesis remains elusive. To develop mechanistic relationships between bTBI and post-blast neurological sequelae, it is imperative to characterize the initiating traumatic mechanical events leading to eventual alterations of cell, tissue, and organ structure and function. This paper presents a wireless sensing system capable of monitoring the intracranial brain deformation in real-time during the event of a bTBI. The system consists of an implantable soft magnet and an external head-mounted magnetic sensor that is able to measure the field in three dimensions. The change in the relative position of the soft magnet WITH respect to the external sensor as the result of the blast wave induces changes in the magnetic field. The magnetic field data in turn is used to extract the temporal and spatial motion of the brain under the blast wave in real-time. The system has temporal and spatial resolutions of 5 μs and 10 μm. Following the characterization and validation of the sensor system, we measured brain deformations in a live rodent during a bTBI. PMID:26586273

  2. Dislocations in extruded Co-49.3 at. pct Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaney, D. L.; Nix, W. D.; Pelton, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Polycrystalline Co-49.3 at. pct Al, which had been extruded at 1505 K, was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Diffraction contrast analysis showed that b = 100 as well as b = 111 line dislocations contribute to elevated temperature deformation in CoAl. Therefore, it was concluded that sufficient slip systems exist in CoAl to allow for general plasticity in the absence of diffusional mechanisms. Line dislocations of the type b = 001 were observed on both 110 and 100 planes while b = 111 line dislocations were observed on 1 -1 0 planes.

  3. Concentric reduction of the dislocated hip: computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Concentric reduction of a dislocated hip can be evaluated by anteroposterior views or linear tomography. Anterior relationships, however, may be difficult to evaluate from a frontal radiograph despite good visibility. Computed tomography (CT), because of its cross-sectional imaging capabilities, is superior in demonstrating these relationships. The CT appearance of two types of dislocations (posterior and lateral ) is described. A posterior dislocation should be suspected if the femoral metaphysis approximates the acetabulum, a mass projects behind the ischium, or the fat plane anterior to the gluteus maximus is deformed or displaced posteriorly.

  4. Modeling deformation-induced fluid flow in cortical bone's canalicular-lacunar system.

    PubMed

    Gururaja, S; Kim, H J; Swan, C C; Brand, R A; Lakes, R S

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential role that load-induced fluid flow plays as a mechano-transduction mechanism in bone adaptation, a lacunar-canalicular scale bone poroelasticity model is developed and implemented. The model uses micromechanics to homogenize the pericanalicular bone matrix, a system of straight circular cylinders in the bone matrix through which bone fluids can flow, as a locally anisotropic poroelastic medium. In this work, a simplified two-dimensional model of a periodic array of lacunae and their surrounding systems of canaliculi is used to quantify local fluid flow characteristics in the vicinity of a single lacuna. When the cortical bone model is loaded, microscale stress, and strain concentrations occur in the vicinity of individual lacunae and give rise to microscale spatial variations in the pore fluid pressure field. Furthermore, loading of the bone matrix containing canaliculi generates fluid pressures in the contained fluids. Consequently, loading of cortical bone induces fluid flow in the canaliculi and exchange of fluid between canaliculi and lacunae. For realistic bone morphology parameters, and a range of loading frequencies, fluid pressures and fluid-solid drag forces in the canalicular bone are computed and the associated energy dissipation in the models compared to that measured in physical in vitro experiments on human cortical bone. The proposed model indicates that deformation-induced fluid pressures in the lacunar-canalicular system have relaxation times on the order of milliseconds as opposed to the much shorter times (hundredths of milliseconds) associated with deformation-induced pressures in the Haversian system.

  5. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-07-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a (10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy.

  6. How to identify dislocations in molecular dynamics simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo; Wang, FengChao; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, YaPu

    2014-12-01

    Dislocations are of great importance in revealing the underlying mechanisms of deformed solid crystals. With the development of computational facilities and technologies, the observations of dislocations at atomic level through numerical simulations are permitted. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggests itself as a powerful tool for understanding and visualizing the creation of dislocations as well as the evolution of crystal defects. However, the numerical results from the large-scale MD simulations are not very illuminating by themselves and there exist various techniques for analyzing dislocations and the deformed crystal structures. Thus, it is a big challenge for the beginners in this community to choose a proper method to start their investigations. In this review, we summarized and discussed up to twelve existing structure characterization methods in MD simulations of deformed crystal solids. A comprehensive comparison was made between the advantages and disadvantages of these typical techniques. We also examined some of the recent advances in the dynamics of dislocations related to the hydraulic fracturing. It was found that the dislocation emission has a significant effect on the propagation and bifurcation of the crack tip in the hydraulic fracturing.

  7. Dislocation Starvation and Exhaustion Hardening in Mo-alloy Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Claire; Bei, Hongbin; Lowry, M. B.; Oh, Jason; Asif, S.A. Syed; Warren, O.; Shan, Zhiwei; George, Easo P; Minor, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of defects in Mo alloy nanofibers with initial dislocation densities ranging from 0 to 1.6 1014 m2 were studied using an in situ push-to-pull device in conjunction with a nanoindenter in a transmission electron microscope. Digital image correlation was used to determine stress and strain in local areas of deformation. When they had no initial dislocations the Mo alloy nanofibers suffered sudden catastrophic elongation following elastic deformation to ultrahigh stresses. At the other extreme fibers with a high dislocation density underwent sustained homogeneous deformation after yielding at much lower stresses. Between these two extremes nanofibers with intermediate dislocation densities demonstrated a clear exhaustion hardening behavior, where the progressive exhaustion of dislocations and dislocation sources increases the stress required to drive plasticity. This is consistent with the idea that mechanical size effects ( smaller is stronger ) are due to the fact that nanostructures usually have fewer defects that can operate at lower stresses. By monitoring the evolution of stress locally we find that exhaustion hardening causes the stress in the nanofibers to surpass the critical stress predicted for self-multiplication, supporting a plasticity mechanism that has been hypothesized to account for the rapid strain softening observed in nanoscale bcc materials at high stresses.

  8. Deformation mechanisms of Cu nanowires with planar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xia Yang, Haixia; Wan, Rui; Cui, Junzhi; Yu, Xingang

    2015-01-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanical behavior of Cu nanowires (NWs) with planar defects such as grain boundaries (GBs), twin boundaries (TBs), stacking faults (SFs), etc. To investigate how the planar defects affect the deformation and fracture mechanisms of naowires, three types of nanowires are considered in this paper: (1) polycrystalline Cu nanowire; (2) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with twin boundaries; and (3) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with stacking faults. Because of the large fraction of atoms at grain boundaries, the energy of grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains. Thus, grain boundaries are proved to be the preferred sites for dislocations to nucleate. Moreover, necking and fracture prefer to occur at the grain boundary interface owing to the weakness of grain boundaries. For Cu nanowires in the presence of twin boundaries, it is found that twin boundaries can strength nanowires due to the restriction of the movement of dislocations. The pile up of dislocations on twin boundaries makes them rough, inducing high energy in twin boundaries. Hence, twin boundaries can emit dislocations, and necking initiates at twin boundaries. In the case of Cu nanowires with stacking faults, all pre-existing stacking faults in the nanowires are observed to disappear during deformation, giving rise to a fracture process resembling the samples without stacking fault.

  9. Direct observation of deformation-induced grain growth during the nanoindentation of ultrafine-grained Al at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, M.; Minor, A.M.; Stach, E.A.; Morris, J.W. . E-mail: jwmorris@berkeley.edu

    2004-10-18

    In situ nanoindentation within a transmission electron microscope is used to investigate the deformation mechanisms in ultrafine-grained Al films. Deformation-induced grain growth resulting from grain boundary migration, grain rotation and grain coalescence is commonly observed as the indentation proceeds. In situ studies of nanograined films suggest that the same mechanisms are operative, though the difficulty of imaging nanosized grains makes the evidence less clear. The results suggest that grain growth and coalescence are important modes of response in the deformation of ultrafine- and nanograined materials.

  10. Including dislocation flux in a continuum crystal plasticity model to produce size scale effects

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Arsenlis, A; Bulatov, V V; Parks, D M

    2004-02-13

    A novel model has been developed to capture size scale and gradient effects within the context of continuum crystal plasticity by explicitly incorporating details of dislocation transport, coupling dislocation transport to slip, evolving spatial distributions of dislocations consistent with the flux, and capturing the interactions among various dislocation populations. Dislocation flux and density are treated as nodal degrees of freedom in the finite element model, and they are determined as part of the global system of equations. The creation, annihilation and flux of dislocations between elements are related by transport equations. Crystallographic slip is coupled to the dislocation flux and the stress state. The resultant gradients in dislocation density and local lattice rotations are analyzed for geometrically necessary and statistically stored dislocation contents that contribute to strength and hardening. Grain boundaries are treated as surfaces where dislocation flux is restricted depending on the relative orientations of the neighboring grains. Numerical results show different behavior near free surfaces and non-deforming surfaces resulting from differing levels of dislocation transmission. Simulations also show development of dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries and an increase in flow strength reminiscent of the Hall-Petch model. The dislocation patterns have a characteristic size independent of the numerical discretization.

  11. The development of physically based micro-mechanics - Based on the characteristic tip field of dislocation pileup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Q.; Liu, H. W.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the analytical solution by Eshelby et al. (1951) and the numerical calculations by Chou and Li (1969) and Armstrong et al. (1962), it is shown that the force, F, on the locked leading dislocation of a discrete dislocation pileup is capable of characterizing uniquely the stress, strain, and displacement field at the tip of the pileup, including the positions of the discrete mobile dislocations next to the leading dislocation. Conversely, the positions of the mobile dislocations can be used to measure F. The F thus measured can be used to study micro-plastic deformation and micro-fractures at grain boundaries or any other dislocation barriers.

  12. THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION AND DEFORMATION OF ZIRCONIUM UNDER CASCADE DAMAGE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barashev, Alexander V; Golubov, Stanislav I; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-06-01

    This work is based on our reaction-diffusion model of radiation growth of Zr-based materials proposed recently in [1]. In [1], the equations for the strain rates in unloaded pure crystal under cascade damage conditions of, e.g., neutron or heavy-ion irradiation were derived as functions of dislocation densities, which include contributions from dislocation loops, and spatial distribution of their Burgers vectors. The model takes into account the intra-cascade clustering of self-interstitial atoms and their one-dimensional diffusion; explains the growth stages, including the break-away growth of pre-annealed samples; and accounts for some striking observations, such as of negative strain in prismatic direction, and co-existence of vacancy- and interstitial-type prismatic loops. In this report, the change of dislocation densities due to accumulation of sessile dislocation loops is taken into account explicitly to investigate the dose dependence of radiation growth. The dose dependence of climb rates of dislocations is calculated, which is important for the climb-induced glide model of radiation creep. The results of fitting the model to available experimental data and some numerical calculations of the strain behavior of Zr for different initial dislocation structures are presented and discussed. The computer code RIMD-ZR.V1 (Radiation Induced Microstructure and Deformation of Zr) developed is described and attached to this report.

  13. What dislocation modelling at the atomic scale tell us about the strength of MgSiO3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraych, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heat transfer through the mantle is carried by convection, which involves plastic flow of the mantle constituents. The plasticity of (Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)O3 Bridgmanite, the main constituent of the lower mantle, is therefore crucial to understand the Earth's dynamics. Its deformation occurs at extreme pressure and temperature conditons (from 30 to 140 GPa, 2000 to 3000 K) and very low strain rate (from 10-12 to 10-16 s-1), the latter being impossible to reach experimentally. Here we calculate the strength of MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv), by modelling [100] and [010] dislocations at the atomic scale with molecular statics calculation. To assess the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate action of stress and temperature, we describe their behaviour into a kink-pair model. We develop therefore a velocity model informed by atomistic calculations, taking into account P, T, stress and deformation strain-rate. We show that our model is consistent with deformation experiments on perovskite (see figure), and can also be used to calculate the strength of Mg-Pv induced by dislocation creep at natural strain rate relevant to the mantle.

  14. The effect of length scale on the determination of geometrically necessary dislocations via EBSD continuum dislocation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, T J; Rampton, T M; Khosravani, A; Fullwood, D T

    2016-05-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) dislocation microscopy is an important, emerging field in metals characterization. Currently, calculation of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density is problematic because it has been shown to depend on the step size of the EBSD scan used to investigate the sample. This paper models the change in calculated GND density as a function of step size statistically. The model provides selection criteria for EBSD step size as well as an estimate of the total dislocation content. Evaluation of a heterogeneously deformed tantalum specimen is used to asses the method. PMID:26986021

  15. Medial subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kinik, H; Oktay, O; Arikan, M; Mergen, E

    1999-01-01

    We report a medial subtalar dislocation without fracture in an eighteen year old male injured during basketball game. He was successfully treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. At one year follow-up he was symptomless.

  16. Dislocation damping and anisotropic seismic wave attenuation in Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Farla, Robert J M; Jackson, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D; Faul, Ulrich H; Zimmerman, Mark E

    2012-04-20

    Crystal defects form during tectonic deformation and are reactivated by the shear stress associated with passing seismic waves. Although these defects, known as dislocations, potentially contribute to the attenuation of seismic waves in Earth's upper mantle, evidence for dislocation damping from laboratory studies has been circumstantial. We experimentally determined the shear modulus and associated strain-energy dissipation in pre-deformed synthetic olivine aggregates under high pressures and temperatures. Enhanced high-temperature background dissipation occurred in specimens pre-deformed by dislocation creep in either compression or torsion, the enhancement being greater for prior deformation in torsion. These observations suggest the possibility of anisotropic attenuation in relatively coarse-grained rocks where olivine is or was deformed at relatively high stress by dislocation creep in Earth's upper mantle. PMID:22517856

  17. Dislocation damping and anisotropic seismic wave attenuation in Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Farla, Robert J M; Jackson, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D; Faul, Ulrich H; Zimmerman, Mark E

    2012-04-20

    Crystal defects form during tectonic deformation and are reactivated by the shear stress associated with passing seismic waves. Although these defects, known as dislocations, potentially contribute to the attenuation of seismic waves in Earth's upper mantle, evidence for dislocation damping from laboratory studies has been circumstantial. We experimentally determined the shear modulus and associated strain-energy dissipation in pre-deformed synthetic olivine aggregates under high pressures and temperatures. Enhanced high-temperature background dissipation occurred in specimens pre-deformed by dislocation creep in either compression or torsion, the enhancement being greater for prior deformation in torsion. These observations suggest the possibility of anisotropic attenuation in relatively coarse-grained rocks where olivine is or was deformed at relatively high stress by dislocation creep in Earth's upper mantle.

  18. Lens dislocation has a possible relationship with laser iridotomy.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tetsuya; Barrette, Kevin F; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Chikuda, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    We report our recent experience of four eyes with spontaneous lens dislocation in four patients with no history of trauma or any systemic disease associated with zonular dialysis. Lens dislocation developed with 0.5 to 6 months following laser iridotomy. All patients were male and two eyes were complicated with acute primary angle closure glaucoma preoperatively. Case 1 showed bilateral lens dislocation, while cases 2 and 3 involved unilateral lens dislocation. Cases 2 and 3 showed lenses completely dislocated into the vitreous cavity. All cases needed lens removal and scleral fixation of intraocular lenses. Final visual acuity was 1.2 in all cases. We suspect that laser iridotomy may induce localized zonular dialysis that results in progressive zonular weakness, leading to lens dislocation. PMID:23271880

  19. Constraints on Lithosphere Rheology from Observations of Volcano-induced Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Watts, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle rheology at lithospheric conditions (i.e., temperature < 1200 oC) is important for understanding fundamental geodynamic problems including the dynamics of plate tectonics, subducted slabs, and lithosphere-mantle interaction. Laboratory studies suggest that the rheology at lithospheric conditions can be approximately divided into three different regimes: brittle or frictional sliding, semi-brittle, and plastic flow. In this study, we seek to constrain lithospheric rheology, using observations of deformation at seamounts and oceanic islands caused by volcanic loading. Volcano-induced surface deformation depends critically on lithospheric rheology at the time of seamount and oceanic island emplacement and while it changes rapidly on short time-scales it does not change significantly on long time-scales. In an earlier study [Watts and Zhong, 2000], we used the effective elastic thickness at seamounts and oceanic islands inferred from the observations of deformation and gravity to determine an effective activation energy of 120 KJ/mol for lithospheric mantle with Newtonian rheology. We have now expanded this study to incorporate non-Newtonian power-law and frictional sliding rheologies, and more importantly, to include realistic 3-D volcanic load geometries. We use the Hawaiian Islands as an example. We construct 3-D loads for the Hawaiian Islands by applying an appropriate median filter to remove Hawaiian swell topography and correcting for lithospheric age effect on the bathymetry. The loads are then used in 3-D finite element loading models with viscoelastic, non-Newtonian and frictional sliding rheologies to determine the lithospheric response including surface vertical motions and lithospheric stresses. Comparisons of our new model predictions to observations suggest that the activation energy of lithospheric mantle is significantly smaller than most experimentally determined values for olivine at high temperatures, but may be consistent with more recent

  20. Geomorphic response to tectonically-induced ground deformation in the Wabash Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, G.S.; Thompson, T.A.; Olyphant, G.A.; Furer, L.; Bennett, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous low- to moderate-intensity earthquakes have been recorded in a zone of diffuse modern seismicity in southwest Indiana, southeast Illinois, and northernmost Kentucky. Structural elements within the zone include the Wabash Valley Fault System, the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt in western Illinois, and the Rough Creek-Shawneetown Fault System in northern Kentucky. The presence of seismically-induced liquefaction features in the near-surface alluvial sediments in the region indicates that strong ground motion has occurred in the recent geological past, but because the glacial and alluvial sediments in the Wabash Valley appear to be otherwise undisturbed, post-Paleozoic ground deformation resulting from movement on these structural elements has not yet been documented. Morphometric analysis of the land surface, detailed mapping of geomorphic elements in the valley, reconnaissance drilling of the Holocene and Pleistocene alluvium, and structural analysis of the bedrock underlying the valley were used to determine whether the geomorphology of the valley and the patterns of alluviation of the Wabash River were affected by surface deformation associated with the seismic zone during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Among the observed features in the valley that can be attributed to deformation are: (1) tilting of the modern land surface to the west, (2) preferred channel migration toward the west side of the valley, with concomitant impact on patterns of soil development and sedimentation rate, (3) a convex longitudinal profile of the Wabash River where it crosses the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt, and (4) increased incision of the river into its floodplain downstream from the anticlinal belt.

  1. Electronic selection rules controlling dislocation glide in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis E; Eberhart, Mark E; Clougherty, Dennis P; Woodward, Chris

    2008-08-22

    The validity of the structure-property relationships governing the low-temperature deformation behavior of many bcc metals was brought into question with recent ab initio density functional studies of isolated screw dislocations in Mo and Ta. These relationships were semiclassical in nature, having grown from atomistic investigations of the deformation properties of the group V and VI transition metals. We find that the correct form for these structure-property relationships is fully quantum mechanical, involving the coupling of electronic states with the strain field at the core of long a/<2111> screw dislocations. PMID:18764636

  2. Electronic Selection Rules Controlling Dislocation Glide in bcc Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Travis E.; Eberhart, Mark E.; Clougherty, Dennis P.; Woodward, Chris

    2008-08-01

    The validity of the structure-property relationships governing the low-temperature deformation behavior of many bcc metals was brought into question with recent ab initio density functional studies of isolated screw dislocations in Mo and Ta. These relationships were semiclassical in nature, having grown from atomistic investigations of the deformation properties of the group V and VI transition metals. We find that the correct form for these structure-property relationships is fully quantum mechanical, involving the coupling of electronic states with the strain field at the core of long a/2⟨111⟩ screw dislocations.

  3. Wall-Thickness Dependence of Cooling-Induced Deformation of Polystyrene Spherical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Goto, K.; Yasuda, M.; Fujima, Y.

    2003-05-15

    Experiments on the wall-thickness dependence of the cooling-induced deformation (CID) of polystyrene (PS) spherical shells were carried out. For the experiments, the PS shells were fabricated by the density-matched emulsion method using the hand-shaken microencapsulation technique. The number-averaged and weight-averaged molecular weights of the PS were M{sub n} 1.1 x 10{sup 5} and M{sub w} = 4.0 x 10{sup 5}, respectively. The diameter of the PS shells was {approx}400-550 {mu}m. To investigate the wall-thickness dependence of the CID, the wall thickness of the PS shells was varied between 5 and 60 {mu}m. In the experiments, the PS shells were cooled by using liquid nitrogen, and their images were captured at 0 and -190 deg. C. For the investigation of the CID, two shapes of each shell that were measured at 0 and -190 deg. C were compared. The thinner PS shells showed larger CID. The maximum deformation was almost 1% of the outer radius when the shell aspect ratio (outer radius)/(wall thickness) was higher than 20. The repeatability of the CID was studied, and the results implied that residual stress in the PS shells had an influence on the CID.

  4. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under nonhydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Michaels, C. A.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Haberl, Bianca; Cook, Robert F.

    2015-12-17

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique (IIT). The occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were observed. Furthermore, the obtained experimental results are linked with previously published work on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a model for the deformation behavior of a-Si under indentation loading.

  5. Ultra-smooth metal surfaces generated by pressure-induced surface deformation of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logeeswaran, V. J.; Chan, M.-L.; Bayam, Y.; Saif Islam, M.; Horsley, D. A.; Li, X.; Wu, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Williams, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    We present a mechanical pressing technique for generating ultra-smooth surfaces on thin metal films by flattening the bumps, asperities, rough grains and spikes of a freshly vacuum deposited metal film. The method was implemented by varying the applied pressure from 100 MPa to 600 MPa on an e-beam evaporated silver film of thickness 1000 Å deposited on double-polished (100)-oriented silicon surfaces, resulting in a varying degree of film smoothness. The surface morphology of the thin film was studied using atomic force microscopy. Notably, at a pressure of ˜600 MPa an initial silver surface with 13-nm RMS roughness was plastically deformed and transformed to an ultra-flat plane with better than 0.1 nm RMS. Our demonstration with the e-beam evaporated silver thin film exhibits the potential for applications in decreasing the scattering-induced losses in optical metamaterials, plasmonic nanodevices and electrical shorts in molecular-scale electronic devices.

  6. Rotating Rig Development for Droplet Deformation/Breakup and Impact Induced by Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feo, A.; Vargas, M.; Sor, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the development of a Rotating Rig Facility by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility is located at the INTA installations near Madrid, Spain. It has been designed to study the deformation, breakup and impact of large droplets induced by aerodynamic bodies. The importance of these physical phenomena is related to the effects of Supercooled Large Droplets in icing clouds on the impinging efficiency of the droplets on the body, that may change should these phenomena not be taken into account. The important variables and the similarity parameters that enter in this problem are presented. The facility's components are described and some possible set-ups are explained. Application examples from past experiments are presented in order to indicate the capabilities of the new facility.

  7. Measurement and compensation of laser-induced wavefront deformations and focal shifts in near IR optics.

    PubMed

    Stubenvoll, Martin; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of passive compensation of the thermal lens effect in fused silica optics, placing suitable optical materials with negative dn/dT in the beam path of a high power near IR fiber laser. Following a brief overview of the involved mechanisms, photo-thermal absorption measurements with a Hartmann-Shack sensor are described, from which coefficients for surface/coating and bulk absorption in various materials are determined. Based on comprehensive knowledge of the 2D wavefront deformations resulting from absorption, passive compensation of thermally induced aberrations in complex optical systems is possible, as illustrated for an F-Theta objective. By means of caustic measurements during high-power operation we are able to demonstrate a 60% reduction of the focal shift in F-Theta lenses through passive compensation.

  8. Poroelastic theory applied to the adsorption-induced deformation of vitreous silica.

    PubMed

    Coasne, Benoit; Weigel, Coralie; Polian, Alain; Kint, Mathieu; Rouquette, Jérome; Haines, Julien; Foret, Marie; Vacher, René; Rufflé, Benoit

    2014-12-11

    When vitreous silica is submitted to high pressures under a helium atmosphere, the change in volume observed is much smaller than expected from its elastic properties. It results from helium penetration into the interstitial free volume of the glass network. We present here the results of concurrent spectroscopic experiments using either helium or neon and molecular simulations relating the amount of gas adsorbed to the strain of the network. We show that a generalized poromechanical approach, describing the elastic properties of microporous materials upon adsorption, can be applied successfully to silica glass in which the free volume exists only at the subnanometer scale. In that picture, the adsorption-induced deformation accounts for the small apparent compressibility of silica observed in experiments. PMID:25383694

  9. Measurement and compensation of laser-induced wavefront deformations and focal shifts in near IR optics.

    PubMed

    Stubenvoll, Martin; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of passive compensation of the thermal lens effect in fused silica optics, placing suitable optical materials with negative dn/dT in the beam path of a high power near IR fiber laser. Following a brief overview of the involved mechanisms, photo-thermal absorption measurements with a Hartmann-Shack sensor are described, from which coefficients for surface/coating and bulk absorption in various materials are determined. Based on comprehensive knowledge of the 2D wavefront deformations resulting from absorption, passive compensation of thermally induced aberrations in complex optical systems is possible, as illustrated for an F-Theta objective. By means of caustic measurements during high-power operation we are able to demonstrate a 60% reduction of the focal shift in F-Theta lenses through passive compensation. PMID:25401572

  10. Ritually induced growth disturbances and deformities of the orofacial system--a contribution to cranial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dietze, S; Winkelmann, D; Garve, R; Blens, T; Fanghänel, J; Proff, P; Gedrange, T; Maile, S

    2007-01-01

    Numerous ritual acts involving the skull result in orofacial changes. The present study focuses on ritual acts of Brazilian Zoé Indians. A distinct deformation effect of the ritual act (wearing a lip-plug) on the morphology of the orofacial system is demonstrated and documented using jaw models. The studies show that the lip-plug significantly influences tooth position and jaw growth. While the maxilla displays palatal displacement of the lateral incisors and elevation of the palate, retraction occurs in the mandible depending upon plug size. Additionally, both the plug and the nutritional habits of the Indians induce marked abrasion of all teeth. Moreover, it is shown that the duration of lip-plug wear is an essential determinant of sustained orofacial changes.

  11. Orientation dependence of the dislocation microstructure in compressed body-centered cubic molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Wang, M.P.; Chen, C.; Xiao, Z.; Jia, Y.L.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z.X.

    2014-05-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in commercial pure molybdenum. After deformation, the dislocation boundaries of compressed molybdenum can be classified, similar to that in face-centered cubic metals, into three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries parallel to (Type 1) or not parallel to (Type 3) a (110) trace. However, it shows a reciprocal relationship between face-centered cubic metals and body-centered cubic metals on the orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure. The higher the strain, the finer the microstructure is and the smaller the inclination angle between extended planar boundaries and the compression axis is. - Highlights: • A reciprocal relationship between FCC metals and BCC metals is confirmed. • The dislocation boundaries can be classified into three types in compressed Mo. • The dislocation characteristic of different dislocation boundaries is different.

  12. Reversible Movement of Homogenously Nucleated Dislocations in a {beta}-Titanium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J. P.; Hao, Y. L.; Li, S. J.; Sui, M. L.; Li, D. X.; Yang, R.

    2009-01-30

    We demonstrate reversible movement of (1/2)[110](110) dislocation loops generated from nanodisturbances in a {beta}-titanium alloy. High resolution transmission electron microscope observations during an in situ tensile test found three reversible deformation mechanisms, nanodisturbances, dislocation loops and martensitic transformation, that are triggered in turn with increasing applied stress. All three mechanisms contribute to the nonlinear elasticity of the alloy. The experiments also revealed the evolution of the dislocation loops to disclination dipoles that cause severe local lattice rotations.

  13. Mechanism of grain growth during severe plastic deformation of a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Wang, Y B; Ho, J C; Liao, X Z; Zhu, Y T; Ringer, S P

    2009-01-01

    Deformation induced grain growth has been widely reported in nanocrystalline materials. However, the grain growth mechanism remains an open question. This study applies high-pressure torsion to severely deform bulk nanocrystalline Ni-20 wt % Fe disks and uses transmission electron microscopy to characterize the grain growth process. Our results provide solid evidence suggesting that high pressure torsion induced grain growth is achieved primarily via grain rotation for grains much smaller than 100 nm. Dislocations are mainly seen at small-angle subgrain boundaries during the grain growth process but are seen everywhere in grains after the grains have grown large.

  14. Electric field-induced deformation of high-k doped PDMS spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubblefield, Jeff

    Electric fields have been shown to exert forces on both charged and uncharged dielectric objects. If these objects have a relatively high dielectric constant (k), the electric field-induced force becomes even more significant and can add to the electric field sensitivity of the overall object. In this report, we investigate such an effect on the morphology dependent optical resonances, or MDR (also called the whispering gallery modes, WGM), of polymeric microspheres that are both pristine and doped with varying amounts of nanopowder materials, which include barium titanate, carbon black and calcium copper titanate. The doped microspheres have significantly higher dielectric constants than their pure polymeric counterparts. In the presence of an external electric field, a net charge will develop on the microsphere surface, contributing to the elastic deformation of the microsphere (strain effect). This effect is time-dependent and exhibits an exponential behavior (reaches an asymptotic value of deformation with a time constant unique to the sphere type). There is also an accompanying change in the refractive index (stress effect) of the polymeric-based material. Acting together, these changes induce a shift in the MDR (or WGM) of the microsphere. In the present study, analytical expressions of the MDR shifts were obtained for a solid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere as a function of the applied electrostatic field and curing agent ratio. The curing agent ratio refers to the volumetric ratio of the polymer base material to the curing agent used to cross-link the polymer chains. This value is typically given as a ratio of x:y, where x denotes the volume of polymer base material and y denotes the volume of the curing agent. Experiments were conducted using 10:1 and 60:1 PDMS microspheres, whose diameters ranged from 700 microm to 1 mm. The 10:1 PDMS microspheres were considered since the material properties at this ratio are well-known and are typically used in

  15. Edge dislocation induced self-assembly of InGaN nano-flower on GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Lai; Wang, Jiaxing; Hao, Zhibiao; Luo, Yi

    2011-07-01

    InGaN nano-flowers are self-assembled on GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy photos show the nano-flower structure is formed through InGaN quantum dots aggregating around the exposure site of the edge dislocation extending to the surface. Calculation on the strain states indicates that the edge dislocation can generate lateral tensile and compressive strain regions on the surface, but the screw dislocation cannot. And the tensile strain regions are corresponding to the shape of the nano-flower. This is attributed to that the tensile GaN lattices on surface are easy to attract adatoms to form InGaN quantum dots.

  16. Kinematic assumptions and their consequences on the structure of field equations in continuum dislocation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbermann, C. B.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-03-01

    Continuum Dislocation Theory (CDT) relates gradients of plastic deformation in crystals with the presence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Therefore, the dislocation tensor is introduced as an additional thermodynamic state variable which reflects tensorial properties of dislocation ensembles. Moreover, the CDT captures both the strain energy from the macroscopic deformation of the crystal and the elastic energy of the dislocation network, as well as the dissipation of energy due to dislocation motion. The present contribution deals with the geometrically linear CDT. More precise, the focus is on the role of dislocation kinematics for single and multi-slip and its consequences on the field equations. Thereby, the number of active slip systems plays a crucial role since it restricts the degrees of freedom of plastic deformation. Special attention is put on the definition of proper, well-defined invariants of the dislocation tensor in order to avoid any spurious dependence of the resulting field equations on the coordinate system. It is shown how a slip system based approach can be in accordance with the tensor nature of the involved quantities. At first, only dislocation glide in one active slip system of the crystal is allowed. Then, the special case of two orthogonal (interacting) slip systems is considered and the governing field equations are presented. In addition, the structure and symmetry of the backstress tensor is investigated from the viewpoint of thermodynamical consistency. The results will again be used in order to facilitate the set of field equations and to prepare for a robust numerical implementation.

  17. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  18. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  19. A parallel algorithm for 3D dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Ghoniem, Nasr; Swaminarayan, Sriram; LeSar, Richard

    2006-12-01

    Dislocation dynamics (DD), a discrete dynamic simulation method in which dislocations are the fundamental entities, is a powerful tool for investigation of plasticity, deformation and fracture of materials at the micron length scale. However, severe computational difficulties arising from complex, long-range interactions between these curvilinear line defects limit the application of DD in the study of large-scale plastic deformation. We present here the development of a parallel algorithm for accelerated computer simulations of DD. By representing dislocations as a 3D set of dislocation particles, we show here that the problem of an interacting ensemble of dislocations can be converted to a problem of a particle ensemble, interacting with a long-range force field. A grid using binary space partitioning is constructed to keep track of node connectivity across domains. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of the parallel micro-plasticity code and discuss how O(N) methods map naturally onto the parallel data structure. Finally, we present results from applications of the parallel code to deformation in single crystal fcc metals.

  20. Microscopic theory of light-induced deformation in amorphous side-chain azobenzene polymers.

    PubMed

    Toshchevikov, V; Saphiannikova, M; Heinrich, G

    2009-04-16

    We propose a microscopic theory of light-induced deformation of side-chain azobenzene polymers taking into account the internal structure of polymer chains. Our theory is based on the fact that interaction of chromophores with the polarized light leads to the orientation anisotropy of azobenzene macromolecules which is accompanied by the appearance of mechanical stress. It is the first microscopic theory which provides the value of the light-induced stress larger than the yield stress. This result explains a possibility for the inscription of surface relief gratings in glassy side-chain azobenzene polymers. For some chemical architectures, elongation of a sample demonstrates a nonmonotonic behavior with the light intensity and can change its sign (a stretched sample starts to be uniaxially compressed), in agreement with experiments. Using a viscoplastic approach, we show that the irreversible strain of a sample, which remains after the light is switched off, decreases with increasing temperature and can disappear at certain temperature below the glass transition temperature. This theoretical prediction is also confirmed by recent experiments.

  1. Measuring surface dislocation nucleation in defect-scarce nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lisa Y; He, Mo-rigen; Shin, Jungho; Richter, Gunther; Gianola, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Linear defects in crystalline materials, known as dislocations, are central to the understanding of plastic deformation and mechanical strength, as well as control of performance in a variety of electronic and photonic materials. Despite nearly a century of research on dislocation structure and interactions, measurements of the energetics and kinetics of dislocation nucleation have not been possible, as synthesizing and testing pristine crystals absent of defects has been prohibitively challenging. Here, we report experiments that directly measure the surface dislocation nucleation strengths in high-quality 〈110〉 Pd nanowhiskers subjected to uniaxial tension. We find that, whereas nucleation strengths are weakly size- and strain-rate-dependent, a strong temperature dependence is uncovered, corroborating predictions that nucleation is assisted by thermal fluctuations. We measure atomic-scale activation volumes, which explain both the ultrahigh athermal strength as well as the temperature-dependent scatter, evident in our experiments and well captured by a thermal activation model. PMID:25985457

  2. Cell membrane deformation and bioeffects produced by tandem bubble-induced jetting flow

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Yang, Chen; Zhong, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation with bubble–bubble interaction is a fundamental feature in therapeutic ultrasound. However, the causal relationships between bubble dynamics, associated flow motion, cell deformation, and resultant bioeffects are not well elucidated. Here, we report an experimental system for tandem bubble (TB; maximum diameter = 50 ± 2 μm) generation, jet formation, and subsequent interaction with single HeLa cells patterned on fibronectin-coated islands (32 × 32 μm) in a microfluidic chip. We have demonstrated that pinpoint membrane poration can be produced at the leading edge of the HeLa cell in standoff distance Sd ≤ 30 μm, driven by the transient shear stress associated with TB-induced jetting flow. The cell membrane deformation associated with a maximum strain rate on the order of 104 s−1 was heterogeneous. The maximum area strain (εA,M) decreased exponentially with Sd (also influenced by adhesion pattern), a feature that allows us to create distinctly different treatment outcome (i.e., necrosis, repairable poration, or nonporation) in individual cells. More importantly, our results suggest that membrane poration and cell survival are better correlated with area strain integral (∫​εA2dt) instead of εA,M, which is characteristic of the response of materials under high strain-rate loadings. For 50% cell survival the corresponding area strain integral was found to vary in the range of 56 ∼ 123 μs with εA,M in the range of 57 ∼ 87%. Finally, significant variations in individual cell’s response were observed at the same Sd, indicating the potential for using this method to probe mechanotransduction at the single cell level. PMID:26663913

  3. Energetics and Noise in dislocation patterning.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, R. M.; Koslowski, M.; LeSar, R. ,

    2004-01-01

    The competition between energy and noise in the patterning transition in deformation is explored by employing a 2D model of parallel straight edge dislocations. We define a generalized force for ordering and show that at mechanical equilibrium, the ordering force is equal to the average back stress noise on the slip plane. We consider a system subjected to a total external strain that is a uniform linear function of time. When the external stress reaches a critical value that depends on the instantaneous state of strain and dislocation content, a discrete strain event occurs (what we have called elsewhere a percolation event) with the formation of one or perhaps a few micro slip steps on the surface. Within these micro slip bands, the dislocation content increases in a time short compared to the time between strain events. After the stress drop associated with the stain event, the strain stops. During the time between events, the configuration relaxes to a new equilibrium configuration, which may include thermally generated recovery. As the stress again builds owing to the continuously increasing total strain, it reaches a new critical stress determined by the newly achieved dislocation configuration. Our modeling addresses the changes during the relaxation of the system in the time between events. In our model, the initial state is a random configuration i.e., it does not contain any memory of the previous state of the deforming system. This is an extreme assumption, because in a real system, the order will evolve from one event to the next. Nevertheless, if the real system does order, we expect this to be captured in the model - we will simply be careful not to predict the quantitative order in the evolving system from our modeling.

  4. Quantitative observations of dislocation mechanisms in gamma TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Viguier, B.; Cieslar, M.; Martin, J.L.; Hemker, K.J.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative TEM observations have been made on a series of gamma Ti{sub 47}Al{sub 51}Mn{sub 2} polycrystals that were deformed at different temperatures. Special attention has been given to determining the statistical variation of defect densities that occur at the different temperatures. The results, which are in good agreement with mechanical testing, indicate that three different mechanisms control deformation in this alloy: lattice friction and the formation of faulted dipoles at low temperatures, the pinning of ordinary dislocations at intermediate temperatures, and the bowing and looping of dislocations at high temperatures. The anomalous flow strength of this alloy has been found to be related to the intrinsic pinning of ordinary dislocations. Details of this pinning and subsequent unzipping process, which are the basis for the new local-pinning-unzipping (LPU) models, are outlined within.

  5. The effect of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms of the <123> Hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Tukeev, M. S.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2007-10-01

    The role of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms (slip, twinning) of <123> single crystals of Hadfield steel under tensile loading at T = 300 K is demonstrated. It is found out that aluminum alloying suppresses twinning deformation in the <123> single crystals and, during slip, results in a dislocation structure change from a uniform dislocation distribution to a planar dislocation structure.

  6. Behavior of dislocations in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Koji

    1995-08-01

    A review is given of dynamic behavior of dislocations in silicon on the basis of works of the author`s group. Topics taken up are generation, motion and multiplication of dislocations as affected by oxygen impurities and immobilization of dislocations due to impurity reaction.

  7. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  8. Dislocated Worker Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1988

    Due to the severe economic decline in the automobile manufacturing industry in southeastern Michigan, a Dislocated Workers Program has been developed through the partnership of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce, three community colleges, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, the Michigan State Department of Education, the…

  9. Dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, T L; Horne, J G

    1980-11-01

    A case of a rare radiocarpal fracture dislocation in a 17-year-old girl, with persisting loss of radiocarpal joint space following reduction under hematoma block, is described. The wrist joint was exposed, and two osteochondral fragments were rotated 90 degrees and secured with 2.7-mm AO screws. Satisfactory healing followed 3 months postinjury.

  10. White Beam Microdiffraction and Dislocations Gradients (Chapter 79)

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, Gene E; Barabash, Rozaliya

    2007-03-01

    Dislocations are lines of irregularity in the structure of a solid analogous to the bumps in a badly laid carpet. Like these bumps they can be easily moved, and they provide the most important mechanism by which the solid can be deformed. They also have a strong influence on crystal growth and on the electronic properties of semiconductors.

  11. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  12. Dislocation–Twin Boundary Interactions Induced Nanocrystalline via SPD Processing in Bulk Metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fucheng; Feng, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhinan; Kang, Jie; Wang, Tiansheng

    2015-01-01

    This report investigated dislocation–twin boundary (TB) interactions that cause the TB to disappear and turn into a high-angle grain boundary (GB). The evolution of the microstructural characteristics of Hadfield steel was shown as a function of severe plastic deformation processing time. Sessile Frank partial dislocations and/or sessile unit dislocations were formed on the TB through possible dislocation reactions. These reactions induced atomic steps on the TB and led to the accumulation of gliding dislocations at the TB, which resulted in the transition from coherent TB to incoherent GB. The factors that affect these interactions were described, and a physical model was established to explain in detail the feasible dislocation reactions at the TB. PMID:25757550

  13. Influence of misfit stresses on dislocation glide in single crystal superalloys: A three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Siwen; Fivel, Marc; Ma, Anxin; Hartmaier, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    In the characteristic γ / γ ‧ microstructure of single crystal superalloys, misfit stresses occur due to a significant lattice mismatch of those two phases. The magnitude of this lattice mismatch depends on the chemical composition of both phases as well as on temperature. Furthermore, the lattice mismatch of γ and γ ‧ phases can be either positive or negative in sign. The internal stresses caused by such lattice mismatch play a decisive role for the micromechanical processes that lead to the observed macroscopic athermal deformation behavior of these high-temperature alloys. Three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulations are applied to investigate dislocation glide in γ matrix channels and shearing of γ ‧ precipitates by superdislocations under externally applied uniaxial stresses, by fully taking into account internal misfit stresses. Misfit stress fields are calculated by the fast Fourier transformation (FFT) method and hybridized with DDD simulations. For external loading along the crystallographic [001] direction of the single crystal, it was found that the different internal stress states for negative and positive lattice mismatch result in non-uniform dislocation movement and different dislocation patterns in horizontal and vertical γ matrix channels. Furthermore, positive lattice mismatch produces a lower deformation rate than negative lattice mismatch under the same tensile loading, but for an increasing magnitude of lattice mismatch, the deformation resistance always diminishes. Hence, the best deformation performance is expected to result from alloys with either small positive, or even better, vanishing lattice mismatch between γ and γ ‧ phase.

  14. Dislocation injection in strontium titanate by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Michael S.; Echlin, McLean P.; Gumbsch, Peter; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation is used in applications which require low damage surface treatments, such as serial sectioning, spectroscopy, and micromachining. However, dislocations are generated by femtosecond laser-induced shockwaves and consequently have been studied in strontium titanate (STO) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. The laser ablated surfaces in STO exhibit dislocation structures that are indicative of those produced by uniaxial compressive loading. TEM analyses of dislocations present just below the ablated surface confirm the presence of ⟨110 ⟩ dislocations that are of approximately 35° mixed character. The penetration depth of the dislocations varied with grain orientation relative to the surface normal, with a maximum depth of 1.5 μm. Based on the critical resolved shear stress of STO crystals, the approximate shockwave pressures experienced beneath the laser irradiated surface are reported.

  15. An electron microscopy study of dislocation structures in Mg single crystals compressed along [0 0 0 1] at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, K. S.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Geng, J.; Mishra, R. K.

    2016-01-09

    We compressed Mg single crystals along [0 0 0 1] at room temperature to various stress levels (40, 80, 120, 160 and 320 MPa) and the evolution of dislocation structure with stress increment was investigated by TEM slip is confirmed to be the dominant deformation mode; the predominance of edge dislocation debris lying along the <1 0more » $$\\bar{1}$$ 0> implies that screw dislocations are more mobile than their edge counterpart. The edge dislocation may dissociate into and dislocations, and the latter can extend further on the basal plane and bound a basal-stacking fault.« less

  16. Strength and Dislocation Structure Evolution of Small Metals under Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngan, Alfonso

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that ultrasonic vibration can soften metals, and this phenomenon has been widely exploited in industrial applications concerning metal forming and bonding. In this work, we explore the effects of a superimposed small oscillatory load on metal plasticity, from the nano- to macro-size range, and from audible to ultrasonic frequency ranges. Macroscopic and nano-indentation were performed on aluminum, copper and molybdenum, and the results show that the simultaneous application of oscillatory stresses can lower the hardness of these samples. More interestingly, EBSD and TEM observations show that subgrain formation and reduction in dislocation density generally occurred when stress oscillations were applied. These findings point to an important knowledge gap in metal plasticity - the existing understanding of ultrasound softening in terms of the vibrations either imposing additional stress waves to augment the quasi-static applied load, or heating up the metal, whereas the metal's intrinsic deformation resistance or dislocation interactive processes are assumed unaltered by the ultrasound, is proven wrong by the present results. Furthermore, in the case of nanoindentation, the Continuous Stiffness Measurement technique for contact stiffness measurement assumes that the imposed signal-carrier oscillations do not intrinsically alter the material properties of the specimen, and again, the present results prove that this can be wrong. To understand the enhanced subgrain formation and dislocation annihilation, Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations were carried out and these show that when an oscillatory stress is superimposed on a quasi-static applied stress, reversals of motion of dislocations may occur, and these allow the dislocations to revisit repeatedly suitable configurations for annihilation. DDD, however, was unable to predict the observed subgrain formation presumably because the number of dislocations that can be handled is not large

  17. A remotely driven and controlled micro-gripper fabricated from light-induced deformation smart material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chaolei; Lv, Jiu-an; Tian, Xiaojun; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Jie; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-09-01

    Micro-gripper is an important tool to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects. Generally, as micro-gripper is too small to be directly driven by general motors, it always needs special driving devices and suitable structure design. In this paper, two-finger micro-grippers are designed and fabricated, which utilize light-induced deformation smart material to make one of the two fingers. As the smart material is directly driven and controlled by remote lights instead of lines and motors, this light-driven mode simplifies the design of the two-finger micro-gripper and avoids special drivers and complex mechanical structure. In addition, a micro-manipulation experiment system is set up which is based on the light-driven micro-gripper. Experimental results show that this remotely light-driven micro-gripper has ability to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects both in air and water. Furthermore, two micro-grippers can also work together for cooperation which can further enhance the assembly ability. On the other hand, this kind of remotely controllable micro-gripper that does not require on-board energy storage, can be used in mobile micro-robot as a manipulation hand.

  18. High-Strain-Induced Deformation Mechanisms in Block-Graft and Multigraft Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Ralf; Duan, Y. X.; Weidisch, Roland; Holzer, Suzette R; Schneider, Ken R; Stamm, M.; Uhrig, David; Mays, Jimmy; Heinrich, G.; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The molecular orientation behavior and structural changes of morphology at high strains for multigraft and block graft copolymers based on polystyrene (PS) and polyisoprene (PI) were investigated during uniaxial monotonic loading via FT-IR and synchrotron SAXS. Results from FT-IR revealed specific orientations of PS and PI segments depending on molecular architecture and on the morphology, while structural investigations revealed a typical decrease in long-range order with increasing strain. This decrease was interpreted as strain-induced dissolution of the glassy blocks in the soft matrix, which is assumed to affect an additional enthalpic contribution (strain-induced mixing of polymer chains) and stronger retracting forces of the network chains during elongation. Our interpretation is supported by FT-IR measurements showing similar orientation of rubbery and glassy segments up to high strains. It also points to highly deformable PS domains. By synchrotron SAXS, we observed in the neo-Hookean region an approach of glassy domains, while at higher elongations the intensity of the primary reflection peak was significantly decreasing. The latter clearly verifies the assumption that the glassy chains are pulled out from the domains and are partly mixed in the PI matrix. Results obtained by applying models of rubber elasticity to stressstrain and hysteresis data revealed similar correlations between the softening behavior and molecular and morphological parameters. Further, an influence of the network modality was observed (randomgrafted branches). For sphere formingmultigraft copolymers the domain functionality was found to be less important to achieve improved mechanical properties but rather size and distribution of the domains.

  19. Shock-induced deformation phenomena in magnetite and their consequences on magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Fritz, Jörg; Gerhards, Uta

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of shock waves on magnetic and microstructural behavior of multidomain magnetite from a magnetite-bearing ore, experimentally shocked to pressures of 5, 10, 20, and 30 GPa. Changes in apparent crystallite size and lattice parameter were determined by X-ray diffraction, and grain fragmentation and defect accumulation were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic properties were characterized by low-temperature saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), susceptibility measurements around the Verwey transition as well as by hysteresis parameters at room temperature. It is established that the shock-induced refinement of magnetic domains from MD to SD-PSD range is a result of cooperative processes including brittle fragmentation of magnetite grains, plastic deformation with shear bands and twins as well as structural disordering in form of molten grains and amorphous nanoclusters. Up to 10 GPa, a decrease of coherent crystallite size, lattice parameter, saturation magnetization (Ms), and magnetic susceptibility and an increase in coercivity, SIRM, and width of Verwey transition are mostly associated with brittle grain fragmentation. Starting from 20 GPa, a slight recovery is documented in all magnetic and nonmagnetic parameters. In particular, the recovery in SIRM is correlated with an increase of the lattice constant. The recovery effect is associated with the increasing influence of shock heating/annealing at high shock pressures. The strong decrease of Ms at 30 GPa is interpreted as a result of strong lattice damage and distortion. Our results unravel the microstructural mechanisms behind the loss of magnetization and the modification of magnetic properties of magnetite and contribute to our understanding of shock-induced magnetic phenomena in impacted rocks on earth and in meteorites.

  20. Impact-induced brittle deformation, porosity loss, and aqueous alteration in the Murchison CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Romy D.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Zolensky, Mike; Behr, Whitney M.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray computed tomographic scanning of a 44 g Murchison stone (USNM 5487) reveals a preferred alignment of deformed, partially altered chondrules, which define a prominent foliation and weak lineation in 3D. The presence of a lineation and evidence for a component of rotational, noncoaxial shear suggest that the deformation was caused by impact. Olivine optical extinction indicates that the sample can be classified as shock stage S1, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and electron microscopy reveal that plastic deformation within the chondrules was minimal and that brittle deformation in the form of fracturing, cataclasis, and grain boundary sliding was the dominant microstructural strain-accommodating mechanism. Textural evidence such as serpentine veins parallel to the foliation fabric and crosscutting alteration veins strongly suggest that some aqueous alteration post-dated or was contemporaneous with the deformation and that multiple episodes of fracturing and mineralization occurred. Finally, using the deformed shape of the chondrules we estimate that the strain experienced by Murchison was 17-43%. This combined with the current measured porosity of Murchison suggests that the original bulk porosity of Murchison prior to its deformation was 32.2-53.4% and likely at the upper end of this range due to chondrule compressibility, providing a unique estimate of pre-deformation porosity for a carbonaceous chondrite. Our findings suggest that significant porosity loss, deformation, and compaction from impact can occur on chondrite parent bodies whose samples may record only a low level of shock, and that significant chondrule deformation resulting in a chondrite foliation fabric can occur primarily through brittle processes and does not require plastic deformation of grains.

  1. A field theory of piezoelectric media containing dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Taupin, V. Fressengeas, C.; Ventura, P.; Lebyodkin, M.

    2014-04-14

    A field theory is proposed to extend the standard piezoelectric framework for linear elastic solids by accounting for the presence and motion of dislocation fields and assessing their impact on the piezoelectric properties. The proposed theory describes the incompatible lattice distortion and residual piezoelectric polarization fields induced by dislocation ensembles, as well as the dynamic evolution of these fields through dislocation motion driven by coupled electro-mechanical loading. It is suggested that (i) dislocation mobility may be enhanced or inhibited by the electric field, depending on the polarity of the latter, (ii) plasticity mediated by dislocation motion allows capturing long-term time-dependent properties of piezoelectric polarization. Due to the continuity of the proposed electro-mechanical framework, the stress/strain and polarization fields are smooth even in the dislocation core regions. The theory is applied to gallium nitride layers for validation. The piezoelectric polarization fields associated with bulk screw/edge dislocations are retrieved and surface potential modulations are predicted. The results are extended to dislocation loops.

  2. Correlation of photothermal conversion on the photo-induced deformation of amorphous carbon nitride films prepared by reactive sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Harata, T.; Aono, M. Kitazawa, N.; Watanabe, Y.

    2014-08-04

    The photo-induced deformation of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) films was investigated under visible-light illumination. The films gave rise to photothermal conversion by irradiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of thermal energy generated by irradiation on the deformation of a-CN{sub x}/ultrathin substrate bimorph specimens. The films were prepared on both ultrathin Si and SiO{sub 2} substrates by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from a graphite target in the presence of pure nitrogen gas. The temperature of the film on the SiO{sub 2} substrate increased as the optical band-gap of the a-CN{sub x} was decreased. For the film on Si, the temperature remained constant. The deformation degree of the films on Si and SiO{sub 2} substrates were approximately the same. Thus, the deformation of a-CN{sub x} films primarily induced by photon energy directly.

  3. Single crystal plasticity by modeling dislocation density rate behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Benjamin L; Bronkhorst, Curt; Beyerlein, Irene; Cerreta, E. K.; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2010-12-23

    The goal of this work is to formulate a constitutive model for the deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates. Damage and failure of materials frequently occurs at a variety of deformation rates within the same sample. The present state of the art in single crystal constitutive models relies on thermally-activated models which are believed to become less reliable for problems exceeding strain rates of 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. This talk presents work in which we extend the applicability of the single crystal model to the strain rate region where dislocation drag is believed to dominate. The elastic model includes effects from volumetric change and pressure sensitive moduli. The plastic model transitions from the low-rate thermally-activated regime to the high-rate drag dominated regime. The direct use of dislocation density as a state parameter gives a measurable physical mechanism to strain hardening. Dislocation densities are separated according to type and given a systematic set of interactions rates adaptable by type. The form of the constitutive model is motivated by previously published dislocation dynamics work which articulated important behaviors unique to high-rate response in fcc systems. The proposed material model incorporates thermal coupling. The hardening model tracks the varying dislocation population with respect to each slip plane and computes the slip resistance based on those values. Comparisons can be made between the responses of single crystals and polycrystals at a variety of strain rates. The material model is fit to copper.

  4. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  5. Simulations of gravity-induced trapping of a deformable drop in a three-dimensional constriction.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z; Davis, Robert H

    2012-10-01

    An efficient algorithm is developed to determine the three-dimensional shape of a deformable drop trapped under gravity in a constriction, employing an artificial evolution to a steady state. During the simulation, the drop surface is advanced using a rationally-devised normal "velocity", based on local deviation from the Young-Laplace equation and the adjacent solid shape, to approach the trapped drop shape. The artificial "time-dependent" evolution of the drop to the static, trapped shape requires that the free portions of the drop interface eventually satisfy the Young-Laplace equation, and the drop-solid contact portions of the drop interface conform to the solid surface. The significant advantage of this solution method is that a simple, numerically-efficient "velocity" is used to construct the evolution to the steady state; the coated areas where the drop is in near contact with solid boundaries of the constriction do not have to be specified a priori, but are found in the course of the solution. Alternative methods (e.g., boundary integral) based on realistic time-marching would be much more costly for determining the trapped state. Trapping conditions and drop shapes are studied for gravity-induced settling of a deformable drop into a three-dimensional constriction. For conditions near critical, where the trapped-drop steady state ceases to exist, severe surface-mesh distortions are treated by a combination of 'passive mesh stabilization', mesh relaxation and topological mesh transformations through node reconnections. For Bond numbers above a critical value, the drop is deformable enough to pass through the hole of the constriction, with no trapping. Critical Bond numbers are determined by linearly fitting minima of the root-mean-squared (rms) surface velocities versus corresponding Bond numbers greater than critical, and then extrapolating the Bond number to where the minimum rms velocity is zero (i.e., the drop becomes trapped). For ring and hyperbolic

  6. Dislocation Ledge Sources: Dispelling the Myth of Frank-Read Source Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1960s, J.C.M. Li questioned the formation of dislocation pileups at grain boundaries, especially in high-stacking-fault free-energy fcc metals and alloys, and proposed grain boundary ledge sources for dislocations in contrast to Frank-Read sources. This article reviews these proposals and the evolution of compelling evidence for grain boundary or related interfacial ledge sources of dislocations in metals and alloys, including unambiguous observations using transmission electron microscopy. Such observations have allowed grain boundary ledge source emission profiles of dislocations to be quantified in 304 stainless steel (with a stacking-fault free energy of ~23 mJ/m2) and nickel (with a stacking-fault free energy of ~128 mJ/m2) as a function of engineering strain. The evidence supports the conclusion that FR dislocation sources are virtually absent in metal and alloy deformation with ledges at interfaces dominating as dislocation sources.

  7. Nanostructure of Edge Dislocations in a Smectic-C* Liquid Crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Grubb, A M; Seed, A J; Sampson, P; Jákli, A; Lavrentovich, O D

    2015-08-21

    We report on the first direct nanoscale imaging of elementary edge dislocations in a thermotropic smectic-C* liquid crystal with the Burgers vector equal to one smectic layer spacing d. We find two different types of dislocation profiles. In the dislocation of type A, the layers deformations lack mirror symmetry with respect to the plane perpendicular to the Burgers vector; the dislocation core size is on the order of d. In the dislocation of type S, the core is strongly anisotropic, extending along the Burgers vector over distances much larger (by a factor of 4) than d. The difference is attributed to a different orientation of the molecular tilt plane with respect to the dislocation's axis; the asymmetric layers distortions are observed when the molecular tilt plane is perpendicular to the axis and the split S core is observed when the molecules are tilted along the line.

  8. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R. Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-14

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic 〈a〉 dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 °C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by 〈a〉 dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, (011{sup ¯}1)〈01{sup ¯}12〉 twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 °C.

  9. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R.; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 °C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, {01 1 ¯ 1 }⟨0 1 ¯ 12 ⟩ twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 °C.

  10. Dislocation Substructure in the Cold-Rolled Ni-20 Mass Pct Cr Alloy Analyzed by X-ray Diffraction, Positron Annihilation Lifetime, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Inoue, Koji

    2016-08-01

    The systematic change in the dislocation density and characteristics that develop under cold rolling as a simulated deformation was studied in order to examine the fundamental behavior of dislocations in terms of the dislocation substructure formation. In particular, the dislocation density was quantified by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA), which is effective for quantifying the dislocation density and character; positron annihilation lifetime (PAL), which is sensitive to vacancy-type lattice defects; the Bailey-Hirsch equation from the hardness (Hv); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The strain dependency of the dislocation density analyzed by XLPA, PAL, TEM, and Hv showed a similar tendency with an increase in the dislocation. In particular, the dislocation density by XLPA had good agreement with the results of TEM at low strain levels and with PAL at high strain levels. As a result, a combination of these techniques successfully showed the behavior of the dislocation substructure.

  11. Dislocation motion in {gamma} TiAl by in situ straining experiments in the HVEM

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, U.; Bartsch, M.; Haeussler, D.; Hattenhauer, R.; Aindow, M.; Jones, I.P.

    1995-08-01

    Micro-tensile specimens of coarse-grained Ti52at%Al crystals have been deformed in situ in a high voltage electron microscope at room temperature. In addition to some twinning, ``simple`` 1/2{l_angle}110] dislocations as well as super dislocations were moving, with the simple dislocations prevailing even if their orientation factor is lower than that of the super dislocations. Both types of dislocations are pinned, probably by small precipitates having a distance along the dislocations of about 100 nm. The precipitates consist most probably of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Under stress, the dislocations bow out between the obstacles. The bowing is stronger for 1/2{l_angle}110] dislocations. An effective stress of about 41 MPa is estimated from their curvature. The kinematic behavior of the dislocations is in accord with precipitation hardening. The dislocations are generated by the double-cross slip mechanism. Their density within the slip bands corresponds to a long-range internal stress of about 40 MPa. These data are consistent with the flow stress of PST crystals in the easy orientation, taken from the literature.

  12. Geometric aspects of shear jamming induced by deformation of frictionless sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that shear deformation of frictionless sphere packings leads to structures that will undergo jamming in the presence of friction, at densities well below the isotropic jamming point {φj}≈ 0.64 , and at high enough strains. Here, we show that the geometric features induced by strain are robust with respect to finite size effects, and include the feature of hyperuniformity, previously studied in the context of jamming, and more recently in driven systems. We study the approach to jamming as strain is increased, by evolving frictionless sheared configurations through frictional dynamics, and thereby identify a critical, or jamming, strain for each density, for a chosen value of the coefficient of friction. In the presence of friction above a certain strain value the sheared frictionless packings begin to develop finite stresses, which marks the onset of shear jamming. At a higher strain value, the shear stress reaches a saturation value after rising rapidly above the onset of shear jamming, which permits identification of the shear jamming transition. The onset of shear jamming and shear jamming are found to occur when the coordination number Z reaches values of Z  =  3 and Z  =  4 respectively. By considering percolation probabilities for the contact network, clusters of four coordinated and six coordinated spheres, we show that the percolation of four coordinated spheres corresponds to the onset of shear jamming behaviour, whereas the percolation of six coordinated spheres corresponds to shear jamming, for the chosen friction coefficients. At the onset of shear jamming, the force distribution begins to develop a peak at finite value and the force network is anisotropic and heterogeneous. And at the shear jamming transition, the force distribution has a well defined peak close to < f> and the force network is less anisotropic and homogeneous. We briefly discuss mechanical aspects of the jamming behaviour by

  13. Some effects of thermal-cycle-induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Price, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation process observed in the hot gas side wall of rocket combustion chambers was investigaged for three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure by using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/cu m. The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the problems of life prediction associated with the types of failures encountered in the present work. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers. From these deformation data and observation of the failure sites it is evident that modeling the failure process as classic low cycle thermal fatigue is inadequate as a life prediction method.

  14. Modeling of the Deformation of Living Cells Induced by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Baesu, E; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2001-12-21

    We describe finite element modeling of the deformation of living cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an AFM measurement. Often the local properties, the subject of the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. The Lagrangian finite deformation model we have developed and implemented in finite elements analysis offers a solution to this problem. The effect of the gross deformation of the cell can be subtracted from the experimentally measured data in order to give a reproducible value for local properties. This facilitates concurrent experimental efforts to measure the mechanical properties at specific receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell.

  15. Congenital dislocation of the hip. A review.

    PubMed

    Sherk, H H; Pasquariello, P S; Watters, W C

    1981-08-01

    Congenital dislocation of the hip usually results from capsular stretching caused by fetal malposition and crouching late in the third trimester. Early recognition of hip dislocation or instability soon after birth permits prompt treatment. Ortolani's and Barlow's maneuvers, respectively, reduce into and displace from the acetabulum a femoral head that is insecurely contained therein. The diagnosis of CDH in the first month of life usually depends on these clinical components of the physical examination of the newborn, because similar device, in this age group can usually maintain the displaced hip in sufficient flexion and abduction to permit reduction and normal development. By 3 months of age, the nuclei of the pelvis and upper femur have ossified enough to permit radiologic diagnosis of CDH. Problems related to treatment increase as the child grows older. In infants up to 6 months of age, closed methods with a harness usually succeed. Beyond 6 months, the soft tissues shorten and prevent easy reduction. These patients almost always require pre-reduction traction. An adductor tenotomy also facilitates reduction and apparently lessens compressive forces on the femoral head, an important consideration in preventing avascular necrosis of the head. Children over 1 year old develop bony changes, such as excessive femoral valgus and anteversion and deformity of the acetabulum. Treatment in these patients requires realignment of bony deformities with femoral or pelvic osteotomies in addition to the measures noted previously. The gentleness and high success rate of early treatment make early diagnosis of CDH an important consideration in infants and newborns.

  16. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  17. Comparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah.

    PubMed

    Verdon, James P; Kendall, J-Michael; Stork, Anna L; Chadwick, R Andy; White, Don J; Bissell, Rob C

    2013-07-23

    Geological storage of CO2 that has been captured at large, point source emitters represents a key potential method for reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this technology will only be viable if it can be guaranteed that injected CO2 will remain trapped in the subsurface for thousands of years or more. A significant issue for storage security is the geomechanical response of the reservoir. Concerns have been raised that geomechanical deformation induced by CO2 injection will create or reactivate fracture networks in the sealing caprocks, providing a pathway for CO2 leakage. In this paper, we examine three large-scale sites where CO2 is injected at rates of ~1 megatonne/y or more: Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah. We compare and contrast the observed geomechanical behavior of each site, with particular focus on the risks to storage security posed by geomechanical deformation. At Sleipner, the large, high-permeability storage aquifer has experienced little pore pressure increase over 15 y of injection, implying little possibility of geomechanical deformation. At Weyburn, 45 y of oil production has depleted pore pressures before increases associated with CO2 injection. The long history of the field has led to complicated, sometimes nonintuitive geomechanical deformation. At In Salah, injection into the water leg of a gas reservoir has increased pore pressures, leading to uplift and substantial microseismic activity. The differences in the geomechanical responses of these sites emphasize the need for systematic geomechanical appraisal before injection in any potential storage site.

  18. Comparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah.

    PubMed

    Verdon, James P; Kendall, J-Michael; Stork, Anna L; Chadwick, R Andy; White, Don J; Bissell, Rob C

    2013-07-23

    Geological storage of CO2 that has been captured at large, point source emitters represents a key potential method for reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this technology will only be viable if it can be guaranteed that injected CO2 will remain trapped in the subsurface for thousands of years or more. A significant issue for storage security is the geomechanical response of the reservoir. Concerns have been raised that geomechanical deformation induced by CO2 injection will create or reactivate fracture networks in the sealing caprocks, providing a pathway for CO2 leakage. In this paper, we examine three large-scale sites where CO2 is injected at rates of ~1 megatonne/y or more: Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah. We compare and contrast the observed geomechanical behavior of each site, with particular focus on the risks to storage security posed by geomechanical deformation. At Sleipner, the large, high-permeability storage aquifer has experienced little pore pressure increase over 15 y of injection, implying little possibility of geomechanical deformation. At Weyburn, 45 y of oil production has depleted pore pressures before increases associated with CO2 injection. The long history of the field has led to complicated, sometimes nonintuitive geomechanical deformation. At In Salah, injection into the water leg of a gas reservoir has increased pore pressures, leading to uplift and substantial microseismic activity. The differences in the geomechanical responses of these sites emphasize the need for systematic geomechanical appraisal before injection in any potential storage site. PMID:23836635

  19. Opposite photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers with different molecular architecture: Molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav M.; Neher, Dieter; Saphiannikova, Marina

    2011-07-01

    Photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers (azo-polymers) are central to a number of applications, such as optical storage and fabrication of diffractive elements. The microscopic nature of the underlying opto-mechanical coupling is yet not clear. In this study, we address the experimental finding that the scenario of the effects depends on molecular architecture of the used azo-polymer. Typically, opposite deformations in respect to the direction of light polarization are observed for liquid crystalline and amorphous azo-polymers. In this study, we undertake molecular dynamics simulations of two different models that mimic these two types of azo-polymers. We employ hybrid force field modeling and consider only trans-isomers of azobenzene, represented as Gay-Berne sites. The effect of illumination on the orientation of the chromophores is considered on the level of orientational hole burning and emphasis is given to the resulting deformation of the polymer matrix. We reproduce deformations of opposite sign for the two models being considered here and discuss the relevant microscopic mechanisms in both cases.

  20. Opposite photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers with different molecular architecture: Molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav M.; Neher, Dieter; Saphiannikova, Marina

    2011-07-28

    Photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers (azo-polymers) are central to a number of applications, such as optical storage and fabrication of diffractive elements. The microscopic nature of the underlying opto-mechanical coupling is yet not clear. In this study, we address the experimental finding that the scenario of the effects depends on molecular architecture of the used azo-polymer. Typically, opposite deformations in respect to the direction of light polarization are observed for liquid crystalline and amorphous azo-polymers. In this study, we undertake molecular dynamics simulations of two different models that mimic these two types of azo-polymers. We employ hybrid force field modeling and consider only trans-isomers of azobenzene, represented as Gay-Berne sites. The effect of illumination on the orientation of the chromophores is considered on the level of orientational hole burning and emphasis is given to the resulting deformation of the polymer matrix. We reproduce deformations of opposite sign for the two models being considered here and discuss the relevant microscopic mechanisms in both cases.

  1. Comparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah

    PubMed Central

    Verdon, James P.; Kendall, J.-Michael; Stork, Anna L.; Chadwick, R. Andy; White, Don J.; Bissell, Rob C.

    2013-01-01

    Geological storage of CO2 that has been captured at large, point source emitters represents a key potential method for reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this technology will only be viable if it can be guaranteed that injected CO2 will remain trapped in the subsurface for thousands of years or more. A significant issue for storage security is the geomechanical response of the reservoir. Concerns have been raised that geomechanical deformation induced by CO2 injection will create or reactivate fracture networks in the sealing caprocks, providing a pathway for CO2 leakage. In this paper, we examine three large-scale sites where CO2 is injected at rates of ∼1 megatonne/y or more: Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah. We compare and contrast the observed geomechanical behavior of each site, with particular focus on the risks to storage security posed by geomechanical deformation. At Sleipner, the large, high-permeability storage aquifer has experienced little pore pressure increase over 15 y of injection, implying little possibility of geomechanical deformation. At Weyburn, 45 y of oil production has depleted pore pressures before increases associated with CO2 injection. The long history of the field has led to complicated, sometimes nonintuitive geomechanical deformation. At In Salah, injection into the water leg of a gas reservoir has increased pore pressures, leading to uplift and substantial microseismic activity. The differences in the geomechanical responses of these sites emphasize the need for systematic geomechanical appraisal before injection in any potential storage site. PMID:23836635

  2. Structural modifications induced by compressive plastic deformation in single-step and sequentially irradiated UHMWPE for hip joint components.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Zhu, Wenliang; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Structural modifications were studied at the molecular scale in two highly crosslinked UHMWPE materials for hip-joint acetabular components, as induced upon application of (uniaxial) compressive strain to the as-manufactured microstructures. The two materials, quite different in their starting resins and belonging to different manufacturing generations, were a single-step irradiated and a sequentially irradiated polyethylene. The latter material represents the most recently launched gamma-ray-irradiated polyethylene material in the global hip implant market. Confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy was systematically applied to characterize the initial microstructures and the microstructural response of the materials to plastic deformation. Crystallinity fractions and preferential orientation of molecular chains have been followed up during in vitro deformation tests on unused cups and correlated to plastic strain magnitude and to the recovery capacity of the material. Moreover, analyses of the in vivo deformation behavior of two short-term retrieved hip cups are also presented. Trends of preferential orientation of molecular chains as a function of residual strain were similar for both materials, but distinctly different in their extents. The sequentially irradiated material was more resistant to plastic deformation and, for the same magnitude of residual plastic strain, possessed a higher capacity of recovery as compared to the single-step irradiated one.

  3. Impact-Induced Chondrule Deformation and Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, R. D.; Zolensky, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Behr, W. M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Deformed chondrules in CM2 Murchison have been found to define a prominent foliation [1,2] and lineation [3] in 3D using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). It has been hypothesized that chondrules in foliated chondrites deform by "squeezing" into surrounding pore space [4,5], a process that also likely removes primary porosity [6]. However, shock stage classification based on olivine extinction in Murchison is consistently low (S1-S2) [4-5,7] implying that significant intracrystalline plastic deformation of olivine has not occurred. One objective of our study is therefore to determine the microstructural mechanisms and phases that are accommodating the impact stress and resulting in relative displacements within the chondrules. Another question regarding impact deformation in Murchison is whether it facilitated aqueous alteration as has been proposed for the CMs which generally show a positive correlation between degree of alteration and petrofabric strength [7,2]. As pointed out by [2], CM Murchison represents a unique counterpoint to this correlation: it has a strong petrofabric but a relatively low degree of aqueous alteration. However, Murchison may not represent an inconsistency to the proposed causal relationship between impact and alteration, if it can be established that the incipient aqueous alteration post-dated chondrule deformation. Methods: Two thin sections from Murchison sample USNM 5487 were cut approximately perpendicular to the foliation and parallel to lineation determined by XCT [1,3] and one section was additionally polished for EBSD. Using a combination of optical petrography, SEM, EDS, and EBSD several chondrules were characterized in detail to: determine phases, find microstructures indicative of strain, document the geometric relationships between grain-scale microstructures and the foliation and lineation direction, and look for textural relationships of alteration minerals (tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine) that indicate timing of their

  4. Effects of Temperature on Structure and Mobility of the <100> Edge Dislocation in Body-Centred Cubic Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2010-01-01

    Dislocation segments with Burgers vector b = <1 0 0> are formed during deformation of body-centred-cubic (bcc) metals by the interaction between dislocations with b = 1/2<1 1 1>. Such segments are also created by reactions between dislocations and dislocation loops in irradiated bcc metals. The obstacle resistance produced by these segments on gliding dislocations is controlled by their mobility, which is determined in turn by the atomic structure of their cores. The core structure of a straight <1 0 0> edge dislocation is investigated here by atomic-scale computer simulation for {alpha}-iron using three different interatomic potentials. At low temperature the dislocation has a non-planar core consisting of two 1/2<1 1 1> fractional dislocations with atomic disregistry spread on planes inclined to the main glide plane. Increasing temperature modifies this core structure and so reduces the critical applied shear stress for glide of the <1 0 0> dislocation. It is concluded that the response of the <1 0 0> edge dislocation to temperature or applied stress determines specific reaction pathways occurring between a moving dislocation and 1/2<1 1 1> dislocation loops. The implications of this for plastic flow in unirradiated and irradiated ferritic materials are discussed and demonstrated by examples.

  5. Temperature dependence of [100](010) and [001](010) dislocation mobility in natural olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Blaha, Stephan; Pintér, Zsanett; Farla, Robert; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Katsura, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Dislocation recovery experiments were conducted on pre-deformed olivine single crystals at 1450 to 1760 K, room pressure, and oxygen partial pressures near the Ni-NiO buffer to determine the annihilation rates for [100] and [001] dislocations on the (010) plane. Olivine single crystals were first deformed to activate the desired slip systems under simple shear geometry and then annealed at target conditions. The edge and screw dislocations with Burgers vectors, b, of [100] and [001], respectively, both elongated in the [001] direction were produced by the deformation. The dislocation annihilation rate constants of both types of dislocations are identical within 0.3 log unit. The activation energies for both dislocations are also identical, i.e., ∼400 kJ/mol, which is also identical to that of the Si self-diffusion coefficient. This correspondence suggests that olivine dislocation creep controlled by a diffusion-controlled process under low-stress and high-temperature conditions. This study offers a potential insight into the formation of AG-type fabric in olivine.

  6. Dislocation and fracture-dislocation of the carpometacarpal joints.

    PubMed

    Jebson, P J; Engber, W D; Lange, R H

    1994-02-01

    Dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the carpometacarpal joints are rare. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, careful examination, and appropriate radiography. Treatment is controversial and is based upon the injury pattern and the surgeon's experience and preference. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, evaluation, and treatment of patients with carpometacarpal joint injuries.

  7. Simulations of dislocation pile-ups at assymetric tilt boundaries in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, Steven; Wang, Jian M; Hoagland, Richard C; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-21

    Materials deformation processes are increasingly approachable through the both conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics. In one deformation process, dislocation pile-up at a grain boundary, a greater understanding is required as to how dislocations transmit through grain boundaries, causing plastic deformation, or reflect and reconstruct the grain boundary, but with no macroscopic deformation. Here dislocation pile-ups in an alwninum bicrystal with an asymmetric tilt grain boundary are simulated atomistically, introducing effects of dislocation interactions beyond linear elastic ones. The observed responses as functions of the number of explicitly modeled dislocations and the magnitude of the applied stress are discussed. Typical conditions for the simulations consist of thermal relaxation room temperature, five active dislocations inserted within a 6.5-million-atom cell, and an additional fourteen dislocations represented within the atomistic simulation by their elastic strain fields. The dislocations are initially distributed according to linear elastic estimates of their positions in a double-ended pile-up from a chosen far-field stress. The whole cell is allowed to relax according to a procedure to be described. In the ensuing simulations, the system is propagated for some substantial period of time (lOs of ps), followed by small increments of strain. After a number of such increments, we observe all of the anticipated events. Usually several of the closest dislocations are absorbed into the grain boundary, resulting in varying amounts of reconstruction. Reflections from the boundary are common and show a strong dependence on sample thickness. Transmission events are seen on both slip systems in the other grain. The particulars of these events will be described as well.

  8. Period-doubling reconstructions of semiconductor partial dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji -Sang; Huang, Bing; Wei, Su -Huai; Kang, Joongoo; McMahon, William E.

    2015-09-18

    Atomic-scale understanding and control of dislocation cores is of great technological importance, because they act as recombination centers for charge carriers in optoelectronic devices. Using hybrid density-functional calculations, we present period-doubling reconstructions of a 90° partial dislocation in GaAs, for which the periodicity of like-atom dimers along the dislocation line varies from one to two, to four dimers. The electronic properties of a dislocation change drastically with each period doubling. The dimers in the single-period dislocation are able to interact, to form a dispersive one-dimensional band with deep-gap states. However, the inter-dimer interaction for the double-period dislocation becomes significantly reduced; hence, it is free of mid-gap states. The Ga core undergoes a further period-doubling transition to a quadruple-period reconstruction induced by the formation of small hole polarons. Lastly, the competition between these dislocation phases suggests a new passivation strategy via population manipulation of the detrimental single-period phase.

  9. Period-doubling reconstructions of semiconductor partial dislocations

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Ji -Sang; Huang, Bing; Wei, Su -Huai; Kang, Joongoo; McMahon, William E.

    2015-09-18

    Atomic-scale understanding and control of dislocation cores is of great technological importance, because they act as recombination centers for charge carriers in optoelectronic devices. Using hybrid density-functional calculations, we present period-doubling reconstructions of a 90° partial dislocation in GaAs, for which the periodicity of like-atom dimers along the dislocation line varies from one to two, to four dimers. The electronic properties of a dislocation change drastically with each period doubling. The dimers in the single-period dislocation are able to interact, to form a dispersive one-dimensional band with deep-gap states. However, the inter-dimer interaction for the double-period dislocation becomes significantly reduced;more » hence, it is free of mid-gap states. The Ga core undergoes a further period-doubling transition to a quadruple-period reconstruction induced by the formation of small hole polarons. Lastly, the competition between these dislocation phases suggests a new passivation strategy via population manipulation of the detrimental single-period phase.« less

  10. Inelastic deformation and phenomenological modeling of aluminum including transient effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A review was made of several phenomenological theories which have recently been proposed to describe the inelastic deformation of crystalline solids. Hart's deformation theory has many advantages, but there are disagreements with experimental deformation at stress levels below yield. A new inelastic deformation theory was proposed, introducing the concept of microplasticity. The new model consists of five deformation elements: a friction element representing a deformation element controlled by dislocation glide, a nonrecoverable plastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the strong dislocation barriers, a microplastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the weak barriers, a short range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable anelastic strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the weak barriers, and a long range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the strong barriers. Load relaxation and tensile testing in the plastic range were used to determine the material parameters for the plastic friction elements. The short range and long range anelastic moduli and the material parameters for the kinetics of microplasticity were determined by the measurement of anelastic loops and by performing load relaxation tests in the microplastic region. Experimental results were compared with a computer simulation of the transient deformation behavior of commercial purity aluminum. An attempt was made to correlate the material parameters and the microstructure from TEM. Stability of material parameters during inelastic deformation was discussed and effect of metallurgical variables was examined experimentally. 71 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Inhomogeneous deformation in INCONEL 718 during monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthem, D. W.; Robertson, I. M.; Leckie, F. A.; Socie, D. F.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1990-12-01

    The deformation microstructures produced by room-temperature monotonie tensile and uniaxial low-cycle fatigue tests in aged (precipitate-hardened) INCONEL 718 were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Regularly spaced arrays of deformation bands on {111} slip planes were observed. Under monotonie loading, the dislocation structure within a deformation band formed an inverse pileup at a grain boundary, indicating that the boundary was the probable dislocation source. Under fatigue loading, the bands contained a high density of dislocations in a complex arrangement, which was attained after relatively few cycles. Samples of homogenized (precipitate-free) material were deformed monotonically in tension for comparison with the aged material. Early in the deformation, there was only one deformation band per grain and little evidence of work hardening; that is, there was a region of constant flow stress. With increased deformation, work hardening began, more bands nucleated, and their spacing became similar to that in the aged material. This result demonstrates that the degree of coarseness of inhomogeneous deformation in this material was not necessarily a result of a softening process within the bands because of precipitate shearing, but rather, it was primarily a function of the amount of work hardening within the bands. The regularity of the bands and the dislocation structure can be rationalized in terms of a periodic resistance to glide of the dislocations due to the presence of the precipitates and a distribution of dislocation sources along the grain boundaries.

  12. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  13. The Evolution of Deformation-Induced Grain-Boundary Porosity and Dynamic Permeability in Crustal Fault Zones: Insights From the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. M.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids and minor phases have an important influence on the bulk rheology of a deforming rock mass, but they are not uniformly distributed at any scale within fault zones. Additionally, exhumed ductile shear zones show little interconnected porosity or static permeability, requiring a dynamic process at depth to allow fluids to access the deforming rock mass. It was recently recognized that reactive fluids interact with high-strain sites to generate cavities on quartz grain boundaries, increasing the grain-scale porosity and dynamic permeability of the rock and allowing for additional fluids to infiltrate the shear zone along interlinking cavities, stimulating further reaction and cavitation. Grain-boundary cavities and fine-grained secondary phases impede grain-boundary mobility and cause a transition in deformation mechanisms from grain-size insensitive dislocation creep to grain-size sensitive creep, which is recognized as a weakening mechanism that promotes strain localisation. At present, it is unclear how the distribution of grain-boundary pores within fault rocks reflects the bulk mineralogy and phase arrangement, which is a function of shear strain. We have used micro-computed x-ray tomography (μ-CT), SEM imaging, and EDS analyses to examine how the distribution of grain-boundary pores varies in relation to the arrangement of secondary phases in exhumed protomylonites, mylonites, and ultramylonites within the actively-deforming Alpine Fault zone, and in samples acquired from the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP). Additionally, EBSD is coupled with µ-CT and EDS analyses to characterise the evolution of microstructures in three dimensions across a finite strain gradient. Here we examine the relationship and competition between grain-boundary cavitation and microstructural processes during deformation in a high-strain shear zone, and discuss the implications of these grain-scale deformation processes on strain localisation and continental fault zone dynamics.

  14. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  15. Gramicidin channel-induced lipid membrane deformation energy: influence of chain length and boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Ring, A

    1996-01-31

    The influence of boundary conditions on the deformation energy of a lipid membrane containing a gramicidin A channel was evaluated numerically. A liquid crystal model was used to calculate the relative contributions of compression, splay and surface tension. It is proposed that the nearest neighbor lipid molecules are displaced from the channel end in a direction perpendicular to the bilayer and it is concluded that surface tension is the major component of the deformation free energy for monoolein (gmo)/n-alkane membranes. This unexpected result supports the validity of the liquid crystal models of membrane deformation since gramicidin lifetime has been shown to correlate with surface tension for gmo membranes. The theory accurately predicts the experimentally measured relative lifetimes without the use of adjustable parameters. For conditions where splay may be neglected surface tension is always the major component of the deformation energy, irrespective of the magnitude of the compression coefficient. The deformation may extend for hundreds of angstroms from the peptide. The results obtained here are expected to be important for the characterization of protein-membrane interactions in general.

  16. Experiments of dike-induced deformation: Insights on the long-term evolution of divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, D.; Ruch, J.; Acocella, V.; Rivalta, E.

    2015-10-01

    The shallow transport of magma occurs through dikes causing surface deformation. Our understanding of the effects of diking at the surface is limited, especially on the long term, for repeated intrusive episodes. We use analogue models to study the upper crustal deformation induced by dikes. We insert metal plates within cohesive sand with three setups: in setup A, the intrusion rises upward with constant thickness and in setups B and C, the intrusion thickens at a fixed depth, with final rectangular (setup B) or triangular (setup C) shape in section. Setup A creates a doming delimited by reverse faults, with secondary apical graben, without close correspondence in nature. In setups B and C, a depression flanked by two uplifted areas is bordered by inward dipping normal faults propagating downward and, for deeper intrusions in setup B, also by inner faults, reverse at the surface; this deformation is similar to what is observed in nature, suggesting a consistent physical behavior. Dikes in nature initially propagate developing a mode I fracture at the tip, subsequently thickened by magma intrusion, without any host rock translation in the propagation direction (as in setup A). The deformation pattern in setups B and C depends on the intrusion depth and thickness, consistently to what is observed along divergent plate boundaries. The early deformation in setups B and C is similar to that from a single rifting episode (i.e., Lakagigar, Iceland, and Dabbahu, Afar), whereas the late stages resemble the structure of mature rifts (i.e., Krafla, Iceland), confirming diking as a major process in shaping divergent plate boundaries.

  17. Dislocation development in V-5CR-5TI and pure vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to explain notch sensitivity noted in the candidate alloy V-5Cr-5Ti. Microstructural examinations have been performed on deformed tensile specimens of V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium in order to explain notch sensitivity noted in the candidate alloy V-5Cr-5Ti. SS-3 tensile specimens have been prepared, stress relieved and deformed to 5% strain. The resulting deformation structures have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that 5% deformation in V-5Cr-5Ti produces a higher dislocation density consisting of long straight dislocations, typical of Stage II, and many small loops, whereas in pure vanadium, the dislocation arrangements are more complex, typical of Stage III, and the small loops are at a lower density.

  18. Weakly faceted cellular patterns versus growth-induced plastic deformation in thin-sample directional solidification of monoclinic biphenyl.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Akamatsu, Silvère; Faivre, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    We present an experimental study of thin-sample directional solidification (T-DS) in impure biphenyl. The platelike growth shape of the monoclinic biphenyl crystals includes two low-mobility (001) facets and four high-mobility {110} facets. Upon T-DS, biphenyl plates oriented with (001) facets parallel to the sample plane can exhibit either a strong growth-induced plastic deformation (GID), or deformation-free weakly faceted (WF) growth patterns. We determine the respective conditions of appearance of these phenomena. GID is shown to be a long-range thermal-stress effect, which disappears when the growth front has a cellular structure. An early triggering of the cellular instability allowed us to avoid GID and study the dynamics of WF patterns as a function of the orientation of the crystal.

  19. Correlation between the Sorption-Induced Deformation of Nanoporous Glass and the Continuous Freezing of Adsorbed Argon.

    PubMed

    Schappert, Klaus; Reiplinger, Nicolas; Pelster, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    In this article we study the dependence of the sorption-induced deformation of nanoporous glass on the liquid-solid phase transition of adsorbed argon. During cooling we observe a continuous reduction of the expansion of the porous glass matrix caused by the adsorbate. The contraction is attended by a likewise continuous change of the adsorbed argon's phase state from liquid to solid. This simultaneous behavior evidences that the liquid-solid phase transition leads to a reduction of the pressure the adsorbate exerts on the pore walls. Furthermore, the study shows that small temperature changes can temporarily cause strong deformations of the porous material that decay in long time intervals of up to 1 week. We expect that our observations for the model system of argon and porous glass can be generalized to other systems. Consequently, this study will have implications when considering porous materials for applications, e.g., as a medium for storage. PMID:27398774

  20. Learning intervention-induced deformations for non-rigid MR-CT registration and electrode localization in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Onofrey, John A.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning a statistical model of non-rigid deformations induced by interventional procedures. We make use of this learned model to perform constrained non-rigid registration of pre-procedural and post-procedural imaging. We demonstrate results applying this framework to non-rigidly register post-surgical computed tomography (CT) brain images to pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of epilepsy patients who had intra-cranial electroencephalography electrodes surgically implanted. Deformations caused by this surgical procedure, imaging artifacts caused by the electrodes, and the use of multi-modal imaging data make non-rigid registration challenging. Our results show that the use of our proposed framework to constrain the non-rigid registration process results in significantly improved and more robust registration performance compared to using standard rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26900569

  1. Disordered long-range internal stresses in deformed copper and the mechanisms underlying plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Lyle E.; Larson, Ben C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Geantil, P.; Kassner, Michael E.; Liu, W.; Stoudt, M. R.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The strength of wavy glide metals increases dramatically during deformation as dislocations multiply and entangle, forming dense dislocation wall structures. Numerous competing models have been proposed for this process but experimental validation and guidance for further model development require new experimental approaches capable of resolving local stresses within the dislocation microstructure. We use three-dimensional X-ray microscopy combining submicrometer spatial resolution with diffracted-beam masking to make direct measurements of axial elastic strain (and thus stress) in individual dislocation cell walls and their adjacent cell interiors in heavily deformed copper. These spatially resolved measurements show broad, asymmetric distributions of dipolar stresses that directly discriminate between long-standing deformation models and demonstrate that the distribution of local stresses is statistically connected to the global behavior through simple rules.

  2. Misfit dislocations in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Jan H.

    2002-08-01

    This article on epitaxy highlights the following: the definition and some historical milestones; the introduction by Frenkel and Kontorowa (FK) of a truncated Fourier series to model the periodic interaction at crystalline interfaces; the invention by Frank and van der Merwe (FvdM)—using the FK model—of (interfacial) misfit dislocations as an important mechanism in accommodating misfit at epilayer-substrate interfaces; the generalization of the FvdM theory to multilayers; the application of the parabolic model by Jesser and van der Merwe to describe, for growing multilayers and superlattices, the impact of Fourier coefficients in the realization of epitaxial orientations and the stability of modes of misfit accommodation; the involvement of intralayer interaction in the latter—all features that impact on the attainment of perfection in crystallinity of thin films, a property that is so vital in the fabrication of useful uniformly thick epilayers (uniformity being another technological requirement), which also depends on misfit accommodation through the interfacial energy that function strongly in the criterion for growth modes, proposed by Bauer; and the ingenious application of the Volterra model by Matthews and others to describe misfit accommodation by dislocations in growing epilayers.

  3. A general numerical method to solve for dislocation configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, X. J.; Wagoner, R. H.; Daehn, G. S.

    1999-08-01

    The shape of a mechanically equilibrated dislocation line is of considerable interest in the study of plastic deformation of metals and alloys. A general numerical method for finding such configurations in arbitrary stress fields has been developed. Analogous to the finite-element method (FEM), a general dislocation line is approximated by a series of straight segments (elements) bounded by nodes. The equilibrium configuration is found by minimizing the system energy with respect to nodal positions using a Newton-Raphson procedure. This approach, termed the finite-segment method (FSM), confers several advantages relative to segment-based, explicit formulations. The utility, generality, and robustness of the FSM is demonstrated by analyzing the Orowan bypass mechanism and a model of dislocation generation and equilibration at misfitting particles. Energy differences from previous analytical methods based on simple loop shapes are significant, up to 80 pct. Explicit expressions for the coordinate transformations, energies, and forces required for numerical implementation are presented.

  4. Dislocation of the distal phalanx epiphysis in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Waters, P M; Benson, L S

    1993-07-01

    Two cases of physeal fracture dislocation of the distal phalanx are reviewed. Each injury occurred in a toddler, was originally undiagnosed, and appeared years later as a dorsal mass in a fore-shortened digit with decreased distal interphalangeal joint motion. In each case x-ray films revealed a dislocated epiphysis, accounting for the enlarging dorsal prominence and the phalangeal growth disturbance. These cases demonstrate that dislocation of the distal phalanx epiphysis can occur with a crush injury and may be difficult to detect before development of the ossification center. Careful physical examination and a high index of suspicion will increase the likelihood of early diagnosis. Early open reduction may prevent the late complications of deformity and stiffness. PMID:8349960

  5. Mesoscale modeling of strain induced solid state amorphization in crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei

    Solid state amorphization, and in particular crystalline to amorphous transformation, can be observed in metallic alloys, semiconductors, intermetallics, minerals, and also molecular crystals when they undergo irradiation, hydrogen gas dissolution, thermal interdiffusion, mechanical alloying, or mechanical milling. Although the amorphization mechanisms may be different, the transformation occurs due to the high level of disorder introduced into the material. Milling induced solid state amorphization is proposed to be the result of accumulation of crystal defects, specifically dislocations, as the material is subjected to large deformations during the high energy process. Thus, understanding the deformation mechanisms of crystalline materials will be the first step in studying solid state amorphization in crystalline materials, which not only has scientific contributions, but also technical consequences. A phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is employed in this work to simulate plastic deformation of molecular crystals. This PFDD model has the advantage of tracking all of the dislocations in a material simultaneously. The model takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, the lattice resistance to dislocation motion, and the elastic interaction of dislocations with an external stress field. The PFDD model is employed to describe the deformation of molecular crystals with pharmaceutical applications, namely, single crystal sucrose, acetaminophen, gamma-indomethacin, and aspirin. Stress-strain curves are produced that result in expected anisotropic material response due to the activation of different slip systems and yield stresses that agree well with those from experiments. The PFDD model is coupled to a phase transformation model to study the relation between plastic deformation and the solid state amorphization of crystals that undergo milling. This model predicts the amorphous volume fraction in excellent agreement with

  6. Compression-induced deformation of individual metal-organic framework microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhi; Miao, Yu-Run; Mao, Shi-Min; Zhang, Guang-Hui; Dillon, Shen; Miller, Jeffrey T; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-02-11

    The deformation and mechanical behavior of individual zeolitic-imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) micro- and sub-microcrystals were observed under compression. Young's modulus and volume changes as a function of applied pressure were determined on individual single crystals, offering insights in the relationship among structure, morphology, and mechanical properties. Dramatic volume decreases and amorphization were detected during compression over a pressure range of 0-4 GPa for individual 1.2 μm ZIF-8 microcrystals, and the deformed microcrystals partially recovered after pressure release. The orientation and size effects on the mechanical behavior of ZIF-8 nano- and microcrystals were also investigated. The presence of solvates within the pores of the ZIF-8 has a dramatic effect on the mechanical properties of the single crystals. Methanol-solvated ZIF-8 microcrystals are much less deformable than the desolvated microcrystals and shatter completely at very low applied force.

  7. Ion adsorption and its influence on direct current electric field induced deformations of flexoelectric nematic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derfel, Grzegorz; Buczkowska, Mariola

    2011-07-01

    The influence of ion adsorption on the behavior of the nematic liquid crystal layers is studied numerically. The homeotropic flexoelectric layer subjected to the dc electric field is considered. Selective adsorption of positive ions is assumed. The analysis is based on the free energy formalism for ion adsorption. The distributions of director orientation angle, electric potential, and ion concentrations are calculated by numerical resolving of suitable torques equations and Poisson equation. The threshold voltages for the deformations are also determined. It was shown that adsorption affects the distributions of both cations and anions. Sufficiently large number of adsorbed ions leads to spontaneous deformation arising without any threshold if the total number of ions creates sufficiently strong electric field with significant field gradients in the neighborhood of electrodes. The spontaneous deformations are favored by strong flexoelectricity, large thickness, large ion concentrations, weak anchoring, and large adsorption energy.

  8. Deformation behavior of metastable β-type Ti-25Nb-2Mo-4Sn alloy for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S.; Meng, Q. K.; Cheng, X. N.; Zhao, X. Q.

    2014-08-29

    The deformation behavior of metastable β-type Ti–25Nb–2Mo–4Sn (wt%) alloy subjected to different thermo-mechanical treatments was discussed by the combining results from transmission electron microscope, tensile test and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Visible “double yielding” behavior, which is characterized by the presence of stress-plateau, was observed in the solution treated specimen. Upon a cold rolling treatment, the Ti–25Nb–2Mo–4Sn alloy performs nonlinear deformation because of the combined effects of elastic deformation and stress-induced α" martensitic transformation. After the subsequent annealing, the β phase is completely stabilized and no stress-induced martensitic transformation takes place on loading due to the inhibitory effect of grain boundaries and dislocations on martensitic transformation. As a result, the annealed specimen exhibits linear elastic deformation.

  9. Cumulative mechanical moments and microstructure deformation induced by growth shape in columnar solidification.

    PubMed

    Billia, Bernard; Bergeon, Nathalie; Thi, Henri Nguyen; Jamgotchian, Haïk; Gastaldi, Joseph; Grange, Gérard

    2004-09-17

    The dynamical interaction between columnar interface microstructure and self-stress, resulting in unforeseen mechanical deformation phenomena, is brought to light by means of in situ and real-time synchrotron x-ray topography during directional solidification of dilute aluminum alloys. Beyond long-known local mechanical stresses, global mechanical constraints are found to be active. In particular, column rotation results from deformation caused by the mechanical moments associated with the very growth shape, namely, the cumulative torque acting together with the cumulative bending moment under gravity. A basic model allowing for a qualitative explanation of the observed distinctive features of the self-stress effects on microstructure dynamics is proposed.

  10. Styles of volcano-induced deformation: numerical models of substratum flexure, spreading and extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Matela, Ray

    1998-04-01

    The gravitational deformation of volcanoes is largely controlled by ductile layers of substrata. Using numerical finite-element modelling we investigate the role of ductile layer thickness and viscosity on such deformation. To characterise the deformation we introduce two dimensionless ratios; Πa (volcano radius/ductile layer thickness) and Πb (viscosity of ductile substratum/failure strength of volcano). We find that the volcanic edifice spreads laterally when underlain by thin ductile layers ( Πa>1), while thicker ductile layers lead to inward flexure ( Πa<1). The deformation style is related to the switch from predominantly horizontal to vertical flow in the ductile layer with increasing thickness (increasing Πa). Structures produced by lateral spreading include concentric thrust belts around the volcano base and radial normal faulting in the cone itself. In contrast, flexure on thick ductile substrata leads to concentric normal faults around the base and compression in the cone. In addition, we show that lower viscosities in the ductile layer (low Πb) lead to faster rates of movement, and also affect the deformation style. Considering a thin ductile layer, if viscosity is high compared to the failure strength of the volcano (high Πb) then deformation is coupled and spreading is produced. However, if the viscosity is low (low Πb) substratum is effectively decoupled from the volcano and extrudes from underneath it. In this latter case evidence is likely to be found for basement compression, but corresponding spreading features in the volcano will be absent, as the cone is subject to a compressive stress regime similar to that produced by flexure. At volcanoes where basement extrusion is operating, high volcano stresses and outward substratum movement may combine to produce catastrophic sector collapse. An analysis of deformation features at a volcano can provide information about the type of basement below it, a useful tool for remote sensing and

  11. Surface deformation effects induced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in dielectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Malacarne, L. C.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    The surface displacement produced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces is investigated considering the commonly accepted theories proposed by Minkowski and Abraham for the energy-momentum tensor. The contributions are modeled considering each effect separately assuming non-absorbing and absorbing solids and the thermoelastic deformation equations are solved numerically. We show that the surface deformation profiles as calculated by the Minkowski or Abraham momenta give different surface curvature, which could in principle be detected by measuring the surface displacement. Finally, an all-optical pump-probe photothermal method to detect the radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in transparent dielectric solids is proposed.

  12. Experimental characterisation and modelling of deformation- induced microstructure in an A6061 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyca, J. F.; Falahati, A.; Kozeschnik, E.

    2016-03-01

    For industry, the mechanical properties of a material in form of flow curves are essential input data for finite element simulations. Current practice is to obtain flow curves experimentally and to apply fitting procedures to obtain constitutive equations that describe the material response to external loading as a function of temperature and strain rate. Unfortunately, the experimental procedure for characterizing flow curves is complex and expensive, which is why the prediction of flow-curves by computer modelling becomes increasingly important. In the present work, we introduce a state parameter based model that is capable of predicting the flow curves of an A6061 aluminium alloy in different heat-treatment conditions. The model is implemented in the thermo-kinetic software package MatCalc and takes into account precipitation kinetics, subgrain formation, dynamic recovery by spontaneous annihilation and dislocation climb. To validate the simulation results, a series of compression tests is performed on the thermo-mechanical simulator Gleeble 1500.

  13. Thermomechanical Modeling of Laser-Induced Structural Relaxation and Deformation of Glass: Volume Changes in Fused Silica at High Temperatures [Thermo-mechanical modeling of laser-induced structural relaxation and deformation of SiO2 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Vignes, Ryan M.; Soules, Thomas F.; Stolken, James S.; Settgast, Randolph R.; Elhadj, Selim; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Mauro, J.

    2012-12-17

    In a fully coupled thermomechanical model of the nanoscale deformation in amorphous SiO2 due to laser heating is presented. Direct measurement of the transient, nonuniform temperature profiles was used to first validate a nonlinear thermal transport model. Densification due to structural relaxation above the glass transition point was modeled using the Tool-Narayanaswamy (TN) formulation for the evolution of structural relaxation times and fictive temperature. TN relaxation parameters were derived from spatially resolved confocal Raman scattering measurements of Si–O–Si stretching mode frequencies. These thermal and microstructural data were used to simulate fictive temperatures which are shown to scale nearly linearly with density, consistent with previous measurements from Shelby et al. Volumetric relaxation coupled with thermal expansion occurring in the liquid-like and solid-like glassy states lead to residual stresses and permanent deformation which could be quantified. But, experimental surface deformation profiles between 1700 and 2000 K could only be reconciled with our simulation by assuming a roughly 2 × larger liquid thermal expansion for a-SiO2 with a temperature of maximum density ~150 K higher than previously estimated by Bruckner et al. Calculated stress fields agreed well with recent laser-induced critical fracture measurements, demonstrating accurate material response prediction under processing conditions of practical interest.

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of dislocation motion in 9Cr steel at elevated temperatures: influence of shear stress on dislocation behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Susumu; Sakai, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate high-temperature plastic deformation (creep) mechanism in materials, it is essential to observe dislocation motion under tensile loading. There are many reports on in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations in the literature; however, the relationship between the dislocation motion and shear stress in 9Cr steel is still not clear. In this study, in order to evaluate this relationship quantitatively, in situ TEM observations were carried out in conjunction with finite element method (FEM) analysis. A tensile test sample was strained at an elevated temperature (903 K) inside a transmission electron microscope, and the stress distribution in the strained sample was analyzed by FEM. The dislocation behavior was clearly found to depend on the shear stress. At a shear stress of 66 MPa, both the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density were low. However, a high shear stress level of 95 MPa caused a noticeable increase in the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density. Furthermore, in this article, we discuss the dependence of the dislocation behavior on stress. The results presented here also indicate that the relationship between the microstructure and the strength of materials can be revealed by the methods used in this work. PMID:25298228

  15. Superclimb of Dislocations in Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklov, Anatoly

    2011-03-01

    Edge dislocation with superfluid core can perform superclimb -- non-conservative motion (climb) assisted by superflow along its core. Such dislocation, with Burgers vector along the C-axis, has been found in ab initio simulations of hcp solid 4. Uniform network of superclimbing dislocations can induce isochoric compressibility which is finite (in contrast to ideal solid where it vanishes) and, practically, independent of the network density. Here N is total number of atoms and is chemical potential. Such giant response has been observed by Ray and Hallock during superfluid flow events through solid He4. Study of superclimbing dislocation within the model of Granato-Lücke string, subjected to Peierls potential and to vanishing bias by , has found that exhibits wide peak in the intermediate range of temperatures (T) - above some determined by Peierls energy and below above which superfluidity of the core essentially vanishes. Non-Luttinger type behavior characterized by K scaling as some power χ of dislocation length is observed in the wide peak region. Biasing superclimbing dislocation by finite μ (due to a contact with liquid through vycor electrodes,) can induce core roughening caused by thermally assisted tunneling of jog-antijog pairs through the barrier produced by combination of Peierls potential and the bias. The threshold for this effect scales as with some power a~ 1.7. The roughening is found to be hysteretic below some temperature Thyst , with TR determining temperature of thermal roughening, He exhibits strong and narrow resonant peak leading to a dip in the core superfluid sound velocity. This mechanism is proposed as an explanation for a strong and narrow dip observed in critical superflow rate. It is found that the dip characteristics are sensitive to the bias by μ and, therefore, this can be used as a test for the proposed mechanism. It is also predicted that the dip depth at given μc ~ 1 /La should be periodic in χ with the period T . This

  16. Size dependence of yield strength simulated by a dislocation-density function dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. S. S.; Leung, H. S.; Cheng, B.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2015-04-01

    The size dependence of the strength of nano- and micron-sized crystals is studied using a new simulation approach in which the dynamics of the density functions of dislocations are modeled. Since any quantity of dislocations can be represented by a density, this approach can handle large systems containing large quantities of dislocations, which may handicap discrete dislocation dynamics schemes due to the excessive computation time involved. For this reason, pillar sizes spanning a large range, from the sub-micron to micron regimes, can be simulated. The simulation results reveal the power-law relationship between strength and specimen size up to a certain size, beyond which the strength varies much more slowly with size. For specimens smaller than ∼4000b, their strength is found to be controlled by the dislocation depletion condition, in which the total dislocation density remains almost constant throughout the loading process. In specimens larger than ∼4000b, the initial dislocation distribution is of critical importance since the presence of dislocation entanglements is found to obstruct deformation in the neighboring regions within a distance of ∼2000b. This length scale suggests that the effects of dense dislocation clusters are greater in intermediate-sized specimens (e.g. 4000b and 8000b) than in larger specimens (e.g. 16 000b), according to the weakest-link concept.

  17. Deformation mechanisms in Be{sub 12}X compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Brimhall, J.L.; Charlot, L.A.; Sondhi, S.; Hoagland, R.G.; Hirth, J.P.

    1992-12-01

    Dislocation structures have been examined, and active slip systems identified, in Be{sub l2}Nb after compressive deformation at 20, 800, 900 1000 and 1200C. A large number of slip systems are active at 1200C, but these decrease significantly at temperatures below 1000C. Dislocation structures at low temperatures are limited to 1/2<101(101) partial dislocations either paired or creating isolated planar faults. Significant ductility is not observed until 1200C when a second type of partial dislocation, 1/2<100(011) is present. Dislocations observed in the body-centered tetragonal Be{sup 12}X compounds (where X can be Nb, Ta, Mo, V, Fe etc.) have been modelled atomistically using molecular dynamics. Simulations corroborate the stability of these dislocation systems and indicate that the stacking faults associated with these partial dislocations have very low fault energy.

  18. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama–Wassermann and Kurdjumov–Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  19. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-03-07

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  20. Equivalences and correspondences between the deforming body induced flow and heat in two-three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic fluid flow and heat transfer due to two-three dimensional porous and deforming (stretching/shrinking) bodies. It is aimed to prove from a theoretical approach that several boundary value problems regardless of two or three dimensions associated with the stretching/shrinking surfaces having different physical origin result in either the equivalent structure of governing equations or the interchangeable role of mechanisms of stretching or shrinking. Therefore, a link is created between the deforming surface phenomena considered in different geometries in the open literature. On the grounds of the provided theorems, a special care must be paid before working on the variations of this physical phenomenon, since the skin friction and the rate of heat transfer of engineering interest may have already been extracted from an already studied twin problem, namely the two-dimensional nonlinear (power-law) deformation analysis. It is further shown that the radial nonlinear stretching/shrinking sheet problem also evolves into the two-dimensional nonlinear wall deformation problem.

  1. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  2. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  3. Edifice and substrata deformation induced by intrusive complexes and gravitational loading in the Mull volcano (Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; Vries, Benjamin Van Wyk De

    2009-12-01

    It is likely that the structure of a volcanic edifice can be significantly modified by deformation caused by large, shallow intrusions. Such deformation may interact with that caused by volcano loading. We explore such intrusion-related and loading-related deformation with field evidence and analogue models. To do this we have chosen the eroded Palaeogene Mull volcano (Scotland) that had a major edifice, has well exposed intrusions and significant deformation. There are thin Mesozoic sedimentary rocks forming ductile layers below the volcano, but their thickness is insufficient to allow the gravitational spreading of the volcanic edifice, especially when considering that a thick lava pile covers them. Thus intrusive push may have been the driving force for deformation. The Mull activity migrated toward the northwest, forming three successive intrusive complexes (Centres 1, 2 and 3). Our detailed fieldwork reveals that deformation due to these was accommodated on three levels; along thrust planes in lava sequences, along a décollement located in a thin clay-rich sediment succession and in basement schists. A relative chronology has been established between different groups of structures using dyke and sill cross-cutting relationships. Centre 1 is surrounded by a fold and thrust belt leading to radial expansion. In contrast, Centre 2 and 3 are connected to thrusts located to the south and east, bounded by strike-slip faults, leading to expansion to the southeast. The migration of centres and the directed sliding of the edifice may be related to the presence to the southeast of low-resistance Dalradian basement that failed significantly during growth of Centres 2 and 3. To study the observed relationships we have carried out scaled analogue models. Models are made with fine powder intruded by a viscous magma analogue. The models show an intimate relationship between intrusion growth, uplift of the volcano and subsequent flank sliding. The structures produced can be

  4. Regularities of bainitic steel deformation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, V. E.; Nikitina, E. N.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Aksenova, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of defect and carbide subsystems evolution in medium-carbon bainitic steel subjected to compressive strain up to 36% was performed by means of transmission electron diffraction microscopy. Dislocation substructure and carbide phase parameters dependence on degree of deformation are identified, possible reasons of staging in their changes are discussed. It is suggested that the reason for bainitic steel softening at high (over 15%) degrees of deformation is activation of deformation microtwinning process.

  5. Seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures revealed by X-ray computed tomography of boring cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Komatsubara, Junko

    2016-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) allows us to visualize three-dimensional structures hidden in boring cores nondestructively. We applied medical X-ray CT to cores containing seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDSs) obtained from the Kanto region of Japan, where the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake occurred. The CT images obtained clearly revealed various types of the seismically induced SSDSs embedded in the cores: a propagating sand dyke bent complexly by the preexisting geological structure, deformed laminations of fluidized sandy layers, and two types of downward mass movement (ductile downward folding and brittle normal faulting) as compensation for upward sand transport through sand dykes. Two advanced image analysis techniques were applied to the sand dyke CT images for the first time. The GrowCut algorithm, a specific digital image segmentation technique that uses cellular automata, was used successfully to extract the three-dimensional complex sand dyke structures embedded in the sandy sediments, which would have been difficult to achieve using a conventional image processing technique. Local autocorrelation image analysis was performed to detect the flow pattern aligned along the sand dykes objectively. The results demonstrate that X-ray CT coupled with advanced digital image analysis techniques is a promising approach to studying the seismically induced SSDSs in boring cores.

  6. Strain-rate effects on microstructural deformation in irradiated 316 SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, James I.; Tsai, Hanchung; Allen, Todd R.; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Akasaka, Naoaki; Yamagata, Ichiro; Nakamura, Yasuo

    2006-06-01

    A series of studies have been performed to investigate the post-irradiation deformation and failure behavior of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel following irradiation to variety of doses and temperatures in the outer rows of the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). In the current phase of these studies, three sets of samples with different radiation-induced microstructures have been characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following tensile testing to failure at a 'fast' strain-rate (1 × 10 -3 s -1) and a 'slow' strain-rate (1 × 10 -7 s -1). The samples were irradiated to doses between 9 and 41 dpa at temperatures between 383 and 443 °C. Tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 430 °C and only regions outside of the necked region were examined. Over the parameters tested, strain-rate had a negligible effect on the deformation microstructure. In addition, there was no clear evidence of localized deformation behavior and the deformation appeared relatively homogeneous, characterized by unfaulting and incorporation of faulted dislocation loops into the general dislocation network structure. The influence of the defect microstructures and strain-rate on deformation behavior is discussed.

  7. Theoretical study of kinks on screw dislocation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzagalli, L.; Pedersen, A.; Arnaldsson, A.; Jónsson, H.; Beauchamp, P.

    2008-02-01

    Theoretical calculations of the structure, formation, and migration of kinks on a nondissociated screw dislocation in silicon have been carried out using density functional theory calculations as well as calculations based on interatomic potential functions. The results show that the structure of a single kink is characterized by a narrow core and highly stretched bonds between some of the atoms. The formation energy of a single kink ranges from 0.9to1.36eV , and is of the same order as that for kinks on partial dislocations. However, the kinks migrate almost freely along the line of an undissociated dislocation unlike what is found for partial dislocations. The effect of stress has also been investigated in order to compare with previous silicon deformation experiments which have been carried out at low temperature and high stress. The energy barrier associated with the formation of a stable kink pair becomes as low as 0.65eV for an applied stress on the order of 1GPa , indicating that displacements of screw dislocations likely occur via thermally activated formation of kink pairs at room temperature.

  8. Silver photo-diffusion and photo-induced macroscopic surface deformation of Ge33S67/Ag/Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Asaoka, H.; Uozumi, Y.; Kondo, K.; Yamazaki, D.; Soyama, K.; Ailavajhala, M.; Mitkova, M.

    2016-08-01

    Ge-chalcogenide films show various photo-induced changes, and silver photo-diffusion is one of them which attracts lots of interest. In this paper, we report how silver and Ge-chalcogenide layers in Ge33S67/Ag/Si substrate stacks change under light exposure in the depth by measuring time-resolved neutron reflectivity. It was found from the measurement that Ag ions diffuse all over the matrix Ge33S67 layer once Ag dissolves into the layer. We also found that the surface was macroscopically deformed by the extended light exposure. Its structural origin was investigated by a scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Deformation-induced grain boundary wetting and its effects on the acoustic and rheological properties of partially molten rock analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Yasuko

    2005-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of deviatoric stress on the microstructure of partially molten polycrystalline aggregates. Borneol (organic crystal) + melt system having an eutectic temperature of 43°C and a moderate dihedral angle was used as a partially molten rock analogue. Large samples (70 mm cube) having melt fractions of 0.089-0.22 were deformed ductilely under a uniform pure shear stress (shear strain rate of ˜0.8-7×10-7 s-1), while monitoring the sample microstructure in situ using ultrasonic shear waves. Each sample was deformed repeatedly by changing the principal stress direction, resulting in the microstructural changes well detectable under the microscope. The most remarkable features of the stress- and/or deformation-induced microstructural changes are enhanced grain boundary wetting, enhanced grain coarsening, and formation of large (approximately sample scale) melt sheet parallel to the shear plane, which is an assembly of completely wetted two-grain boundaries at the microscopic scale. Significant changes in the elastic, anelastic, and viscous properties associated with these microstructural changes were observed. The velocity monitoring provided a detailed picture of growth and healing of grain boundary melt films in response to loading cycles. The microstructural changes observed in this study have many similarities with the "dynamic wetting" reported for the partially molten peridotite.

  10. Differentiation of Deformation Modes in Nanocrystalline Pd Films Inferred from Peak Asymmetry Evolution Using In Situ X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmiller, Jochen; Baumbusch, Rudolf; Kraft, Oliver; Gruber, Patric A.

    2013-02-01

    Synchrotron-based in situ tensile testing was used to study the dominant deformation mechanisms of nanocrystalline Pd thin films on a compliant substrate. An x-ray diffraction peak profile analysis reveals an (hkl) independent deformation induced peak asymmetry. It is argued that the asymmetry is caused by a broad distribution of elastic strains among individual grains and the complexity of accommodation processes. The reversal of peak asymmetry manifests the transition from heterogeneous microplasticity to dislocation-based macroplasticity. Independently, stress-driven grain boundary migration is active.

  11. Dislocation locking versus easy glide in titanium and zirconium.

    PubMed

    Clouet, Emmanuel; Caillard, Daniel; Chaari, Nermine; Onimus, Fabien; Rodney, David

    2015-09-01

    The ease of a metal to deform plastically in selected crystallographic planes depends on the core structure of its dislocations. As the latter is controlled by electronic interactions, metals with the same valence electron configuration usually exhibit a similar plastic behaviour. For this reason, titanium and zirconium, two transition metals of technological importance from the same column of the periodic table, have so far been assumed to deform in a similar fashion. However, we show here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy straining experiments, that plasticity proceeds very differently in these two metals, being intermittent in Ti and continuous in Zr. This observation is rationalized using first-principles calculations, which reveal that, in both metals, dislocations may adopt the same set of different cores that are either glissile or sessile. An inversion of stability of these cores between Zr and Ti is shown to be at the origin of the profoundly different plastic behaviours. PMID:26147845

  12. Dislocation nucleation in bcc Ta single crystals studied by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-08-08

    The study of dislocation nucleation in closed-packed metals by nanoindentation has recently attracted much interest. Here, we address the peculiarities of the incipient plasticity in body centered cubic (bcc) metals using low index Ta single-crystals as a model system. The combination of nanoindentation with high-resolution atomic force microscopy provides us with experimental atomic-scale information on the process of dislocation nucleation and multiplication. Our results reveal a unique deformation behavior of bcc Ta at the onset of plasticity which is distinctly different from that of closed-packed metals. Most noticeable, we observe only one rather than a sequence of discontinuities in the load-displacement curves. This and other differences are discussed in context of the characteristic plastic deformation behavior of bcc metals.

  13. Dislocation locking versus easy glide in titanium and zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouet, Emmanuel; Caillard, Daniel; Chaari, Nermine; Onimus, Fabien; Rodney, David

    2015-09-01

    The ease of a metal to deform plastically in selected crystallographic planes depends on the core structure of its dislocations. As the latter is controlled by electronic interactions, metals with the same valence electron configuration usually exhibit a similar plastic behaviour. For this reason, titanium and zirconium, two transition metals of technological importance from the same column of the periodic table, have so far been assumed to deform in a similar fashion. However, we show here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy straining experiments, that plasticity proceeds very differently in these two metals, being intermittent in Ti and continuous in Zr. This observation is rationalized using first-principles calculations, which reveal that, in both metals, dislocations may adopt the same set of different cores that are either glissile or sessile. An inversion of stability of these cores between Zr and Ti is shown to be at the origin of the profoundly different plastic behaviours.

  14. Measurement of probability distributions for internal stresses in dislocated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, Angus J.; Tarleton, Edmund; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Collins, David M.; Jiang, Jun; Britton, T. Benjamin

    2014-11-03

    Here, we analyse residual stress distributions obtained from various crystal systems using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Histograms showing stress probability distributions exhibit tails extending to very high stress levels. We demonstrate that these extreme stress values are consistent with the functional form that should be expected for dislocated crystals. Analysis initially developed by Groma and co-workers for X-ray line profile analysis and based on the so-called “restricted second moment of the probability distribution” can be used to estimate the total dislocation density. The generality of the results are illustrated by application to three quite different systems, namely, face centred cubic Cu deformed in uniaxial tension, a body centred cubic steel deformed to larger strain by cold rolling, and hexagonal InAlN layers grown on misfitting sapphire and silicon carbide substrates.

  15. New approach to the growth of low dislocation relaxed SiGe material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, A. R.; Iyer, S. S.; LeGoues, F. K.

    1994-04-01

    In this growth process a new strain relief mechanism operates, whereby the SiGe epitaxial layer relaxes without the generation of threading dislocations within the SiGe layer. This is achieved by depositing SiGe on an ultrathin silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate with a superficial silicon thickness less than the SiGe layer thickness. Initially, the thin Si layer is put under tension due to an equalization of the strain between the Si and SiGe layers. Thereafter, the strain created in the thin Si layer relaxes by plastic deformation. Since the dislocations are formed and glide in the thin Si layer, no threading dislocation is ever introduced in to the upper SiGe material, which appeared dislocation free to the limit of the cross sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis. We thus have a method for producing very low dislocation, relaxes SiGe films with the additional benefit of an SOI substrate.

  16. Dislocation punching from interfaces in functionally-graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, M.; Lee, J.K.; Mori, T.

    1997-06-01

    A new dislocation punching model for a functionally graded material (FGM) subjected to a temperature change is proposed, using Eshelby`s model. FGM, consisting of several layers, is deposited on a ceramic substrate. Two types of microstructures are examined for a layer: one consists of a metal matrix and ceramic particles and the other of a ceramic matrix and metal particles. An elastic energy is evaluated when plastic strain, in addition to thermal mismatch strain, is introduced in the metal phase. The work dissipated by the plastic deformation is also calculated. From the condition that the reduction in the elastic energy is larger than the work dissipated, a critical thermal mismatch strain to induce stress relaxation is determined. The magnitude of the plastic strain is also determined, when the relaxation occurs. The theory is applied to a model FGM consisting of mixtures of Pd and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate.

  17. Study of the mechanisms of current-induced suppression of serrated deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Zheltov, M. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Gasanov, M. F.

    2015-11-01

    The main results of studying the influence of electric current on the Portevin‒Le Chatelier serrated deformation in some commercial aluminum alloys of the Al‒Mg, Al‒Li-Mg, Al‒Zn‒Mg‒Cu, and Al‒Cu systems are reported. It is found that the passage of a low-density (~10-60 A/mm2) dc current leads to the suppression of serrated deformation and band formation in all alloys under study, except for the Al‒Cu alloy. Possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed, basically in terms of possible influence of current on the processes of precipitation and dynamic strain aging, which are used to explain the Portevin‒Le Chatelier effect.

  18. Volumetric deformation of live cells induced by pressure-activated cross-membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hui, T H; Zhou, Z L; Qian, J; Lin, Y; Ngan, A H W; Gao, H

    2014-09-12

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  19. Volumetric Deformation of Live Cells Induced by Pressure-Activated Cross-Membrane Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, T. H.; Zhou, Z. L.; Qian, J.; Lin, Y.; Ngan, A. H. W.; Gao, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  20. Deformation and dewetting of thin liquid films induced by moving gas jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-10-01

    We study the deformation of thin liquid films subjected to impinging air-jets that are moving with respect to the substrate. The height profile and shape of the deformed liquid film is evaluated experimentally and numerically for different jet Reynolds numbers and translation speeds, for different liquids and substrate materials. Experiments and numerical results are in good agreement. On partially wetting substrates film rupture occurs. We imaged the appearance of dry spots and emergence of droplet patterns by high-speed, dual-wavelength interference microscopy. We systematically evaluated the resulting average droplet size and droplet density as a function of the experimental conditions. We show that within experimental accuracy the distribution of dry spots is dependent only on the residual film thickness and is not directly influenced by the shear stress and pressure gradients of the air-jet, nor by the speed of the substrate.

  1. On the irradiation creep by climb-enabled glide of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashev, A. V.; Golubov, S. I.; Stoller, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    In the climb-enabled glide model of irradiation creep, the plastic deformation is defined by the elastic deflections of pinned dislocations, which is an inconsistency. We argue that this relation is incorrect; instead, as in other pinning-unpinning-type models, the dislocations move from one set of obstacles to another, so that the inter-obstacle spacing determines creep rate, whereas the dependence on the applied stress is only implicit in the unpinning time.

  2. On the irradiation creep by climb-enabled glide of dislocations

    DOE PAGES

    Barashev, A. V.; Golubov, S. I.; Stoller, R. E.

    2016-05-03

    The plastic deformation is defined by the proportional to stress elastic deflections of pinned dislocations in climb-enabled glide models of irradiation creep. Here, we argue that this relation is incorrect; instead, as in other pinning-unpinning-type models, the dislocations move from one set of obstacles to another, so that the inter-obstacle spacing determines creep rate, whereas the dependence on the applied stress is only implicit in the unpinning time.

  3. Dislocation density of pure copper processed by accumulative roll bonding and equal-channel angular pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Miyajima, Yoji; Okubo, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroki; Okumura, Hiroki; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Onaka, Susumu; Kato, Masaharu

    2015-06-15

    The dislocation density of pure copper fabricated by two severe plastic deformation (SPD) processes, i.e., accumulative roll bonding and equal-channel angular pressing, was evaluated using scanning transmission electron microscopy/transmission electron microscopy observations. The dislocation density drastically increased from ~ 10{sup 13} m{sup −} {sup 2} to about 5 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −} {sup 2}, and then saturated, for both SPD processes.

  4. Formation of disordered dislocational substructures and fracture of Cu-Mn polycrystal solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.; Cherkasova, T. V.; Kozlov, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    The evolution of dislocational substructures (DSS) during deformation was investigated using the TEM method. The process was held up to the fracture of Cu-Mn polycrystalline solid solutions with various grain sizes. The interconnection of microcracks formation in the alloys with the dislocation substructures being formed was revealed. It was established that the microcracks are formed along the grain boundaries and the disoriented substructure boundaries. The reasons for different plasticity of alloys with small and large Mn content are discussed.

  5. Influence of finite thickness and stiffness on cellular adhesion-induced deformation of compliant substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, John M.; Walton, Emily B.; Bruce, Christopher M.; van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2008-10-01

    Thin, mechanically compliant coatings commonly serve as substrata for adherent cells in cell biology and biophysics studies, biological engineering applications, and biomedical device design. The deformation of such a coating at the cell-substratum interface defines the link between cellular traction, substratum stiffness, and the chemomechanical feedback mechanisms responsible for cellular mechanosensitivity. Here we apply elasticity theory to investigate how this deformation is affected by the finite thickness of such a cell substratum. The model idealizes a cellular adhesion site (e.g., a focal adhesion) as a circular area of uniform tangential traction, and compares the deformation of a compliant semi-infinite material to that of a coating of the same material supported by a rigid base. Two parameters are identified and considered: center displacement (as a measure of adhesion site displacement) and normal strain gradient (as a measure of adhesion site distortion). The attenuation of these parameters provides two measures for the influence of a finite coating thickness and underlying rigid base on cell-mediated deformation of the compliant substratum. A dimensionless term in the resulting solutions connects the coating thickness to the characteristic size of the adhesion sites. This relation, and calculations of the minimum thickness at which the rigid base is practically undetectable by an adherent cell, are supported by existing experimental literature and our observations of the projected area of fibroblasts adhered to polyacrylamide hydrogel coatings with various thicknesses atop relatively rigid glass. The model thus provides a tool for estimating the effective stiffness sensed by a cell attached to a compliant coating. We also identify and consider conceptualizations of critical thickness, or minimum suitable thickness for an application, which depend on both the frame of reference and the cell behavior of interest. The appropriate usage of different

  6. Temperature Dependent Dislocation Mobility in MgSiO3 Perovskite: An Atomic Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraych, A.; Hirel, P.; Carrez, P.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer through the mantle is carried by convection, which involves plastic flow of the mantle constituents. Among these constituents, (Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)O3 perovskite is known to be the most abundant. This material is deformed at very low strain rate (from 10-12 to 10-16 s-1), and under extreme pressure and temperature conditions (from 30 to 140GPa, 1500 to 4000°C). Its plastic behaviour is challenging to reproduce experimentally, but crucial for a better understanding of the Earth's dynamic. The recent progress in modelling the behaviours of materials, which until now have been mostly used on metals, are applied here on MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv). We characterize dislocations at the atomic scale, as the first step of a multi-scale modelling approach on Mg-Pv plastic deformation. We model dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (described within the Pbnm space group), which are the shortest lattice parameters in the orthorhombic structure. Dislocation cores are determined to be described at various pressures. The resistance to glide of the dislocations is quantified indicating that [100](010) and [010](100) are the easiest slip systems in Mg-Pv over the full pressure range of the lower mantle. The effect of temperature is introduced by assimilating the thermal activation on dislocation lines to vibrations of a string lying into a potential valley. These vibrations allow the dislocation to overcome locally the energy barrier that represents the lattice friction, and then propagates under the effect of stress. With this model, by combining elastic theory of dislocations and calculations at the atomic scale, a first expression of the strain rate produced by dislocation glide is provided.Left figure : Thermally activated propagation of dislocation over the energy barrierRight figure : Shape of the crossing dislocation obtained from atomic scale modelling

  7. Moving Dislocations in Disordered Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Caro, A

    2006-11-18

    Using atomistic simulations of dislocation motion in Ni and Ni-Au alloys we report a detailed study of the mobility function as a function of stress, temperature and alloy composition. We analyze the results in terms of analytic models of phonon radiation and their selection rules for phonon excitation. We find a remarkable agreement between the location of the cusps in the {sigma}-v relation and the velocity of waves propagating in the direction of dislocation motion. We identify and characterize three regimes of dissipation whose boundaries are essentially determined by the direction of motion of the dislocation, rather than by its screw or edge character.

  8. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  9. Buckling of dislocation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Wang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    The buckling of dislocation in graphene is discussed through the lattice theory of dislocation and elastic theory. The approximate solution of the buckling is obtained based on the inner stress distribution caused by different structure of dislocations and is proved to be suitable by the simulation. The position of the highest buckling is predicted to be at the vertex of the pentagon far away from the heptagon. The buckling is strongly influenced by the internal stress and the distance between the extrusive area and stretching area, as well as the critical stress σc. The SW defect is proved to be unbuckled due to its strong interaction between extrusion and stretching.

  10. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  11. Dislocation mechanism of void growth at twin boundary of nanotwinned nickel based on molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yanan

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate dislocation mechanism of void growth at twin boundary (TB) of nanotwinned nickel. Simulation results show that the deformation of nanotwinned nickel containing a void at TB is dominated by the slip involving both leading and trailing partials, where the trailing partials are the dissociation products of stair-rod dislocations formed by the leading partials. The growth of a void at TB is attributed to the successive emission of the leading partials followed by trailing partials as well as the escape of these partial dislocations from the void surface.

  12. Modelling dislocation cores in MgSiO3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Kraych, A.

    2012-12-01

    MgSiO3 perovskite is the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle (i.e. between 700 and 2900 km depth) and accounts for half of Earth's mass. At lower mantle pressures (25-135 GPa) MgSiO3 crystallises in a distorted (orthorhombic) perovskite structure (described in the following using the Pbnm space group). In this structure, SiO6 octahedra are tilted with tilt angles increasing with increasing pressure. Since it is very difficult to perform deformation experiments under the extreme P, T conditions of the lower mantle, little is known about plastic deformation of MgSiO3 perovskite and its slip systems are still a matter of debate. To overcome this difficulty, we model dislocation core structures in this mineral taking into account the influence of pressure. In this study, we focus on dislocation core structures of dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (which derive from <110> Burgers vectors of the underlying pseudo-cubic structure). Atomistic calculations are performed using pair-wise potentials as implemented in the LAMMPS code. The choice of potentials was initially validated by comparing generalized stacking fault (GSF) energies to similar calculations performed with the density functional theory (DFT). The core structures of screw dislocations are calculated using two independent methods. The first one is based on Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin simulations involving GSF as an input. Direct calculations have also bee performed using cluster approach. It turns out that screw dislocations with [100] Burgers vector are characterised by a core mostly spread in the (010) plane. The core exhibits two edge-sharing octahedra in a configuration very similar to that modelled in SrTiO3 cubic perovskite. The structure of [010] screw dislocations is more complex with dissociation into two, non-collinear partial dislocations with a significant non-screw component. Both dislocations exhibit high Peierls stresses. This illustrates the effect of orthorhombic

  13. Deformation-induced ω phase in modified Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy by Cr addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken

    2013-08-01

    For spinal-fixation applications, implants should have a high Young's modulus to reduce springback during operations, though a low Young's modulus is required to prevent stress shielding for patients after surgeries. In the present study, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ) with a low Young's modulus was modified by adding Cr to obtain a higher deformation-induced Young's modulus in order to satisfy these contradictory requirements. Two newly designed alloys, TNTZ-8Ti-2Cr and TNTZ-16Ti-4Cr, possess more stable β phases than TNTZ. These alloys consist of single β phases and exhibit relatively low Young's moduli of <65GPa after solution treatment. However, after cold rolling, they exhibit higher Young's moduli owing to a deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. These modified TNTZ alloys show significantly less springback than the original TNTZ alloy based on tensile and bending loading-unloading tests. Thus, the Cr-added TNTZ alloys are beneficial for spinal-fixation applications. PMID:23624220

  14. Flow-induced deformation of poroelastic tissues and gels: a new perspective on equilibrium pressure-flow-thickness relations.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure-driven flows through soft tissues and gels cause deformations of the solid network to occur, due to drag from the flowing fluid. This phenomenon occurs in many contexts including physiological flows and infusions through soft tissues, in mechanically stimulated engineered tissues, and in direct permeation measurements of hydraulic permeability. Existing theoretical descriptions are satisfactory in particular cases, but none provide a description which is easy to generalize for the design and interpretation of permeation experiments involving a range of different boundary conditions and gel properties. Here a theoretical description of flow-induced permeation is developed using a relatively simple approximate constitutive law for strain-dependent permeability and an assumed constant elastic modulus, using dimensionless parameters which emerge naturally. Analytical solutions are obtained for relationships between fundamental variables, such as flow rate and pressure drop, which were not previously available. Guidelines are provided for assuring that direct measurements of hydraulic permeability are performed accurately, and suggestions emerge for alternative measurement protocols. Insights obtained may be applied to interpretation of flow-induced deformation and related phenomena in many contexts.

  15. Interaction of run-in edge dislocations with twist grain boundaries in Al-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Naveen Kumar, N.; Samal, M. K.; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries play an important role in outlining the mechanical properties of crystalline materials. They act as sites for absorption/nucleation of dislocations, which are the main carriers of plastic deformation. In view of this, the interactions between edge dislocations and twist grain boundaries-dislocation pileup, dislocation absorption and dislocation emission were explored by performing molecular dynamics simulations in face-centered cubic Al using embedded atom method. The ?1 1 0? twist grain boundaries with various misorientation angles were selected for this purpose. It was found that the misorientation angle of boundary and stress anomalies arising from repeated dislocation absorption at the grain boundaries are the important parameters in determining the ability of the boundary to emit dislocations. Complex network of dislocations results in later stages of deformation, which may have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the material. The peculiarities of dislocation nucleation, their emission from twist grain boundaries and the ramifications of this study towards development of higher length scale material models are discussed.

  16. Overview of the recommended procedures dealing with the evaluation of liquefaction-induced deformation allong a pipeline corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, George

    2016-04-01

    The last decade several pipeline corridors have been designed in order to transmit to Europe natural gas and oil from Asia. Although the fact that a pipeline is considered as an underground structure, an analysis of earthquake-induced structural failures should be conducted in prone to earthquake countries e.g. Greece, Italy in EU. The aim of these specific analyses is to assess and evaluate the hazard and the relevant risk induced by earthquake-induced slope failures and soil liquefaction. The latter is a phenomenon that is triggered under specific site conditions. In particular the basic ingredients for the occurrence of liquefaction is the surficial water table, the existence of non-plastic or low plasticity soil layer and the generation of strong ground motion. Regarding the liquefaction-induced deformation that should be assessed and evaluated in order to minimize the risk, it is concluded that the pervasive types of ground failures for level to gently sloping sites are the ground settlements and lateral spreads. The goal of this study is to overview the most widely approaches used for the computation of liquefaction-induced settlement and to present a more detailed description, step by step, of the methodology that is recommended to follow for the evaluation of lateral spreading.

  17. In Situ TEM Observation of Dislocation Evolutionin Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    L. F. HE; 1 M. A. KIRK; Argonne National Laboratory; J. Gan; T. R. ALLEN

    2014-10-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of polycrystalline UO2 (with average grain size of about 5 lm) irradiated with Kr ions at 600C and 800C was conducted to understand the radiation-induced dislocation evolution under the influence of grain boundaries. The dislocation evolution in the grain interior of polycrystalline UO2 was similar under Kr irradiation at different ion energies and temperatures. As expected, it was characterized by the nucleation and growth of dislocation loops at low irradiation doses, followed by transformation to extended dislocation lines and tangles at high doses. For the first time, a dislocation-denuded zone was observed near a grain boundary in the 1-MeV Kr-irradiated UO2 sample at 800C. The denuded zone in the vicinity of grain boundary was not found when the irradiation temperature was at 600C. The suppression of dislocation loop formation near the boundary is likely due to the enhanced interstitial diffusion toward grain boundary at the high temperature.

  18. Avalanches and scaling in plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Koslowski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Plastic deformation of crystalline materials is a complex non-homogeneous process characterized by avalanches in the motion of dislocations. We study the evolution of dislocations loops using an analytically solvable phase-field model of dislocations for ductile single crystals during monotonic loading. We present simulations of dislocations under slow external loading that generate scale-free avalanches and power-law behavior that are characteristics of self organized criticality. The distribution of dislocation loop sizes is given by P(A) {approx} A{sup -{sigma}}, with {sigma} = 1.8 {+-} 0.1. The power law exponent is in agreement with those found in acoustic emission measurements on stressed ice single crystals. In addition to the jerky character of dislocation motion, this model also predicts a range of macroscopic behaviors in agreement with observation, including hardening and dislocation multiplication with monotonic loading and a maximum in the acoustic emission signal at the onset of yielding. At sufficient large stress, the hardening rate drops and the stress-strain curve saturates. At the same time the acoustic emission as well as the dislocation production decreases in agreement with experimental observation.

  19. Dislocation Detection Through Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, B. T.; Kropf, M.; Boudraeu, K.; Guers, M. J.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2010-02-01

    A fundamental goal of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is to characterize material defects before failure. During material fatigue, dislocations tend to nucleate, becoming sources of stress concentration. Eventually, cracks start to form and lead to material failure. Recent research has indicated that nonlinear harmonic generation can be used to distinguish between materials of high and low dislocation densities. This research reports nonlinear harmonic generation measurements to distinguish between those areas of high and low dislocation densities in copper bars. The copper bars were subjected to flexural fatigue. Periodic scans were taken in order to track dislocation development during the fatigue life of the material. We show that this technique provides improved early detection for critical components of failure.

  20. Atomistic mechanisms of intermittent plasticity in metals: dislocation avalanches and defect cluster pinning.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Shimokawa, Tomotsugu

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent plastic deformation in crystals with power-law behaviors has been reported in previous experimental studies. The power-law behavior is reminiscent of self-organized criticality, and mesoscopic models have been proposed that describe this behavior in crystals. In this paper, we show that intermittent plasticity in metals under tensile deformation can be observed in molecular dynamics models, using embedded atom method potentials for Ni, Cu, and Al. Power-law behaviors of stress drop and waiting time of plastic deformation events are observed. It is shown that power-law behavior is due to dislocation avalanche motions in Cu and Ni. A different mechanism of dislocation pinning is found in Al. These different stress relaxation mechanisms give different power-law exponents. We propose a probabilistic model to describe the novel dislocation motion in Al and analytically deduce the power-law behavior.

  1. Atomistic mechanisms of intermittent plasticity in metals: dislocation avalanches and defect cluster pinning.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Shimokawa, Tomotsugu

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent plastic deformation in crystals with power-law behaviors has been reported in previous experimental studies. The power-law behavior is reminiscent of self-organized criticality, and mesoscopic models have been proposed that describe this behavior in crystals. In this paper, we show that intermittent plasticity in metals under tensile deformation can be observed in molecular dynamics models, using embedded atom method potentials for Ni, Cu, and Al. Power-law behaviors of stress drop and waiting time of plastic deformation events are observed. It is shown that power-law behavior is due to dislocation avalanche motions in Cu and Ni. A different mechanism of dislocation pinning is found in Al. These different stress relaxation mechanisms give different power-law exponents. We propose a probabilistic model to describe the novel dislocation motion in Al and analytically deduce the power-law behavior. PMID:25768512

  2. Perilunar carpal dislocations treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Tarczyńska, Marta; Kosior, Piotr

    2006-06-30

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze late outcomes of perilunar carpal dislocations, depending on the type of the injury, time of the diagnosis and the treatment methods. Material and methods. The material is constituted by 37 patients treated in our department between 1981-2004 because of perilunar dislocation. In group were 2 women and 35 men, aged 19-56 (mean 31 years). All patients were asked for control visit. DASH and Mayo score were used to evaluate the outcome. Range of wrist motion, its stability, grip strength and X-ray pictures were analyzed. Results. Better follow-up results were observed in persons with early diagnosed dislocations of the wrist. The best outcomes were observed in group with perilunar early diagnosed dislocations, which were treated by open reduction. Posttraumatic wrist instability often was diagnosed in patients with dislocation of lunar bone and late-diagnosed transscaphoid perilunar carpal dislocations. Conclusions. The data we obtained show, that the consequences of late-diagnosed and late-treated injuries of the wrist are instability, pain, decrease in range of motion and hand skills. PMID:17592406

  3. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  4. Displacement field for an edge dislocation in a layered half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The displacement field for an edge dislocation in an Earth model consisting of a layer welded to a half-space of different material is found in the form of a Fourier integral following the method given by Weeks et al. [1968]. There are four elementary solutions to be considered: the dislocation is either in the half-space or the layer and the Burgers vector is either parallel or perpendicular to the layer. A general two-dimensional solution for a dip-slip faulting or dike injection (arbitrary dip) can be constructed from a superposition of these elementary solutions. Surface deformations have been calculated for an edge dislocation located at the interface with Burgers vector inclined 0??, 30??, 60??, and 90?? to the interface for the case where the rigidity of the layer is half of that of the half-space and the Poisson ratios are the same. Those displacement fields have been compared to the displacement fields generated by similarly situated edge dislocations in a uniform half-space. The surface displacement field produced by the edge dislocation in the layered half-space is very similar to that produced by an edge dislocation at a different depth in a uniform half-space. In general, a low-modulus (high-modulus) layer causes the half-space equivalent dislocation to appear shallower (deeper) than the actual dislocation in the layered half-space.

  5. Repulsive interactions between dislocations and overgrown v-shaped defects in epitaxial GaN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, P. H.; Schnedler, M.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial distribution and the projected line directions of dislocations intersecting a cross-sectional (101¯0) cleavage plane of a GaN(0001) epitaxial layer is mapped using scanning tunneling microscopy. The data is correlated with the spatial positions of v-shaped defects. The dislocations are found to be bent away from the inclined semipolar facets of v-shaped defects, due to a strain-induced repulsive interaction. The dislocation distribution is characterized by agglomerations and intersecting bundles of dislocations with parallel projected line directions, stabilized by many body effects in the repulsive strain interactions.

  6. Crystal growth of completely dislocation-free and striation-free GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohda, H.; Yamada, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Osaka, J.

    1985-06-01

    Completely dislocation-free and striation-free, semi-insulating GaAs crystals with 50 mm diameter were grown by means of the newly developed Czochralski process. These crytals were obtained by combining the following techniques: (1) A dislocation-free seed crystal is used to eliminate grown-in dislocations; (2) the fully encapsulated Czochralski (FEC) method is applied in combination with indium doping to suppress stress-induced dislocations; and (3) a vertical magnetic-field is applied to homogenize the distribution of doped indium.

  7. Energetic dislocation interactions and thermodynamical aspects of strain gradient crystal plasticity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertürk, İ.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2009-11-01

    This paper focuses on the unification of two frequently used and apparently different strain gradient crystal plasticity frameworks: (i) the physically motivated strain gradient crystal plasticity models proposed by Evers et al. [2004a. Non-local crystal plasticity model with intrinsic SSD and GND effects. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 52, 2379-2401; 2004b. Scale dependent crystal plasticity framework with dislocation density and grain boundary effects. International Journal of Solids and Structures 41, 5209-5230] and Bayley et al. [2006. A comparison of dislocation induced back stress formulations in strain gradient crystal plasticity. International Journal of Solids and Structure 43, 7268-7286; 2007. A three dimensional dislocation field crystal plasticity approach applied to miniaturized structures. Philosophical Magazine 87, 1361-1378] (here referred to as Evers-Bayley type models), where a physical back stress plays the most important role and which are further extended here to deal with truly large deformations, and (ii) the thermodynamically consistent strain gradient crystal plasticity model of Gurtin (2002-2008) (here referred to as the Gurtin type model), where the energetic part of a higher order micro-stress is derived from a non-standard free energy function. The energetic micro-stress vectors for the Gurtin type models are extracted from the definition of the back stresses of the improved Evers-Bayley type models. The possible defect energy forms that yield the derived physically based micro-stresses are discussed. The duality of both type of formulations is shown further by a comparison of the micro-boundary conditions. As a result, this paper provides a direct physical interpretation of the different terms present in Gurtin's model.

  8. Movement of basal plane dislocations in GaN during electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, E. B.; Vergeles, P. S.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, S. J.

    2015-03-30

    The movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in low-dislocation-density GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth as a result of irradiation with the probing beam of a scanning electron microscope was detected by means of electron beam induced current. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocations was susceptible to such changes and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide for dislocations pinned by two different types of pinning sites: a low-activation-energy site and a high-activation-energy site. Only dislocation segments pinned by the former sites can be moved by irradiation and only until they meet the latter pinning sites.

  9. Transient laser-induced surface deformation of silicon in relation to damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun C.; Ho, Woei-Yun; Walser, Rodger M.; Becker, Michael F.

    1993-06-01

    Transient thermal expansion, heat generation and conduction, and nonlinear laser heating of single crystal Si wafers below and above the damage onset has been investigated via a laser pump-probe configuration. The transient photothermal deflection (TPD) technique that we employed consisted of a 10 ns Nd:YAG pump source at 1064 nm with 10 Hz repetition rate. A cw HeNe probe beam was used to probe the localized time dependent slope change of illuminated surface. The deflection of the reflected probe beam, centered at the maximum slope of the irradiated spot, was detected by a fast bicell photodiode. The deformation signals were recorded by a digital camera system in conjunction with a high-speed oscilloscope. The waveforms were later analyzed for surface angular deflection and vertical displacement based on the geometry of the Gaussian irradiation profile. Vertical displacement down to a few nm could be detected and converted into instantaneous peak surface temperature by a first-order, approximate thermal model. Measured displacement and surface temperature were then compared to computer simulations at different fluence levels. They were found to be in excellent agreement to each other. In addition, single and multiple shot experiments were performed to obtain their respective damage onsets and thresholds. Measurement of peak surface deformation at subthreshold fluences gives insight into the thermomechanical processes which may play an important role in multi-pulse damage.

  10. Observations of adhesion-induced deformations between spheroidal gold particles and conducting substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, D. S.; DeMejo, L. P.; Bowen, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Spheroidal gold particles, approximately 3 μm in diameter, were deposited on both hard and soft planar, electrically conducting substrates, and the interfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the particles appeared to embed into the softer substrate, but not into the harder one. The softer substrate also appeared to flow up the sides of the particles. The diameters of the craters formed are compared with the predictions based on Hertz' [Zimon, Adhesion of Dusts and Powders (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1982)] model of elastic deformation, Krupp's [Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 1, 111 (1967)] model of plastic response [assuming van der Waals (Zimon, ibid. and Krupp, ibid.) interactions], and Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts' [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 324, 301 (1971)] model of tensile response due to surface tension. These calculations suggest that the observed deformation on the softer substrate is predominantly plastic rather than elastic and that surface tension is significant. The techniques are expanded and results reported for the case of gold particles on insulating surfaces.

  11. Creep mechanisms and interface-enhanced deformation twinning in a two-phase lamellar TiAl alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L.M., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    Deformation mechanisms and the role of interfaces in deformation twinning of a two-phase [TiAl({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al({alpha}{sub 2})] lamellar alloy creep deformed at elevated temperatures have been investigated. Since the multiplication of lattice dislocations within both {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae is very limited at a low stress level due to a refined lamellar microstructure, the glide of interfacial dislocations on both {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma}/{gamma} interfaces (i.e interface sliding) becomes an important deformation mode. Obstacles such as impinged lattice dislocations can impede the movement of interfacial dislocations, which glide in a cooperative fashion along the lamellar interfaces. The impediment of dislocation motion subsequently causes a dislocation pile-up in front of obstacles as creep strain accumulates. When the crystals deform at high stress level, deformation twinning becomes a predominant deformation mode. Deformation twins are found to nucleate from the interfaces as a result of a local stress concentration generated from dislocation pile-ups. It is suggested that the deformation twinning in lamellar TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al crystals can be vieived as a stress relaxation process for the concentration of stress at the head of each dislocation pile-up. An interface-assisted twinning mechanism is accordingly proposed and discussed.

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-08-15

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.

  13. Detection of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake-induced landslide surface deformation in Kathmandu using InSAR images from PALSAR-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi P.; Une, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies reported that the 2015 Gorkha earthquake (Mw 7.8), which occurred in Nepal, triggered landslides in mountainous areas. In Kathmandu, earthquake-induced land subsidence was identified by interpreting local phase changes in interferograms produced from Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2/Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 data. However, the associated ground deformation was not discussed in detail. We studied line-of-sight (LoS) changes from InSAR images in the SE area of Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu. To obtain the change in LoS caused only by local, short-wavelength surface deformation, we subtracted the change in LoS attributed to coseismic deformation from the original change in LoS. The resulting change in LoS showed that the river terrace was driven to the bottom of the river valley. We also studied the changes in LoS in both ascending and descending InSAR images of the area along the Bishnumati River and performed 2.5D analysis. Removing the effect of coseismic deformation revealed east-west and up-down components of local surface deformation, indicating that the river terrace deformed eastward and subsided on the western riverbank of the river. On the east riverbank, the river terrace deformed westward and subsided. However, in the southern part of the river basin, the river terrace deformed westward and was uplifted. The deformation data and field survey results indicate that local surface deformation in these two areas was not caused by land subsidence but by a landslide (specifically, lateral spread).

  14. Dislocation-Radiation Obstacle Interactions: Developing Improved Mechanical Property Constitutive Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Robertson

    2008-10-10

    The objective of this program was to understand the interaction of dislocations with a wide range of obstacles commonly produced in materials under irradiation (dislocation loops, voids, helium bubbles, stacking fault tetrahedra and radiation-induced precipitates). The approach employed in this program combined multi-scale modeling and dynamic in-situ and static ex-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  15. Deformation analysis for understanding landslide-induced brittle fractures at the Super-Sauze landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Häfner, Rolf; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Applying passive seismic analysis techniques realized by Nanoseismic Monitoring to creeping or slow-moving, soft-rock landslides in the Alps, we observed fracture processes (M_L < 0) of slope material, also called slidequakes. Their time-frequency signature is similar to impulsive signals from local earthquakes, and indicates brittle fracturing of slope material. Slidequakes are weak signals with poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); thus neither precise depths nor moment tensor solutions could be derived. Another type of non-impulsive, very weak signals that are recorded are called tremors. These signals are visible on too few single stations and thus cannot be located, but the source can be attributed to the immediate vicinity of the seismometers. Seismic analysis tools alone do not help to understand the occurrence and the possible generation mechanisms of these seismic signals. For several years, seismic strain-rate tensors derived from earthquake observations and crustal geodetic strain-rate were combined to provide insights into the deformation process of tectonically active zones. This showed that the axes of the seismic and the geodetic strain rate tensors have similar orientation and are of similar style. We applied a deformation analysis of the temporal and spatial heterogeneous displacement fields of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps) that were derived from multi-temporal aerial photographs, DGPS and TLS measurements. The geodetic strain rate at the surface and the shear rates in the direction of movement were determined. The strain rate fields exhibit heterogeneous patterns, reflecting the temporally and spatially variable extension and compression of subareas. In regions with a temporal strain drop a preferred occurrence of slidequakes can be expected. The areas with increased shear rates, however are presumed to be the source of tremor signals, which are infact most often encountered in the boundary regions between hard rock and slope

  16. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 1. General phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Javanbakht, Mahdi

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamically consistent, three-dimensional (3D) phase field approach (PFA) for coupled multivariant martensitic transformations (PTs), including cyclic PTs, variant-variant transformations (i.e., twinning), and dislocation evolution is developed at large strains. One of our key points is in the justification of the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic, transformational, and plastic parts. The plastic part includes four mechanisms: dislocation motion in martensite along slip systems of martensite and slip systems of austenite inherited during PT and dislocation motion in austenite along slip systems of austenite and slip systems of martensite inherited during reverse PT. The plastic part of the velocity gradient for all these mechanisms is defined in the crystal lattice of the austenite utilizing just slip systems of austenite and inherited slip systems of martensite, and just two corresponding types of order parameters. The explicit expressions for the Helmholtz free energy and the transformation and plastic deformation gradients are presented to satisfy the formulated conditions related to homogeneous thermodynamic equilibrium states of crystal lattice and their instabilities. In particular, they result in a constant (i.e., stress- and temperature-independent) transformation deformation gradient and Burgers vectors. Thermodynamic treatment resulted in the determination of the driving forces for change of the order parameters for PTs and dislocations. It also determined the boundary conditions for the order parameters that include a variation of the surface energy during PT and exit of dislocations. Ginzburg-Landau equations for dislocations include variation of properties during PTs, which in turn produces additional contributions from dislocations to the Ginzburg-Landau equations for PTs. A complete system of coupled PFA and mechanics equations is presented. A similar theory can be developed for PFA to dislocations and other

  17. Analysis of rock deformation and fracture induced by rock-cutting tools used in coal mining. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.

    1982-10-15

    Deformation induced in Carthage Limestone and Tennessee Sandstone by an Austin AP24 Flat Cutter in laboratory tests consists of four sets of extension fractures and gouge (fine-grained wear particles). The fracture array, inferred sequence of fracture development, and inferred stress field are independent of rock type and texture. The deformation is three-dimensional, extends laterally as much as 1.8 times the half-width of the tool on either side of the tool, and in depth, most of it is confined to the zone 0.07 in. (1.8 mm) below the base of the cutter. As the tool passes a given point the four sets of extension fractures are formed and subsequently the gouge is developed and reworked by shearing. The efficiency of the Austin cutter could be improved by kerfing and by employing water jets that would remove chips bounded by the fractures before energy was wasted grinding and regrinding the chips, fragments and the sides of the groove. Horizontal and vertical cutting forces decrease with increasing depth of cut and when divided by the area of material removed, they tentatively suggest an optimum depth of cut, namely 0.075 in. (1.9 mm). This interesting result needs to be tested much more extensively.

  18. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It ismore » found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.« less

  19. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It is found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.

  20. Deformation-induced localized solid-state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Qing; Lian, Jianshe

    2012-01-01

    Although amorphous structures have been widely obtained in various multi-component metallic alloys, amorphization in pure metals has seldom been observed and remains a long-standing scientific curiosity and technological interest. Here we present experimental evidence of localized solid-state amorphization in bulk nanocrystalline nickel introduced by quasi-static compression at room temperature. High-resolution electron microscope observations illustrate that nano-scale amorphous structures present at the regions where severe deformation occurred, e.g. along crack paths or surrounding nano-voids. These findings have indicated that nanocrystalline structures are highly desirable for promoting solid-state amorphization, which may provide new insights for understanding the nature of the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation and suggested a potential method to produce elemental metallic glasses that have hardly been available hitherto through rapid solidification. PMID:22768383

  1. Anomalous transport and diffusion phenomena induced by biharmonic forces in deformable potential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbemmo, André Marie Fopossi; Kenmoé, Germaine Djuidjé; Kofané, Timoléon Crépin

    2016-09-01

    We study transport properties of an inertial Brownian motor which moves in a deformable Remoissenet-Peyrad periodic potential and is subjected to both a static bias force and time periodic driving biharmonic force. By modifying the shape of the potential, the anomalous transport is identified for a particular set of the system parameters. For a particular potential shape, the mean velocity of a particle is modified by going from negative to positive values according to the external bias force. These features also depend on both the biharmonic parameter and the phase-lag of two signals. A remarkable transition of the negative velocity depending on the shape of the potential is observed. We also focus on the efficiency of the motor and discuss velocity fluctuation. In addition, within selected system parameters, different types of diffusion particle such as subdiffusion, superdiffusion, normal diffusion, ballistic diffusion, hyperdiffusion and dispersionless transport phenomena are generated in the system.

  2. Magneto-induced tunability of thermo-spin current in deformed zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinehloo, Davoud; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this report is to unfold how the thermo-electric spin-polarized current in a transverse-biased zigzag graphene nanoribbon changes in the presence of uniaxial deformations and uniform perpendicular magnetic field. Employing the two-parameter Hubbard model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we found that both uniaxial strain and magnetic field can significantly modulate the bandgap, local distribution of edge states, and the critical transverse electric field needed to achieve the half-metallic phase in the ribbon. Our analysis shows a significant enhancement of the maximum attainable spin-polarized current as functions of both source temperature and contacts temperature difference, with increasing the magnetic field or applying any magnitude of compressive strain. Furthermore, it is shown that the magneto-resistance ratio of the device, can be drastically tuned via strain engineering, reaching values as high as 2 × 104% for compressive strains of 5% magnitude.

  3. Sheet on a deformable sphere: Wrinkle patterns suppress curvature-induced delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohlfeld, Evan; Davidovitch, Benny

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion of a stiff film onto a curved substrate often generates elastic stresses in the film that eventually give rise to its delamination. Here we predict that delamination of very thin films can be dramatically suppressed through tiny, smooth deformations of the substrate, dubbed here "wrinklogami," that barely affect the macro-scale topography. This "prolamination" effect reflects a surprising capability of smooth wrinkles to suppress compression in elastic films even when spherical or other doubly curved topography is imposed, in a similar fashion to origami folds that enable construction of curved structures from an unstretchable paper. We show that the emergence of a wrinklogami pattern signals a nontrivial isometry of the sheet to its planar, undeformed state, in the doubly asymptotic limit of small thickness and weak tensile load exerted by the adhesive substrate. We explain how such an "asymptotic isometry" concept broadens the standard usage of isometries for describing the response of elastic sheets to geometric constraints and mechanical loads.

  4. Surface-force-induced deformations of monodisperse polystyrene spheres on planar silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, D. S.; DeMejo, L. P.; Bowen, R. C.

    1990-12-01

    The contact radii between polystyrene spheres, having diameters between approximately 1.5 and 12 μm, and polished silicon wafers, arising from adhesion forces, were determined using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the contact radius varied approximately as the square root of the particle radius. This dependence is consistent with nonelastic response models of adhesion, such as those proposed by Krupp [H. Krupp, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 1, 111 (1967)] and by Maugis and Pollock [D. Maugis and H. M. Pollock, Acta Metall. 32, 1323 (1984)], but is inconsistent with various elastic response models which assume Hertzian deformations. The experimentally determined contact radii are also compared to those obtained for polystyrene spheres on a polyurethane substrate [D. S. Rimai, L. P. DeMejo, and R. C. Bowen, J. Appl. Phys. 66, 3574 (1989)].

  5. Optomechanical properties of cancer cells revealed by light-induced deformation and quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Budde, Björn; Isbach, Michael; Rommel, Christina; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in cell biology and clinical diagnostics in label-free, optical techniques as the interaction with the sample is minimized and substances like dyes or fixatives do not affect the investigated cells. Such techniques include digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and the optical stretching by fiber optical two beam traps. DHM enables quantitative phase contrast imaging and thereby the determination of the cellular refractive index, dry mass and the volume, whereas optical cell stretching reveals the deformability of cells. Since optical stretching strongly depends on the optical properties and the shape of the investigated material we combined the usage of fiber optical stretching and DHM for the characterization of pancreatic tumor cells. The risk of tumors is their potential to metastasize, spread through the bloodstream and build distal tumors/metastases. The grade of dedifferentiation in which the cells lose their cell type specific properties is a measure for this metastatic potential. The less differentiated the cells are, the higher is their risk to metastasize. Our results demonstrate that pancreatic tumor cells, which are from the same tumor but vary in their grade of differentiation, show significant differences in their deformability. The retrieved data show that differentiated cells have a higher stiffness than less differentiated cells of the same tumor. Even cells that differ only in the expression of a single tumor suppressor gene which is responsible for cell-cell adhesions can be distinguished by their mechanical properties. Additionally, results from DHM measurements yield that the refractive index shows only few variations, indicating that it does not significantly influence optical cell stretching. The obtained results show a promising new approach for the phenotyping of different cell types, especially in tumor cell characterization and cancer diagnostics.

  6. In situ atomic-scale observation of continuous and reversible lattice deformation beyond the elastic limit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Liu, Pan; Guan, Pengfei; Yang, Mingjie; Sun, Jialin; Cheng, Yongqiang; Hirata, Akihiko; Zhang, Ze; Ma, Evan; Chen, Mingwei; Han, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    The elastic strain sustainable in crystal lattices is usually limited by the onset of inelastic yielding mediated by discrete dislocation activity, displacive deformation twinning and stress-induced phase transformations, or fracture associated with flaws. Here we report a continuous and gradual lattice deformation in bending nickel nanowires to a reversible shear strain as high as 34.6%, which is approximately four times that of the theoretical elastic strain limit for unconstrained loading. The functioning deformation mechanism was revealed on the atomic scale by an in situ nanowire bending experiments inside a transmission electron microscope. The complete continuous lattice straining process of crystals has been witnessed in its entirety for the straining path, which starts from the face-centred cubic lattice, transitions through the orthogonal path to reach a body-centred tetragonal structure and finally to a re-oriented face-centred cubic structure. PMID:24022231

  7. Shock temperatures in silica glass - Implications for modes of shock-induced deformation, phase transformation, and melting with pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock-induced radiative thermal emissions are used to determine the gray body temperatures and emittances of silica glass under shock compression between 10 and 30 GPa. The results suggest that fused quartz deforms heterogeneously in this shock pressure range. It is shown that the 10-16 GPa range coincides with the permanent densification region, while the 16-30 GPa range coincides with the inferred mixed phase region along the silica glass Hugoniot. Low emittances in the mixed phase region are thought to represent the melting temperature of the high-pressure phase, stishovite. Also, consideration is given to the effects of pressure on melting relations for the system SiO2-Mg2SiO4.

  8. Effect of carbon on copper precipitation in deformed Fe-based alloys studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Schut, H.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2013-06-01

    The role of deformation-induced defects and carbon addition on the copper precipitation during aging at 550 °C is investigated in high-purity Fe-Cu-B-N-C alloy samples by Coincidence Doppler Broadening. In samples with 0% and 8% cold pre-strain, the influence of tensile pre-deformation on the precipitation kinetics of copper is studied. The deformation-induced defects are found to enhance the Cu precipitation kinetics. A sharp reduction in open volume defects is accompanied with a strong increase of Cu signature during the initial stage of aging, implying that the open defects (mainly dislocations) act as nucleation sites for Cu precipitates. A comparison of the time evolution of S-W plots between Fe-Cu, Fe-Cu-B-N, and Fe-Cu-B-N-C alloys indicates that the addition of carbon does not alter the Cu precipitation mechanism but decelerates the kinetics.

  9. Modeling hydrogen transport by dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Martin, May L.; Nagao, Akihide; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental studies of the microstructure beneath fracture surfaces of specimens fractured in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen suggest that the dislocation structure and hydrogen transported by mobile dislocations play important roles in establishing the local conditions that promote failure. The experiments demonstrate that hydrogen is responsible for the copious plasticity in large volumes of material before the onset of fracture and further afield from a crack tip. A revised model for hydrogen transport that accounts for hydrogen carried by dislocations along with stress driven diffusion and trapping at other microstructural defects is proposed. With the use of this new model, numerical simulation results for transient hydrogen profiles in the neighborhood of a crack tip are presented. Based on hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and density, the results indicate that dislocation transport can contribute to the elevation of the local hydrogen concentrations ahead of the crack to levels above those predicted by the classical diffusion model and to distributions that extend farther afield.

  10. Dislocations and other topological oddities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieranski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    We will show that the book Dislocations by Jacques Friedel, published half a century ago, can still be recommended, in agreement with the author's intention, as a textbook "for research students at University and for students at engineering schools as well as for research engineers". Indeed, today dislocations are known to occur not only in solid crystals but also in many other systems discovered more recently such as colloidal crystals or liquid crystals having periodic structures. Moreover, the concept of dislocations is an excellent starting point for lectures on topological defects occurring in systems equipped with order parameters resulting from broken symmetries: disclinations in nematic or hexatic liquid crystals, dispirations in chiral smectics or disorientations in lyotropic liquid crystals. The discussion of dislocations in Blue Phases will give us an opportunity to call on mind Sir Charles Frank, friend of Jacques Friedel since his Bristol years, who called these ephemeral mesophases "topological oddities". Being made of networks of disclinations, Blue Phases are similar to Twist Grain Boundary (TGB) smectic phases, which are made of networks of screw dislocations and whose existence was predicted by de Gennes in 1972 on the basis of the analogy between smectics and superconductors. We will stress that the book by Jacques Friedel contains seeds of this analogy.

  11. Dislocation-density function dynamics - An all-dislocation, full-dynamics approach for modeling intensive dislocation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, H. S.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2016-06-01

    It has long been recognized that a successful strategy for computational plasticity will have to bridge across the meso scale in which the interactions of high quantities of dislocations dominate. In this work, a new meso-scale scheme based on the full dynamics of dislocation-density functions is proposed. In this scheme, the evolution of the dislocation-density functions is derived from a coarse-graining procedure which clearly defines the relationship between the discrete-line and density representations of the dislocation microstructure. Full dynamics of the dislocation-density functions are considered based on an "all-dislocation" concept in which statistically stored dislocations are preserved and treated in the same way as geometrically necessary dislocations. Elastic interactions between dislocations in a 3D space are treated in accordance with Mura's formula for eigen stress. Dislocation generation is considered as a consequence of dislocations to maintain their connectivity, and a special scheme is devised for this purpose. The model is applied to simulate a number of intensive microstructures involving discrete dislocation events, including loop expansion and shrinkage under applied and self stress, dipole annihilation, and Orowan looping. The scheme can also handle high densities of dislocations present in extensive microstructures.

  12. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  13. Plastic Deformations in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Durniak, C.; Samsonov, D.

    2011-04-29

    Complex plasmas are macroscopic model systems of real solids and liquids, used to study underdamped dynamics and wave phenomena. Plastic deformations of complex plasma crystals under slow uniaxial compression have been studied experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the lattice becomes locally sheared and that this strain is relaxed by shear slips resulting in global uniform compression and heat generation. Shear slips generate pairs of dislocations which move in opposite directions at subsonic speeds.

  14. Deformation of Diopside Single Crystal at Mantle Pressure 2 TEM Characterization of Deformation Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    E Amiguet; P Cordier; P Raterron

    2011-12-31

    The dislocation microstructures of diopside single crystals deformed at high-pressure (4 {<=} P {<=} 9 GPa), high-temperature (1100{sup o} {<=} T {<=} 1400 {sup o}C) using a Deformation-DIA high-pressure apparatus (D-DIA) have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy using weak-beam dark-field (WBDF), precession electron diffraction (PED), large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and the thickness-fringe method. Dislocation glide is the dominant deformation mechanism under these conditions. The 1/2<110>{l_brace}110{r_brace} glide is controlled by lattice friction on the edge segments and shows extensive cross-slip. The [001] glide occurs mostly on {l_brace}110{r_brace}; no evidence for [001](010) glide has been found. The [100] dislocations bear a strong lattice friction probably due to complex (out of glide) core structures.

  15. On the elastic–plastic decomposition of crystal deformation at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Stukowski, Alexander; Arsenlis, A.

    2012-03-02

    Given two snapshots of an atomistic system, taken at different stages of the deformation process, one can compute the incremental deformation gradient field, F, as defined by continuum mechanics theory, from the displacements of atoms. However, such a kinematic analysis of the total deformation does not reveal the respective contributions of elastic and plastic deformation. We develop a practical technique to perform the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation field, F = FeFp, into elastic and plastic parts for the case of crystalline materials. The described computational analysis method can be used to quantify plastic deformation in a material due to crystal slip-based mechanisms in molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations. The knowledge of the plastic deformation field, Fp, and its variation with time can provide insight into the number, motion and localization of relevant crystal defects such as dislocations. As a result, the computed elastic field, Fe, provides information about inhomogeneous lattice strains and lattice rotations induced by the presence of defects.

  16. On the elastic–plastic decomposition of crystal deformation at the atomic scale

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander; Arsenlis, A.

    2012-03-02

    Given two snapshots of an atomistic system, taken at different stages of the deformation process, one can compute the incremental deformation gradient field, F, as defined by continuum mechanics theory, from the displacements of atoms. However, such a kinematic analysis of the total deformation does not reveal the respective contributions of elastic and plastic deformation. We develop a practical technique to perform the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation field, F = FeFp, into elastic and plastic parts for the case of crystalline materials. The described computational analysis method can be used to quantify plastic deformation in a material due tomore » crystal slip-based mechanisms in molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations. The knowledge of the plastic deformation field, Fp, and its variation with time can provide insight into the number, motion and localization of relevant crystal defects such as dislocations. As a result, the computed elastic field, Fe, provides information about inhomogeneous lattice strains and lattice rotations induced by the presence of defects.« less

  17. Thalidomide induces limb deformities by perturbing the Bmp/Dkk1/Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Shaughnessy, John D; Rüther, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative originally used to treat morning sickness and now used to treat leprosy and multiple myeloma, is also a teratogen that induces birth defects in humans such as limb truncations and microphthalmia. However, the teratogenic mechanism of action of this drug remains obscure. Thalidomide induces limb and eye defects in the chicken embryo at an EC50 of 50 microg/kg egg wt and apoptosis in primary human embryonic fibroblasts (HEFs) at an EC50 of 8.9 microM. Using these model systems, we demonstrate by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount in situ hybridization that thalidomide-induced oxidative stress enhances signaling through bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps). This leads to up-regulation of the Bmp target gene and Wnt antagonist Dickkopf1 (Dkk1) with subsequent inhibition of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and increased cell death as shown by trypan blue and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining. Thalidomide-induced cell death was dramatically reduced in HEFs and in embryonic limb buds by the use of inhibitors against Bmps, Dkk1, and Gsk3beta, a beta-catenin antagonist acting downstream of Dkk1 in the Wnt pathway. Most interestingly, blocking of Dkk1 or Gsk3beta dramatically counteracts thalidomide-induced limb truncations and microphthalmia. From this, we conclude that perturbing of Bmp/Dkk1/Wnt signaling is central to the teratogenic effects of thalidomide.

  18. Recrystallization and grain growth induced by ELMs-like transient heat loads in deformed tungsten samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Sagapuram, D.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-11-01

    Tungsten has been chosen as the main candidate for plasma facing components (PFCs) due to its superior properties under extreme operating conditions in future nuclear fusion reactors such as ITER. One of the serious issues for PFCs is the high heat load during transient events such as ELMs and disruption in the reactor. Recrystallization and grain size growth in PFC materials caused by transients are undesirable changes in the material, since the isotropic microstructure developed after recrystallization exhibits a higher ductile-to-brittle transition temperature which increases with the grain size, a lower thermal shock fatigue resistance, a lower mechanical strength, and an increased surface roughening. The current work was focused on careful determination of the threshold parameters for surface recrystallization, grain growth rate, and thermal shock fatigue resistance under ELM-like transient heat events. Transient heat loads were simulated using long pulse laser beams for two different grades of ultrafine-grained tungsten. It was observed that cold rolled tungsten demonstrated better power handling capabilities and higher thermal stress fatigue resistance compared to severely deformed tungsten. Higher recrystallization threshold, slower grain growth, and lower degree of surface roughening were observed in the cold rolled tungsten.

  19. Recrystallization and grain growth induced by ELMs-like transient heat loads in deformed tungsten samples

    PubMed Central

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Sagapuram, D.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten has been chosen as the main candidate for plasma facing components (PFCs) due to its superior properties under extreme operating conditions in future nuclear fusion reactors such as ITER. One of the serious issues for PFCs is the high heat load during transient events such as ELMs and disruption in the reactor. Recrystallization and grain size growth in PFC materials caused by transients are undesirable changes in the material, since the isotropic microstructure developed after recrystallization exhibits a higher ductile-to-brittle transition temperature which increases with the grain size, a lower thermal shock fatigue resistance, a lower mechanical strength, and an increased surface roughening. The current work was focused on careful determination of the threshold parameters for surface recrystallization, grain growth rate, and thermal shock fatigue resistance under ELM-like transient heat events. Transient heat loads were simulated using long pulse laser beams for two different grades of ultrafine-grained tungsten. It was observed that cold rolled tungsten demonstrated better power handling capabilities and higher thermal stress fatigue resistance compared to severely deformed tungsten. Higher recrystallization threshold, slower grain growth, and lower degree of surface roughening were observed in the cold rolled tungsten. PMID:25366885

  20. Magneto-induced tunability of thermo-spin current in deformed zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Adinehloo, Davoud Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-12-21

    The aim of this report is to unfold how the thermo-electric spin-polarized current in a transverse-biased zigzag graphene nanoribbon changes in the presence of uniaxial deformations and uniform perpendicular magnetic field. Employing the two-parameter Hubbard model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we found that both uniaxial strain and magnetic field can significantly modulate the bandgap, local distribution of edge states, and the critical transverse electric field needed to achieve the half-metallic phase in the ribbon. Our analysis shows a significant enhancement of the maximum attainable spin-polarized current as functions of both source temperature and contacts temperature difference, with increasing the magnetic field or applying any magnitude of compressive strain. Furthermore, it is shown that the magneto-resistance ratio of the device, can be drastically tuned via strain engineering, reaching values as high as 2 × 10{sup 4}% for compressive strains of 5% magnitude.