Science.gov

Sample records for deformation linear response

  1. Linearization of the response of a 91-actuator magnetic liquid deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F; Rochette, Maxime; Landry, Daniel Bouffard

    2010-04-12

    We present the experimental performance of a 91-actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid) using a new technique that linearizes the response of the mirror by superposing a uniform magnetic field to the one produced by the actuators. We demonstrate linear driving of the mirror using influence functions, measured with a Fizeau interferometer, by producing the first 36 Zernikes polynomials. Based on our measurements, we predict achievable mean PV wavefront amplitudes of up to 30 microm having RMS residuals of lambda/10 at 632.8 nm. Linear combination of Zernikes and over-time repeatability are also demonstrated.

  2. Dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of maraging steel linear cellular alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam E.; Fredenberg, David A.; McCoy, Tammy; Thadhani, Naresh; Cochran, Joe K.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN finite element code. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with highspeed imaging. Analysis of observed deformation states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation.

  3. Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, D. A.; McCoy, T.; Thadhani, N. N.; Cochran, J.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6 mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with high-speed imaging. For purpose of comparison, the response of 25% dense hollow cylinders of same density as the 9-cell LCA was also studied. Analysis of observed states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation. In comparison, the simple hollow cylinder undergoes significant radial lipping, eventually producing larger sized, external fragments. DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-07-1-0018 and NDSEG Fellowship Program.

  4. Materials and noncoplanar mesh designs for integrated circuits with linear elastic responses to extreme mechanical deformations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Song, Jizhou; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Liu, Zhuangjian; Huang, Yonggang Y.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Zhang, Yong-wei; Rogers, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems that offer elastic mechanical responses to high-strain deformations are of growing interest because of their ability to enable new biomedical devices and other applications whose requirements are impossible to satisfy with conventional wafer-based technologies or even with those that offer simple bendability. This article introduces materials and mechanical design strategies for classes of electronic circuits that offer extremely high stretchability, enabling them to accommodate even demanding configurations such as corkscrew twists with tight pitch (e.g., 90° in ≈1 cm) and linear stretching to “rubber-band” levels of strain (e.g., up to ≈140%). The use of single crystalline silicon nanomaterials for the semiconductor provides performance in stretchable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits approaching that of conventional devices with comparable feature sizes formed on silicon wafers. Comprehensive theoretical studies of the mechanics reveal the way in which the structural designs enable these extreme mechanical properties without fracturing the intrinsically brittle active materials or even inducing significant changes in their electrical properties. The results, as demonstrated through electrical measurements of arrays of transistors, CMOS inverters, ring oscillators, and differential amplifiers, suggest a valuable route to high-performance stretchable electronics. PMID:19015528

  5. Linear response of light deformed nuclei investigated by self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Losa, C.; Doessing, T.; Pastore, A.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2010-06-15

    We present a calculation of the properties of vibrational states in deformed, axially-symmetric even-even nuclei, within the framework of a fully self-consistent quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). The same Skyrme energy density and density-dependent pairing functionals are used to calculate the mean field and the residual interaction in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. We have tested our software in the case of spherical nuclei against fully self-consistent calculations published in the literature, finding excellent agreement. We investigate the consequences of neglecting the spin-orbit and Coulomb residual interactions in QRPA. Furthermore we discuss the improvement obtained in the QRPA result associated with the removal of spurious modes. Isoscalar and isovector responses in the deformed {sup 24-26}Mg, {sup 34}Mg isotopes are presented and compared to experimental findings.

  6. Relation of deformed nonlinear algebras with linear ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, A.; Tkachuk, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    The relation between nonlinear algebras and linear ones is established. For a one-dimensional nonlinear deformed Heisenberg algebra with two operators we find the function of deformation for which this nonlinear algebra can be transformed to a linear one with three operators. We also establish the relation between the Lie algebra of total angular momentum and corresponding nonlinear one. This relation gives a possibility to simplify and to solve the eigenvalue problem for the Hamiltonian in a nonlinear case using the reduction of this problem to the case of linear algebra. It is demonstrated in an example of a harmonic oscillator.

  7. Linear and Nonlinear Photoinduced Deformations of Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; Warner, M.

    2007-10-01

    Glassy and elastomeric nematic networks with dye molecules present can be very responsive to illumination, huge reversible strains being possible. If absorption is appreciable, strain decreases with depth into a cantilever, leading to bend that is the basis of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS). Bend actually occurs even when Beer’s law suggests a tiny penetration of light into a heavily dye-doped system. We model the nonlinear opto-elastic processes behind this effect. In the regime of cantilever thickness giving optimal bending for a given incident light intensity, there are three neutral surfaces. In practice such nonlinear absorptive effects are very important since heavily doped systems are commonly used.

  8. Linear diode laser bar optical stretchers for cell deformation

    PubMed Central

    Sraj, Ihab; Marr, David W.M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the use of linear diode laser bars to optically stretch cells and measure their mechanical properties, we present numerical simulations using the immersed boundary method (IBM) coupled with classic ray optics. Cells are considered as three-dimensional (3D) spherical elastic capsules immersed in a fluid subjected to both optical and hydrodynamic forces in a periodic domain. We simulate cell deformation induced by both single and dual diode laser bar configurations and show that a single diode laser bar induces significant stretching but also induces cell translation of speed < 10 µm/sec for applied 6.6 mW/µm power in unconfined systems. The dual diode laser bar configuration, however, can be used to both stretch and optically trap cells at a fixed position. The net cell deformation was found to be a function of the total laser power and not the power distribution between single or dual diode laser bar configurations. PMID:21258483

  9. Non-linear computer simulation of brain deformation.

    PubMed

    Miller, K

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents realistic computer simulation of deformation of the brain subject to in-vivo indentation. The work presented provides a step towards neurosurgical simulation, with applications to non-rigid registration, virtual reality training and operation planning systems and robotic devices to perform minimally invasive brain surgery. In order to properly analyze experimental data collected in-vivo, a three-dimensional, non-linear finite element model of the brain was developed. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to obtain geometric information needed for the model. The shape of the force-displacement curve obtained using the numerical solution was very similar to the experimental one. The predicted forces were about 31% lower than those recorded during the experiment. Having in mind that the coefficients in the model had been identified based on experimental data obtained in-vitro, and large variability of mechanical properties of biological tissues, such agreement can be considered as very good. By appropriately increasing material parameters describing instantaneous stiffness of the tissue one is able, without changing the structure of the model, to reproduce experimental curve almost perfectly. Numerical studies showed also, that the linear, viscoelastic model of brain tissue is not appropriate for the modeling brain tissue deformation even for moderate strains.

  10. Inter and intra-modal deformable registration: continuous deformations meet efficient optimal linear programming.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Ben; Paragios, Nikos; Komodakis, Nikos; Tziritas, Georgios; Navab, Nassir

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel non-rigid volume registration based on discrete labeling and linear programming. The proposed framework reformulates registration as a minimal path extraction in a weighted graph. The space of solutions is represented using a set of a labels which are assigned to predefined displacements. The graph topology corresponds to a superimposed regular grid onto the volume. Links between neighborhood control points introduce smoothness, while links between the graph nodes and the labels (end-nodes) measure the cost induced to the objective function through the selection of a particular deformation for a given control point once projected to the entire volume domain, Higher order polynomials are used to express the volume deformation from the ones of the control points. Efficient linear programming that can guarantee the optimal solution up to (a user-defined) bound is considered to recover the optimal registration parameters. Therefore, the method is gradient free, can encode various similarity metrics (simple changes on the graph construction), can guarantee a globally sub-optimal solution and is computational tractable. Experimental validation using simulated data with known deformation, as well as manually segmented data demonstrate the extreme potentials of our approach.

  11. Linear Response for Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Todd, Mike

    2016-11-01

    We consider the one parameter family {α mapsto T_{α}} ({α in [0,1)}) of Pomeau-Manneville type interval maps {T_{α}(x) = x(1+2^{α} x^{α})} for {x in [0,1/2)} and {T_{α}(x)=2x-1} for {x in [1/2, 1]}, with the associated absolutely continuous invariant probability measure {μ_{α}}. For {α in (0,1)}, Sarig and Gouëzel proved that the system mixes only polynomially with rate {n^{1-1/{α}}} (in particular, there is no spectral gap). We show that for any {ψ in Lq}, the map {α to int_01 ψ d μ_{α}} is differentiable on {[0,1-1/q)}, and we give a (linear response) formula for the value of the derivative. This is the first time that a linear response formula for the SRB measure is obtained in the setting of slowly mixing dynamics. Our argument shows how cone techniques can be used in this context. For {α ≥ 1/2} we need the {n^{-1/{α}}} decorrelation obtained by Gouëzel under additional conditions.

  12. Measurement and characterization of soft tissue behavior with surface deformation and force response under large deformations.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bummo; Kim, Jung

    2010-04-01

    Soft tissue characterization with the inverse finite element method (FEM) optimization algorithm plays an important role in developing a physical model for medical simulations. However, tissue characterization that takes into account comprehensive boundary conditions for large deformations remains a challenge due to computational complexities and a lack of experimental data. In this study, soft tissue experiments on porcine livers were performed to measure the surface deformation and force response of soft tissues resulting from indentation loading depending on various indentation depths and two different tip shapes. Measurements were carried out with a three-dimensional (3D) optical system and a force transducer. Using the surface deformation and force response results, we estimated the maximum radius of influence, which can be utilized to determine the minimal required soft tissue model size for the FEM simulation. Considering the influence of the boundary conditions, the model was designed and integrated into an inverse FEM optimization algorithm to estimate the model parameters. The mechanical behavior of large deformations was characterized with FE modeling via hyperelastic and linear viscoelastic models. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Continuum Mechanics Based Bi-linear Shear Deformable Shell Element Using Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-07

    the convergent solution in the case of the continuum mechanics based bi- linear shear deformable ANCF shell element. 5.3 Slit Annular Plate Subjected...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. #24515 CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR SHEAR DEFORMABLE SHELL ELEMENT...MAR 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED 07-01-2014 to 04-03-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR

  14. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter S.; Balling, Peter; Muren, Ludvig P.; Taasti, Vicki T.; Swakoń, Jan; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rydygier, Marzena; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B. B.

    2017-02-01

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1 cm into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter’s deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3D-dose-distributions from proton beams.

  15. Shape-based image reconstruction using linearized deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öktem, Ozan; Chen, Chong; Onur Domaniç, Nevzat; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a reconstruction framework that can account for shape related prior information in imaging-related inverse problems. It is a variational scheme that uses a shape functional, whose definition is based on deformable template machinery from computational anatomy. We prove existence and, as a proof of concept, we apply the proposed shape-based reconstruction to 2D tomography with very sparse and/or highly noisy measurements.

  16. Prediction of formability for non-linear deformation history using generalized forming limit concept (GFLC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Wolfram; Suh, Joungsik

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of formability is one of the most important tasks in sheet metal process simulation. The common criterion in industrial applications is the Forming Limit Curve (FLC). The big advantage of FLCs is the easy interpretation of simulation or measurement data in combination with an ISO standard for the experimental determination. However, the conventional FLCs are limited to almost linear and unbroken strain paths, i.e. deformation histories with non-linear strain increments often lead to big differences in comparison to the prediction of the FLC. In this paper a phenomenological approach, the so-called Generalized Forming Limit Concept (GFLC), is introduced to predict the localized necking on arbitrary deformation history with unlimited number of non-linear strain increments. The GFLC consists of the conventional FLC and an acceptable number of experiments with bi-linear deformation history. With the idea of the new defined "Principle of Equivalent Pre-Forming" every deformation state built up of two linear strain increments can be transformed to a pure linear strain path with the same used formability of the material. In advance this procedure can be repeated as often as necessary. Therefore, it allows a robust and cost effective analysis of beginning instability in Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for arbitrary deformation histories. In addition, the GFLC is fully downwards compatible to the established FLC for pure linear strain paths.

  17. Deformation and burst of a liquid droplet freely suspended in a linear shear field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthes-Biesel, D.; Acrivos, A.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the deformation and the conditions for breakup of a liquid droplet freely suspended in a general linear shear field. This is achieved by expanding the solution to the creeping-flow equations in powers of the deformation parameter epsilon and using linear stability theory to determine the onset of bursting. When compared with numerical solutions and with the available experimental data, the theoretical results are generally found to be of acceptable accuracy although, in some cases, the agreement is only qualitative.

  18. Optically isolated signal coupler with linear response

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An optocoupler for isolating electrical signals that translates an electrical input signal linearly to an electrical output signal. The optocoupler comprises a light emitter, a light receiver, and a light transmitting medium. The light emitter, preferably a blue, silicon carbide LED, is of the type that provides linear, electro-optical conversion of electrical signals within a narrow wavelength range. Correspondingly, the light receiver, which converts light signals to electrical signals and is preferably a cadmium sulfide photoconductor, is linearly responsive to light signals within substantially the same wavelength range as the blue LED.

  19. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways.

  20. Linear response theory applied to geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodai, Tamas; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-04-01

    We investigate in an intermediate-complexity climate model the applicability of linear response theory to a geoengineering problem. Global climate change with respect to an appropriate ensemble average of the surface air temperature ⟨[T]⟩ due to a given rise in carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] is attempted to be canceled out or modulated by an appropriately chosen modulation of the solar forcing. The latter is predicted by linear response theory in frequency-domain as: Δfs(ω) = (Δ⟨[T]⟩(ω) -χCO2(ω)ΔfCO2(ω))/χs(ω), where the χ's are linear susceptibilities. With a doubling of [CO2] the response is nonlinear to a certain degree, but a significant cancellation with respect to (wrt.) [T] is achieved, the asymptotic total response to combined forcing being only 10% of that with [CO2]-doubling alone. We investigate in this geoengineering scenario the response wrt. zonal or regional averages of T too. The nonlinearities have a more severe effect with respect to the predictability of the spatial total response pattern, but in actual fact a significant cancellation is achieved even locally. Similar conclusions can be drawn wrt. the model variable of large scale precipitation. The regional and global response can be characterized by a single dominant multi-year time scale. The spatial pattern of the response time is rather nontrivial.

  1. Large deformation image classification using generalized locality-constrained linear coding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Niethammer, Marc; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been demonstrated to be very useful for clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A common approach to using MR images for AD detection is to spatially normalize the images by non-rigid image registration, and then perform statistical analysis on the resulting deformation fields. Due to the high nonlinearity of the deformation field, recent studies suggest to use initial momentum instead as it lies in a linear space and fully encodes the deformation field. In this paper we explore the use of initial momentum for image classification by focusing on the problem of AD detection. Experiments on the public ADNI dataset show that the initial momentum, together with a simple sparse coding technique-locality-constrained linear coding (LLC)--can achieve a classification accuracy that is comparable to or even better than the state of the art. We also show that the performance of LLC can be greatly improved by introducing proper weights to the codebook.

  2. Response of progressive hillslope deformation to precipitation

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1984-01-01

    Abstract - To document a relationship between progressive hillslope deformation and precipitation, boreholes on the Redwood Creek basin in northern California were surveyed semiannually from 1974 to 1982. Regressions were calculated between borehole displacement and an antecedent precipitation index (API) variable. Values for the API variable were obtained by summing...

  3. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  4. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  5. Prediction of Undsteady Flows in Turbomachinery Using the Linearized Euler Equations on Deforming Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William S.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1994-01-01

    A linearized Euler solver for calculating unsteady flows in turbomachinery blade rows due to both incident gusts and blade motion is presented. The model accounts for blade loading, blade geometry, shock motion, and wake motion. Assuming that the unsteadiness in the flow is small relative to the nonlinear mean solution, the unsteady Euler equations can be linearized about the mean flow. This yields a set of linear variable coefficient equations that describe the small amplitude harmonic motion of the fluid. These linear equations are then discretized on a computational grid and solved using standard numerical techniques. For transonic flows, however, one must use a linear discretization which is a conservative linearization of the non-linear discretized Euler equations to ensure that shock impulse loads are accurately captured. Other important features of this analysis include a continuously deforming grid which eliminates extrapolation errors and hence, increases accuracy, and a new numerically exact, nonreflecting far-field boundary condition treatment based on an eigenanalysis of the discretized equations. Computational results are presented which demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of the method and demonstrate the effectiveness of the deforming grid, far-field nonreflecting boundary conditions, and shock capturing techniques. A comparison of the present unsteady flow predictions to other numerical, semi-analytical, and experimental methods shows excellent agreement. In addition, the linearized Euler method presented requires one or two orders-of-magnitude less computational time than traditional time marching techniques making the present method a viable design tool for aeroelastic analyses.

  6. Deformation of Brillouin gain spectrum shape caused by strain varying linearly with respect to time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Ayako; Tateda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The shape of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) that is produced in an optical fiber undergoing strain varying linearly with respect to time, which is a typical example of temporally non-uniform strain, is theoretically derived through an analysis similar to that by which the BGS under spatially non-uniform strain would be derived. The BGS shape that is theoretically derived agrees well with the shape experimentally observed. The characteristics of the BGS deformation and strain measurement error under the temporally linear strain are discussed based on their similarity to the BGS shape derived under spatially linear strain.

  7. Raman study of uniaxial deformation of single-crystal mats of ultrahigh molecular weight linear polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavgorodnev, Yu V.; Chvalun, S. N.; Nikolaeva, G. Yu; Sagitova, E. A.; Pashinin, P. P.; Gordeyev, S. A.; Prokhorov, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present for the first time a Raman spectroscopic study of the deformation process of solution-crystallized single-crystal mats of ultrahigh molecular weight linear polyethylene (UHMW PE). We study the deformed regions of the films, drawn only until the formation of the neck, and the films of much higher draw ratios, just before rupture starts. For comparison, we have also carried out Raman investigations of films produced by compression of UHMW PE powder. We have found that the uniaxial molecular orientation in the neck region of the single-crystal mat films develops more slowly as compared to the films, prepared by compression of the UHMW PE powder.

  8. An update on the nonequilibrium linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiesi, M.; Maes, C.

    2013-01-01

    The unique fluctuation-dissipation theorem for equilibrium stands in contrast with the wide variety of nonequilibrium linear response formulae. Their most traditional approach is ‘analytic’, which, in the absence of detailed balance, introduces the logarithm of the stationary probability density as observable. The theory of dynamical systems offers an alternative with a formula that continues to work even when the stationary distribution is not smooth. We show that this method works equally well for stochastic dynamics, and we illustrate it with a numerical example for the perturbation of circadian cycles. A second ‘probabilistic’ approach starts from dynamical ensembles and expands the probability weights on path space. This line suggests new physical questions, as we meet the frenetic contribution to linear response, and the relevance of the change in dynamical activity in the relaxation to a (new) nonequilibrium condition.

  9. Linear Response Function of Bond-Order

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nayuta; Mitsuta, Yuki; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the linear response function of bond-orders (LRF-BO) based on a real space integration scheme for molecular systems. As in the case of the LRF of density, the LRF-BO is defined as the response of the bond order of the molecule for the virtual perturbation. Our calculations show that the LRF-BO enables us not only to detect inductive and resonating effects of conjugating systems, but also to predict pKa values on substitution groups via linear relationships between the Hammett constants and the LRF-BO values for meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. More importantly, the LRF-BO values for the O-H bonds strongly depend on the sites to which the virtual perturbation is applied, implying that the LRF-BO values include essential information about reaction mechanism of the acid-dissociation of substituted benzoic acids. PMID:27792148

  10. A non-linear elastic constitutive framework for replicating plastic deformation in solids.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Scott Alan; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2014-02-01

    Ductile metals and other materials typically deform plastically under large applied loads; a behavior most often modeled using plastic deformation constitutive models. However, it is possible to capture some of the key behaviors of plastic deformation using only the framework for nonlinear elastic mechanics. In this paper, we develop a phenomenological, hysteretic, nonlinear elastic constitutive model that captures many of the features expected of a plastic deformation model. This model is based on calculating a secant modulus directly from a materials stress-strain curve. Scalar stress and strain values are obtained in three dimensions by using the von Mises invariants. Hysteresis is incorporated by tracking an additional history variable and assuming an elastic unloading response. This model is demonstrated in both single- and multi-element simulations under varying strain conditions.

  11. Deformation Response and Life of Metallic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2005-01-01

    The project was initially funded for one year (for $100,764) to investigate the potential of particulate reinforced metals for aeropropulsion applications and to generate fatigue results that quantify the mean stress effect for a titanium alloy matrix material (TIMETAL 21S). The project was continued for a second year (for $85,000) to more closely investigate cyclic deformation, especially ratcheting, of the titanium alloy matrix at elevated temperature. Equipment was purchased (for $19,000) to make the experimental program feasible; this equipment included an extensometer calibrator and a multi-channel signal conditioning amplifier. The project was continued for a third year ($50,000) to conduct cyclic relaxation experiments aimed at validating the elastic-viscoelastic-viscoplastic model that NASA GRC had developed for the titanium alloy. Finally, a one-year no cost extension was granted to enable continued analysis of the experimental results and model comparisons.

  12. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  13. Ballistic transport in graphene beyond linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.; Korniyenko, Y.; Lewkowicz, M.; Kao, H. C.

    2010-01-15

    The process of coherent creation of particle-hole excitations by an electric field in graphene is quantitatively described beyond linear response. We calculate the evolution of current density, number of pairs and energy in ballistic regime for electric field E using the tight-binding model. While for ballistic flight times smaller than t{sub nl}propor toE{sup -1/2} current is linear in E and independent of time, for larger ballistic times the current increases after t{sub nl} as Jpropor toE{sup 3/2}t and finally at yet larger times (t>t{sub B}propor toE{sup -1}) Bloch oscillations set in. It is shown that the number of pairs follows the 2D generalization of the Schwinger's creation rate npropor toE{sup 3/2} only on certain time segments with a prefactor different from that obtained using the asymptotic formula.

  14. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  15. Linear response approximation in effective field theory for the calculation of elastically mediated interactions in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Koleski, Goce; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The linear response approximation, used within effective field theory to calculate mediated interactions between inclusions, is studied for an exactly solvable one-dimensional model. We show that it works poorly in the case of inclusions imposing absolute deformations to the field, while it works well for massless theories in the case of inclusions imposing relative deformations to the field.

  16. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  18. Soft Ionic Electroactive Polymer Actuators with Tunable Non-Linear Angular Deformation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wangyujue; Almomani, Abdallah; Chen, Yuanfen; Jamshidi, Reihaneh; Montazami, Reza

    2017-06-21

    The most rational approach to fabricate soft robotics is the implementation of soft actuators. Conventional soft electromechanical actuators exhibit linear or circular deformation, based on their design. This study presents the use of conjugated polymers, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to locally vary ion permeability of the ionic electroactive polymer actuators and manipulate ion motion through means of structural design to realize intrinsic angular deformation. Such angular deformations are closer to biomimetic systems and have potential applications in bio-robotics. Electrochemical studies reveal that the mechanism of actuation is mainly associated with the charging of electric double layer (EDL) capacitors by ion accumulation and the PEDOT:PSS layer's expansion by ion interchange and penetration. Dependence of actuator deformation on structural design is studied experimentally and conclusions are verified by analytical and finite element method modeling. The results suggest that the ion-material interactions are considerably dominated by the design of the drop-cast PEDOT:PSS on Nafion.

  19. Soft Ionic Electroactive Polymer Actuators with Tunable Non-Linear Angular Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wangyujue; Almomani, Abdallah; Chen, Yuanfen; Jamshidi, Reihaneh; Montazami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The most rational approach to fabricate soft robotics is the implementation of soft actuators. Conventional soft electromechanical actuators exhibit linear or circular deformation, based on their design. This study presents the use of conjugated polymers, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to locally vary ion permeability of the ionic electroactive polymer actuators and manipulate ion motion through means of structural design to realize intrinsic angular deformation. Such angular deformations are closer to biomimetic systems and have potential applications in bio-robotics. Electrochemical studies reveal that the mechanism of actuation is mainly associated with the charging of electric double layer (EDL) capacitors by ion accumulation and the PEDOT:PSS layer’s expansion by ion interchange and penetration. Dependence of actuator deformation on structural design is studied experimentally and conclusions are verified by analytical and finite element method modeling. The results suggest that the ion-material interactions are considerably dominated by the design of the drop-cast PEDOT:PSS on Nafion. PMID:28773036

  20. Linear friction weld process monitoring of fixture cassette deformations using empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, O. J.; Gibson, C.; Wilson, P.; Lohse, N.; Popov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Due to its inherent advantages, linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process of increasing importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and power generation equipment industries. Tangential oscillations and forge stroke during the burn-off phase of the joining process introduce essential dynamic forces, which can also be detrimental to the welding process. Since burn-off is a critical phase in the manufacturing stage, process monitoring is fundamental for quality and stability control purposes. This study aims to improve workholding stability through the analysis of fixture cassette deformations. Methods and procedures for process monitoring are developed and implemented in a fail-or-pass assessment system for fixture cassette deformations during the burn-off phase. Additionally, the de-noised signals are compared to results from previous production runs. The observed deformations as a consequence of the forces acting on the fixture cassette are measured directly during the welding process. Data on the linear friction-welding machine are acquired and de-noised using empirical mode decomposition, before the burn-off phase is extracted. This approach enables a direct, objective comparison of the signal features with trends from previous successful welds. The capacity of the whole process monitoring system is validated and demonstrated through the analysis of a large number of signals obtained from welding experiments.

  1. Responsive linear-dendritic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Eva; Piñol, Milagros; Oriol, Luis

    2014-06-01

    The combination of dendritic and linear polymeric structures in the same macromolecule opens up new possibilities for the design of block copolymers and for applications of functional polymers that have self-assembly properties. There are three main strategies for the synthesis of linear-dendritic block copolymers (LDBCs) and, in particular, the emergence of click chemistry has made the coupling of preformed blocks one of the most efficient ways of obtaining libraries of LDBCs. In these materials, the periphery of the dendron can be precisely functionalised to obtain functional LDBCs with self-assembly properties of interest in different technological areas. The incorporation of stimuli-responsive moieties gives rise to smart materials that are generally processed as self-assemblies of amphiphilic LDBCs with a morphology that can be controlled by an external stimulus. Particular emphasis is placed on light-responsive LDBCs. Furthermore, a brief review of the biomedical or materials science applications of LDBCs is presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Comparison of the linear finite element prediction of deformation and strain of human cancellous bone to 3D digital volume correlation measurements.

    PubMed

    Zauel, R; Yeni, Y N; Bay, B K; Dong, X N; Fyhrie, D P

    2006-02-01

    The mechanical properties of cancellous bone and the biological response of the tissue to mechanical loading are related to deformation and strain in the trabeculae during function. Due to the small size of trabeculae, their motion is difficult to measure. To avoid the need to measure trabecular motions during loading the finite element method has been used to estimate trabecular level mechanical deformation. This analytical approach has been empirically successful in that the analytical models are solvable and their results correlate with the macroscopically measured stiffness and strength of bones. The present work is a direct comparison of finite element predictions to measurements of the deformation and strain at near trabecular level. Using the method of digital volume correlation, we measured the deformation and calculated the strain at a resolution approaching the trabecular level for cancellous bone specimens loaded in uniaxial compression. Smoothed results from linearly elastic finite element models of the same mechanical tests were correlated to the empirical three-dimensional (3D) deformation in the direction of loading with a coefficient of determination as high as 97% and a slope of the prediction near one. However, real deformations in the directions perpendicular to the loading direction were not as well predicted by the analytical models. Our results show, that the finite element modeling of the internal deformation and strain in cancellous bone can be accurate in one direction but that this does not ensure accuracy for all deformations and strains.

  3. Minimum deformations of commutative algebra and linear group GL(n)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupnik, B. M.

    1993-06-01

    In the algebra of formal series M q ( x i ), the relations of generalized commutativity that preserve the tensor I q grading and depend on parameters q(i, k) are considered. A norm of the differential calculus on M q consistent with the I q grading is chosen. A new construction of a symmetrized tensor product of algebras of the type M q ( x i ) and a corresponding definition of the minimally deformed linear group QGL(n) and Lie algebra qgl(n) are proposed. A study is made of the connection of QGL(n) and qgl(n) with the special matrix algebra Mat( n, Q), which consists of matrices with noncommuting elements. The deformed determinant in the algebra Mat( n, Q) is defined. The exponential mapping in the algebra Mat( n, Q) is considered on the basis of the Campbell-Hausdorff formula.

  4. Study of non-linear deformation of vocal folds in simulations of human phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Shakti; Bodony, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is performed on a two-dimensional compressible, viscous fluid interacting with a non-linear, viscoelastic solid as a model for the generation of the human voice. The vocal fold (VF) tissues are modeled as multi-layered with varying stiffness in each layer and using a finite-strain Standard Linear Solid (SLS) constitutive model implemented in a quadratic finite element code and coupled to a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver through a boundary-fitted fluid-solid interface. The large non-linear mesh deformation is handled using an elliptic/poisson smoothening technique. Supra-glottal flow shows asymmetry in the flow, which in turn has a coupling effect on the motion of the VF. The fully compressible simulations gives direct insight into the sound produced as pressure distributions and the vocal fold deformation helps study the unsteady vortical flow resulting from the fluid-structure interaction along the full phonation cycle. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award Number 1150439).

  5. Deformation of Indian Ocean Lithosphere Implies Highly Non-linear Rheological Law for Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Richard; Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The width of diffuse oceanic plate boundaries is determined by the rheology of oceanic lithosphere. Here we apply thin viscous sheet models, which have been successfully applied to deformation in several continental deforming zones, to investigate the deformation of oceanic lithosphere in the diffuse oceanic plate boundaries between the India, Capricorn, and Australia plates. We apply kinematic boundary conditions based on the current motion between these plates. We neglect buoyancy forces due to plate thinning or thickening and assume that the thin viscous sheet has the same depth-integrated non-linear viscosity coefficient everywhere. Our initial models have only one adjustable parameter, n, the power-law exponent, with n=1, 3, 10, 30, 100. The predicted width of the deforming zone decreases with increasing n, with n ≥ 30 explaining the observations. This n-value is higher than has been estimated for continental lithosphere, and suggests that more of the strength of oceanic lithosphere lies in layers deforming by faulting or by dislocation glide than for continental lithosphere. To obtain a stress field that better fits the distribution and type of earthquake focal mechanisms in the diffuse oceanic plate boundary, we add a second adjustable parameter, representing the effect of slab-pull stretching the oceanic plate near the Sumatra trench. We show that an average velocity increment on this boundary segment of 5 mm/a (relative to the average velocity of the India and Australia plates) fits the observed distribution of fault types better than velocities of 3.3 mm/a or 10 mm/a.

  6. Characterization of material deformation and failure responses from ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. B.

    Recent advances in ultrasonic techniques to characterize the structure of materials are presented. Observable parameters include the velocity, attenuation and scattering of ultrasonic waves and their variation with propagation direction and frequency. Applications are described in which information obtained from such measurements is used to characterize the deformation and failure responses of metals, metal-metal bonds, heavily deformed metal-metal composites and thick, filament-wound composites. In each case, unsolved mechanics problems whose solutions are needed to improve the application results are identified.

  7. Non Linear Effects of Applied Loads and Large Deformations on Aircraft Normal Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    the sBams secteo lia base for the solution of many structural dynamics and static dermations. aeroelastic problems (flutter, response to gust and 0...manufacturing and certification of the Horizontal Tailplanes (HTP). In the case of a megaliner, the Figure 1. Beam with static axial load and dynamic...method. The effect of in-plane loading is considered large static deformations. in two parts. First, effects of direct in-plane loading only Most of the

  8. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of dislocations around

  9. Normal and shear strain imaging using 2D deformation tracking on beam steered linear array datasets

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Varghese, Tomy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous publications have reported on the use of one-dimensional cross-correlation analysis with beam-steered echo signals. However, this approach fails to accurately track displacements at larger depths (>4.5 cm) due to lower signal-to-noise. In this paper, the authors present the use of adaptive parallelogram shaped two-dimensional processing blocks for deformation tracking. Methods: Beam-steered datasets were acquired using a VFX 9L4 linear array transducer operated at a 6 MHz center frequency for steered angles from −15 to 15° in increments of 1°, on both uniformly elastic and single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantoms. Echo signals were acquired to a depth of 65 mm with the focus set at 40 mm corresponding to the center of phantom. Estimated angular displacements along and perpendicular to the beam direction are used to compute axial and lateral displacement vectors using a least-squares approach. Normal and shear strain tensor component are then estimated based on these displacement vectors. Results: Their results demonstrate that parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking significantly improves spatial resolution (factor of 7.79 along the beam direction), signal-to-noise (5 dB improvement), and contrast-to-noise (8–14 dB improvement) associated with strain imaging using beam steering on linear array transducers. Conclusions: Parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking is demonstrated in beam-steered radiofrequency data, enabling its use in the estimation of normal and shear strain components. PMID:23298118

  10. Deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium (TD-NiCr) 0.1 inch thick sheet was examined using various cold-rolling and annealing treatments. Upon annealing (above 816 C (1500 F), the as-received material was converted from an initially ultra-fine grain size (average grain dimension 0.51 micron) to a large grain structure. Increases in grain size by a factor of 100 to 200 were observed for this transformation. However, in those material states where the large grain transformation was absent, a fine grain recrystallized structure formed upon annealing (above 732 C (1350 F)). The deformation and annealing response of TD-NiCr sheet was evaluated with respect to the processing related variables as mode and severity of deformation and annealing temperature. Results indicate that the large grain transformation, classical primary recrystallization occurs. Using selected materials produced during the deformation and annealing study, the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet were examined in the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1093 C (2000 F). It was observed that the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet could be optimized by the stabilization of a large grain size in this material using the cold working and/or annealing treatments developed during the present investigation.

  11. Non-linear optical deformation potentials in uniaxially strained ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, C.; Wille, M.; Lenzner, J.; Khujanov, S.; Grundmann, M.

    2017-02-01

    The emission properties of bent ZnO microwires with diameters ranging from 1.5 μm to 7.3 μm are systematically investigated by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy at T ≈ 10 K . We induced uniaxial strains along the c-axis of up to ± 2.9 % . At these high strain values, we observe a non-linear shift of the emission energy with respect to the induced strain, and the magnitude of the energy shift depends on the sign of the strain. The linear and non-linear deformation potentials were determined to be D 1 = - 2.50 ± 0.05 eV and D 2 = - 15.0 ± 0.5 eV , respectively. The non-linearity of the energy shift is also reflected in the observed spectral broadening of the emission peak as a function of the locally induced strain, which decreases with increasing strain on the compressive side and increases on the tensile side.

  12. Fatigueless response of spider draglines in cyclic torsion facilitated by reversible molecular deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that spider draglines exhibit a fatigueless response in extreme cyclic torsion up to its breaking limit. The well defined Raman bands at 1095 and 1245 cm-1 shifted linearly towards lower wavenumbers versus increasing twist in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. Under thousands of continuous loading cycles of twist strain approaching its breaking limit, all the Raman bands were preserved and the characteristic Raman peak shifts were found to be reversible. Besides, nanoscale surface profile of the worked silk appeared as good as the pristine silk. This unique fatigueless twist response of draglines, facilitated by reversible deformation of protein molecules, could find applications in durable miniatured devices.

  13. Analysis of axial deformation response during reverse shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, T. C.; Lipkin, J.

    T HE RESPONSE of a polycrystalline metal undergoing torsional shearing deformation is examined in detail using a strain-rate dependent model of the deformation of polycrystals. Several boundary value problems are solved to determine the roles of anisotropic elasticity and boundary constraints on the stresses and strains that develop along the torsion axis during forward and reverse shearing deformation. An initially random orientation distribution of 300 grains is assumed, and boundary conditions are chosen to represent a thin-walled tube with fixed, free and intermediate stiffness end constraints. A constant quasi-static shear strain rate of γ = 0.00775 s -1 is imposed to prestrain the polycrystal to a maximum shear strain γ = 1.6. At this point the sign of the shear strain rale is reversed and deformation is continued until the shear strain is reduced to essentially zero. For calculations in which some degree of axial constraint is imposed, the axial stress increases monotonically in compression during forward shearing. During reverse shearing, the axial stress response depends sensitively upon the degree of axial constraint, the textural anisotropy induced during forward shearing of the polycrystal. and the elastic anisotropy of the constituent grains. The model predictions demonstrate the role of anisotropic elasticity and the importance of minor strain components when modeling elastic plastic transients in textured polycrystals. Finally, the model predictions are compared with the results of experiments on short, thin-walled tubes of 304L stainless steel. Satisfactory agreement between a number of predicted and measured features of the response was obtained.

  14. Extension of non-linear beam models with deformable cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I.; Krylov, S.; Harari, I.

    2015-12-01

    Geometrically exact beam theory is extended to allow distortion of the cross section. We present an appropriate set of cross-section basis functions and provide physical insight to the cross-sectional distortion from linear elastostatics. The beam formulation in terms of material (back-rotated) beam internal force resultants and work-conjugate kinematic quantities emerges naturally from the material description of virtual work of constrained finite elasticity. The inclusion of cross-sectional deformation allows straightforward application of three-dimensional constitutive laws in the beam formulation. Beam counterparts of applied loads are expressed in terms of the original three-dimensional data. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the applied stress, keeping in mind applications such as hydrogel actuators under environmental stimuli or devices made of electroactive polymers. Numerical comparisons show the ability of the beam model to reproduce finite elasticity results with good efficiency.

  15. Deformation of the free surface of a conducting fluid in the magnetic field of current-carrying linear conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The magnetic shaping problem is studied for the situation where a cylindrical column of a perfectly conducting fluid is deformed by the magnetic field of a system of linear current-carrying conductors. Equilibrium is achieved due to the balance of capillary and magnetic pressures. Two two-parametric families of exact solutions of the problem are obtained with the help of conformal mapping technique. In accordance with them, the column essentially deforms in the cross section up to its disintegration.

  16. Rheological responses to plate boundary deformation at the Eastern Volcanic Zone in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Located on the mid-Atlantic ridge, Iceland allows for direct measurement of crustal deformation. Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ), Iceland, and crustal deformation of the rift near its southern end at 64°N show a spreading rate of 13.8 ± 1.8 mm yr- 1. About 90% of the deformation occurs in an 80 to 90-km wide zone. To understand how the rheology of the lithosphere influences rifting, we applied a thermo-mechanical stretching model that includes thermal states in Iceland using temperature- and stress-dependent wet and dry olivine rheology. We attempt to reproduce the thermal structure of a rift by defining 700 °C from 5- to 15-km depth at the rift axis that leads to variation in rheological structure, and to estimate the layer (from surface to a depth of 700 °C) where the elastic deformation of the lithosphere is the greatest. At a fixed spreading rate, the deformation field is controlled by the sub-surface thermal state. The vertical subsidence rate at the ridge axis increases almost linearly as the half-velocity increases. The best fitted model suggests a thermal gradient of 54 °C km- 1 at depth below where 700 °C occurs at the ridge axis. The models have little sensitivity to the wet or dry olivine rheology. Estimated viscosity is 1 × 1019 Pa s at 20-km depth at the ridge axis and 1 × 1018 Pa s up to 100-km depth in the model. The spreading rate influences the tangential (non-linearity) shape of the deformation field, and a change in spreading rate affects the deformation field the most. After spreading velocity, the model's second most sensitive parameter is the location of the 700 °C at the rift axis. The thermomechanical model confirms that the rheological responses at the central part of the rift zone in the EVZ, Iceland caused of plate spreading is nonlinear, comparable with surface deformation observed by GPS measurement.

  17. The large deformation elastic response of woven Kevlar fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The large deformation elastic response of a plane woven Kevlar fabric is investigated analytically and experimentally. The analysis assumes the undeformed geometry to be a sequence of interlaced arcs of circles which reverse at each yarn midpoint, ad each yarn is modeled as an extensible elastical subject to certain compatibility conditions. Deflection-force relations for the fabric are determined in terms of the initial weave geometry and the elastic properties of the individual yarns. The theoretical results agree well with the results of experiments performed on a fabric woven from 400 denier Kevlar yarns under conditions of uniaxial loading in both warp and fill directions. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  18. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y; Liang, J; Yan, D

    2006-02-01

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  19. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  20. Quasi-non-linear deformation modeling of a human liver based on artificial and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Firat; Celebi, M Serdar

    2016-09-01

    Researchers working on error-prevention theories have shown that the use of replica models within simulation systems has improved operating skills, resulting in better patient outcomes. This study aims to provide material test data specifically for a human liver to validate the accuracy of viscoelastic soft tissue models. This allows the validation of virtual surgery simulators by comparison with physical test data obtained from material tests on a viscoelastic silicone gel pad. The results proved that stress behavior and relaxation curves of Aquaflex® experiment and FEM simulation are close if average liver response and respective material parameters and model are used. The precise representation of manipulated tissues used in virtual surgery trainers involves the accurate characterization of mechanical properties of the tissue. Consequently, successful implementations of these mechanical properties in a mathematical model of the deforming organ are of major importance. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Deformation response of conformally coated carbon nanotube forest.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Parisa Pour Shahid Saeed; Maschmann, Matthew R; Baur, Jeffery W; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A

    2013-11-29

    The deformation mechanism and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests conformally coated with alumina using atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated using in situ and ex situ micro-indentation. While micro-indentation of a CNT forest coated with a thin discontinuous layer using 20 ALD cycles results in a deformation response similar to the response of uncoated CNT forests, a similar test on a CNT forest coated with a sufficiently thick and continuous layer using 100 ALD cycles causes fracture of both the alumina coatings and the core CNTs. With a 10 nm coating, 4-fold and 14-fold stiffness increases are measured using a flat punch and a Berkovich tip, respectively. Indentation testing with the Berkovich tip also reveals increased recoverability at relatively low strains. The results show that ALD coated CNT forests could be useful for applications that require higher stiffness or recoverability. Also, fracturing of the nanotubes shows that upper limits exist in the loading of conformally coated CNT forests.

  2. Deformation Bands as Linear Elastic Fractures: Progress in Theory and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternlof, K.; Pollard, D.

    2001-12-01

    Deformation bands (DBs) are thin, tabular, bounded features of highly localized shear and/or compaction that commonly occur as systematic and pervasive arrays in porous sandstone. They also constitute an active area of theoretical and experimental research into the compressive failure of granular materials. Based on our ongoing study of DBs in the field, we propose that they originate at stress concentrations and propagate as brittle fractures in a linear elastic medium. Furthermore, we suggest that individual DB morphology is largely dominated by the closing (anti-mode I) component of the displacement discontinuity accommodated. The notion of DBs as "anti-cracks" akin to pressure solution surfaces is not new. But close examination of real DB arrays within the unifying context of linear elastic fracture mechanics is needed to add depth and bring quantitative rigor to our understanding of the phenomenon. Thus, we are building a body of detailed data based on field observation and thin-section analysis to substantiate and expand our central hypothesis, while also laying the foundation for an effort to replicate realistic DB arrays using numerical modeling techniques. Our field effort focuses on the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone as exposed in and around the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. This area offers expansive and varied DB exposures within a thick and relatively consistent sequence of dune-dominated aeolian sandstone. We will present interim results, interpretations and conclusions specific to the elastic nature of DBs, in particular comparing our data to the three distinct fracture-tip models: the dislocation, and the crack with and without cohesive end zones. Each of these models predicts substantially different near-tip stress fields for the same material under the same remote loading conditions, leading to different expectations for basic DB shape, structure, and propagation and mechanical interaction behavior. These expectations will be compared to and judged

  3. Linear response theory for open systems: Quantum master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Arimitsu, Toshihico; Shibata, Fumiaki

    2017-02-01

    A linear response theory for open quantum systems is formulated by means of the time-local and time-nonlocal quantum master equations, where a relevant quantum system interacts with a thermal reservoir as well as with an external classical field. A linear response function that characterizes how a relaxation process deviates from its intrinsic process by a weak external field is obtained by extracting the linear terms with respect to the external field from the quantum master equation. It consists of four parts. One represents the linear response of a quantum system when system-reservoir correlation at an initial time and correlation between reservoir states at different times are neglected. The others are correction terms due to these effects. The linear response function is compared with the Kubo formula in the usual linear response theory. To investigate the properties of the linear response of an open quantum system, an exactly solvable model for a stochastic dephasing of a two-level system is examined. Furthermore, the method for deriving the linear response function is applied for calculating two-time correlation functions of open quantum systems. It is shown that the quantum regression theorem is not valid for open quantum systems unless their reduced time evolution is Markovian.

  4. Competitive inhibition can linearize dose-response and generate a linear rectifier.

    PubMed

    Savir, Yonatan; Tu, Benjamin P; Springer, Michael

    2015-09-23

    Many biological responses require a dynamic range that is larger than standard bi-molecular interactions allow, yet the also ability to remain off at low input. Here we mathematically show that an enzyme reaction system involving a combination of competitive inhibition, conservation of the total level of substrate and inhibitor, and positive feedback can behave like a linear rectifier-that is, a network motif with an input-output relationship that is linearly sensitive to substrate above a threshold but unresponsive below the threshold. We propose that the evolutionarily conserved yeast SAGA histone acetylation complex may possess the proper physiological response characteristics and molecular interactions needed to perform as a linear rectifier, and we suggest potential experiments to test this hypothesis. One implication of this work is that linear responses and linear rectifiers might be easier to evolve or synthetically construct than is currently appreciated.

  5. Competitive inhibition can linearize dose-response and generate a linear rectifier

    PubMed Central

    Savir, Yonatan; Tu, Benjamin P.; Springer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many biological responses require a dynamic range that is larger than standard bi-molecular interactions allow, yet the also ability to remain off at low input. Here we mathematically show that an enzyme reaction system involving a combination of competitive inhibition, conservation of the total level of substrate and inhibitor, and positive feedback can behave like a linear rectifier—that is, a network motif with an input-output relationship that is linearly sensitive to substrate above a threshold but unresponsive below the threshold. We propose that the evolutionarily conserved yeast SAGA histone acetylation complex may possess the proper physiological response characteristics and molecular interactions needed to perform as a linear rectifier, and we suggest potential experiments to test this hypothesis. One implication of this work is that linear responses and linear rectifiers might be easier to evolve or synthetically construct than is currently appreciated. PMID:26495436

  6. Linear response of zero-resistance states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkreiz, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional electron system in the presence of a magnetic field and microwave irradiation can undergo a phase transition towards a zero-resistance state (ZRS). A widely used model predicts the ZRS to be a domain state, which responds to applied dc voltages or dc currents by slightly changing the domain structure. Here we propose an alternative response scenario, according to which the domain pattern remains unchanged. Surprisingly, a fixed domain pattern does not destroy zero-resistance, provided that the resistance is direction independent. Otherwise, if the symmetry of the domain pattern allows a direction dependence of the resistance, the domain state can be dissipative. We give examples for both situations and simulate the response behavior numerically.

  7. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  8. The response of the deformable earth to different driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. W.; Tie, Q. X.; Yang, L.

    2007-10-01

    The space-time variations of the earth deformation and gravitational field have important meaning, whether in basic theoretical research or building space geographical information. The earth would come into being deformation under the function of every kind of mechanical mechanisms, this deformation again induced change of gravitational potential, namely, deformable accession potential or Eulerian increments of gravitational potential. This paper had been based on the theory of vector spherical harmonic functions, discussed influences of the tidal generating force, the loading force, the surface and boundary stress on the earth deformation and the incremental gravitational potential. At one time, presented the material expressions Eulerian increment of gravitational potential and the theoretical relationship among Love numbers, for a homogeneous and incompressible deformable earth. This work could provided reference and gist for theoretical research of the earth deformation.

  9. Linear and nonlinear response in sheared soft spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian

    2013-11-01

    Packings of soft spheres provide an idealized model of foams, emulsions, and grains, while also serving as the canonical example of a system undergoing a jamming transition. Packings' mechanical response has now been studied exhaustively in the context of ``strict linear response,'' i.e. by linearizing about a stable static packing and solving the resulting equations of motion. Both because the system is close to a critical point and because the soft sphere pair potential is non-analytic at the point of contact, it is reasonable to ask under what circumstances strict linear response provides a good approximation to the actual response. We simulate sheared soft sphere packings close to jamming and identify two distinct strain scales: (i) the scale on which strict linear response fails, coinciding with a topological change in the packing's contact network; and (ii) the scale on which linear superposition of the averaged stress-strain curve breaks down. This latter scale provides a ``weak linear response'' criterion and is likely to be more experimentally relevant.

  10. Modeling the mechanical response of in vivo human skin under a rich set of deformations.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, Poul

    2011-07-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of an individual's skin is important in the fields of pathology, biomedical device design, and plastic surgery. To address this need, we present a finite element model that simulates the skin of the anterior forearm and posterior upper arm under a rich set of three-dimensional deformations. We investigated the suitability of the Ogden and Tong and Fung strain energy functions along with a quasi-linear viscoelastic law. Using non-linear optimization techniques, we found material parameters and in vivo pre-stresses for different volunteers. The model simulated the experiments with errors-of-fit ranging from 13.7 to 21.5%. Pre-stresses ranging from 28 to 92 kPa were estimated. We show that using only in-plane experimental data in the parameter optimization results in a poor prediction of the out-of-plane response. The identifiability of the model parameters, which are evaluated using different determinability criteria, improves by increasing the number of deformation orientations in the experiments.

  11. Linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Xu, Wen-qing; Fan, Ren-jie

    2016-11-01

    In order to validate the good linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer(abbreviated to DTL-1) and check the great accuracy of radiance, the experiments which checked the DTL-1 using the large diameter integrating sphere system verified that the instrument had fine linearity and working stability. At the same time, the sky radiance in Hefei was measured, and the validity and correctness of DTL-1 were verified using fibre-optical spectrometer. The results indicated that the instrument had fine work ability, including good linear response, and could satisfy the scientific research and the actual application. However, the linear response of the instrument entitled Sky Radiometer in different region will be validated.

  12. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  13. Linear optical response of finite systems using multishift linear system solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-07-28

    We discuss the application of multishift linear system solvers to linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. Using this technique the complete frequency-dependent electronic density response of finite systems to an external perturbation can be calculated at the cost of a single solution of a linear system via conjugate gradients. We show that multishift time-dependent density functional theory yields excitation energies and oscillator strengths in perfect agreement with the standard diagonalization of the response matrix (Casida's method), while being computationally advantageous. We present test calculations for benzene, porphin, and chlorophyll molecules. We argue that multishift solvers may find broad applicability in the context of excited-state calculations within density-functional theory and beyond.

  14. Assessment of regional non-linear tissue deformation and air volume change of human lungs via image registration.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Nariman; Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-05-07

    We evaluate the non-linear characteristics of the human lung via image registration-derived local variables based on volumetric multi-detector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) lung image data of six normal human subjects acquired at three inflation levels: 20% of vital capacity (VC), 60% VC and 80% VC. Local variables include Jacobian (ratio of volume change) and maximum shear strain for assessment of lung deformation, and air volume change for assessment of air distribution. First, the variables linearly interpolated between 20% and 80% VC images to reflect deformation from 20% to 60% VC are compared with those of direct registration of 20% and 60% VC images. The result shows that the linearly-interpolated variables agree only qualitatively with those of registration (P<0.05). Then, a quadratic (or linear) interpolation is introduced to link local variables to global air volumes of three images (or 20% and 80% VC images). A sinusoidal breathing waveform is assumed for assessing the time rate of change of these variables. The results show significant differences between two-image and three-image results (P<0.05). The three-image results for the whole lung indicate that the peak of the maximum shear rate occurs at about 37% of the maximum volume difference between 20% and 80% VC, while the peaks for the Jacobian and flow rate occur at 50%. This is in agreement with accepted physiology whereby lung tissues deform more at lower lung volumes due to lower elasticity and greater compliance. Furthermore, the three-image results show that the upper and middle lobes, even in the recumbent, supine posture, reach full expansion earlier than the lower lobes.

  15. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time.

  16. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  17. Learning in higher order Boltzmann machines using linear response.

    PubMed

    Leisink, M A; Kappen, H J

    2000-04-01

    We introduce an efficient method for learning and inference in higher order Boltzmann machines. The method is based on mean field theory with the linear response correction. We compute the correlations using the exact and the approximated method for a fully connected third order network of ten neurons. In addition, we compare the results of the exact and approximate learning algorithm. Finally we use the presented method to solve the shifter problem. We conclude that the linear response approximation gives good results as long as the couplings are not too large.

  18. Linear and nonlinear responses to middle latitude surface temperature anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, John O.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear responses to fixed and seasonally varying surface temperature anomalies in a two-level hemispheric time-dependent coupled atmosphere-surface mixed layer model are described. Linear stationary models that are equivalent to the nonlinear time-dependent model are used to analyze these responses. A model linearized around the climatological zonal state of the time dependent model and forced by anomalous surface temperatures does not provide a reasonable estimate for the anomalous reponses, which are considerably underestimated. Better responses are obtained when the anomalous stationary nonlinear eddy fluxes are included in a model linearized around the full climatology. However, this latter model is overly sensitive, and anomalous responses are a small residual balance to the forcing by the surface temperature anomalies and the anomalous transient eddy fluxes. To better understand these linear responses, an eigenanalysis of the climatological state is performed. Seasonal anomalies appear to be dominated by one characteristic pattern near resonance which can be associated with a slowly growing coupled atmosphere-ocean instability.

  19. Endoreversible quantum heat engines in the linear response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honghui; He, Jizhou; Wang, Jianhui

    2017-07-01

    We analyze general models of quantum heat engines operating a cycle of two adiabatic and two isothermal processes. We use the quantum master equation for a system to describe heat transfer current during a thermodynamic process in contact with a heat reservoir, with no use of phenomenological thermal conduction. We apply the endoreversibility description to such engine models working in the linear response regime and derive expressions of the efficiency and the power. By analyzing the entropy production rate along a single cycle, we identify the thermodynamic flux and force that a linear relation connects. From maximizing the power output, we find that such heat engines satisfy the tight-coupling condition and the efficiency at maximum power agrees with the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency known as the upper bound in the linear response regime.

  20. Qubit Measurement with a Nonlinear Cavity Detector Beyond Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, Catherine; Clerk, Aashish

    2012-02-01

    We consider theoretically the use of a driven, nonlinear superconducting microwave cavity to measure a coupled superconducting qubit. This is similar to setups studied in recent experiments.ootnotetextM. Hatridge et al. Phys.Rev.B, 83,134501 (2011)^,ootnotetextF.R. Ong et al. PRL 106,167002 (2011) In a previous work, we demonstrated that for weak coupling (where linear response theory holds) one misses the quantum limit on QND detection in this system by a large factor proportional to the parametric gain.ootnotetextC. Laflamme and A.A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. A 83, 033803 (2011) Here we calculate measurement backaction beyond linear response by using an approximate mapping to a detuned degenerate parametric amplifier having both linear and dispersive couplings to the qubit. We find surprisingly that the backaction dephasing rate is far more sensitive to corrections beyond linear response than the detector response. Thus, increasing the coupling strength can significantly increase the efficiency of the measurement. We interpret this behavior in terms of the non-Gaussian photon number fluctuations of the nonlinear cavity. Our results have applications to quantum information processing and quantum amplification with superconducting microwave circuits.

  1. Chaos pass filter: linear response of synchronized chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Steffen; Kestler, Johannes; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The linear response of synchronized time-delayed chaotic systems to small external perturbations, i.e., the phenomenon of chaos pass filter, is investigated for iterated maps. The distribution of distances, i.e., the deviations between two synchronized chaotic units due to external perturbations on the transferred signal, is used as a measure of the linear response. It is calculated numerically and, for some special cases, analytically. Depending on the model parameters this distribution has power law tails in the region of synchronization leading to diverging moments of distances. This is a consequence of multiplicative and additive noise in the corresponding linear equations due to chaos and external perturbations. The linear response can also be quantified by the bit error rate of a transmitted binary message which perturbs the synchronized system. The bit error rate is given by an integral over the distribution of distances and is calculated analytically and numerically. It displays a complex nonmonotonic behavior in the region of synchronization. For special cases the distribution of distances has a fractal structure leading to a devil's staircase for the bit error rate as a function of coupling strength. The response to small harmonic perturbations shows resonances related to coupling and feedback delay times. A bidirectionally coupled chain of three units can completely filter out the perturbation. Thus the second moment and the bit error rate become zero.

  2. Cardiotachometer with linear beat-to-beat frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Pope, J. M.; Smith, D. B. D.

    1967-01-01

    Cardiotachometer detects and displays the human heart rate during physiological studies. It provides linear response to the heart rate, records heart rate during rest and under heavy stress, provides a beat-to-beat indication of changes in heart rate, and is relatively free of interfering signals from activities other than the heart rate.

  3. Nucleus pulposus deformation in response to lumbar spine lateral flexion: an in vivo MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Fazey, Peter J; Takasaki, Hiroshi; Singer, Kevin P

    2010-07-01

    Whilst there are numerous studies examining aspects of sagittal plane motion in the lumbar spine, few consider coronal plane range of motion and there are no in vivo reports of nucleus pulposus (NP) displacement in lateral flexion. This study quantified in vivo NP deformation in response to side flexion in healthy volunteers. Concomitant lateral flexion and axial rotation range were also examined to evaluate the direction and extent of NP deformation. Axial T2- and coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained from 21 subjects (mean age, 24.8 years) from L1 to S1 in the neutral and left laterally flexed position. Images were evaluated for intersegmental ranges of lateral flexion and axial rotation. A novel methodology derived linear pixel samples across the width of the disc from T2 images, from which the magnitude and direction of displacement of the NP was determined. This profiling technique represented the relative hydration pattern within the disc. The NP was displaced away from the direction of lateral flexion in 95/105 discs (p < 0.001). The extent of NP displacement was associated strongly with lateral flexion at L2-3 (p < 0.01). The greatest range of lateral flexion occurred at L2-3, L3-4 and L4-5. Small intersegmental ranges of axial rotation occurred at all levels, but were not associated with NP displacement. The direction of NP deformation was highly predictable in laterally flexed healthy lumbar spines; however, the magnitude of displacement was not consistent with the degree of intersegmental lateral flexion or rotation.

  4. Pipeline response to permanent ground deformation: A benchmark case

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, T.D.; O`Rourke, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Permanent ground deformation on Balboa Blvd. and McLennon Ave. during the 1994 Northridge earthquake affected four gas transmission, one oil transmission, and two water trunk pipelines. Deformation occurred as sliding of a relatively coherent soil mass parallel to the longitudinal axes of the pipelines, rupturing three lines and leaving the other four undamaged. Relevant pipe, soil, and geometric conditions are reported in this paper. Analytical results from sliding block models of soil-pipeline interaction are compared with observed pipeline performance. The analytical results compare favorably with field performance, and thus provide a benchmark case history from which design and siting decisions can be made for pipelines under similar conditions of ground deformation.

  5. Linear response formalism and ensemble adjoint methods for climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, T.; Eyink, G.; Lea, D.

    2003-04-01

    Climate sensitivities represent the response of long-time averages of relevant selected variables in geophysical systems to changes in an external forcing. e.g. the response of a global mean temperature averaged over many annual cycles to a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Conceptually, such sensitivities are similar to the response of molecular systems to external forcings, such as the Ohmic response of a metallic conductor to an applied electric field. In the latter systems, linear response formalism gives simple "Green-Kubo formulae" for the derivative response or sensitivity matrix, such as the electrical conductivity in Ohm's law. Recently, the linear response formalism has been extended to general chaotic nonlinear dynamical systems, without any assumption of thermal equilibrium statistics [1]. In this generality, the formalism may be applied to geophysical models to calculate climate sensitivities. We show that the resulting "Green-Kubo formulae" can be evaluated by a novel ensemble adjoint technique. The new procedure is compared with a more standard ensemble adjoint method [2,3], in which an average is taken over an ensemble of adjoint calculations of the derivative response for the time-averaged quantity. The two methods are compared for their accuracy, convergence and stability and for their computational requirements on storage and number of model integrations. [1] D. Ruelle, "General linear response formula in statistical mechanics, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem far from equilibrium." Phys. Letters A 245: 220--224 (1998). [2] D. L. Lea, M. R. Allen, and T. W. N. Haine, "Sensitivity analysis of the climate of a chaotic system," Tellus 52A: 523--532 (2000) [3] D. L. Lea, M. R. Allen, T. W. N. Haine, and J. Hansen, "Sensitivity analysis of the climate of a chaotic ocean circulation model," in press, Q. J. Roy. Met. Soc., 2002.

  6. Thermodynamic formalism and linear response theory for nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study the linear response in systems driven away from thermal equilibrium into a nonequilibrium steady state with nonvanishing entropy production rate. A simple derivation of a general response formula is presented under the condition that the generating function describes a transformation that (to lowest order) preserves normalization and thus describes a physical stochastic process. For Markov processes we explicitly construct the conjugate quantities and discuss their relation with known response formulas. Emphasis is put on the formal analogy with thermodynamic potentials and some consequences are discussed.

  7. Rate of correction after asymmetrical physeal suppression in valgus deformity: analysis using a linear mixed model application.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ki Hyuk; Ahn, Soyeon; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Kim, Tae Won; Han, Ho Sung; Kim, Dae Ha; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed to estimate the rate of angular correction after asymmetrical physeal suppression and analyze the factors that influence the rate of correction by using a linear mixed model application. A total of 175 physes (72 distal femoral, 70 proximal tibial, and 33 distal tibial) from 78 consecutive patients with valgus angular deformity of the lower limb who underwent asymmetrical physeal suppression were included. The anatomic lateral distal femoral angle, the anatomic lateral proximal tibial angle, and the anatomic lateral distal tibial angle were measured from the teleroentgenograms of the patients' preoperative visit and periodic follow-ups. The rate of angular correction was adjusted by multiple factors by using a linear mixed model with age, sex, and surgical method as the fixed effects and each subject as the random effect. The final model included the age-specific and surgical method-specific rate and sex-specific and surgical method-specific intercept. Multivariate analysis was performed for this model. In younger children (boys 14 y or younger and girls 12 y or younger), the rate of correction of valgus deformity at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal tibia was 0.71 degrees/month (8.5 degrees/y), 0.40 degrees/month (4.8 degrees/y), and 0.48 degrees/month (5.8 degrees/y), respectively. In older children, the rate of correction of valgus deformity at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal tibia was 0.39 degrees/month (4.7 degrees/y), 0.29 degrees/month (3.5 degrees/y), and 0.48 degrees/month (5.8 degrees/y), respectively. The rate of correction at the distal femur was significantly lower in older children (P = 0.025). The rate of angular correction at the proximal tibia was significantly faster in the screw group than in the staple group (P = 0.046). Asymmetrical physeal suppression with staples, percutaneous transphyseal screws, and permanent method all are effective methods for treating valgus deformity in growing children

  8. A linear chromatic mechanism drives the pupillary response.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, S.; Wolffsohn, J. S.; Gilmartin, B.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a chromatic mechanism can drive pupil responses. The aim of this research was to clarify whether a linear or nonlinear chromatic mechanism drives pupillary responses by using test stimuli of various colours that are defined in cone contrast space. The pupil and accommodation responses evoked by these test stimuli were continuously and simultaneously objectively measured by photorefraction. The results with isochromatic and isoluminant stimuli showed that the accommodative level remained approximately constant (< 0.25 D change in mean level) even when the concurrent pupillary response was large (ca. 0.30 mm). The pupillary response to an isoluminant grating was sustained, delayed (by ca. 60 ms) and larger in amplitude than that for a isochromatic uniform stimulus, which supports previous work suggesting that the chromatic mechanism contributes to the pupillary response. In a second experiment, selected chromatic test gratings were used and isoresponse contours in cone contrast space were obtained. The results showed that the isoresponse contour in cone contrast space is well described (r(2) = 0.99) by a straight line with a positive slope. The results indicate that a /L - M/ linear chromatic mechanism, whereby a signal from the long wavelength cone is subtracted from that of the middle wavelength cone and vice versa, drives pupillary responses. PMID:11674867

  9. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  10. Deformation of PDMS membrane and microcantilever by a water droplet: comparison between Mooney-Rivlin and linear elastic constitutive models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying-Song; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, we studied the role of vertical component of surface tension of a water droplet on the deformation of membranes and microcantilevers (MCLs) widely used in lab-on-a-chip and micro- and nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS). Firstly, a membrane made of a rubber-like material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), was considered. The deformation was investigated using the Mooney-Rivlin (MR) model and the linear elastic constitutive relation, respectively. By comparison between the numerical solutions with two different models, we found that the simple linear elastic model is accurate enough to describe such kind of problem, which would be quite convenient for engineering applications. Furthermore, based on small-deflection beam theory, the effect of a liquid droplet on the deflection of a MCL was also studied. The free-end deflection of the MCL was investigated by considering different cases like a cylindrical droplet, a spherical droplet centered on the MCL and a spherical droplet arbitrarily positioned on the MCL. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the deflection might not be neglected, and showed good agreement with our theoretical analyses.

  11. Linearity in the response of photopolymers as optical recording media.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sergi; Marquez, Andrés; Guardiola, Francisco J; Riquelme, Marina; Fernández, Roberto; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2013-05-06

    Photopolymer are appealing materials for diffractive elements recording. Two of their properties when they are illuminated are useful for this goal: the relief surface changes and the refractive index modifications. To this goal the linearity in the material response is crucial to design the optimum irradiance for each element. In this paper we measured directly some parameters to know how linear is the material response, in terms of the refractive index modulation versus exposure, then we can predict the refractive index distributions during recording. We have analyzed at different recording intensities the evolution of monomer diffusion during recording for photopolymers based on PVA/Acrylamide. This model has been successfully applied to PVA/Acrylamide photopolymers to predict the transmitted diffracted orders and the agreement with experimental values has been increased.

  12. Linear response of tripartite entanglement to infinitesimal noise

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fu-Lin; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2014-10-15

    Recent experimental progress in prolonging the coherence time of a quantum system prompts us to explore the behavior of quantum entanglement at the beginning of the decoherence process. The response of the entanglement under an infinitesimal noise can serve as a signature of the robustness of entangled states. A crucial problem of this topic in multipartite systems is to compute the degree of entanglement in a mixed state. We find a family of global noise in three-qubit systems, which is composed of four W states. Under its influence, the linear response of the tripartite entanglement of a symmetrical three-qubit pure state is studied. A lower bound of the linear response is found to depend completely on the initial tripartite and bipartite entanglement. This result shows that the decay of tripartite entanglement is hastened by the bipartite one. - Highlights: • We study a set of W-type noise and its linear effect on symmetric pure states. • Its effect on two-qubit entanglement depends only on the initial concurrence. • A lower bound of the effect on 3-tangle is found in terms of initial entanglements. • We obtain the time of three-tangle sudden death for two families of typical states. • These reveal that the bipartite entanglement speeds up the decay of the tripartite one.

  13. The Exact Solution for Linear Thermoelastic Axisymmetric Deformations of Generally Laminated Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed exact solution is presented for laminated-composite circular cylinders with general wall construction and that undergo axisymmetric deformations. The overall solution is formulated in a general, systematic way and is based on the solution of a single fourth-order, nonhomogeneous ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients in which the radial displacement is the dependent variable. Moreover, the effects of general anisotropy are included and positive-definiteness of the strain energy is used to define uniquely the form of the basis functions spanning the solution space of the ordinary differential equation. Loading conditions are considered that include axisymmetric edge loads, surface tractions, and temperature fields. Likewise, all possible axisymmetric boundary conditions are considered. Results are presented for five examples that demonstrate a wide range of behavior for specially orthotropic and fully anisotropic cylinders.

  14. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory in the linear response formalism.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Hine, N D M; Spencer, J S; Harrison, N M; Riley, D J; Haynes, P D

    2013-08-14

    We present an implementation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the linear response formalism enabling the calculation of low energy optical absorption spectra for large molecules and nanostructures. The method avoids any explicit reference to canonical representations of either occupied or virtual Kohn-Sham states and thus achieves linear-scaling computational effort with system size. In contrast to conventional localised orbital formulations, where a single set of localised functions is used to span the occupied and unoccupied state manifold, we make use of two sets of in situ optimised localised orbitals, one for the occupied and one for the unoccupied space. This double representation approach avoids known problems of spanning the space of unoccupied Kohn-Sham states with a minimal set of localised orbitals optimised for the occupied space, while the in situ optimisation procedure allows for efficient calculations with a minimal number of functions. The method is applied to a number of medium sized organic molecules and a good agreement with traditional TDDFT methods is observed. Furthermore, linear scaling of computational cost with system size is demonstrated on (10,0) carbon nanotubes of different lengths.

  15. Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Response of Polypropylene-Based Composites Deformed at Small Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Pessey, D.; Bahlouli, N.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    The mechanical properties and response of two composites based polypropylene (PP) have been determined for small strains and for a range of strain rates in the quasi static domain. These two materials are the talc-filled and non-filled high impact PP. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed at different strain rates in order to characterize the mechanical response and the strain rate effect. Experimental results showed that both unfilled and talc-filled high impact polypropylene were sensitive to strain rate and have a non linear behavior even at relatively low strains. SEM analysis has been conducted to obtain a better comprehension of deformation mechanisms involved during loading by observations of the microstructure evolution. For each of these two materials, two existing modeling approaches are proposed. The first one is a three-parameter nonlinear constitutive model based on the experimental results. The second is a micromechanically-based approach for the elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the composite materials. The stress-strain curves predicted by these models are in fairly good agreement with our experimental results.

  16. Non-linear finite element stress analysis of plastic deformation in Co-Cr wrought-wire clasps.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Kenichiro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2008-11-01

    The purpose was to assess the influence of plastic deformation by bending on stress, flexibility and permanent deformation in wrought-wire clasps. A three-dimensional finite element model of a straight wire (120 mm in length and 1.0mm in diameter) was created. The non-linear stress-strain relationship of a commercial Co-Cr alloy straight wrought-wire, measured by means of tensile test (n = 5) was put into the program. Bending to an angle of 90 degrees or 120 degrees and subsequent unloading processes with spring back phenomenon, were simulated in the clasp shoulder and arm. The stress distributions were analyzed at loading and unloading. Thereafter, the clasp models were deflected outwardly 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mm at the clasp tip, to simulate the removal and insertion of a denture. Under the bending force, the maximum tensile stress was recorded at the outside surface of the bending corner; while after unloading, the maximum tensile stress appeared at the inside of the bending angle. By deflection of the clasp tip, this stress increased up to 203% of that before deflection. The change of stress by deflection was larger at the shoulder than at the arm. The load required for deflection was approximately 43% larger in the models with the arm angle of 120 degrees than those with an angle of 90 degrees . The results suggest that the permanent deformation of wrought-wire clasps is likely to initiate at the clasp shoulder, while clasp flexibility is dependent on the bending angle of the clasp arm.

  17. Stochastic simulation of anharmonic dissipation. I. Linear response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yun-An

    2016-11-01

    Over decades, the theoretical study of the quantum dissipative dynamics was mainly based on the linear dissipation model. The study of the nonlinear dissipative dynamics in condensed phases, where there exist an infinite number of bath modes, is extremely difficult even if not impossible. This work put forward a stochastic scheme for the simulation of the nonlinear dissipative dynamics. In the linear response regime, the second-order cumulant expansion becomes exact to reproduce the effect of the bath on the evolution of the reduced system. Consequently, a Hermitian stochastic Liouville equation is derived without explicit treatment of the bath. Stochastic simulations for an anharmonic model illustrate that the dynamics dissipated by anharmonic bath exhibits substantial difference on temperature dependence compared to that with the Caldeira-Leggett model.

  18. Thermoelectric effects in quantum Hall systems beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Rosa; Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David

    2014-12-01

    We consider a quantum Hall system with an antidot acting as a energy dependent scatterer. In the purely charge case, we find deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law that take place in the nonlinear regime of transport. We also discuss Peltier effects beyond linear response and describe both effects using magnetic-field asymmetric transport coefficients. For the spin case such as that arising along the helical edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator, we investigate the generation of spin currents as a result of applied voltage and temperature differences in samples attached to ferromagnetic leads. We find that in the parallel configuration the spin current can be tuned with the leads' polarization even in the linear regime of transport. In contrast, for antiparallel magnetizations the spin currents has a strict nonlinear dependence on the the applied fields.

  19. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  20. The nonconforming linear strain tetrahedron for a large deformation elasticity problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larsson, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of the nonconforming linear strain tetrahedron element introduced by Hansbo (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 200(9-12):1311-1316, 2011; J Numer Methods Eng 91(10):1105-1114, 2012). This approximation uses midpoints of edges on tetrahedra in three dimensions with either point continuity or mean continuity along edges of the tetrahedra. Since it contains (rotated) bilinear terms it performs substantially better than the standard constant strain element in bending. It also allows for under-integration in the form of one point Gauss integration of volumetric terms in near incompressible situations. We combine under-integration of the volumetric terms with houglass stabilization for the isochoric terms.

  1. On nonlinear viscoelastic deformations: a reappraisal of Fung's quasi-linear viscoelastic model

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Riccardo; Abrahams, I. David; Parnell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a reappraisal of Fung's model for quasi-linear viscoelasticity. It is shown that a number of negative features exhibited in other works, commonly attributed to the Fung approach, are merely a consequence of the way it has been applied. The approach outlined herein is shown to yield improved behaviour and offers a straightforward scheme for solving a wide range of models. Results from the new model are contrasted with those in the literature for the case of uniaxial elongation of a bar: for an imposed stretch of an incompressible bar and for an imposed load. In the latter case, a numerical solution to a Volterra integral equation is required to obtain the results. This is achieved by a high-order discretization scheme. Finally, the stretch of a compressible viscoelastic bar is determined for two distinct materials: Horgan–Murphy and Gent. PMID:24910527

  2. On nonlinear viscoelastic deformations: a reappraisal of Fung's quasi-linear viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Riccardo; Abrahams, I David; Parnell, William J

    2014-06-08

    This paper offers a reappraisal of Fung's model for quasi-linear viscoelasticity. It is shown that a number of negative features exhibited in other works, commonly attributed to the Fung approach, are merely a consequence of the way it has been applied. The approach outlined herein is shown to yield improved behaviour and offers a straightforward scheme for solving a wide range of models. Results from the new model are contrasted with those in the literature for the case of uniaxial elongation of a bar: for an imposed stretch of an incompressible bar and for an imposed load. In the latter case, a numerical solution to a Volterra integral equation is required to obtain the results. This is achieved by a high-order discretization scheme. Finally, the stretch of a compressible viscoelastic bar is determined for two distinct materials: Horgan-Murphy and Gent.

  3. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Elastic Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-13

    linear case, it has been shown (MILTON, 1985; AVELLANEDA , 1987) that the DSC estimates can be attained by particular microstructures. Then, we could...with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant No. 89-0288. 26 P. CASTA.EDA REFERENCES AVELLANEDA . N. 1987 Commun. Pure appl

  4. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Elastic Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-30

    procedure in general to es.et the energy of the composite W (i). For the linear case, it has been shown (MILTON, 1985; AVELLANEDA , 1987) that the DSC...No. 89-0288. 26 P. . CASTAFEDA REFRENcEs AVELLANEDA . M. 1987 Commun. Pure appi. Math. 40, 527. BOUCHER. S. 1974 J. Compos. Mater. 8, 82. BUDIANSKY, B

  5. The Overall Response of Composite Materials Undergoing Large Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-15

    University, December 11, 1991. "Propiedades effectivas de materiales compuestos." & "Propiedades effectivas de materiales compuestos no- lineales ...unlike the corresponding problem for a general composite. simplifies to an algebraic one. Although. in principle. the resulting problem can always...take the form of complicated sets of nonlinear algebraic equations. However, if the composite is made up of linear phases (with quadratic energy

  6. Deformation Response of Unsymmetrically Laminated Plates Subjected to Inplane Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochinero, Tomoya T.; Hyer, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the out-of-plane deformation behavior of unsymmetric cross-ply composite plates compressed inplane by displacing one edge of the plate a known amount. The plates are assumed to be initially flat and several boundary conditions are considered. Geometrically nonlinear behavior is assumed. The primary objectives are to study the out-of-plane behavior as a function of increasing inplane compression and to determine if bifurcation behavior and secondary buckling can occur. It is shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, both can occur, though the characteristics are different than the pre and post-buckling behavior of a companion symmetric cross-ply plate. Furthermore, while a symmetric cross-ply plate can postbuckle with either a positive or negative out-of-plane displacement, the unsymmetric cross-ply plates studied deflect out-of-plane only in one direction throughout the range of inplane compression, the direction again depending on the boundary conditions

  7. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  8. Linear response theory for magnon transport in ferromagnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2012-02-01

    We study transverse response of magnons in ferromagnetic insulators within linear response theory. In analogy with the corresponding theory for electrons [1], magnon transverse response is described, including the Hall effect, Nernst effect, and thermal Hall effect. As is also the case for electrons [1], the response functions for magnons consist of the Kubo-formula term, and the term corresponding to the orbital angular momentum. We can rewrite the response functions in terms of the Berry curvature in momentum space [2]. We apply this theory to the (quantum-mechanical) magnons and to the classical magnetostatic waves. For the magnetostatic waves, the eigenmodes are given by a generalized eigenvalue problem, giving rise to the special form of the Berry curvature [2]. We explain various properties of this Berry curvature for the generalized eigenvalue problem, and discuss its implications for the physical properties of magnetostatic modes. [1] L. Smrcka and P. Streda, J. Phys. C, 10, 2153 (1977); H. Oji, P. Streda, Phys. Rev. B 31, 7291 (1985); [2] R. Matsumoto and S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197202 (2011); Phys. Rev. B 84, 184406 (2011).

  9. Heart rate increases linearly in response to acute isovolemic anemia.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Richard B; Feiner, John; Hopf, Harriet; Viele, Maurene K; Watson, Jessica J; Lieberman, Jeremy; Kelley, Scott; Toy, Pearl

    2003-02-01

    The cardiovascular response to acute isovolemic anemia in humans is thought to differ from that of other species. Studies of anesthetized humans have found either no change or a decreased heart rate. A previous study showed that in 32 healthy unmedicated humans, heart rate increased during acute isovolemic anemia. The hypothesis that heart rate in humans increases in response to acute isovolemic anemia and that the increase is affected by gender was tested. Acute isovolemic anemia to a Hb concentration of approximately 5 g per dL in 95 unmedicated healthy humans was produced by simultaneous withdrawal of blood and IV replacement with 5-percent HSA and autologous platelet-rich plasma. The relationship between heart rate and Hb concentration was examined using a mixed-effects linear regression model that allowed each person to have a fitted line with its own slope and intercept. Cubic and quadratic terms were added to determine if these improved the goodness of fit. The effect of gender was tested by including it and its interactions with Hb in the mixed model. The relationship between heart rate and Hb concentration was linear (p < 0.001) and consistent among the population studied: heart rate = 116.0-4.0 [Hb] (slope 95% CI: -4.2 to -3.8 beats/min/g Hb). Adding a cubic or quadratic term did not significantly improve the goodness of fit of the mathematical expression to the data, confirming the linear nature of the relationship between heart rate and Hb concentration. For women, the slope of the heart rate response was significantly greater than it was for males (difference +/- SE: 0.70 +/- 0.23, p < 0.005). In 95 unmedicated, healthy humans, heart rate was a linear function of Hb during acute isovolemic anemia. Females had a significantly greater slope of increase in heart rate with decreasing Hb concentration than did males. The relationship is consistent among individuals, is similar to that reported for conscious dogs, and differs from that found previously in

  10. Efficient calculation of optical linear response of large silicon clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gefei; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2005-03-01

    Nanoscale silicon clusters have potential applications as light-emitting devices and bio-sensors. Ab initio calculations of the optical linear response of small-size nanoparticles have been performed via time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)^1 and by solving many-body Bethe-Salpeter equations (MBSE)^2,3. We show that the ab initio calculations can be made much more efficient when the nanocluster possess high point group symmetry and symmetrized basis functions are used. This allows us to extend the ab initio calculation to much larger Si clusters (up to a few hundred Si atoms) on a personal computer. The optical linear response of Si nanocluster (passivated with hydrogen) as a function of cluster size is examined. The effect of phosphorus doping of Si nanocluster on its optical properties is also studied.1. Ogũt,S., J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3162(1998); Marques, M., A. Castro, and A. Rubio, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3006(2001). 2. Rohlfing, M., and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3320(1998);PRB 62, 4927(2000). 3. Grossman, J. C., M. Rohlfing, L. Mitas, S. G. Louie, and M. L. Cohen,PRL 86, 472(2001).

  11. Evaluating linear response in active systems with no perturbing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szamel, Grzegorz

    2017-03-01

    We present a method for the evaluation of time-dependent linear response functions for systems of active particles propelled by a persistent (colored) noise from unperturbed simulations. The method is inspired by the Malliavin weights sampling method proposed by Warren and Allen (Phys. Rev. Lett., 109 (2012) 250601) for out-of-equilibrium systems of passive Brownian particles. We illustrate our method by evaluating two linear response functions for a single active particle in an external harmonic potential. As an application, we calculate the time-dependent mobility function and an effective temperature, defined through the Einstein relation between the self-diffusion and mobility coefficients, for a system of many active particles interacting via a screened Coulomb potential. We find that this effective temperature decreases with increasing persistence time of the self-propulsion. Initially, for not too large persistence times, it changes rather slowly, but then it decreases markedly when the persistence length of the self-propelled motion becomes comparable with the particle size.

  12. Mechanisms responsible for texture development in a 5182 aluminum alloy deformed at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Chen, S.R.; Kocks, U.F.; Schwartz, A.J.; MacEwen, S.R.; Beaudoin, A.J.

    1998-12-01

    The textures that develop in a 5182 aluminum alloy as a result of monotonic high-temperature compression have been investigated. The authors found that the deformation texture was a function of temperature. For compressive deformation at 300 C and below the material formed the classic (101) deformation texture, while the material develops a texture that is a combination of the classical uniaxial compression deformation texture, (101), and static recrystallization texture, (001), as a result of the deformation alone when the deformation temperature was at and above 400 C. The investigation has focused on determining the mechanism responsible for the development of this unusual progression of deformation textures. In addition the authors have performed orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) to identify the shapes of grains with particular orientations and grain-to-grain orientation relationships. The conclusions are summarized as follows: The texture development is not a result of static processes, i.e. static recrystallization at the various hold times altered neither the textures nor the constitutive behavior. Simulation using a crystal plasticity model indicates that the combination of a cube component prevalent in the original texture, slip activity on 011 planes, and increased rate sensitivity leads to a combined (001) and (101) texture. Finally, the microscopic OIM results are consistent with these observations.

  13. Geyser periodicity and the response of geysers to deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations of multiphase fluid and heat transport through a porous medium define combinations of rock properties and boundary conditions which lead to geyser-like periodic discharge. Within the rather narrow range of conditions that allow geyser-like behavior, eruption frequency and discharge are highly sensitive to the intrinsic permeabilities of the geyser conduit and the surrounding rock matrix, to the relative permeability functions assumed, and to pressure gradients in the matrix. In theory, heats pipes (concomitant upward flow of steam and downward flow of liquid) can exist under similar conditions, but our simulations suggest that the periodic solution is more stable. Simulated time series of geyser discharge are chaotic, but integrated quantities such as eruption frequency and mass discharge per eruption are free of chaos. These results may explain the observed sensitivity of natural geysers to small strains such as those caused by remote earthquakes, if ground motion is sufficient to induce permeability changes. Changes in geyser behavior caused by minor preseismic deformation, periodic surface loading, and Earth tides are more difficult to explain in the context of our current model. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  15. Direct calculation of the linear thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 via symmetry-preserving deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chee Kwan; Liu, Yu Yang Fredrik

    2016-10-01

    Using density-functional perturbation theory and the Grüneisen formalism, we directly calculate the linear thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of a hexagonal bulk system MoS2 in the crystallographic a and c directions. The TEC calculation depends critically on the evaluation of a temperature-dependent quantity Ii(T ) , which is the integral of the product of heat capacity and Γi(ν ) , of frequency ν and strain type i , where Γi(ν ) is the phonon density of states weighted by the Grüneisen parameters. We show that to determine the linear TECs we may use minimally two uniaxial strains in the z direction and either the x or y direction. However, a uniaxial strain in either the x or y direction drastically reduces the symmetry of the crystal from a hexagonal one to a base-centered orthorhombic one. We propose to use an efficient and accurate symmetry-preserving biaxial strain in the x y plane to derive the same result for Γ (ν ) . We highlight that the Grüneisen parameter associated with a biaxial strain may not be the same as the average of Grüneisen parameters associated with two separate uniaxial strains in the x and y directions due to possible preservation of degeneracies of the phonon modes under a biaxial deformation. Large anisotropy of TECs is observed where the linear TEC in the c direction is about 1.8 times larger than that in the a or b direction at high temperatures. Our theoretical TEC results are compared with experiment. The symmetry-preserving approach adopted here may be applied to a broad class of two lattice-parameter systems such as hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal systems, which allows many complicated systems to be treated on a first-principles level.

  16. How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Hannah W.; Merrill, Evelyn H.; Spiteri, Raymond J.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In areas of oil and gas exploration, seismic lines have been reported to alter the movement patterns of wolves (Canis lupus). We developed a mechanistic first passage time model, based on an anisotropic elliptic partial differential equation, and used this to explore how wolf movement responses to seismic lines influence the encounter rate of the wolves with their prey. The model was parametrized using 5 min GPS location data. These data showed that wolves travelled faster on seismic lines and had a higher probability of staying on a seismic line once they were on it. We simulated wolf movement on a range of seismic line densities and drew implications for the rate of predator–prey interactions as described by the functional response. The functional response exhibited a more than linear increase with respect to prey density (type III) as well as interactions with seismic line density. Encounter rates were significantly higher in landscapes with high seismic line density and were most pronounced at low prey densities. This suggests that prey at low population densities are at higher risk in environments with a high seismic line density unless they learn to avoid them. PMID:22419990

  17. Nonequilibrium thermal transport and its relation to linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Ilan, R.; Moore, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of spin chains driven out of thermal equilibrium by an initial temperature gradient TL≠TR using density matrix renormalization group methods. We demonstrate that the nonequilibrium energy current saturates fast to a finite value if the linear-response thermal conductivity is infinite, i.e., if the Drude weight D is nonzero. Our data suggest that a nonintegrable dimerized chain might support such dissipationless transport (D>0). We show that the steady-state value JE of the current for arbitrary TL≠TR is of the functional form JE=f(TL)-f(TR), i.e., it is completely determined by the linear conductance. We argue for this functional form, which is essentially a Stefan-Boltzmann law in this integrable model; for the XXX ferromagnet, f can be computed via the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz in good agreement with the numerics. Inhomogeneous systems exhibiting different bulk parameters as well as Luttinger liquid boundary physics induced by single impurities are discussed briefly.

  18. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B. N.; Ye, Huanchun

    1992-03-01

    The linear response of energetic particles of the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width; when the banana width Δ b is much larger than the mode thickness Δ m, we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When Δm/ Δb≪1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor Δm/ Δb from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balanced-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (| v‖|= vA) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (| v‖|= vA/(2 l-1) with l⩾2) is substantially reduced.

  19. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Ye, Huanchun; Breizman, B. N.

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width delta(sub b) is much larger than the mode thickness delta(sub m), we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When delta(sub m)/delta(sub b) is much less than 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of delta(sub m)/delta(sub b) from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (absolute value of upsilon(parallel) = upsilon(sub A) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (absolute value of upsilon(parallel) = upsilon(sub A)/(2l - 1) with l greater than or = 2) is substantially reduced.

  20. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Ye, Huanchun . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Breizman, B.N. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width {triangle}{sub b} is much larger than the mode thickness {triangle}{sub m}, we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} {much lt} 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} = {upsilon}{sub A} is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar}) = {upsilon}{sub A}/(2{ell} {minus} 1) with {ell} {ge} 2) is substantially reduced. 10 refs.

  1. A Transient Response Method for Linear Coupled Substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, J. R.; Brunty, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the transient response of a discrete coordinate model of a linear structural system composed of substructures. The method is applicable to systems consisting of any number of substructures, both determinate and indeterminate interface boundaries, and any topological arrangement of the substructures. The method is simple to implement from a computational point of view because the equations of motion of each of the substructures are solved independently, and the interface boundary compatibility conditions are enforced at each integration time step by a matrix multiplication. The method is demonstrated for a structural system consisting of two beam segments and acted upon by a time dependent force. The numerical results from the demonstration problem validates the accuracy of the method. The application of this method to structural systems with changing interface boundary conditions between substructures is discussed.

  2. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA. PMID:27725959

  3. Patient-specific non-linear finite element modelling for predicting soft organ deformation in real-time: application to non-rigid neuroimage registration.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Adam; Joldes, Grand; Couton, Mathieu; Warfield, Simon K; Miller, Karol

    2010-12-01

    Long computation times of non-linear (i.e. accounting for geometric and material non-linearity) biomechanical models have been regarded as one of the key factors preventing application of such models in predicting organ deformation for image-guided surgery. This contribution presents real-time patient-specific computation of the deformation field within the brain for six cases of brain shift induced by craniotomy (i.e. surgical opening of the skull) using specialised non-linear finite element procedures implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). In contrast to commercial finite element codes that rely on an updated Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration in time domain for steady state solutions, our procedures utilise the total Lagrangian formulation with explicit time stepping and dynamic relaxation. We used patient-specific finite element meshes consisting of hexahedral and non-locking tetrahedral elements, together with realistic material properties for the brain tissue and appropriate contact conditions at the boundaries. The loading was defined by prescribing deformations on the brain surface under the craniotomy. Application of the computed deformation fields to register (i.e. align) the preoperative and intraoperative images indicated that the models very accurately predict the intraoperative deformations within the brain. For each case, computing the brain deformation field took less than 4 s using an NVIDIA Tesla C870 GPU, which is two orders of magnitude reduction in computation time in comparison to our previous study in which the brain deformation was predicted using a commercial finite element solver executed on a personal computer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient-Specific Non-Linear Finite Element Modelling for Predicting Soft Organ Deformation in Real-Time; Application to Non-Rigid Neuroimage Registration

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Adam; Joldes, Grand; Couton, Mathieu; Warfield, Simon K.; Miller, Karol

    2010-01-01

    Long computation times of non-linear (i.e. accounting for geometric and material non-linearity) biomechanical models have been regarded as one of the key factors preventing application of such models in predicting organ deformation for image-guided surgery. This contribution presents real-time patient-specific computation of the deformation field within the brain for six cases of brain shift induced by craniotomy (i.e. surgical opening of the skull) using specialised non-linear finite element procedures implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). In contrast to commercial finite element codes that rely on an updated Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration in time domain for steady state solutions, our procedures utilise the total Lagrangian formulation with explicit time stepping and dynamic relaxation. We used patient-specific finite element meshes consisting of hexahedral and non-locking tetrahedral elements, together with realistic material properties for the brain tissue and appropriate contact conditions at the boundaries. The loading was defined by prescribing deformations on the brain surface under the craniotomy. Application of the computed deformation fields to register (i.e. align) the preoperative and intraoperative images indicated that the models very accurately predict the intraoperative deformations within the brain. For each case, computing the brain deformation field took less than 4 s using a NVIDIA Tesla C870 GPU, which is two orders of magnitude reduction in computation time in comparison to our previous study in which the brain deformation was predicted using a commercial finite element solver executed on a personal computer. PMID:20868706

  5. Dynamic Deformation Response of Maraging Steel Hollow Sphere and Aluminum Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Gregory; Scripka, David; Welchel, Ricky; Cochran, Joe; Sanders, Tom; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation response of a light-weight composite system consisting of maraging steel hollow spheres in an aluminum matrix is investigated. The composite system made by in-filtrating aluminum alloy melt around the high strength and toughness maraging steel hollow spheres, enables design of a light-weight energy-absorbing structural material. Rod-on-anvil Taylor impact tests are conducted to study the behavior of the composite material under uniaxial stress loading. The transient deformation states are captured using high-speed digital imaging for correlation with AUTODYN simulations. The recovered impacted samples are characterized using microscopy to determine the deformation response of the hollow spheres and the influence of the matrix-sphere interface on the overall properties of the composite material.

  6. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lequieu, Joshua; Córdoba, Andrés; Hinckley, Daniel; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-08-17

    The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA.

  7. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Lequieu, Joshua; Córdoba, Andrés; Hinckley, Daniel; ...

    2016-08-17

    The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic,more » rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA.« less

  8. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  9. Magnetoelectric Effect in Topological Insulator Films Beyond Linear Response Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Baasanjav, Dashdeleg; Nomura, Kentaro

    2014-03-01

    We study the response of topological insulator films to strong magnetic and electric fields beyond the linear response theory. As a model, we use three-dimensional lattice Wilson-Dirac Hamiltonian where we simultaneously introduce both magnetic field as Aharonov Bohm phase and electric field as potential energy depending on lattice coordinate. We compute the energy spectrum by numerically diagonalizing this Hamiltonian for electrons and obtain the quantized magnetoelectric polarizability. In addition, we find that the magnetoelectric effect vanishes as width of the film decreases, due to the hybridization of surface wavefunctions. Furthermore, by applying a gate voltage between the surfaces, we observe multiple quantized plateaus of θ-term. We explain that the multiple quantization rule of θ is mainly determined by the physics of Landau level structures on the top and bottom surfaces of topological insulator, whereas the small deviations from the exact quantization are coming from the asymmetry of the surface wavefunctions in the bulk. We also show that the magnetoelectric effect persists even for strong bulk interactions with magnetic field or magnetic impurities. We acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 24740211, No. 25800184, and No. 25247056) from the MEXT, Japan.

  10. Responses of proteins to different ionic environment are linearly interrelated.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Uversky, Alexey V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-03-27

    Protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) is widely used as a convenient, inexpensive, and readily scaled-up separation technique. Protein partition behavior in ATPS is known to be readily manipulated by ionic composition. However, the available data on the effects of salts and buffer concentrations on protein partitioning are very limited. To fill this gap, partitioning of 15 proteins was examined in dextran-poly(ethylene glycol) ATPSs with different salt additives (Na2SO4, NaClO4, NaSCN, CsCl) in 0.11 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. This analysis reveals that there is a linear relationship between the logarithms of the protein partition coefficients determined in the presence of different salts. This relationship suggests that the protein response to ionic environment is determined by the protein structure and type and concentrations of the ions present. Analysis of the differences between protein structures (described in terms of proteins responses to different salts) and that of cytochrome c chosen as a reference showed that the peculiarities of the protein surface structure and B-factor used as a measure of the protein flexibility are the determining parameters. Our results provide better insight into the use of different salts in manipulating protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems. These data also demonstrate that the protein responses to different ionic environments are interrelated and are determined by the structural peculiarities of protein surface. It is suggested that changes in ionic microenvironment of proteins may regulate protein transport and behavior in biological systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Responses of Varroa-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to Deformed Wing Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of Deformed wing virus (DWV) on Apis mellifera is magnified by Varroa destructor parasitism. This study compared the responses of two Varroa-resistant honey bee stocks [Russian honey bees (RHB) and an outcross of Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees (POL)] to DWV infection to that of Italian ho...

  12. Reversible and repeatable linear local cell force response under large stretches

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shengyuan; Saif, Taher . E-mail: saif@uiuc.edu

    2005-04-15

    Large stretching and un-stretching force response of adherent fibroblasts is measured by micromachined mechanical force sensors. The force sensors are composed of a probe and flexible beams. The probe, functionalized by fibronectin, is used to contact the cells. The flexible beams are the sensing element. The sensors are made of single crystal silicon and fabricated by the SCREAM process. The maximum cell stretch reached is {approx}50 {mu}m, which is about twice of the cell initial size, and the time delay between two consecutive stretching/un-stretching steps is 75 s unless otherwise stated. We find that the force response of the cells is strongly linear, reversible, and repeatable, with a small stiffening at the initial deformation stage. Force response of single cells measured before and after cytochalasin D treatment suggests that actin filaments take almost all the cell internal forces due to stretch. These findings may shed light on the increasing understanding on the mechanical behavior of cells and provide clues for making new classes of biological materials having uncommon properties.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Filled and Unfilled Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; Thadhani, Naresh

    2008-04-01

    We are investigating the mechanics of impact-induced stress transfer between a linear cellular alloy (LCA) and a reactive filler to determine the effect of cell geometry on deformation and fragmentation. LCAs are honeycomb structures made of maraging steel, and provide structural integrity for the reactive filler such as a powder mixture of Ta+Fe2O3. 3-D computations are used to determine stress and strain distributions in both filled and unfilled LCAs during impact. The strength and failure models used for maraging steel and the response of Ta+Fe2O3 are validated through experiment. The failure response of three different geometries: 9-cell, pie, and reinforced pie, are compared with the response of a hollow cylinder, for impact velocities of 100, 200, and 300 m/s. Unfilled, the cylindrical geometry provides the least resistance to deformation and fragmentation, while the reinforced pie LCA provides the most resistance. Understanding of the mechanics of deformation and failure is used to determine the most effective geometry for stress transfer to the filler.

  14. Nonlinear viscoelastic response of highly filled elastomers under multiaxial finite deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Steven T. J.; Landel, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A biaxial tester was used to obtain precise biaxial stress responses of highly filled, high strain capability elastomers. Stress-relaxation experiments show that the time-dependent part of the relaxation response can be reasonably approximated by a function which is strain and biaxiality independent. Thus, isochronal data from the stress-relaxation curves can be used to determine the stored energy density function. The complex behavior of the elastomers under biaxial deformation may be caused by dewetting.

  15. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.

  16. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    DOE PAGES

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; ...

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digitalmore » image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.« less

  17. The Effect of Crosslinking on the Microscale Stress Response and Molecular Deformations in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Fitzpatrick, Robert; Valdivia, Jonathon; Anderson, Rae M. R.

    Actin, the most abundant protein in eukaryotic cells, is a semi-flexible biopolymer in the cytoskeleton that plays a crucial structural and mechanical role in cell stability, motion and replication, as well as muscle contraction. Most of these mechanically driven structural changes in cells stem from the complex viscoelastic nature of entangled actin networks and the presence of a myriad of proteins that cross-link actin filaments. Despite their importance, the mechanical response of actin networks is not yet well understood, particularly at the molecular level. Here, we use optical trapping - coupled with fluorescence microscopy - to characterize the microscale stress response and induced filament deformations in entangled and cross-linked actin networks subject to localized mechanical perturbations. In particular, we actively drive a microsphere 10 microns through an entangled or cross- linked actin network at a constant speed and measure the resistive force that the deformed actin filaments exert on the bead during and following strain. We simultaneously visualize and track individual sparsely-labeled actin filaments to directly link force response to molecular deformations, and map the propagation of the initially localized perturbation field throughout the rest of the network (~100 um). By varying the concentration of actin and cross-linkers we directly determine the role of crosslinking and entanglements on the length and time scales of stress propagation, molecular deformation and relaxation mechanisms in actin networks.

  18. Linear response formula for piecewise expanding unimodal maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Smania, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    The average R(t)=\\int \\varphi\\,\\rmd \\mu_t of a smooth function phiv with respect to the SRB measure μt of a smooth one-parameter family ft of piecewise expanding interval maps is not always Lipschitz (Baladi 2007 Commun. Math. Phys. 275 839-59, Mazzolena 2007 Master's Thesis Rome 2, Tor Vergata). We prove that if ft is tangent to the topological class of f, and if ∂t ft|t = 0 = X circle f, then R(t) is differentiable at zero, and R'(0) coincides with the resummation proposed (Baladi 2007) of the (a priori divergent) series \\sum_{n=0}^\\infty \\int X(y) \\partial_y (\\varphi \\circ f^n)(y)\\,\\rmd \\mu_0(y) given by Ruelle's conjecture. In fact, we show that t map μt is differentiable within Radon measures. Linear response is violated if and only if ft is transversal to the topological class of f.

  19. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  20. Process Setting through General Linear Model and Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjuntichai, Angsumalin

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the efficiency of the flow-wrap packaging process in soap industry through the reduction of defectives. At the 95% confidence level, with the regression analysis, the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimper are found to be the significant factors for the flow-wrap process with respect to the number/percentage of defectives. Twenty seven experiments have been designed and performed according to three levels of each controllable factor. With the general linear model (GLM), the suggested values for the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimpers are 185, 85 and 85° C, respectively while the response surface method (RSM) provides the optimal process conditions at 186, 89 and 88° C. Due to different assumptions between percentage of defective and all three temperature parameters, the suggested conditions from the two methods are then slightly different. Fortunately, the estimated percentage of defectives at 5.51% under GLM process condition and the predicted percentage of defectives at 4.62% under RSM process condition are not significant different. But at 95% confidence level, the percentage of defectives under RSM condition can be much lower approximately 2.16% than those under GLM condition in accordance with wider variation. Lastly, the percentages of defectives under the conditions suggested by GLM and RSM are reduced by 55.81% and 62.95%, respectively.

  1. The low cycle fatigue deformation response of a single-crystal superalloy at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and the associated deformation structure of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 were investigated. Specimens of various crystallographic orientations were tested in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) at 650 C, resulting in a significant tension-compression anisotropy in initial yield strength associated with the shearing of gamma-prime precipitates by dislocation pairs, and a LCF cyclic hardening of the crystals associated with dislocation interactions occurring in the gamma phase. In specimens deforming by slip on a single slip system, dislocations of the primary slip system accumulated in the gamma matrix and formed seesile entanglements. In specimens deforming by slip on several slip systems, the dislocations of the different operative slip systems intersected in the gamma matrix and formed sessile arrangements.

  2. The low cycle fatigue deformation response of a single-crystal superalloy at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and the associated deformation structure of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 were investigated. Specimens of various crystallographic orientations were tested in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) at 650 C, resulting in a significant tension-compression anisotropy in initial yield strength associated with the shearing of gamma-prime precipitates by dislocation pairs, and a LCF cyclic hardening of the crystals associated with dislocation interactions occurring in the gamma phase. In specimens deforming by slip on a single slip system, dislocations of the primary slip system accumulated in the gamma matrix and formed seesile entanglements. In specimens deforming by slip on several slip systems, the dislocations of the different operative slip systems intersected in the gamma matrix and formed sessile arrangements.

  3. Viscoelastoplastic Deformation and Damage Response of Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.; Kasemer, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation and damage behavior can significantly affect the life of aerospace propulsion components. Consequently, one needs an accurate constitutive model that can represent both reversible and irreversible behavior under multiaxial loading conditions. This paper details the characterization and utilization of a multi-mechanism constitutive model of the GVIPS class (Generalized Viscoplastic with Potential Structure) that has been extended to describe the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Associated material constants were characterized at five elevated temperatures where viscoelastoplastic behavior was observed, and at three elevated temperatures where damage (of both the stiffness reduction and strength reduction type) was incurred. Experimental data from a wide variety of uniaxial load cases were used to correlate and validate the proposed GVIPS model. Presented are the optimized material parameters, and the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage responses at the various temperatures.

  4. Response to pediatric physical therapy in infants with positional preference and skull deformation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Renske M; Pelsma, Maaike; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G M; IJzerman, Maarten J; van Vlimmeren, Leo A; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric physical therapy seems to reduce skull deformation in infants with positional preference. However, not all infants show improvement. The study objective was to determine which infant and parent characteristics were related to responses to pediatric physical therapy in infants who were 2 to 4 months old and had positional preference, skull deformation, or both. This was a prospective cohort study. Infants who were 2 to 4 months old and had positional preference, skull deformation, or both were recruited by pediatric physical therapists at the start of pediatric physical therapy. The primary outcome was a good response or a poor response (moderate or severe skull deformation) at 4.5 to 6.5 months of age. Potential predictors for responses to pediatric physical therapy were assessed at baseline with questionnaires, plagiocephalometry, and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses with a stepwise backward elimination method were performed. A total of 657 infants participated in the study. At follow-up, 364 infants (55.4%) showed a good response to therapy, and 293 infants (44.6%) showed a poor response. Multiple logistic regression analysis resulted in the identification of several significant predictors for a poor response to pediatric physical therapy at baseline: starting therapy after 3 months of age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.50, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=1.04-2.17), skull deformation (plagiocephaly [aOR=2.64, 95% CI=1.67-4.17] or brachycephaly [aOR=3.07, 95% CI=2.09-4.52]), and a low parental satisfaction score (aOR=2.64, 95% CI=1.67-4.17). A low parental satisfaction score indicates low parental satisfaction with the infant's head shape. Information about pediatric physical therapy was collected retrospectively and included general therapy characteristics. Because data were collected retrospectively, no adjustment in therapy for individual participants could be made. Several predictors for responses

  5. Characterization of the passive responses of live skeletal muscle using the quasi-linear theory of viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Best, T M; McElhaney, J; Garrett, W E; Myers, B S

    1994-04-01

    The tensile viscoelastic responses of live, innervated rabbit skeletal muscle were measured and characterized using the quasi-linear model of viscoelasticity. The tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits were surgically exposed and tested under in vivo conditions. Rate sensitivity of the force-time history was observed in response to constant velocity testing at rates from 0.01 to 2.0 Hz. Average hysteresis energy, expressed as a percentage of maximum stored strain energy, was 39.3 +/- 5.4% and was insensitive to deformation rate. The quasi-linear model, with constants derived from relaxation testing, was able to describe and predict these responses with correlation exceeding the 99% confidence interval for the 132 constant velocity tests performed (rmean = 0.9263 +/- 0.0373). The predictive ability of this model was improved when compressive loading effects on the muscle were neglected, rmean = 0.9306 +/- 0.0324. The rate insensitivity of hysteresis energy was predicted by the model; however, the absolute value of the hysteresis was underestimated (30.2 +/- 4.0%). Both muscles demonstrated strikingly different elastic functions. Geometric normalization of these responses (stress and strain) did not result in a single elastic function capable of describing both muscles. Based on these results, the quasi-linear model is recommended for the characterization of the structural responses of muscle; however, further investigation is required to determine the influence of muscle geometry and fiber architecture on the elastic function.

  6. Radiographic response of brain metastasis after linear accelerator radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Cox, J Bridger; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Carter, Jamal H; Friedman, William A

    2012-01-01

    Radiographic response of brain metastasis to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) over time has not been well characterized. Being able to predict SRS-induced changes in tumor size over time may allow improved counseling of patients and potentially earlier recognition of poor response to SRS. To quantify the rate of change in size of metastatic brain tumors after treatment with a linear accelerator (LINAC) SRS. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with single metastatic brain tumors treated with LINAC SRS at the University of Florida between 1992 and 2009 who had at least one MRI after treatment. A total of 218 patients with 406 follow-up MRI scans were included in the study. Tumor area was calculated by measuring the largest tumor area on axial imaging and using the equation for area of an ellipse. Primary outcome was percent change in tumor size. The contribution of several factors including gender, primary tumor histology, synchronous or asynchronous presentation, prior treatment, primary tumor control, and SRS dose were examined using multivariate analysis. Mean patient age was 58.3 years (range 4-86), and 48.6% of patients were female. Sixty-three percent of patients had primary tumor control and 70.6% had asynchronous presentation of their brain metastases. SRS peripheral dose range was 1,000-2,250 cGy with a median of 1,750 cGy. The mean percent size change was -22.6% with a mean rate of change of -7.0% per month. The median percent change was -49.7% with a median rate of change of -8.8% per month. The median follow-up was 4.8 months (range 0.3-52.5). Female gender and melanoma histology were found to be significant predictors of an increase in tumor size. Lack of previous surgical resection was a significant predictor of a decrease in tumor size after SRS. Other factors tested with multivariate analysis, including age, synchronicity of presentation, dose, dose volume, Karnofsky performance score, and primary tumor control, were not significant in

  7. Impact response of restrained PMHS in frontal sled tests: skeletal deformation patterns under seat belt loading.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Greg; Parent, Dan; Purtsezov, Sergey; Lessley, David; Crandall, Jeff; Kent, Richard; Guillemot, Herve; Ridella, Stephen A; Takhounts, Erik; Martin, Peter

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated the response of restrained post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) in 40 km/h frontal sled tests. Eight male PMHS were restrained on a rigid planar seat by a custom 3-point shoulder and lap belt. A video motion tracking system measured three-dimensional trajectories of multiple skeletal sites on the torso allowing quantification of ribcage deformation. Anterior and superior displacement of the lower ribcage may have contributed to sternal fractures occurring early in the event, at displacement levels below those typically considered injurious, suggesting that fracture risk is not fully described by traditional definitions of chest deformation. The methodology presented here produced novel kinematic data that will be useful in developing biofidelic human models. Additional analysis of the data produced by the reported tests as well as additional tests with a variety of loading conditions are required to fully characterize torso response including ribcage fracture tolerance.

  8. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  9. Predicting nonlinear properties of metamaterials from the linear response.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin; Suchowski, Haim; Rho, Junsuk; Salandrino, Alessandro; Kante, Boubacar; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of optical second harmonic generation in 1961 started modern nonlinear optics. Soon after, R. C. Miller found empirically that the nonlinear susceptibility could be predicted from the linear susceptibilities. This important relation, known as Miller's Rule, allows a rapid determination of nonlinear susceptibilities from linear properties. In recent years, metamaterials, artificial materials that exhibit intriguing linear optical properties not found in natural materials, have shown novel nonlinear properties such as phase-mismatch-free nonlinear generation, new quasi-phase matching capabilities and large nonlinear susceptibilities. However, the understanding of nonlinear metamaterials is still in its infancy, with no general conclusion on the relationship between linear and nonlinear properties. The key question is then whether one can determine the nonlinear behaviour of these artificial materials from their exotic linear behaviour. Here, we show that the nonlinear oscillator model does not apply in general to nonlinear metamaterials. We show, instead, that it is possible to predict the relative nonlinear susceptibility of large classes of metamaterials using a more comprehensive nonlinear scattering theory, which allows efficient design of metamaterials with strong nonlinearity for important applications such as coherent Raman sensing, entangled photon generation and frequency conversion.

  10. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  11. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Hoelzl, M.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  12. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics.

  13. The linear and non-linear magnetic response of a tri-uranium single molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, B. S.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.; Kumar, P.; Celli, V.

    2017-03-01

    We report here low temperature magnetization isotherms for the single molecule magnet, (UO2-L)3. By analyzing the low temperature magnetization in terms of M  =  χ 1 B  +  χ 3 B 3 we extract the linear susceptibility χ 1 and the leading order nonlinear susceptibility χ 3. We find that χ 1 exhibits a peak at a temperature of T 1  =  10.4 K with χ 3 also exhibiting a peak but at a reduced temperature T 3  =  5 K. At the lowest temperatures the isotherms exhibit a critical field B c  =  11.5 T marked by a clear point of inflection. A minimal Hamiltonian employing S  =  1 (pseudo) spins with only a single energy scale (successfully used to model the behavior of bulk f-electron metamagnets) is shown to provide a good description of the observed linear scaling between T 1, T 3 and B c. We further show that a Heisenberg Hamiltonian previously employed by Carretta et al (2013 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25 486001) to model this single molecule magnet gives formulas for the angle averaged susceptibilities (in the Ising limit) very similar to those of the minimal model.

  14. Analysis of the finite deformation response of shape memory polymers: I. Thermomechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Brent L.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2010-07-01

    This study presents the analysis of the finite deformation response of a shape memory polymer (SMP). This two-part paper addresses the thermomechanical characterization of SMPs, the derivation of material parameters for a finite deformation phenomenological model, the numerical implementation of such a model, and the predictions from the model with comparisons to experimental data. Part I of this work presents the thermomechanical characterization of the material behavior of a shape memory polymer. In this experimental investigation, the vision image correlation system, a visual-photographic apparatus, was used to measure displacements in the gauge area. A series of tensile tests, which included nominal values of the extension of 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, were performed on SMP specimens. The effects on the free recovery behavior of increasing the value of the applied deformation and temperature rate were considered. The stress-extension relationship was observed to be nonlinear for increasing values of the extension, and the shape recovery was observed to occur at higher temperatures upon increasing the temperature rate. The experimental results, aided by the advanced experimental apparatus, present components of the material behavior which are critical for the development and calibration of models to describe the response of SMPs.

  15. Linear and non-linear dose-response functions reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Diamond, David M

    2008-10-16

    Over a century of behavioral research has shown that stress can enhance or impair learning and memory. In the present review, we have explored the complex effects of stress on cognition and propose that they are characterized by linear and non-linear dose-response functions, which together reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning. We suggest that stress initially enhances hippocampal function, resulting from amygdala-induced excitation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, as well as the excitatory effects of several neuromodulators, including corticosteroids, norepinephrine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, acetylcholine and dopamine. We propose that this rapid activation of the amygdala-hippocampus brain memory system results in a linear dose-response relation between emotional strength and memory formation. More prolonged stress, however, leads to an inhibition of hippocampal function, which can be attributed to compensatory cellular responses that protect hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity. This inhibition of hippocampal functioning in response to prolonged stress is potentially relevant to the well-described curvilinear dose-response relationship between arousal and memory. Our emphasis on the temporal features of stress-brain interactions addresses how stress can activate, as well as impair, hippocampal functioning to produce a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

  16. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  17. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  18. The strain path dependence of plastic deformation response of AA5754: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Minh-Son; Hu, Lin; Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2013-12-16

    This work presents modeling of experiments on a balanced biaxial (BB) pre-strained AA5754 alloy, subsequently reloaded uniaxially along the rolling direction and transverse direction. The material exhibits a complex plastic deformation response during the change in strain path due to 1) crystallographic texture, 2) aging (interactions between dislocations and Mg atoms) and 3) recovery (annihilation and re-arrangement of dislocations). With a BB prestrain of about 5 %, the aging process is dominant, and the yield strength for uniaxially deformed samples is observed to be higher than the flow stress during BB straining. The strain hardening rate after changing path is, however, lower than that for pre-straining. Higher degrees of pre-straining make the dynamic recovery more active. The dynamic recovery at higher strain levels compensates for the aging effect, and results in: 1) a reduction of the yield strength, and 2) an increase in the hardening rate of re-strained specimens along other directions. The yield strength of deformed samples is further reduced if these samples are left at room temperature to let static recovery occur. The synergistic influences of texture condition, aging and recovery processes on the material response make the modeling of strain path dependence of mechanical behavior of AA5754 challenging. In this study, the influence of crystallographic texture is taken into account by incorporating the latent hardening into a visco-plastic self-consistent model. Different strengths of dislocation glide interaction models in 24 slip systems are used to represent the latent hardening. Moreover, the aging and recovery effects are also included into the latent hardening model by considering strong interactions between dislocations and dissolved atom Mg and the microstructural evolution. These microstructural considerations provide a powerful capability to successfully describe the strain path dependence of plastic deformation behavior of AA5754.

  19. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  20. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  1. On the response of Escherichia coli to high rates of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Painter, J. D.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    While a large body of work exists on the low strain-rate loading of biological systems such as bacteria, there is a paucity of information on the response of such organisms at high rates of deformation. Here, the response of a readily accessible strain of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), has been examined under shock loading conditions. Although previous studies have shown greatly reduced growth in shock conditions up to several GPa, relationships between loading conditions and bacterial response have yet to be fully elucidated. Initial results of a more rigorous investigation into the 1D shock loading response of E. coli are presented here, expectantly leading to a more comprehensive view of its behaviour when exposed to high pressures. Comparison has been drawn to provide insight into the importance of the nature of the loading regime to the survival of these biological systems.

  2. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The purpose of the conference was to attract researchers from diverse backgrounds who are working in the common area of non-linear dose - response relationships...This unique interdisciplinary conference represents an important step in furthering the understanding of the occurrence, origin, mechanisms, significance and practical applications of non-linear dose - response relationships.

  3. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  4. The Generalized Logit-Linear Item Response Model for Binary-Designed Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revuelta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the generalized logit-linear item response model (GLLIRM), which represents the item-solving process as a series of dichotomous operations or steps. The GLLIRM assumes that the probability function of the item response is a logistic function of a linear composite of basic parameters which describe the operations, and the…

  5. Using crosscorrelation techniques to determine the impulse response of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallabetta, Michael J.; Li, Harry W.; Demuth, Howard B.

    1993-01-01

    A crosscorrelation method of measuring the impulse response of linear systems is presented. The technique, implementation, and limitations of this method are discussed. A simple system is designed and built using discrete components and the impulse response of a linear circuit is measured. Theoretical and software simulation results are presented.

  6. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  7. Stationary engines in and beyond the linear response regime at the Carnot efficiency.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Naoto

    2017-05-01

    The condition for stationary engines to attain the Carnot efficiency in and beyond the linear response regime is investigated. We find that this condition for finite-size engines is significantly different from that for macroscopic engines in the thermodynamic limit. For the case of finite-size engines, the tight-coupling condition in the linear response regime directly implies the attainability of the Carnot efficiency beyond the linear response regime. As opposed to this, for the case of macroscopic engines in the thermodynamic limit, there are three types of mechanisms to attain the Carnot efficiency. One mechanism allows engines to attain the Carnot efficiency only in the linear response limit, while the other two mechanisms enable engines to attain the Carnot efficiency beyond the linear response regime. These three mechanisms are classified by introducing a tight-coupling window.

  8. Stationary engines in and beyond the linear response regime at the Carnot efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto

    2017-05-01

    The condition for stationary engines to attain the Carnot efficiency in and beyond the linear response regime is investigated. We find that this condition for finite-size engines is significantly different from that for macroscopic engines in the thermodynamic limit. For the case of finite-size engines, the tight-coupling condition in the linear response regime directly implies the attainability of the Carnot efficiency beyond the linear response regime. As opposed to this, for the case of macroscopic engines in the thermodynamic limit, there are three types of mechanisms to attain the Carnot efficiency. One mechanism allows engines to attain the Carnot efficiency only in the linear response limit, while the other two mechanisms enable engines to attain the Carnot efficiency beyond the linear response regime. These three mechanisms are classified by introducing a tight-coupling window.

  9. Viscoelastic deformation response of red blood cells under conditions of oscillating centrifugal field.

    PubMed

    Farges, E; Grebe, R; Baumann, M

    2003-01-01

    The red cell deformation under the conditions of oscillating centrifugal fields was studied. Experiments were carried out with a modified Cell-Elastometer operating in oscillating mode (0.02 to 0.30 Hz). Gravitational acceleration was sinusoidally modulated between 620 g and 2250 g. At low frequencies (below 0.08 Hz), native red cells followed the applied stress without delay. At 0.09 Hz and up, the cellular deformation was still periodical and included an additional perturbation due to intracellular movements. This perturbation was analysed and quantified. The influence of alterations on the erythrocyte membrane by diamide was analysed to verify the sensitivity of this method. On increasing the membrane stiffness with low concentrations of diamide, the response to oscillatory centrifugal stress was impaired characteristically in terms of amplitude deformation. Based on tangential and centrifugal accelerations, a physical model was developed that describes the basic observable changes on varying the oscillation frequency. From the data it can be concluded that viscoelastic properties of red cells can be analysed and quantified using oscillatory centrifugal accelerations. The described method can become a valid tool to differentiate between membrane alterations or intracellular viscous modifications.

  10. Cell response to nanocrystallized metallic substrates obtained through severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Bagherifard, Sara; Ghelichi, Ramin; Khademhosseini, Ali; Guagliano, Mario

    2014-06-11

    Cell-substrate interface is known to control the cell response and subsequent cell functions. Among the various biophysical signals, grain structure, which indicates the repeating arrangement of atoms in the material, has also proved to play a role of significant importance in mediating the cell activities. Moreover, refining the grain size through severe plastic deformation is known to provide the processed material with novel mechanical properties. The potential application of such advanced materials as biomedical implants has recently been evaluated by investigating the effect of different substrate grain sizes on a wide variety of cell activities. In this review, recent advances in biomedical applications of severe plastic deformation techniques are highlighted with special attention to the effect of the obtained nano/ultra-fine-grain size on cell-substrate interactions. Various severe plastic deformation techniques used for this purpose are discussed presenting a brief description of the mechanism for each process. The results obtained for each treatment on cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation, as well as the in vivo studies, are discussed. Finally, the advantages and challenges regarding the application of these techniques to produce multifunctional bio-implant materials are addressed.

  11. Modification of ovalbumin with fructooligosaccharides: consequences for network morphology and mechanical deformation responses.

    PubMed

    Munialo, Claire D; Ortega, Rodrigo G; van der Linden, Erik; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2014-11-25

    The Maillardation of proteins has been used as a natural alternative to improve its functionality by covalent coupling of proteins with saccharides. However, the impact of Maillard reaction on the structural aspects of protein networks and, as a consequence, the mechanical breakdown properties of the gel networks has not been reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate how the attachment of linear oligo-sugar moieties onto ovalbumin affects its aggregation, network morphology, and consequently the mechanical deformation properties including the ability of the networks to elastically store energy in this material. To potentially alter the morphology of the network structure, ovalbumin was modified by conjugating some of its amino groups with fructooligosaccharide (FOS) moieties via the Maillard reaction. It was demonstrated that the attachment of FOS to ovalbumin does not affect the integrity of the secondary and tertiary structure as characterized using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence. Differences in the network morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy for FOS-modified ovalbumin variants. Upon increased modification, the microstructure of the gels had more and larger pores and had thinner strands than nonmodified variants. Evaluation of the large deformation properties of the gels demonstrated that FOS-modified gels were less strong and less brittle and showed lower stiffness than nonmodified variants. The recoverable energy (elastically stored energy) of gels reduced with an increase in the degree of modification. The results show that the attachment of FOS to ovalbumin alters the structural and mechanical (large) breakdown properties of the protein gels. The consequences of the alteration of the network structure and large deformation properties of FOS-modified ovalbumin offer opportunities to efficiently design food materials with desirable techno-functional applications.

  12. Pair potentials for simple metallic systems: Beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. A.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Chester, G. V.

    2010-06-01

    The formalism of electron response theory is extended to second order in a perturbing pseudopotential, and the consequences for effective ionic pair potentials of simple metals under standard conditions are then examined. Inclusion of second-order response terms in the pair potentials leads to the potential minima for sodium, magnesium, aluminum, and metallic silicon being located quite close to the experimental nearest-neighbor distances in the respective crystalline solids. Second-order effects are found to become increasingly important with higher valence. As a test case, it is also found that, for an assumed metallic form of hydrogen, inclusion of second-order response terms is insufficient to reproduce the experimental intramolecular distance under standard conditions: higher-order response terms are necessary to obtain the correct (Heitler-London-type) result. For any element treatable by response methods, the results further show that neglect of even one of the second-order response terms may significantly impact the determination of the pair potential.

  13. SU-E-J-148: Evaluating Tumor Response with a Commercially Available Deformable Registration System

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, J; Ramsey, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a method for evaluating the response to treatment using a commercially available deformable image registration software package (Velocity Medical Systems) and repeat PET/CT imaging. This technique can be used to identify volumes that are risk for tumor recurrence. Methods: Response to treatment was evaluated using PET/CT images acquired prior-to and post-treatment for radiation therapy patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Velocity (Version 3.0.1) was used to deform the initial PET/CT to the post treatment PET/CT. The post-treatment PET images were then subtracted from the pre-treatment PET images. The resulting re-sampled image is a three-dimensional SUV difference map that shows pixels with increasing SUV values. SUV values increases greater than 2.5 in the post treatment images were identified for additional follow-up. Results: A total of 5 Lung patients were analyzed as part of this study. One lung patient in the cohort had an SUV increase of +3.28 that was identified using the SUV difference map. This volume of increased uptake was located outside the treatment field and adjacent to the 35 Gy isodose line. The remaining four patients all had SUV decreases inside the planning target volume, and no unexpected areas of increase outside the irradiated volumes. All five patients were analyzed using standard tools inside the Velocity application. Conclusion: The response to treatment can easily be measured using serial PET/CT images and a commercially available deformable image registration. This provides both the radiation oncologists and medical oncologists with a quantitative assessment of their treatment to use in patient follow-up.

  14. Corneal Deformation Response and Ocular Geometry: A Non-invasive Diagnostic Strategy in Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beene, Lauren C.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Seven, Ibrahim; Ford, Matthew R.; Roy, Abhijit Sinha; Butler, Robert S.; Dupps, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate corneal air-puff deformation responses and ocular geometry as predictors of Marfan syndrome. Design Prospective observational clinical study Methods Sixteen investigator-derived, 4 standard Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA), and geometric variables from corneal tomography and optical biometry using Oculus Pentacam and IOL Master were assessed for discriminative value in Marfan syndrome, measuring right eyes of 24 control and 13 Marfan syndrome subjects. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses Results Six investigator-derived ORA variables successfully discriminated Marfan syndrome. The best lone disease predictor was Concavity Min (Marfan syndrome 47.5 ± 20, control 69 ± 14, p = 0.003; AUROC = 0.80). Corneal hysteresis and corneal resistance factor were decreased (Marfan syndrome CH 9.45 ± 1.62, control CH 11.24 ± 1.21, p = 0.01; Marfan syndrome CRF 9.77 ± 1.65, control CRF 11.03 ± 1.72, p = 0.01) and corneas were flatter in Marfan syndrome (Marfan syndrome Kmean 41.25 ± 2.09 D, control Kmean 42.70 ± 1.81 D, p = 0.046). No significant differences were observed in central corneal thickness, axial eye length, or intraocular pressure. A multivariate regression model incorporating corneal curvature and hysteresis loop area (HLA) provided the best predictive value for Marfan syndrome (AUROC = 0.85). Conclusions This study describes novel biodynamic features of corneal deformation responses in Marfan syndrome, including increased deformation, decreased bending resistance, and decreased energy dissipation capacity. A predictive model incorporating HLA and corneal curvature shows greatest potential for non-invasive clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. PMID:26432567

  15. Corneal Deformation Response and Ocular Geometry: A Noninvasive Diagnostic Strategy in Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beene, Lauren C; Traboulsi, Elias I; Seven, Ibrahim; Ford, Matthew R; Sinha Roy, Abhijit; Butler, Robert S; Dupps, William J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate corneal air-puff deformation responses and ocular geometry as predictors of Marfan syndrome. Prospective observational clinical study. Sixteen investigator-derived, 4 standard Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA), and geometric variables from corneal tomography and optical biometry using Oculus Pentacam and IOL Master were assessed for discriminative value in Marfan syndrome, measuring right eyes of 24 control and 13 Marfan syndrome subjects. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Six investigator-derived ORA variables successfully discriminated Marfan syndrome. The best lone disease predictor was Concavity Min (Marfan syndrome 47.5 ± 20, control 69 ± 14, P = .003; AUROC = 0.80). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were decreased (Marfan syndrome CH 9.45 ± 1.62, control CH 11.24 ± 1.21, P = .01; Marfan syndrome CRF 9.77 ± 1.65, control CRF 11.03 ± 1.72, P = .01) and corneas were flatter in Marfan syndrome (Marfan syndrome Kmean 41.25 ± 2.09 diopter, control Kmean 42.70 ± 1.81 diopter, P = .046). No significant differences were observed in central corneal thickness, axial eye length, or intraocular pressure. A multivariate regression model incorporating corneal curvature and hysteresis loop area (HLA) provided the best predictive value for Marfan syndrome (AUROC = 0.85). This study describes novel biodynamic features of corneal deformation responses in Marfan syndrome, including increased deformation, decreased bending resistance, and decreased energy dissipation capacity. A predictive model incorporating HLA and corneal curvature shows greatest potential for noninvasive clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of the elastic deformation of a foam on its mobility in channels of linearly varying width.

    PubMed

    Dollet, Benjamin; Jones, Siân A; Méheust, Yves; Cantat, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    We study foam flow in an elementary model porous medium consisting of a convergent and a divergent channel positioned side by side and possessing a fixed joint porosity. Configurations of converging or diverging channels are ubiquitous at the pore scale in porous media, as all channels linking pores possess a converging and diverging part. The resulting flow kinematics imposes asymmetric bubble deformations in the two channels, which modulate foam-wall friction and strongly impact the flux distribution. We measure, as well as quantitatively predict, the ratio of the fluxes in the two channels as a function of the channel widths by modeling pressure drops of both viscous and capillary origins. This study reveals the crucial importance of boundary-induced bubble deformation on the mobility of a flowing foam, resulting in particular in flow irreversibility.

  17. Separating Non-Linear Deformation And Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) For INSAR Time Series Analysis Using Least-Square Collocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Hanssen, R. F.; Samiei-Esfahany, S.; Hooper, A.; Van Leijen, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for separating ground defor- mation from atmospheric phase screen (APS) based on PSInSAR. By stochastic modeling of ground deformation and APS via their variance-covariance functions we can not only estimate the signals with the best accuracy but also assess the estimation accuracy using least-squares collocation[5]. We evaluate the APS estimated by our method and the APS obtained from a commonly used window-based filtering method [6] by comparing them to repeat-pass interferograms over ground surfaces outside the subsiding region of Mexico City. The comparison shows that our method results in a better estimation of APS than the filtering method which ignores the temporal variability of APS variance. Our method is desired when there are temporal gaps in a SAR time series. In such a case, the filtering method needs a large temporal window to suppress APS, which may lead to leakage from ground deformation to APS.

  18. Linear ubiquitination by LUBEL has a role in Drosophila heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Tomoko; Almagro, Jorge; Ehrhardt, Christine; Tsai, Isabella; Schleiffer, Alexander; Deszcz, Luiza; Junttila, Sini; Ringrose, Leonie; Mechtler, Karl; Kavirayani, Anoop; Gyenesei, Attila; Hofmann, Kay; Duchek, Peter; Rittinger, Katrin; Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2016-11-01

    The HOIP ubiquitin E3 ligase generates linear ubiquitin chains by forming a complex with HOIL-1L and SHARPIN in mammals. Here, we provide the first evidence of linear ubiquitination induced by a HOIP orthologue in Drosophila We identify Drosophila CG11321, which we named Linear Ubiquitin E3 ligase (LUBEL), and find that it catalyzes linear ubiquitination in vitro We detect endogenous linear ubiquitin chain-derived peptides by mass spectrometry in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells and adult flies. Furthermore, using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we establish linear ubiquitination-defective flies by mutating residues essential for the catalytic activity of LUBEL Linear ubiquitination signals accumulate upon heat shock in flies. Interestingly, flies with LUBEL mutations display reduced survival and climbing defects upon heat shock, which is also observed upon specific LUBEL depletion in muscle. Thus, LUBEL is involved in the heat response by controlling linear ubiquitination in flies.

  19. Item Response Theory Using Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravand, Hamdollah

    2015-01-01

    Multilevel models (MLMs) are flexible in that they can be employed to obtain item and person parameters, test for differential item functioning (DIF) and capture both local item and person dependence. Papers on the MLM analysis of item response data have focused mostly on theoretical issues where applications have been add-ons to simulation…

  20. MODELING STREAM-AQUIFIER INTERACTIONS WITH LINEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem of stream-aquifer interactions is pertinent to conjunctive-use management of water resources and riparian zone hydrology. Closed form solutions are derived for stream-aquifer interactions in rates and volumes expressed as convolution integrals of impulse response and ...

  1. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond

    2015-10-06

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate the density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.

  2. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin-orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the particle-hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin-isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  3. Effect of Actin Filament on Deformation-Induced Ca2+ Response in Osteoblast-Like Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Taiji; Murai, Takayuki; Hoshiai, Sodai; Tomita, Yoshihiro

    Under the influence of mechanical environment, bone structure is formed and maintained by adaptive remodeling that involves osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic formation. In the mechanotransduction system in osteoblasts, it is believed that intracellular calcium plays a fundamental role and cytoskeletal actin filament is a crucial component for the signal transduction process. To clarify the role of actin filament in deformation-induced Ca2+ signaling, osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) with different actin filament densities controlled by cytochalasin D were subjected to tensile strain in vitro. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration labeled by fluo-3 was observed using a confocal laser-scanning microscope. As a result, the disruption of the actin filament was found to significantly suppress the deformation-induced Ca2+ response that was regulated according to the degree of actin filament organization. This result indicates that the actin filament is indispensable for the quantitative regulation of Ca2+ signaling in response to a mechanical stimulus in osteoblasts.

  4. Analysis of non-linear response of the human body to vertical whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Tarabini, Marco; Solbiati, Stefano; Moschioni, Giovanni; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The human response to vibration is typically studied using linear estimators of the frequency response function, although different literature works evidenced the presence of non-linear effects in whole-body vibration response. This paper analyses the apparent mass of standing subjects using the conditioned response techniques in order to understand the causes of the non-linear behaviour. The conditioned apparent masses were derived considering models of increasing complexity. The multiple coherence function was used as a figure of merit for the comparison between the linear and the non-linear models. The apparent mass of eight male subjects was studied in six configurations (combinations of three vibration magnitudes and two postures). The contribution of the non-linear terms was negligible and was endorsed to the change of modal parameters during the test. Since the effect of the inter-subject variability was larger than that due to the increase in vibration magnitude, the biodynamic response should be more meaningfully modelled using a linear estimator with uncertainty rather than looking for a non-linear modelling.

  5. Responses of rostral fastigial neurons to linear acceleration in an alert monkey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Tang, B F; King, W M

    2001-07-01

    Vestibular-only neuronal responses to angular acceleration have been systematically characterized in the rostral fastigial nucleus (FN) by several studies. However, responses of these neurons to linear acceleration have not been examined. In this study, we recorded single-unit activity of vestibular-only neurons in an alert monkey during pure sinusoidal linear acceleration along different directions in the horizontal plane. Spatiotemporal response properties were quantified by computing two-dimensional response ellipses in the horizontal plane. Based on this analysis, neurons were classified as narrowly or broadly tuned. About 29% (5/17) of neurons were broadly tuned. The other 71% (12/17) were narrowly tuned. Unlike vestibular nuclei neurons, all recorded FN neurons exhibited irregular resting discharge rates (CV*0.2). Based on studies of linear motion-sensitive neurons in the vestibular nuclei, the data suggest that irregular neurons in the rostral FN and the vestibular nuclei have similar responses to linear acceleration in behaving monkeys.

  6. Research of dynamical Characteristics of slow deformation Waves as Massif Responses on Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The research of massif state with use of approaches of open system theory [1-3] was developed for investigation the criterions of dissipation regimes for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. For realization of that research we used the data of seismic catalogue of Tashtagol mine. As a result of the analyze of that data we defined character morphology of phase trajectories of massif response, which was locally in time in a stable state: on the phase plane with coordinates released by the massif during the dynamic event energy E and lg(dE/dt) there is a local area as a ball of twisted trajectories and some not great bursts from that ball, which are not greater than 105 joules. In some time intervals that burst can be larger, than 105 joules, achieving 106 joules and yet 109 joules. [3]. Evidently there are two reciprocal depend processes: the energy accumulation in the attracted phase trajectories area and resonance fault of the accumulated energy. But after the fault the system returns again to the same attracted phase trajectories area. For analyzing of the thin structure of the chaotic area we decided to add the method of processing of the seismic monitoring data by new parameters. We shall consider each point of explosion as a source of seismic or deformation waves. Using the kinematic approach of seismic information processing we shall each point of the massif response use as a time point of the first arrival of the deformation wave for calculation of the wave velocity, because additionally we know the coordinates of the fixed response and the coordinates of explosion. The use of additional parameter-velocity of slow deformation wave propagation allowed us with use method of phase diagrams identify their hierarchic structure, which allow us to use that information for modeling and interpretation the propagation seismic and deformation waves in hierarchic structures. It is researched with use of that suggested processing method the thin

  7. Thermal shifts and intermittent linear response of aging systems.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Paolo; Christiansen, Simon

    2008-04-01

    At time t after an initial quench, an aging system responds to a perturbation turned on at time twresponse on the ratio t/tw . Further insight is obtained imposing small temperature steps, so-called T shifts. The average response as a function of t/tw,eff , where tw,eff is the effective age, is similar to the response of a system aged isothermally at the final temperature. Using an Ising model with plaquette interactions, the applicability of analytic formulas for the average isothermal magnetization is confirmed. The T -shifted aging behavior of the model is approximately described using effective ages. Large positive shifts nearly reset the effective age. Negative T shifts offer a more detailed probe of the dynamics. Assuming the marginal stability of the "current" attractor against thermal noise fluctuations, the scaling form tw,eff=tw x and the dependence of the exponent x on the aging temperatures before and after the shift are theoretically available. The predicted form of x has no adjustable parameters. Both the algebraic scaling of the effective age and the form of the exponent reasonably agree with the data. The present simulations thus confirm the crucial role of marginal stability in glassy relaxation.

  8. The linearity and selectivity of neuronal responses in awake visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Anand, Sanjiv; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L.; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A.; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are frequently classified based on their response linearity: the extent in which their visual responses to drifting gratings resemble a linear replica of the stimulus. This classification is supported by the finding that response linearity is bimodally distributed across neurons in area V1 of anesthetized animals. However, recent studies suggest that such bimodal distribution may not reflect two neuronal types but a nonlinear relationship between the membrane potential and the spike output. A main limitation of these previous studies is that they measured response linearity in anesthetized animals, where the distance between the neuronal membrane potential and spike threshold is artificially increased by anesthesia. Here, we measured V1 response linearity in the awake brain and its correlation with the neuronal spontaneous firing rate, which is related to the distance between membrane potential and threshold. Our results demonstrate that response linearity is bimodally distributed in awake V1 but that it is poorly correlated with spontaneous firing rate. In contrast, the spontaneous firing rate is best correlated to the response selectivity and response latency to stimuli. PMID:19761345

  9. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  10. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  11. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  12. Generalized linear porokeratosis: a rare entity with excellent response to acitretin.

    PubMed

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Varghese, Bincy; Barara, Meenu; Nangia, Anita

    2011-05-15

    Linear porokeratosis is a rare disorder of keratinization that usually presents at birth. We report a 17-year-old male with generalized linear porokeratosis, a very rare variant of porokeratosis, with extensive involvement of the trunk and extremities along with nail and genital involvement. The patient was treated with oral acitretin with excellent clinical response.

  13. Deformation of accretionary wedges in response to seamount subduction: Insights from sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, S.; Malavieille, J.; Lallemand, S. E.

    2000-02-01

    Sandbox experiments, using a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional approach, are used to study the deformation of margins in response to seamount subduction. Successive mechanisms of deformation are activated during the subduction of conical seamounts. First, reactivation of the frontal thrusts and compaction of the accretionary wedge is observed. Then, back thrusting and, conjugate strike-slip faulting develops above the leading slope of the subducted seamount. The basal decollement is deflected upward in the wake of the subducting high, and a large shadow zone develops behind the seamount trailing slope. Consequently, frontal accretion is inhibited and part of the frontal margin is dragged into the subduction zone. When the main decollement returns to its basal level in the wake of the seamount, the margin records a rapid subsidence and a new accretionary wedge develops, closing the margin reentrant. The sediments underthrusted in the wake of the seamount into the shadow zone, are underplated beneath the rear part of the accretionary wedge. Substantial shortening and thickening of the deformable seaward termination of the upper plate basement, associated with basal erosion is observed. Seamount subduction induces significant material transfer within the accretionary wedge, favors large tectonic erosion of the frontal margin and thickening of the rear part of the margin. The subduction and underplating of relatively undeformed, water-ladden sediments, associated with fluid expulsion along the fractures affecting the margin could modify the fluid pressure along the basal decollement. Consequently, significant variations of the effective basal friction and local mechanical coupling between the two plates could be expected around the subducting seamount.

  14. Ligand-induced protein responses and mechanical signal propagation described by linear response theories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lee-Wei; Kitao, Akio; Huang, Bang-Chieh; Gō, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-16

    In this study, a general linear response theory (LRT) is formulated to describe time-dependent and -independent protein conformational changes upon CO binding with myoglobin. Using the theory, we are able to monitor protein relaxation in two stages. The slower relaxation is found to occur from 4.4 to 81.2 picoseconds and the time constants characterized for a couple of aromatic residues agree with those observed by UV Resonance Raman (UVRR) spectrometry and time resolved x-ray crystallography. The faster "early responses", triggered as early as 400 femtoseconds, can be best described by the theory when impulse forces are used. The newly formulated theory describes the mechanical propagation following ligand-binding as a function of time, space and types of the perturbation forces. The "disseminators", defined as the residues that propagate signals throughout the molecule the fastest among all the residues in protein when perturbed, are found evolutionarily conserved and the mutations of which have been shown to largely change the CO rebinding kinetics in myoglobin. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An implicit three-dimensional model for describing the inelastic response of solids undergoing finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a new unified class of 3D nonlinear anisotropic finite deformation inelasticity model that (1) exhibits rate-independent or dependent hysteretic response (i.e., response wherein reversal of the external stimuli does not cause reversal of the path in state space) with or without yield surfaces. The hysteresis persists with quasistatic loading. (2) Encompasses a wide range of different types of inelasticity models (such as Mullins effect in rubber, rock and soil mechanics, traditional metal plasticity, hysteretic behavior of shape memory materials) into a simple unified framework that is relatively easy to implement in computational schemes and (3) does not require any a priori particular notion of plastic strain or yield function. The core idea behind the approach is the development of an system of implicit rate equations that allow for the continuity of the response but with different rates along different directions. The theory, which is in purely mechanical setting, subsumes and generalizes many commonly used approaches for hypoelasticity and rate-independent plasticity. We illustrate its capability by modeling the Mullins effect which is the inelastic behavior of certain rubbery materials. We are able to simulate the entire cyclic response without the use of additional internal variables, i.e., the entire response is modeled by using an implicit function of stress and strain measures and their rates.

  16. Linear and nonlinear density response functions for a simple atomic fluid.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Benjamin A; Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D; Snook, Ian K

    2013-07-28

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the linear and nonlinear density response functions for simple fluids under the influence of spatially periodic external fields. Using a direct Fourier space decomposition of the instantaneous microscopic density for the perturbed fluid we can clearly identify the distinct order of response. Using a single component sinusoidal longitudinal force for a set of wavelengths and amplitudes we show that in the linear response regime the proportionality between the external field amplitude and the density perturbation can be used to determine the linear density response function, and hence the pair correlation function, static liquid structure factor, and lowest order direct correlation function. We show also that for large external field amplitudes a single component external field can be used to determine the form for lowest order and second lowest order nonlinear response functions for restricted regions of the total response function spaces.

  17. Peripharyngeal tissue deformation, stress distributions, and hyoid bone movement in response to mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Amatoury, Jason; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Bilston, Lynne E; Amis, Terence C

    2015-02-01

    Mandibular advancement (MA) increases upper airway (UA) patency and decreases collapsibility. Furthermore, MA displaces the hyoid bone in a cranial-anterior direction, which may contribute to MA-associated UA improvements via redistribution of peripharyngeal tissue stresses (extraluminal tissue pressure, ETP). In the present study, we examined effects of MA on ETP distributions, deformation of the peripharyngeal tissue surface (UA geometry), and hyoid bone position. We studied 13 supine, anesthetized, tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Graded MA was applied from 0 to ∼4.5 mm. ETP was measured at six locations distributed throughout three UA regions: tongue, hyoid, and epiglottis. Axial computed tomography images of the UA (nasal choanae to glottis) were acquired and used to measure lumen geometry (UA length; regional cross-sectional area) and hyoid displacement. MA resulted in nonuniform decreases in ETP (greatest at tongue region), ranging from -0.11 (-0.15 to -0.06) to -0.82 (-1.09 to -0.54) cmH2O/mm MA [linear mixed-effects model slope (95% confidence interval)], across all sites. UA length decreased by -0.5 (-0.8 to -0.2) %/mm accompanied by nonuniform increases in cross-sectional area (greatest at hyoid region) ranging from 7.5 (3.6-11.4) to 18.7 (14.9-22.5) %/mm. The hyoid bone was displaced in a cranial-anterior direction by 0.42 (0.36-0.44) mm/mm MA. In summary, MA results in nonuniform changes in peripharyngeal tissue pressure distributions and lumen geometry. Displacement of the hyoid bone with MA may play a pivotal role in redistributing applied MA loads, thus modifying tissue stress/deformation distributions and determining resultant UA geometry outcomes.

  18. Deformation and Stress Response of Carbon Nanotubes/UHMWPE Composites under Extensional-Shear Coupling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxia; Cao, Changlin; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Xudong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of varying extensional-shear couple loading on deformation and stress response of Carbon Nanotubes/ ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (CNTs/UHMWPE) composites was investigated using finite element numerical simulation, with expect to improve the manufacturing process of UHMWPE-based composites with reduced stress and lower distortion. When applying pure extensional loading and pure X-Y shear loading, it was found that the risk of a structural breakage greatly rises. For identifying the coupling between extensional and shear loading, distinct generations of force loading were defined by adjusting the magnitude of extensional loading and X-Y shear loading. It was shown that with the decrement of X-Y shear loading the deformation decreases obviously where the maximal Mises stress in Z-direction at 0.45 m distance is in the range from 24 to 10 MPa and the maximal shear stress at 0.61 m distance is within the range from 0.9 to 0.3 MPa. In addition, all the stresses determined were clearly below the yield strength of CNTs/UHMWPE composites under extensional-shear couple loading.

  19. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  20. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Borrat, Xavier; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Jospin, Mathieu; Jensen, Erik Weber; Gambus, Pedro; Caminal, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS). Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands.

  1. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Borrat, Xavier; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Jospin, Mathieu; Jensen, Erik Weber; Gambus, Pedro; Caminal, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS). Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands. PMID:25901571

  2. Variational finite-difference methods in linear and nonlinear problems of the deformation of metallic and composite shells (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyuk, V. A.; Storozhuk, E. A.; Chernyshenko, I. S.

    2012-11-01

    Variational finite-difference methods of solving linear and nonlinear problems for thin and nonthin shells (plates) made of homogeneous isotropic (metallic) and orthotropic (composite) materials are analyzed and their classification principles and structure are discussed. Scalar and vector variational finite-difference methods that implement the Kirchhoff-Love hypotheses analytically or algorithmically using Lagrange multipliers are outlined. The Timoshenko hypotheses are implemented in a traditional way, i.e., analytically. The stress-strain state of metallic and composite shells of complex geometry is analyzed numerically. The numerical results are presented in the form of graphs and tables and used to assess the efficiency of using the variational finite-difference methods to solve linear and nonlinear problems of the statics of shells (plates)

  3. Ligand-Induced Protein Responses and Mechanical Signal Propagation Described by Linear Response Theories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lee-Wei; Kitao, Akio; Huang, Bang-Chieh; Gō, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a general linear response theory (LRT) is formulated to describe time-dependent and -independent protein conformational changes upon CO binding with myoglobin. Using the theory, we are able to monitor protein relaxation in two stages. The slower relaxation is found to occur from 4.4 to 81.2 picoseconds and the time constants characterized for a couple of aromatic residues agree with those observed by UV Resonance Raman (UVRR) spectrometry and time resolved x-ray crystallography. The faster “early responses”, triggered as early as 400 femtoseconds, can be best described by the theory when impulse forces are used. The newly formulated theory describes the mechanical propagation following ligand-binding as a function of time, space and types of the perturbation forces. The “disseminators”, defined as the residues that propagate signals throughout the molecule the fastest among all the residues in protein when perturbed, are found evolutionarily conserved and the mutations of which have been shown to largely change the CO rebinding kinetics in myoglobin. PMID:25229149

  4. Linearized theory of peridynamic states.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew

    2009-04-01

    A state-based peridynamic material model describes internal forces acting on a point in terms of the collective deformation of all the material within a neighborhood of the point. In this paper, the response of a state-based peridynamic material is investigated for a small deformation superposed on a large deformation. The appropriate notion of a small deformation restricts the relative displacement between points, but it does not involve the deformation gradient (which would be undefined on a crack). The material properties that govern the linearized material response are expressed in terms of a new quantity called the modulus state. This determines the force in each bond resulting from an incremental deformation of itself or of other bonds. Conditions are derived for a linearized material model to be elastic, objective, and to satisfy balance of angular momentum. If the material is elastic, then the modulus state is obtainable from the second Frechet derivative of the strain energy density function. The equation of equilibrium with a linearized material model is a linear Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. An analogue of Poincare's theorem is proved that applies to the infinite dimensional space of all peridynamic vector states, providing a condition similar to irrotationality in vector calculus.

  5. Signal amplification in immunohistochemistry: loose-jointed deformable heteropolymeric HRP conjugates vs. linear polymer backbone HRP conjugates.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, Igor; Boecker, Werner; Wolf, Eduard; Samoilova, Vera; Tiemann, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Improvements in reagents and protocols for immunohistochemistry have led to increased sensitivity of detection systems. A significant level of signal amplification was achieved by the chain-polymer conjugate technology utilizing enzyme-labeled inert "backbone" molecule of dextran (Dako). However, the relatively large size of the dextran molecule in aqueous phase appears to create spatial hindrance compromising the penetrative ability of the detection reagent. Novel AmpliStain™ detection systems (SDT GmbH, Baesweiler, Germany) seem to overcome these constraints offering a more compact and deformable conjugate design that facilitates agile penetration through the narrowest diffusion pathways in tissue sections. Here, we compared the level of signal amplification achievable with AmpliStain™-HRP (SDT) and EnVision™+-HRP (Dako). Our results show that the AmpliStain™-HRP systems allow higher dilutions of primary antibodies in both immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Compared with EnVision™+, anti-mouse AmpliStain™ enables at least three times more sensitive detection of mouse antibodies, whereas anti-rabbit AmpliStain™ is ten times more sensitive than anti-rabbit EnVision™+.

  6. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R. J.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Bachtiar, V.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-07

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever–surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  7. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. J.; Bachtiar, V.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever-surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  8. Explicit solvent simulations of the aqueous oxidation potential and reorganization energy for neutral molecules: gas phase, linear solvent response, and non-linear response contributions.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Jennifer J; Tentscher, Peter R; Seijo, Marianne; Samuel Arey, J

    2015-06-14

    First principles simulations were used to predict aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox) and associated half-cell reorganization energies (λaq) for aniline, phenol, methoxybenzene, imidazole, and dimethylsulfide. We employed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the oxidized and reduced species in an explicit aqueous solvent, followed by EOM-IP-CCSD computations with effective fragment potentials for diabatic energy gaps of solvated clusters, and finally thermodynamic integration of the non-linear solvent response contribution using classical MD. A priori predicted Eox and λaq values exhibit mean absolute errors of 0.17 V and 0.06 eV, respectively, compared to experiment. We also disaggregate Eox into several well-defined free energy properties, including the gas phase adiabatic free energy of ionization (7.73 to 8.82 eV), the solvent-induced shift in the free energy of ionization due to linear solvent response (-2.01 to -2.73 eV), and the contribution from non-linear solvent response (-0.07 to -0.14 eV). The linear solvent response component is further apportioned into contributions from the solvent-induced shift in vertical ionization energy of the reduced species (ΔVIEaq) and the solvent-induced shift in negative vertical electron affinity of the ionized species (ΔNVEAaq). The simulated ΔVIEaq and ΔNVEAaq are found to contribute the principal sources of uncertainty in computational estimates of Eox and λaq. Trends in the magnitudes of disaggregated solvation properties are found to correlate with trends in structural and electronic features of the solute. Finally, conflicting approaches for evaluating the aqueous reorganization energy are contrasted and discussed, and concluding recommendations are given.

  9. Activation of Bone Remodeling after Fatigue: Differential Response to Linear Microcracks and Diffuse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Herman, B.C.; Cardoso, L.; Majeska, R.J.; Jepsen, K.J.; Schaffler, M.B

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments point to two predominant forms of fatigue microdamage in bone: linear microcracks (tens to a few hundreds microns in length) and “diffuse damage” (patches of diffuse stain uptake in fatigued bone comprised of clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks). The physiological relevance of diffuse damage in activating bone remodeling is not known. In this study microdamage amount and type were varied to assess whether linear or diffuse microdamage have similar effects on the activation of intracortical resorption. Activation of resorption was correlated to the number of linear microcracks (Cr.Dn) in the bone (R2=0.60, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no activation of resorption in response to diffuse microdamage alone. Furthermore, there was no significant change in osteocyte viability in response to diffuse microdamage, suggesting that osteocyte apoptosis, which is know to activate remodeling at typical linear microcracks in bone, does not result from sublamellar damage. These findings indicate that inability of diffuse microdamage to activate resorption may be due to lack of a focal injury response. Finally, we found that duration of loading does not affect the remodeling response. In conclusion, our data indicate that osteocytes activate resorption in response to linear microcracks but not diffuse microdamage, perhaps due to lack of a focal injury-induced apoptotic response. PMID:20633708

  10. A quantum-mechanical perspective on linear response theory within polarizable embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Norman, Patrick; Kongsted, Jacob; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2017-06-01

    We present a derivation of linear response theory within polarizable embedding starting from a rigorous quantum-mechanical treatment of a composite system. To this aim, two different subsystem decompositions (symmetric and nonsymmetric) of the linear response function are introduced and the pole structures as well as residues of the individual terms are discussed. In addition to providing a thorough justification for the descriptions used in polarizable embedding models, this theoretical analysis clarifies which form of the response function to use and highlights complications in separating out subsystem contributions to molecular properties. The basic features of the presented expressions and various approximate forms are illustrated by their application to a composite model system.

  11. Deformation responses of slow moving landslides to precipitation in the Northern Apennines (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Benedikt; Simoni, Alessandro; Schmidt, David; Bertello, Lara; Berti, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Slow moving landslides are a frequent feature in the Northern Apennines of Italy and one of the main landscape forming agents. Among the most common landslide types are complex earth flows that occur in chaotic clay-shales and complex rock slides in highly fractured flysch. We present the results of an InSAR-based survey in the Reno and Panaro river catchments, which are located South of Bologna and Modena in the Northern Apennines of Italy. We processed Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed radar data using the Stanford Method of Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) and documented movement on 62 deep-seated landslides. These landslides were compared to the regional landslide inventory that contains information about the type of landslide, its state of activity and the lithological characteristics of the host rock. Of the landslides found using InSAR, 42 % correspond to active landslide bodies in the regional inventory, while 48 % are mapped as dormant and 10% are not previously mapped. InSAR-derived landslides often do not correspond to the exact extent of mapped landslide bodies. InSAR results show two recurring styles of deformation: (1) earthflows involving chaotic clay-shale units that exhibit steady state displacement, or exhibit long-term (multi-annual) accelerations and decelerations, or (2) complex landslides in flysch units that are characterized by distinct increases in displacement rate following periods (weeks-to-months) of intense precipitation. Such differences in behavior might be due to inherent differences in the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of the material in relation to the specific climatic forcing experienced during the observation period (2003 and 2015). Flysch units are relatively more fragile and have higher permeability when compared to clay-shale units. Hence the deformation response to the precipitation is likely faster and characterized by more abrupt accelerations and decelerations.

  12. The spin polarized linear response from density functional theory: Theory and application to atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fias, Stijn Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-11-14

    Within the context of spin polarized conceptual density functional theory, the spin polarized linear response functions are introduced both in the [N, N{sub s}] and [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representations. The mathematical relations between the spin polarized linear response functions in both representations are examined and an analytical expression for the spin polarized linear response functions in the [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representation is derived. The spin polarized linear response functions were calculated for all atoms up to and including argon. To simplify the plotting of our results, we integrated χ(r, r′) to a quantity χ(r, r{sup ′}), circumventing the θ and ϕ dependence. This allows us to plot and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table within the two different representations. For the first time, χ{sub αβ}(r, r{sup ′}), χ{sub βα}(r, r{sup ′}), and χ{sub SS}(r, r{sup ′}) plots have been calculated and discussed. By integration of the spin polarized linear response functions, different components to the polarisability, α{sub αα}, α{sub αβ}, α{sub βα}, and α{sub ββ} have been calculated.

  13. A review of linear response theory for general differentiable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2009-04-01

    The classical theory of linear response applies to statistical mechanics close to equilibrium. Away from equilibrium, one may describe the microscopic time evolution by a general differentiable dynamical system, identify nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) and study how these vary under perturbations of the dynamics. Remarkably, it turns out that for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems (those satisfying the 'chaotic hypothesis'), the linear response away from equilibrium is very similar to the linear response close to equilibrium: the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations hold, and the fluctuation-dispersion theorem survives in a modified form (which takes into account the oscillations around the 'attractor' corresponding to the NESS). If the chaotic hypothesis does not hold, two new phenomena may arise. The first is a violation of linear response in the sense that the NESS does not depend differentiably on parameters (but this nondifferentiability may be hard to see experimentally). The second phenomenon is a violation of the dispersion relations: the susceptibility has singularities in the upper half complex plane. These 'acausal' singularities are actually due to 'energy nonconservation': for a small periodic perturbation of the system, the amplitude of the linear response is arbitrarily large. This means that the NESS of the dynamical system under study is not 'inert' but can give energy to the outside world. An 'active' NESS of this sort is very different from an equilibrium state, and it would be interesting to see what happens for active states to the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem.

  14. The deformation response of three-dimensional woven composites subjected to high rates of loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Mark Robert

    The use of polymer matrix composites is widespread, with development in automotive, aerospace and recreational equipment. These applications have produced loading scenarios which are unfamiliar and not well understood. Several applications involve impact loading, which produces large strain rates and delamination failure. New manufacturing methods have led to three dimensional (3D) weave geometries that provide composites with damage protection. This is accomplished through elimination of delamination, and localizing the extent of damage. The present work is a combined experimental and computational study aimed at developing a mechanism based deformation response model for 3D woven composites, including the prediction of failure strengths at high loading rates. Three unique experimental configurations have been developed; along with finite element based simulations to predict the material response and failure mechanisms that are experimentally observed. End Notch Flexure (ENF) tests were used to determine the effectiveness of the Z-fiber at resisting crack propagation. The crack propagation was found to have rate dependent properties, with architecture based parameters required to predict the strength and resistance. The computational results reinforced the experimental observations. A new FE implementation captured the effectiveness of the Z-fiber reinforcement bridging the growing crack. Shock impact testing was performed to simulate the effects of blast loading on the material. New experimental measurement methods were utilized to record the deformations and strains which led to observations of matrix micro-cracking, the first failure mode. Computational models were developed to predict the material behavior subjected to shock loading, including matrix micro-cracking, which was predicted accurately. Finally, split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing was done to understand the high strain rate behavior of the material in compression in all three directions. The

  15. Quasilaminar regime in the linear response of a turbulent flow to wall waviness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo; Charru, François

    2017-01-01

    The linear response of the wall-shear stress of a turbulent flow to wall waviness is analyzed in the context of a comparison between existing experiments, direct numerical simulations, and analytical approximations. The spectral region where the response is largest is found to be amenable to a simplified quasilaminar analysis. The end result is a parameterless description of this phenomenon that completely captures its physics in a single analytical formula, a Padé approximation of the response function.

  16. Linear-response calculation in the time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Inakura, Tsunenori; Avogadro, Paolo; Ebata, Shuichiro; Sato, Koichi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2012-11-12

    Linear response calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory are presented. Especially, we report results of the finite amplitude method which we have recently proposed as an alternative and feasible approach to the (quasiparticle-)random-phase approximation. Calculated properties of the giant resonances and low-energy E1 modes are discussed. We found a universal linear correlation between the low-energy E1 strength and the neutron skin thickness.

  17. Effects of negative ageing on deformation and strength response of geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M.; Towhata, I.; Yamada, S.; Qureshi, M. U.; Kawano, K.

    2009-04-01

    Negative ageing or decay of grains with time is often ignored in conventional geotechnical investigations. Geology is always vital in such a scenario but the micro-scale geotechnical point of concern is the time-dependent loss of strength and deformation characteristics. This paper presents unique data from torsional shear tests on crushed soft rocks from Yokosuka, Japan and 2005-Kashmir earthquake hit areas of Pakistan. Material being sensitive to disintegrate by water-action allowed to simulate the long-term stress-strain and volume change response under saturated conditions whereas dry tests on similar soil represent initial intact response of the material. Negative ageing is manipulated by an enormous decrease in shear strength parameters, changes in grain size curve and increase in volumetric compression. It is concluded that for long-term hazard evaluation of various geotechnical structures, the effects of loss of strength due to decay of grains with time should be incorporated in conventional analysis and design models.

  18. Load response of the tarsal bones in patients with flatfoot deformity: in vivo 3D study.

    PubMed

    Kido, Masamitsu; Ikoma, Kazuya; Imai, Kan; Maki, Masahiro; Takatori, Ryota; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Inoue, Nozomu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bone rotation of each joint in the hindfoot and compare the load response in healthy feet with that in flatfeet by analyzing the reconstructive three-dimensional (3D) CT image data during weightbearing. CT scans of 21 healthy feet and 21 feet with flatfoot deformity were taken in non-load condition followed by full-body weightbearing load condition. The images of the hindfoot bones were reconstructed into 3D models. The volume merge method in three planes was used to calculate the position of the talus relative to the tibia in the tibiotalar joint, the navicular relative to the talus in talonavicular joint, and the calcaneus relative to the talus in the talocalcaneal joint. The talar position difference to the load response relative to the tibia in the tibiotalar joint in a flatfoot was 1.7 degrees more plantarflexed in comparison to that in a healthy foot (p = 0.031). The navicular position difference to the load response relative to the talus in the talonavicular joint was 2.3 degrees more everted (p = 0.0034). The calcaneal position difference to the load response relative to the talus in the talocalcaneal joint was 1.1 degrees more dorsiflexed (p = 0.0060) and 1.7 degrees more everted (p = 0.0018). Referring to previous cadaver study, regarding not only the cadaveric foot, but also the live foot, joint instability occurred in the hindfoot with load in patients with flatfoot. The method used in this study might be applied to clinical analysis of foot diseases such as the staging of flatfoot and to biomechanical analysis to evaluate the effects of foot surgery in the future.

  19. Frequency response of synthetic vocal fold models with linear and nonlinear material properties.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Stephanie M; Thomson, Scott L; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F0) during anterior-posterior stretching. Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1-mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and F0 at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1-mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than do linear models, especially with respect to F0 response.

  20. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency during anterior-posterior stretching. Method Three materially linear and three materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1 mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and fundamental frequency (F0) at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1 mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Results Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Conclusions Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than linear models, especially with respect to F0 response. PMID:22271874

  1. Introduction of non-linear elasticity models for characterization of shape and deformation statistics: application to contractility assessment of isolated adult cardiocytes.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Carlos; Hawkins, Trevor; Torres-Barba, David; Blomgren, Peter; Paolini, Paul

    2011-08-22

    We are exploring the viability of a novel approach to cardiocyte contractility assessment based on biomechanical properties of the cardiac cells, energy conservation principles, and information content measures. We define our measure of cell contraction as being the distance between the shapes of the contracting cell, assessed by the minimum total energy of the domain deformation (warping) of one cell shape into another. To guarantee a meaningful vis-à-vis correspondence between the two shapes, we employ both a data fidelity term and a regularization term. The data fidelity term is based on nonlinear features of the shapes while the regularization term enforces the compatibility between the shape deformations and that of a hyper-elastic material. We tested the proposed approach by assessing the contractile responses in isolated adult rat cardiocytes and contrasted these measurements against two different methods for contractility assessment in the literature. Our results show good qualitative and quantitative agreements with these methods as far as frequency, pacing, and overall behavior of the contractions are concerned. We hypothesize that the proposed methodology, once appropriately developed and customized, can provide a framework for computational cardiac cell biomechanics that can be used to integrate both theory and experiment. For example, besides giving a good assessment of contractile response of the cardiocyte, since the excitation process of the cell is a closed system, this methodology can be employed in an attempt to infer statistically significant model parameters for the constitutive equations of the cardiocytes.

  2. Quenched Stresses And Linear Elastic Response Of Random Packings Of Frictionless Particles Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Kamran

    We study stress correlations and elastic response in large-scale computer simulations of particle packings near jamming. We show that there are characteristic lengths in both the stresses and elastic response that diverge in similar ways as the confining pressure approaches zero from above. For the case of the stress field, we show that the power spectrum of the hydrostatic pressure and shear stress agrees with a field-theoretic framework proposed by Henkes and Chakraborty [15] at short to intermediate wavelengths (where the power is flat in Fourier space), but contains significant excess power at wavelengths larger than about 50 to 100 particle diameters, with the specific crossover point going to larger wavelength at decreasing pressure, consistent with a divergence at p = 0. These stress correlations were missed in previous studies by other groups due to limited system size. For the case of the elastic response, we probe the system in three ways: i) point forcing, ii) constrained homogeneous deformation where the system is driven with no-slip boundary conditions, and iii) free periodic homogeneous deformation. For the point force, we see distinct characteristic lengths for longitudinal and transverse modes each of which diverges in a different way with decreasing pressure with xiT ˜ p--1/4 and xiL ˜ p--0.4 respectively. For the constrained homogeneous deformation we see a scaling of the local shear modulus with the size of the probing region consistent with xi ˜ p--1/2 similar to the xiL ˜ p --0.4 observed in the longitudinal component of the point response and in perfect agreement with the rigidity length discussed in recently proposed scenarios for jamming. Finally, we show that the transverse and longitudinal contributions to the strain field in response to unconstrained deformation (either volumetric or shear) have markedly different behavior. The transverse contribution is surprisingly invariant with respect to p with localized shear transformations

  3. Linear and non-linear responses of vegetation and soils to glacial-interglacial climate change in a Mediterranean refuge.

    PubMed

    Holtvoeth, Jens; Vogel, Hendrik; Valsecchi, Verushka; Lindhorst, Katja; Schouten, Stefan; Wagner, Bernd; Wolff, George A

    2017-08-14

    The impact of past global climate change on local terrestrial ecosystems and their vegetation and soil organic matter (OM) pools is often non-linear and poorly constrained. To address this, we investigated the response of a temperate habitat influenced by global climate change in a key glacial refuge, Lake Ohrid (Albania, Macedonia). We applied independent geochemical and palynological proxies to a sedimentary archive from the lake over the penultimate glacial-interglacial transition (MIS 6-5) and the following interglacial (MIS 5e-c), targeting lake surface temperature as an indicator of regional climatic development and the supply of pollen and biomarkers from the vegetation and soil OM pools to determine local habitat response. Climate fluctuations strongly influenced the ecosystem, however, lake level controls the extent of terrace surfaces between the shoreline and mountain slopes and hence local vegetation, soil development and OM export to the lake sediments. There were two phases of transgressional soil erosion from terrace surfaces during lake-level rise in the MIS 6-5 transition that led to habitat loss for the locally dominant pine vegetation as the terraces drowned. Our observations confirm that catchment morphology plays a key role in providing refuges with low groundwater depth and stable soils during variable climate.

  4. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  5. Dielectric function beyond the random-phase approximation: kinetic theory versus linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, H; Röpke, G

    2012-03-01

    Calculating the frequency-dependent dielectric function for strongly coupled plasmas, the relations within kinetic theory and linear response theory are derived and discussed in comparison. In this context, we give a proof that the Kohler variational principle can be extended to arbitrary frequencies. It is shown to be a special case of the Zubarev method for the construction of a nonequilibrium statistical operator from the principle of the extremum of entropy production. Within kinetic theory, the commonly used energy-dependent relaxation time approach is strictly valid only for the Lorentz plasma in the static case. It is compared with the result from linear response theory that includes electron-electron interactions and applies for arbitrary frequencies, including bremsstrahlung emission. It is shown how a general approach to linear response encompasses the different approximations and opens options for systematic improvements.

  6. Determining the continuous family of quantum Fisher information from linear-response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Tomohiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-12-01

    The quantum Fisher information represents a continuous family of metrics on the space of quantum states and places the fundamental limit on the accuracy of quantum state estimation. We show that the entire family of quantum Fisher information can be determined from linear-response theory through generalized covariances. We derive the generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates linear-response functions to generalized covariances and hence allows us to determine the quantum Fisher information from linear-response functions, which are experimentally measurable quantities. As an application, we examine the skew information, which is a quantum Fisher information, of a harmonic oscillator in thermal equilibrium, and show that the equality of the skew-information-based uncertainty relation holds.

  7. Project REPONS: Offshore Faults, Tectonic Deformation and Turbidite Record in Response to the January 12 2010 Earthquake, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Gulick, S. P.; Cormier, M.; Dieudonne, N.; Diebold, J. B.; Douilly, R.; Hornbach, M.; Johnson, H. E.; Mishkin, K.; Seeber, L.; Sorlien, C. C.; Steckler, M. S.; Symithe, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an NSF RAPID response to the January 12, 2010 earthquake, we mapped the underwater continuation of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGF) west of Léogâne. Multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, chirp subbottom profiler, sediment sampling and CTD measurements were conducted in water depths of 2 m to 1750 m from the R/V Endeavor and from a small inflatable boat. The offshore segment of the EPGF is manifested by two steep, 50-80 m high linear ridges and at least two subsurface faults. The submarine EPGF is part of a transition from releasing to restraining segment. To the east, it joins its onshore trace in a releasing bend and continues to the west in a restraining bend that perhaps caused the Tapion ridge. Within the Baies de Petit and Grand Goâve, river outlets are correlated with lateral spreading and/or subsidence where we observed increased local damage to structures. Lateral spreading and/or subsidence appears to have increased tsunami effects locally. Coral uplift NE and SW of offshore fault traces offer evidence of the January 12, 2010 surface deformation. While a seafloor rupture is not evident from the data collected we do image deformation within the upper 20 m in both bays. Mass wasting and gravity flow deposits from the last and older earthquakes were tracked from the Léogâne delta and along the coast to the deepest depocenter. Th-234 and Be-7 with half-lives of 24 and 53 days, respectively verified the January 12 turbidite and indicated an influx of terrigenous sediment mixed with marine sources. Coral debris was sampled in the shelf and upper slope (100-300 m) near the EPGF; basalt sand derived from the highlands and wood fragments at intermediate water depths (1000-1100 m); lastly an ~0.03 km3 and >1 m thick turbidite was deposited over 50 km2 in the Canal du Sud depocenter (1750 m). The sandy parts of all cores recovered from Canal du Sud depocenter have alternate episodes of traction deposition and erosion that reflect

  8. Nonlinear system stochastic response determination via fractional equivalent linearization and Karhunen-Loève expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fractional equivalent linearization (EL) approach is developed by incorporating a fractional derivative term into the classical linearization equation. Due to the introduction of the fractional derivative term, the accuracy of the new linearization is improved, illustrated by a Duffing oscillator that is subjected to a harmonic excitation. Furthermore, a new method for solving stochastic response of nonlinear SDOF system is developed by combining Karhunen-Loève (K-L) expansion and fractional EL. The method firstly decomposes the stochastic excitation in terms of a set of random variables and deterministic sub-excitations using K-L expansion, and then construct sub-fractional equivalent linear system according to each sub-excitation by fractional EL, the response of the original nonlinear system is finally approximated as the weighed summation of the deterministic response of each sub-system multiplied by the corresponding random variable. The random nature of the final response comes from the set of random variables that is obtained in K-L expansion. In this way, the stochastic response computation is converted to a set of deterministic response analysis problems. The effectiveness of the developed method is demonstrated by a Duffing oscillator that is subjected to stochastic excitation modeled by Winner process. The results are compared with the numerical method and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS).

  9. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  10. Evolution of a fold-thrust belt deforming a unit with pre-existing linear asperities: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, Caroline M.; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn L.

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneity, whether geometric or rheologic, in crustal material undergoing compression affects the geometry of the structures produced. This study documents the thrust fault geometries produced when discrete linear asperities are introduced into an analog model, scaled to represent bulk upper crustal properties, and compressed. Varying obliquities of the asperities are used, relative to the imposed compression, and the resultant development of thrust fault traces and branch lines in map view is tracked. Once the model runs are completed, cross-sections are created and analyzed. The models show that asperities confined to the base layer promote the clustering of branch lines in the surface thrusts. Strong clustering in branch lines is also noted where several asperities are in close proximity or cross. Slight reverse-sense reactivation of asperities cut through the sedimentary sequence is noted in cross-section, where the asperity and the subsequent thrust belt interact. The model results are comparable to the situation in the Dinaric Alps, where pre-existing faults to the SW of the NE Adriatic Fault Zone contribute to the clustering of branch lines developed in the surface fold-thrust belt. These results can therefore be used to evaluate the evolution of other basement-involved fold-thrust belts worldwide.

  11. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force‐related‐BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S.; Friston, Karl J.; Toosy, Ahmed T.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler‐Kingshott, Claudia A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum‐optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non‐linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non‐linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD‐force relationship that is region‐dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2566–2579, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28240422

  12. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force-related-BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Adnan A S; Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S; Friston, Karl J; Toosy, Ahmed T; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-02-27

    The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum-optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non-linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non-linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD-force relationship that is region-dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.

    2010-03-15

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  14. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  15. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  16. Validity, Reliability, and Responsiveness of SRS-7 as an Outcomes Assessment Instrument for Operatively Treated Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Lafage, Virginie; Kelly, Michael P; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Neuman, Brian J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P; Scheer, Justin K; Burton, Douglas; Gupta, Munish C; Hart, Robert; Hostin, Richard A; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective analysis. The aim of our study was to compare the normality, concurrent validity, internal consistency, responsiveness, and dimensionality of an item response theory-derived seven-question instrument (SRS-7), against the Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) questionnaire in operatively treated patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). Compared with SRS-22r, SRS-7 (which has been validated in operatively treated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis) has advantages of being short, unidimensional, and linear. A prospective database of ASD patients was queried for patients 18 years or older who were operatively treated, and who answered pre- and postoperative (at 2-year follow-up) SRS-22r questions (n = 276). Corresponding SRS-7 scores were calculated using answers to SRS-22r items 1, 4, 6, 10, 18, 19, and 20. Significance was set at a P value less than 0.01. SRS-7 and SRS-22r were normally distributed preoperatively but not postoperatively. SRS-7 and SRS-22r scores had high correlation both preoperatively (r = 0.76, P < 0.01) and postoperatively (r = 0.83, P < 0.01). The internal consistency reliability Cronbach α values were 0.61 (SRS-7) and 0.83 (SRS-22r) preoperatively and 0.91 (SRS-7) and 0.95 (SRS-22r) postoperatively. SRS-7 was found to be more responsive than SRS-22r with measures of effect size: Cohen d = 1.21 versus 1.13, Hedge g = 1.21 versus 1.13, and effect size correlation r = 0.52 versus 0.49. Iterative principal factor analysis of pre- and postoperative scores showed the presence of one dominant latent factor in SRS-7 (unidimensionality) and four latent factors in SRS-22r (multidimensionality). SRS-7 is a valid, reliable, responsive, and unidimensional instrument, which can be used as a short-form alternative to the SRS-22r for assessing global changes in patient-reported outcomes over time in patients with ASD. 3.

  17. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-09

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; McCoy, Tammy; Cochran, Joe; Thadhani, Naresh

    2009-06-01

    A refined Johnson-Cook material strength model is developed for predicting the dynamic strain and fracture response of Maraging 250 steel at high-strain rates. Finite element simulations of rod-on-anvil impacts are carried out at velocities exceeding 100m/s and compared with experimental impact tests performed on a 7.62mm gas gun. The transient and final dimensions of the simulated and experimentally impacted rods are compared and Johnson-Cook strength parameters are modified accordingly. The newly developed Maraging 250 steel Johnson-cook strength model is then applied to simulate the impact response of multiple, 25% dense linear cellular alloys (LCA) of various geometries at velocities exceeding 100m/s. Analyses of the deformation, fragmentation, and stress transfer behavior of the simulated LCAs are performed and validated through comparison of corresponding impact experiments performed on the LCAs produced via an extrusion and reduction process. Stress transfer to the interior walls varies as a function of LCA geometry, which also influences the outward fragmentation and energy retention at the cross-section of impact.

  19. Trans-endplate nucleotomy increases deformation and creep response in axial loading.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Wade; Cloyd, Jordan M; O'Connell, Grace D; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge of the functional role of the nucleus pulposus is critical for the development and evaluation of disc treatment strategies to restore mechanical function. While previous motion segment studies have shown that nucleotomy alters disc mechanics, disruption of the annulus fibrosus may have influenced these experiments. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanical role of the nucleus pulposus in support of axial loads via a trans-endplate nucleotomy procedure. Sheep motion segments were randomly assigned to three groups: control, limited nucleotomy, and radical nucleotomy. Mechanical testing consisted of 20 cycles of compression-tension, a 1-h creep, and a slow constant-rate compressive ramp test. Nucleotomy led to increased axial deformations, in particular an elongated neutral zone, a greater range of motion, and altered creep behavior. In general, the elastic properties exhibited a graded response with respect to the amount of nucleus material removed. This graded effect can be attributed to swelling of the nucleus pulposus in the limited nucleotomy group, whereas little swelling was observed in the radical group. The findings of the present study indicate that functional evaluation of nucleus pulposus replacements and disc implants should include range of motion measures (including neutral zone) and viscoelastic creep experiments in addition to considering compressive stiffness.

  20. Dynamic deformation and recovery response of red blood cells to a cyclically reversing shear flow: Effects of frequency of cyclically reversing shear flow and shear stress level.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-microm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs.

  1. Experimental Validation of Two-dimensional Finite Element Method for Simulating Constitutive Response of Polycrystals During High Temperature Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Briant, Clyde L.; Krajewski, Paul E.; Bower, Allan F.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    A finite element method was recently designed to model the mechanisms that cause superplastic deformation (A.F. Bower and E. Wininger, A Two-Dimensional Finite Element Method for Simulating the Constitutive Response and Microstructure of Polycrystals during High-Temperature Plastic Deformation, J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 2004, 52, p 1289-1317). The computations idealize the solid as a collection of two-dimensional grains, separated by sharp grain boundaries. The grains may deform plastically by thermally activated dislocation motion, which is modeled using a conventional crystal plasticity law. The solid may also deform by sliding on the grain boundaries, or by stress-driven diffusion of atoms along grain boundaries. The governing equations are solved using a finite element method, which includes a front-tracking procedure to monitor the evolution of the grain boundaries and surfaces in the solid. The goal of this article is to validate these computations by systematically comparing numerical predictions to experimental measurements of the elevated-temperature response of aluminum alloy AA5083 (M.-A. Kulas, W.P. Green, E.M. Taleff, P.E. Krajewski, and T.R. McNelley, Deformation Mechanisms in Superplastic AA5083 materials. Metall. Mater. Trans. A, 2005, 36(5), p 1249-1261). The experimental work revealed that a transition occurs from grain-boundary sliding to dislocation (solute-drag) creep at approximately 0.001/s for temperatures between 425 and 500 °C. In addition, increasing the grain size from 7 to 10 μm decreased the transition to significantly lower strain rates. Predictions from the finite element method accurately predict the effect of grain size on the transition in deformation mechanisms.

  2. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the linear and nonlinear impulse responses from a magnetoplasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grody, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear responses of a magnetoplasma resulting from inhomogeneity in the background plasma density are studied. The plasma response to an impulse electric field was measured and the results are compared with the theory of an inhomogeneous cold plasma. Impulse responses were recorded for the different plasma densities, static magnetic fields, and neutral pressures and generally appeared as modulated, damped oscillations. The frequency spectra of the waveforms consisted of two separated resonance peaks. For weak excitation, the results correlate with the linear theory of a cold, inhomogeneous, cylindrical magnetoplasma. The damping mechanism is identified with that of phase mixing due to inhomogeneity in plasma density. With increasing excitation voltage, the nonlinear impulse responses display stronger damping and a small increase in the frequency of oscillation.

  3. Non-Linear Concentration-Response Relationships between Ambient Ozone and Daily Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sanghyuk; Lim, Youn-Hee; Kashima, Saori; Yorifuji, Takashi; Honda, Yasushi; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambient ozone (O3) concentration has been reported to be significantly associated with mortality. However, linearity of the relationships and the presence of a threshold has been controversial. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine the concentration-response relationship and threshold of the association between ambient O3 concentration and non-accidental mortality in 13 Japanese and Korean cities from 2000 to 2009. Methods We selected Japanese and Korean cities which have population of over 1 million. We constructed Poisson regression models adjusting daily mean temperature, daily mean PM10, humidity, time trend, season, year, day of the week, holidays and yearly population. The association between O3 concentration and mortality was examined using linear, spline and linear-threshold models. The thresholds were estimated for each city, by constructing linear-threshold models. We also examined the city-combined association using a generalized additive mixed model. Results The mean O3 concentration did not differ greatly between Korea and Japan, which were 26.2 ppb and 24.2 ppb, respectively. Seven out of 13 cities showed better fits for the spline model compared with the linear model, supporting a non-linear relationships between O3 concentration and mortality. All of the 7 cities showed J or U shaped associations suggesting the existence of thresholds. The range of city-specific thresholds was from 11 to 34 ppb. The city-combined analysis also showed a non-linear association with a threshold around 30-40 ppb. Conclusion We have observed non-linear concentration-response relationship with thresholds between daily mean ambient O3 concentration and daily number of non-accidental death in Japanese and Korean cities. PMID:26076447

  4. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  5. Flutter and Forced Response Analyses of Cascades using a Two-Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, O.

    1999-01-01

    Flutter and forced response analyses for a cascade of blades in subsonic and transonic flow is presented. The structural model for each blade is a typical section with bending and torsion degrees of freedom. The unsteady aerodynamic forces due to bending and torsion motions. and due to a vortical gust disturbance are obtained by solving unsteady linearized Euler equations. The unsteady linearized equations are obtained by linearizing the unsteady nonlinear equations about the steady flow. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces include the effect of steady aerodynamic loading due to airfoil shape, thickness and angle of attack. The aeroelastic equations are solved in the frequency domain by coupling the un- steady aerodynamic forces to the aeroelastic solver MISER. The present unsteady aerodynamic solver showed good correlation with published results for both flutter and forced response predictions. Further improvements are required to use the unsteady aerodynamic solver in a design cycle.

  6. Combined myocardial deformation to predict cardiac resynchronization therapy response in nonischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Liang, Zhao-Guang; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Liu, Hui; Chi, Chao; Tian, Yan-Feng; Qi, Shu-Han; Wang, Bi-Yu; Han, Wei

    2017-09-01

    20-30% of patients do not benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) when the established selection criteria were applied. We hypothesized that a combined assessment of mechanical dyssynchrony, myocardial deformation, and diastolic function would identify patients who would benefit most from CRT. In 36 CRT patients, clinical evaluation and echocardiography were performed before and after CRT. Patients were classified into three subgroups according to their amount of response: echocardiographic responders, clinical responders, and nonresponders. Radial dyssynchrony and left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal, radial, and circumferential peak strain was assessed by speckle-tracking image. Diastolic function was quantified by conventional echocardiography. In addition to left bundle branch block, nonspecific intraventricular conduction disturbance with intraventricular dyssynchrony could also improve LV remodeling. Echocardiographic responders had better global longitudinal strain, global circumferential peak strain, and global radial strain at baseline which significantly increased at 12-month follow-up. An improvement in estimates of LV filling pressure and a decrease in mitral regurgitation and left atrial dimensions were observed only in echocardiographic responders to CRT. Patients with clinical but without echocardiographic response showed a significant improvement in atrioventricular (AV) synchrony and a nonsignificant improvement in other parameters. The nonresponder group did not improve the AV and intraventricular dyssynchrony. CRT could not improve restrictive filling pattern with normal filling time. Overall, those patients with AV and intraventricular dyssynchrony and those with best contractile function and short diastolic filling time of restrictive filling pattern at baseline demonstrated the greatest benefit from CRT. Mechanical dyssynchrony, contractile function, and filling pattern are important determinants of the benefits in CRT.

  7. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  8. Effects of Cyclic and Monotonic Deformations on Nonlinear Ultrasonic Response of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Xiang, Yanxun; Zhao, Peng

    2016-05-01

    The effect of plastic deformations on the nonlinear ultrasonic response in austenite stainless steel was investigated under the tensile, asymmetric cyclic, and symmetric cyclic loadings. Nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurement was performed on the interrupted specimens. Results show that cyclic and monotonic plastic deformations lead to the significantly different acoustic nonlinear response. The increase of dislocation density and martensite transformation causes the increase of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrast, the well-developed cell structures decrease the acoustic nonlinear response. Under the asymmetric cyclic loading condition, the lightly decrease of acoustic nonlinearity is caused by the development of cell structures, while the slight increase of acoustic nonlinearity should be attributed to the increase of martensite transformation. Comparatively, the severe increase of acoustic nonlinearity during the first stage under symmetric cyclic loading is ascribed to the fast generation of dislocation structures and martensite transformation.

  9. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  10. On the Linear Relation between the Mean and the Standard Deviation of a Response Time Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Brown, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the spread of a response time (RT) distribution increases with the mean, the precise nature of this relation remains relatively unexplored. The authors show that in several descriptive RT distributions, the standard deviation increases linearly with the mean. Results from a wide range of tasks from different…

  11. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  12. Enhancement of linear/nonlinear optical responses of molecular vibrations using metal nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morichika, Ikki; Kusa, Fumiya; Takegami, Akinobu; Ashihara, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Plasmonic enhancements of optical near-fields with metal nanostructures offer extensive potential for amplifying lightmatter interactions. We analytically formulate the enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical responses of molecular vibrations through resonant nanoantennas, based on a coupled-dipole model. We apply the formulae to evaluation of signal enhancement factors in the antenna-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy.

  13. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics’ force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities. PMID:27305996

  14. On the Linear Relation between the Mean and the Standard Deviation of a Response Time Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Brown, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the spread of a response time (RT) distribution increases with the mean, the precise nature of this relation remains relatively unexplored. The authors show that in several descriptive RT distributions, the standard deviation increases linearly with the mean. Results from a wide range of tasks from different…

  15. An Application of Linear Covariance Analysis to the Design of Responsive Near-Rendezvous Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    of-freedom simulation. The goal of this thesis is to demonstrate the utility of Linear Covariance analysis to responsive space mission planning. This...of the three degree-of-freedom simulation and Lincov Tools are employed to the space mission and the results are presented.

  16. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-14

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  17. Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert R.; Kim, Jieun; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay; Gollub, Randy L.; Harris, Richard E.; Park, Kyungmo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional MRI, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that region’s functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least five different, regionally-specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (e.g., primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (e.g., posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (e.g., contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: 1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and 2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities in order to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing. PMID:22883925

  18. Linear response theory for annealing of radiation damage in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, Vitaly

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of the radiation/annealing response of MOS ICs is described. Although many experiments have been performed in this field, no comprehensive theory dealing with radiation/annealing response has been proposed. Many attempts have been made to apply linear response theory, but no theoretical foundation has been presented. The linear response theory outlined here is capable of describing a broad area of radiation/annealing response phenomena in MOS ICs, in particular, both simultaneous irradiation and annealing, as well as short- and long-term annealing, including the case when annealing is nearing completion. For the first time, a simple procedure is devised to determine the response function from experimental radiation/annealing data. In addition, this procedure enables us to study the effect of variable temperature and dose rate, effects which are of interest in spaceflight. In the past, the shift in threshold potential due to radiation/annealing has usually been assumed to depend on one variable: the time lapse between an impulse dose and the time of observation. While such a suggestion of uniformity in time is certainly true for a broad range of radiation annealing phenomena, it may not hold for some ranges of the variables of interest (temperature, dose rate, etc.). A response function is projected which is dependent on two variables: the time of observation and the time of the impulse dose. This dependence on two variables allows us to extend the theory to the treatment of a variable dose rate. Finally, the linear theory is generalized to the case in which the response is nonlinear with impulse dose, but is proportional to some impulse function of dose. A method to determine both the impulse and response functions is presented.

  19. Vortex creep and the internal temperature of neutron stars - Linear and nonlinear response to a glitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpar, M. A.; Cheng, K. S.; Pines, D.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of pinned superfluid in neutron stars is determined by the thermal 'creep' of vortices. Vortex creep can respond to changes in the rotation rate of the neutron star crust and provide the observed types of dynamical relaxation following pulsar glitches. It also gives rise to energy dissipation, which determines the thermal evolution of pulsars once the initial heat content has been radiated away. The different possible regimes of vortex creep are explored, and it is shown that the nature of the dynamical response of the pinned superfluid evolves with a pulsar's age. Younger pulsars display a linear regime, where the response is linear in the initial perturbation and is a simple exponential relaxation as a function of time. A nonliner response, with a characteristic nonlinear dependence on the initial perturbation, is responsible for energy dissipation and becomes the predominant mode of response as the pulsar ages. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear regime depends sensitively on the temperature of the neutron star interior. A preliminary review of existing postglitch observations is given within this general evolutionary framework.

  20. Vortex creep and the internal temperature of neutron stars - Linear and nonlinear response to a glitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpar, M. A.; Cheng, K. S.; Pines, D.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of pinned superfluid in neutron stars is determined by the thermal 'creep' of vortices. Vortex creep can respond to changes in the rotation rate of the neutron star crust and provide the observed types of dynamical relaxation following pulsar glitches. It also gives rise to energy dissipation, which determines the thermal evolution of pulsars once the initial heat content has been radiated away. The different possible regimes of vortex creep are explored, and it is shown that the nature of the dynamical response of the pinned superfluid evolves with a pulsar's age. Younger pulsars display a linear regime, where the response is linear in the initial perturbation and is a simple exponential relaxation as a function of time. A nonliner response, with a characteristic nonlinear dependence on the initial perturbation, is responsible for energy dissipation and becomes the predominant mode of response as the pulsar ages. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear regime depends sensitively on the temperature of the neutron star interior. A preliminary review of existing postglitch observations is given within this general evolutionary framework.

  1. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  2. Calculation of static and dynamic linear magnetic response in approximate time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-14

    We report implementations and results of time-dependent density functional calculations (i) of the frequency-dependent magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability, (ii) of the (observable) translationally invariant linear magnetic response, and (iii) of a linear intensity differential (LID) which includes the dynamic dipole magnetizability. The density functional calculations utilized density fitting. For achieving gauge-origin independence we have employed time-periodic magnetic-field-dependent basis functions as well as the dipole velocity gauge, and have included explicit density-fit related derivatives of the Coulomb potential. We present the results of calculations of static and dynamic magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizabilities for a set of small molecules, the LID for the SF6 molecule, and dispersion curves for M-hexahelicene of the origin invariant linear magnetic response as well as of three dynamic polarizabilities: magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole, electric dipole-electric dipole, and electric dipole-magnetic dipole. We have also performed comparison of the linear magnetic response and magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability over a wide range of frequencies for H2O and SF6.

  3. Application of linear response theory to experimental data of simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the application of linear response theory are compared to experimental data from simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device. In particular, a method is applied which was developed earlier to determine the characteristic time, t(0), as well as the parameters A and C in the 1n(t) dependence of the linear response function R(t) = -C + A1n(1-t/t(0)). The method is based on a study of the linear response for t being much less than t(0), when R(t) can be expanded in a power series of t: R(t) = R(0) + R'(0)t + 1/2R''(0)t-squared + 1/3R'''(0)t-cubed + ..., where R'(0) and R''(0) are, respectively, the first and second derivatives of R with respect to t. To find the linear response, R(t-t') is substituted in the form of this power series equation into a general equation for the shift of the threshold potential. To test the method, irradiation experiments were conducted on RCA 10(6) rad-hard CMOS IC's. A dose rate of approximately 130 rads/min was used. An IC was irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays for several hours, taking measurements of the threshold potential for one n-channel and one p-channel transistor every ten minutes. For the p-channel transistor, t(0) was found to be approximately 110 min and for the n-channel, t(0) was approximately 70 min. For the p-channel, the theoretical curve deviates from the experimental points only after 70 min; for the n-channel, the deviation takes place after 45 min. Additional findings are discussed and the application of the method to pure annealing is described.

  4. The Mexican Ridges Fold Belt, Gulf of Mexico: Deformation, Dynamics of Deposition of Growth Strata, and the Delay of Sedimentary Response to Tectonic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbuh Lugo, U. I.; Contreras, J.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation of the Mexican Ridges fold belt (MRFB), western Gulf of Mexico, initiated in the Late Neogene in response to normal faulting along the Quetzalcoatl Extensional System offshore Veracruz. Previous authors analyzed stacking patterns of growth strata concluding deformation occurred in two stages: the western section of the fold belt developed during the Upper Miocene whereas the eastern part became active during the Lower Pliocene. Here we analyze a regional seismic line to determine whether deformation migrated progressively eastward. In contrast to previous studies we do not use stacking patterns but excess area. This parameter provides direct information of both linear shortening, and superficial mass transport. We construct excess-area plots for each of the folds comprising the MRFB; from them we estimate the shortening and the degradation path of the seafloor deformed by folding. Moreover, by assuming denudation is in steady state, we are able to differentiate sediments derived locally from sediments transported from distant sources. Results show tectonic transport in the MRFB is 11.8 km; shortening of individual folds ranges 3-16%, with an average strain for the entire MRFB of ~10%; structures grew at a mean uplift rate of 0.2 mm/yr. We estimate the constant of mass diffusivity, which controls the rate of degradation, has a mean value of 0.27 m2/yr. This value is characteristic of rapid, episodic mass movements. Finally, the sedimentation rate is ~0.2 mm/yr. Those parameters, however, are not constant; they decrease toward the deepwater portion of the fold belt. The structures proximal to the continental shelf are rising rapidly and are being degraded more intensely than those in the distal part of the fold belt. Our results reveal that deformation started synchronously throughout the MRFB during the Late Miocene and not in two episodes as previously reported. The reason for the seeming discrepancy is due to the copious sedimentation in the eastern

  5. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  6. Procedure for preventing response strain on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil

    2016-03-01

    An experiment examined the impact of a procedure designed to prevent response or extinction strain occurring on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop (i.e., an RI+ schedule). Rats lever-pressed for food reinforcement on either a RI+ or a random interval (RI) schedule that was matched to the RI+ schedule in terms of reinforcement rate. Two groups of rats responded on an RI+ and two on an RI schedule matched for rate of reinforcement. One group on each schedule also received response-independent food if there had been no response for 60 s, and response-independent food continued to be delivered on an RT-60 schedule until a response was made. Rats on the RI and RI+ obtained similar rates of reinforcement and had similar reinforced inter-response times to one another. On the schedules without response-independent food, rats had similar rates of response to one another. However, while the delivery of response-independent food reduced rates of response on an RI schedule, they enhanced response rates on an RI+ schedule. These results suggest that rats can display sensitivity to the molar aspects of the free-operant contingency, when procedures are implemented to reduce the impact of factors such as extinction-strain.

  7. GENERAL: A Study on Stochastic Resonance in Biased Subdiffusive Smoluchowski Systems within Linear Response Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Juan; Kang, Yan-Mei

    2010-08-01

    The method of matrix continued fraction is used to investigate stochastic resonance (SR) in the biased subdiffusive Smoluchowski system within linear response range. Numerical results of linear dynamic susceptibility and spectral amplification factor are presented and discussed in two-well potential and mono-well potential with different subdiffusion exponents. Following our observation, the introduction of a bias in the potential weakens the SR effect in the subdiffusive system just as in the normal diffusive case. Our observation also discloses that the subdiffusion inhibits the low-frequency SR, but it enhances the high-frequency SR in the biased Smoluchowski system, which should reflect a “flattening" influence of the subdiffusion on the linear susceptibility.

  8. Response linearity of alert monkey non-eye movement vestibular nucleus neurons during sinusoidal yaw rotation.

    PubMed

    Newlands, Shawn D; Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2009-09-01

    Vestibular afferents display linear responses over a range of amplitudes and frequencies, but comparable data for central vestibular neurons are lacking. To examine the effect of stimulus frequency and magnitude on the response sensitivity and linearity of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons, we recorded from the vestibular nuclei in awake rhesus macaques during sinusoidal yaw rotation at frequencies between 0.1 and 2 Hz and between 7.5 and 210 degrees/s peak velocity. The dynamics of the neurons' responses across frequencies, while holding peak velocity constant, was consistent with previous studies. However, as the peak velocity was varied, while holding the frequency constant, neurons demonstrated lower sensitivities with increasing peak velocity, even at the lowest peak velocities tested. With increasing peak velocity, the proportion of neurons that silenced during a portion of the response increased. However, the decrease in sensitivity of these neurons with higher peak velocities of rotation was not due to increased silencing during the inhibitory portion of the cycle. Rather the neurons displayed peak firing rates that did not increase in proportion to head velocity as the peak velocity of rotation increased. These data suggest that, unlike vestibular afferents, the central vestibular neurons without eye movement sensitivity examined in this study do not follow linear systems principles even at low velocities.

  9. Response Linearity of Alert Monkey Non-Eye Movement Vestibular Nucleus Neurons During Sinusoidal Yaw Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Newlands, Shawn D.; Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular afferents display linear responses over a range of amplitudes and frequencies, but comparable data for central vestibular neurons are lacking. To examine the effect of stimulus frequency and magnitude on the response sensitivity and linearity of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons, we recorded from the vestibular nuclei in awake rhesus macaques during sinusoidal yaw rotation at frequencies between 0.1 and 2 Hz and between 7.5 and 210°/s peak velocity. The dynamics of the neurons' responses across frequencies, while holding peak velocity constant, was consistent with previous studies. However, as the peak velocity was varied, while holding the frequency constant, neurons demonstrated lower sensitivities with increasing peak velocity, even at the lowest peak velocities tested. With increasing peak velocity, the proportion of neurons that silenced during a portion of the response increased. However, the decrease in sensitivity of these neurons with higher peak velocities of rotation was not due to increased silencing during the inhibitory portion of the cycle. Rather the neurons displayed peak firing rates that did not increase in proportion to head velocity as the peak velocity of rotation increased. These data suggest that, unlike vestibular afferents, the central vestibular neurons without eye movement sensitivity examined in this study do not follow linear systems principles even at low velocities. PMID:19553479

  10. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  11. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real-time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-01

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations. PACS

  12. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings

    PubMed Central

    Boos, William R.; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a “tipping point.” Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation’s ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  13. Response statistics of rotating shaft with non-linear elastic restoring forces by path integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidai, Oleg; Naess, Arvid; Dimentberg, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Extreme statistics of random vibrations is studied for a Jeffcott rotor under uniaxial white noise excitation. Restoring force is modelled as elastic non-linear; comparison is done with linearized restoring force to see the force non-linearity effect on the response statistics. While for the linear model analytical solutions and stability conditions are available, it is not generally the case for non-linear system except for some special cases. The statistics of non-linear case is studied by applying path integration (PI) method, which is based on the Markov property of the coupled dynamic system. The Jeffcott rotor response statistics can be obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation of the 4D dynamic system. An efficient implementation of PI algorithm is applied, namely fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to simulate dynamic system additive noise. The latter allows significantly reduce computational time, compared to the classical PI. Excitation is modelled as Gaussian white noise, however any kind distributed white noise can be implemented with the same PI technique. Also multidirectional Markov noise can be modelled with PI in the same way as unidirectional. PI is accelerated by using Monte Carlo (MC) estimated joint probability density function (PDF) as initial input. Symmetry of dynamic system was utilized to afford higher mesh resolution. Both internal (rotating) and external damping are included in mechanical model of the rotor. The main advantage of using PI rather than MC is that PI offers high accuracy in the probability distribution tail. The latter is of critical importance for e.g. extreme value statistics, system reliability, and first passage probability.

  14. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mg stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.

  15. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; ...

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mgmore » stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.« less

  16. Linear Population Allocation by Bistable Switches in Response to Transient Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Neu, John; Tanouchi, Yu; Lee, Tae Jun; You, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular decision processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and phenotypic switching, are controlled by bistable signaling networks. In response to transient or intermediate input signals, these networks allocate a population fraction to each of two distinct states (e.g. OFF and ON). While extensive studies have been carried out to analyze various bistable networks, they are primarily focused on responses of bistable networks to sustained input signals. In this work, we investigate the response characteristics of bistable networks to transient signals, using both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. We find that bistable systems exhibit a common property: for input signals with short durations, the fraction of switching cells increases linearly with the signal duration, allowing the population to integrate transient signals to tune its response. We propose that this allocation algorithm can be an optimal response strategy for certain cellular decisions in which excessive switching results in lower population fitness. PMID:25141235

  17. The adequate stimulus for avian short latency vestibular responses to linear translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.; Colbert, S.

    1998-01-01

    Transient linear acceleration stimuli have been shown to elicit eighth nerve vestibular compound action potentials in birds and mammals. The present study was undertaken to better define the nature of the adequate stimulus for neurons generating the response in the chicken (Gallus domesticus). In particular, the study evaluated the question of whether the neurons studied are most sensitive to the maximum level of linear acceleration achieved or to the rate of change in acceleration (da/dt, or jerk). To do this, vestibular response thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus onset slope. Traditional computer signal averaging was used to record responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli. Stimulus onset slope was systematically varied. Acceleration thresholds decreased with increasing stimulus onset slope (decreasing stimulus rise time). When stimuli were expressed in units of jerk (g/ms), thresholds were virtually constant for all stimulus rise times. Moreover, stimuli having identical jerk magnitudes but widely varying peak acceleration levels produced virtually identical responses. Vestibular response thresholds, latencies and amplitudes appear to be determined strictly by stimulus jerk magnitudes. Stimulus attributes such as peak acceleration or rise time alone do not provide sufficient information to predict response parameter quantities. Indeed, the major response parameters were shown to be virtually independent of peak acceleration levels or rise time when these stimulus features were isolated and considered separately. It is concluded that the neurons generating short latency vestibular evoked potentials do so as "jerk encoders" in the chicken. Primary afferents classified as "irregular", and which traditionally fall into the broad category of "dynamic" or "phasic" neurons, would seem to be the most likely candidates for the neural generators of short latency vestibular compound action potentials.

  18. The adequate stimulus for avian short latency vestibular responses to linear translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.; Colbert, S.

    1998-01-01

    Transient linear acceleration stimuli have been shown to elicit eighth nerve vestibular compound action potentials in birds and mammals. The present study was undertaken to better define the nature of the adequate stimulus for neurons generating the response in the chicken (Gallus domesticus). In particular, the study evaluated the question of whether the neurons studied are most sensitive to the maximum level of linear acceleration achieved or to the rate of change in acceleration (da/dt, or jerk). To do this, vestibular response thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus onset slope. Traditional computer signal averaging was used to record responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli. Stimulus onset slope was systematically varied. Acceleration thresholds decreased with increasing stimulus onset slope (decreasing stimulus rise time). When stimuli were expressed in units of jerk (g/ms), thresholds were virtually constant for all stimulus rise times. Moreover, stimuli having identical jerk magnitudes but widely varying peak acceleration levels produced virtually identical responses. Vestibular response thresholds, latencies and amplitudes appear to be determined strictly by stimulus jerk magnitudes. Stimulus attributes such as peak acceleration or rise time alone do not provide sufficient information to predict response parameter quantities. Indeed, the major response parameters were shown to be virtually independent of peak acceleration levels or rise time when these stimulus features were isolated and considered separately. It is concluded that the neurons generating short latency vestibular evoked potentials do so as "jerk encoders" in the chicken. Primary afferents classified as "irregular", and which traditionally fall into the broad category of "dynamic" or "phasic" neurons, would seem to be the most likely candidates for the neural generators of short latency vestibular compound action potentials.

  19. Nonrigid, Resistive Linear Plasma Response Models Based on Perturbed Equilibria for Axisymmetric Tokamak Control Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Leuer, J. A.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.

    2003-10-01

    Linear, perturbed equilibrium plasma response models can accurately represent the experimental response of tokamak plasmas to applied fields [A. Coutlis, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 663 (1999)]. However, agreement between experiment and model is much better when average flux over the plasma, rather than at each fluid element, is conserved [P. Vyas, et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 1043 (1998)]. The close experimental agreement of average flux-conserving models is consistent with approximating field penetration effects produced by finite plasma resistivity, particularly in the edge region. We report on the development of nonrigid linear plasma response models which include finite local plasma resistivity in order to more accurately represent the dynamic response due to this field penetration. Such response models are expected to be important for designing profile control algorithms in advanced tokamaks. Accounting for finite plasma resistivity is also important in designing multivariable integrated controllers which must simultaneously regulate plasma shape and plasma current. Consequences of including resisitivity will be illustrated and comparisons with DIII-D experimental plasma responses will be made.

  20. Linear and nonlinear response of the Vlasov system with nonintegrable Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun

    2017-07-01

    Linear and nonlinear response formulas taking into account all Casimir invariants are derived without use of angle-action variables of a single-particle (mean-field) Hamiltonian. This article deals mainly with the Vlasov system in a spatially inhomogeneous quasistationary state whose associating single-particle Hamiltonian is not integrable and has only one integral of the motion, the Hamiltonian itself. The basic strategy is to restrict the form of perturbation so that it keeps Casimir invariants within a linear order, and the single particle's probabilistic density function is smooth with respect to the single particle's Hamiltonian. The theory is applied for a spatially two-dimensional system and is confirmed by numerical simulations. A nonlinear response formula is also derived in a similar manner.

  1. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature, and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Giomi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Large collections of autonomously moving agents, such as animals or micro-organisms, are able to flock coherently in space even in the absence of a central control mechanism. While the direction of the flock resulting from this critical behavior is random, this can be controlled by a small subset of informed individuals acting as leaders of the group. In this article we use the Vicsek model to investigate how flocks respond to leadership and make decisions. Using a combination of numerical simulations and continuous modeling we demonstrate that flocks display a linear response to leadership that can be cast in the framework of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, identifying an effective temperature reflecting how promptly the flock reacts to the initiative of the leaders. The linear response to leadership also holds in the presence of two groups of informed individuals with competing interests, indicating that the flock's behavioral decision is determined by both the number of leaders and their degree of influence.

  2. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel; Giomi, Luca

    The Vicsek model is the prototypical system for studying collective behavior of interacting self propelled particles (SPPs). It has formed the basis for models explaining the collective behavior of many active systems including flocks of birds and swarms of insects. To the standard Vicsek model we introduce a small angular torque to a subset of the particles and observe how this effects the direction of polarisation of the entire swarm. This is analogous to a few informed birds trying to lead the rest of a large flock by initiating a turn. We find a linear response to this perturbation and fluctuations that are in agreement with fluctuation dissipation theorem. This allows the identification of an effective temperature for the Vicsek model that follows a power law with the noise amplitude. The linear response can also be extended to the process of decision-making, wherein flocks must decide between the behaviors of two competing subgroups of individuals.

  3. Laser speckle strain and deformation sensor using linear array image cross-correlation method for specifically arranged triple-beam triple-camera configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafzadeh-Khoee, Adel K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of triple-beam and triple-sensor in a laser speckle strain/deformation measurement system. The triple-beam/triple-camera configuration combined with sequential timing of laser beam shutters is capable of providing indications of surface strain and structure deformations. The strain and deformation quantities, the four variables of surface strain, in-plane displacement, out-of-plane displacement and tilt, are determined in closed form solutions.

  4. Nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchod, Basile; Penfold, Thomas; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2013-09-01

    We review our recent work on ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics, based on linear-response timedependent density functional theory for the calculation of the nuclear forces, potential energy surfaces, and nonadiabatic couplings. Furthermore, we describe how nuclear quantum dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation can be performed using quantum trajectories. Finally, the coupling and control of an external electromagnetic field with mixed quantum/classical trajectory surface hopping is discussed.

  5. Challenges within the linear response approximation when studying enzyme catalysis and effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Varatharaj, Rajapandian; Shurki, Avital

    2015-01-13

    Various aspects of the linear response approximation (LRA) approach were examined when calculating reaction barriers within an enzyme and its different mutants. Scaling the electrostatic interactions is shown to slightly affect the absolute values of the barriers but not the overall trend when comparing wild-type and mutants. Convergence of the overall energetics was shown to depend on the sampling. Finally, the contribution of particular residues was shown to be significant, despite its small value.

  6. Numerical calculations of the linear response of a gaseous disk to a protoplanet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Pollack, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the linear response of a 2D gaseous disk to the perturbations induced by a protoplanet and the corresponding torque are presented. When the pressure gradient is taken into account, torques are increased in disks with gradients in either surface density and sound speed, the effect of the latter being much greater for the same-sized gradient as measured by the power law index. The torques in turn may be used to calculate timescales for orbital migration of protoplanets.

  7. Excited states with internally contracted multireference coupled-cluster linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis; Hanauer, Matthias; Köhn, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the linear response (LR) theory for the variant of internally contracted multireference coupled cluster (ic-MRCC) theory described by Hanauer and Köhn [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204211 (2011)] has been formulated and implemented for the computation of the excitation energies relative to a ground state of pronounced multireference character. We find that straightforward application of the linear-response formalism to the time-averaged ic-MRCC Lagrangian leads to unphysical second-order poles. However, the coupling matrix elements that cause this behavior are shown to be negligible whenever the internally contracted approximation as such is justified. Hence, for the numerical implementation of the method, we adopt a Tamm-Dancoff-type approximation and neglect these couplings. This approximation is also consistent with an equation-of-motion based derivation, which neglects these couplings right from the start. We have implemented the linear-response approach in the ic-MRCC singles-and-doubles framework and applied our method to calculate excitation energies for a number of molecules ranging from CH2 to p-benzyne and conjugated polyenes (up to octatetraene). The computed excitation energies are found to be very accurate, even for the notoriously difficult case of doubly excited states. The ic-MRCC-LR theory is also applicable to systems with open-shell ground-state wavefunctions and is by construction not biased towards a particular reference determinant. We have also compared the linear-response approach to the computation of energy differences by direct state-specific ic-MRCC calculations. We finally compare to Mk-MRCC-LR theory for which spurious roots have been reported [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044116 (2012)], being due to the use of sufficiency conditions to solve the Mk-MRCC equations. No such problem is present in ic-MRCC-LR theory.

  8. Excited states with internally contracted multireference coupled-cluster linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis; Hanauer, Matthias; Köhn, Andreas

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, the linear response (LR) theory for the variant of internally contracted multireference coupled cluster (ic-MRCC) theory described by Hanauer and Köhn [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204211 (2011)] has been formulated and implemented for the computation of the excitation energies relative to a ground state of pronounced multireference character. We find that straightforward application of the linear-response formalism to the time-averaged ic-MRCC Lagrangian leads to unphysical second-order poles. However, the coupling matrix elements that cause this behavior are shown to be negligible whenever the internally contracted approximation as such is justified. Hence, for the numerical implementation of the method, we adopt a Tamm-Dancoff-type approximation and neglect these couplings. This approximation is also consistent with an equation-of-motion based derivation, which neglects these couplings right from the start. We have implemented the linear-response approach in the ic-MRCC singles-and-doubles framework and applied our method to calculate excitation energies for a number of molecules ranging from CH2 to p-benzyne and conjugated polyenes (up to octatetraene). The computed excitation energies are found to be very accurate, even for the notoriously difficult case of doubly excited states. The ic-MRCC-LR theory is also applicable to systems with open-shell ground-state wavefunctions and is by construction not biased towards a particular reference determinant. We have also compared the linear-response approach to the computation of energy differences by direct state-specific ic-MRCC calculations. We finally compare to Mk-MRCC-LR theory for which spurious roots have been reported [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044116 (2012)], being due to the use of sufficiency conditions to solve the Mk-MRCC equations. No such problem is present in ic-MRCC-LR theory.

  9. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.230602]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics.

  10. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011)]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics.

  11. Linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica: annealing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Morgan, S. H.; Henderson, D. O.; Park, S. Y.; Weeks, R. A.; Magruder, R. H.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1995-10-01

    We report the linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica with doses of 6 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. The nonlinear refractive index, n2, was measured using a Z-scan technique with a mode locked Ti:sapphire laser operating in 140 fs pulse duration at 770 nm wavelength. It is found that the nonlinear refractive index n2 of as-implanted samples is large, in the order of 10 -10 cm 2/W and the n2 value of Bi as-implanted sample is about 2.4 times lager than that of Sb as-implanted sample. The large n2 response is attributed to the presence of nanosized metal particles in the implanted layer observed by transmission electron microscopy. We also report the changes of linear and nonlinear optical response when implanted samples were subsequently annealed at temperatures from 500 to 1000 C in argon and oxygen atmospheres. The annealing effect on optical properties is found to be strongly dependent on the annealing atmospheres. Our results indicate that annealing treatment in O 2 affects the local environment of the implanted metal ions and hence the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the metal-dielectric composite. We suggest that a new phase of metal-oxygen-silicate was formed during annealing in O 2 atmosphere.

  12. The sense of balance in humans: Structural features of otoconia and their response to linear acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kniep, Rüdiger; Zahn, Dirk; Wulfes, Jana; Walther, Leif Erik

    2017-01-01

    We explored the functional role of individual otoconia within the otolith system of mammalians responsible for the detection of linear accelerations and head tilts in relation to the gravity vector. Details of the inner structure and the shape of intact human and artificial otoconia were studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), including decalcification by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to discriminate local calcium carbonate density. Considerable differences between the rhombohedral faces of human and artificial otoconia already indicate that the inner architecture of otoconia is not consistent with the point group -3m. This is clearly confirmed by decalcified otoconia specimen which are characterized by a non-centrosymmetric volume distribution of the compact 3+3 branches. This structural evidence for asymmetric mass distribution was further supported by light microscopy in combination with a high speed camera showing the movement of single otoconia specimen (artificial specimen) under gravitational influence within a viscous medium (artificial endolymph). Moreover, the response of otoconia to linear acceleration forces was investigated by particle dynamics simulations. Both, time-resolved microscopy and computer simulations of otoconia acceleration show that the dislocation of otoconia include significant rotational movement stemming from density asymmetry. Based on these findings, we suggest an otolith membrane expansion/stiffening mechanism for enhanced response to linear acceleration transmitted to the vestibular hair cells.

  13. A NOVEL STATISTICAL BASED APPROACH TO NON-LINEAR MODEL UPDATING USING RESPONSE FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    J. SCHULTZ; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    This research presents a new method to improve analytical model fidelity for non-linear systems. The approach investigates several mechanisms to assist the analyst in updating an analytical model based on experimental data and statistical analysis of parameter effects. The first is a new approach at data reduction called feature extraction. This is an expansion of the ''classic'' update metrics to include specific phenomena or characters of the response that are critical to model application. This is an extension of the familiar linear updating paradigm of utilizing the eigen-parameters or frequency response functions (FRFs) to include such devices as peak acceleration, time of arrival or standard deviation of model error. The next expansion of the updating process is the inclusion of statistical based parameter analysis to quantify the effects of uncertain or significant effect parameters in the construction of a meta-model. This provides indicators of the statistical variation associated with parameters as well as confidence intervals on the coefficients of the resulting meta-model. Also included in this method is the investigation of linear parameter effect screening using a partial factorial variable array for simulation. This is intended to aid the analyst in eliminating from the investigation the parameters that do not have a significant variation effect on the feature metric. Finally an investigation of the model to replicate the measured response variation is examined.

  14. Development of a linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis for cascade gust response predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    A method for predicting the unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gust excitations is being developed. Here, the unsteady flow is regarded as a small perturbation of a nonuniform isentropic and irrotational steady background flow. A splitting technique is used to decompose the linearized unsteady velocity into rotational and irrotational parts leading to equations for the complex amplitudes of the linearized unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and velocity potential that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations are described by transport equations for which closed-form solutions in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions can be determined. The potential fluctuation is described by an inhomogeneous convected wave equation in which the source term depends on the rotational velocity field, and is determined using finite-difference procedures. The analytical and numerical techniques used to determine the linearized unsteady flow are outlined. Results are presented to indicate the status of the solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described herein leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamic response phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  15. Linear Crop Response Functions to Soil Salinity With a Threshold Salinity Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, E.; Yaron, D.; Bielorai, H.

    1982-02-01

    The response function of a crop yield to soil salinity level is essential in decision-making in regard to irrigation with saline water. A switching regression approach to estimate the piecewise linear response function with critical threshold level is presented, and the asymptotical stochastic properties of the estimates are described. The empirical estimates, based on grapefruit yield data, are compared with those of a recent published study by Maas and Hoffman (1977) and the statistical significance of the differences is discussed. Finally, the threshold hypothesis is tested empirically against some alternative formulations. It turns out that the `threshold hypothesis' is confirmed.

  16. Computed Linear/Nonlinear Acoustic Response of a Cascade for Single/Multi Frequency Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Hixon, R.; Sawyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines mode generation and propagation characteristics of a 2-D cascade due to incident vortical disturbances using a time domain approach. Full nonlinear Euler equations are solved employing high order accurate spatial differencing and time marching techniques. The solutions show the generation and propagation of mode orders that are expected from theory. Single frequency excitations show linear response over a wide range of amplitudes. The response for multi-frequency excitations tend to become nonlinear due to interaction between frequencies and self interaction.

  17. Poroelastic Response to the 2012 Costa Rica Earthquake and the Effects on Geodetic Surface Deformation and Groundwater Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, K. A.; Hesse, M.

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing and geodetic measurements are providing a new wealth of spatially distributed, time-series data that have the ability to improve our understanding of co-seismic rupture and post-seismic processes in subduction zones. Following a large earthquake, large-scale deformation is influenced by a myriad of post-seismic processes occurring on different spatial and temporal scales. These include continued slip on the fault plane (after-slip), a poroelastic response due to the movement of over-pressurized groundwater and viscoelastic relaxation of the underlying mantle. Often, the only means of observing these phenomena are through surface deformation measurements - either GPS or InSAR. Such tools measure the combined result of all these processes, which makes studying the effects of any single process difficult. For the 2012 Mw 7.6 Costa Rica Earthquake, we formulate a Bayesian inverse problem to infer the slip distribution on the plate interface using an elastic finite element model and GPS surface deformation measurements. From this study we identify a horseshoe-shaped rupture area surrounding a locked patch that is likely to release stress in the future. The results of our inversion are then used as an initial condition in a coupled poroelastic forward model to investigate the role of poroelastic effects on post-seismic deformation and stress transfer. We model the co-seismic pore pressure change as well as the pressure evolution and resulting deformation in the months after the earthquake. The surface permeability field is constrained by pump-test data from 526 groundwater wells throughout the study area. The results of the forward model indicate that earthquake-induced pore pressure changes dissipate quickly in most areas near the surface, resulting in relaxation of the surface in the seven to twenty days following the earthquake. Near the subducting slab interface, pore pressure changes can be an order of magnitude larger and may persist for many months

  18. Dynamic response analysis of linear stochastic truss structures under stationary random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Cui, Mingtao; Cheng, Yi

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for the dynamic response analysis of linear stochastic truss structures under stationary random excitation. Considering the randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions, the computational expressions of the mean value, variance and variation coefficient of the mean square value of the structural displacement and stress response under the stationary random excitation are developed by means of the random variable's functional moment method and the algebra synthesis method from the expressions of structural stationary random response of the frequency domain. The influences of the randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions on the randomness of the mean square value of the structural displacement and stress response are inspected by the engineering examples.

  19. Research the dynamical characteristics of slow deformation waves as a rock massif response to explosions during its outworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    As a result of long-term natural geomechanics and geophysical observation data on mines of complex ore rocks, generalization of the non-linear reaction of rock massif to heavy dynamic influences have been established. In addition, pendulum type waves have been observed and the sources of them have been located inside geoblocks of different hierarchic levels (Oparin et al., 2010). At the same time, these waves propagate with wide low (compared with seismic waves) velocity values (Kurlenja et al., 1993; Oparin et al., 2006). Research into the massif state with the use of the dynamic systems theory approach (Naimark et al., 2009; Chulichkov, 2003; Hachay et al., 2010) has been developed to ascertain the criteria of dissipative regimes changing for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. To realize such research we used the data from the seismic record of the Tashtagol mine for the two-year period from June 2006 up to June 2008. We used the space-time coordinates for all dynamic massif event responses, which occurred during that period inside the mine space and for the explosions - values fixed by seismic station energy (Hachay et al., 2010). The phase diagrams of the massif state for the northern and southern parts of the mine space were plotted in coordinates Ev(t) and d(Ev(t))/dt, t - time - in parts of 24 hours, Ev - the dissipated massive seismic energy - in joules. Hachay et al., (2010) analysed the morphology of seismic response phase trajectories on the explosion influences during different serial intervals in the southern part of the mine. In that period, according to data for different explosions in the mine, the majority of the total energy had been injected into the southern part of the mine. Moreover, at the end of 2007, just in the southern part, the strongest rock burst during the whole history of the working mine happened. We developed a new processing method of seismological information in real, which we can use directly in the

  20. Continuous deflation and plate spreading at the Askja volcanic system, Iceland: Constrains on deformation processes from finite element models using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, Vincent Jean Paul B.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is located on the mid Atlantic ridge, where the spreading rate is nearly 2 cm/yr. The high rate of magmatism in Iceland is caused by the interaction between the Iceland hotspot and the divergent mid-Atlantic plate boundary. Iceland hosts about 35 volcanoes or volcanic systems that are active. Most of these are aliened along the plate boundary. The best studied magma chamber of central volcanoes (e.g., Askja, Krafla, Grimsvötn, Katla) have verified (suggested) a shallow magma chamber (< 5 km), which has been model successfully with a Mogi source, using elastic and/or elastic-viscoelastic half-space. Maxwell and Newtonian viscosity is mainly considered for viscoelastic half-space. Therefore, rheology may be oversimplified. Our attempt is to study deformation of the Askja volcano together with plate spreading in Iceland using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology. It offers continuous variation of rheology, laterally and vertically from rift axis and surface. To implement it, we consider thermo-mechanic coupling models where rheology follows dislocation flow in dry condition based on a temperature distribution. Continuous deflation of the Askja volcanic system is associated with solidification of magma in the magma chamber and post eruption relaxation. A long time series of levelling data show its subsidence trend to exponentially. In our preliminary models, a magma chamber at 2.8 km depth with 0.5 km radius is introduced at the ridge axis as a Mogi source. Simultaneously far field of rift axis stretching by 18.4 mm/yr (measured during 2007 to 20013) is applied to reproduce plate spreading. Predicted surface deformation caused of combined effect of tectonic-volcanic activities is evaluated with GPS during 2003-2009 and RADARSAT InSAR data during 2000 to 2010. During 2003-2009, data from the GPS site OLAF (close to the centre of subsidence) shows average rate of subsidence 19±1 mm/yr relative to the ITRF2005 reference frame. The MASK (Mid ASKJA) site is

  1. Load response of the medial longitudinal arch in patients with flatfoot deformity: in vivo 3D study

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Masamitsu; Ikoma, Kazuya; Imai, Kan; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Inoue, Nozomu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Background The acquisition of flatfoot by an adult is thought to primarily be caused by posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, although some other causes, such as congenital flexible flatfoot or an accessory navicular, may also be responsible. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bone rotation of each joint in the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) and compare the response in healthy feet with that in flat feet by analyzing the reconstructive three-dimensional (3D) CT image data during weightbearing. Methods CT scans of 20 healthy feet and 24 feet with flatfoot deformity were taken in non-load condition followed by full-body weightbearing condition. Images of the tibia and MLA bones (first metatarsal bone, cuneiforms, navicular, talus, and calcaneus) were reconstructed into 3D models. The volume merge method in three planes was used to calculate the bone-to-bone relative rotations. Findings Under loading conditions, the flatfoot dorsiflexed more in the first tarsometatarsal joint, and everted more in the talonavicular and talocalcaneal joints compared with the healthy foot. The total relative rotation was larger in the flatfoot compared with the healthy foot only in the first tarsometatarsal joint. Interpretation Supporting the MLA in the sagittal direction and the subtalar joint in the coronal direction may be useful for treating flatfoot deformity. The first tarsometatarsal joint may play an important role in diagnosing or treating flatfoot deformity. PMID:23643289

  2. Load response of the medial longitudinal arch in patients with flatfoot deformity: in vivo 3D study.

    PubMed

    Kido, Masamitsu; Ikoma, Kazuya; Imai, Kan; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Inoue, Nozomu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2013-06-01

    The acquisition of flatfoot by an adult is thought to primarily be caused by posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, although some other causes, such as congenital flexible flatfoot or an accessory navicular, may also be responsible. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bone rotation of each joint in the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) and compare the response in healthy feet with that in flat feet by analyzing the reconstructive three-dimensional (3D) CT image data during weightbearing. CT scans of 20 healthy feet and 24 feet with flatfoot deformity were taken in non-load condition followed by full-body weightbearing condition. Images of the tibia and MLA bones (first metatarsal bone, cuneiforms, navicular, talus, and calcaneus) were reconstructed into 3D models. The volume merge method in three planes was used to calculate the bone-to-bone relative rotations. Under loading conditions, the flatfoot dorsiflexed more in the first tarsometatarsal joint, and everted more in the talonavicular and talocalcaneal joints compared with the healthy foot. The total relative rotation was larger in the flatfoot compared with the healthy foot only in the first tarsometatarsal joint. Supporting the MLA in the sagittal direction and the subtalar joint in the coronal direction may be useful for treating flatfoot deformity. The first tarsometatarsal joint may play an important role in diagnosing or treating flatfoot deformity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tensile Deformation and Adiabatic Heating in Post-Yield Response of Polycarbonate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    measurements performed on the specimen during deformation. In this study, American Society for Testing and Materials tensile dog -bone PC specimens were used...adiabatic heat generation to be quantified. 2. Experiments ASTM D638-1018 standard polymer tensile dog -bone specimens were cut out of 5.75-mm-thick PC

  4. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation responses to intermittent and continuous artificial gravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marijke, Grau; Vera, Abeln; Tobias, Vogt; Wilhelm, Bloch; Stefan, Schneider

    2017-02-01

    Artificial gravity protocols are used to improve g-tolerance of aviators and discussed as countermeasure during prolonged space flight. Little is known about the impact of artificial gravity on the red blood cells (RBC). The purpose of the study was to test how artificial gravity affects RBC deformability and aggregation, which are important determinants of microcirculation. Nine male subjects were exposed to two hypergravity protocols using a short arm human centrifuge: a continuous (CONT) protocol with constant +2 Gz for 30 min and an intermittent (INTER) protocol with repeated intervals of +2 Gz and rest. Blood was sampled pre and post interventions to measure basal blood parameters, RBC nitrite, RBC deformability, aggregation, and to determine the shear rate balancing aggregation and disaggregation (γ at dIsc min). To test for orthostasis effects, five male subjects were asked to stay for 46 min, corresponding to the length of the centrifuge protocols, with blood sampling pre and post intervention. Artificial gravity programs did not affect basal blood parameters or RBC nitrite levels; a marker for RBC deformability influencing nitric oxide. The INTER program did not affect any of the tested parameters. The CONT program did not remarkably affect RBC deformability or γ at dIsc min but significantly aggravated aggregation. Orthostasis effects were thus excluded. The results indicate that continuous artificial gravity, especially with higher g-forces applied, may negatively affect the RBC system and that for a prolonged space flight intermittent but not continuous artificial gravity might represent an appropriate countermeasure.

  5. The response of single crystal and polycrystal nickel to quasistatic and shock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.; Gray, G.T. III

    1989-01-01

    Stress-strain measurements and TEM observations in shock-deformed nickel single and polycrystalline samples are reported. When the stress measurements are normalized by the appropriate Taylor factor, the shock induced strain hardening is shown to be similar in all materials studied. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. A Generalized Linear Model for Estimating Spectrotemporal Receptive Fields from Responses to Natural Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Ana; Schumacher, Joseph W.; Schneider, David M.; Paninski, Liam; Woolley, Sarah M. N.

    2011-01-01

    In the auditory system, the stimulus-response properties of single neurons are often described in terms of the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF), a linear kernel relating the spectrogram of the sound stimulus to the instantaneous firing rate of the neuron. Several algorithms have been used to estimate STRFs from responses to natural stimuli; these algorithms differ in their functional models, cost functions, and regularization methods. Here, we characterize the stimulus-response function of auditory neurons using a generalized linear model (GLM). In this model, each cell's input is described by: 1) a stimulus filter (STRF); and 2) a post-spike filter, which captures dependencies on the neuron's spiking history. The output of the model is given by a series of spike trains rather than instantaneous firing rate, allowing the prediction of spike train responses to novel stimuli. We fit the model by maximum penalized likelihood to the spiking activity of zebra finch auditory midbrain neurons in response to conspecific vocalizations (songs) and modulation limited (ml) noise. We compare this model to normalized reverse correlation (NRC), the traditional method for STRF estimation, in terms of predictive power and the basic tuning properties of the estimated STRFs. We find that a GLM with a sparse prior predicts novel responses to both stimulus classes significantly better than NRC. Importantly, we find that STRFs from the two models derived from the same responses can differ substantially and that GLM STRFs are more consistent between stimulus classes than NRC STRFs. These results suggest that a GLM with a sparse prior provides a more accurate characterization of spectrotemporal tuning than does the NRC method when responses to complex sounds are studied in these neurons. PMID:21264310

  7. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  8. Properties of a novel linear sulfur response mode in a multiple flame photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-01-24

    A new linear sulfur response mode was established in the multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) by monitoring HSO* emission in the red spectral region above 600nm. Optimal conditions for this mode were found by using a 750nm interference filter and oxygen flows to the worker flames of this device that were about 10mL/min larger than those used for monitoring quadratic S2* emission. By employing these parameters, this mode provided a linear response over about 4 orders of magnitude, with a detection limit near 5.8×10(-11)gS/s and a selectivity of sulfur over carbon of about 3.5×10(3). Specifically, the minimum detectable masses for 10 different sulfur analytes investigated ranged from 0.4 to 3.6ng for peak half-widths spanning 4-6s. The response toward ten different sulfur compounds was examined and produced an average reproducibility of 1.7% RSD (n=10) and an average equimolarity value of 1.0±0.1. In contrast to this, a conventional single flame S2* mode comparatively yielded respective values of 6.7% RSD (n=10) and 1.1±0.4. HSO* emission in the mFPD was also found to be relatively much less affected by response quenching due to hydrocarbons compared to a conventional single flame S2* emission mode. Results indicate that this new alternative linear mFPD response mode could be beneficial for sulfur monitoring applications.

  9. Non-linear resonances in the forced responses of plates. I - Symmetric responses of circular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamic analogue of the von Karman equations is used to study the symmetric response of a circular plate to a harmonic excitation when the frequency of the excitation is near one of the natural frequencies. It is shown that, in general, when there is no internal resonance (i.e., the natural frequencies are not commensurable), only the mode having a frequency near that of the excitation is strongly excited (i.e., is needed to represent the response in the first approximation). A clamped, circular plate is used as a numerical example to show that, when there is an internal resonance, more than one of the modes involved in this resonance can be strongly excited; moreover, when more than one mode is strongly excited, the lower modes can dominate the response, even when the frequency of the excitation is near that of the highest mode. This possibility was not revealed by any of the earlier studies which were based on the same governing equations.

  10. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  11. Linearized formulation for fluid-structure interaction: Application to the linear dynamic response of a pressurized elastic structure containing a fluid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotté, J.-S.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-05-01

    To control the linear vibrations of structures partially filled with liquids is of prime importance in various industries such as aerospace, naval, civil and nuclear engineering. It is proposed here to investigate a linearized formulation adapted to a rational computation of the vibrations of such coupled systems. Its particularity is to be fully Lagrangian since it considers the fluid displacement field with respect to a static equilibrium configuration as the natural variable describing the fluid motion, as classically done in structural dynamics. As the coupled system considered here is weakly damped in the low frequency domain (low modal density), the analysis of the vibrations of the associated undamped conservative system constitutes the main objective of this paper. One originality of the present formulation is to take into account the effect of the pressurization of the tank on the dynamics of the system, particularly in the case of a compressible liquid. We propose here a new way of deriving the linearized equations of the coupled problem involving a deformable structure and an inner inviscid liquid with a free surface. A review of the classical case considering a heavy incompressible liquid is followed by an application to the new case involving a light compressible liquid. A solution procedure in the frequency domain is proposed and a numerical discretization using the finite element method is discussed. In order to reduce the computational costs, an appropriate reduced order matrix model using modal synthesis approach is also presented.

  12. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  13. Discrete-time linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses for efficient CFD analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Walter Arturo

    This dissertation discusses the mathematical existence and the numerical identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This will establish the aerodynamic discrete-time impulse response function as the most fundamental and computationally efficient aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this dissertation help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. Nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses are identified using the Volterra theory of nonlinear systems. The theory is described and a discrete-time kernel identification technique is presented. The kernel identification technique is applied to a simple nonlinear circuit for illustrative purposes. The method is then applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example of an application to a simple CFD model. Finally, the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear

  14. Relevance of sampling schemes in light of Ruelle's linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Kuna, Tobias; Wouters, Jeroen; Faranda, Davide

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the theory of the linear response of non-equilibrium steady states to perturbations. We first show that using a general functional decomposition for space-time dependent forcings, we can define elementary susceptibilities that allow us to construct the linear response of the system to general perturbations. Starting from the definition of SRB measure, we then study the consequence of taking different sampling schemes for analysing the response of the system. We show that only a specific choice of the time horizon for evaluating the response of the system to a general time-dependent perturbation allows us to obtain the formula first presented by Ruelle. We also discuss the special case of periodic perturbations, showing that when they are taken into consideration the sampling can be fine-tuned to make the definition of the correct time horizon immaterial. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results in terms of strategies for analysing the outputs of numerical experiments by providing a critical review of a formula proposed by Reick.

  15. Non-Markovian linear response theory for quantum open systems and its applications.

    PubMed

    Shen, H Z; Li, D X; Yi, X X

    2017-01-01

    The Kubo formula is an equation that expresses the linear response of an observable due to a time-dependent perturbation. It has been extended from closed systems to open systems in recent years under the Markovian approximation, but is barely explored for open systems in non-Markovian regimes. In this paper, we derive a formula for the linear response of an open system to a time-independent external field. This response formula is available for both Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics depending on parameters in the spectral density of the environment. As an illustration of the theory, the Hall conductance of a two-band system subjected to environments is derived and discussed. With the tight-binding model, we point out the Hall conductance changes from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics by modulating the spectral density of the environment. Our results suggest a way to the controlling of the system response, which has potential applications for quantum statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics.

  16. Non-Markovian linear response theory for quantum open systems and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. Z.; Li, D. X.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-01-01

    The Kubo formula is an equation that expresses the linear response of an observable due to a time-dependent perturbation. It has been extended from closed systems to open systems in recent years under the Markovian approximation, but is barely explored for open systems in non-Markovian regimes. In this paper, we derive a formula for the linear response of an open system to a time-independent external field. This response formula is available for both Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics depending on parameters in the spectral density of the environment. As an illustration of the theory, the Hall conductance of a two-band system subjected to environments is derived and discussed. With the tight-binding model, we point out the Hall conductance changes from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics by modulating the spectral density of the environment. Our results suggest a way to the controlling of the system response, which has potential applications for quantum statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics.

  17. Titanium dioxide nanoparticle based optical fiber humidity sensor with linear response and enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Aneesh, R; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2012-04-20

    An optical fiber humidity sensor employing an in-house scaled TiO2-nanoparticle doped nanostructured thin film as the fiber sensing cladding and evanescent wave absorption is reported. The main objective of the present work is to achieve a throughout-linear sensor response with high sensitivity, possibly over a wide dynamic range using the simplest possible sensor geometry. In order to realize this, first, the nanostructured sensing film is synthesized over a short length of a centrally decladded straight and uniform optical fiber and then a comprehensive experimental investigation is carried out to optimize the design configuration/parameters of the nanostructured sensing film and to achieve the best possible sensor response. Much improved sensitivity of 27.1 mV/%RH is observed for the optimized sensor along with a throughout-linear sensor response over a dynamic range as wide as 24% to 95%RH with an average response time of 0.01 s for humidification and 0.06 s for desiccation. In addition, the sensor exhibits a very good degree of reversibility and repeatability.

  18. Deformation response of paired donor corneas to an air puff: intact whole globe versus mounted corneoscleral rim.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Kimberly M; Mahmoud, Ashraf M; Liu, Jun; Roberts, Cynthia J

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of ocular shell biomechanical characteristics on corneal deformation response to an air puff. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. Experimental study. Twenty-four eyes of 12 human donors were obtained in matched pairs. One eye was secured in a purpose-designed whole globe mount (whole-globe group). The cornea from the fellow eye was placed in a Barron artificial anterior chamber (artificial-chamber group). The corneas were mounted sequentially and connected to a pressure-control system. Deformation data were acquired using the Corvis ST, a dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer. Internal pressure was set to 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mm Hg; at least 4 examinations were performed at each pressure. Statistically significantly higher maximum deformation amplitude was observed in the whole-globe group than in the artificial-chamber group at all pressures. The mean amplitude differences were 1.006 mm ± 0.238 [SD], 0.614 ± 0.137 mm, 0.384 ± 0.099 mm, 0.229 ± 0.087 mm, and 0.133 ± 0.068 mm at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mm Hg, respectively (P<.0001, P<.0001, P<.0001, P<.0001, and P<.0002, respectively). Nonlinear regression of the deformation amplitude differences between pairs showed a significant decrease with increasing pressure (P<.0001, R(2) = 0.8385). The deformation response to an air puff was affected by the type of mount used, with a stiffer shell producing a stiffer corneal response and decreasing differences at higher internal pressures. In vivo air-puff examinations may be affected by scleral stiffness in addition to the cornea. Dr. Roberts is a consultant to Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH and Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems AG and has received research funding from Carl Zeiss Meditec AG and travel funds from Sooft Italia. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-28

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007)]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  20. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-01

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007), 10.1063/1.2713754]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  1. Investigation of the longitudinal magnetic field effect on dynamic response of viscoelastic graphene sheet based on sinusoidal shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arani, A. Ghorbanpour; Jalaei, M. H.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of a longitudinal magnetic field on the dynamic response of single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) resting on viscoelastic foundation based on the nonlocal sinusoidal shear deformation theory. The present model is capable of capturing both small scale effect and transverse shear deformation effects of nanoplate, and does not require shear correction factors. The material properties of graphene sheet are assumed orthotropic viscoelastic using Kelvin-Voigt model. Utilizing Hamilton's principle governing equations of motion are derived and solved analytically. The parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the magnetic field, structural damping, stiffness and damping coefficient of the foundation, nonlocal parameter, aspect ratio and length to thickness ratio on the dynamic response of the SLGS. Results indicate that the longitudinal magnetic field exerted on the SLGS decreases the amplitude of dynamic response. In addition, it is observed that the magnetic field effect on the dynamic response is more distinguished as the nonlocal parameter increases while by increasing the foundation and structural damping coefficients, this effect diminishes. The results of this study can be used in design and manufacturing of nanomechanical devices in the presence of magnetic field as a parametric controller.

  2. New differential equations governing the response cross-correlations of linear systems subjected to coloured loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsone, G.; Settineri, D.

    2011-06-01

    A procedure for evaluating the response cross-correlation of a linear structural system subjected to the action of stationary random multi-correlated processes is presented in this work. It is based on the definition of the fourth-order differential equation governing the modal response cross-correlation and of the corresponding solution. This is expressed in terms of the corresponding fundamental matrix, whose expression is related to the fundamental matrices of the differential equations governing the modal responses. The properties of this matrix allows to define a particular unconditionally stable numerical integration approach, which is composed of two independent step-by-step procedures, a progressive one and a regressive one. The applications have shown a level of accuracy comparable to that corresponding to the numerical solution of the double convolution integral, but the presented approach is characterised by a reduced computational effort.

  3. Identifying the nonlinear mechanical behaviour of micro-speakers from their quasi-linear electrical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilletti, Michele; Marker, Arthur; Elliott, Stephen John; Holland, Keith

    2017-05-01

    In this study model identification of the nonlinear dynamics of a micro-speaker is carried out by purely electrical measurements, avoiding any explicit vibration measurements. It is shown that a dynamic model of the micro-speaker, which takes into account the nonlinear damping characteristic of the device, can be identified by measuring the response between the voltage input and the current flowing into the coil. An analytical formulation of the quasi-linear model of the micro-speaker is first derived and an optimisation method is then used to identify a polynomial function which describes the mechanical damping behaviour of the micro-speaker. The analytical results of the quasi-linear model are compared with numerical results. This study potentially opens up the possibility of efficiently implementing nonlinear echo cancellers.

  4. Transient response of multidegree-of-freedom linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to analyze the transient response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with unknown time dependence but having known bounds. Particular attention is given to forcing functions which include: (1) maximum displacement of any given mass element, (2) maximum relative displacement of any two adjacent masses, and (3) maximum acceleration of a given mass. Linear mechanical systems with an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom and only one forcing function acting are considered. In the general case, the desired forcing function is found to be a function that switches from the upper-to-lower bound and vice-versa at certain moments of time. A general procedure for finding such switching times is set forth.

  5. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  6. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  7. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  8. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  9. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation responses to intermittent and continuous artificial gravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Marijke, Grau; Vera, Abeln; Tobias, Vogt; Wilhelm, Bloch; Stefan, Schneider

    2017-02-01

    Artificial gravity protocols are used to improve g-tolerance of aviators and discussed as countermeasure during prolonged space flight. Little is known about the impact of artificial gravity on the red blood cells (RBC). The purpose of the study was to test how artificial gravity affects RBC deformability and aggregation, which are important determinants of microcirculation. Nine male subjects were exposed to two hypergravity protocols using a short arm human centrifuge: a continuous (CONT) protocol with constant +2Gz for 30min and an intermittent (INTER) protocol with repeated intervals of +2Gz and rest. Blood was sampled pre and post interventions to measure basal blood parameters, RBC nitrite, RBC deformability, aggregation, and to determine the shear rate balancing aggregation and disaggregation (γ at dIsc min). To test for orthostasis effects, five male subjects were asked to stay for 46min, corresponding to the length of the centrifuge protocols, with blood sampling pre and post intervention. Artificial gravity programs did not affect basal blood parameters or RBC nitrite levels; a marker for RBC deformability influencing nitric oxide. The INTER program did not affect any of the tested parameters. The CONT program did not remarkably affect RBC deformability or γ at dIsc min but significantly aggravated aggregation. Orthostasis effects were thus excluded. The results indicate that continuous artificial gravity, especially with higher g-forces applied, may negatively affect the RBC system and that for a prolonged space flight intermittent but not continuous artificial gravity might represent an appropriate countermeasure. Copyright © 2017 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation spectroscopy based on non-linear response of silver colloids (including SEHRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, G.; Sauer, G.; Fritz, N.; Schneider, S.; Zaitsev, S.

    2005-02-01

    The non-linear response (second harmonic generation, SHG, hyper-Rayleigh scattering, HRS, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, SEHRS, and continuum generation) of two different types of silver colloids is compared by stationary and correlation spectroscopy. Employing a poly-disperse colloid prepared after the protocol of Lee and Meisel we found that the efficiency of all types of non-linear response is greatly enhanced if the colloid is 'activated' by addition of chloride ions. This activation is also necessary to observe SEHRS with both the Lee-Meisel and the mono-disperse colloid prepared by hydrazine reduction. The correlation curves of both types of colloid show one step (τ1/2∼10 ms) which can be associated with lateral diffusion of the individual particles. Its τ1/2-value is larger for the poly-disperse colloid, which contains larger particles. In addition, we find a second step, its relative amplitude being dependent on experimental parameters, whose τ1/2-value is, however, essentially the same for all samples investigated (τ‧1/2∼50 μs). We assign this correlation time to processes that lead to a restructuring of the surface and the formation and destruction of so-called 'hot spots'. Under optimum condition, the efficiency for all non-linear processes connected with one such 'hot spot' is extremely high. 'Hot particles' contain at least one hot spot and can therefore dominate the non-linear signal without the need of aggregation (field enhancement in the gap between particles).

  11. Linear Modeling and Evaluation of Controls on Flow Response in Western Post-Fire Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, S.; Hogue, T. S.; Hay, L.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigates the impact of wildfires on watershed flow regimes throughout the western United States, specifically focusing on evaluation of fire events within specified subregions and determination of the impact of climate and geophysical variables in post-fire flow response. Fire events were collected through federal and state-level databases and streamflow data were collected from U.S. Geological Survey stream gages. 263 watersheds were identified with at least 10 years of continuous pre-fire daily streamflow records and 5 years of continuous post-fire daily flow records. For each watershed, percent changes in runoff ratio (RO), annual seven day low-flows (7Q2) and annual seven day high-flows (7Q10) were calculated from pre- to post-fire. Numerous independent variables were identified for each watershed and fire event, including topographic, land cover, climate, burn severity, and soils data. The national watersheds were divided into five regions through K-clustering and a lasso linear regression model, applying the Leave-One-Out calibration method, was calculated for each region. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) was used to determine the accuracy of the resulting models. The regions encompassing the United States along and west of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the coastal watersheds, produced the most accurate linear models. The Pacific coast region models produced poor and inconsistent results, indicating that the regions need to be further subdivided. Presently, RO and HF response variables appear to be more easily modeled than LF. Results of linear regression modeling showed varying importance of watershed and fire event variables, with conflicting correlation between land cover types and soil types by region. The addition of further independent variables and constriction of current variables based on correlation indicators is ongoing and should allow for more accurate linear regression modeling.

  12. Thin-skinned mass-wasting responsible for edifice-wide deformation at Arenal Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Susanna; Biggs, Juliet; Muller, Cyril; Avard, Geoffroy

    2014-12-01

    The shape and stability of a volcano’s edifice depends on the relationship between eruption rate and the loss or redistribution of material due to erosion, mass-wasting or deformation. This work provides measurements of deformation and shallow mass-wasting at a stratovolcano immediately after an extended period of growth, and demonstrates that high rates of deformation can be associated with shallow edifice processes. We measure displacements and surface property changes on the upper flanks of Arenal, Costa Rica, after a ~40 year period of edifice growth. We present high-resolution satellite radar imagery of the 2011-2013 period that provides evidence of frequent rockfalls and of at least 16 slow-moving, shallow landslides (estimated to be 5-11 m thick, total volume = 2.4×107 m3 DRE). The 2012 Nicoya Earthquake (Mw 7.4) had no measurable impact on the velocities of sliding units at Arenal, but did result in an increase in the area affected by rockfall.

  13. Linearity and nonlinearity of basin response as a function of scale: Discussion of alternative definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, M.; Jothityangkoon, C.; Menabde, M.

    2002-02-01

    Two uses of the terms ``linearity'' and ``nonlinearity'' appear in recent literature. The first definition of nonlinearity is with respect to the dynamical property such as the rainfall-runoff response of a catchment, and nonlinearity in this sense refers to a nonlinear dependence of the storm response on the magnitude of the rainfall inputs [Minshall, 1960; Wang et al., 1981]. The second definition of nonlinearity [Huang and Willgoose, 1993; Goodrich et al., 1997] is with respect to the dependence of a catchment statistical property, such as the mean annual flood, on the area of the catchment. They are both linked to important and interconnected hydrologic concepts, and furthermore, the change of nonlinearity with area (scale) has been an important motivation for hydrologic research. While both definitions are correct mathematically, they refer to hydrologically different concepts. In this paper we show that nonlinearity in the dynamical sense and that in the statistical sense can exist independently of each other (i.e., can be unrelated). If not carefully distinguished, the existence of these two definitions can lead to a catchment's response being described as being both linear and nonlinear at the same time. We therefore recommend separating these definitions by reserving the term ``nonlinearity'' for the classical, dynamical definition with respect to rainfall inputs, while adopting the term ``scaling relationship'' for the dependence of a catchment hydrological property on catchment area.

  14. Thermodynamic bounds and general properties of optimal efficiency and power in linear responses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-10-01

    We study the optimal exergy efficiency and power for thermodynamic systems with an Onsager-type "current-force" relationship describing the linear response to external influences. We derive, in analytic forms, the maximum efficiency and optimal efficiency for maximum power for a thermodynamic machine described by a N×N symmetric Onsager matrix with arbitrary integer N. The figure of merit is expressed in terms of the largest eigenvalue of the "coupling matrix" which is solely determined by the Onsager matrix. Some simple but general relationships between the power and efficiency at the conditions for (i) maximum efficiency and (ii) optimal efficiency for maximum power are obtained. We show how the second law of thermodynamics bounds the optimal efficiency and the Onsager matrix and relate those bounds together. The maximum power theorem (Jacobi's Law) is generalized to all thermodynamic machines with a symmetric Onsager matrix in the linear-response regime. We also discuss systems with an asymmetric Onsager matrix (such as systems under magnetic field) for a particular situation and we show that the reversible limit of efficiency can be reached at finite output power. Cooperative effects are found to improve the figure of merit significantly in systems with multiply cross-correlated responses. Application to example systems demonstrates that the theory is helpful in guiding the search for high performance materials and structures in energy researches.

  15. Linear and fractional response for the SRB measure of smooth hyperbolic attractors and discontinuous observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Kuna, Tobias; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-03-01

    We consider a smooth one-parameter family t\\mapsto ≤ft( {{f}t}:M\\to M\\right) of diffeomorphisms with compact transitive Axiom A attractors {{ Λ }t} , denoting by \\text{d}{ρt} the SRB measure of {{f}t}{{|}{{ Λ t}}} . Our first result is that for any function θ in the Sobolev space Hpr(M) , with 1 and 0  <  r  <  1/p, the map t\\mapsto {\\int}θ \\text{d}{ρt} is α-Hölder continuous for all α . This applies to θ (x)=h(x) \\Theta ≤ft(g(x)-a\\right) (for all α <1 ) for h and g smooth and \\Theta the Heaviside function, if a is not a critical value of g. Our second result says that for any such function θ (x)=h(x) \\Theta ≤ft(g(x)-a\\right) so that in addition the intersection of ≤ft\\{x|g(x)=a\\right\\} with the support of h is foliated by ‘admissible stable leaves’ of f t , the map t\\mapsto {\\int}θ \\text{d}{ρt} is differentiable. (We provide distributional linear response and fluctuation-dissipation formulas for the derivative.) Obtaining linear response or fractional response for such observables θ is motivated by extreme-value theory.

  16. Skew-normal/independent linear mixed models for censored responses with applications to HIV viral loads

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.; Castro, Luis M.; Dey, Dipak K.

    2012-01-01

    Often in biomedical studies, the routine use of linear mixed-effects models (based on Gaussian assumptions) can be questionable when the longitudinal responses are skewed in nature. Skew-normal/elliptical models are widely used in those situations. Often, those skewed responses might also be subjected to some upper and lower quantification limits (viz. longitudinal viral load measures in HIV studies), beyond which they are not measurable. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian analysis of censored linear mixed models replacing the Gaussian assumptions with skew-normal/independent (SNI) distributions. The SNI is an attractive class of asymmetric heavy-tailed distributions that includes the skew-normal, the skew-t, skew-slash and the skew-contaminated normal distributions as special cases. The proposed model provides flexibility in capturing the effects of skewness and heavy tail for responses which are either left- or right-censored. For our analysis, we adopt a Bayesian framework and develop a MCMC algorithm to carry out the posterior analyses. The marginal likelihood is tractable, and utilized to compute not only some Bayesian model selection measures but also case-deletion influence diagnostics based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence. The newly developed procedures are illustrated with a simulation study as well as a HIV case study involving analysis of longitudinal viral loads. PMID:22685005

  17. Thermodynamic bounds and general properties of optimal efficiency and power in linear responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-10-01

    We study the optimal exergy efficiency and power for thermodynamic systems with an Onsager-type "current-force" relationship describing the linear response to external influences. We derive, in analytic forms, the maximum efficiency and optimal efficiency for maximum power for a thermodynamic machine described by a N ×N symmetric Onsager matrix with arbitrary integer N. The figure of merit is expressed in terms of the largest eigenvalue of the "coupling matrix" which is solely determined by the Onsager matrix. Some simple but general relationships between the power and efficiency at the conditions for (i) maximum efficiency and (ii) optimal efficiency for maximum power are obtained. We show how the second law of thermodynamics bounds the optimal efficiency and the Onsager matrix and relate those bounds together. The maximum power theorem (Jacobi's Law) is generalized to all thermodynamic machines with a symmetric Onsager matrix in the linear-response regime. We also discuss systems with an asymmetric Onsager matrix (such as systems under magnetic field) for a particular situation and we show that the reversible limit of efficiency can be reached at finite output power. Cooperative effects are found to improve the figure of merit significantly in systems with multiply cross-correlated responses. Application to example systems demonstrates that the theory is helpful in guiding the search for high performance materials and structures in energy researches.

  18. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal functionals for exchange-correlation energy of the inhomogeneous electron gas are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response function of the uniform electron gas. The WDA is constructed so that it is exact in the opposite limit of one-electron systems, and it was conjectured that the WDA is also accurate in the uniform gas limit. To test this conjecture, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of the WDA. We then compare the results with the Monte Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local-field correction, and identify the weak points of conventional WDA in the homogeneous limit. We suggest how the WDA can be modified to improve the response function. The resulting approximation is a good one in both opposite limits. Future testing should show whether it will also be better than conventional WDA and ADA for practical nonlocal density-functional calculations.

  19. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal exchange-correlation density functionals are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). The ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response of the uniform electron gas. WDA is constructed so that it is exact for one-electron systems, and was shown to yield good results for solids, too. While the WDA has correct one-electron behavior, it is important to access the accuracy of the method in the opposite limit of the nearly homogeneous electron gas. To do so, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of WDA. We compare our results with Monte-Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local field correction, and identify the weak points of the conventional WDA in this limit. The WDA can be modified to improve the response function in the short wavelength regime. The exchange-correlation local field correction includes a term derived from the correlation part of the kinetic energy, which does not decay at qarrow ∞. This can be reproduced by adding a delta-function part to the WDA weight function. The resulting approximation is good in both limits, and may be useful for practical density functional calculations. (More at this URL.)

  20. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  1. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  2. Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields.

    PubMed

    Peng, Degao; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Recent development in particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) broadens the perspective on ground state correlation energies [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013), Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, S. N. Steinmann, D. Peng, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174110 (2013); D. Peng, S. N. Steinmann, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104112 (2013)] and N ± 2 excitation energies [Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 224105 (2013)]. So far Hartree-Fock and approximated density-functional orbitals have been utilized to evaluate the pp-RPA equation. In this paper, to further explore the fundamentals and the potential use of pairing matrix dependent functionals, we present the linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields with both adiabatic and frequency-dependent kernels. This theory is related to the density-functional theory and time-dependent density-functional theory for superconductors, but is applied to normal non-superconducting systems for our purpose. Due to the lack of the proof of the one-to-one mapping between the pairing matrix and the pairing field for time-dependent systems, the linear-response theory is established based on the representability assumption of the pairing matrix. The linear response theory justifies the use of approximated density-functionals in the pp-RPA equation. This work sets the fundamentals for future density-functional development to enhance the description of ground state correlation energies and N ± 2 excitation energies.

  3. Trajectory Surface Hopping within Linear Response Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapavicza, Enrico; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    A fewest switches trajectory surface hopping algorithm based on linear response time-dependent density-functional theory is developed and implemented into the plane wave ab initio molecular dynamics package CPMD. A scheme to calculate nonadiabatic couplings using a multi determinantal approximation of the excited state wave function is introduced. The method is applied to the study of the photorelaxation of protonated formaldimine, a minimal model of the rhodopsin chromophore retinal. A good agreement of the structural and dynamic behavior is found with respect to state averaged multiconfiguration self consistent field based trajectory surface hopping.

  4. Kovacs effect in the one-dimensional Ising model: A linear response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-García, M.; Prados, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the so-called Kovacs effect in the one-dimensional Ising model with Glauber dynamics. We consider small enough temperature jumps, for which a linear response theory has been recently derived. Within this theory, the Kovacs hump is directly related to the monotonic relaxation function of the energy. The analytical results are compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, and an excellent agreement is found. Remarkably, the position of the maximum in the Kovacs hump depends on the fact that the true asymptotic behavior of the relaxation function is different from the stretched exponential describing the relevant part of the relaxation at low temperatures.

  5. Reduced Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of an RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  6. A Revolute Joint With Linear Load-Displacement Response for Precision Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Warren, Peter A.; Peterson, Lee D.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Langley Research center is developing key structures and mechanisms technologies for micron-accuracy, in-space deployment of future space instruments. Achieving micron-accuracy deployment requires significant advancements in deployment mechanism design such as the revolute joint presented herein. The joint presented herein exhibits a load-cycling response that is essentially linear with less than two percent hysteresis, and the joint rotates with less than one in.-oz. of resistance. A prototype reflector metering truss incorporating the joint exhibits only a few microns of kinematic error under repeated deployment and impulse loading. No other mechanically deployable structure found in literature has been demonstrated to be this kinematically accurate.

  7. Long-term prediction test procedure for most ICs, based on linear response theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Ivakhnenko, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimentally, thermal annealing is known to be a factor which enables a number of different integrated circuits (IC's) to recover their operating characteristics after suffering radiation damage in the space radiation environment; thus, decreasing and limiting long term cumulative total-dose effects. This annealing is also known to be accelerated at elevated temperatures both during and after irradiation. Linear response theory (LRT) was applied, and a linear response function (LRF) to predict the radiation/annealing response of sensitive parameters of IC's for long term (several months or years) exposure to the space radiation environment were constructed. Compressing the annealing process from several years in orbit to just a few hours or days in the laboratory is achieved by subjecting the IC to elevated temperatures or by increasing the typical spaceflight dose rate by several orders of magnitude for simultaneous radiation/annealing only. The accomplishments are as follows: (1) the test procedure to make predictions of the radiation response was developed; (2) the calculation of the shift in the threshold potential due to the charge distribution in the oxide was written; (3) electron tunneling processes from the bulk Si to the oxide region in an MOS IC were estimated; (4) in order to connect the experimental annealing data to the theoretical model, constants of the model of the basic annealing process were established; (5) experimental data obtained at elevated temperatures were analyzed; (6) time compression and reliability of predictions for the long term region were shown; (7) a method to compress test time and to make predictions of response for the nonlinear region was proposed; and (8) nonlinearity of the LRF with respect to log(t) was calculated theoretically from a model.

  8. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear plasma response models for non-axisymmetric perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Lanctot, M. J.; Izzo, V. A.; Lazarus, E. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Park, J.-K.; Lazerson, S.; Reiman, A.; Cooper, W. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Turco, F.

    2013-05-15

    With the installation of non-axisymmetric coil systems on major tokamaks for the purpose of studying the prospects of ELM-free operation, understanding the plasma response to the applied fields is a crucial issue. Application of different response models, using standard tools, to DIII-D discharges with applied non-axisymmetric fields from internal coils, is shown to yield qualitatively different results. The plasma response can be treated as an initial value problem, following the system dynamically from an initial unperturbed state, or from a nearby perturbed equilibrium approach, and using both linear and nonlinear models [A. D. Turnbull, Nucl. Fusion 52, 054016 (2012)]. Criteria are discussed under which each of the approaches can yield a valid response. In the DIII-D cases studied, these criteria show a breakdown in the linear theory despite the small 10{sup −3} relative magnitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations in this case. For nonlinear dynamical evolution simulations to reach a saturated nonlinear steady state, appropriate damping mechanisms need to be provided for each normal mode comprising the response. Other issues arise in the technical construction of perturbed flux surfaces from a displacement and from the presence of near nullspace normal modes. For the nearby equilibrium approach, in the absence of a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction with a controlled comparison, constraints relating the 2D system profiles to the final profiles in the 3D system also need to be imposed to assure accessibility. The magnetic helicity profile has been proposed as an appropriate input to a 3D equilibrium calculation and tests of this show the anticipated qualitative behavior.

  9. Constructing quasi-linear V̇O2 responses from nonlinear parameters.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Samuel L; Broxterman, Ryan M; Barstow, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    Oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics have been shown to be governed by a nonlinear control system across a range of work rates. However, the linearity of the V̇O2 response to ramp incremental exercise would appear to be the result of a linear control system. This apparent contradiction could represent a balancing of changing V̇O2 kinetics parameter values across a range of work rates. To test this, six healthy men completed bouts of ramp incremental exercise at 15, 30, and 60 W/min (15R, 30R, 60R, respectively) and four bouts of an extended-step incremental exercise. V̇O2 parameter values were derived from the step exercise using two monoexponential models: one starting at time zero and encompassing the entire stage (MONO), and the other truncated to the first 5 min and allowing a time delay (5TD). The resulting parameter values were applied to an integrative model to estimate the ramp responses. As work rate increased, gain values increased (P < 0.001 for MONO and 5TD), as did mean response time (or time constant) values (MONO: P < 0.001; 5TD: P = 0.003). Up to maximal V̇O2 (V̇O(2 max)), the gains of the estimated ramp responses from both models were not different from the gains of the actual observed V̇O2 responses for 15R and 30R (15R: 11.3 ± 1.2, 11.7 ± 0.7, 10.9 ± 0.3; 30R: 10.5 ± 0.8, 11.0 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 0.3 ml O2·min(-1)·W(-1), for actual, MONO, 5TD, respectively) but were significantly greater for 60R (8.7 ± 1.0, 9.9 ± 0.4, 10.3 ± 0.3 ml O2·min(-1)·W(-1) for actual, MONO, 5TD, respectively). Up to 80%V̇O(2 max) gain values were not significantly different for any ramp rate (P > 0.05 for all). We conclude that the apparent linearity of the V̇O2 response to ramp incremental exercise is consequent to a balancing of increasing time constant and gain parameter values.

  10. Linear Mixed Models for Skew-Normal Independent bivariate responses with an application to Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.; Abanto-Valle, Carlos A.; Ghosh, Pulak

    2010-01-01

    Bivariate clustered (correlated) data often encountered in epidemiological and clinical research are routinely analyzed under a linear mixed model framework with underlying normality assumptions of the random effects and within-subject errors. However, such normality assumptions might be questionable if the data-set particularly exhibit skewness and heavy tails. Using a Bayesian paradigm, we use the skew-normal/independent (SNI) distribution as a tool for modeling clustered data with bivariate non-normal responses in a linear mixed model framework. The SNI distribution is an attractive class of asymmetric thick-tailed parametric structure which includes the skew-normal distribution as a special case. We assume that the random effects follows multivariate skew-normal/independent distributions and the random errors follow symmetric normal/independent distributions which provides substantial robustness over the symmetric normal process in a linear mixed model framework. Specific distributions obtained as special cases, viz. the skew-t, the skew-slash and the skew-contaminated normal distributions are compared, along with the default skew-normal density. The methodology is illustrated through an application to a real data which records the periodontal health status of an interesting population using periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). PMID:20740568

  11. The neuronal response at extended timescales: a linearized spiking input–output relation

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems are modulated by unknown slow processes. This can severely hinder analysis – especially in excitable neurons, which are highly non-linear and stochastic systems. We show the analysis simplifies considerably if the input matches the sparse “spiky” nature of the output. In this case, a linearized spiking Input–Output (I/O) relation can be derived semi-analytically, relating input spike trains to output spikes based on known biophysical properties. Using this I/O relation we obtain closed-form expressions for all second order statistics (input – internal state – output correlations and spectra), construct optimal linear estimators for the neuronal response and internal state and perform parameter identification. These results are guaranteed to hold, for a general stochastic biophysical neuron model, with only a few assumptions (mainly, timescale separation). We numerically test the resulting expressions for various models, and show that they hold well, even in cases where our assumptions fail to hold. In a companion paper we demonstrate how this approach enables us to fit a biophysical neuron model so it reproduces experimentally observed temporal firing statistics on days-long experiments. PMID:24765073

  12. Linearization of EBT3 film dose response and virtual film dosimetry for SBRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Archibald-Heeren, B.; Wang, Y.; Metcalfe, P.

    2017-01-01

    EBT3 film offers high spatial resolution and low energy dependence, making it a suitable choice for quality assurance where high dose gradients are present, such as the case for SBRT. This work presents a simple method to adjust scanner settings so that dose response becomes linear. This linearity eliminates the need to obtain a calibration curve and associated uncertainties in curve fitting. Relative dosimetry can be performed after dose normalization to a reference point. Linearity is also a more robust condition than calibration curve with respect to scanner warm-up conditions, resulting in reduced uncertainty in dose measurement. An in-house developed program reads the film scan and a 2D dose map then constructs both to virtual films using grayscale values. Film intensity value was normalized to dose at reference point. Relative dosimetry was performed by comparing the two resulting images. Patient specific quality assurance was conducted for two SBRT cases. In both plans more than 95% gamma function points passed the gamma criteria of 2%/3mm.

  13. Multiple linear and principal component regressions for modelling ecotoxicity bioassay response.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana I; Pires, José C M; Figueiredo, Sónia A; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2014-01-01

    The ecotoxicological response of the living organisms in an aquatic system depends on the physical, chemical and bacteriological variables, as well as the interactions between them. An important challenge to scientists is to understand the interaction and behaviour of factors involved in a multidimensional process such as the ecotoxicological response. With this aim, multiple linear regression (MLR) and principal component regression were applied to the ecotoxicity bioassay response of Chlorella vulgaris and Vibrio fischeri in water collected at seven sites of Leça river during five monitoring campaigns (February, May, June, August and September of 2006). The river water characterization included the analysis of 22 physicochemical and 3 microbiological parameters. The model that best fitted the data was MLR, which shows: (i) a negative correlation with dissolved organic carbon, zinc and manganese, and a positive one with turbidity and arsenic, regarding C. vulgaris toxic response; (ii) a negative correlation with conductivity and turbidity and a positive one with phosphorus, hardness, iron, mercury, arsenic and faecal coliforms, concerning V. fischeri toxic response. This integrated assessment may allow the evaluation of the effect of future pollution abatement measures over the water quality of Leça River.

  14. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  15. Geomorphic response to tectonically-induced ground deformation in the Wabash Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, G.S.; Thompson, T.A.; Olyphant, G.A.; Furer, L.; Bennett, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous low- to moderate-intensity earthquakes have been recorded in a zone of diffuse modern seismicity in southwest Indiana, southeast Illinois, and northernmost Kentucky. Structural elements within the zone include the Wabash Valley Fault System, the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt in western Illinois, and the Rough Creek-Shawneetown Fault System in northern Kentucky. The presence of seismically-induced liquefaction features in the near-surface alluvial sediments in the region indicates that strong ground motion has occurred in the recent geological past, but because the glacial and alluvial sediments in the Wabash Valley appear to be otherwise undisturbed, post-Paleozoic ground deformation resulting from movement on these structural elements has not yet been documented. Morphometric analysis of the land surface, detailed mapping of geomorphic elements in the valley, reconnaissance drilling of the Holocene and Pleistocene alluvium, and structural analysis of the bedrock underlying the valley were used to determine whether the geomorphology of the valley and the patterns of alluviation of the Wabash River were affected by surface deformation associated with the seismic zone during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Among the observed features in the valley that can be attributed to deformation are: (1) tilting of the modern land surface to the west, (2) preferred channel migration toward the west side of the valley, with concomitant impact on patterns of soil development and sedimentation rate, (3) a convex longitudinal profile of the Wabash River where it crosses the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt, and (4) increased incision of the river into its floodplain downstream from the anticlinal belt.

  16. Pressure measurements on a deforming surface in response to an underwater explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, G.; Sandusky, H.; Zerilli, F.; Rye, K.; Tussing, R.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to benchmark calculations of structural deformation from an underwater explosion with the coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian DYSMAS code. Aluminum (Al) tubes were filled with distilled water except for a small explosive charge in the center that was suspended from hypodermic needle tubing. Tourmaline and carbon resistor gages at the water/wall interface recorded the initial shock loading, cavitation, and reloading as cavitation collapsed. The initial shock loading was consistent with a fine mesh 1-D WONDY calculation and the entire event was mostly simulated by the coarser mesh 2-D DYSMAS calculation.

  17. DNA microarray mediated transcriptional profiling of Nitrosomonas europaea in response to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Junpei; Inaba, Kazuho; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2008-05-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) constitute, quantitatively, the most important group of synthetic surfactants used today. We studied the gene expression of Nitrosomonas europaea in response to LAS using a DNA microarray because ammonia-oxidizers are thought to be more sensitive to LAS than other microorganisms. Our objective was to elucidate which genes are expressed for N. europaea in response to LAS exposure. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR assay revealed that c. 30 genes were significantly expressed after LAS exposure, in particular genes associated with energy production and conversion. Our findings demonstrate that physical disruption of membrane structures, which contain enzymes associated with energy production and conversion, might be an important explanation for the high sensitivity of N. europaea to LAS exposure.

  18. Non-linear modeling of the plasma response to RMPs in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, F.; Hölzl, M.; Viezzer, E.; Dunne, M.; Bécoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Morales, J.; Willensdorfer, M.; Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Pamela, S.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.; Strumberger, E.; Lessig, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    The plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in ASDEX Upgrade is modeled with the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, using input profiles that match those of the experiments as closely as possible. The RMP configuration for which edge localized modes are best mitigated in experiments is related to the largest edge kink response observed near the X-point in modeling. On the edge resonant surfaces q  =  m/n, the coupling between the kink component (m  >  nq) and the m resonant component is found to induce the amplification of the resonant magnetic perturbation. The ergodicity and the 3D-displacement near the X-point induced by the resonant amplification can only partly explain the density pumpout observed in experiments.

  19. Linear response of hydrodynamically-coupled particles under a nonequilibrium reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Cem; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    A recent experiment driving colloids electromagnetically, by Bérut et al 2014 Europhys. Lett. 107 60004, is an ideal paradigm for illustrating a linear response theory for nonequilibrium overdamped systems including hydrodynamic interactions and, unusually, a reservoir itself out of equilibrium. Indeed, in this setup one finds a nonequilibrium environment in which the mobility and diffusivity of free particles are not simply proportional to each other. We derive both the response to a mechanical forcing and to temperature variations in terms of correlations between an observable and a path-weight action. The time-antisymmetric component of the latter turns out not to be simply proportional to the heat flowing into the environment. These results are visualized with simulations resembling conditions and protocols easily realizable in the experiment, thereby tracing a path for experimental verifications of the theory.

  20. Non-linear intensification of Sahel rainfall as a possible dynamic response to future warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, Jacob; Levermann, Anders

    2017-07-01

    Projections of the response of Sahel rainfall to future global warming diverge significantly. Meanwhile, paleoclimatic records suggest that Sahel rainfall is capable of abrupt transitions in response to gradual forcing. Here we present climate modeling evidence for the possibility of an abrupt intensification of Sahel rainfall under future climate change. Analyzing 30 coupled global climate model simulations, we identify seven models where central Sahel rainfall increases by 40 to 300 % over the 21st century, owing to a northward expansion of the West African monsoon domain. Rainfall in these models is non-linearly related to sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropical Atlantic and Mediterranean moisture source regions, intensifying abruptly beyond a certain SST warming level. We argue that this behavior is consistent with a self-amplifying dynamic-thermodynamical feedback, implying that the gradual increase in oceanic moisture availability under warming could trigger a sudden intensification of monsoon rainfall far inland of today's core monsoon region.

  1. Linear response approach to collective electronic excitations of solids and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Gao, Shiwu

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a parallel computer program for the study of dynamic response of periodic systems. It computes the linear response of an interacting many-electron system from its ground-state electronic structures, which are obtained from ab initio band structure calculations in the plane-wave and pseudopotential scheme. As test examples, we applied this program to calculate the linear response of bulk aluminum and a beryllium monolayer. The excitation spectra show prominent plasmon resonances, which compare well with the available data and previous calculations. For surfaces or thin films, we found that removing periodicity perpendicular to the surface gives a more reliable description of the low-energy excitation spectra, especially in the long-wavelength limit. Program summaryProgram title: Dresponse Catalogue identifier: AECK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 836 088 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/MPI Computer: Any architecture with a Fortran 90 compiler Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 50 MB-2 GB per processor depending on system size Classification: 7.3 External routines: BLAS ( http://www.netlib.org/blas/), Lapack ( http://www.netlib.org/lapack/), MPI ( http://www-unix.mcs.anl.gov/mpi/), abinit (for ground-state calculations, http://www.abinit.org/) Nature of problem: The dynamic response of bulk and surface systems. It is usually dominated by collective electronic excitations (plasmons) at low-energy range. Solution method: The ground-state wavefunctions are obtained from ab initio density-functional calculation in the planewave and

  2. General linear response formula for non integrable systems obeying the Vlasov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patelli, Aurelio; Ruffo, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Long-range interacting N-particle systems get trapped into long-living out-of-equilibrium stationary states called quasi-stationary states (QSS). We study here the response to a small external perturbation when such systems are settled into a QSS. In the N → ∞ limit the system is described by the Vlasov equation and QSS are mapped into stable stationary solutions of such equation. We consider this problem in the context of a model that has recently attracted considerable attention, the Hamiltonian mean field (HMF) model. For such a model, stationary inhomogeneous and homogeneous states determine an integrable dynamics in the mean-field effective potential and an action-angle transformation allows one to derive an exact linear response formula. However, such a result would be of limited interest if restricted to the integrable case. In this paper, we show how to derive a general linear response formula which does not use integrability as a requirement. The presence of conservation laws (mass, energy, momentum, etc.) and of further Casimir invariants can be imposed a posteriori. We perform an analysis of the infinite time asymptotics of the response formula for a specific observable, the magnetization in the HMF model, as a result of the application of an external magnetic field, for two stationary stable distributions: the Boltzmann-Gibbs equilibrium distribution and the Fermi-Dirac one. When compared with numerical simulations the predictions of the theory are very good away from the transition energy from inhomogeneous to homogeneous states. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Vlasov Equation", edited by Francesco Pegoraro, Francesco Califano, Giovanni Manfredi and Philip J. Morrison.

  3. A computer tool for a minimax criterion in binary response and heteroscedastic simple linear regression models.

    PubMed

    Casero-Alonso, V; López-Fidalgo, J; Torsney, B

    2017-01-01

    Binary response models are used in many real applications. For these models the Fisher information matrix (FIM) is proportional to the FIM of a weighted simple linear regression model. The same is also true when the weight function has a finite integral. Thus, optimal designs for one binary model are also optimal for the corresponding weighted linear regression model. The main objective of this paper is to provide a tool for the construction of MV-optimal designs, minimizing the maximum of the variances of the estimates, for a general design space. MV-optimality is a potentially difficult criterion because of its nondifferentiability at equal variance designs. A methodology for obtaining MV-optimal designs where the design space is a compact interval [a, b] will be given for several standard weight functions. The methodology will allow us to build a user-friendly computer tool based on Mathematica to compute MV-optimal designs. Some illustrative examples will show a representation of MV-optimal designs in the Euclidean plane, taking a and b as the axes. The applet will be explained using two relevant models. In the first one the case of a weighted linear regression model is considered, where the weight function is directly chosen from a typical family. In the second example a binary response model is assumed, where the probability of the outcome is given by a typical probability distribution. Practitioners can use the provided applet to identify the solution and to know the exact support points and design weights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Origin of the linearity no threshold (LNT) dose-response concept.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2013-09-01

    This paper identifies the origin of the linearity at low-dose concept [i.e., linear no threshold (LNT)] for ionizing radiation-induced mutation. After the discovery of X-ray-induced mutations, Olson and Lewis (Nature 121(3052):673-674, 1928) proposed that cosmic/terrestrial radiation-induced mutations provide the principal mechanism for the induction of heritable traits, providing the driving force for evolution. For this concept to be general, a LNT dose relationship was assumed, with genetic damage proportional to the energy absorbed. Subsequent studies suggested a linear dose response for ionizing radiation-induced mutations (Hanson and Heys in Am Nat 63(686):201-213, 1929; Oliver in Science 71:44-46, 1930), supporting the evolutionary hypothesis. Based on an evaluation of spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced mutation with Drosophila, Muller argued that background radiation had a negligible impact on spontaneous mutation, discrediting the ionizing radiation-based evolutionary hypothesis. Nonetheless, an expanded set of mutation dose-response observations provided a basis for collaboration between theoretical physicists (Max Delbruck and Gunter Zimmer) and the radiation geneticist Nicolai Timoféeff-Ressovsky. They developed interrelated physical science-based genetics perspectives including a biophysical model of the gene, a radiation-induced gene mutation target theory and the single-hit hypothesis of radiation-induced mutation, which, when integrated, provided the theoretical mechanism and mathematical basis for the LNT model. The LNT concept became accepted by radiation geneticists and recommended by national/international advisory committees for risk assessment of ionizing radiation-induced mutational damage/cancer from the mid-1950s to the present. The LNT concept was later generalized to chemical carcinogen risk assessment and used by public health and regulatory agencies worldwide.

  5. Lead-lag relationships between stock and market risk within linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, Stanislav; Balatsky, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We study historical correlations and lead-lag relationships between individual stock risks (standard deviation of daily stock returns) and market risk (standard deviation of daily returns of a market-representative portfolio) in the US stock market. We consider the cross-correlation functions averaged over stocks, using historical stock prices from the Standard & Poor's 500 index for 1994-2013. The observed historical dynamics suggests that the dependence between the risks was almost linear during the US stock market downturn of 2002 and after the US housing bubble in 2007, remaining at that level until 2013. Moreover, the averaged cross-correlation function often had an asymmetric shape with respect to zero lag in the periods of high correlation. We develop the analysis by the application of the linear response formalism to study underlying causal relations. The calculated response functions suggest the presence of characteristic regimes near financial crashes, when individual stock risks affect market risk and vice versa. This work was supported by VR 621-2012-2983.

  6. Exact linear response of reacting thermal defects driven by creation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C. P.

    2007-04-01

    The exact, linear response at steady state is calculated for reacting, but otherwise noninteracting, thermal defects driven by defect creation processes. The theory applies to vacancies and interstitials in the bulk, or to adatoms and advacancies on surface terraces. A wide variety of possible driving forces includes nuclear reaction, particle irradiation, epitaxial growth, surface erosion, and sublimation. When the defect life cycle typically starts and ends with spontaneous pair creation and annihilation, both species respond to the difference of their separate driving terms (the ''Poisson'' regime), and the law of mass action holds everywhere with a position dependent chemical potential {mu}*(r). The value of {mu}*(r) in linear response is employed here to discuss the conditions under which thermal defects precipitate, particularly as islands on terraces and dislocation loops in the bulk. It is shown, for the Poisson regime, that an approximate symmetry exists between processes for the two antidefects. Specifically, if {mu}{sub c}* suffices to nucleate a precipitate of one antidefect, then -{mu}{sub c}* is required to nucleate the other.

  7. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: Efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  8. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Tapavicza, Enrico; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2009-03-01

    A method is developed to compute the nonadiabatic coupling vectors (NACVs) between electronic ground and excited states as well as between any possible pair of excited states within the framework of linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the adiabatic approximation. The development is an extension to our previous work on surface hopping dynamics [E. Tapavicza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023001 (2007)] for which we improve the description of the TDDFT approximation of the excited state wavefunctions by means of linear response orbitals. The method is first validated on the H +H2 system that has a region of strong coupling near the conical intersection at the equilateral geometry. These results confirm the quality and the numerical efficiency of the approach, which has an accuracy comparable to the one achieved with wavefunction-based methods. Finally, we apply the method to the calculation of the NACVs of protonated formaldimine (NH2CH2+) along a surface hopping trajectory initiated in the second excited state.

  9. Linear response, fluctuation-dissipation, and finite-system-size effects in superdiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    Lévy walks (LWs) are a popular stochastic tool to model anomalous diffusion and have recently been used to describe a variety of phenomena. We study the linear response behavior of this generic model of superdiffusive LWs in finite systems to an external force field under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. These finite-size LWs are based on power-law waiting time distributions with a finite-time regularization at τc, such that the physical requirements are met to apply linear response theory and derive the power spectrum with the correct short frequency limit, without the introduction of artificial cutoffs. We obtain the generalized Einstein relation for both ensemble and time averages over the entire process time and determine the turnover to normal Brownian motion when the full system is explored. In particular, we obtain an exact expression for the long time diffusion constant as a function of the scaling exponent of the waiting time density and the characteristic time scale τc.

  10. Recent developments in time-dependent density-functional theory within and beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, E. K. U.

    2013-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a popular and rather successful method in the description of photo-absorption spectra of atoms and molecules in the linear response regime. In extended solids, however, a satisfactory description of excitonic effects has become possible only recently with the advent of advanced approximations for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. One of these advanced approximations is the so-called bootstrap kernel [S. Sharma et al, PRL 107, 186401 (2011)]. We shall explore the performance of this kernel in the long-wavelength limit and for finite values of q, looking at electron-loss as well as photo-absorption spectra. We find, in particular, that excitonic effects in LiF and Ar are enhanced for values of q away from the Γ-point [S. Sharma et al, New J Phys 14, 053052 (2012)]. Then we present two recent developments in TDDFT beyond the linear-response regime: (i) By using a geometrical partitioning, we calculate the angle and energy resolved photo-electron spectra of finite systems including multi-photon effects [De Giovannini, et al, A. Rubio, PRA 86, 062515 (2012)]. (ii) Finally we show how the dynamics of many-electron systems can be controlled with lasers by marrying TDDFT with optimal control theory [A. Castro et al, PRL 109, 153603 (2012)].

  11. Linear density response function in the projector augmented wave method: Applications to solids, surfaces, and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens. J.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2011-06-01

    We present an implementation of the linear density response function within the projector-augmented wave method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response function is represented in plane waves while the single-particle eigenstates can be expanded on a real space grid or in atomic-orbital basis for increased efficiency. The exchange-correlation kernel is treated at the level of the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) and crystal local field effects are included. The calculated static and dynamical dielectric functions of Si, C, SiC, AlP, and GaAs compare well with previous calculations. While optical properties of semiconductors, in particular excitonic effects, are generally not well described by ALDA, we obtain excellent agreement with experiments for the surface loss function of graphene and the Mg(0001) surface with plasmon energies deviating by less than 0.2 eV. Finally, the method is applied to study the influence of substrates on the plasmon excitations in graphene.

  12. Functional imaging of kinetic parameters from the time dependent linear response function by dynamic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stritzke, P.; Knop, J.; Spielmann, R.P.; Montz, R.; Schneider, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the locally differing time dependent linear response function h(r,t) of a radioactive tracer injected into a patients blood pool B(t) by mathematical analysis of a dynamic scintigraphic study A(r,t). Transit times, uptake rates and clearance rates of different tracers are calculated from the linear response function at every matrix point by one computer program. The parameters are presented in functional images on a standard computer display. Thus the whole information from a dynamic study can be condensed within a few images. The integral equation A=h+B +c(r)*B (+ means convolution, c(r)*B(t)=nontarget activity) derived from tracer theory is deconvoluted by mathematical methods, which are unsensitive against noise contamination of the input data. The numerical technique is successfully applied in Iodide-123-Hippuran and Tc-99m-DMSA kidney studies, in Tc-99m-MDP and -DPD bone studies, in Tl-201 myocardial studies and in Iodide-123 thyroid studies. Because the regional blood pool-or nontarget activity is calculated and subtracted, the kinetic parameters are considered to be free from nontarget contributions in all dynamic scintigraphic studies. Examples are demonstrated and the usefulness for clinical application is discussed.

  13. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-14

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  14. Practical methods for dealing with 'not applicable' item responses in the AMC Linear Disability Score project

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Glas, Cees AW; Lindeboom, Robert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; de Haan, Rob J

    2004-01-01

    Background Whenever questionnaires are used to collect data on constructs, such as functional status or health related quality of life, it is unlikely that all respondents will respond to all items. This paper examines ways of dealing with responses in a 'not applicable' category to items included in the AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) project item bank. Methods The data examined in this paper come from the responses of 392 respondents to 32 items and form part of the calibration sample for the ALDS item bank. The data are analysed using the one-parameter logistic item response theory model. The four practical strategies for dealing with this type of response are: cold deck imputation; hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. Results The item and respondent population parameter estimates were very similar for the strategies involving hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. The estimates obtained using the cold deck imputation method were substantially different. Conclusions The cold deck imputation method was not considered suitable for use in the ALDS item bank. The other three methods described can be usefully implemented in the ALDS item bank, depending on the purpose of the data analysis to be carried out. These three methods may be useful for other data sets examining similar constructs, when item response theory based methods are used. PMID:15200681

  15. Nanoparticle Addition to Enhance the Mechanical Response of Magnesium Alloys Including Nanoscale Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Gupta, Manoj

    In this study, various magnesium alloy nanocomposites derived from AZ (Aluminium-Zinc) or ZK (Zinc-Zirconium) series matrices and containing Al2O3, Si3N4, TiC or carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoparticle reinforcement (representative oxide, nitride, carbide or carbon nanoparticle reinforcement, respectively) were fabricated using solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. The main aim here was to simultaneously enhance tensile strength and ductility of each alloy using nanoparticles. The magnesium-oxygen strong affinity and magnesium-carbon weak affinity (comparison of extremes in affinity) are both well known in the context of magnesium composite processing. However, an approach to possibly quantify this affinity in magnesium nanocomposite processing is not clear. In this study accordingly, Nanoscale Electro Negative Interface Density or NENID quantifies the nanoparticle-alloy matrix interfacial area per unit volume in the magnesium alloy nanocomposite taking into consideration the electronegativity of the nanoparticle reinforcement. The beneficial (as well as comparative) effect of the nanoparticles on each alloy is discussed in this article. Regarding the mechanical performance of the nanocomposites, it is important to understand the experimentally observed nanoparticle-matrix interactions during plastic deformation (nanoscale deformation mechanisms). Little is known in this area based on direct observations for metal matrix nanocomposites. Here, relevant multiple nanoscale phenomena includes the emanation of high strain zones (HSZs) from nanoparticle surfaces.

  16. Linear, Star, and Comb Oxidation-Responsive Polymers: Effect of Branching Degree and Topology on Aggregation and Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    d'Arcy, Richard; Gennari, Arianna; Donno, Roberto; Tirelli, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    Families of amphiphilic oxidation-responsive polymers (poly(ethylene glycol)-polysulfides) with different architectures (linear, 4, 6, and 8-armed stars and 10, 15, and 20-armed combs) and compositions (variable ethylene sulfide/propylene sulfide ratio) are prepared. In water, all the polymers assemble in spherical micelles, with critical micellar concentrations <0.01 mg mL(-1) for all the branched polymers. Triple-detection gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and asymmetric field flow fractionation (AFFF) with dynamic and static light scattering detection, respectively, show an increasing compaction of the polymeric coil and a strong reduction of the aggregation number with increasing degree of branching. The key finding of this study is that the kinetics of the oxidative response sharply depend on the branching; in particular, it is highlighted that the degree of branching influences the lag time before a response can be observed rather than the speed of the response itself, a phenomenon that is attributed to a branching-dependent solubility of the oxidant in the polysulfide matrix.

  17. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  18. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D).

  19. ENPP1 and ESR1 genotypes influence temporomandibular disorders development and surgical-treatment response in dento-facial deformities

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Romain; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Raoul, Gwénaël; Delmotte, Constance; Duhamel, Alain; Ferri, Joël; Sciote, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Dentofacial deformities are dys-morpho-functional disorders involving the temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Many authors have report a TMJ improvement in dysfunctional subjects with malocclusion after orthodontic or combined orthodontic and surgical treatment particularly for the relief of pain. In particular, few studies have highlighted the demographic and clinical predictors of response to surgical treatment. To date, no genetic factor has yet been identified as a predictor of response to surgical treatment. The aim of this cohort study is therefore to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with postoperative temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or with TMJ symptoms after orthognathic surgery. Here, we found the AA genotype of SNP rs1643821 (ESR1 gene) as a risk factor for dysfunctional worsening after orthognathic surgery. In addition, we have identified TT genotype of SNP rs858339 (ENPP1 gene) as a protective factor against TMD in a population of patients with dentofacial deformities. Conversely, the heterozygous genotype AT was identified as a risk factor of TMD with respect to the rest of our population. All these elements are particularly important to bring new screening strategies and tailor future treatment. PMID:27519661

  20. Exactly isochoric deformations of soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John S.; Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many materials of contemporary interest, such as gels, biological tissues and elastomers, are easily deformed but essentially incompressible. Traditional linear theory of elasticity implements incompressibility only to first order and thus permits some volume changes, which become problematically large even at very small strains. Using a mixed coordinate transformation originally due to Gauss, we enforce the constraint of isochoric deformations exactly to develop a linear theory with perfect volume conservation that remains valid until strains become geometrically large. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by calculating the response of an infinite soft isochoric solid to a point force that leads to a nonlinear generalization of the Kelvin solution. Our approach naturally generalizes to a range of problems involving deformations of soft solids and interfaces in two-dimensional and axisymmetric geometries, which we exemplify by determining the solution to a distributed load that mimics muscular contraction within the bulk of a soft solid.

  1. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  2. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  3. Fully relativistic description of spin-orbit torques by means of linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, S.; Chadova, K.; Seemann, M.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.

    2016-08-01

    Symmetry and magnitude of spin-orbit torques (SOT), i.e., current-induced torques on the magnetization of systems lacking inversion symmetry, are investigated in a fully relativistic linear response framework based on the Kubo formalism. By applying all space-time symmetry operations contained in the magnetic point group of a solid to the relevant response coefficient, the torkance expressed as torque-current correlation function, restrictions to the shape of the direct and inverse response tensors are obtained. These are shown to apply to the corresponding thermal analogs as well, namely the direct and inverse thermal SOT in response to a temperature gradient or heat current. Using an implementation of the Kubo-Bastin formula for the torkance into a first-principles multiple-scattering Green function framework and accounting for disorder effects via the so-called coherent potential approximation, all contributions to the SOT in pure systems, dilute as well as concentrated alloys can be treated on equal footing. This way, material specific values for all torkance tensor elements in the fcc (111) trilayer alloy system Pt| FexCo1 -x|Cu are obtained over a wide concentration range and discussed in comparison to results for electrical and spin conductivity, as well as to previous work—in particular concerning symmetry with respect to magnetization reversal and the nature of the various contributions.

  4. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  5. Calibration of the linear response range of x-ray imaging plates and their reader based on image grayscale values.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kuan; Xu, Tao; Zheng, Jianhua; Dong, Jianjun; Wei, Minxi; Li, Chaoguang; Cao, Zhurong; Du, Huabing; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Yi, Rongqing; Zhang, Jiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Liu, Shenye; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Jin; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    X-ray imaging plates are one of the most important X-ray imaging detectors and are widely used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. However, their linear response range, which is the foundation of their quantitative data analysis, has not been sufficiently deeply investigated. In this work, we develop an X-ray fluorescer calibration system and carefully explore the linear response range of X-ray imaging plates. For the first time, nearly the entire grayscale range of the X-ray imaging plate linear response-7819-64 879 in the range of 0-65 535-has been observed. Further, we discuss the uncertainties involved in the calibration process. This work demonstrates the excellent linear response qualities of X-ray imaging plates and provides a significant foundation for expanding their quantitative applied range.

  6. THE RESPONSE OF DRUG EXPENDITURE TO NON-LINEAR CONTRACT DESIGN: EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE PART D.

    PubMed

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2015-05-01

    We study the demand response to non-linear price schedules using data on insurance contracts and prescription drug purchases in Medicare Part D. We exploit the kink in individuals' budget set created by the famous "donut hole," where insurance becomes discontinuously much less generous on the margin, to provide descriptive evidence of the drug purchase response to a price increase. We then specify and estimate a simple dynamic model of drug use that allows us to quantify the spending response along the entire non-linear budget set. We use the model for counterfactual analysis of the increase in spending from "filling" the donut hole, as will be required by 2020 under the Affordable Care Act. In our baseline model, which considers spending decisions within a single year, we estimate that "filling" the donut hole will increase annual drug spending by about $150, or about 8 percent. About one-quarter of this spending increase reflects "anticipatory" behavior, coming from beneficiaries whose spending prior to the policy change would leave them short of reaching the donut hole. We also present descriptive evidence of cross-year substitution of spending by individuals who reach the kink, which motivates a simple extension to our baseline model that allows - in a highly stylized way - for individuals to engage in such cross year substitution. Our estimates from this extension suggest that a large share of the $150 drug spending increase could be attributed to cross-year substitution, and the net increase could be as little as $45 per year.

  7. THE RESPONSE OF DRUG EXPENDITURE TO NON-LINEAR CONTRACT DESIGN: EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE PART D*

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We study the demand response to non-linear price schedules using data on insurance contracts and prescription drug purchases in Medicare Part D. We exploit the kink in individuals’ budget set created by the famous “donut hole,” where insurance becomes discontinuously much less generous on the margin, to provide descriptive evidence of the drug purchase response to a price increase. We then specify and estimate a simple dynamic model of drug use that allows us to quantify the spending response along the entire non-linear budget set. We use the model for counterfactual analysis of the increase in spending from “filling” the donut hole, as will be required by 2020 under the Affordable Care Act. In our baseline model, which considers spending decisions within a single year, we estimate that “filling” the donut hole will increase annual drug spending by about $150, or about 8 percent. About one-quarter of this spending increase reflects “anticipatory” behavior, coming from beneficiaries whose spending prior to the policy change would leave them short of reaching the donut hole. We also present descriptive evidence of cross-year substitution of spending by individuals who reach the kink, which motivates a simple extension to our baseline model that allows – in a highly stylized way – for individuals to engage in such cross year substitution. Our estimates from this extension suggest that a large share of the $150 drug spending increase could be attributed to cross-year substitution, and the net increase could be as little as $45 per year. PMID:26769984

  8. DEFORM-4: fuel pin characterization and transient response in the SAS4A accident analysis code system

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, K.J.; Hill, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The DEFORM-4 module is the segment of the SAS4A Accident Analysis Code System that calculates the fuel pin characterization in response to a steady state irradiation history, thereby providing the initial conditions for the transient calculation. The various phenomena considered include fuel porosity migration, fission gas bubble induced swelling, fuel cracking and healing, fission gas release, cladding swelling, and the thermal-mechanical state of the fuel and cladding. In the transient state, the module continues the thermal-mechanical response calculation, including fuel melting and central cavity pressurization, until cladding failure is predicted and one of the failed fuel modules is initiated. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated the validity of the modeling approach.

  9. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  10. Quantum Kramers model: Corrections to the linear response theory for continuous bath spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rips, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Decay of the metastable state is analyzed within the quantum Kramers model in the weak-to-intermediate dissipation regime. The decay kinetics in this regime is determined by energy exchange between the unstable mode and the stable modes of thermal bath. In our previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 42, 4427 (1990)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.42.4427], Grabert's perturbative approach to well dynamics in the case of the discrete bath [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1683 (1988)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.61.1683] has been extended to account for the second order terms in the classical equations of motion (EOM) for the stable modes. Account of the secular terms reduces EOM for the stable modes to those of the forced oscillator with the time-dependent frequency (TDF oscillator). Analytic expression for the characteristic function of energy loss of the unstable mode has been derived in terms of the generating function of the transition probabilities for the quantum forced TDF oscillator. In this paper, the approach is further developed and applied to the case of the continuous frequency spectrum of the bath. The spectral density functions of the bath of stable modes are expressed in terms of the dissipative properties (the friction function) of the original bath. They simplify considerably for the one-dimensional systems, when the density of phonon states is constant. Explicit expressions for the fourth order corrections to the linear response theory result for the characteristic function of the energy loss and its cumulants are obtained for the particular case of the cubic potential with Ohmic (Markovian) dissipation. The range of validity of the perturbative approach in this case is determined (γ/ω_{b}<0.26), which includes the turnover region. The dominant correction to the linear response theory result is associated with the "work function" and leads to reduction of the average energy loss and its dispersion. This reduction increases with the increasing dissipation strength

  11. Quantum Kramers model: Corrections to the linear response theory for continuous bath spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Decay of the metastable state is analyzed within the quantum Kramers model in the weak-to-intermediate dissipation regime. The decay kinetics in this regime is determined by energy exchange between the unstable mode and the stable modes of thermal bath. In our previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 42, 4427 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevA.42.4427], Grabert's perturbative approach to well dynamics in the case of the discrete bath [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1683 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.61.1683] has been extended to account for the second order terms in the classical equations of motion (EOM) for the stable modes. Account of the secular terms reduces EOM for the stable modes to those of the forced oscillator with the time-dependent frequency (TDF oscillator). Analytic expression for the characteristic function of energy loss of the unstable mode has been derived in terms of the generating function of the transition probabilities for the quantum forced TDF oscillator. In this paper, the approach is further developed and applied to the case of the continuous frequency spectrum of the bath. The spectral density functions of the bath of stable modes are expressed in terms of the dissipative properties (the friction function) of the original bath. They simplify considerably for the one-dimensional systems, when the density of phonon states is constant. Explicit expressions for the fourth order corrections to the linear response theory result for the characteristic function of the energy loss and its cumulants are obtained for the particular case of the cubic potential with Ohmic (Markovian) dissipation. The range of validity of the perturbative approach in this case is determined (γ /ωb<0.26 ), which includes the turnover region. The dominant correction to the linear response theory result is associated with the "work function" and leads to reduction of the average energy loss and its dispersion. This reduction increases with the increasing dissipation strength (up to ˜10 % ) within the

  12. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  13. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.; Kato, T.

    1998-04-06

    We investigate non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional- radiative model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The calculated net emission is presented as a NLTE response matrix. In agreement with a rigorous general rule of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the linear response is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and {+-} 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  14. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-Linear Dynamic Response of a Spur Gear Pair: Modelling and Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARKER, R. G.; VIJAYAKAR, S. M.; IMAJO, T.

    2000-10-01

    The dynamic response of a spur gear pair is investigated using a finite element/contact mechanics model that offers significant advantages for dynamic gear analyses. The gear pair is analyzed across a wide range of operating speeds and torques. Comparisons are made to other researchers' published experiments that reveal complex non-linear phenomena. The non-linearity source is contact loss of the meshing teeth, which, in contrast to the prevailing understanding, occurs even for large torques despite the use of high-precision gears. A primary feature of the modelling is that dynamic mesh forces are calculated using a detailed contact analysis at each time step as the gears roll through the mesh; there is no need to externally specify the excitation in the form of time-varying mesh stiffness, static transmission error input, or the like. A semi-analytical model near the tooth surface is matched to a finite element solution away from the tooth surface, and the computational efficiency that results permits dynamic analysis. Two-single-degree-of-freedom models are also studied. While one gives encouragingly good results, the other, which appears to have better mesh stiffness modelling, gives poor comparisons with experiments. The results indicate the sensitivity of such models to the Fourier spectrum of the changing mesh stiffness.

  16. Non-linear response of infinite periodic solids to homogenous electric fields and collective atomic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosez, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    The non-linear response of infinite periodic solids to homogenous electric fields and cooperative atomic displacements will be discussed in the framework of density functional perturbation theory. The approach is based on the “2n + 1” theorem applied to an electric field dependent energy functional. We will focus on the non-linear optical susceptibilities, Raman scattering efficiencies and electrooptic coefficients. Different formulations of third-order energy derivatives will be examined and their convergence with respect to the k-point sampling will be discussed. The method will be applied to conventional semiconductors and to ferroelectric oxides. In the latter case, we will also describe how the first- principles results can be combined to an effective Hamiltonian approach in order to provide access to the temperature dependence of the optical properties. This work was done in collabration with M. Veithen and X. Gonze and was supported by the VolkwagenStiftung, FNRS-Belgium and the FAME-NoE.

  17. The influence of the density ratio on the linear frequency response of low-density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro; Lesshafft, Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Low-density jets support global self-sustained oscillations when the jet-to-ambient density ratio is sufficiently small, a phenomenon that has been linked to the presence of a region of local absolute instability in the underlying parallel base flow. However, the use of local stability analysis requires introducing ad-hoc criteria to match the experimental observations (see). In this work we therefore use a global approach, where the wavepacket structures are temporal eigenmodes of the linearized equations of motion in a 2D domain. The resulting eigenvalue spectra show that, when the density ratio is decreased, a discrete eigenmode becomes increasingly dominant, eventually reaching a positive growth rate for a certain critical density ratio. For the particular case of a He/air jet, this critical density ratio, as well as the corresponding oscillation frequency, is in good quantitative agreement with the experiments of. The influence of the density ratio on the linear frequency response of the jet under globally stable conditions is also investigated. Supported by Spanish MINECO under project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  18. Thermal equation of state of bcc and hcp Fe: linear response quasi-harmonic lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Xianwei

    2005-03-01

    Linear-response Linear-Muffin-Tin-Orbital calculations have been performed to understand and predict the thermal equation of state, elasticity, and phase stability of bcc and hcp Fe, for input into dynamic shock finite-element simulations. The phonon dispersion and phonon density of states have been calculated at different volumes and various c/a axial ratios for hcp structures, which show good agreements with available experimental data. The thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity at different pressure have been calculated. Free energy functional for bcc and hcp Fe has been derived, and has been further applied to establish the thermal equation of state, bulk modulus K0, dK0/dT, and thermal expansion coefficients under high pressures and temperatures. A detailed comparison with experiment has been made. For hcp Fe, the variations of c/a ratios with temperatures and pressures have been predicted. The influence of anharmonic effects has been examined using tight-binding calculations. This work was supported by US Department of Energy ASCI/ASAP subcontract to Caltech , Grant DOE W-7405-ENG-48 (to REC).

  19. Indoor calibration of Sky Quality Meters: Linearity, spectral responsivity and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravettoni, M.; Strepparava, D.; Cereghetti, N.; Klett, S.; Andretta, M.; Steiger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The indoor calibration of brightness sensors requires extremely low values of irradiance in the most accurate and reproducible way. In this work the testing equipment of an ISO 17025 accredited laboratory for electrical testing, qualification and type approval of solar photovoltaic modules was modified in order to test the linearity of the instruments from few mW/cm2 down to fractions of nW/cm2, corresponding to levels of simulated brightness from 6 to 19 mag/arcsec2. Sixteen Sky Quality Meter (SQM) produced by Unihedron, a Canadian manufacturer, were tested, also assessing the impact of the ageing of their protective glasses on the calibration coefficients and the drift of the instruments. The instruments are in operation on measurement points and observatories at different sites and altitudes in Southern Switzerland, within the framework of OASI, the Environmental Observatory of Southern Switzerland. The authors present the results of the calibration campaign: linearity; brightness calibration, with and without protective glasses; transmittance measurement of the glasses; and spectral responsivity of the devices. A detailed uncertainty analysis is also provided, according to the ISO 17025 standard.

  20. Linear sea-level response to abrupt ocean warming of major West Antarctic ice basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, M.; Feldmann, J.; Levermann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica's contribution to global sea-level rise has recently been increasing. Whether its ice discharge will become unstable and decouple from anthropogenic forcing or increase linearly with the warming of the surrounding ocean is of fundamental importance. Under unabated greenhouse-gas emissions, ocean models indicate an abrupt intrusion of warm circumpolar deep water into the cavity below West Antarctica's Filchner-Ronne ice shelf within the next two centuries. The ice basin's retrograde bed slope would allow for an unstable ice-sheet retreat, but the buttressing of the large ice shelf and the narrow glacier troughs tend to inhibit such instability. It is unclear whether future ice loss will be dominated by ice instability or anthropogenic forcing. Here we show in regional and continental-scale ice-sheet simulations, which are capable of resolving unstable grounding-line retreat, that the sea-level response of the Filchner-Ronne ice basin is not dominated by ice instability and follows the strength of the forcing quasi-linearly. We find that the ice loss reduces after each pulse of projected warm water intrusion. The long-term sea-level contribution is approximately proportional to the total shelf-ice melt. Although the local instabilities might dominate the ice loss for weak oceanic warming, we find that the upper limit of ice discharge from the region is determined by the forcing and not by the marine ice-sheet instability.

  1. Linear frequency response analysis of a high subsonic and a supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Oliver; Colonius, Tim; Brès, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    A linear frequency response, or resolvent analysis of two turbulent jet mean flows is conducted. The mean flows are obtained from two high-fidelity large eddy simulations of a Mach 0.9 and a Mach 1.5 turbulent jet at Reynolds numbers of 1 ×106 and 3 ×105 , respectively. For both cases, curves of the optimal and sub-optimal output gains are calculated as a function of frequency for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The gain curves bring to light pseudo-resonances associated with different linear instability mechanisms. The same mechanisms are recovered in global stability analyses, and the results are compared. In the case of the Mach 0.9 jet, the resolvent analysis allows for a detailed study of trapped acoustic modes inside the potential core that were subject to previous stability studies. The structure of the resolvent and global modes are compared to POD mode estimates of the LES data. Additionally, the projection of the LES data onto the modes allows for quantitative assessment of how well the modal structures represent the coherent structures in the jet.

  2. Tests of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    It is pointed out that induction of lung cancer by exposure to Rn daughters, applied at high doses to miners and at low doses to exposures in homes, provides a very stringent and sensitive test of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation, because this relationship predicts that a substantial fraction of lung cancer among non-smokers is due to average Rn levels. Therefore, it predicts an easily observable elevation of lung cancer rates in areas where Rn levels are many times greater than the average, especially at times before cigarette smoking began to have important effects on lung cancer statistics. While more data are needed (and will be forthcoming), some of the early indications of these studies are reviewed here. Several cases are now known where average Rn levels are very high, and in all of these cases lung cancer rates are well below average. Methods for analyzing these data are discussed, and it is concluded that, based on current evidence, they indicate at least a factor of 4 disagreement with linear, no-threshold predictions.

  3. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Response in Silver Nanoclusters: Insight from a Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Day, Paul N; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A; Bigioni, Terry P

    2016-02-04

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) investigation of the thiolated silver nanoclusters [Ag44(SR)30](4-), Ag14(SR)12(PR'3)8, Ag31(SG)19, Ag32(SG)19, and Ag15(SG)11, which were synthesized and for which one-photon absorption (OPA) characterization is available. Our computational investigation based on careful examination of the exchange-correlation functional used in DFT geometry optimization and for the linear optical properties predictions by TDDFT, demonstrated good agreement with the measured linear absorption spectra, however dependent on the applied functional. Following the benchmarking, we evaluated the two-photon absorption (TPA) response using TDDFT, noting that accurate prediction of OPA is important for suppositions on the spectral range for TPA enhancement because of the sensitivity to the excitation energies. Although the TPA cross-section results are complicated by resonance effects and quantifying TPA cross sections for these systems is difficult, our results indicate that the nanoclusters Ag15 and Ag31/32 are likely to have large TPA cross sections. The spherical symmetry of the Ag44 and Ag14 nanoclusters leads to applicability of superatom theory, while it is not as useful for the more oblate geometries of the Ag15 and Ag31/32 systems.

  4. Reflections on the nature of non-linear responses of the climate to forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Peter

    2017-04-01

    On centennial to multi-millennial time scales the paleoclimatic record shows that climate responds in a very non-linear way to the external forcing. Perhaps most puzzling is the change in glacial period duration at the Middle Pleistocene Transition. From a dynamical systems perspective, this could be a change in frequency locking between the orbital forcing and the climatic response or it could be a non-linear resonance phenomenon. In both cases the climate system shows a non-trivial oscillatory behaviour. From the records it seems that this behaviour can be described by an effective dynamics on a low-dimensional slow manifold. These different possible dynamical behaviours will be discussed. References: Arianna Marchionne, Peter Ditlevsen, and Sebastian Wieczorek, "Three types of nonlinear resonances", arXiv:1605.00858 Peter Ashwin and Peter Ditlevsen, "The middle Pleistocene transition as a generic bifurcation on a slow manifold", Climate Dynamics, 45, 2683, 2015. Peter D. Ditlevsen, "The bifurcation structure and noise assisted transitions in the Pleistocene glacial cycles", Paleoceanography, 24, PA3204, 2009

  5. Length-dependent Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions beyond linear response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, we theoretically study characteristics of the nonlinear Seebeck effect in a single-molecule junction with chain-like bridge of an arbitrary length. We have employed tight-binding models to compute the electron transmission through the system. We concentrate on the analysis of dependences of thermovoltage Vth and differential thermopower S on the bridge length. It is shown that Vth becomes stronger and S grows as the bridge lengthens. We discuss the effects of the bridge coupling to the electrodes and of specific characteristics of terminal sites on the bridge on the length-dependent Vth and S, which appear when the system operates beyond the linear response regime.

  6. Linearly enhanced response of thermopower in cascaded array of dual-stripe single-metal thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Han, Danhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zhenhai; Pi, Yudan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shengyong

    2017-05-01

    Based on the width dependence of thermopower, cascaded single-metal thermocouples were demonstrated in this report. The cascaded thermocouples were made from 100 nm thick Ni films with a 100 μm wide stripe and a 5 μm narrow stripe. The experiment results showed a linearly enhanced response of thermopower. The 64-cascaded thermocouple achieved an equivalent Seebeck coefficient of up to 55.69 μV/K, which is higher than that of a commercial type-K thermocouple (39.6 μV/K). The single-metal thermocouples were also fabricated on flexible substrates. With the simple fabrication process and remarkable temperature sensing ability, the cascaded single-metal thermocouples may find promising applications in temperature measurement of modern flexible electronic products and wearable devices.

  7. Ab initio calculation of the Gilbert damping parameter via the linear response formalism.

    PubMed

    Ebert, H; Mankovsky, S; Ködderitzsch, D; Kelly, P J

    2011-08-05

    A Kubo-Greenwood-like equation for the Gilbert damping parameter α is presented that is based on the linear response formalism. Its implementation using the fully relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band structure method in combination with coherent potential approximation alloy theory allows it to be applied to a wide range of situations. This is demonstrated with results obtained for the bcc alloy system Fe(1-x)Co(x) as well as for a series of alloys of Permalloy with 5d transition metals. To account for the thermal displacements of atoms as a scattering mechanism, an alloy-analogy model is introduced. The corresponding calculations for Ni correctly describe the rapid change of α when small amounts of substitutional Cu are introduced.

  8. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100 V

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100 V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.

  9. Sensitive linear response of an electron-hole superfluid in a periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Ziegler, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    We consider excitons in a two-dimensional periodic potential and study the linear response of the excitonic superfluid to an electromagnetic wave at low and high densities. It turns out that the static structure factor for small wavevectors is very sensitive to a change of density and temperature. It is a consequence of the fact that thermal fluctuations play a crucial role at small wavevectors, since exchanging the order of the two limits, zero temperature and vanishing wavevector, leads to different results for the structure factor. This effect could be used for high accuracy measurements in the superfluid exciton phase, which might be realized by a gated electron-hole gas, for instance, in coupled quantum wells or double layer materials. The transition of the exciton system from the superfluid state to a non-superfluid state and its manifestation by light scattering are discussed.

  10. Computation of molecular parity violation using the coupled-cluster linear response approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horný, Ľuboš; Quack, Martin

    2015-07-01

    In memoriam, Nicholas C. Handy. We report the implementation of a coupled-cluster linear response approach for the computation of molecular parity violation (in the framework of the PSI3 code, in particular). The approach is applied first to molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), hydrogen disulfide (HSSH) and dichlorinedioxide (ClOOCl), which have been studied previously. The importance of including correlation is demonstrated for these examples, also including selected variations of geometry providing parity violation as a function of torsional angles. For the substituted allenes, 1,3 difluoroallene (CHF=C=CHF), 1,fluoro,3 chloroallene (CHF=C=CHCl) and 1,3 dichloroallene (CHCl=C=CHCl), we find that in particular the last molecule may be a suitable candidate for the experimental study of molecular parity violation.

  11. Constraining the general linear model for sensible hemodynamic response function waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ciftçi, Koray; Sankur, Bülent; Kahya, Yasemin P; Akin, Ata

    2008-08-01

    We propose a method to do constrained parameter estimation and inference from neuroimaging data using general linear model (GLM). Constrained approach precludes unrealistic hemodynamic response function (HRF) estimates to appear at the outcome of the GLM analysis. The permissible ranges of waveform parameters were determined from the study of a repertoire of plausible waveforms. These parameter intervals played the role of prior distributions in the subsequent Bayesian analysis of the GLM, and Gibbs sampling was used to derive posterior distributions. The method was applied to artificial null data and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data. The results show that constraining the GLM eliminates unrealistic HRF waveforms and decreases false activations, without affecting the inference for "realistic" activations, which satisfy the constraints.

  12. Response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.; Riley, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is made of the maximum response of discrete, linear mechanical systems to arbitrary forcing functions which lie within specified bounds. Primary attention is focused on the complete determination of the forcing function which will engender maximum displacement to any particular mass element of a multi-degree-of-freedom system. In general, the desired forcing function is found to be a bang-bang type function, i.e., a function which switches from the maximum to the minimum bound and vice-versa at certain instants of time. Examples of two-degree-of-freedom systems, with and without damping, are presented in detail. Conclusions are drawn concerning the effect of damping on the switching times and the general procedure for finding these times is discussed.

  13. Linear-response theory for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method: excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Jagau, Thomas-C; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-28

    The recently presented linear-response function for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method (Mk-MRCC) [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044115 (2012)] is employed to determine vertical excitation energies within the singles and doubles approximation (Mk-MRCCSD-LR) for ozone as well as for o-benzyne, m-benzyne, and p-benzyne, which display increasing multireference character in their ground states. In order to assess the impact of a multireference ground-state wavefunction on excitation energies, we compare all our results to those obtained at the single-reference coupled-cluster level of theory within the singles and doubles as well as within the singles, doubles, and triples approximation. Special attention is paid to the artificial splitting of certain excited states which arises from the redundancy intrinsic to Mk-MRCC theory and hinders the straightforward application of the Mk-MRCC-LR method.

  14. Derivation of spin-orbit couplings in collinear linear-response TDDFT: A rigorous formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Franco de Carvalho, Felipe; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Tavernelli, Ivano; Penfold, Thomas J.

    2014-04-14

    Using an approach based upon a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions we present a rigorous derivation of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) within the framework of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT). Our method is based on a perturbative correction of the non-relativistic collinear TDDFT equations using a Breit-Pauli spin-orbit Hamiltonian. The derivation, which is performed within both the Casida and Sternheimer formulations of LR-TDDFT, is valid for any basis set. The requirement of spin noncollinearity for the treatment of spin-flip transitions is also discussed and a possible alternative solution for the description of these transitions in the collinear case is also proposed. Our results are validated by computing the SOC matrix elements between singlet and triplet states of two molecules, formaldehyde and acetone. In both cases, we find excellent agreement with benchmark calculations performed with a high level correlated wavefunction method.

  15. A revolute joint with linear load-displacement response for a deployable lidar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Warren, Peter A.; Peterson, Lee D.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is developing concepts for an advanced spacecraft, called LidarTechSat, to demonstrate key structures and mechanisms technologies necessary to deploy a segmented telescope reflector. Achieving micron-accuracy deployment requires significant advancements in deployment mechanism design, such as the revolute joint presented herein. The joint exhibits load-cycling response that is essentially linear with less than 2% hysteresis, and the joint rotates with less than 7 mN-m (1 in-oz) of resistance. A prototype reflector metering truss incorporating the joint exhibits only a few microns of kinematic error under repected deployment and impulse loading. No other mechanically deployment structure found in the literature has been demonstrated to be this kinematically accurate.

  16. Fields of an ultrashort tightly focused radially polarized laser pulse in a linear response plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.

    2017-10-01

    Analytical expressions for the fields of a radially polarized, ultrashort, and tightly focused laser pulse propagating in a linear-response plasma are derived and discussed. The fields are obtained from solving the inhomogeneous wave equations for the vector and scalar potentials, linked by the Lorenz gauge, in a plasma background. First, the scalar potential is eliminated using the gauge condition, then the vector potential is synthesized from Fourier components of an initial uniform distribution of wavenumbers, and the inverse Fourier transformation is carried out term-by-term in a truncated series (finite sum). The zeroth-order term in, for example, the axial electric field component is shown to model a pulse much better than its widely used paraxial approximation counterpart. Some of the propagation characteristics of the fields are discussed and all fields are shown to have manifested the expected limits for propagation in a vacuum.

  17. Linear β-1,3 Glucans Are Elicitors of Defense Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Klarzynski, Olivier; Plesse, Bertrand; Joubert, Jean-Marie; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Kopp, Marguerite; Kloareg, Bernard; Fritig, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Laminarin, a linear β-1,3 glucan (mean degree of polymerization of 33) was extracted and purified from the brown alga Laminaria digitata. Its elicitor activity on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was compared to that of oligogalacturonides with a mean degree of polymerization of 10. The two oligosaccharides were perceived by suspension-cultured cells as distinct chemical stimuli but triggered a similar and broad spectrum of defense responses. A dose of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin or oligogalacturonides induced within a few minutes a 1.9-pH-units alkalinization of the extracellular medium and a transient release of H2O2. After a few hours, a strong stimulation of Phe ammonia-lyase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, and lipoxygenase activities occurred, as well as accumulation of salicylic acid. Neither of the two oligosaccharides induced tissue damage or cell death nor did they induce accumulation of the typical tobacco phytoalexin capsidiol, in contrast with the effects of the proteinaceous elicitor β-megaspermin. Structure activity studies with laminarin, laminarin oligomers, high molecular weight β-1,3–1,6 glucans from fungal cell walls, and the β-1,6–1,3 heptaglucan showed that the elicitor effects observed in tobacco with β-glucans are specific to linear β-1,3 linkages, with laminaripentaose being the smallest elicitor-active structure. In accordance with its strong stimulating effect on defense responses in tobacco cells, infiltration of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin in tobacco leaves triggered accumulation within 48 h of the four families of antimicrobial pathogenesis-related proteins investigated. Challenge of the laminarin-infiltrated leaves 5 d after treatment with the soft rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora resulted in a strong reduction of the infection when compared with water-treated leaves. PMID:11080280

  18. Exciton Absorption Spectra by Linear Response Methods: Application to Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Martín A; Jackson, Nicholas E; Fauvell, Thomas J; Kelley, Matthew S; Chen, Lin X; Schatz, George C; Ratner, Mark A

    2017-03-15

    The theoretical description of the time-evolution of excitons requires, as an initial step, the calculation of their spectra, which has been inaccessible to most users due to the high computational scaling of conventional algorithms and accuracy issues caused by common density functionals. Previously (J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 204105), we developed a simple method that resolves these issues. Our scheme is based on a two-step calculation in which a linear-response TDDFT calculation is used to generate orbitals perturbed by the excitonic state, and then a second linear-response TDDFT calculation is used to determine the spectrum of excitations relative to the excitonic state. Herein, we apply this theory to study near-infrared absorption spectra of excitons in oligomers of the ubiquitous conjugated polymers poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), and poly(benzodithiophene-thieno[3,4-b]thiophene) (PTB7). For P3HT and MEH-PPV oligomers, the calculated intense absorption bands converge at the longest wavelengths for 10 monomer units, and show strong consistency with experimental measurements. The calculations confirm that the exciton spectral features in MEH-PPV overlap with those of the bipolaron formation. In addition, our calculations identify the exciton absorption bands in transient absorption spectra measured by our group for oligomers (1, 2, and 3 units) of PTB7. For all of the cases studied, we report the dominant orbital excitations contributing to the optically active excited state-excited state transitions, and suggest a simple rule to identify absorption peaks at the longest wavelengths. We suggest our methodology could be considered for further developments in theoretical transient spectroscopy to include nonadiabatic effects, coherences, and to describe the formation of species such as charge-transfer states and polaron pairs.

  19. Testing for the linearity of responses to multiple anthropogenic climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, C. E.; Stone, P. H.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2001-12-01

    To test whether climate forcings are additive, we compare climate model simulations in which anthropogenic forcings are applied individually and in combination. Tests are performed with different values for climate system properties (climate sensitivity and rate of heat uptake by the deep ocean) as well as for different strengths of the net aerosol forcing, thereby testing for the dependence of linearity on these properties. The MIT 2D Land-Ocean Climate Model used in this study consists of a zonally averaged statistical-dynamical atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer Q-flux ocean model, with heat anomalies diffused into the deep ocean. Following our previous studies, the anthropogenic forcings are the changes in concentrations of greenhouse gases (1860-1995), sulfate aerosol (1860-1995), and stratospheric and tropospheric ozone (1979-1995). The sulfate aerosol forcing is applied as a surface albedo change. For an aerosol forcing of -1.0 W/m2 and an effective ocean diffusitivity of 2.5 cm2/s, the nonlinearity of the response of global-mean surface temperatures to the combined forcing shows a strong dependence on climate sensitivity. The fractional change in decadal averages ([(Δ TG + Δ TS + Δ TO) - Δ TGSO ]/ Δ TGSO) for the 1986-1995 period compared to pre-industrial times are 0.43, 0.90, and 1.08 with climate sensitivities of 3.0, 4.5, and 6.2 oC, respectively. The values of Δ TGSO for these three cases are 0.52, 0.62, and 0.76 oC. The dependence of linearity on climate system properties, the role of climate system feedbacks, and the implications for the detection of climate system's response to individual forcings will be presented. Details of the model and forcings can be found at http://web.mit.edu/globalchange/www/.

  20. Testing For The Linearity of Responses To Multiple Anthropogenic Climate Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, C. E.; Stone, P. H.; Sokolov, A. P.

    To test whether climate forcings are additive, we compare climate model simulations in which anthropogenic forcings are applied individually and in combination. Tests are performed with different values for climate system properties (climate sensitivity and rate of heat uptake by the deep ocean) as well as for different strengths of the net aerosol forcing, thereby testing for the dependence of linearity on these properties. The MIT 2D Land-Ocean Climate Model used in this study consists of a zonally aver- aged statistical-dynamical atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer Q-flux ocean model, with heat anomalies diffused into the deep ocean. Following our previous stud- ies, the anthropogenic forcings are the changes in concentrations of greenhouse gases (1860-1995), sulfate aerosol (1860-1995), and stratospheric and tropospheric ozone (1979-1995). The sulfate aerosol forcing is applied as a surface albedo change. For an aerosol forcing of -1.0 W/m2 and an effective ocean diffusitivity of 2.5 cm2/s, the nonlinearity of the response of global-mean surface temperatures to the combined forcing shows a strong dependence on climate sensitivity. The fractional change in decadal averages ([(TG + TS + TO) - TGSO]/TGSO) for the 1986-1995 period compared to pre-industrial times are 0.43, 0.90, and 1.08 with climate sensitiv- ities of 3.0, 4.5, and 6.2 C, respectively. The values of TGSO for these three cases o are 0.52, 0.62, and 0.76 C. The dependence of linearity on climate system properties, o the role of climate system feedbacks, and the implications for the detection of climate system's response to individual forcings will be presented. Details of the model and forcings can be found at http://web.mit.edu/globalchange/www/.

  1. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response.

    PubMed

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M

    2016-09-14

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  2. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  3. Linear response of the hydrogen atom in Stark states to a harmonic uniform electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, T.A.

    1989-04-15

    The influence of a weak harmonic uniform electric field, switched on adiabatically, on a nonrelativistic hydrogenlike atom is examined. Each of the phi- and A-gauge first-order corrections to the wave function of a stationary state chemically bondN> is determined by a vector function that we denote v/sub N/ and w/sub N/, respectively. The absolute starting point of our calculations is Schwinger's formula for the Coulomb Green's function in momentum space. In the case of a bound state with definite angular momentum, we report a compact integral representation and also an explicit expression of the phi-gauge vector v/sub n//sub l//sub m/, which are analogous to those of the corresponding A-gauge vector w/sub n//sub l//sub m/ studied previously. We have derived compact analytic expressions of the linear-response vectors v/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$ and w/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$ associated to an arbitrary Stark state. These are written first as contour integrals, and then explicitly in terms of a new generalized hypergeometric function with five variables, /sub 2/phi/sub H/, which is a finite sum of Humbert functions phi/sub 1/. We have calculated the static limit of the regular part of the vector v/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$. Also discussed are the Sturmian-function expansions of the linear-response vectors for angular momentum states.

  4. Transient Deformation Patterns in Response to Quaternary Glacial Advance-Retreat Across the Offshore St. Elias Mountains, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, L. L.; Clary, W. A.; Daigle, H.; Koons, P. O.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The southern Alaska margin, home to the St. Elias Mountains, the highest coastal mountain range on Earth experiencing the highest erosion rates on Earth, provides a superb setting for evaluating competing influences of rheological and climate control on orogen development. Previous studies have recognized this potential, but conclusions were limited due to the absence of information on the time-dependent behavior of climate and rheological processes. These limitations can now be surpassed due to 1) the recent availability of high-precision age constraints on the structural and stratigraphic evolution of offshore sediments and structures and 2) geotechnical information on the extent of dewatering and related spatial changes in the material properties of these sediments. We correlate emerging results from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341 Sites U1420 and U1421 with regional seismic data across the continental shelf and slope to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of thrusting in response to Yakutat-North American convergence. Our mapping shows that the pattern of faulting changed from distributed across the shelf to highly localized away from the primary glacial depocenter over the course of one glacial cycle. Core samples suggest that the glacially derived sediment is overpressured, with pore pressures possibly reaching >90% of lithostatic stress. Elevated pore pressures develop rapidly in response to focused glaciomarine sedimentation, in addition to direct ice loading, and may induce a transient state of wedge reorganization manifested as a change in localization of deformation. This relationship suggests that the additive response of pore pressure variations over glacial cycles throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene result in constant reorganization of deformation style and location.

  5. Effects of Initial Geometric Imperfections On the Non-Linear Response of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the elastic buckling and nonlinear behavior of the liquid-oxygen tank for the new Space Shuttle superlightweight external fuel tank are presented. Selected results that illustrate three distinctly different types of non-linear response phenomena for thin-walled shells which are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads are presented. These response phenomena consist of a bifurcation-type buckling response, a short-wavelength non-linear bending response and a non-linear collapse or "snap-through" response associated with a limit point. The effects of initial geometric imperfections on the response characteristics are emphasized. The results illustrate that the buckling and non-linear response of a geometrically imperfect shell structure subjected to complex loading conditions may not be adequately characterized by an elastic linear bifurcation buckling analysis, and that the traditional industry practice of applying a buckling-load knock-down factor can result in an ultraconservative design. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections, and that the use a buckling-load knock-down factor is needed for this case.

  6. Effects of Initial Geometric Imperfections On the Non-Linear Response of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the elastic buckling and nonlinear behavior of the liquid-oxygen tank for the new Space Shuttle superlightweight external fuel tank are presented. Selected results that illustrate three distinctly different types of non-linear response phenomena for thin-walled shells which are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads are presented. These response phenomena consist of a bifurcation-type buckling response, a short-wavelength non-linear bending response and a non-linear collapse or "snap-through" response associated with a limit point. The effects of initial geometric imperfections on the response characteristics are emphasized. The results illustrate that the buckling and non-linear response of a geometrically imperfect shell structure subjected to complex loading conditions may not be adequately characterized by an elastic linear bifurcation buckling analysis, and that the traditional industry practice of applying a buckling-load knock-down factor can result in an ultraconservative design. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections, and that the use a buckling-load knock-down factor is needed for this case.

  7. Calibration of the linear response range of x-ray imaging plates and their reader based on image grayscale values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kuan; Xu, Tao; Zheng, Jianhua; Dong, Jianjun; Wei, Minxi; Li, Chaoguang; Cao, Zhurong; Du, Huabing; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Yi, Rongqing; Zhang, Jiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Liu, Shenye; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Jin; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    X-ray imaging plates are one of the most important X-ray imaging detectors and are widely used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. However, their linear response range, which is the foundation of their quantitative data analysis, has not been sufficiently deeply investigated. In this work, we develop an X-ray fluorescer calibration system and carefully explore the linear response range of X-ray imaging plates. For the first time, nearly the entire grayscale range of the X-ray imaging plate linear response—7819-64 879 in the range of 0-65 535—has been observed. Further, we discuss the uncertainties involved in the calibration process. This work demonstrates the excellent linear response qualities of X-ray imaging plates and provides a significant foundation for expanding their quantitative applied range.

  8. Circumventing chronological uncertainty in attempts to detect and understand non-linear ecosystem responses in shallow lake paleorecords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow lakes can undergo rapid changes in key biotic components. These phenomena, which include loss of submerged macrophytes, fish kills and algal blooms, can occur at sub-seasonal timescales and are often reported to be non-linear, threshold responses to a gradual intensification of an external driver and reflective of a change in state. Although such threshold responses are widely reported, a recent meta-analysis found that most such changes cannot be unequivocally confirmed as true threshold responses. This is because clear records of system stability in the face of a gradual increase in external driver intensity followed by rapid system change are lacking, as are records of post threshold stability in the new state following release of external driver pressure. That threshold responses were not confirmed often reflects insufficient time series of before or after data to establish driver variability and ecosystem stability. In this context, paleo studies provide a means to clearly identify non-linear, threshold responses in shallow lake ecosystems. The challenge of detecting evidence of non-linear responses in shallow lake ecosystems is often seen as a chronological one. Highly resolved and accurate sediment chronologies coupled with historical records of external driver intensity do provide a means to detect non-linear, threshold responses, but such chronologies are rare in shallow lakes. Fortunately, the 'tight chronology-historical record of external driver' approach is not the only, or even the most direct, way to detect non-linear ecosystem responses in paleo records. An alternative, more direct approach is ecosystem response and external driver intensity to be preserved in the same sedimentary record. Theoretically, it is arguable whether any chronological control is needed at all to determine if a non-linear response has occurred, for the key is not how quickly an ecosystem response may occur or if it is linear with respect to time, it is whether it is

  9. Is the Pain Visual Analogue Scale Linear and Responsive to Change? An Exploration Using Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Paula; White, Peter J.; Tennant, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pain visual analogue scales (VAS) are commonly used in clinical trials and are often treated as an interval level scale without evidence that this is appropriate. This paper examines the internal construct validity and responsiveness of the pain VAS using Rasch analysis. Methods Patients (n = 221, mean age 67, 58% female) with chronic stable joint pain (hip 40% or knee 60%) of mechanical origin waiting for joint replacement were included. Pain was scored on seven daily VASs. Rasch analysis was used to examine fit to the Rasch model. Responsiveness (Standardized Response Means, SRM) was examined on the raw ordinal data and the interval data generated from the Rasch analysis. Results Baseline pain VAS scores fitted the Rasch model, although 15 aberrant cases impacted on unidimensionality. There was some local dependency between items but this did not significantly affect the person estimates of pain. Daily pain (item difficulty) was stable, suggesting that single measures can be used. Overall, the SRMs derived from ordinal data overestimated the true responsiveness by 59%. Changes over time at the lower and higher end of the scale were represented by large jumps in interval equivalent data points; in the middle of the scale the reverse was seen. Conclusions The pain VAS is a valid tool for measuring pain at one point in time. However, the pain VAS does not behave linearly and SRMs vary along the trait of pain. Consequently, Minimum Clinically Important Differences using raw data, or change scores in general, are invalid as these will either under- or overestimate true change; raw pain VAS data should not be used as a primary outcome measure or to inform parametric-based Randomised Controlled Trial power calculations in research studies; and Rasch analysis should be used to convert ordinal data to interval data prior to data interpretation. PMID:24921952

  10. Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi: Simulations vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell; Benafan, Othmane; Noebe, Ronald; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A recent microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal-based plasticity, the B2<-> MB190 phase transformation and anisotropic elasticity at the grain scale is calibrated to recent data for polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at.% Ni). Inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, texture and differential scanning calorimetry data, as well as a subset of recent isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. The model is assessed against additional experimental data. Several experimental trends are captured - in particular, the transformation strain during thermal cycling monotonically increases and reaches a peak with increasing bias stress. This is achieved, in part, by modifying the martensite hardening matrix proposed by Patoor et al. [Patoor E, Eberhardt A, Berveiller M. J Phys IV 1996;6:277]. Some experimental trends are underestimated - in particular, the ratcheting of macrostrain during thermal cycling. This may reflect a model limitation that transformation-plasticity coupling is captured on a coarse (grain) scale but not on a fine (martensitic plate) scale.

  11. Maintaining tetrahedral mesh quality in response to time-dependent topological and geometrical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.; George, D.

    1998-12-01

    When modeling deformation of geometrically complex regions, unstructured tetrahedral meshes provide the flexibility necessary to track interfaces as they change geometrically and topologically. In the class of time-dependent simulations considered in this paper, multimaterial interfaces are represented by sets of triangular facets, and motion of the interfaces is controlled by physical considerations. The motion of interior points in the conforming tetrahedral mesh (i.e., points not on interfaces) is arbitrary and may be chosen to produce good element shapes. In the context of specified boundary motion driven by physical considerations, they have found that a rather large glossary of mesh changes is required to allow the simulation to survive all the transitions of interface geometry and topology that occur during time evolution. This paper will describe mesh changes required to maintain good element quality as the geometry evolves, as well as mesh changes required to capture changes i n topology that occur when material regions collapse or pinch off. This paper will present a detailed description of mesh changes necessary for capturing the aforementioned geometrical and topological changes, as implemented in the code GRAIN3D, and will provide examples from a metallic grain growth simulation in which the normal velocity of the grain boundary is proportional to mean curvature.

  12. Assessment of the setup dependence of detector response functions for mega-voltage linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Christopher; Simon, Tom; Simon, Bill; Dempsey, James F.; Kahler, Darren; Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu Chihray; Yan Guanghua

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of beam profiles is important for precise treatment planning dosimetry. Calculated beam profiles need to precisely replicate profiles measured during machine commissioning. Finite detector size introduces perturbations into the measured profiles, which, in turn, impact the resulting modeled profiles. The authors investigate a method for extracting the unperturbed beam profiles from those measured during linear accelerator commissioning. Methods: In-plane and cross-plane data were collected for an Elekta Synergy linac at 6 MV using ionization chambers of volume 0.01, 0.04, 0.13, and 0.65 cm{sup 3} and a diode of surface area 0.64 mm{sup 2}. The detectors were orientated with the stem perpendicular to the beam and pointing away from the gantry. Profiles were measured for a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field at depths ranging from 0.8 to 25.0 cm and SSDs from 90 to 110 cm. Shaping parameters of a Gaussian response function were obtained relative to the Edge detector. The Gaussian function was deconvolved from the measured ionization chamber data. The Edge detector profile was taken as an approximation to the true profile, to which deconvolved data were compared. Data were also collected with CC13 and Edge detectors for additional fields and energies on an Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy, and Siemens Oncor linear accelerator and response functions obtained. Response functions were compared as a function of depth, SSD, and detector scan direction. Variations in the shaping parameter were introduced and the effect on the resulting deconvolution profiles assessed. Results: Up to 10% setup dependence in the Gaussian shaping parameter occurred, for each detector for a particular plane. This translated to less than a {+-}0.7 mm variation in the 80%-20% penumbral width. For large volume ionization chambers such as the FC65 Farmer type, where the cavity length to diameter ratio is far from 1, the scan direction produced up to a 40% difference in the shaping

  13. Plastic deformation in a metallic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, Ryan W.; Carlson, William

    2016-03-01

    Solitary wave response was investigated in a metallic granular chain-piston system using LS-DYNA. A power law hardening material model was used to show that localized plastic deformation is present in a metallic granular chain for an impact velocity of 0.5 m/s. This loss due to plastic deformation was quantified via impulse, and it was shown that the loss scales nearly linearly with impact velocity. Therefore, metallic grains may not be suitable for devices that require high-amplitude solitary waves. There would be too much energy lost to plastic deformation. One can assume that ceramics will behave elastically; therefore, the response of an aluminum oxide granular chain was compared to that of a steel chain.

  14. On spurious detection of linear response and misuse of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in finite time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Wormell, J. P.; Wouters, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Using a sensitive statistical test we determine whether or not one can detect the breakdown of linear response given observations of deterministic dynamical systems. A goodness-of-fit statistics is developed for a linear statistical model of the observations, based on results for central limit theorems for deterministic dynamical systems, and used to detect linear response breakdown. We apply the method to discrete maps which do not obey linear response and show that the successful detection of breakdown depends on the length of the time series, the magnitude of the perturbation and on the choice of the observable. We find that in order to reliably reject the assumption of linear response for typical observables sufficiently large data sets are needed. Even for simple systems such as the logistic map, one needs of the order of 106 observations to reliably detect the breakdown with a confidence level of 95 %; if less observations are available one may be falsely led to conclude that linear response theory is valid. The amount of data required is larger the smaller the applied perturbation. For judiciously chosen observables the necessary amount of data can be drastically reduced, but requires detailed a priori knowledge about the invariant measure which is typically not available for complex dynamical systems. Furthermore we explore the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) in cases with limited data length or coarse-graining of observations. The FDT, if applied naively to a system without linear response, is shown to be very sensitive to the details of the sampling method, resulting in erroneous predictions of the response.

  15. Polarizable embedding with a multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory linear response method.

    PubMed

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-03-21

    We present here the coupling of a polarizable embedding (PE) model to the recently developed multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory method (MC-srDFT), which can treat multiconfigurational systems with a simultaneous account for dynamical and static correlation effects. PE-MC-srDFT is designed to combine efficient treatment of complicated electronic structures with inclusion of effects from the surrounding environment. The environmental effects encompass classical electrostatic interactions as well as polarization of both the quantum region and the environment. Using response theory, molecular properties such as excitation energies and oscillator strengths can be obtained. The PE-MC-srDFT method and the additional terms required for linear response have been implemented in a development version of Dalton. To benchmark the PE-MC-srDFT approach against the literature data, we have investigated the low-lying electronic excitations of acetone and uracil, both immersed in water solution. The PE-MC-srDFT results are consistent and accurate, both in terms of the calculated solvent shift and, unlike regular PE-MCSCF, also with respect to the individual absolute excitation energies. To demonstrate the capabilities of PE-MC-srDFT, we also investigated the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore embedded in the channelrhodopsin protein. While using a much more compact reference wave function in terms of active space, our PE-MC-srDFT approach yields excitation energies comparable in quality to CASSCF/CASPT2 benchmarks.

  16. Use of the linear-quadratic radiobiological model for quantifying kidney response in targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dale, Roger

    2004-06-01

    This paper reviews the generalized application of the linear quadratic (LQ) model of radiobiological effect to targeted radiotherapy. Special attention is given to formulations for normal tissue responses and these are applied, in particular, to the kidney. Because it is derived from self-consistent bio-physical principles, the LQ model currently remains the standard formalism for assessing biological responses for the whole range of radiotherapy treatments. A central feature of the model is the derivation of biologically effective doses (BEDs), which may be used to quantify the impact of a treatment on both tumors and normal tissues. BEDs are routinely derived for conventional external-beam treatments. The likely limits of targeted radiotherapy may, thus, be assessed by comparing the expected normal-tissue BEDs for such treatments with those known to be just tolerable in conventional therapy. The main parameters required in the model are defined, and data are provided which demonstrate the tentative link between targeted radiotherapy doses and those used in conventional radiotherapy. The extension of the LQ method to targeted radiotherapy involves using parameters for which the numerical values may not be accurately known at present. This places a restriction on the overall predictive accuracy of the model and the necessary caveats are, therefore, outlined.

  17. Polarizable embedding with a multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory linear response method

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-03-21

    We present here the coupling of a polarizable embedding (PE) model to the recently developed multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory method (MC-srDFT), which can treat multiconfigurational systems with a simultaneous account for dynamical and static correlation effects. PE-MC-srDFT is designed to combine efficient treatment of complicated electronic structures with inclusion of effects from the surrounding environment. The environmental effects encompass classical electrostatic interactions as well as polarization of both the quantum region and the environment. Using response theory, molecular properties such as excitation energies and oscillator strengths can be obtained. The PE-MC-srDFT method and the additional terms required for linear response have been implemented in a development version of DALTON. To benchmark the PE-MC-srDFT approach against the literature data, we have investigated the low-lying electronic excitations of acetone and uracil, both immersed in water solution. The PE-MC-srDFT results are consistent and accurate, both in terms of the calculated solvent shift and, unlike regular PE-MCSCF, also with respect to the individual absolute excitation energies. To demonstrate the capabilities of PE-MC-srDFT, we also investigated the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore embedded in the channelrhodopsin protein. While using a much more compact reference wave function in terms of active space, our PE-MC-srDFT approach yields excitation energies comparable in quality to CASSCF/CASPT2 benchmarks.

  18. Response of Non-Linear Shock Absorbers-Boundary Value Problem Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Ahmed, U.; Uddin, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear boundary value problem of two degrees-of-freedom (DOF) untuned vibration damper systems using nonlinear springs and dampers has been numerically studied. As far as untuned damper is concerned, sixteen different combinations of linear and nonlinear springs and dampers have been comprehensively analyzed taking into account transient terms. For different cases, a comparative study is made for response versus time for different spring and damper types at three important frequency ratios: one at r = 1, one at r > 1 and one at r <1. The response of the system is changed because of the spring and damper nonlinearities; the change is different for different cases. Accordingly, an initially stable absorber may become unstable with time and vice versa. The analysis also shows that higher nonlinearity terms make the system more unstable. Numerical simulation includes transient vibrations. Although problems are much more complicated compared to those for a tuned absorber, a comparison of the results generated by the present numerical scheme with the exact one shows quite a reasonable agreement

  19. A pseudorandom pink noise for the computer-based measurements of linear responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tohru; Sakurai, Katsumi; Mitsui, Takahisa

    1998-07-01

    We propose a nonbinary pseudorandom sequence for the measurement of linear responses. Compared with a maximal length shift register sequence (m sequence), this sequence is more suitable for digital processing based on computers; with the use of discrete Fourier transforms, the response functions are reproduced without approximations from digitally sampled data because the input power spectrum is pink, i.e., completely flat in a given frequency range and 0 otherwise. In practice, the new sequence is simply the sum of harmonics with arbitrary phases and is produced readily with digital wave form generators. For reducing the peak power of this sequence, the amplitude distribution is better to be bimodal rather than Gaussian. For demonstrating its feasibility with common digital hardware, the magnetic resonance of Rb atoms in a sub-MHz region was measured successfully. With the use of the fast Fourier transform algorithm, our software task was only 0.4% of that for the cross-correlational calculation based on an m sequence.

  20. Linear minimum mean-square error filtering for evoked responses: application to fetal MEG.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingli; Van Veen, Barry D; Wakai, Ronald T

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes a linear minimum mean-squared error (LMMSE) approach for designing spatial filters that improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of multiepoch evoked response data. This approach does not rely on availability of a forward solution and thus is applicable to problems in which a forward solution is not readily available, such as fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG). The LMMSE criterion leads to a spatial filter that is a function of the autocorrelation matrix of the data and the autocorrelation matrix of the signal. The signal statistics are unknown, so we approximate the signal autocorrelation matrix using the average of the data across epochs. This approximation is reasonable provided the mean of the noise is zero across epochs and the signal mean is significant. An analysis of the error incurred using this approximation is presented. Calculations of SNR for the exact and approximate LMMSE filters and simple averaging for the rank-1 signal case are shown. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated with simulated evoked response data and fetal MEG data.

  1. First-principles study on the effect of alloying elements on the elastic deformation response in β-titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gouda, Mohammed K. Gepreel, Mohamed A. H.; Nakamura, Koichi

    2015-06-07

    Theoretical deformation response of hypothetical β-titanium alloys was investigated using first-principles calculation technique under periodic boundary conditions. Simulation was carried out on hypothetical 54-atom supercell of Ti–X (X = Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr, Nb, Mo, Al, and Sn) binary alloys. The results showed that the strength of Ti increases by alloying, except for Cr. The most effective alloying elements are Nb, Zr, and Mo in the current simulation. The mechanism of bond breaking was revealed by studying the local structure around the alloying element atom with respect to volume change. Moreover, the effect of alloying elements on bulk modulus and admissible strain was investigated. It was found that Zr, Nb, and Mo have a significant effect to enhance the admissible strain of Ti without change in bulk modulus.

  2. First-principles study on the effect of alloying elements on the elastic deformation response in β-titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Mohammed K.; Nakamura, Koichi; A. H. Gepreel, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical deformation response of hypothetical β-titanium alloys was investigated using first-principles calculation technique under periodic boundary conditions. Simulation was carried out on hypothetical 54-atom supercell of Ti-X (X = Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr, Nb, Mo, Al, and Sn) binary alloys. The results showed that the strength of Ti increases by alloying, except for Cr. The most effective alloying elements are Nb, Zr, and Mo in the current simulation. The mechanism of bond breaking was revealed by studying the local structure around the alloying element atom with respect to volume change. Moreover, the effect of alloying elements on bulk modulus and admissible strain was investigated. It was found that Zr, Nb, and Mo have a significant effect to enhance the admissible strain of Ti without change in bulk modulus.

  3. The Effect of Training Structure on the Latency of Responses to a Five-Term Linear Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Thomas; Whelan, Robert; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2005-01-01

    The current experiment investigated the effect of differential training histories on responses to a 5-term linear chain of nonsense syllables (described here with sequential, alphabetical characters; A [is less than] B [is less than] C [is less than] D [is less than] E) across unreinforced probe trials. Participants' responses to nonarbitrary…

  4. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  6. Thin-skinned Mass-wasting Responsible for Rapid, Edifice-wide Deformation at Arenal Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Biggs, J.; Muller, C.; Avard, G.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic edifices are built rapidly, at rates far exceeding those of erosion. The resulting mechanical failure of the edifices of both active and quiescent volcanoes can result in hazards on a range of scales, from rockfall to sector collapse. The stability of a volcanic edifice depends on the ratio of its exogenous growth to mass loss due to erosion, deformation and mass wasting. Geodetic measurements of edifice spreading have mostly been associated with local zones of extension at island volcanoes and relatively few observations have been made at continental stratovolcanoes. We present measurements of displacement and surface property changes at Arenal, Costa Rica, a continental stratovolcano that stopped erupting in 2010 after almost 42 years of activity. High resolution TerraSAR-X data (2011-2013) have increased the area covered geodetically by ~40%, allowing us to make measurements of displacements close to Arenal's summit for the first time. InSAR and intensity change observations provide evidence of frequent rockfalls and of shallow landslides (5-11 m thick, total volume = 1.9×107 m3 DRE). Rockfall and shallow translational landsliding have a stabilizing effect on Volcán Arenal's edifice that reduces the potential for external triggering of slope failure. We map 16 shallow landslides (5-11 m depth, 4% of post-1968 deposits) and expect failure planes to be associated with layers of blocky debris and lava crust. Unstable material on Arenal's upper slopes is removed steadily, potentially reducing sensitivity to external triggers: the 2012 Nicoya Earthquake (Mw 7.6) had no measurable impact on the velocities of sliding units, but did result in an elevated area of rockfall. This demonstrates the importance of mass wasting for the stability of young volcanic edifices.

  7. Second-order variational coupled-cluster linear-response method: A Hermitian time-dependent theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kats, Daniel; Usvyat, Denis; Schuetz, Martin

    2011-06-15

    The formalism is presented for the linear response of a time-dependent (TD) variational coupled cluster (VCC), truncated according to Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory, i.e., a TD-VCC[n] linear response, where n denotes the order of the corresponding quasienergy with respect to the fluctuation potential. The resulting eigenvalue problem determining the excitation energies is Hermitian and of the simple Tamm-Dancoff form. The VCC excitation energies are equivalent to those of the configuration-interaction singles (CIS) model, while the Casida equation for the TD-Hartree-Fock approach is an approximation to it. The TD-VCC response, the lowest-order method including electron correlation, is discussed in detail and the relations to other second-order methods, such as the CC2 linear response and the algebraic diagrammatic construction at second order [ADC(2)] are explored.

  8. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response of weakly disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Vignale, G.

    2002-05-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDFT) provides a way of calculating, in principle exactly, the linear response of interacting many-electron systems, and thus allows one to obtain their excitation energies. For extended systems, there exist excitations of a collective nature, such as bulk and surface plasmons in metals or intersubband plasmons in doped semiconductor quantum wells. This paper develops a quantitatively accurate first-principles description for the frequency and the linewidth of such excitations in inhomogeneous weakly disordered systems. A finite linewidth in general has intrinsic and extrinsic sources. At low temperatures and outside the region where electron-phonon interaction occurs, the only intrinsic damping mechanism is provided by electron-electron interaction. This kind of intrinsic damping can be described within TDFT, but one needs to go beyond the adiabatic approximation and include retardation effects. It has been shown [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4878 (1997)] that a density-functional response theory that is local in space but nonlocal in time has to be constructed in terms of the currents, rather than the density. This theory will be reviewed in the first part of this paper. For quantitatively accurate linewidths, extrinsic dissipation mechanisms, such as impurities or disorder, have to be included in the response theory. In the second part of this paper, we discuss how extrinsic dissipation can be described within the so-called memory-function formalism. This formalism will first be introduced and reviewed for homogeneous systems. We will then present a synthesis of TDFT with the memory function formalism for inhomogeneous systems, which allows one to simultaneously account for intrinsic and extrinsic damping of collective excitations. As an example where both sources of dissipation are important and where high-quality experimental data are available for comparison, we discuss intersubband

  9. Influence of Cutting Time on Brush Response: Implications for Herbivory in Linear (Transportation) Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Roy V.; Child, Kenneth N.; Spata, David P.; MacDonald, Douglas

    2007-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the influence the time of brush-cutting can have on plant regrowth and attractiveness to herbivores that browse in linear corridors. The influence of cutting time on leaf flush and senescence, shoot morphometry, and biomass was measured for 3 consecutive years after initial brush-cutting. Results indicate that morphological and phenological attributes of three woody deciduous plants were influenced by the timing of brush-cutting for up to 3 years after initial cutting. Brush-cutting generally stimulated plants to produce larger than normal shoots and delay leaf senescence. The degree to which plants were affected, however, varied with the timing of initial cutting and the species in question. Generally, plants cut later in the year resprouted more vigorously and were taller in the third year after cutting but produced less overall biomass than when cut earlier. In the years following brush-cutting, plants cut earlier flushed leaves earlier in the spring but delayed leaf senescence in the fall when compared to uncut controls. Results of these trials suggest that brush-cutting time influences plant response and several plant attributes known to influence plant attractiveness to moose and other herbivores. We therefore recommend that roadside and railside vegetation management plans consider the influence of cutting time on plant regrowth. Such considerations can ensure that brush is cut to reduce the attractiveness of plant regrowth in these linear corridors, reduce the utilization of such brush by herbivores, and, as such, mitigate collision risk between motorists and herbivores such as moose.

  10. Influence of cutting time on brush response: implications for herbivory in linear (transportation) corridors.

    PubMed

    Rea, Roy V; Child, Kenneth N; Spata, David P; MacDonald, Douglas

    2007-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the influence the time of brush-cutting can have on plant regrowth and attractiveness to herbivores that browse in linear corridors. The influence of cutting time on leaf flush and senescence, shoot morphometry, and biomass was measured for 3 consecutive years after initial brush-cutting. Results indicate that morphological and phenological attributes of three woody deciduous plants were influenced by the timing of brush-cutting for up to 3 years after initial cutting. Brush-cutting generally stimulated plants to produce larger than normal shoots and delay leaf senescence. The degree to which plants were affected, however, varied with the timing of initial cutting and the species in question. Generally, plants cut later in the year resprouted more vigorously and were taller in the third year after cutting but produced less overall biomass than when cut earlier. In the years following brush-cutting, plants cut earlier flushed leaves earlier in the spring but delayed leaf senescence in the fall when compared to uncut controls. Results of these trials suggest that brush-cutting time influences plant response and several plant attributes known to influence plant attractiveness to moose and other herbivores. We therefore recommend that roadside and railside vegetation management plans consider the influence of cutting time on plant regrowth. Such considerations can ensure that brush is cut to reduce the attractiveness of plant regrowth in these linear corridors, reduce the utilization of such brush by herbivores, and, as such, mitigate collision risk between motorists and herbivores such as moose.

  11. The response of the vestibulosympathetic reflex to linear acceleration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, S B; Martinelli, G P; Raphan, T; Cohen, B

    2016-12-01

    The vestibulosympathetic reflex (VSR) increases blood pressure (BP) upon arising to maintain blood flow to the brain. The optimal directions of VSR activation and whether changes in heart rate (HR) are associated with changes in BP are still not clear. We used manually activated pulses and oscillatory linear accelerations of 0.2-2.5 g along the naso-occipital, interaural, and dorsoventral axes in isoflurane-anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats. BP and HR were recorded with an intra-aortic sensor and acceleration with a three-dimensional accelerometer. Linear regressions of BP changes in accelerations along the upward, downward, and forward axes had slopes of ≈3-6 mmHg · g(-1) (P < 0.05). Lateral and backward accelerations did not produce consistent changes in BP. Thus upward, downward, and forward translations were the directions that significantly altered BP. HR was unaffected by these translations. The VSR sensitivity to oscillatory forward-backward translations was ≈6-10 mmHg · g(-1) at frequencies of ≈0.1 Hz (0.2 g), decreasing to zero at frequencies above 2 Hz (1.8 g). Upward, 70° tilts of an alert rat increased BP by 9 mmHg · g(-1) without changes in HR, indicating that anesthesia had not reduced the VSR sensitivity. The similarity in BP induced in alert and anesthetized rats indicates that the VSR is relatively insensitive to levels of alertness and that the VSR is likely to cause changes in BP through modification of peripheral vascular resistance. Thus the VSR, which is directed toward the cardiovascular system, is in contrast to the responses in the alert state that can produce sweating, alterations in BP and HR, and motion sickness. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The Linear Response of OXYGEN-16 in a Relativistic Particle-Hole Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Michael William

    The nuclear structure of excited states in ('16)O is studied using the particle-hole (p-h) model in a Dirac -Hartree single-particle basis. The excited-states are assumed to be produced by an exter- nal perturbation which acts in first order and can be expressed as a sum of single -nucleon operators (linear response). In this thesis, the excited nuclear states are viewed as a linear combination of p-h states which are mixed by a Lorentz invariant finite -range p-h interaction. The particle- and hole-states are described by the self-consistently determined Dirac-Hartree spinor wave functions of Horowitz and Serot.* The linearized equations of motion are solved for the excited state energies and the corresponding p-h admixture amplitudes in the Tamm -Dancoff and random-phase approximations. In this model, the p-h basis is at first restricted to p-h states allowed from 1-(H/2PI)(omega) transitions (in the language of an oscillator model) and then extended to include particle states that lie at higher energies in the Dirac-Hartree continuum. The p-h interaction is writ- ten as a sum of five Lorentz invariant terms (scalar, vector, pseudo-scalar or pseudo-vector, axial-vector and tensor) and is allowed to assume various parameterizations (strengths and ranges) including (a) those suggested by relativistic mean field theories based on (sigma) and (omega), and (sigma), (omega), (rho) and (pi) meson exchange, and (b) those obtained by means of chi-squared RPA fits to selected experimental energy levels in ('16)O. Throughout this work, the validity of the predicted excited state energy levels arising from the various treatments of the p-h basis and interaction is tested by comparing with experimental energy levels in ('16)O. The calculated admixture amplitudes are used in conjunction with relativistic transition operators to predict transition rates for selected electro-weak processes. It is found that the agreement between these relativistic predictions and experimental

  13. Influence of large-strain deformation on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical response of tantalum bar

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.; Chen, S.R.; Bingert, J.F.; Wright, S.I.

    1996-03-01

    Numerous studies have established the influence of impurities, crystallographic texture, temperature, and strain rate separately or collectively on the constitutive response of annealed tantalum, in particular plate Ta-stock. However, fewer detailed studies have examined the evolution of crystallographic texture and the mechanical response of tantalum bar or rod material following prestraining to large strains {epsilon} > I. In this paper the influence of large plastic prestraining on the microstructure evolution, texture evolution, and mechanical response of high-purity tantalum bar material is presented. Tantalum cylinders annealed at 1200 {degrees}C were quasi-statically upset forged, with intermediate lubrication, to true strains of 0.4, 0.95, and 1.85. Microstructural and textural banding within the starting Ta-bar was characterized in detail. It was found that different oriented bands evolved differently during large-strain forging leading to significant scatter in the mechanical response. Aspects of defect storage, work-hardening response, and texture evolution in Ta-bar as a function of forging strain are discussed.

  14. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics.

  15. Factors limiting the linearity of response of tissue equivalent proportional counters used in micro- and nano-dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, T. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Proportional counters filled with tissue equivalent gas mixtures are extremely useful instruments and are being used extensively as sensitive detectors for all types of radiations to measure the energy transferred to small tissue volumes. The linearity of their response is of primary importance. So the investigation and clarification of the physical phenomena taking place in the counter and of the limits within which useful results may be obtained would contribute to a more efficient use and a wider application of these counters. The linearity of response in the dose and in the gas gain has been determined. Linearity in the dose is limited by the total count rate effect, while linearity in the gas gain is limited by secondary processes occurring in the electron avalanche and by the self-induced space charge effect.

  16. A New Approach to Evaluate Drug Treatment Response of Ovarian Cancer Patients Based on Deformable Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Li, Zheng; Qiu, Yuchen; McMeekin, Scott D.; Thai, Theresa C.; Ding, Kai; Moore, Kathleen N.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Although Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the current clinical guideline to assess size change of solid tumors after therapeutic treatment, it has a relatively lower association to the clinical outcome of progression free survival (PFS) of the patients. In this paper, we presented a new approach to assess responses of ovarian cancer patients to new chemotherapy drugs in clinical trials. We first developed and applied a multi-resolution B-spline based deformable image registration method to register two sets of computed tomography (CT) image data acquired pre- and post-treatment. The B-spline difference maps generated from the co-registered CT images highlight the regions related to the volumetric growth or shrinkage of the metastatic tumors, and density changes related to variation of necrosis inside the solid tumors. Using a testing dataset involving 19 ovarian cancer patients, we compared patients’ response to the treatment using the new image registration method and RECIST guideline. The results demonstrated that using the image registration method yielded higher association with the six-month PFS outcomes of the patients than using RECIST. The image registration results also provided a solid foundation of developing new computerized quantitative image feature analysis schemes in the future studies. PMID:26336119

  17. Impact of ghosts on the viscoelastic response of gelatinized corn starch dispersions subjected to small strain deformations.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Navas, H; Avila-de la Rosa, G; Gómez-Luría, D; Meraz, M; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2014-09-22

    Corn starch dispersions (5.0% w/w) were gelatinized by heating at 90°C for 20 min using gentle stirring. Under these conditions, ghosts, which are insoluble material with high amylopectin content, were detected by optical microscopy. Strain sweep tests showed that the gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD) exhibited a loss modulus (G″) overshoot at relatively low strains (∼1%). In order to achieve a greater understanding as to the mechanisms giving rise to this uncharacteristic nonlinear response at low strains, very small constant torques (from 0.05 to 0.5 μN m) were applied in the bulk of the GSD with a rotating biconical disc. This resulted in small deformations exhibiting torque-dependent inertio-elastic damped oscillations which were subjected to phenomenological modelling. Inertial effects played an important role in the starch mechanical response. The model parameters varied with the magnitude of constant small applied torque and could be related to microstructural changes of ghosts and to the viscoelastic response of GSD.

  18. Responses of Varroa-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to Deformed wing virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The negative impact of Deformedwing virus (DWV) on European honey bees Apis mellifera is magnified by Varroa destructor parasitism. This study compared the responses of two Varroa-resistant honey bee stocks, pure Russian honey bees (RHB) and out-crossed Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees, Pol-line (POL)...

  19. Moisture diffusion through a corrugated fiberboard under compressive loading : its deformation and stiffness response

    Treesearch

    Adeeb A. Rahman; Thomas J. Urbanik; Mustafa Mahamid

    2002-01-01

    This research develops a model using finite element to study the response of a panel made of a typical commercial corrugated fireboard due to an induced moisture function at one side of the fiberboard. The model predicts how the moisture diffusion will permeate through the fiberboard's layers (medium and liners) providing information on moisture content at any...

  20. Energy Loss of a High Charge Bunched Electron Beam in Plasma: Nonlinear Plasma Response and Linear Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Barov, N.; Thompson, M. C.; Yoder, R.

    2002-12-01

    There has been much experimental and theoretical interest in blowout regime of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), which features ultra-high accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion. Using an exact analysis, we examine here a fundamental limit of nonlinear PWFA excitation, by an infinitesimally short, relativistic electron beam. The beam energy loss in this case is shown to be linear in charge even for nonlinear plasma response, where a normalized, unitless charge exceeds unity, and relativistic plasma effects become important or dominant. The physical bases for this persistence of linear response are pointed out. As a byproduct of our analysis, we re-examine the issue of field divergence as the point-charge limit is approached, suggesting an important modification of commonly held views of evading unphysical energy loss. Deviations from linear behavior are investigated using simulations with finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind a finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude well into the nonlinear regime. On the other hand, at large enough normalized charge, linear scaling of fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. The dramatic implications of these results for observing the collapse of linear scaling in planned experiments are discussed.

  1. Optimization of linear-logarithmic CMOS image sensor using a photogate and a cascode MOSFET for reducing pixel response variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Myunghan; Choi, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Jimin; Oh, Chang-Woo; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2017-02-01

    Recently, CMOS image sensors (CISs) have become more and more complex because they require high-performances such as wide dynamic range, low-noise, high-speed operation, high-resolution and so on. First of all, wide dynamic range (WDR) is the first requirement for high-performance CIS. Several techniques have been proposed to improve the dynamic range. Although logarithmic pixel can achieve wide dynamic range, it leads to a poor signal-to-noise ratio due to small output swings. Furthermore, the fixed pattern noise of logarithmic pixel is significantly greater compared with other CISs. In this paper, we propose an optimized linear-logarithmic pixel. Compared to a conventional 3-transistor active pixel sensor structure, the proposed linear-logarithmic pixel is using a photogate and a cascode MOSFET in addition. The photogate which is surrounding a photodiode carries out change of sensitivity in the linear response and thus increases the dynamic range. The logarithmic response is caused by a cascode MOSFET. Although the dynamic range of the pixel has been improved, output curves of each pixel were not uniform. In general, as the number of devices increases in the pixel, pixel response variation is more pronounced. Hence, we optimized the linear-logarithmic pixel structure to minimize the pixel response variation. We applied a hard reset method and an optimized cascode MOSFET to the proposed pixel for reducing pixel response variation. Unlike the conventional reset operation, a hard reset using a p-type MOSFET fixes the voltage of each pixel to the same voltage. This reduces non-uniformity of the response in the linear response. The optimized cascode MOSFET achieves less variation in the logarithmic response. We have verified that the optimized pixel shows more uniform response than the conventional pixel, by both simulation and experiment.

  2. Nucleus pulposus deformation in response to rotation at L1-2 and L4-5.

    PubMed

    Fazey, Peter J; Song, Swithin; Price, Roger I; Singer, Kevin P

    2013-06-01

    Spinal rotation couples with lateral flexion as a composite movement. Few data report the in vivo mechanical deformation of the nucleus pulposus following sustained rotation. MRI provides a non-invasive method of examining nucleus pulposus deformation by mapping the hydration signal distribution within the intervertebral disc. T1 weighted coronal and sagittal lumbar images and T2 weighted axial images at L1-2 and L4-5 were obtained from 10 asymptomatic subjects (mean age 29, range: 24-34 years) in sustained flexed and extended positions plus combined positions of left rotation with flexion and extension. Nucleus pulposus deformation was tracked by mapping the change in hydration profiles from coronal and sagittal pixel measurements. An average sagittal change in position of 44° (SD 14.5°) from flexion to extension was recorded between L1 and S1 (range: 18°- 60°) resulting in a mean anterior nucleus pulposus deformation of 16% of disc hydration profile (range: 3.5%-19%) in 19/20 discs. When rotation was combined with either flexion or extension, mean coronal deformation was 4.8% (SD-5.1%; range: 0.4%-15%). Lateral nucleus pulposus deformation direction varied in rotation (44% deformed left and 56% deformed right). Intersegmental lateral flexion direction more strongly predicted nucleus pulposus deformation direction with 75% deforming contralaterally. Nucleus pulposus deformation direction in young subjects was more predictable following sagittal position change than in rotation combined with flexion or extension. Deformation magnitude was reduced in rotated positions. Intersegmental lateral flexion was a stronger predictor of nucleus pulposus deformation direction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Computation of linear and nonlinear site response for near field ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Luis Fabian

    The near-surface geological site conditions in the upper tens of meters are one of the dominant factors in controlling the amplitude and variation of strong ground motion during large earthquakes. The understanding of these site effects comes primarily from surface recordings. For instance, different methods to estimate site response and their variability are studied using aftershock data for the 17 January 1994 M6.7 Northridge, California earthquake. A second approach corresponds to borehole measurements. We use the Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA), which consists of a set of seven downhole strong-motion instruments ranging from 0 to 500 meters depth, to study site response effects. The GVDA velocity structure is first studied, then the H/ V is evaluated, and finally some considerations of 2D and 3D basin effects are also shown. These previous studies considered small to moderate earthquakes, where strain levels are small enough, so that linear wave propagation is assumed. However, for strong motions produced during large earthquakes, the soils behave nonlinearly. In this study we present evidence that nonlinearity can be directly observed in acceleration time histories such as Wildlife Refuge, 1987 Superstition Hills, CA; Kushiro Port station, 1993 Kushiro-Oki, Japan; among others. To understand the nature of nonlinear soil dynamics, we developed a model that includes anelastic dissipation of energy due to hysteresis. The hysteresis is described by the generalized Masing rules. This new hysteresis formulation, based on the classical Masing rules, has a functional representation, and depends only on one parameter that can be related to damping ratio tests. The coupling with pore pressure generation shows the degradation of the shear modulus and the yield stress during the cyclic response of the material. The simulations show amplitude reduction as well as the shift of the fundamental frequency to lower frequencies as observed on vertical arrays. The synthetic

  4. Extrusion die geometry effects on the energy absorbing properties and deformation response of 6063-type Al-Mg-Si aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbenebor, O. P.; Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Inegbenebor, A. O.; Oyawale, F.

    The response of 6063-type Al-Mg-Si alloy to deformation via extrusion was studied using tool steel dies with 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75° entry angles. Compressive loads were subjected to each sample using the AVERY DENISON machine, adapted to supply a compressive load on the punch. The ability of the extrudate to absorb energy before fracture was calculated by integrating numerically the polynomial relationship between the compressive stress and sample strains. Strain rate was calculated for each specimen and the deformation zone length was mathematically derived from the die geometry to decipher its influence on both lateral and axial deformations. Results showed that extruding with a 15° die was the fastest as a result of the low flow stress encountered. Outstanding compressive strength, plastic deformation, strain rate and energy absorbing capacity were observed for the alloy extruded with a 75° die angle. Increase in die angles led to a decrease in deformation zone length and samples deformed more in the axial direction than in the lateral except for the 45o die which showed the opposite; the sample also showed the least ductility.

  5. Influence of transverse-shear and large-deformation effects on the low-speed impact response of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Prasad, Chunchu B.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented for determining the transient response of simply supported, rectangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors. A first-order shear-deformation theory is included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wave-length transient bending response. The impact force is modeled as a locally distributed load with a cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small-increment method are used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and in-plane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate that using the appropriate local force distribution for the locally loaded area and including transverse-shear-deformation effects in the laminated plate response analysis are important. The applicability of the present analytical procedure based on small deformation theory is investigated by comparing analytical and experimental results for combinations of quasi-isotropic laminate thicknesses and impact energy levels. The results of this study indicate that large-deformation effects influence the response of both 24- and 32-ply laminated plates, and that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is required for predicting the response accurately.

  6. Gain in stochastic resonance: precise numerics versus linear response theory beyond the two-mode approximation.

    PubMed

    Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Denk, Claus; Gómez-Ordóñez, José; Morillo, Manuel; Hänggi, Peter

    2003-03-01

    In the context of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), we study the correlation function, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the ratio of output over input SNR, i.e., the gain, which is associated to the nonlinear response of a bistable system driven by time-periodic forces and white Gaussian noise. These quantifiers for SR are evaluated using the techniques of linear response theory (LRT) beyond the usually employed two-mode approximation scheme. We analytically demonstrate within such an extended LRT description that the gain can indeed not exceed unity. We implement an efficient algorithm, based on work by Greenside and Helfand (detailed in the Appendix), to integrate the driven Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. The predictions of LRT are carefully tested against the results obtained from numerical solutions of the corresponding Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. We further present an accurate procedure to evaluate the distinct contributions of the coherent and incoherent parts of the correlation function to the SNR and the gain. As a main result we show for subthreshold driving that both the correlation function and the SNR can deviate substantially from the predictions of LRT and yet the gain can be either larger or smaller than unity. In particular, we find that the gain can exceed unity in the strongly nonlinear regime which is characterized by weak noise and very slow multifrequency subthreshold input signals with a small duty cycle. This latter result is in agreement with recent analog simulation results by Gingl et al. [ICNF 2001, edited by G. Bosman (World Scientific, Singapore, 2002), pp. 545-548; Fluct. Noise Lett. 1, L181 (2001)].

  7. Some Aspects of the Deformation Response of Swirl-Mat Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Elahi, M.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1999-10-01

    This report concerns the mechanical response of random glass fiber strand swirl-mat/urethane matrix composite under static and cyclic loads as well as under elevated temperatures and exposure to distilled water. The article presents an extensive amount of experimental data as well as predictions based on a couple damage/viscoelastic constitutive formulation generated to model the specific behavior of the material at hand. Damage evolution relations are derived from an empirical relationship. This work extends previously published results. It is shown that the current model has the capability to predict long-term response on the basis of short-term data and account for time-varying stresses and temperatures.

  8. The non-linear response of a muscle in transverse compression: assessment of geometry influence using a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Gras, Laure-Lise; Mitton, David; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie; Laporte, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Most recent finite element models that represent muscles are generic or subject-specific models that use complex, constitutive laws. Identification of the parameters of such complex, constitutive laws could be an important limit for subject-specific approaches. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of modelling muscle behaviour in compression with a parametric model and a simple, constitutive law. A quasi-static compression test was performed on the muscles of dogs. A parametric finite element model was designed using a linear, elastic, constitutive law. A multi-variate analysis was performed to assess the effects of geometry on muscle response. An inverse method was used to define Young's modulus. The non-linear response of the muscles was obtained using a subject-specific geometry and a linear elastic law. Thus, a simple muscle model can be used to have a bio-faithful, biomechanical response.

  9. Hydrogeology and deformation of sandbars in response to fluctuations in flow of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, M.C.; Carruth, R.L.; Fink, J.B.; Boling, J.K.; Cluer, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Rill erosion, slumping, and fissuring develop on seepage faces of many sandbars along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. These processes, observed at low river stage, are a response to residual head gradients in the sandbars caused by the river-stage fluctuation. Three sandbars were instrumented with sensors for continual monitoring of pore pressure and ground-water temperature within the sandbars and river stage. Two of the sandbars also had tilt sensors to aid in determining the relation between ground-water flow within and out of the sandbars and sandbar deformation. Tilting at sandbar 43.1L occurred on the downward limb of the hydrograph in the absence of scour, indicating slumping or a slump-creep sequence. The deformation was caused by outward-flowing bank storage, oversteepening of the lower part of the slope in the zone of fluctuating river stage by filling, and increased effective stress. At sandbar 172.3L, tilts were probably all related to scour and occurred on the rising limb of a hydrograph. Tilt occurred on April 17, May 7, May 13, June 18, and September 1, 1991. On September 1, the entire face of sandbar 172.3L was scoured. Rill erosion and slumping accompanied by measured tilts continued in reduced magnitude on sandbar 43.1L during interim flows. Thus, reduction in the range of discharge does not eliminate degradation caused by rill erosion, slumping, and fissuring. The importance of the ground-water processes is that they occur on every sandbar and become increasingly important on all sandbars in the absence of sandbar-building flows.

  10. Calculation of excitation energies from the CC2 linear response theory using Cholesky decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, Pablo; Marín, José Sánchez; Cuesta, Inmaculada García; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M. J.

    2014-03-14

    A new implementation of the approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles CC2 linear response model is reported. It employs a Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals that significantly reduces the computational cost and the storage requirements of the method compared to standard implementations. Our algorithm also exploits a partitioning form of the CC2 equations which reduces the dimension of the problem and avoids the storage of doubles amplitudes. We present calculation of excitation energies of benzene using a hierarchy of basis sets and compare the results with conventional CC2 calculations. The reduction of the scaling is evaluated as well as the effect of the Cholesky decomposition parameter on the quality of the results. The new algorithm is used to perform an extrapolation to complete basis set investigation on the spectroscopically interesting benzylallene conformers. A set of calculations on medium-sized molecules is carried out to check the dependence of the accuracy of the results on the decomposition thresholds. Moreover, CC2 singlet excitation energies of the free base porphin are also presented.

  11. A Bayesian approach for inducing sparsity in generalized linear models with multi-category response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The dimension and complexity of high-throughput gene expression data create many challenges for downstream analysis. Several approaches exist to reduce the number of variables with respect to small sample sizes. In this study, we utilized the Generalized Double Pareto (GDP) prior to induce sparsity in a Bayesian Generalized Linear Model (GLM) setting. The approach was evaluated using a publicly available microarray dataset containing 99 samples corresponding to four different prostate cancer subtypes. Results A hierarchical Sparse Bayesian GLM using GDP prior (SBGG) was developed to take into account the progressive nature of the response variable. We obtained an average overall classification accuracy between 82.5% and 94%, which was higher than Support Vector Machine, Random Forest or a Sparse Bayesian GLM using double exponential priors. Additionally, SBGG outperforms the other 3 methods in correctly identifying pre-metastatic stages of cancer progression, which can prove extremely valuable for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Importantly, using Geneset Cohesion Analysis Tool, we found that the top 100 genes produced by SBGG had an average functional cohesion p-value of 2.0E-4 compared to 0.007 to 0.131 produced by the other methods. Conclusions Using GDP in a Bayesian GLM model applied to cancer progression data results in better subclass prediction. In particular, the method identifies pre-metastatic stages of prostate cancer with substantially better accuracy and produces more functionally relevant gene sets. PMID:26423345

  12. Energy loss of ions in a magnetized plasma: conformity between linear response and binary collision treatments.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, H B; Zwicknagel, G; Toepffer, C

    2003-02-01

    The energy loss of a heavy ion moving in a magnetized electron plasma is considered within the linear response (LR) and binary collision (BC) treatments with the purpose to look for a connection between these two models. These two complementary approaches yield close results if no magnetic field is present, but there develop discrepancies with growing magnetic field at ion velocities that are lower than, or comparable with, the thermal velocity of the electrons. We show that this is a peculiarity of the Coulomb interaction which requires cutoff procedures to account for its singularity at the origin and its infinite range. The cutoff procedures in the LR and BC treatments are different as the order of integrations in velocity and in ordinary (Fourier) spaces is reversed in both treatments. While BC involves a velocity average of Coulomb logarithms, there appear in LR Coulomb logarithms of velocity averaged cutoffs. The discrepancies between LR and BC vanish, except for small contributions of collective modes, for smoothened potentials that require no cutoffs. This is shown explicitly with the help of an improved BC in which the velocity transfer is treated up to second order in the interaction in Fourier space.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory of open quantum systems in the linear-response regime.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Watson, Mark A; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-02-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has recently been extended to describe many-body open quantum systems evolving under nonunitary dynamics according to a quantum master equation. In the master equation approach, electronic excitation spectra are broadened and shifted due to relaxation and dephasing of the electronic degrees of freedom by the surrounding environment. In this paper, we develop a formulation of TDDFT linear-response theory (LR-TDDFT) for many-body electronic systems evolving under a master equation, yielding broadened excitation spectra. This is done by mapping an interacting open quantum system onto a noninteracting open Kohn-Sham system yielding the correct nonequilibrium density evolution. A pseudoeigenvalue equation analogous to the Casida equations of the usual LR-TDDFT is derived for the Redfield master equation, yielding complex energies and Lamb shifts. As a simple demonstration, we calculate the spectrum of a C(2 +) atom including natural linewidths, by treating the electromagnetic field vacuum as a photon bath. The performance of an adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel is analyzed and a first-order frequency-dependent correction to the bare Kohn-Sham linewidth based on the Görling-Levy perturbation theory is calculated.

  14. Linear ground-water flow, flood-wave response program for programmable calculators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, John Michael

    1978-01-01

    Two programs are documented which solve a discretized analytical equation derived to determine head changes at a point in a one-dimensional ground-water flow system. The programs, written for programmable calculators, are in widely divergent but commonly encountered languages and serve to illustrate the adaptability of the linear model to use in situations where access to true computers is not possible or economical. The analytical method assumes a semi-infinite aquifer which is uniform in thickness and hydrologic characteristics, bounded on one side by an impermeable barrier and on the other parallel side by a fully penetrating stream in complete hydraulic connection with the aquifer. Ground-water heads may be calculated for points along a line which is perpendicular to the impermeable barrie and the fully penetrating stream. Head changes at the observation point are dependent on (1) the distance between that point and the impermeable barrier, (2) the distance between the line of stress (the stream) and the impermeable barrier, (3) aquifer diffusivity, (4) time, and (5) head changes along the line of stress. The primary application of the programs is to determine aquifer diffusivity by the flood-wave response technique. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Johnston, William A; McKinnon, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  16. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond G.

    2015-10-06

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires half of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.

  17. Adding salt to a surfactant solution: Linear rheological response of the resulting morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudino, Danila; Pasquino, Rossana Grizzuti, Nino

    2015-11-15

    The micellar system composed of Cetylpyridinium Chloride-Sodium Salicylate (CPyCl-NaSal) in brine aqueous solutions has been studied by systematically changing the salt concentration, in order to investigate the rheology of the arising morphologies. In particular, the zero-shear viscosity and the linear viscoelastic response have been measured as a function of the NaSal concentration (with [CPyCl] = 100 mM). The Newtonian viscosity shows a nonmonotonic dependence upon concentration, passing through a maximum at NaSal/CPyCl ≈ 0.6, and eventually dropping at higher salt concentrations. The progressive addition of salt determines first a transition from a Newtonian to a purely Maxwell-like behavior as the length of the micelles significantly increases. Beyond the peak viscosity, the viscoelastic data show two distinct features. On the one hand, the main relaxation time of the system strongly decreases, while the plateau modulus remains essentially constant. Calculations based on the rheological data show that, as the binding salt concentration increases, there is a decrease in micelles breaking rate and a decrease in their average length. On the other hand, in the same concentration region, a low-frequency elastic plateau is measured. Such a plateau is considered as the signature of a tenuous, but persistent branched network, whose existence is confirmed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy images.

  18. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond G

    2015-11-10

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires half of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.

  19. Testing a linear time invariant model for skin conductance responses by intraneural recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gerster, Samuel; Namer, Barbara; Elam, Mikael; Bach, Dominik R

    2017-09-01

    Skin conductance responses (SCR) are increasingly analyzed with model-based approaches that assume a linear and time-invariant (LTI) mapping from sudomotor nerve (SN) activity to observed SCR. These LTI assumptions have previously been validated indirectly, by quantifying how much variance in SCR elicited by sensory stimulation is explained under an LTI model. This approach, however, collapses sources of variability in the nervous and effector organ systems. Here, we directly focus on the SN/SCR mapping by harnessing two invasive methods. In an intraneural recording experiment, we simultaneously track SN activity and SCR. This allows assessing the SN/SCR relationship but possibly suffers from interfering activity of non-SN sympathetic fibers. In an intraneural stimulation experiment under regional anesthesia, such influences are removed. In this stimulation experiment, about 95% of SCR variance is explained under LTI assumptions when stimulation frequency is below 0.6 Hz. At higher frequencies, nonlinearities occur. In the intraneural recording experiment, explained SCR variance is lower, possibly indicating interference from non-SN fibers, but higher than in our previous indirect tests. We conclude that LTI systems may not only be a useful approximation but in fact a rather accurate description of biophysical reality in the SN/SCR system, under conditions of low baseline activity and sporadic external stimuli. Intraneural stimulation under regional anesthesia is the most sensitive method to address this question. © 2017 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Calculation of excitation energies from the CC2 linear response theory using Cholesky decomposition.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Pablo; Sánchez Marín, José; García Cuesta, Inmaculada; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M J

    2014-03-14

    A new implementation of the approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles CC2 linear response model is reported. It employs a Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals that significantly reduces the computational cost and the storage requirements of the method compared to standard implementations. Our algorithm also exploits a partitioning form of the CC2 equations which reduces the dimension of the problem and avoids the storage of doubles amplitudes. We present calculation of excitation energies of benzene using a hierarchy of basis sets and compare the results with conventional CC2 calculations. The reduction of the scaling is evaluated as well as the effect of the Cholesky decomposition parameter on the quality of the results. The new algorithm is used to perform an extrapolation to complete basis set investigation on the spectroscopically interesting benzylallene conformers. A set of calculations on medium-sized molecules is carried out to check the dependence of the accuracy of the results on the decomposition thresholds. Moreover, CC2 singlet excitation energies of the free base porphin are also presented.

  1. Non-Linear Optical Response Simulations for Strongly Corellated Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetyan, Areg; Bondarev, Igor; Gelin, Maxim

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid carbon nanotube systems, nanotubes containing extrinsic atomic type species (dopants) such as semiconductor quantum dots, extrinsic atoms, or ions, are promising candidates for the development of the new generation of tunable nanooptoelectronic devices - both application oriented, e.g., photovoltaic devices of improved light-harvesting efficiency, and devices for use in fundamental research. Here, we simulate non-linear optical response signals for a pair of spatially separated two-level dipole emitters (to model the dopants above) in the regime where they are coupled strongly to a low-energy surface plasmon resonance of a metallic carbon nanotube. Such a coupling makes them entangled, and we show that the cross-peaks in 2D photon-echo spectra are indicative of the bipartite entanglement being present in the system. We simulate various experimental conditions and formulate practical recommendations for the reliable experimental observation of this unique quantum phenomenon of relevance to the solid-state quantum information science. ARO-W911NF-11-1-0189 (AM), DOE-DE-SC0007117 (IB), DFG-MAP (MG)

  2. Midpoint Distribution of Directed Polymers in the Stationary Regime: Exact Result Through Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-07-01

    We obtain an exact result for the midpoint probability distribution function (pdf) of the stationary continuum directed polymer, when averaged over the disorder. It is obtained by relating that pdf to the linear response of the stochastic Burgers field to some perturbation. From the symmetries of the stochastic Burgers equation we derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation so that the pdf gets given by the stationary two space-time points correlation function of the Burgers field. An analytical expression for the latter was obtained by Imamura and Sasamoto (J Stat Phys 150:908-939, 2013), thereby rendering our result explicit. In the large length limit that implies that the pdf is nothing but the scaling function f_{KPZ}(y) introduced by Prähofer and Spohn (J Stat Phys 115(1):255-279, 2004). Using the KPZ-universality paradigm, we find that this function can therefore also be interpreted as the pdf of the position y of the maximum of the Airy process minus a parabola and a two-sided Brownian motion. We provide a direct numerical test of the result through simulations of the Log-Gamma polymer.

  3. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    DOE PAGES

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; ...

    2015-10-06

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires halfmore » of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.« less

  4. Path-following analysis of the dynamical response of a piecewise-linear capsule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez Chávez, Joseph; Liu, Yang; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2016-08-01

    The dynamical response of a piecewise-linear capsule system is studied by means of path-following techniques in this paper. As the capsule model belongs to the class of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems involving impact and friction, a special care is taken in order to divide the trajectory of the system into a smooth vector field in each disjoint subregion. Specifically we study a two-sided drifting system focusing on directional control and energy consumption. We aim to address two practical problems which are maximizing the rate of progression and directional control of the system by following a typical period-1 trajectory. The one-parameter analysis shows that two types of bifurcations, grazing bifurcation and boundary-intersection crossing bifurcation are found, and the maximal rate of progression is achieved when the capsule performs the oscillations without sticking phases. In our two-parameter study, the control parameters for which the rate of progression is maximal are identified using fixed value of power consumption, and the curves which divide the motion of the capsule between forward and backward progression are obtained.

  5. Midpoint Distribution of Directed Polymers in the Stationary Regime: Exact Result Through Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-09-01

    We obtain an exact result for the midpoint probability distribution function (pdf) of the stationary continuum directed polymer, when averaged over the disorder. It is obtained by relating that pdf to the linear response of the stochastic Burgers field to some perturbation. From the symmetries of the stochastic Burgers equation we derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation so that the pdf gets given by the stationary two space-time points correlation function of the Burgers field. An analytical expression for the latter was obtained by Imamura and Sasamoto (J Stat Phys 150:908-939, 2013), thereby rendering our result explicit. In the large length limit that implies that the pdf is nothing but the scaling function f_{KPZ}(y) introduced by Prähofer and Spohn (J Stat Phys 115(1):255-279, 2004). Using the KPZ-universality paradigm, we find that this function can therefore also be interpreted as the pdf of the position y of the maximum of the Airy process minus a parabola and a two-sided Brownian motion. We provide a direct numerical test of the result through simulations of the Log-Gamma polymer.

  6. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, John C.; Johnston, William A.; McKinnon, Daniel D.

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  7. Long-term linear growth of children with severe steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Sesto, Antonella; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2003-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the risk of permanent linear growth impairment in a selected group of 42 children with steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS) and 14 children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome (FRNS). Longitudinal height measurements were available in all patients from the onset of the disease for a mean follow-up of 11.7+/-3.5 years. During the prepubertal period, patients lost 0.49+/-0.6 height SD score (HtSDS) ( P<0.001). Twenty-three patients have reached their final height with an average loss of 0.92+/-0.8 HtSDS from the onset of their disease ( P<0.001) and 0.68+/-0.7 from their target HtSDS ( P<0.001). The pubertal growth spurt was mildly delayed in male but not female patients. Steroid therapy, calculated as the mean duration of prednisone (PDN) treatment or as the average cumulative PDN dose, was the only predictor of poor growth evolution. Partial catch-up growth occurred after PDN withdrawal. Children with early onset NS and adolescent patients, who were still receiving PDN after the age of 9 years in girls and 11 years in boys, were at higher risk for HtSDS loss. In conclusion, children with severe steroid-responsive NS are at risk of permanent growth retardation secondary to prolonged courses of steroid treatment.

  8. Efficient block preconditioned eigensolvers for linear response time-dependent density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Vecharynski, Eugene; Brabec, Jiri; Shao, Meiyue; ...

    2017-08-24

    Within this paper, we present two efficient iterative algorithms for solving the linear response eigenvalue problem arising from the time dependent density functional theory. Although the matrix to be diagonalized is nonsymmetric, it has a special structure that can be exploited to save both memory and floating point operations. In particular, the nonsymmetric eigenvalue problem can be transformed into an eigenvalue problem that involves the product of two matrices M and K. We show that, because MK is self-adjoint with respect to the inner product induced by the matrix K, this product eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently by amore » modified Davidson algorithm and a modified locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate gradient (LOBPCG) algorithm that make use of the K-inner product. Additionally, the solution of the product eigenvalue problem yields one component of the eigenvector associated with the original eigenvalue problem. We show that the other component of the eigenvector can be easily recovered in an inexpensive postprocessing procedure. As a result, the algorithms we present here become more efficient than existing methods that try to approximate both components of the eigenvectors simultaneously. In particular, our numerical experiments demonstrate that the new algorithms presented here consistently outperform the existing state-of-the-art Davidson type solvers by a factor of two in both solution time and storage.« less

  9. Indentation analysis of biphasic articular cartilage: nonlinear phenomena under finite deformation.

    PubMed

    Suh, J K; Spilker, R L

    1994-02-01

    The nonlinear indentation response of hydrated articular cartilage at physiologically relevant rates of mechanical loading is studied using a two-phase continuum model of the tissue based on the theory of mixtures under finite deformation. The matrix equations corresponding to the governing mixture equations for this nonlinear problem are derived using a total Lagrangian penalty finite element method, and solved using a predictor-corrector iteration within a modified Newton-Raphson scheme. The stress relaxation indentation problem is examined using either a porous (free draining) indenter or solid (impermeable) indenter under fast and slow compression rates. The creep indentation problem is studied using a porous indenter. We examine the finite deformation response and compare with the response obtained using the linear infinitesimal response. Differences between the finite deformation response and the linear response are shown to be significant when the compression rate is fast or when the indenter is impermeable. The finite deformation model has a larger ratio of peak-to-equilibrium reaction force, and higher relaxation rate than the linear model during the early relaxation period, but a similar relaxation time. The finite deformation model predicts a slower creep rate than the linear model, as well as a smaller equilibrium creep displacement. The pressure distribution below the indenter, particularly near the loaded surface is also larger with the finite deformation model.

  10. Design and sample size for evaluating combinations of drugs of linear and loglinear dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Li, Wei; Tan, Ming

    2009-07-01

    The study of drug combinations has become important in drug development due to its potential for efficacy at lower, less toxic doses and the need to move new therapies rapidly into clinical trials. The goal is to identify which combinations are additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Although there exists statistical framework for finding doses and sample sizes needed to detect departure from additivity, e.g., the power maximized F-test, different classes of drugs of different does-response shapes require different derivation for calculating sample size and finding doses. Motivated by two anticancer combination studies that we are involved with, this article proposes dose-finding and sample size method for detecting departures from additivity o