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Sample records for deformed boson scheme

  1. Decoherence of spin-deformed bosonic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Sh.; Mahdifar, A.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2013-07-15

    The decoherence rate and some parameters affecting it are investigated for the generalized spin-boson model. We consider the spin-bosonic model when the bosonic environment is modeled by the deformed harmonic oscillators. We show that the state of the environment approaches a non-linear coherent state. Then, we obtain the decoherence rate of a two-level system which is in contact with a deformed bosonic environment which is either in thermal equilibrium or in the ground state. By using some recent realization of f-deformed oscillators, we show that some physical parameters strongly affect the decoherence rate of a two-level system. -- Highlights: •Decoherence of the generalized spin-boson model is considered. •In this model the environment consists of f-oscillators. •Via the interaction, the state of the environment approaches non-linear coherent states. •Effective parameters on decoherence are considered.

  2. Tidal deformability of compact boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennett, Noah; Steinhoff, Jan; Hinderer, Tanja; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves can be used to probe the structure of compact objects in coalescing binary systems. This structure enters the pre-merger waveform through tidal interactions between the two bodies, characterized by each object's tidal deformability. We investigate whether these effects can differentiate binary black holes from systems containing compact boson stars. We compute the tidal deformability for various boson star models, including ultracompact non-topological solitonic solutions.

  3. Tidal deformability of boson stars and dark matter clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Raissa F. P.; Yang, Huan

    2017-09-01

    In this work we consider minimally-coupled boson stars immersed in a tidal environment and compute their tidal deformability to leading order. We also describe an approximate correspondence between Newtonian boson star configurations (described by the Schrödinger–Poisson equations) and dynamical dark matter clumps (described by the collisionless Boltzmann equation). This allows us to map our results for the tidal deformability of boson stars to approximate statements for dark matter clumps.

  4. f-Deformed Boson Algebra Related to Gentile Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the deformed boson algebra giving the Gentile distribution function is constructed by using the model of ideal gas of deformed bosons and some properties of a root of unity. As an example we discuss the quantum optical problem related to the Gentile (or f-deformed) boson algebra with large but finite M. For this algebra we construct the Gentile (or f-deformed) coherent state and discuss its nonclassical properties such as sub-Poissonian statistics and anti-bunching effect.

  5. f-Deformed Boson Algebra Related to Gentile Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper the deformed boson algebra giving the Gentile distribution function is constructed by using the model of ideal gas of deformed bosons and some properties of a root of unity. As an example we discuss the quantum optical problem related to the Gentile (or f-deformed) boson algebra with large but finite M. For this algebra we construct the Gentile (or f-deformed) coherent state and discuss its nonclassical properties such as sub-Poissonian statistics and anti-bunching effect.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensional systems with deformed bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algin, Abdullah; Olkun, Ali

    2017-08-01

    We study the low and high temperature thermostatistical properties of a deformed boson gas constructed by the bosonic intermediate-statistics particles confined in low spatial dimensions. Many of the deformed thermodynamical functions of the system such as internal energy and entropy are investigated by means of some elements of the Fibonacci calculus. Particular emphasis is given to a careful analysis on low dimensional systems of such deformed bosons, and the conditions under which the Bose-Einstein condensation would occur in such systems are discussed. We show that low dimensional systems with deformed bosons exhibit the Bose-Einstein condensation for values of the model deformation parameters (p , q) greater than one. We also study possible anyonic behavior of the model for high temperatures. The results obtained in this work reveal that the present deformed boson gas model can be used for modeling nonlinear behavior of systems with quasiparticles encountered in several areas of research particularly in quantum science.

  7. GENERAL: Q-Deformed Bosons at Quasi-classical Limit of SO(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Gao, Yi-Bo; Li, Yan-Min

    2009-03-01

    When a boson interacts with another to form a composite system with SO(3) dynamic symmetry, it is shown that there exists the q-deformed bosonic excitation satisfying the q-deformed Heisenberg commutation relation in the quasi-classical limit that the angular momentum j for SO(3) is large, but not infinite. In second quantization this quasi-excitation is associated with the boson realization of SO(3) Lie algebra. Physically, the phenomena of q-deformed excitation can happen in many models of quantum dynamics, such as super emission from a system of many identical two-level atoms, the spin wave in Heisenberg chain, the high spin precession and the coherent output of Bose-Einstein atoms in a trap. Especially, in these models, the deformation parameter q is well defined intrinsically by a conservative quantity, such as the total atomic number and the angular momentum.

  8. String theories with deformed energy-momentum relations, and a possible nontachyonic bosonic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magueijo, João; Smolin, Lee

    2005-01-01

    We consider a prescription for introducing deformed dispersion relations in the bosonic string action. We find that in a subset of such theories it remains true that the embedding coordinates propagate linearly on the world sheet. While both the string modes and the center of mass propagate with deformed dispersion relations, the speed of light remains energy independent. We consider the canonical quantization of these strings and find that it is possible to choose theories so that ghost modes still decouple, as usual. We also find that there are examples where the tachyon is eliminated from the spectrum of the free bosonic string.

  9. Energy spectrum inverse problem of q-deformed harmonic oscillator and entanglement of composite bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Nguyen Anh; Thu Thuy, Do Thi; Loan, Nguyen Thi Ha; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2017-06-01

    Using the simple deformed three-level model (D3L model) proposed in our early work, we study the entanglement problem of composite bosons. Consider three first energy levels are known, we can get two energy separations, and can define the level deformation parameter δ. Using connection between q-deformed harmonic oscillator and Morse-like anharmonic potential, the deform parameter q also can be derived explicitly. Like the Einstein’s theory of special relativity, we introduce the observer e˙ects: out side observer (looking from outside the studying system) and inside observer (looking inside the studying system). Corresponding to those observers, the outside entanglement entropy and inside entanglement entropy will be defined.. Like the case of Foucault pendulum in the problem of Earth rotation, our deformation energy level investigation might be useful in prediction the environment e˙ect outside a confined box.

  10. A Green's function decoupling scheme for the Edwards fermion-boson model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D M; Ejima, S; Alvermann, A; Fehske, H

    2010-11-03

    Holes in a Mott insulator are represented by spinless fermions in the fermion-boson model introduced by Edwards. Although the physically interesting regime is for low to moderate fermion density, the model has interesting properties over the whole density range. It has previously been studied at half-filling in the one-dimensional (1D) case by numerical methods, in particular using exact diagonalization and the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). In the present study the one-particle Green's function is calculated analytically by means of a decoupling scheme for the equations of motion, valid for arbitrary density in 1D, 2D and 3D with fairly large boson energy and zero boson relaxation parameter. The Green's function is used to compute some ground state properties, and the one-fermion spectral function, for fermion densities n = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9 in the 1D case. The results are generally in good agreement with numerical results obtained using the DMRG and dynamical DMRG, and new light is shed on the nature of the ground state at different fillings. The Green's function approximation is sufficiently successful in 1D to justify future application to the 2D and 3D cases.

  11. Information quantifiers, entropy squeezing and entanglement properties of superconducting qubit-deformed bosonic field system under dephasing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Al-Rajhi, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the evolution of some measures of nonclassicality and entanglement in the framework of the interaction between a superconducting qubit and deformed bosonic fields under decoherence effect. We compare the dynamical behavior of the different quantum quantifiers by exploiting a large set of nonlinear bosonic fields that are characterized by the deformation parameter. Additionally, we demonstrate how the connection between the appearance of the nonlinearity in the deformed field and the quantum information quantifiers. The time correlation between entropy squeezing, purity, and entanglement is examined in terms of the physical parameters involved in the whole system. Lastly, we explore the exact ranges of the physical parameters in order to combat the decoherence effect and maintain high amount of entanglement during the time evolution.

  12. Marginal deformations of vacua with massive boson-fermion degeneracy symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florakis, Ioannis; Kounnas, Costas; Toumbas, Nicolaos

    2010-07-01

    Two-dimensional string vacua with Massive Spectrum boson-fermion Degeneracy Symmetry, [, are explicitly constructed in Type II and Heterotic superstring theories. The study of their moduli space indicates the existence of large marginal deformations that connect continuously the initial [ vacua to higher-dimensional conventional superstring vacua, where spacetime supersymmetry is spontaneously broken by geometrical fluxes. We find that the maximally symmetric, [, Type II vacuum, is in correspondence with the maximal, N=8, d=4 "gauged supergravity", where the supergravity gauging is induced by the fluxes. This correspondence is extended to less symmetric cases where the initial MSDS symmetry is reduced by orbifolds: [:MSDS]d=2 ↔ [. We also exhibit and analyse thermal interpretations of some Euclidean versions of the models and identify classes of MSDS vacua that remain tachyon-free under arbitrary marginal deformations about the extended symmetry point. The connection between the two-dimensional MSDS vacua and the resulting four-dimensional effective supergravities arises naturally within the context of an adiabatic cosmological evolution, where the very early Universe is conjectured to be described by an MSDS vacuum, while at late cosmological times it is described by an effective N=1 supergravity theory with spontaneously broken supersymmetry.

  13. Thermal Radiation Laws of a q-deformed Boson System in m Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, QiJun; Ge, Jing; Luo, Hao; Luo, YongSong

    2017-09-01

    Within the theoretical framework of multidimensional space and q bosons, we generalize our hypothesis of regarding the CMBR as the radiation of q bosons, and investigate the thermal radiation laws of a q boson system in m dimensions. Utilizing the new radiation laws, we make a numerical calculation and the results show that these new laws have some special features. We consider that this work may provide more insight into the theory of q bosons and the study on the CMBR.

  14. The Standard Model Results from a Scheme to Protect the Mass of the Scalar Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, M.

    2005-08-01

    The masses of phenomenological scalar bosons are not protected against large contributions due to quantum loops involving the hypothetical very high energy theory that we assume is the true theory. Here I present a generalization of Yang-Mills theories that treats vector and scalar bosons on the same footing and results in Ward identities and current conservations that protect the masses of the scalars. It is remarkable that that the Standard Model obtains immediately upon choosing an appropriate gauge symmetry and allowing for one scalar field and one vector field to possess large vacuum expectation values. The Standard Model then appears as the unitary gauge of the chosen gauge symmetry. Due to the vectorial VEV there is a small breaking of the Lorentz invariance.

  15. An Efficient Radial Basis Function Mesh Deformation Scheme within an Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Optimization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Vincent

    Mesh deformation schemes play an important role in numerical aerodynamic optimization. As the aerodynamic shape changes, the computational mesh must adapt to conform to the deformed geometry. In this work, an extension to an existing fast and robust Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh movement scheme is presented. Using a reduced set of surface points to define the mesh deformation increases the efficiency of the RBF method; however, at the cost of introducing errors into the parameterization by not recovering the exact displacement of all surface points. A secondary mesh movement is implemented, within an adjoint-based optimization framework, to eliminate these errors. The proposed scheme is tested within a 3D Euler flow by reducing the pressure drag while maintaining lift of a wing-body configured Boeing-747 and an Onera-M6 wing. As well, an inverse pressure design is executed on the Onera-M6 wing and an inverse span loading case is presented for a wing-body configured DLR-F6 aircraft.

  16. Renormalization scheme dependence of the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM.

    PubMed

    Borowka, S; Hahn, T; Heinemeyer, S; Heinrich, G; Hollik, W

    Reaching a theoretical accuracy in the prediction of the lightest MSSM Higgs-boson mass, [Formula: see text], at the level of the current experimental precision requires the inclusion of momentum-dependent contributions at the two-loop level. Recently two groups presented the two-loop QCD momentum-dependent corrections to [Formula: see text] (Borowka et al., Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014; Degrassi et al., Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015), using a hybrid on-shell-[Formula: see text] scheme, with apparently different results. We show that the differences can be traced back to a different renormalization of the top-quark mass, and that the claim in Ref. Degrassi et al. (Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015) of an inconsistency in Ref. Borowka et al. (Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014) is incorrect. We furthermore compare consistently the results for [Formula: see text] obtained with the top-quark mass renormalized on-shell and [Formula: see text]. The latter calculation has been added to the FeynHiggs package and can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections beyond the two-loop level.

  17. A further assessment of interpolation schemes for window deformation in PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2006-09-01

    We have evaluated the performances of the following seven interpolation schemes used for window deformation in particle image velocimetry (PIV): the linear, quadratic, B-spline, cubic, sinc, Lagrange, and Gaussian interpolations. Artificially generated images comprised particles of diameter in a range 1.1 ≤ d p ≤ 10.0 pixel were investigated. Three particle diameters were selected for detailed evaluation: d p = 2.2, 3.3, and 4.4 pixel with a constant particle concentration 0.02 particle/pixel2. Two flow patterns were considered: uniform and shear flow. The mean and random errors, and the computation times of the interpolation schemes were determined and compared.

  18. Quench of non-Markovian coherence in the deep sub-Ohmic spin–boson model: A unitary equilibration scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yao

    2015-09-15

    The deep sub-Ohmic spin–boson model shows a longstanding non-Markovian coherence at low temperature. Motivating to quench this robust coherence, the thermal effect is unitarily incorporated into the time evolution of the model, which is calculated by the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group algorithm combined with the orthogonal polynomials theory. Via introducing a unitary heating operator to the bosonic bath, the bath is heated up so that a majority portion of the bosonic excited states is occupied. It is found in this situation the coherence of the spin is quickly quenched even in the coherent regime, in which the non-Markovian feature dominates. With this finding we come up with a novel way to implement the unitary equilibration, the essential term of the eigenstate-thermalization hypothesis, through a short-time evolution of the model.

  19. 3-D deformable image registration: a topology preservation scheme based on hierarchical deformation models and interval analysis optimization.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Vincent; Heinrich, Christian; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2005-05-01

    This paper deals with topology preservation in three-dimensional (3-D) deformable image registration. This work is a nontrivial extension of, which addresses the case of two-dimensional (2-D) topology preserving mappings. In both cases, the deformation map is modeled as a hierarchical displacement field, decomposed on a multiresolution B-spline basis. Topology preservation is enforced by controlling the Jacobian of the transformation. Finding the optimal displacement parameters amounts to solving a constrained optimization problem: The residual energy between the target image and the deformed source image is minimized under constraints on the Jacobian. Unlike the 2-D case, in which simple linear constraints are derived, the 3-D B-spline-based deformable mapping yields a difficult (until now, unsolved) optimization problem. In this paper, we tackle the problem by resorting to interval analysis optimization techniques. Care is taken to keep the computational burden as low as possible. Results on multipatient 3-D MRI registration illustrate the ability of the method to preserve topology on the continuous image domain.

  20. A novel scheme for automatic nonrigid image registration using deformation invariant feature and geometric constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-10-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for non-rigid deformation images which are more complicated and common in remote sensing images, such as distorted UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) images or scanning imaging images caused by flutter. Traditional non-rigid image registration methods are based on the correctly matched corresponding landmarks, which usually needs artificial markers. It is a rather challenging task to locate the accurate position of the points and get accurate homonymy point sets. In this paper, we proposed an automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm which mainly consists of three steps: To begin with, we introduce an automatic feature point extraction method based on non-linear scale space and uniform distribution strategy to extract the points which are uniform distributed along the edge of the image. Next, we propose a hybrid point matching algorithm using DaLI (Deformation and Light Invariant) descriptor and local affine invariant geometric constraint based on triangulation which is constructed by K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Based on the accurate homonymy point sets, the two images are registrated by the model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline). Our method is demonstrated by three deliberately designed experiments. The first two experiments are designed to evaluate the distribution of point set and the correctly matching rate on synthetic data and real data respectively. The last experiment is designed on the non-rigid deformation remote sensing images and the three experimental results demonstrate the accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared with other traditional methods.

  1. A robust time-base transformation scheme for computing waveform deformation during nonlinear propagation of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaff, Boris; Raghunathan, Shreyas B.; Verweij, Martin D.

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of nonlinear wave propagation is important for predicting the performance of novel medical procedures and devices that are based on nonlinear ultrasound. Over the years, many simulation methods for nonlinear ultrasound waves have been developed. A large number of these methods are based on the split-step approach, and employ an implicit solution of the Burgers equation for the nonlinear substep. The traditional implementation of this substep involves a pressure-dependent deformation of the time axis, followed by an interpolation procedure to get back at the original time grid. In the shock wave regime, the deformation of the time axis may result in the `crossing over' of time points, which leads to erroneous interpolations. With the traditional implementation, the problem can only be avoided by decreasing the spatial stepping distance, at the cost of an increase of computation time. In this paper we investigate the cause of the occurring difficulties and we propose an alternative implementation of the nonlinear substep, for which the mentioned difficulties do not show up. Moreover, we will present numerical results that demonstrate that the spatial stepping distance can be chosen much larger than with the traditional approach.

  2. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  3. Deformation in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes: Radioactive decay scheme studies in the neodymium, promethium, and samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbach, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Several experiments were performed at the UNISOR isotope separator facility at HHIRF at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes. Data for the decay chain {sup 133}Sm {yields} {sup 133}Pm {yields} {sup 133}Nd was obtained, consisting of multiscaled spectra of {gamma} rays, X rays, and conversion electrons, as well as {gamma}{gamma}t, X{gamma}t, e{gamma}t and eXt coincidences. Gamma rays associated with the decay of {sup 133}Sm and {sup 133}Pm were observed for the first time. The decay of a new low-spin (1/2) isomeric state, with a half life of about 70 sec was established for {sup 133}Nd. The level schemes for {sup 133}Nd and {sup 133}Pr were constructed. An M3 and two E1 isomers are established in {sup 133}Nd and an E3 isomer is confirmed in {sup 133}Pr. The energy level systematics for the nuclear region bounded by Z {ge} 58 and N {le} 78 is discussed. Theoretical interpretations are based on the particle-plus-triaxial rotor model calculations. In the framework of these calculations, the {beta}{sub 2} deformation is moderate for these nuclei ({beta}{sub 2} {approx} 0.20-0.25). A sudden onset of strong deformation is not observed, in contrast with the theoretical predictions by Leander and Moeller [Lea82].

  4. Full-field wing deformation measurement scheme for in-flight cantilever monoplane based on 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei-Gang; Liang, Jin; Guo, Xiang; Guo, Cheng; Hu, Hao; Tang, Zheng-Zong

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a new non-contact scheme, based on 3D digital image correlation technology, is presented to measure the full-field wing deformation of in-flight cantilever monoplanes. Because of the special structure of the cantilever wing, two conjugated camera groups, which are rigidly connected and calibrated to an ensemble respectively, are installed onto the vertical fin of the aircraft and record the whole measurement. First, a type of pre-stretched target and speckle pattern are designed to adapt the oblique camera view for accurate detection and correlation. Then, because the measurement cameras are swinging with the aircraft vertical trail all the time, a camera position self-correction method (using control targets sprayed on the back of the aircraft), is designed to orientate all the cameras’ exterior parameters to a unified coordinate system in real time. Besides, for the excessively inclined camera axis and the vertical camera arrangement, a weak correlation between the high position image and low position image occurs. In this paper, a new dual-temporal efficient matching method, combining the principle of seed point spreading, is proposed to achieve the matching of weak correlated images. A novel system is developed and a simulation test in the laboratory was carried out to verify the proposed scheme.

  5. Thermostatistics of bosonic and fermionic Fibonacci oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algin, Abdullah; Arik, Metin; Senay, Mustafa; Topcu, Gozde

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we first introduce some new properties concerning the Fibonacci calculus. We then discuss the thermostatistics of gas models of two-parameter deformed oscillators, called bosonic and fermionic Fibonacci oscillators, in the thermodynamical limit. In this framework, we analyze the behavior of two-parameter deformed mean occupation numbers describing the Fibonacci-type bosonic and fermionic intermediate-statistics particles. A virial expansion of the equation of state for the bosonic Fibonacci oscillators’ gas model is obtained in both two and three dimensions, and the first five virial coefficients are derived in terms of the real independent deformation parameters p and q. The effect of bosonic and fermionic p, q-deformation on the thermostatistical properties of Fibonacci-type p, q-boson and p, q-fermion gas models are also discussed. The results obtained in this work can be useful for investigating some exotic quasiparticle states encountered in condensed matter systems.

  6. General form of the boson-fermion interaction in the interacting boson-fermion model-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, F. A.; Barea, J.

    2017-03-01

    The boson-fermion interaction in the interacting boson-fermion model-2 (IBFM-2) is derived in a systematic and general form from a quadrupole-quadrupole force using several nondegenerate levels. The boson-fermion quadrupole operator employed is obtained from the boson-fermion image of the one nucleon transfer operator which in turn can be calculated following two alternative schemes: the Otsuka-Arima-Iachello and generalized Holstein-Primakoff schemes. Four different terms (two quadrupole and two exchange) were obtained. Application of the new expressions to a single-j model is studied and analyzed.

  7. Superalgebra and fermion-boson symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Hironari

    2010-01-01

    Fermions and bosons are quite different kinds of particles, but it is possible to unify them in a supermultiplet, by introducing a new mathematical scheme called superalgebra. In this article we discuss the development of the concept of symmetry, starting from the rotational symmetry and finally arriving at this fermion-boson (FB) symmetry. PMID:20228617

  8. Vibronic Boson Sampling: Generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling for Molecular Vibronic Spectra at Finite Temperature.

    PubMed

    Huh, Joonsuk; Yung, Man-Hong

    2017-08-07

    Molecular vibroic spectroscopy, where the transitions involve non-trivial Bosonic correlation due to the Duschinsky Rotation, is strongly believed to be in a similar complexity class as Boson Sampling. At finite temperature, the problem is represented as a Boson Sampling experiment with correlated Gaussian input states. This molecular problem with temperature effect is intimately related to the various versions of Boson Sampling sharing the similar computational complexity. Here we provide a full description to this relation in the context of Gaussian Boson Sampling. We find a hierarchical structure, which illustrates the relationship among various Boson Sampling schemes. Specifically, we show that every instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling with an initial correlation can be simulated by an instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling without initial correlation, with only a polynomial overhead. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling associated with a product of vacuum modes. We refer such a generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling motivated by the molecular sampling problem as Vibronic Boson Sampling.

  9. Interacting Boson Model and nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2012-10-01

    An overview on the recent development of the microscopic derivation of the Interacting Boson Model is presented with some remarks not found elsewhere. The OAI mapping is reviewed very briefly, including the basic correspondence from nucleon-pair to boson. The new fermionboson mapping method is introduced, where intrinsic states of nucleons and bosons for a wide variation of shapes play an important role. Nucleon intrinsic states are obtained from mean field models, which is Skyrme model in examples to be shown. This method generates IBM-2 Hamiltonian which can describe and predict various situations of quadrupole collective states, including U(5), SU(3), O(6) and E(5) limits. The method is extended so that rotational response (cranking) can be handled, which enables us to describe rotational bands of strongly deformed nuclei. Thus, we have obtained a unified framework for the microscopic derivation of the IBM covering all known situations of quadrupole collectivity at low energy.

  10. A Coupled/Uncoupled Computational Scheme for Deformation and Fatigue Damage Analysis of Unidirectional Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, Thomas E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Saleeb, Atef F.

    1997-01-01

    A fatigue damage computational algorithm utilizing a multiaxial, isothermal, continuum-based fatigue damage model for unidirectional metal-matrix composites has been implemented into the commercial finite element code MARC using MARC user subroutines. Damage is introduced into the finite element solution through the concept of effective stress that fully couples the fatigue damage calculations with the finite element deformation solution. Two applications using the fatigue damage algorithm are presented. First, an axisymmetric stress analysis of a circumferentially reinforced ring, wherein both the matrix cladding and the composite core were assumed to behave elastic-perfectly plastic. Second, a micromechanics analysis of a fiber/matrix unit cell using both the finite element method and the generalized method of cells (GMC). Results are presented in the form of S-N curves and damage distribution plots.

  11. Exciton-exciton scattering: Composite boson versus elementary boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combescot, M.; Betbeder-Matibet, O.; Combescot, R.

    2007-05-01

    This paper shows the necessity of introducing a quantum object, the “coboson,” to properly describe, through a fermion scheme, any composite particle, such as the exciton, which is made of two fermions. Although commonly dealt with as elementary bosons, these composite bosons—cobosons in short—differ from them due to their composite nature which makes the handling of their many-body effects quite different from the existing treatments valid for elementary bosons. As a direct consequence of this composite nature, there is no correct way to describe the interaction between cobosons as a potential V . This is rather dramatic because, with the Hamiltonian not written as H=H0+V , all the usual approaches to many-body effects fail. In particular, the standard form of the Fermi golden rule, written in terms of V , cannot be used to obtain the transition rates of two cobosons. To get them, we have had to construct an unconventional expression for this Fermi golden rule in which H only appears. Making use of this expression, we give here a detailed calculation of the time evolution of two excitons. We compare the results of this exact approach with the ones obtained by using an effective bosonic Hamiltonian in which the excitons are considered as elementary bosons with effective scatterings between them, these scatterings resulting from an elaborate mapping between the two-fermion space and the ideal boson space. We show that the relation between the inverse lifetime and the sum of the transition rates for elementary bosons differs from the one of the composite bosons by a factor of 1/2 , so that it is impossible to find effective scatterings between bosonic excitons giving these two physical quantities correctly, whatever the mapping from composite bosons to elementary bosons is. The present paper thus constitutes a strong mathematical proof that, in spite of a widely spread belief, we cannot forget the composite nature of these cobosons, even in the extremely low

  12. Supersymmetric Ito equation: Bosonization and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Bo; Yu Jun; Lin Ji

    2013-04-15

    Based on the bosonization approach, the N=1 supersymmetric Ito (sIto) system is changed to a system of coupled bosonic equations. The approach can effectively avoid difficulties caused by intractable fermionic fields which are anticommuting. By solving the coupled bosonic equations, the traveling wave solutions of the sIto system are obtained with the mapping and deformation method. Some novel types of exact solutions for the supersymmetric system are constructed with the solutions and symmetries of the usual Ito equation. In the meanwhile, the similarity reduction solutions of the model are also studied with the Lie point symmetry theory.

  13. Phase transitions in the interacting boson fermion model: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.E.; Arias, J.M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2005-12-15

    The phase transition around the critical point in the evolution from spherical to deformed {gamma}-unstable shapes is investigated in odd nuclei within the interacting boson fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. The particular choice of the j=3/2 orbital preserves in the odd case the condition of {gamma}-instability of the system. As a consequence, energy spectrum and electromagnetic transitions, in correspondence of the critical point, display behaviors qualitatively similar to those of the even core. The results are also in qualitative agreement with the recently proposed E(5/4) model, although few differences are present, due to the different nature of the two schemes.

  14. Conformal gravity and the bosonic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julve, J.; Tiemblo, A.; Tresguerres, R.

    1987-06-01

    We show that the Callan et al. effective equations of motion for the bosonic closed string in a non-trivial background may not be derived only from the bosonic part of the N=1 supergravity action of Manton and Chapline, but also from just a general conformally invariant theory of gravity. In our scheme the invariance under gauge transformations of the antisymmetric tensor field turns out to be a consequence of the metricity condition.

  15. Beyond the Schwinger boson representation of the su(2)-algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Providência, Constança; da Providência, João; Yamamura, Masatoshi

    2015-04-01

    With the use of two kinds of boson operators, a new boson representation of the su(2)-algebra is proposed. The basic idea comes from the pseudo su(1,1)-algebra recently given by the present authors [Y. Tsue et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2013, 103D04 (2013)]. It forms a striking contrast to the Schwinger boson representation of the su(2)-algebra, which is also based on two kinds of bosons. It is proved that this new boson representation obeys the su(2)-algebra in a certain subspace in the whole boson space constructed by the Schwinger boson representation of the su(1,1)-algebra. This representation may be suitable for describing the time dependence of the system interacting with the external environment in the framework of the thermo field dynamics formalism, i.e., phase space doubling. Further, several deformations related to the su(2)-algebra in this boson representation are discussed. On the basis of these deformed algebras, various types of time evolution of a simple boson system are investigated.

  16. Numerical solution of axisymmetric, unsteady free-boundary problems at finite Reynolds number. I - Finite-difference scheme and its application to the deformation of a bubble in a uniaxial straining flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. S.; Leal, L. G.

    1987-07-01

    A numerical technique for solving axisymmetric, unsteady free-boundary problems in fluid mechanics is presented. This finite-difference method is a generalization of the steady algorithm reported by Ryskin and Leal (1984). In this scheme, all boundary surfaces of the solution domain at any time coincide exactly with a coordinate line of a numerically generated orthogonal coordinate system. Thus, unreasonable grid deformation during calculation is not a problem. A transient algorithm for applying the orthogonal mapping technique to unsteady free-boundary problems is developed. The unsteady deformation of a bubble in a uniaxial extensional flow for Reynolds numbers between 0.1 and 100 is considered as an example.

  17. The Higgs Boson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  18. The Higgs Boson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  19. Duality of boson and fermion: New intermediate-statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang; Algin, Abdullah

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we propose a new model for describing an intermediate-statistics particles system. Starting with a deformed grand partition function, we investigate several thermodynamical and statistical properties of a gas model of two-parameter deformed particles. We specifically focus on the low-temperature behavior of the model and the conditions under which either boson condensation or fermion condensation would occur in such a model are discussed. Our results obtained in this study reveal that the present deformed gas model exhibits duality of boson and fermion, and can be useful for approaching the thermostatistics of condensation characteristics in quantum systems.

  20. Fermion boson metamorphosis in field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Y.K.

    1982-01-01

    In two-dimensional field theories many features are especially transparent if the Fermi fields are represented by non-local expressions of the Bose fields. Such a procedure is known as boson representation. Bilinear quantities appear in the Lagrangian of a fermion theory transform, however, as simple local expressions of the bosons so that the resulting theory may be written as a theory of bosons. Conversely, a theory of bosons may be transformed into an equivalent theory of fermions. Together they provide a basis for generating many interesting equivalences between theories of different types. In the present work a consistent scheme for constructing a canonical Fermi field in terms of a real scalar field is developed and such a procedure is valid and consistent with the tenets of quantum field theory is verified. A boson formulation offers a unifying theme in understanding the structure of many theories. This is illustrated by the boson formulation of a multifermion theory with chiral and internal symmetries. The nature of dynamical generation of mass when the theory undergoes boson transmutation and the preservation of continuous chiral symmetry in the massive case are examined. The dynamics of the system depends to a great extent on the specific number of fermions and different models of the same system can have very different properties. Many unusual symmetries of the fermion theory, such as hidden symmetry, duality and triality symmetries, are only manifest in the boson formulation. The underlying connections between some models with U(N) internal symmetry and another class of fermion models built with Majorana fermions which have O(2N) internal symmetry are uncovered.

  1. Higgs Boson 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-11-16

    The Higgs boson burst into the public arena on July 4, 2012, when scientists working at the CERN laboratory announced the particle’s discovery. However the initial discovery was a bit tentative, with the need to verify that the discovered particle was, indeed, the Higgs boson. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln looks at the data from the perspective of 2016 and shows that more recent analyses further supports the idea that the Higgs boson is what was discovered.

  2. Are Bosonic Replicas Faulty?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir Al.; Kanzieper, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    Motivated by the ongoing discussion about a seeming asymmetry in the performance of fermionic and bosonic replicas, we present an exact, nonperturbative approach to both fermionic and bosonic zero-dimensional replica field theories belonging to the broadly interpreted β=2 Dyson symmetry class. We then utilize the formalism developed to demonstrate that the bosonic replicas do correctly reproduce the microscopic spectral density in the QCD-inspired chiral Gaussian unitary ensemble. This disproves the myth that the bosonic replica field theories are intrinsically faulty.

  3. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  4. Minimally symmetric Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Ian

    2015-06-17

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)(L) x U(1)(Y) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective Lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal among all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson. Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  5. Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in Weak Boson Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Rzehak, Heidi

    2009-03-06

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading-order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak-boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading-order corrections in the standard model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than expected and than their electroweak counterparts. These corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  6. Boson-mediated quantum spin simulators in transverse fields: X Y model and spin-boson entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    The coupling of spins to long-wavelength bosonic modes is a prominent means to engineer long-range spin-spin interactions, and has been realized in a variety of platforms, such as atoms in optical cavities and trapped ions. To date, much of the experimental focus has been on the realization of long-range Ising models, but generalizations to other spin models are highly desirable. In this work, we explore a previously unappreciated connection between the realization of an X Y model by off-resonant driving of a single sideband of boson excitation (i.e., a single-beam Mølmer-Sørensen scheme) and a boson-mediated Ising simulator in the presence of a transverse field. In particular, we show that these two schemes have the same effective Hamiltonian in suitably defined rotating frames, and analyze the emergent effective X Y spin model through a truncated Magnus series and numerical simulations. In addition to X Y spin-spin interactions that can be nonperturbatively renormalized from the naive Ising spin-spin coupling constants, we find an effective transverse field that is dependent on the thermal energy of the bosons, as well as other spin-boson couplings that cause spin-boson entanglement not to vanish at any time. In the case of a boson-mediated Ising simulator with transverse field, we discuss the crossover from transverse field Ising-like to X Y -like spin behavior as a function of field strength.

  7. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    DOE PAGES

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  8. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    SciTech Connect

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  9. N=2 supersymmetric a=4-Korteweg-de Vries hierarchy derived via Gardner's deformation of Kaup-Boussinesq equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hussin, V.; Kiselev, A. V.; Krutov, A. O.; Wolf, T.

    2010-08-15

    We consider the problem of constructing Gardner's deformations for the N=2 supersymmetric a=4-Korteweg-de Vries (SKdV) equation; such deformations yield recurrence relations between the super-Hamiltonians of the hierarchy. We prove the nonexistence of supersymmetry-invariant deformations that retract to Gardner's formulas for the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) with equation under the component reduction. At the same time, we propose a two-step scheme for the recursive production of the integrals of motion for the N=2, a=4-SKdV. First, we find a new Gardner's deformation of the Kaup-Boussinesq equation, which is contained in the bosonic limit of the superhierarchy. This yields the recurrence relation between the Hamiltonians of the limit, whence we determine the bosonic super-Hamiltonians of the full N=2, a=4-SKdV hierarchy. Our method is applicable toward the solution of Gardner's deformation problems for other supersymmetric KdV-type systems.

  10. Higgs Boson 2016

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-12-14

    The Higgs boson burst into the public arena on July 4, 2012, when scientists working at the CERN laboratory announced the particle’s discovery. However the initial discovery was a bit tentative, with the need to verify that the discovered particle was, indeed, the Higgs boson. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln looks at the data from the perspective of 2016 and shows that more recent analyses further supports the idea that the Higgs boson is what was discovered.

  11. D-Pseudo-Bosons, Complex Hermite Polynomials, and Integral Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. Twareque; Bagarello, Fabio; Gazeau, Jean Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The D-pseudo-boson formalism is illustrated with two examples. The first one involves deformed complex Hermite polynomials built using finite-dimensional irreducible representations of the group GL(2,C) of invertible 2 × 2 matrices with complex entries. It reveals interesting aspects of these representations. The second example is based on a pseudo-bosonic generalization of operator-valued functions of a complex variable which resolves the identity. We show that such a generalization allows one to obtain a quantum pseudo-bosonic version of the complex plane viewed as the canonical phase space and to understand functions of the pseudo-bosonic operators as the quantized versions of functions of a complex variable.

  12. Complete two loop bosonic contributions to the muon lifetime in the standard model.

    PubMed

    Awramik, M; Czakon, M

    2002-12-09

    The last missing correction to the muon lifetime in the standard model at O(alpha(2)) coming from gauge and Higgs boson loops is presented. The associated contribution to the parameter Deltar in the on-shell scheme ranges from 6x10(-5) to -4x10(-5) for Higgs boson masses from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. This result translates into a shift of the W boson mass which does not exceed +/-1 MeV in the same range and amounts, in particular, to approximately -0.8 MeV for a 115 GeV Higgs boson.

  13. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984-2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  14. Gauge invariant one-loop corrections to Higgs boson couplings in nonminimal Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Sakurai, Kodai; Yagyu, Kei

    2017-08-01

    We comprehensively evaluate renormalized Higgs boson couplings at one-loop level in nonminimal Higgs models such as the Higgs singlet model (HSM) and the four types of two Higgs doublet models (THDMs) with a softly broken Z2 symmetry. The renormalization calculation is performed in the on-shell scheme improved by using the pinch technique to eliminate the gauge dependence in the renormalized couplings. We first review the pinch technique for scalar boson two-point functions in the standard model (SM), the HSM and the THDMs. We then discuss the difference in the results of the renormalized Higgs boson couplings between the improved on-shell scheme and the ordinal one with a gauge dependence appearing in mixing parameters of scalar bosons. Finally, we widely investigate how we can identify the HSM and the THDMs focusing on the pattern of deviations in the renormalized Higgs boson couplings from predictions in the SM.

  15. Boson/Fermion Janus Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, R.

    2017-04-01

    Thermodynamically, bosons and fermions differ by their statistics only. A general entropy functional is proposed by superposition of entropic terms, typical for different quantum gases. The statistical properties of the corresponding Janus particles are derived by variation of the weight of the boson/fermion fraction. It is shown that di-bosons and anti-fermions separate in gas and liquid phases, while three-phase equilibrium appears for poly-boson/fermion Janus particles.

  16. Bosonization of Weyl Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Eduardo

    The electron, discovered by Thomson by the end of the nineteenth century, was the first experimentally observed particle. The Weyl fermion, though theoretically predicted since a long time, was observed in a condensed matter environment in an experiment reported only a few weeks ago. Is there any linking thread connecting the first and the last observed fermion (quasi)particles? The answer is positive. By generalizing the method known as bosonization, the first time in its full complete form, for a spacetime with 3+1 dimensions, we are able to show that both electrons and Weyl fermions can be expressed in terms of the same boson field, namely the Kalb-Ramond anti-symmetric tensor gauge field. The bosonized form of the Weyl chiral currents lead to the angle-dependent magneto-conductance behavior observed in these systems.

  17. Higgs boson hunting

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Haber, H.E.; Rindani, S.D.

    1989-05-01

    This is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. We discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K /yields/ /pi/H, /eta//prime/ /yields/ /eta/H,/Upsilon/ /yields/ H/gamma/ and e/sup +/e/sup /minus// /yields/ ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. We also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Accidental Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, B.

    2014-07-01

    We suggest that the Higgs boson is a light composite state that does not emerge from TeV scale strong dynamics for any generic reason, such as when it is pseudo-Goldstone boson. Instead, a state that is Higgs-like and fairly decoupled from heavier states may simply be a reflection of very particular strong dynamics, with properties quite distinct from more familiar large-Nc type gauge dynamics. We elaborate on this picture in the context of a strongly interacting fourth family and an effective 4-Higgs-doublet model. The origin of a decoupling limit and the corrections to it are discussed.

  19. Effects of boson dispersion in fermion-boson coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motome, Yukitoshi; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2000-11-01

    We study the nonlinear feedback in a fermion-boson system using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory and the quantum Monte Carlo method. In the perturbative regimes (weak-coupling and atomic limits) the effective interaction among fermions increases as the width of the boson dispersion increases. In the strong-coupling regime away from the antiadiabatic limit, the effective interaction decreases as we increase the width of the boson dispersion. This behavior is closely related to complete softening of the boson field. We elucidate the parameters that control this nonperturbative region where fluctuations of the dispersive bosons enhance the delocalization of fermions.

  20. Driven Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhofen, Sonja; Bartley, Tim J.; Sansoni, Linda; Kruse, Regina; Hamilton, Craig S.; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Sampling the distribution of bosons that have undergone a random unitary evolution is strongly believed to be a computationally hard problem. Key to outperforming classical simulations of this task is to increase both the number of input photons and the size of the network. We propose driven boson sampling, in which photons are input within the network itself, as a means to approach this goal. We show that the mean number of photons entering a boson sampling experiment can exceed one photon per input mode, while maintaining the required complexity, potentially leading to less stringent requirements on the input states for such experiments. When using heralded single-photon sources based on parametric down-conversion, this approach offers an ˜e -fold enhancement in the input state generation rate over scattershot boson sampling, reaching the scaling limit for such sources. This approach also offers a dramatic increase in the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to higher-order photon generation from such probabilistic sources, which removes the need for photon number resolution during the heralding process as the size of the system increases.

  1. Homogeneous Yang–Baxter deformations as generalized diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Sakatani, Yuho; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2017-10-01

    Yang–Baxter (YB) deformations of string sigma model provide deformed target spaces. We propose that homogeneous YB deformations always lead to a certain class of β-twisted backgrounds and represent the bosonic part of the supergravity fields in terms of the classical r-matrix associated with the YB deformation. We then show that various β-twisted backgrounds can be realized by considering generalized diffeomorphisms in the undeformed background. Our result extends the notable relation between the YB deformations and (non-commuting) TsT transformations. We also discuss more general deformations beyond the YB deformations.

  2. Supergravity background of the λ-deformed AdS3 × S3 supercoset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    We construct the solution of type IIB supergravity describing the integrable λ-deformation of the AdS3 ×S3 supercoset. While the geometry corresponding to the deformation of the bosonic coset has been found in the past, our background is more natural for studying superstrings, and several interesting features distinguish our solution from its bosonic counterpart. We also report progress towards constructing the λ-deformation of the AdS5 ×S5 supercoset.

  3. Repelling Point Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    There is a body of conventional wisdom that holds that a solvable quantum problem, by virtue of its solvability, is pathological and thus irrelevant. It has been difficult to refute this view owing to the paucity of theoretical constructs and experimental results. Recent experiments involving equivalent ions trapped in a spatial conformation of extreme anisotropic confinement (longitudinal extension tens, hundreds or even thousands of times transverse extension) have modified the view of relevancy, and it is now possible to consider systems previously thought pathological, in particular point Bosons that repel in one dimension. It has been difficult for the experimentalists to utilize existing theory, mainly due to long-standing theoretical misunderstanding of the relevance of the permutation group, in particular the non-commutativity of translations (periodicity) and transpositions (permutation). This misunderstanding is most easily rectified in the case of repelling Bosons.

  4. Higgs Boson Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, André Dührssen, Michael

    2016-10-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the measured properties of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN LHC. Searches for deviations from the properties predicted by the standard theory are also summarised. The present status corresponds to the combined analysis of the full Run 1 data sets of collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  5. Simulating b -associated production of Z and Higgs bosons with the Sherpa event generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Frank; Napoletano, Davide; Schumann, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    We compare four- and five-flavor scheme predictions for b -associated production of Z and Higgs bosons. The results are obtained with Sherpa 's Mc@Nlo implementation for the four-flavor scheme, treating the b 's as massive, and with multijet merging at leading and next-to-leading order for the five-flavor schemes. Comparison with data for Z +b (b ¯ ) production at the 7 TeV LHC exhibits strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches and is used to validate predictions for b -associated Higgs-boson production at the 13 TeV Run II.

  6. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  7. A bosonized formulation of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics for shape-invariant potential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleixo, A. N. F.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2014-08-01

    We consider the minimal bosonization realization of supersymmetric shape-invariant systems where generalized supercharge operators are constructed using the partner supersymmetric operators, the parameter potential translation formalism and the reflection operator. We obtain the solution of the eigenvalue equation and study the quantum dynamics of the supersymmetric system including terms in the Hamiltonian which are constructed using the combination of the bosonized supercharge operators. The connections between the bosonized supersymmetric formalism, the Bose-Fermi transformation and the generalization of the R-deformed Heisenberg algebra are discussed. As an illustration, we apply the generalized formalism for the case of the trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential.

  8. Permanents, bosons and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Alexander Yu

    2017-10-01

    The particular complexity of linear quantum optical networks has received certain deserved attention recently due to the possible implications for the theory of quantum computation. Two relevant boson models are discussed in the presented work. The symmetric product of the Hilbert spaces produces a rather abstract model; the second one is obtained by quantization of the harmonic oscillator. In contrast to the considered bosonic processes, the so-called ‘fermionic linear optics’ is effectively simulated on a classical computer. The comparison of the bosonic and fermionic case clarifies the controversy, and the more elaborate oscillator model provides a deeper analogy.

  9. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  10. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy charged Higgs boson production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Ubiali, Maria; Wiesemann, Marius; Zaro, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we study the production of a heavy charged Higgs boson in association with heavy quarks at the LHC in the two-Higgs-doublet model. We present for the first time fully-differential results obtained in the four-flavour scheme at NLO accuracy, both at fixed order and including the matching with parton showers. Relevant differential distributions are studied for two values of the charged boson mass and a thorough comparison is performed between predictions obtained in the four- and five-flavour schemes. We show that the agreement between the two schemes is improved by NLO(+PS) corrections for observables inclusive in the degrees of freedom of bottom quarks. We argue that the four-flavour scheme leads to more reliable predictions, thanks to its accurate description of the bottom-quark kinematics and its small dependence on the Monte Carlos, which in turn is rather large in the five-flavour scheme. A detailed set of recommendations for the simulation of this process in experimental analyses at the LHC is provided.

  12. Chameleon vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ann E.

    2008-05-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 {mu}m, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  13. Dark light Higgs bosons.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Wang, L.-T.; Zhang, H.

    2011-03-24

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, ?, and flavor physics.

  14. Experimental Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Broome, Matthew; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Ralph, Timothy; Dove, Justin; Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Quantum computers are unnecessary for exponentially-efficient computation or simulation if the Extended Church-Turing thesis--a foundational tenet of computer science--is correct. The thesis would be directly contradicted by a physical device that efficiently performs a task believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a task is BOSONSAMPLING: obtaining a distribution of n bosons scattered by some linear-optical unitary process. Here we test the central premise of BOSONSAMPLING, experimentally verifying that the amplitudes of 3-photon scattering processes are given by the permanents of submatrices generated from a unitary describing a 6-mode integrated optical circuit. We find the protocol to be robust, working even with the unavoidable effects of photon loss, non-ideal sources, and imperfect detection. Strong evidence against the Extended-Church-Turing thesis will come from scaling to large numbers of photons, which is a much simpler task than building a universal quantum computer.

  15. One-loop renormalizable Wess-Zumino model on a bosonic-fermionic noncommutative superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Wang, Xu-Dong

    2014-08-01

    We construct a deformed Wess-Zumino model on the noncommutative superspace where the bosonic and fermionic coordinates are no longer commutative with each other. Using the background field method, we calculate the primary one-loop effective action based on the deformed action. By comparing the two actions, we find that the deformed Wess-Zumino model is not renormalizable. To obtain a renormalizable model, we combine the primary one-loop effective action with the deformed action, and then calculate the secondary one-loop effective action based on the combined action. After repeating this process a third time, we finally give the one-loop renormalizable action up to the second order of bosonic-fermionic noncommutative parameters by using our specific techniques of calculation.

  16. What is a Higgs Boson?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the nature of the Higgs boson. Several large experimental groups are hot on the trail of this elusive subatomic particle which is thought to explain the origins of particle mass.

  17. Chiral Bosonization of Superconformal Ghosts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Deheng; Shen, Yang; Liu, Jinling; Xiong, Yongjian

    1996-01-01

    We explain the difference of the Hilbert space of the superconformal ghosts (beta,gamma) system from that of its bosonized fields phi and chi. We calculate the chiral correlation functions of phi, chi fields by inserting appropriate projectors.

  18. What is a Higgs Boson?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2011-07-07

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the nature of the Higgs boson. Several large experimental groups are hot on the trail of this elusive subatomic particle which is thought to explain the origins of particle mass.

  19. M1 excitation in Sm isotopes and the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Sugita, Michiaki

    1991-10-01

    The magnetic-dipole scissors mode in spherical to deformed Sm isotopes is studied in terms of the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model, providing a good agreement with recent experiment by Ziegler et al. The present calculation correctly reproduces the increase of M1 excitation strength in going from spherical to deformed nuclei. It is suggested that there may be 1+ states which do not correspond to the scissors mode but absorb certain M1 strength from the ground state.

  20. Rotating boson stars in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Betti; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; List, Meike

    2010-10-15

    We study rotating boson stars in five spacetime dimensions. The boson fields consist of a complex doublet scalar field. Considering boson stars rotating in two orthogonal planes with both angular momenta of equal magnitude, a special ansatz for the boson field and the metric allows for solutions with nontrivial dependence on the radial coordinate only. The charge of the scalar field equals the sum of the angular momenta. The rotating boson stars are globally regular and asymptotically flat. For our choice of a sextic potential, the rotating boson star solutions possess a flat spacetime limit. We study the solutions in flat and curved spacetime.

  1. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  2. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits.more » By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.« less

  3. Distinguishing boson stars from black holes and neutron stars from tidal interactions in inspiraling binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennett, Noah; Hinderer, Tanja; Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Ossokine, Serguei

    2017-07-01

    Binary systems containing boson stars—self-gravitating configurations of a complex scalar field—can potentially mimic black holes or neutron stars as gravitational-wave sources. We investigate the extent to which tidal effects in the gravitational-wave signal can be used to discriminate between these standard sources and boson stars. We consider spherically symmetric boson stars within two classes of scalar self-interactions: an effective-field-theoretically motivated quartic potential and a solitonic potential constructed to produce very compact stars. We compute the tidal deformability parameter characterizing the dominant tidal imprint in the gravitational-wave signals for a large span of the parameter space of each boson star model, covering the entire space in the quartic case, and an extensive portion of interest in the solitonic case. We find that the tidal deformability for boson stars with a quartic self-interaction is bounded below by Λmin≈280 and for those with a solitonic interaction by Λmin≈1.3 . We summarize our results as ready-to-use fits for practical applications. Employing a Fisher matrix analysis, we estimate the precision with which Advanced LIGO and third-generation detectors can measure these tidal parameters using the inspiral portion of the signal. We discuss a novel strategy to improve the distinguishability between black holes/neutrons stars and boson stars by combining tidal deformability measurements of each compact object in a binary system, thereby eliminating the scaling ambiguities in each boson star model. Our analysis shows that current-generation detectors can potentially distinguish boson stars with quartic potentials from black holes, as well as from neutron-star binaries if they have either a large total mass or a large (asymmetric) mass ratio. Discriminating solitonic boson stars from black holes using only tidal effects during the inspiral will be difficult with Advanced LIGO, but third-generation detectors should

  4. Deformed quons and bi-coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagarello, F.

    2017-04-01

    We discuss how a q-mutation relation can be deformed replacing a pair of conjugate operators with two other and unrelated operators, as it is done in the construction of pseudo-fermions, pseudo-bosons and truncated pseudo-bosons. This deformation involves interesting mathematical problems and suggests possible applications to pseudo-hermitian quantum mechanics. We construct bi-coherent states associated to D -pseudo-quons, and we show that they share many of their properties with ordinary coherent states. In particular, we find conditions for these states to exist, to be eigenstates of suitable annihilation operators and to give rise to a resolution of the identity. Two examples are discussed in details, one connected to an unbounded similarity map, and the other to a bounded map.

  5. Thermodynamic geometry, condensation and Debye model of two-parameter deformed statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Hosein; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Cheraghpour, Narges; Adli, Fereshteh

    2017-08-01

    We consider the statistical distribution function of a two parameter deformed system, namely qp-deformed bosons and fermions. Using a thermodynamic geometry approach, we derive the thermodynamic curvature of an ideal gas with particles obeying qp-bosons and qp-fermions. We show that the intrinsic statistic interaction of qp-bosons is attractive in all physical ranges, while it is repulsive for qp-fermions. Also, the thermodynamic curvature of qp-boson gas is singular at a specified value of fugacity and therefore, a phase transition such as Bose-Einstein condensation can take place. In the following, we compare the experimental and theoretical results of temperature-dependent specific heat capacity of some metallic materials in the framework of q and qp-deformed algebras.

  6. Multiphase Hadamard receivers for classical communication on lossy bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Matteo; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-12-01

    A scheme for transferring classical information over a lossy bosonic channel is proposed by generalizing the proposal presented by Guha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 240502 (2011)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.240502. It employs code words formed by products of coherent states of fixed mean photon number with multiple phases which, through a passive unitary transformation, reduce to a pulse-position modulation code with multiple pulse phases. The maximum information rate achievable with optimal, yet difficult to implement detection schemes is computed and shown to saturate the classical capacity of the channel in the low-energy regime. An easy to implement receiver based on a conditional Dolinar detection scheme is also proposed, finding that while suboptimal, it allows for improvements in an intermediate photon-number regime with respect to previous proposals.

  7. Proposal for Microwave Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peropadre, Borja; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-01

    Boson sampling, the task of sampling the probability distribution of photons at the output of a photonic network, is believed to be hard for any classical device. Unlike other models of quantum computation that require thousands of qubits to outperform classical computers, boson sampling requires only a handful of single photons. However, a scalable implementation of boson sampling is missing. Here, we show how superconducting circuits provide such platform. Our proposal differs radically from traditional quantum-optical implementations: rather than injecting photons in waveguides, making them pass through optical elements like phase shifters and beam splitters, and finally detecting their output mode, we prepare the required multiphoton input state in a superconducting resonator array, control its dynamics via tunable and dispersive interactions, and measure it with nondemolition techniques.

  8. Working Group Report: Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Sally; Gritsan, Andrei; Logan, Heather; Qian, Jianming; Tully, Chris; Van Kooten, Rick

    2013-10-30

    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

  9. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  10. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  11. Bosonic cascades of indirect excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalitov, A. V.; De Liberato, S.; Lagoudakis, P.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the concept of the terahertz bosonic cascade laser (BCL) based on a parabolic quantum well (PQW) embedded in a microcavity was proposed. We refine this proposal by suggesting transitions between indirect exciton (IX) states as a source of terahertz emission. We explicitly propose a structure containing a narrow-square QW and a wide-parabolic QW for the realisation of a bosonic cascade. Advantages of this type of structures are in large dipole matrix elements for terahertz transitions and in long exciton radiative lifetimes which are crucial for realisation of threshold and quantum efficiency BCLs.

  12. Andreev Reflection in Bosonic Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, I.; Sols, F.

    2009-05-08

    We study the bosonic analog of Andreev reflection at a normal-superfluid interface where the superfluid is a boson condensate. We model the normal region as a zone where nonlinear effects can be neglected. Against the background of a decaying condensate, we identify a novel contribution to the current of reflected atoms. The group velocity of this Andreev reflected component differs from that of the normally reflected one. For a three-dimensional planar or two-dimensional linear interface Andreev reflection is neither specular nor conjugate.

  13. Andreev reflection in bosonic condensates.

    PubMed

    Zapata, I; Sols, F

    2009-05-08

    We study the bosonic analog of Andreev reflection at a normal-superfluid interface where the superfluid is a boson condensate. We model the normal region as a zone where nonlinear effects can be neglected. Against the background of a decaying condensate, we identify a novel contribution to the current of reflected atoms. The group velocity of this Andreev reflected component differs from that of the normally reflected one. For a three-dimensional planar or two-dimensional linear interface Andreev reflection is neither specular nor conjugate.

  14. Interacting boson model from energy density functionals: {gamma}-softness and the related topics

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.

    2012-10-20

    A comprehensive way of deriving the Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model (IBM) is described. Based on the fact that the multi-nucleon induced surface deformation in finite nucleus is simulated by effective boson degrees of freedom, the potential energy surface calculated with self-consistent mean-field method employing a given energy density functional (EDF) is mapped onto the IBM analog, and thereby the excitation spectra and transition rates with good symmetry quantum numbers are calculated. Recent applications of the proposed approach are reported: (i) an alternative robust interpretation of the {gamma}-soft nuclei and (ii) shape coexistence in lead isotopes.

  15. New Microscopic foundation of Interacting Boson Model and collectivities in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.; Shimizu, N.; Otsuka, T.

    2009-01-28

    We propose a novel way of determining the Hamiltonian of the Interacting Boson Model (IBM), based on the Mean-field theory. The quadrupole deformations in a fermion system, indicated by a Potential Energy Surface (PES) obtained by the constrained Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculations, are mapped, to a good approximation, onto the appropriate boson system. A merit is that levels and wave functions of excited states are calculated with the exact treatments of angular momentum and particle number. The validity of the process is examined for Sm and Ba isotopes, and predictions are made for unexplored territories on the nuclear chart, namely the right-lower corner of {sup 208}Pb.

  16. The Semi-Infinite q-Boson System with Boundary Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diejen, Jan Felipe; Emsiz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Upon introducing a one-parameter quadratic deformation of the q-boson algebra and a diagonal perturbation at the end point, we arrive at a semi-infinite q-boson system with a two-parameter boundary interaction. The eigenfunctions are shown to be given by Macdonald's hyperoctahedral Hall-Littlewood functions of type BC. It follows that the n-particle spectrum is bounded and absolutely continuous and that the corresponding scattering matrix factorizes as a product of two-particle bulk and one-particle boundary scattering matrices.

  17. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... deformity is often called “pump bump” because the rigid backs of pump-style shoes can create pressure ... when walking. In fact, any shoes with a rigid back, such as ice skates, men’s dress shoes ...

  18. Contracture deformity

    MedlinePlus

    Deformity - contracture ... Contracture can be caused by any of the following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral ... Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating contracture at home. Treatments may include: Doing exercises and ...

  19. Number of spin I states for bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L. H.; Zhao, Y. M.; Jia, L. Y.; Arima, A.

    2008-01-15

    We study number of spin I states for bosons in this article. We extend Talmi's recursion formulas for number of states with given spin I to boson systems, and we prove empirical formulas for five bosons by using these recursions. We obtain number of states with given spin I and F spin for three and four bosons by using sum rules of six-j and nine-j symbols. We also present empirical formulas of states for d bosons with given spin I and F=F{sub max}-1 and F{sub max}-2.0.

  20. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  1. Higgs Boson Discovery and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rowson, Peter C.

    2003-06-02

    We outline issues examined and progress made by the Light Higgs Snowmass 1996 working group regarding discovering Higgs bosons and measuring their detailed properties. We focused primarily on what could be learned at LEP2, the Tevatron (after upgrade), the LHC, a next linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider.

  2. Boson sampling with Gaussian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmakhchyan, L.; Cerf, N. J.

    2017-09-01

    We develop an alternative boson sampling model operating on single-photon states followed by linear interferometry and Gaussian measurements. The hardness proof for simulating such continuous-variable measurements is established in two main steps, making use of the symmetry of quantum evolution under time reversal. Namely, we first construct a twofold version of scattershot boson sampling in which, as opposed to the original proposal, both legs of a collection of two-mode squeezed vacuum states undergo parallel linear-optical transformations. This twofold scattershot model yields, as a corollary, an instance of boson sampling from Gaussian states where photon counting is hard to simulate. Then, a time-reversed setup is used to exhibit a boson sampling model in which the simulation of Gaussian measurements—namely the outcome of eight-port homodyne detection—is proven to be computationally hard. These results illustrate how the symmetry of quantum evolution under time reversal may serve as a tool for analyzing the computational complexity of novel physically motivated computational problems.

  3. E2 transitions in deformed nuclei and the IBA

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, D.D.; Casten, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism which determines the relative E2 strengths in the Interacting Boson Approximation is studied, and the structure of the E2 operator necessary to reproduce the empirical B(E2) values in deformed even-even nuclei in the rate earth region is investigated. (WHK)

  4. Effective boson number calculations in Mo and Cd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata, G.; Bucurescu, D.; Cutoiu, D.; Ivaşcu, M.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1990-09-01

    The effects of the neutron-proton interaction on the low-lying levels of Mo and Cd isotopes have been considered in the frame of the IBA-1 model by taking into account an effective boson number ( N eff). Both an empirical procedure based on previous IBA-2 mixing calculations and the N p N n scheme provide comparable N eff values. Level spectra and electromagnetic transitions are investigated. The results support the idea that IBA-1 calculations with a suitable N eff can largely simulate IBA-2 mixing calculations, taking advantage of simplicity and a smaller number of parameters.

  5. Lieb-Robinson bounds for spin-boson lattice models and trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Jünemann, J; Cadarso, A; Pérez-García, D; Bermudez, A; García-Ripoll, J J

    2013-12-06

    We derive a Lieb-Robinson bound for the propagation of spin correlations in a model of spins interacting through a bosonic lattice field, which satisfies a Lieb-Robinson bound in the absence of spin-boson couplings. We apply these bounds to a system of trapped ions and find that the propagation of spin correlations, as mediated by the phonons of the ion crystal, can be faster than the regimes currently explored in experiments. We propose a scheme to test the bounds by measuring retarded correlation functions via the crystal fluorescence.

  6. Physics of W bosons at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Salvatore

    2004-12-01

    The high-energy and high-luminosity data-taking campaigns of the LEP e+e- collider provided the four collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, with about 50000 W-boson pairs and about a thousand singly produced W bosons. This unique data sample has an unprecedented reach in probing some aspects of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions, and this article reviews several achievements in the understanding of W-boson physics at LEP. The measurements of the cross-sections for W-boson production are discussed, together with their implication on the existence of the coupling between Z and W bosons. The precision measurements of the magnitude of triple gauge-boson couplings are presented. The obervation of the longitudinal helicity component of the W-boson spin, related to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, is described together with the techniques used to probe the CP and CPT symmetries in the W-boson system. A discussion on the intricacies of the measurment of the mass of the W boson, whose knowledge is indispensable to test the internal consistency of the Standard Model and estimate the mass of the Higgs boson, concludes this review.

  7. Exploration of the tensor structure of the Higgs boson coupling to weak bosons in e + e - collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Gilad; Banerjee, Shankha; von Buddenbrock, Stefan; Cornell, Alan S.; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mellado, Bruce; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2015-02-01

    Probing signatures of anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson with pairs of weak vector bosons is an important goal of an e + e - collider commissioned as a Higgs factory. We perform a detailed analysis of such potential of a collider operating at 250 - 300 GeV. Mostly using higher dimensional operators in a gauge-invariant framework, we show that substantial information on anomalous couplings can be extracted from the total rates of s-and t-channel Higgs production. The most obvious kinematic distributions, based on angular dependence of matrix elements, are relatively less sensitive with moderate coefficients of anomalous couplings, unless one goes to higher centre-of-mass energies. Some important quantities to use here, apart from the total event rates, are the ratios of event rates at different energies, ratios of s-and t-channel rates at fixed energies, and under some fortunate circumstances, the correlated changes in the rates for W-boson pair-production. A general scheme of calculating rates with as many as four gauge-invariant operators is also outlined. At the end, we perform a likelihood analysis using phenomenological parametrization of anomalous HWW interaction, and indicate their distinguishability for illustrative values of the strength of such interactions.

  8. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  9. Chiral vortical effect for bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avkhadiev, Artur; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2017-08-01

    The thermal contribution to the chiral vortical effect is believed to be related to the axial anomaly in external gravitational fields. We use the universality of the spin-gravity interaction to extend this idea to a wider set of phenomena. We consider the Kubo formula at weak coupling for the spin current of a vector field and derive a novel anomalous effect caused by the medium rotation: the chiral vortical effect for bosons. The effect consists in a spin current of vector bosons along the angular velocity of the medium. We argue that it has the same anomalous nature as in the fermionic case and show that this effect provides a mechanism for helicity transfer, from flow helicity to magnetic helicity.

  10. Two-dimensional thermofield bosonization

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of this paper was to obtain an operator realization for the bosonization of fermions in 1 + 1 dimensions, at finite, non-zero temperature T. This is achieved in the framework of the real-time formalism of Thermofield Dynamics. Formally, the results parallel those of the T = 0 case. The well-known two-dimensional Fermion-Boson correspondences at zero temperature are shown to hold also at finite temperature. To emphasize the usefulness of the operator realization for handling a large class of two-dimensional quantum field-theoretic problems, we contrast this global approach with the cumbersome calculation of the fermion-current two-point function in the imaginary-time formalism and real-time formalisms. The calculations also illustrate the very different ways in which the transmutation from Fermi-Dirac to Bose-Einstein statistics is realized.

  11. Spin-boson dynamics beyond conventional perturbation theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Francesco; Paladino, Elisabetta; Thorwart, Michael; Grifoni, Milena

    2007-10-01

    A generalized approximation scheme is proposed to describe the dynamics of the spin-boson problem. Being nonperturbative in the coupling strength nor in the tunneling frequency, it gives reliable results over a wide regime of temperatures and coupling strength to the thermal environment for a large class of bath spectral densities. We use a path-integral approach and start from the exact solution for the two-level system population difference in the form of a generalized master equation (GME). Then, we approximate interblip and blip-sojourn interactions up to linear order, while retaining all intrablip correlations to find the kernels entering the GME in analytical form. Our approximation scheme, which we call weakly interacting blip approximation, fully agrees with conventional perturbative approximations in the tunneling matrix element (noninteracting-blip approximation) or in the system-bath coupling strength in the proper parameter regime.

  12. Measurements of trilinear gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.

    1997-10-01

    Direct measurements of the trilinear gauge boson couplings by the D0 collaboration at Fermilab are reported. Limits on the anomalous couplings were obtained at a 95% CL from four diboson production processes: W{gamma} production with the W boson decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW production with both of the W bosons decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW/WZ production with one W boson decaying to e{nu} and the other W or Z boson decaying to two jets, and Z{gamma} production with the Z boson decaying to ee, {mu}{mu}, or {nu}{nu}. Limits were also obtained from a combined fit to W{gamma}, WW {yields} dileptons and WW/WZ {yields} e{nu}jj data samples.

  13. Bosonization and Strongly Correlated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogolin, Alexander O.; Nersesyan, Alexander A.; Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2004-12-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Technical Aspects of Bosonization: 1. A simple case of Bose-Fermi equivalence: Jordan-Wigner transformation; 2. One-dimensional fermions. States near the Fermi points; 3. Gaussian model. Lagrangian formulation; 4. Conformal symmetry and finite size effects; 5. Virasoro algebra; 6. Structure of Hilbert space in conformal theories; 7. Current (Kac-Moody) algebras: the first assault; 8. Relevant and irrelevant fields; 9. Bose-Einstein condensation in two dimensions; Beresinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition; 10. The sine-Gordon model; 11. Spin S=1/2 Heisenberg-Ising chain; 12. Ising model; 13. More about WZNW model; 14. Non-Abelian bosonization; Part II. Application of the Bosonization Technique to Physical Models in (1+1)-Dimensions: 15. Interacting fermions with spin; 16. Spin-1/2 Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid; 17. Instabilities of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid; 18. Interacting fermions with broken spin rotational symmetry; 19. What happens with Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in three dimensions; 20. Two weakly coupled Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids; spinless case; 21. Spin liquids in one dimension: example of spin-ladders; 22. Spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with alternating exchange; 23. Superconductivity in a doped spin liquid; 24. Edge states in quantum Hall effect; Part III. Single Impurity Problems: 25. Potential scattering; 26. X-ray edge problem (Fermi liquids); 27. Impurities in Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid; 28. Multi-channel Kondo problem; General Bibliography; Index.

  14. Bosonization of free Weyl fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, E. C.

    2017-03-01

    We generalize the method of bosonization, in its complete form, to a spacetime with 3  +  1 dimensions, and apply it to free Weyl fermion fields, which thereby, can be expressed in terms of a boson field, namely the Kalb-Ramond anti-symmetric tensor gauge field. The result may have interesting consequences both in condensed matter and in particle physics. In the former, the bosonized form of the Weyl chiral currents provides a simple explanation for the angle-dependent magneto-conductance recently observed in materials known as Weyl semimetals. In the latter, conversely, since electrons can be thought of as a combination of left and right Weyl fermions, our result suggests the possibility of a unified description of the elementary particles, which undergo the fundamental interactions, with the mediators of such interactions, namely, the gauge fields. This would fulfill the pioneering attempt of Skyrme, to unify the particles with their interaction mediators (Skyrme 1962 Nucl. Phys. 31 556).

  15. Fermiophobic Higgs boson and supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, E.; Kannike, K.; Mele, B.; Racioppi, A.; Raidal, M.

    2012-09-01

    If a light Higgs boson with mass 125 GeV is fermiophobic, or partially fermiophobic, then the minimal supersymmetric standard model is excluded. The minimal supersymmetric fermiophobic Higgs scenario can naturally be formulated in the context of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) that admits Z3 discrete symmetries. In the fermiophobic NMSSM, the supersymmetry naturalness criteria are relaxed by a factor Ncyt4/g4˜25, removing the little hierarchy problem and allowing sparticle masses to be naturally of order 2-3 TeV. This scale motivates wino or Higgsino dark matter. The SUSY flavor and CP problems as well as the constraints on sparticle and Higgs boson masses from b→sγ, Bs→μμ and direct LHC searches are relaxed in the fermiophobic NMSSM. The price to pay is that a new, yet unknown, mechanism must be introduced to generate fermion masses. We show that in the fermiophobic NMSSM the radiative Higgs boson branchings to γγ, γZ can be modified compared to the fermiophobic and ordinary standard model predictions, and fit present collider data better. Suppression of dark matter scattering off nuclei explains the absence of signal in XENON100.

  16. Fat jets for a light higgs boson.

    PubMed

    Plehn, Tilman; Salam, Gavin P; Spannowsky, Michael

    2010-03-19

    At the LHC associated top quark and Higgs boson production with a Higgs boson decay to bottom quarks has long been a heavily disputed search channel. Recently, it has been found not to be viable. We show how it can be observed by tagging massive Higgs bosons and top jets. For this purpose we construct boosted top and Higgs taggers for standard-model processes in a complex QCD environment.

  17. A Search for Dark Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-06-08

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the Standard Model-dark sector mixing angle and the dark sector coupling constant.

  18. Collider searches for fermiophobic gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Hundi, R. S.; Kumar, Jason; Rajaraman, Arvind; Yaylali, David

    2011-12-01

    We explore the phenomenology of an extra U(1) gauge boson which primarily couples to standard model gauge bosons. We classify all possible parity-odd couplings up to dimension 6 operators. We then study the prospects for the detection of such a boson at the LHC and show that the electroweak decay channels lead to very clean signals, allowing us to probe couplings well into the TeV scale.

  19. Time-dependent many-body treatment of electron-boson dynamics: Application to plasmon-accompanied photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Berakdar, J.; Pavlyukh, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments access the time-resolved photoelectron signal originating from plasmon satellites in correlated materials and address their buildup and decay in real time. Motivated by these developments, we present the Kadanoff-Baym formalism for the nonequilibrium time evolution of interacting fermions and bosons. In contrast to the fermionic case, the bosons are described by second-order differential equations. Solution of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations—which is the central ingredient of this work—requires substantial modification of the usual two-times electronic propagation scheme. The solution is quite general and can be applied to a number of problems, such as the interaction of electrons with quantized photons, phonons, and other bosonic excitations. Here the formalism is applied to the photoemission from a deep core hole accompanied by plasmon excitation. We compute the time-resolved photoelectron spectra and discuss the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic electron energy losses and their interference.

  20. Investigation of Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings Through W Boson Pair Production in Dilepton Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Paul Craig

    1998-03-01

    An investigation of the interactions between the $W$ boson and the $Z$ boson and photon through the pair production of bosons is presented. This has been accomplished via a study of the reaction $p\\overline{p} \\to \\ell\\overline{\

  1. Rotating boson stars and Q-balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; List, Meike

    2005-09-15

    We consider axially symmetric, rotating boson stars. Their flat-space limits represent spinning Q-balls. We discuss their properties and determine their domain of existence. Q-balls and boson stars are stationary solutions and exist only in a limited frequency range. The coupling to gravity gives rise to a spiral-like frequency dependence of the boson stars. We address the flat-space limit and the limit of strong gravitational coupling. For comparison we also determine the properties of spherically symmetric Q-balls and boson stars.

  2. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  3. Radiative corrections to the Higgs boson couplings in the triplet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Yagyu, Kei

    2013-01-01

    We calculate a full set of one-loop corrections to the Higgs boson coupling constants as well as the electroweak parameters. We compute the decay rate of the standard model-like Higgs boson (h) into diphoton. Renormalized Higgs couplings with the weak gauge bosons hVV (V=W and Z) and the trilinear coupling hhh are also calculated at the one-loop level in the on-shell scheme. Magnitudes of the deviations in these quantities are evaluated in the parameter regions where the unitarity and vacuum stability bounds are satisfied and the predicted W boson mass at the one-loop level is consistent with the data. We find that there are strong correlations among deviations in the Higgs boson couplings hγγ, hVV and hhh. For example, if the event number of the pp→h→γγ channel deviates by +30% (-40%) from the standard model prediction, deviations in the one-loop corrected hVV and hhh vertices are predicted to be about -0.1% (-2%) and -10% (+150%), respectively. The model can be discriminated from the other models by accurately measuring these coupling constants in future collider experiments.

  4. Nonequilibrium dynamics of spin-boson models from phase-space methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro Orioli, Asier; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Wall, Michael L.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2017-09-01

    An accurate description of the nonequilibrium dynamics of systems with coupled spin and bosonic degrees of freedom remains theoretically challenging, especially for large system sizes and in higher than one dimension. Phase-space methods such as the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) have the advantage of being easily scalable and applicable to arbitrary dimensions. In this work we adapt the TWA to generic spin-boson models by making use of recently developed algorithms for discrete phase spaces [J. Schachenmayer, A. Pikovski, and A. M. Rey, Phys. Rev. X 5, 011022 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.011022]. Furthermore we go beyond the standard TWA approximation by applying a scheme based on the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy of equations to our coupled spin-boson model. This allows us, in principle, to study how systematically adding higher-order corrections improves the convergence of the method. To test various levels of approximation we study an exactly solvable spin-boson model, which is particularly relevant for trapped-ion arrays. Using TWA and its BBGKY extension we accurately reproduce the time evolution of a number of one- and two-point correlation functions in several dimensions and for an arbitrary number of bosonic modes.

  5. Goldstone bosons as fractional cosmic neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-06-14

    It is suggested that Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos, contributing about 0.39 to what is reported as the effective number of neutrino types in the era before recombination. The broken symmetry associated with these Goldstone bosons is further speculated to be the conservation of the particles of dark matter.

  6. Higgs Boson Mass, Neutrino Oscillations and Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-11-23

    Finding the Standard Model scalar (Higgs) boson is arguably the single most important mission of the LHC. I review predictions for the Higgs boson mass based on stability and perturbativity arguments, taking into account neutrino oscillations. Primordial inflation based on the Coleman-Weinberg potential is briefly discussed.

  7. Higgs Boson Mass, New Physics and Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-05-13

    Finding the Standard Model scalar (Higgs) boson is arguably the single most important mission of the LHC. I review predictions for the Higgs boson mass based on stability and perturbativity arguments, taking into account neutrino oscillations. Other topics that are briefly discussed include the CMSSM, extra dimensions, higher dimensional orbifold GUTS, and primordial inflation based on the Coleman-Weinberg potential.

  8. Higgs bosons in standard model extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurskaya, A. V.; Dolgopolov, M. V.; Rykova, E. N.

    2017-09-01

    Several possibilities for extending the scalar sector of the Standard Model are considered. The conditions of calculation of Higgs bosons masses in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are discussed. The probable limits on mass parameters of Higgs bosons are analyzed. The role of minimum conditions as a physical criterion in a model with an extended scalar sector is defined.

  9. Higgs boson couplings: Measurements and theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Chiara; Passarino, Giampiero

    2017-02-01

    This report will review the Higgs boson properties: the mass, the total width and the couplings to fermions and bosons. The measurements have been performed with the data collected in 2011 and 2012 at the LHC accelerator at CERN by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Theoretical frameworks to search for new physics are also introduced and discussed.

  10. Degradability of Bosonic Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, Filippo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2006-12-15

    The notion of weak-degradability of quantum channels is introduced by generalizing the degradability definition given by Devetak and Shor. Exploiting the unitary equivalence with beam-splitter/amplifier channels we then prove that a large class of one-mode Bosonic Gaussian channels are either weakly degradable or anti-degradable. In the latter case this implies that their quantum capacity Q is null. In the former case instead, this allows us to establish the additivity of the coherent information for those maps which admit unitary representation with single-mode pure environment.

  11. The Boson peak in supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih. PMID:23771033

  12. Search for new heavy charged gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Magass, Carsten Martin

    2007-11-02

    Additional gauge bosons are introduced in many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model. A search for a new heavy charged gauge boson W' decaying into an electron and a neutrino is presented. The data used in this analysis was taken with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. Since no significant excess is observed in the data, an upper limit is set on the production cross section times branching fraction σW'xBr (W' → ev). Using this limit, a W' boson with mass below ~1 TeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level assuming that the new boson has the same couplings to fermions as the Standard Model W boson.

  13. Chiral bosonization for non-commutative fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok; Gamboa, J.; Méndez, Fernando; López-Sarrión, Justo

    2004-05-01

    A model of chiral bosons on a non-commutative field space is constructed and new generalized bosonization (fermionization) rules for these fields are given. The conformal structure of the theory is characterized by a level of the Kac-Moody algebra equal to (1+theta2) where theta is the non-commutativity parameter and chiral bosons living in a non-commutative fields space are described by a rational conformal field theory with the central charge of the Virasoro algebra equal to 1. The non-commutative chiral bosons are shown to correspond to a free fermion moving with a speed equal to c' = c(1+theta2)1/2 where c is the speed of light. Lorentz invariance remains intact if c is rescaled by crightarrowc'. The dispersion relation for bosons and fermions, in this case, is given by omega = c'|k|.

  14. Spherical boson stars as black hole mimickers

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.; Rueda-Becerril, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth-order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter, it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole, we also study the deflection of light.

  15. From Cooper pairs to Luttinger liquids with bosonic atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Paredes, B; Cirac, J I

    2003-04-18

    We propose a scheme to observe strongly correlated fermionic phenomena with bosonic atoms in optical lattices. For different values of the sign and strength of the scattering lengths, it is possible to reach either a "superconducting" regime, where the system exhibits atomic pairing, or a Luttinger liquid behavior. We identify the range of parameters where these phenomena appear, illustrate our predictions with numerical calculations, and show how to detect the presence of pairing.

  16. Orbifold symmetry reductions of massive boson-fermion degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florakis, Ioannis; Kounnas, Costas

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the existence of string vacua with Massive Spectrum Degeneracy Symmetry ( MSDS) in Heterotic and Type II orbifold constructions. We present a classification of all possible Z2N-orbifolds with MSDS symmetry that can be constructed in the formalism of the 2d free fermionic construction. We explicitly construct several two-dimensional models whose Reduced Massive Spectrum Degeneracy Symmetry ( RMSDS) is due to a set of Z-orbifold projections induced naturally in the framework of the free fermionic construction. In all proposed models the massive boson and fermion degrees of freedom exhibit Massive Spectrum Degeneracy Symmetry while the number of massless bosons n(b) and massless fermions n(f) are different; n(b)≠n(f). This property distinguishes the MSDSZ-twisted theories from ordinary supersymmetric ones. Some comments are stated concerning the large marginal JJ¯-deformations of the proposed models connecting them to higher-dimensional gauged-supergravity theories with non-trivial geometrical fluxes.

  17. Testing the dark matter scenario in the inert doublet model by future precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Sakurai, Kodai

    2016-12-01

    We evaluate radiative corrections to the Higgs boson couplings in the inert doublet model, in which the lightest component of the Z2 odd scalar doublet field can be a dark matter candidate. The one-loop contributions to the h V V , h f f , and h h h couplings are calculated in the on-shell scheme, where h is the Higgs boson with the mass 125 GeV, V represents a weak gauge boson, and f is a fermion. We investigate how the one-loop corrected Higgs boson couplings can be deviated from the predictions in the standard model under the constraints from perturbative unitarity and vacuum stability in the scenario where the model can explain current dark matter data. When the mass of the dark matter is slightly above a half of the Higgs boson mass, it would be difficult to test the model by the direct search experiments for dark matter. We find that in such a case the model can be tested at future collider experiments by either the direct search of heavier inert particles or precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings.

  18. Has the Higgs boson been discovered?

    PubMed

    Renton, Peter

    2004-03-11

    The standard model of particle physics describes the strong and electroweak interactions of fermions (spin-1/2), gauge bosons (spin-1) and a final vital ingredient--the spin-0 Higgs boson, which gives masses to the other particles. But the Higgs boson has yet to be discovered, and its own mass is not specified by the theory. There is some evidence (although statistically not very significant) for its detection at a mass of about 115 GeV/c2, from electron-positron interactions at LEP (the Large Electron Positron collider). Indirect methods can also be used to constrain the mass of the Higgs boson, because it affects other observable quantities (for example, the mass of the W boson and some measurable properties of the Z boson). An indirect determination of the Higgs boson mass from the most recent measurements of such quantities yields a value compatible with 115 GeV/c2, but with some important caveats arising from inconsistencies in the present data.

  19. NLO Vector Boson Production With Light Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Diana, G.; Dixon, L.J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Hoeche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; Ozeren, K.

    2012-02-15

    In this contribution we present recent progress in the computation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections for the production of an electroweak vector boson in association with jets at hadron colliders. We focus on results obtained using the virtual matrix element library BlackHat in conjunction with SHERPA, focusing on results relevant to understanding the background to top production. The production of a vector boson in association with several jets at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is an important background for other Standard Model processes as well as new physics signals. In particular, the production of a W boson in association with many jets is an important background for processes involving one or more top quarks. Precise predictions for the backgrounds are crucial to measurement of top-quark processes. Vector boson production in association with multiple jets is also a very important background for many SUSY searches, as it mimics the signatures of many typical decay chains. Here we will discuss how polarization information can be used as an additional handle to differentiate top pair production from 'prompt' W-boson production. More generally, ratios of observables, for example for events containing a W boson versus those containing a Z boson, are expected to be better-behaved as many uncertainties cancel in such ratios. Precise calculation of ratios, along with measurement of one of the two processes in the ratio, can be used in data-driven techniques for estimating backgrounds.

  20. Final fate of compact boson star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezares, Miguel; Palenzuela, Carlos; Bona, Carles

    2017-06-01

    Boson stars, self-gravitating objects made of a complex scalar field, have been proposed as simple models for very different scenarios, ranging from galaxy dark matter to black hole mimickers. Here we focus on a very compact type of boson stars to study binary mergers by varying different parameters, namely the phase shift, the direction of rotation, and the angular momentum. Our aim is to investigate the properties of the object resulting from the merger in these different scenarios by means of numerical evolutions. These simulations, performed by using a modification of the covariant conformal Z4 formalism of the Einstein equations that does not require the algebraic enforcing of any constraint, indicate that the final state after a head-on collision of low mass boson stars is another boson star. However, almost complete annihilation of the stars occurs during the merger of a boson-antiboson pair. The merger of orbiting boson stars form a rotating bar that quickly relaxes to a nonrotating boson star.

  1. Stringent and Efficient Assessment of Boson-Sampling Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Mayer, Klaus; Buchleitner, Andreas; Mølmer, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Boson sampling holds the potential to experimentally falsify the extended Church-Turing thesis. The computational hardness of boson sampling, however, complicates the certification that an experimental device yields correct results in the regime in which it outmatches classical computers. To certify a boson sampler, one needs to verify quantum predictions and rule out models that yield these predictions without true many-boson interference. We show that a semiclassical model for many-boson propagation reproduces coarse-grained observables that are proposed as witnesses of boson sampling. A test based on Fourier matrices is demonstrated to falsify physically plausible alternatives to coherent many-boson propagation.

  2. Bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  3. Higgs Boson Property Shifts from Radion Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-07-09

    We discuss how mixing between the Standard Model Higgs boson, h, and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model can lead to significant shifts in the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we show that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than {approx}< 5% for most of the parameter space volume. Precision measurements of Higgs boson properties at a Linear Collider are shown to probe a large region of the Randall-Sundrum model parameter space.

  4. Slave boson theories of correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woelfle, P.

    1995-05-01

    Slave boson theories of various models of correlated fermions are critically reviewed and several new results are presented. In the example of the Anderson impurity model the limitations of slave boson mean field theory are discussed. Self-consistent conserving approximations are compared with results obtained from the numerical renormalization group. The gauge field theory of the t-J-model is considered in the quasistatic approximation. It is shown that weak localization effects can give valuable information on the existence of gauge fields. Applications of the slave-boson approach due to Kotliar and Ruckenstein to the Hubbard model are also discussed.

  5. Higgs boson at LHC: a diffractive opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Silveira, G. G.

    2009-03-23

    An alternative process is presented for diffractive Higgs boson production in peripheral pp collisions, where the particles interact through the Double Pomeron Exchange. The event rate is computed as a central-rapidity distribution for Tevatron and LHC energies leading to a result around 0.6 pb, higher than the predictions from previous approaches. Therefore, this result arises as an enhanced signal for the detection of the Higgs boson in hadron colliders. The predictions for the Higgs boson photoproduction are compared to the ones obtained from a similar approach proposed by the Durham group, enabling an analysis of the future developments of its application to pp and AA collisions.

  6. Boson formulation of fermion field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Y.K.

    1984-04-15

    The nonperturbative connection between a canonical Fermi field and a canonical Bose field in two dimensions is developed and its validity verified according to the tenets of quantum field theory. We advocate the point of view that a boson formulation offers a unifying theme in understanding the structure of many theories. This is illustrated by the boson formulation of a multifermion theory with chiral and internal symmetries. Many features of the massless theory, such as dynamical mass generation with asymptotic-freedom behavior, hidden chiral symmetry, and connections with models of apparently different internal symmetries, are readily transparent through such fermion-boson metamorphosis.

  7. Three-dimensional topological insulators and bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Randellini, Enrico; Sisti, Jacopo

    2017-05-01

    Massless excitations at the surface of three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators possess both fermionic and bosonic descriptions, originating from band theory and hydrodynamic BF theory, respectively. We analyze the corresponding field theories of the Dirac fermion and compactified boson and compute their partition functions on the three-dimensional torus geometry. We then find some non-dynamic exact properties of bosonization in (2+1) dimensions, regarding fermion parity and spin sectors. Using these results, we extend the Fu-Kane-Mele stability argument to fractional topological insulators in three dimensions.

  8. Interacting Boson Problems Can Be QMA Hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Mosca, Michele; Nayak, Ashwin

    2010-01-01

    Computing the ground-state energy of interacting electron problems has recently been shown to be hard for quantum Merlin Arthur (QMA), a quantum analogue of the complexity class NP. Fermionic problems are usually hard, a phenomenon widely attributed to the so-called sign problem. The corresponding bosonic problems are, according to conventional wisdom, tractable. Here, we demonstrate that the complexity of interacting boson problems is also QMA hard. Moreover, the bosonic version of N-representability problem is QMA complete. Consequently, these problems are unlikely to have efficient quantum algorithms.

  9. Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1996-10-01

    A measurement of the mass of the W boson is presented based on a sample of 5982 W-->eν decays observed in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector during the 1992-1993 run. From a fit to the transverse mass spectrum, combined with measurements of the Z boson mass, the W boson mass is measured to be MW = 80.350+/-0.140\\(stat\\)+/-0.165\\(syst\\)+/-0.160\\(scale\\) GeV/c2.

  10. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  11. Leptogenesis and neutral gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeck, Julian; Teresi, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    We consider low-scale leptogenesis via right-handed neutrinos N coupled to a Z' boson, with gauged U (1 )B -L as a simple realization. Keeping the neutrinos sufficiently out of equilibrium puts strong bounds on the Z' coupling strength and mass, our focus being on light Z' and N , testable in the near future by SHiP, HPS, Belle II, and at the LHC. We show that leptogenesis could be robustly falsified in a large region of parameter space by the double observation of Z' and N , e.g. in the channel p p →Z'→N N with displaced N -decay vertex, and by several experiments searching for light Z', according to the mass of N .

  12. Dark Light-Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Liu Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang Hao

    2011-03-25

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, {Upsilon}, and flavor physics.

  13. Boson-boson effective nonrelativistic potential for higher-derivative electromagnetic theories in D dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Dias, Marco

    2004-11-15

    The problem of computing the effective nonrelativistic potential U{sub D} for the interaction of charged-scalar bosons, within the context of D-dimensional electromagnetism with a cutoff, is reduced to quadratures. It is shown that U{sub 3} cannot bind a pair of identical charged-scalar bosons; nevertheless, numerical calculations indicate that boson-boson bound states do exist in the framework of three-dimensional higher-derivative electromagnetism augmented by a topological Chern-Simons term.

  14. Complementarity between nonstandard Higgs boson searches and precision Higgs boson measurements in the MSSM

    DOE PAGES

    Carena, Marcela; Haber, Howard E.; Low, Ian; ...

    2015-02-03

    Precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties at the LHC provide relevant constraints on possible weak-scale extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) these constraints seem to suggest that all the additional, non-SM-like Higgs bosons should be heavy, with masses larger than about 400 GeV. This article shows that such results do not hold when the theory approaches the conditions for “alignment independent of decoupling,” where the lightest CP-even Higgs boson has SM-like tree-level couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, independently of the nonstandard Higgs boson masses. In addition, the combinationmore » of current bounds from direct Higgs boson searches at the LHC, along with the alignment conditions, have a significant impact on the allowed MSSM parameter space yielding light additional Higgs bosons. In particular, after ensuring the correct mass for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson, we find that precision measurements and direct searches are complementary and may soon be able to probe the region of non-SM-like Higgs boson with masses below the top quark pair mass threshold of 350 GeV and low to moderate values of tanβ.« less

  15. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV $W'$ boson

    DOE PAGES

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-19

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B-L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W' cascade decays, we then estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  16. Complementarity between nonstandard Higgs boson searches and precision Higgs boson measurements in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Haber, Howard E.; Low, Ian; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2015-02-03

    Precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties at the LHC provide relevant constraints on possible weak-scale extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) these constraints seem to suggest that all the additional, non-SM-like Higgs bosons should be heavy, with masses larger than about 400 GeV. This article shows that such results do not hold when the theory approaches the conditions for “alignment independent of decoupling,” where the lightest CP-even Higgs boson has SM-like tree-level couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, independently of the nonstandard Higgs boson masses. In addition, the combination of current bounds from direct Higgs boson searches at the LHC, along with the alignment conditions, have a significant impact on the allowed MSSM parameter space yielding light additional Higgs bosons. In particular, after ensuring the correct mass for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson, we find that precision measurements and direct searches are complementary and may soon be able to probe the region of non-SM-like Higgs boson with masses below the top quark pair mass threshold of 350 GeV and low to moderate values of tanβ.

  17. Complementarity between nonstandard Higgs boson searches and precision Higgs boson measurements in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Haber, Howard E.; Low, Ian; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.

    2015-02-03

    Precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties at the LHC provide relevant constraints on possible weak-scale extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) these constraints seem to suggest that all the additional, non-SM-like Higgs bosons should be heavy, with masses larger than about 400 GeV. This article shows that such results do not hold when the theory approaches the conditions for “alignment independent of decoupling,” where the lightest CP -even Higgs boson has SM-like tree-level couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, independently of the nonstandard Higgs boson masses. The combination of current bounds from direct Higgs boson searches at the LHC, along with the alignment conditions, have a significant impact on the allowed MSSM parameter space yielding light additional Higgs bosons. In particular, after ensuring the correct mass for the lightest CP -even Higgs boson, we find that precision measurements and direct searches are complementary and may soon be able to probe the region of non-SM-like Higgs boson with masses below the top quark pair mass threshold of 350 GeV and low to moderate values of tanβ

  18. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV $W'$ boson

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-19

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B-L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W' cascade decays, we then estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  19. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    DOE PAGES

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependentmore » modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.« less

  20. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependent modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.

  1. Infinite occupation number basis of bosons: Solving a numerical challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geißler, Andreas; Hofstetter, Walter

    2017-06-01

    In any bosonic lattice system, which is not dominated by local interactions and thus "frozen" in a Mott-type state, numerical methods have to cope with the infinite size of the corresponding Hilbert space even for finite lattice sizes. While it is common practice to restrict the local occupation number basis to Nc lowest occupied states, the presence of a finite condensate fraction requires the complete number basis for an exact representation of the many-body ground state. In this work we present a truncation scheme to account for contributions from higher number states. By simply adding a single coherent-tail state to this common truncation, we demonstrate increased numerical accuracy and the possible increase in numerical efficiency of this method for the Gutzwiller variational wave function and within dynamical mean-field theory.

  2. Non-ideal boson system in the Gaussian approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, P.R.; de Toledo Piza, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate ground-state and thermal properties of a system of non-relativistic bosons interacting through repulsive, two-body interactions in a self-consistent Gaussian mean-field approximation which consists in writing the variationally determined density operator as the most general Gaussian functional of the quantized field operators. Finite temperature results are obtained in a grand canonical framework. Contact is made with the results of Lee, Yang, and Huang in terms of particular truncations of the Gaussian approximation. The full Gaussian approximation supports a free phase or a thermodynamically unstable phase when contact forces and a standard renormalization scheme are used. When applied to a Hamiltonian with zero range forces interpreted as an effective theory with a high momentum cutoff, the full Gaussian approximation generates a quasi-particle spectrum having an energy gap, in conflict with perturbation theory results. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  3. Plaquette boson-fermion model of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Ehud; Auerbach, Assa

    2002-03-01

    The strongly interacting Hubbard model on the square lattice is reduced to the low energy plaquette boson fermion model (PBFM). The four bosons (an antiferromagnon triplet and a d-wave hole pair), and the fermions are defined by the lowest plaquette eigenstates. We apply the contractor renormalization method of Morningstar and Weinstein to compute the boson effective interactions. The range-3 truncation error is found to be very small, signaling short hole-pair and magnon coherence lengths. The pair-hopping and magnon interactions are comparable, which explains the rapid destruction of antiferromagnetic order with emergence of superconductivity, and validates a key assumption of the projected SO(5) theory. A vacuum crossing at larger doping marks a transition into the overdoped regime. With hole fermions occupying small Fermi pockets and Andreev coupled to hole pair bosons, the PBFM yields several testable predictions for photoemission, tunneling asymmetry, and entropy measurements.

  4. Gauge Bosons--The Ties That Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Christopher T.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four basic forces/interactions in nature (strong force, weak force, electromagnetic force and gravity), associated with elementary particles. Focuses on "gauge bosons" (for example, photons), thought to account for strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. (Author/JN)

  5. Ferromagnetic properties of charged vector boson condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, Alexander D.; Lepidi, Angela; Piccinelli, Gabriella E-mail: lepidi@fe.infn.it

    2010-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of W bosons in the early universe is studied. It is shown that, in the broken phase of the standard electroweak theory, the condensed W bosons form a ferromagnetic state with aligned spins. In this case the primeval plasma may be spontaneously magnetized inside macroscopically large domains and form magnetic fields which may be the seeds for the observed today galactic and intergalactic fields. However, in a modified theory, e.g. in a theory with stronger quartic self interactions of gauge bosons e.g. due to a smaller value of the weak mixing angle, antiferromagnetic condensation is possible. In the latter case W bosons form scalar condensate with macroscopically large electric charge density i.e. with a large average value of the bilinear product of W-vector fields but with microscopically small average value of the field itself.

  6. Factorization of the bosonic partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharafat, Ayed; Chair, Noureddine

    2017-04-01

    The factorization formula in the non-interacting quantum field theories that relates the fermionic partition function to the bosonic partition function considered recently by Chair (2013) [3] is obtained for the harmonic oscillator using the path integral formulation. By using the latter, the fermionic partition function turns out to be the ratio of two determinants of the same operator (∂τ + ω), whose eigenmodes being both periodic on the imaginary time intervals [ 0 , 2 β ], [ 0 , β ]. The natural generalization of the factorization formula when β →2m β is derived, such a factorization implies that the bosonic oscillator at temperature β can be seen as a non-interacting mixture of a bosonic oscillator at temperature 2m β and m-fermionic oscillators at different temperatures 2 m - k β, k = 1 , 2 , … , m. As a consequence, a general relationship between the bosonic and fermionic thermal zeta functions is deduced.

  7. Majorization preservation of Gaussian bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels are majorization-preserving over the set of passive states of the harmonic oscillator. This means that comparable passive states under majorization are transformed into equally comparable passive states by any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. Our proof relies on a new preorder relation called Fock-majorization, which coincides with regular majorization for passive states but also induces another order relation in terms of mean boson number, thereby connecting the concepts of energy and disorder of a quantum state. The consequences of majorization preservation are discussed in the context of the broadcast communication capacity of Gaussian bosonic channels. Because most of our results are independent of the specific nature of the system under investigation, they could be generalized to other quantum systems and Hamiltonians, providing a new tool that may prove useful in quantum information theory and especially quantum thermodynamics.

  8. The pomeron in closed bosonic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, A. R.

    2010-12-22

    We compute the couplings of the pomeron to the first few mass levels of closed bosonic string states in flat space. We recognize the deviation from the linearity of the Regge trajectories in a five dimensional anti De Sitter background.

  9. Kondo effect in bosonic spin liquids.

    PubMed

    Florens, Serge; Fritz, Lars; Vojta, Matthias

    2006-01-27

    In a metal, a magnetic impurity is fully screened by the conduction electrons at low temperature. In contrast, impurity moments coupled to spin-1 bulk bosons, such as triplet excitations in paramagnets, are only partially screened, even at the bulk quantum critical point. We argue that this difference is not due to the quantum statistics of the host particles but instead related to the structure of the impurity-host coupling, by demonstrating that frustrated magnets with bosonic spinon excitations can display a bosonic version of the Kondo effect. However, the Bose statistics of the bulk implies distinct behavior, such as a weak-coupling impurity quantum phase transition, and perfect screening for a range of impurity spin values. We discuss implications of our results for the compound Cs2CuCl4, as well as possible extensions to multicomponent bosonic gases.

  10. Gauge Bosons--The Ties That Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Christopher T.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four basic forces/interactions in nature (strong force, weak force, electromagnetic force and gravity), associated with elementary particles. Focuses on "gauge bosons" (for example, photons), thought to account for strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. (Author/JN)

  11. Higgs boson studies at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth

    2016-05-31

    We present the combination of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV , using the full Run 2 dataset collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also present combined measurements of Higgs Boson production cross sections, branching ratios, and couplings to fermions and bosons. Lastly, we present tests of different spin and parity hypotheses for a particle H of mass 125 GeV produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of b quarks, and place constraints on such hypotheses using the D0 data.

  12. Higgs boson studies at the tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Herner, Kenneth

    2016-05-31

    We present the combination of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV , using the full Run 2 dataset collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also present combined measurements of Higgs Boson production cross sections, branching ratios, and couplings to fermions and bosons. Lastly, we present tests of different spin and parity hypotheses for a particle H of mass 125 GeV produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of b quarks, and place constraints on such hypotheses using the D0more » data.« less

  13. The future of the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph; Spiropulu, Maria

    2013-12-15

    Experimentalists and theorists are still celebrating the Nobel-worthy discovery of the Higgs boson that was announced in July 2012 at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. Now they are working on the profound implications of that discovery.

  14. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2012-01-31

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible productionin e{sup +} e{sup -}, {anti p}p and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which have been complemented bysearches at the Fermilab Tevatron. The LHC has recently entered the hunt, excluding a Higgs boson over a large range of masses and revealing a tantalizing hint in the range 119 to125 GeV, and there are good prospects that the existence or otherwise of the Higgs boson will soon be established. One of the most attractive possibilities is that the Higgs bosonis accompanied by supersymmetry, though composite options have yet to be excluded. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  15. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  16. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  17. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  18. SU(N) irreducible Schwinger bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Manu; Raychowdhury, Indrakshi; Anishetty, Ramesh

    2010-09-15

    We construct SU(N) irreducible Schwinger bosons satisfying certain U(N-1) constraints which implement the symmetries of SU(N) Young tableaues. As a result all SU(N) irreducible representations are simple monomials of (N-1) types of SU(N) irreducible Schwinger bosons. Further, we show that these representations are free of multiplicity problems. Thus, all SU(N) representations are made as simple as SU(2).

  19. Evolution of boson-fermion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Palenzuela, Carlos; Alic, Daniela; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Becerril, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    The boson-fermion stars can be modeled with a complex scalar field coupled minimally to a perfect fluid (i.e., without viscosity and non-dissipative). We present a study of these solutions and their dynamical evolution by solving numerically the Einstein-Klein-Gordon-Hydrodynamic (EKGHD) system. It is shown that stable configurations exist, but stability of general configurations depends finely upon the number of bosons and fermions.

  20. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Slominski, W; Szwed, J. |

    1996-04-02

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from {gamma}-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log{sup 2} behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ``resolved`` photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Grazzini, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    The major goal of the Large Hadron Collider is to probe the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and the generation of the elementary particle masses. In the Standard Model this mechanism leads to the existence of a scalar Higgs boson with unique properties. We review the physics of the Standard Model Higgs boson, discuss its main search channels at hadron colliders and the corresponding theoretical predictions. We also summarize the strategies to study its basic properties.

  2. Heavy fermion behavior explained by bosons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallio, A.; Poykko, S.; Apaja, V.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional heavy fermion (HF) theories require existence of massive fermions. We show that heavy fermion phenomena can also be simply explained by existence of bosons with moderate mass but temperature dependent concentration below the formation temperature T(sub B), which in turn is close to room temperature. The bosons B(++) are proposed to be in chemical equilibrium with a system of holes h(+): B(++) = h(+) + h(+). This equilibrium is governed by a boson breaking function f(T), which determines the decreasing boson density and the increasing fermion density with increasing temperature. Since HF-compounds are hybridized from minimum two elements, we assume in addition existence of another fermion component h(sub s)(+) with temperature independent density. This spectator component is thought to be the main agent in binding the bosons in analogy with electronic or muonic molecules. Using a linear boson breaking function we can explain temperature dependence of the giant linear specific heat coefficient gamma(T) coming essentially from bosons. The maxima in resistivity, Hall coefficient, and susceptibility are explained by boson localization effects due to the Wigner crystallization. The antiferromagnetic transitions in turn are explained by similar localization of the pairing fermion system when their density n(sub h)(T(sub FL)) becomes lower than n(sub WC), the critical density of Wigner crystallization. The model applies irrespective whether a compound is superconducting or not. The same model explains the occurrence of low temperature antiferromagnetism also in high-T(sub c) superconductors. The double transition in UPt3 is proposed to be due to the transition of the pairing fermion liquid from spin polarized to unpolarized state.

  3. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson with a Dilepton and Missing Energy Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaudo, Davide

    2011-09-01

    The subject of this thesis is the search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W bosons that in turn decay leptonically, H → W+W- → $\\bar{ℓ}$vℓ$\\bar{v}$. This search is performed considering events produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, where two oppositely charged lepton candidates (e+e-, e±μ±, or μ+μ}-), and missing transverse energy, have been reconstructed. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and are tested against the standard model predictions computed for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 115-200 GeV. No excess of events over background is observed, and limits on Standard Model Higgs boson production are determined. An interpretation of these limits within the hypothesis of a fourth-generation extension to the standard model is also given. The overall analysis scheme is the same for the three dilepton pairs being considered (e+e-, e±μ±, or μ+μ-); this thesis, however, describes in detail the study of the dimuon final state.

  4. Integrability of the η-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Heinze, Martin; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the η-deformed \\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5} background. For this integrable model we construct a 4× 4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the η-deformed Neumann and {{≤ft(\\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5}\\right)}η} geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  5. Classical-quantum correspondence in bosonic two-mode conversion systems: Polynomial algebras and Kummer shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graefe, Eva-Maria; Korsch, Hans Jürgen; Rush, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Bosonic quantum conversion systems can be modeled by many-particle single-mode Hamiltonians describing a conversion of m molecules of type A into n molecules of type B and vice versa. These Hamiltonians are analyzed in terms of generators of a polynomially deformed su(2) algebra. In the mean-field limit of large particle numbers, these systems become classical and their Hamiltonian dynamics can again be described by polynomial deformations of a Lie algebra, where quantum commutators are replaced by Poisson brackets. The Casimir operator restricts the motion to Kummer shapes, deformed Bloch spheres with cusp singularities depending on m and n . It is demonstrated that the many-particle eigenvalues can be recovered from the mean-field dynamics using a WKB-type quantization condition. The many-particle state densities can be semiclassically approximated by the time periods of periodic orbits, which show characteristic steps and singularities related to the fixed points, whose bifurcation properties are analyzed.

  6. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in associated production with w boson at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Xu

    2009-11-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron is presented in this dissertation. The process of interest is the associated production of W boson and Higgs boson, with the W boson decaying leptonically and the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of bottom quarks. The dataset in the analysis is accumulated by the D0 detector from April 2002 to April 2008 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1. The events are reconstructed and selected following the criteria of an isolated lepton, missing transverse energy and two jets. The D0 Neural Network b-jet identification algorithm is further used to discriminate b jets from light jets. A multivariate analysis combining Matrix Element and Neural Network methods is explored to improve the Higgs boson signal significance. No evidence of the Higgs boson is observed in this analysis. In consequence, an observed (expected) limit on the ratio of σ (p$\\bar{p}$ → WH) x Br (H → b$\\bar{b}$) to the Standard Model prediction is set to be 6.7 (6.4) at 95% C.L. for the Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV.

  8. Hidden sector dark matters and elusive Higgs boson(s) at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2012-07-27

    We consider two types of hidden sector dark matters (DM's), with and without QCD-like new strong interaction with confinement properties, and their interplays with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Assuming the hidden sector has only fermions (and gauge bosons in case of strongly interacting hidden sector), we have to introduce a real singlet scalar boson S as a messenger between the SM and the hidden sector dark matters. This singlet scalar will mix with the SM Higgs boson h, and we expect there are two Higgs-like scalar bosons H{sub 1} and H{sub 2}. Imposing all the relevant constraints from collider search bounds on Higgs boson, DM scattering cross section on proton and thermal relic density, we find that one of the two Higgs-like scalar bosons can easily escape the detections at the LHC. Recent results on the Higgs-like new boson with mass around with 125 GeV from the LHC will constrain this class of models, which is left for future study.

  9. Measurements of the associated production of a Z boson and b jets in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the associated production of a Z boson with at least one jet originating from a b quark in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV are presented. Differential cross sections are measured with data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 inverse femtobarns. Z bosons are reconstructed through their decays to electrons and muons. Cross sections are measured as a function of observables characterizing the kinematics of the b jet and the Z boson. Ratios of differential cross sections for the associated production with at least one b jet to the associated production with any jet are also presented. The production of a Z boson with two b jets is investigated, and differential cross sections are measured for the dijet system. Results are compared to theoretical predictions, testing two different flavour schemes for the choice of initial-state partons.

  10. Boson expansions based on the random phase approximation representation

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrocchi, V.G.; Tamura, T.

    1984-04-01

    A new boson expansion theory based on the random phase approximation is presented. The boson expansions are derived here directly in the random phase approximation representation with the help of a technique that combines the use of the Usui operator with that of a new bosonization procedure, called the term-by-term bosonization method. The present boson expansion theory is constructed by retaining a single collective quadrupole random phase approximation component, a truncation that allows for a perturbative treatment of the whole problem. Both Hermitian, as well as non-Hermitian boson expansions, valid for even nuclei, are obtained.

  11. Double Higgs-boson bremsstrahlung from W and Z bosons at supercolliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, V.; Han, T.; Phillips, R. J. N.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the production of two standard-model neutral Higgs bosons via bremsstrahlung from a single W or Z boson in pp or e+e- collisions at supercollider energies. Observation of these processes would test the predicted HHH, HVV, and HHVV couplings (V=W or Z). For e+e--->ZHH we extend previous cross-section calculations to a more comprehensive range of energies and Higgs-boson masses, that may be accessible to future machines; we also give final-particle distributions. In the pp case we present the first calculations of the processes pp-->HHVX the cross sections are comparable to other double Higgs-boson production processes for a range of energies and masses. The presence of W or Z accompanying the Higgs-boson pair has distinct practical advantages for triggering and for separating the final state from backgrounds.

  12. Double Higgs-boson bremsstrahlung from W and Z bosons at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Han, T.; Phillips, R.J.N.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the production of two standard-model neutral Higgs bosons via bremsstrahlung from a single W or Z boson in pp or e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions at supercollider energies. Observation of these processes would test the predicted HHH, HVV, and HHVV couplings (V = W or Z). For e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..ZHH we extend previous cross-section calculations to a more comprehensive range of energies and Higgs-boson masses, that may be accessible to future machines; we also give final-particle distributions. In the pp case we present the first calculations of the processes pp..-->..HHVX; the cross sections are comparable to other double Higgs-boson production processes for a range of energies and masses. The presence of W or Z accompanying the Higgs-boson pair has distinct practical advantages for triggering and for separating the final state from backgrounds.

  13. Quasibosons composed of two q-fermions: realization by deformed oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Kachurik, I. I.; Mishchenko, Yu A.

    2011-11-01

    Composite bosons, here called quasibosons (e.g. mesons, excitons, etc), occur in various physical situations. Quasibosons differ from bosons or fermions as their creation and annihilation operators obey non-standard commutation relations, even for the ‘fermion+fermion’ composites. Our aim is to realize the operator algebra of quasibosons composed of two fermions or two q-fermions (q-deformed fermions) by the respective operators of deformed oscillators, the widely studied objects. For this, the restrictions on quasiboson creation/annihilation operators and on the deformed oscillator (deformed boson) algebra are obtained. Their resolving proves the uniqueness of the family of deformations and gives explicitly the deformation structure function (DSF) which provides the desired realization. In the case of two fermions as constituents, such realization is achieved when the DSF is a quadratic polynomial in the number operator. In the case of two q-fermions, q ≠ 1, the obtained DSF inherits the parameter q and does not continuously converge when q → 1 to the DSF of the first case.

  14. Bosonic self-energy functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügel, Dario; Werner, Philipp; Pollet, Lode; Strand, Hugo U. R.

    2016-11-01

    We derive the self-energy functional theory for bosonic lattice systems with broken U(1) symmetry by parametrizing the bosonic Baym-Kadanoff effective action in terms of one- and two-point self-energies. The formalism goes beyond other approximate methods such as the pseudoparticle variational cluster approximation, the cluster composite boson mapping, and the Bogoliubov+U theory. It simplifies to bosonic dynamical-mean-field theory when constraining to local fields, whereas when neglecting kinetic contributions of noncondensed bosons, it reduces to the static mean-field approximation. To benchmark the theory, we study the Bose-Hubbard model on the two- and three-dimensional cubic lattice, comparing with exact results from path integral quantum Monte Carlo. We also study the frustrated square lattice with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, which is beyond the reach of Monte Carlo simulations. A reference system comprising a single bosonic state, corresponding to three variational parameters, is sufficient to quantitatively describe phase boundaries and thermodynamical observables, while qualitatively capturing the spectral functions, as well as the enhancement of kinetic fluctuations in the frustrated case. On the basis of these findings, we propose self-energy functional theory as the omnibus framework for treating bosonic lattice models, in particular, in cases where path integral quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from severe sign problems (e.g., in the presence of nontrivial gauge fields or frustration). Self-energy functional theory enables the construction of diagrammatically sound approximations that are quantitatively precise and controlled in the number of optimization parameters but nevertheless remain computable by modest means.

  15. Description of odd-mass nuclei within the interacting boson-fermion model based on the Gogny energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2017-07-01

    Spectroscopic properties of odd-mass nuclei are studied within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM) with parameters based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approximation. The parametrization D1M of the Gogny energy density functional (EDF) was used at the mean-field level to obtain the deformation energy surfaces for the considered nuclei in terms of the quadrupole deformations (β ,γ ). In addition to the energy surfaces, both single-particle energies and occupation probabilities were used as a microscopic input for building the IBFM Hamiltonian. Only three strength parameters for the particle-boson-core coupling are fitted to experimental spectra. The IBFM Hamiltonian is then used to compute the energy spectra and electromagnetic transition rates for selected odd-mass Eu and Sm nuclei as well as for 195Pt and 195Au. A reasonable agreement with the available experimental data is obtained for the considered odd-mass nuclei.

  16. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. 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H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-07

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H → WW → ℓνℓν and H → WW → ℓνqq decay channels using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σH × BR(H → WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, one for a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is mH = 1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and mH = 1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200–300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each signal interpretation, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. Thus, at mH = 1500 GeV, the highest-mass point tested, σH × BR(H → WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22fb and 6.6fb at 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively.

  17. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. 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J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-01

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H → WW → ℓνℓν and H → WW → ℓνqq decay channels using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 collected at √{s}=8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σ H × BR( H → WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass m H are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, one for a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is m H = 1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and m H = 1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200-300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each signal interpretation, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. At m H = 1500 GeV, the highest-mass point tested, σ H × BR( H → WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22 fb and 6.6 fb at 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.

    2016-01-07

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H→WW→ℓνℓν and H→WW→ℓνqq decay channels, using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σH×BR(H→WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, one a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is mH=1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and mH=1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200-300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each scenario, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. At mH=1500 GeV, the highest mass point tested, σH∙BR(H→WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22 fb and 6.6 fb at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively.

  19. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-01-07

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H → WW → ℓνℓν and H → WW → ℓνqq decay channels using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σH × BR(H → WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, onemore » for a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is mH = 1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and mH = 1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200–300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each signal interpretation, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. Thus, at mH = 1500 GeV, the highest-mass point tested, σH × BR(H → WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22fb and 6.6fb at 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively.« less

  20. U boson at the BES III detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shouhua

    2007-06-01

    The O(MeV) spin-1 U boson has been proposed to mediate the interaction among electron-positron and O(MeV) dark matter, in order to account for the 511 keV {gamma}-ray observation by SPI/INTEGRAL. In this paper the observability of such a kind of U boson at BESIII is investigated through the processes e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}U{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}U. We find that BESIII and high luminosity B factories have a comparable capacity to detect such a U boson. If the U boson decays mainly into dark matter, i.e. invisibly, BESIII can measure the coupling between the U boson and an electron-positron pair g{sub eR} (see text) down to O(10{sup -5}), and cover large parameter space which can account for 511 keV {gamma}-ray observation. On the other hand, provided that U decays mainly into the electron-positron, BESIII can detect g{sub eR} down to O(10{sup -3}), and it is hard to explore the 511 keV {gamma}-ray measurement allowed parameter space due to the irreducible QED backgrounds.

  1. Light exotic Higgs bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Shoaib

    2017-07-01

    Most models of new physics contain extended Higgs sectors with multiple Higgs bosons. The observation of an additional Higgs boson, besides the ∼ 125 GeV ‘hobs ’, will thus serve as an irrefutable evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). However, even when fairly light, these additional Higgs bosons may still have escaped detection at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider, the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) hitherto, owing to their highly reduced couplings to the SM particles. Therefore, in addition to the searches based on the conventional production processes of these Higgs bosons, such as gluon or vector boson fusion, possible new search modes need to be exploited at collider experiments in order to establish their signatures. We investigate here the phenomenology of pseudoscalars, with masses ranging from {O}(1) GeV to about 150 GeV, in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric SM (NMSSM) and the Type-I 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) in some such atypical search channels at the LHC Run-II.

  2. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  3. Boson stars in higher-derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibhav, Vishal; Maity, Debaprasad

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have constructed boson star (BS) solutions in four-dimensional scalar-Gauss-Bonnet (sGB) theory. In order to have a nontrivial effect from the Gauss-Bonnet term, we invoked nonminimal coupling between a complex scalar field and the Gauss-Bonnet term with a coupling parameter, α . We show that the scalar field can no longer take arbitrary value at the center of the star. Furthermore, boson stars in our higher-derivative theory turn out to be slightly massive but much more compact than those in the usual Einstein's gravity. Interestingly, we found that for α <-0.4 and α >0.8 , binding energy for all possible boson stars is always negative. This implies that these stars are intrinsically stable against the decay by dispersion. However, for -0.4 <α <0.8 , boson stars can have both positive and negative binding energy depending on scalar field value at the center of the star. We also present the mass-radius and mass-frequency curves for boson stars and compare them with other compact objects in gravity models derived from the Gauss-Bonnet term.

  4. Iron Kα line of boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng; Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Zhou, Menglei; Bambi, Cosimo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    The present paper is a sequel to our previous work [1] in which we studied the iron Kα line expected in the reflection spectrum of Kerr black holes with scalar hair. These metrics are solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a massive, complex scalar field. They form a continuous bridge between a subset of Kerr black holes and a family of rotating boson stars depending on one extra parameter, the dimensionless scalar hair parameter q, ranging from 0 (Kerr black holes) to 1 (boson stars). Here we study the limiting case q = 1, corresponding to rotating boson stars. For comparison, spherical boson stars are also considered. We simulate observations with XIS/Suzaku. Using the fact that current observations are well fit by the Kerr solution and thus requiring that acceptable alternative compact objects must be compatible with a Kerr fit, we find that some boson star solutions are relatively easy to rule out as potential candidates to explain astrophysical black holes, while other solutions, which are neither too dilute nor too compact are more elusive and we argue that they cannot be distinguished from Kerr black holes by the analysis of the iron line with current X-ray facilities.

  5. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  6. Equivalence between spin Hamiltonians and boson sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2017-03-01

    Aaronson and Arkhipov showed that predicting or reproducing the measurement statistics of a general linear optics circuit with a single Fock-state input is a classically hard problem. Here we show that this problem, known as boson sampling, is as hard as simulating the short time evolution of a large but simple spin model with long-range X Y interactions. The conditions for this equivalence are the same for efficient boson sampling, namely, having a small number of photons (excitations) as compared to the number of modes (spins). This mapping allows efficient implementations of boson sampling in small quantum computers and simulators and sheds light on the complexity of time evolution with critical spin models.

  7. Inevitable emergence of composite gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2017-09-01

    A simple theorem is proved: When a gauge-invariant local field theory is written in terms of matter fields alone, a composite gauge boson or bosons must be formed dynamically. The theorem results from the fact that the Noether current vanishes in such theories. The proof is carried out by use of the charge-field algebra at equal time in the Heisenberg picture together with the well-established analyticity of the form factor of the current. While there is no need of diagram calculation for the proof, we demonstrate in the leading 1 /N expansion of the existing models what the theorem means in diagrams and how the composite gauge boson emerges.

  8. Approximate gauge symmetry of composite vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-08-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector bosons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in a more intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  9. Light gauge boson in rare K decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-12-01

    We study the production of a light gauge boson in K- →π- X decay, where the associated new charge current is not conserved. It is found that the process can be generated by the tree-level W-boson annihilation and loop-induced s → dX. We find that it strongly depends on the SU (3) limit or the unique gauge coupling to the quarks, whether the decay amplitude of K- →π- X in the W-boson annihilation is suppressed by mX2 ɛX ṡpK; however, no such suppression is found via the loop-induced s → dX. The constraints on the relevant couplings are studied.

  10. Quantum simulation with a boson sampling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Olivares, Diego; Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study a system that consists of 2 M matter qubits that interact through a boson sampling circuit, i.e., an M -port interferometer, embedded in two different architectures. We prove that, under the conditions required to derive a master equation, the qubits evolve according to effective bipartite X Y spin Hamiltonians, with or without local and collective dissipation terms. This opens the door to the simulation of any bipartite spin or hard-core boson models and exploring dissipative phase transitions as the competition between coherent and incoherent exchange of excitations. We also show that in the purely dissipative regime this model has a large number of exact and approximate dark states, whose structure and decay rates can be estimated analytically. We finally argue that this system may be used for the adiabatic preparation of boson sampling states encoded in the matter qubits.

  11. The influence of atomic collisions on the spectrum of light scattered from an f-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenasfard, Z.; Naderi, M. H.; Soltanolkotabi, M.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spectrum of light scattered from a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the framework of an f-deformed boson model. We use an f-deformed quantum model in which Gardiner's phonon operators for the BEC are deformed by an operator-valued function, f(\\hat{n}) , of the particle-number operator \\hat{n} . We also consider the collisions between the atoms as a special kind of f-deformation where the collision rate κ is regarded as the corresponding deformation parameter. By applying the small fluctuation approximation, we obtain the spectrum of light scattered from the f-deformed BEC. By analysing the scattering spectrum we find that by increasing the values of the deformation parameters κ and \\eta = \\frac{1}{N} (N is the total number of condensate atoms) the spectrum shows deviation from the spectrum associated with the non-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate.

  12. Massless conformal fields, AdS(d+1)/CFTd higher spin algebras and their deformations

    DOE PAGES

    Fernando, Sudarshan; Gunaydin, Murat

    2016-02-04

    Here, we extend our earlier work on the minimal unitary representation of SO(d, 2)and its deformations for d=4, 5and 6to arbitrary dimensions d. We show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the minrep of SO(d, 2)and its deformations and massless conformal fields in Minkowskian spacetimes in ddimensions. The minrep describes a massless conformal scalar field, and its deformations describe massless conformal fields of higher spin. The generators of Joseph ideal vanish identically as operators for the quasiconformal realization of the minrep, and its enveloping algebra yields directly the standard bosonic AdS(d+1)/CFTd higher spin algebra. For deformed minreps the generatorsmore » of certain deformations of Joseph ideal vanish as operators and their enveloping algebras lead to deformations of the standard bosonic higher spin algebra. In odd dimensions there is a unique deformation of the higher spin algebra corresponding to the spinor singleton. In even dimensions one finds infinitely many deformations of the higher spin algebra labelled by the eigenvalues of Casimir operator of the little group SO(d–2)for massless representations.« less

  13. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  14. Solid state boson condensation model of cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waber, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This theoretical study is based on the second suggestion of Leaf Turner which was independently developed by Chubb and Chubb. It lead to the selection rule, Bosons In, Bosons Out, which helps to explain the low yield of tritons, protons, neutrons and 3He. The production of the boson 3He has now been correlated with simultaneous production of excess heat.

  15. Cosmic expansion from boson and fermion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Rudinei C.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2011-06-01

    This paper consists in analyzing an action that describes boson and fermion fields minimally coupled to the gravity and a common matter field. The self-interaction potentials of the fields are not chosen a priori but from the Noether symmetry approach. The Noether forms of the potentials allow the boson field to play the role of dark energy and matter and the fermion field to behave as standard matter. The constant of motion and the cyclic variable associated with the Noether symmetry allow the complete integration of the field equations, whose solution produces a universe with alternated periods of accelerated and decelerated expansion.

  16. Theoretical Survey of Higgs Boson and Axions

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Robert O.

    2000-04-05

    The success as well as the problems of the minimal Standard Model are recalled. The authors survey essentially this Model and the theory of the standard axion (Nambu-Goldstone boson). Possible invisible and visualized (theoretical) axions are discussed as are certain astrophysical aspects of the existence of an axion. They survey also axion cosmology in superstring models and its consequence, in the new anomaly cancellation mechanism to the sense of Green and Schwarz. Recent results for the search of the Higgs boson, and the axion are resumed. A great important is reserved for discussion of the Standard Model.

  17. W and Z boson production (CDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, Krzysztof; /Tufts U.

    2009-01-01

    Precise studies of rapidity distributions and asymmetries in W and Z boson production offer important constraints on the parton distribution functions describing the structure of protons. Improving the knowledge of the parton content of protons can help avoid systematic limitations in measuring the mass of the W boson. Measurements of Z rapidity and of charge asymmetry as a function of W rapidity in CDF Run-II datasets corresponding to the integrated luminosities of 2.1 fb{sup -1} and 1fb{sup -1}, respectively, are presented.

  18. ASSOCIATED HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION WITH HEAVY QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON,S.ORR,L.H.REINA,L.WACKEROTH,D.

    2003-03-15

    The production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of e quarks will play a very important role at both hadron and lepton colliders. We review the status of theoretical predictions and their relevance to Higgs boson studies, with particular emphasis on the recently calculated NLO QCD corrections to the inclusive cross section for p{bar p}, pp {yields} t{bar t}h. We conclude by briefly discussing the case of exclusive b{bar b}h production and the potential of this process in revealing signals of new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  19. Higgs boson photoproduction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Silveira, G. G.

    2011-07-15

    We present the current development of the photoproduction approach for the Higgs boson with its application to pp and pA collisions at the LHC. We perform a different analysis for the Gap Survival Probability, where we consider a probability of 3% and also a more optimistic value of 10% based on the HERA data for dijet production. As a result, the cross section for the exclusive Higgs boson production is about 2 fb and 6 fb in pp collisions and 617 and 2056 fb for pPb collisions, considering the gap survival factor of 3% and 10%, respectively.

  20. Transition probabilities and interacting boson-fermion model description of positive parity states in 117Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Yu. N.; Bucurescu, D.

    1998-09-01

    The Doppler shift attenuation method was used to determine lifetimes in the picosecond region for excited states of 117Sb populated with the (α,2nγ) reaction at Eα=27.2 MeV. Interacting boson-fermion model calculations explain reasonably well the main features of the positive parity levels known up to about 2.5 MeV excitation. The mixing of the lowest one-quasiparticle 9/2+ state with the intruder (2p-1h) 9/2+ state, as well as the quadrupole deformation of the intruder band are also discussed.

  1. Bosonic quasideterminants and eigenvalue problems of generalized spin-orbit operators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Geloun, Joseph; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with an extension of the applications of the paper by Gelfand and Retakh [Funct. Anal. Appl. 25, 91 (1991)] on quasideterminant (QsD) algebraic method to eigenvalue problems in quantum mechanics. Using relevant identities on the free 1-mode bosonic algebra, we build characteristic QsDs associated with generalized spin-orbit Hamiltonians with a well defined representation which allows us to explicitly and straightforwardly compute analytical expressions of eigenenergies. Specific instances are provided on f-deformed generalized Jaynes-Cummings models and other Hamiltonian classes widely used in condensed matter physics.

  2. A Parallel Multiblock Mesh Movement Scheme For Complex Aeroelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark A.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2000-01-01

    A scheme has been developed for the movement of multiblock, structured grids due to surface deformation arising from aeroelastics, control surface movement, or design optimization. Elements of the method include a blending of a surface spline approximation and nearest surface point movement for block boundaries. Transfinite interpolation is employed for volume grid deformation. The scheme is demonstrated on a range of simple and complex aeroelastic aircraft applications using Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics and modal structural analyses on parallel processors. Results are robust and accurate, requiring only minimal user input specification.

  3. A Parallel Multiblock Mesh Movement Scheme For Complex Aeroelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark A.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2000-01-01

    A scheme has been developed for the movement of multiblock, structured grids due to surface deformation arising from aeroelastics, control surface movement, or design optimization. Elements of the method include a blending of a surface spline approximation and nearest surface point movement for block boundaries. Transfinite interpolation is employed for volume grid deformation. The scheme is demonstrated on a range of simple and complex aeroelastic aircraft applications using Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics and modal structural analyses on parallel processors. Results are robust and accurate, requiring only minimal user input specification.

  4. Memory Effect Manifested by a Boson Peak in Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wen, P.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the correlation between a boson peak and structural relaxation in a typical metallic glass. Consistent with enthalpy recovery, a boson peak shows a memory effect in an aging-and-scan procedure. Single-step isothermal aging produces a monotonic decrease of enthalpy and boson peak intensity; for double-step isothermal aging, both enthalpy and boson peak intensity experience, coincidently, an incipient increase to a maximum and a subsequent decrease toward the equilibrium state. Our results indicate a direct link between slow structural relaxation and fast boson peak dynamics, which presents a profound understanding of the two dynamic behaviors in glass.

  5. Reweighing the evidence for a light Higgs boson in dileptonic W boson decays.

    PubMed

    Barr, Alan J; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

    2012-01-27

    We reconsider observables for discovering and measuring the mass of a Higgs boson via its dileptonic decays h → W W* → ℓνℓν. We define an observable generalizing the transverse mass that takes into account the fact that one of the intermediate W bosons is likely to be on shell. We compare this new variable with existing ones and argue that it gives a significant improvement for discovery in the region mh < 2 mW.

  6. Light gauge boson Z‧ and LFV decays of the electroweak gauge boson Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jie-Ting; Yue, Chong-Xing

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there is a growing interest of a light leptophilic gauge boson Z‧, which might explain the (g ‑ 2)μ puzzle. Considering the constraints on the Z‧ coupling Zℓℓ‧, we calculate its contributions to the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decay Z → τμ. We find that this kind of new light gauge boson Z‧ might make the LFV decay Z → τμ to be probed in future e+e‑ colliders.

  7. SM Higgs boson hunting at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Yepes, P. )

    1993-01-30

    The best Higgs hunting machine ever built, LEP, started operation in the summer of 1989. Since then the mass region explored in searching for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been extended by more than an order of magnitude. An overview of the searches performed by the four LEP collaborations by the end of 1991 is presented.

  8. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2016-10-01

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible production in e+ e-, bar pp and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which were complemented by searches at the Fermilab Tevatron. Then the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS entered the hunt, announcing on July 4, 2012 the discovery of a "Higgs-like" particle with a mass of about 125 GeV. This identification has been supported by subsequent measurements of its spin, parity and coupling properties. It was widely anticipated that the Higgs boson would be accompanied by supersymmetry, although other options, like compositeness, were not completely excluded. So far there are no signs of any new physics, and the measured properties of the Higgs boson are consistent with the predictions of the minimal Standard Model. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  9. The Higgs Boson Search and Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Gregorio; Konigsberg, Jacobo

    2016-10-01

    We present a brief account of the search for the Higgs boson at the three major colliders that have operated over the last three decades: LEP, the Tevatron, and the LHC. The experimental challenges encountered stemmed from the distinct event phenomenology as determined by the colliders energy and the possible values for the Higgs boson mass, and from the capability of these colliders to deliver as much collision data as possible to fully explore the mass spectrum within their reach. Focusing more on the hadron collider searches during the last decade, we discuss how the search for the Higgs boson was advanced through mastering the experimental signatures of standard theory backgrounds, through the comprehensive utilization of the features of the detectors involved in the searches, and by means of advanced data analysis techniques. The search culminated in 2012 with the discovery, by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, of a Higgs-like particle with mass close to 125 GeV, confirmed more recently to have properties consistent with those expected from the standard theory Higgs boson.

  10. Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery - Rik Yoshida

    ScienceCinema

    Rik Yoshida

    2016-07-12

    Argonne physicist Rik Yoshida explains what the Higgs boson is and what its discovery means for physics, the universe, and life. The third of Argonne's "OutLoud" public lecture series, held at the lab on September 27, 2012. Find out when the next one is at http://www.anl.gov/community/outloud

  11. Assumed Higgs Boson Discovery Proved Einstein Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    The selection-based Tempt Destiny experiment has provided evidence that the fundamental acts of selection are a dichotomy as are their effects. By applying this knowledge to evaluate the preliminary findings of the Higgs boson discovery, we find an omission error has taken place.

  12. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  13. On the trail of the Higgs boson

    DOE PAGES

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-09-11

    I review theoretical issues associated with the Higgs boson and the mystery of spontaneous breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In addition, this essay is intended as an introduction to the special issue of Annalen der Physik, “Particle Physics after the Higgs”.

  14. Higgs boson masses in supersymmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Imposing supersymmetry on a Higgs potential constrains the parameters that define the potential. In supersymmetric extensions to the stranded model containing only Higgs SU(2){sub L} doublets there exist Higgs boson mass sum rules and bounds on the Higgs masses at tree level. The prescription for renormalizing these sum rules is derived. An explicit calculation is performed in the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model (MSSM). In this model at tree level the mass sum rule is M{sub H}{sup 2} + M{sub h}{sup 2} = M{sub A}{sup 2} + M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The results indicate that large corrections to the sum rules may arise from heavy matter fields, e.g. a heavy top quark. Squarks significantly heavier than their fermionic partners contribute large contributions when mixing occurs in the squark sector. These large corrections result from squark-Higgs couplings that become large in this limit. Contributions to individual Higgs boson masses that are quadratic in the squark masses cancel in the sum rule. Thus the naturalness constraint on Higgs boson masses is hidden in the combination of Higgs boson masses that comprise the sum rule. 39 refs., 13 figs.

  15. On the trail of the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-09-11

    I review theoretical issues associated with the Higgs boson and the mystery of spontaneous breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In addition, this essay is intended as an introduction to the special issue of Annalen der Physik, “Particle Physics after the Higgs”.

  16. Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery - Rik Yoshida

    SciTech Connect

    Rik Yoshida

    2012-10-02

    Argonne physicist Rik Yoshida explains what the Higgs boson is and what its discovery means for physics, the universe, and life. The third of Argonne's "OutLoud" public lecture series, held at the lab on September 27, 2012. Find out when the next one is at http://www.anl.gov/community/outloud

  17. Consistent gravitational anomalies for chiral bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Giaccari, Stefano; Menotti, Pietro

    2009-03-15

    Exact consistent gravitational anomalies for chiral bosons in two dimensions are treated both with the Schwinger-DeWitt regularization and independently through a cohomological procedure. The diffeomorphism transformations are described by a single ghost which allows one to climb the cohomological chain in a unique way.

  18. Constraining black holes with light boson hair and boson stars using epicyclic frequencies and quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Nicola; Pani, Paolo; Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Ferrari, Valeria

    2017-06-01

    Light bosonic fields are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model. Even when minimally coupled to gravity, these fields might evade the assumptions of the black-hole no-hair theorems and give rise to spinning black holes which can be drastically different from the Kerr metric. Furthermore, they allow for self-gravitating compact solitons, known as (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the x-ray flux emitted by accreting compact objects carry information about the strong-field region, thus providing a powerful tool to constrain deviations from Kerr's geometry and to search for exotic compact objects. By using the relativistic precession model as a proxy to interpret the QPOs in terms of geodesic frequencies, we investigate how the QPO frequencies could be used to test the no-hair theorem and the existence of light bosonic fields near accreting compact objects. We show that a detection of two QPO triplets with current sensitivity can already constrain these models and that the future eXTP mission or a LOFT-like mission can set very stringent constraints on black holes with bosonic hair and on (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The peculiar geodesic structure of compact scalar/Proca boson stars implies that these objects can easily be ruled out as alternative models for x-ray source GRO J1655-40.

  19. Probing the spin-parity of the Higgs boson via jet kinematics in vector boson fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, A.; Godbole, R. M.; Mellado, B.; Mohan, K.

    2013-06-01

    Determining the spin and the parity quantum numbers of the recently discovered Higgs-like boson at the LHC is a matter of great importance. In this Letter, we consider the possibility of using the kinematics of the tagging jets in Higgs production via the vector boson fusion (VBF) process to test the tensor structure of the Higgs-vector boson (HVV) interaction and to determine the spin and CP properties of the observed resonance. We show that an anomalous HVV vertex, in particular its explicit momentum dependence, drastically affects the rapidity between the two scattered quarks and their transverse momenta and, hence, the acceptance of the kinematical cuts that allow to select the VBF topology. The sensitivity of these observables to different spin-parity assignments, including the dependence on the LHC center of mass energy, are evaluated. In addition, we show that in associated Higgs production with a vector boson some kinematical variables, such as the invariant mass of the system and the transverse momenta of the two bosons and their separation in rapidity, are also sensitive to the spin-parity assignments of the Higgs-like boson.

  20. Structure of krypton isotopes within the interacting boson model derived from the Gogny energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Humadi, Y. M.; Robledo, L. M.; Abusara, H.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution and coexistence of the nuclear shapes as well as the corresponding low-lying collective states and electromagnetic transition rates are investigated along the krypton isotopic chain within the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM). The IBM Hamiltonian is determined through mean-field calculations based on the several parametrizations of the Gogny energy density functional and the relativistic mean-field Lagrangian. The mean-field energy surfaces, as functions of the axial β and triaxial γ quadrupole deformations, are mapped onto the expectation value of the interacting-boson Hamiltonian that explicitly includes the particle-hole excitations. The resulting boson Hamiltonian is then used to compute low-energy excitation spectra as well as E 2 and E 0 transition probabilities for Kr-10070. Our results point to a number of examples of prolate-oblate shape transitions and coexistence both on the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich sides. A reasonable agreement with the available experimental data is obtained for the considered nuclear properties.

  1. Double occupancy in dynamical mean-field theory and the dual boson approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Erik G. C. P.; Krien, Friedrich; Hafermann, Hartmut; Stepanov, Evgeny A.; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the calculation of the double occupancy using dynamical mean-field theory in finite dimensions. The double occupancy can be determined from the susceptibility of the auxiliary impurity model or from the lattice susceptibility. The former method typically overestimates, whereas the latter underestimates the double occupancy. We illustrate this for the square-lattice Hubbard model. We propose an approach for which both methods lead to identical results by construction and which resolves this ambiguity. This self-consistent dual boson scheme results in a double occupancy that is numerically close to benchmarks available in the literature.

  2. Production of Gauge Bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, C.E.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-06-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have used recent data taken at the Tevatron to perform QCD tests with W and Z bosons decaying leptonically. D0 measures the production cross section times branching ratio for W and Z bosons and determines the branching ratio B(W {yields} l{nu}) = (10.43 {+-} 0.44)% (l = e, {mu}). This also gives an indirect measurement of the total width of the W boson: {Gamma}{sub W} = 2.16 {+-} 0.09 GeV. The W cross section times branching ratio into tau leptons is measured to be {sigma}({anti p}p {yields} W + X)B(W {yields} {tau}{nu}) = 2.38{+-}0.13 nb, from which the ratio of the coupling constants is determined: g{sub {tau}}{sup W}/g{sub e}{sup W} = 1.004 {+-} 0.019 {+-} 0.026. D0`s measurement of the differential d{sigma}/dP{sub T} distribution for the Z boson decaying to electrons, discriminates between different phenomenologic vector boson production models. CDF measures the cross section for the Drell-Yan continuum, and extracts improved limits on compositeness scales for quarks and leptons of {Lambda}{sub ql} {approximately} 3 - 6 TeV, depending on the model. Studies of W + Jet production at CDF and D0 find that the QCD prediction underestimates the production rate of W + 1 Jet events by about a factor of 2 as measured by both collaborations.

  3. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  4. Causal Poisson bracket via deformation quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra-Montiel, Jasel; Molgado, Alberto; Palacios-García, César D.

    2016-06-01

    Starting with the well-defined product of quantum fields at two spacetime points, we explore an associated Poisson structure for classical field theories within the deformation quantization formalism. We realize that the induced star-product is naturally related to the standard Moyal product through an appropriate causal Green’s functions connecting points in the space of classical solutions to the equations of motion. Our results resemble the Peierls-DeWitt bracket that has been analyzed in the multisymplectic context. Once our star-product is defined, we are able to apply the Wigner-Weyl map in order to introduce a generalized version of Wick’s theorem. Finally, we include some examples to explicitly test our method: the real scalar field, the bosonic string and a physically motivated nonlinear particle model. For the field theoretic models, we have encountered causal generalizations of the creation/annihilation relations, and also a causal generalization of the Virasoro algebra for the bosonic string. For the nonlinear particle case, we use the approximate solution in terms of the Green’s function, in order to construct a well-behaved causal bracket.

  5. Description of the Ba-Dy(N = 92) nuclei in the interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Huda H.

    Interacting Boson Model (IBM -1) has been used to study the energy levels and B(E2) transition rates in Ba-Dy (N = 92) isotones. A simplified Hamiltonian is used which is written in the creation and annihilation form and for each nucleus, by fitting the selected experimental energy levels and B(E2) transition rates with the calculated ones to get the best model parameters. Using the (IBM) Hamiltonian with an intrinsic state formalism, the potential energy surfaces (PES) for even-even Ba-Dy nuclei have been obtained and the contour plot of PES show that the shape phase transitions from spherical U(5) to deformed shape SU(3) has been determined for the 148Ba, while 150Ce, 152Nd, 154Sm, 156Gd and 158Dy nuclei are deformed and have rotational-like characters. The behavior of energy and B(E2) ratios in the ground state band are examined.

  6. Unified description of the double {beta} decay to the first quadrupole phonon state in spherical and deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Raduta, C. M.; Raduta, A. A.

    2007-10-15

    The Gamow-Teller transition operator is written as a polynomial in the dipole proton-neutron and quadrupole charge-conserving quasiparticle random-phase approximation boson operators, using the prescription of the boson expansion technique. Then, the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} process ending on the first 2{sup +} state in the daughter nucleus is allowed through one-, two-, and three-boson states describing the odd-odd intermediate nucleus. The approach uses a single particle basis that is obtained by projecting out the good angular momentum from an orthogonal set of deformed functions. The basis for mother and daughter nuclei may have different deformations. The GT transition amplitude as well as the half-lives were calculated for 18 transitions. Results are compared with the available data as well as with the predictions obtained with other methods.

  7. Performance of dynamical decoupling in bosonic environments and under pulse-timing fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, W. S.; Kapale, K. T.; Paternostro, M.; Semião, F. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the suppression of qubit dephasing through Uhrig dynamical decoupling (UDD) in nontrivial environments modeled within the spin-boson formalism. In particular, we address the case of (i) a qubit coupled to a bosonic bath with power-law spectral density, and (ii) a qubit coupled to a single harmonic oscillator that dissipates energy into a bosonic bath, which embodies an example of a structured bath for the qubit. We then model the influence of random time jitter in the UDD protocol by sorting pulse-application times from Gaussian distributions centered at appropriate values dictated by the optimal protocol. In case (i) we find that, when few pulses are applied and a sharp cutoff is considered, longer coherence times and robust UDD performances (against random timing errors) are achieved for a super-Ohmic bath. On the other hand, when an exponential cutoff is considered, a super-Ohmic bath is undesirable. In case (ii) the best scenario is obtained for an overdamped harmonic motion. Our study provides relevant information for the implementation of optimized schemes for the protection of quantum states from decoherence.

  8. Parton distribution functions in Monte Carlo factorisation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Płaczek, W.; Sapeta, S.; Siódmok, A.; Skrzypek, M.

    2016-12-01

    A next step in development of the KrkNLO method of including complete NLO QCD corrections to hard processes in a LO parton-shower Monte Carlo is presented. It consists of a generalisation of the method, previously used for the Drell-Yan process, to Higgs-boson production. This extension is accompanied with the complete description of parton distribution functions in a dedicated, Monte Carlo factorisation scheme, applicable to any process of production of one or more colour-neutral particles in hadron-hadron collisions.

  9. Zero-temperature localization in a sub-Ohmic spin-boson model investigated by an extended hierarchy equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chenru; Tang, Zhoufei; Cao, Jianshu; Wu, Jianlan

    2017-06-01

    With a decomposition scheme for the bath correlation function, the hierarchy equation of motion (HEOM) is extended to the zero-temperature sub-Ohmic spin-boson model, providing a numerically accurate prediction of quantum dynamics. As a dynamic approach, the extended HEOM determines the delocalized-localized (DL) phase transition from the extracted rate kernel and the coherent-incoherent dynamic transition from the short-time oscillation. As the bosonic bath approaches from the strong to weak sub-Ohmic regimes, a crossover behavior is identified for the critical Kondo parameter of the DL transition, accompanied by the transition from the coherent to incoherent dynamics in the localization.

  10. Deformable Nanolaminate Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Papavasiliou, A P; Barbee, T W; Miles, R R; Walton, C C; Cohn, M B; Chang, K

    2006-05-12

    We are developing a new class of deformable optic based on electrostatic actuation of nanolaminate foils. These foils are engineered at the atomic level to provide optimal opto-mechanical properties, including surface quality, strength and stiffness, for a wide range of deformable optics. We are combining these foils, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), with commercial metal processing techniques to produce prototype deformable optics with aperture sizes up to 10 cm and actuator spacing from 1 mm to 1 cm and with a range of surface deformation designed to be as much as 10 microns. The existing capability for producing nanolaminate foils at LLNL, coupled with the commercial metal processing techniques being used, enable the potential production of these deformable optics with aperture sizes of over 1 m, and much larger deformable optics could potentially be produced by tiling multiple deformable segments. In addition, based on the fabrication processes being used, deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be produced with areal densities of less than 1 kg per square m for applications in which lightweight deformable optics are desirable, and deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be fabricated with intrinsically curved surfaces, including aspheric shapes. We will describe the basic principles of these devices, and we will present details of the design, fabrication and characterization of the prototype deformable nanolaminate optics that have been developed to date. We will also discuss the possibilities for future work on scaling these devices to larger sizes and developing both devices with lower areal densities and devices with curved surfaces.

  11. Simultaneous description of low-lying positive and negative parity states in spd, sdf and spdf interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Majarshin, A. Jalili; Fouladi, N.

    2016-11-01

    In order to investigate negative parity states, it is necessary to consider negative parity-bosons additionally to the usual s- and d-bosons. The dipole and octupole degrees of freedom are essential to describe the observed low-lying collective states with negative parity. An extended interacting boson model (IBM) that describes pairing interactions among s, p, d and f-boson based on affine SU(1, 1) Lie algebra in the quantum phase transition (QPT) field, such as spd-IBM, sdf-IBM and spdf-IBM, is composed based on algebraic structure. In this paper, a solvable extended transitional Hamiltonian based on affine SU(1, 1) Lie algebra is proposed to describe low-lying positive and negative parity states between the spherical and deformed gamma-unstable shape. Three model of new algebraic solution for even-even nuclei are introduced. Numerical extraction to low-lying energy levels and transition rates within the control parameters of this evaluated Hamiltonian are presented for various N values. We reproduced the positive and negative parity states and our calculations suggest that the results of spdf-IBM are better than spd-IBM and sdf-IBM in this literature. By reproducing the experimental results, the method based on signature of the phase transition such as level crossing in the lowest excited states is used to provide a better description of Ru isotopes in this transitional region.

  12. NLO QCD corrections to the jet activity in Higgs boson production via vector-boson fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figy, Terrance Maynard

    Higgs production plus two jets via vector-boson fusion is expected to provide crucial information on the Higgs boson couplings at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The achievable statistical accuracy demands comparison with next-to-leading order QCD calculations, which are presented here in the form of a fully flexible partonic Monte Carlo program. QCD corrections are determined for jet distributions and are shown to be modest, of the order of 5%--10% in most cases, but reaching 30% occasionally. Remaining scale uncertainties range from the order of 5% or less for distributions to below +/-2% for the Higgs boson cross section in typical vector-boson fusion search regions. Higgs boson production plus two jets via vector-fusion is sensitive to the tensor of the HVV (V = W, Z ) couplings, which distinguishes loop induced vertices from SM expectations. At the CERN Large Hadron Collider this information shows up in the azimuthal angle correlations of the two forward and backward quark jets which are typical for weak boson fusion. The next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, in the presence of anomalous HVV couplings are computed. It is shown that gluon emission does not significantly change the azimuthal jet correlations. For Higgs production via vector boson fusion (VBF), there is suppressed jet activity in the central region of rapidity. Higgs production via VBF in the association of three jets (Hjjj) is computed to NLO accuracy in QCD. K factors for Hjjj are modest, typically, 1.03 to 1.06. Scale uncertainties for the total cross section at NLO are less than 5%. 3-jet ratios for Higgs production via VBF are computed at LO and NLO. The scale dependence of 3-jet ratios is shown to be reduced at NLO.

  13. Feshbach resonances and weakly bound molecular states of boson-boson and boson-fermion NaK pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Alexandra; Simoni, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We conduct a theoretical study of magnetically induced Feshbach resonances and near-threshold bound states in isotopic NaK pairs. Our calculations accurately reproduce Feshbach spectroscopy data on Na 40K and explain the origin of the observed multiplets in the p wave [Phys. Rev. A 85, 051602(R) (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.051602]. We apply the model to predict scattering and bound state threshold properties of the boson-boson Na 39K and Na 41K systems. We find that the Na 39K isotopic pair presents broad magnetic Feshbach resonances and favorable ground-state features for producing nonreactive polar molecules by two-photon association. Broad s -wave resonances are also predicted for Na 41K collisions.

  14. A Geometric Classification of Jaw Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Gateno, Jaime; Alfi, David; Xia, James J.; Teichgraeber, John F.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, the most widely used classification system for jaw deformities is the one provided by the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-CM), a taxonomy scheme that is based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD). The last iteration of ICD-CM, version 10, sorts jaw deformities according to geometry, into 3 groups: anomalies of jaw size, anomalies of jaw-cranial base relationship, or unspecified. Yet these deformities can affect 6 different geometric attributes: size, position, orientation, shape, symmetry, and completeness. In clinical practice and in teaching we have found the ICD-CM classification to be incomplete and disjointed. With this in mind, we have developed a better classification system. The purpose of this paper is to present it. PMID:26608152

  15. Hamiltonian deformations of Gabor frames: First steps.

    PubMed

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2015-03-01

    Gabor frames can advantageously be redefined using the Heisenberg-Weyl operators familiar from harmonic analysis and quantum mechanics. Not only does this redefinition allow us to recover in a very simple way known results of symplectic covariance, but it immediately leads to the consideration of a general deformation scheme by Hamiltonian isotopies (i.e. arbitrary paths of non-linear symplectic mappings passing through the identity). We will study in some detail an associated weak notion of Hamiltonian deformation of Gabor frames, using ideas from semiclassical physics involving coherent states and Gaussian approximations. We will thereafter discuss possible applications and extensions of our method, which can be viewed - as the title suggests - as the very first steps towards a general deformation theory for Gabor frames.

  16. Hamiltonian deformations of Gabor frames: First steps

    PubMed Central

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2015-01-01

    Gabor frames can advantageously be redefined using the Heisenberg–Weyl operators familiar from harmonic analysis and quantum mechanics. Not only does this redefinition allow us to recover in a very simple way known results of symplectic covariance, but it immediately leads to the consideration of a general deformation scheme by Hamiltonian isotopies (i.e. arbitrary paths of non-linear symplectic mappings passing through the identity). We will study in some detail an associated weak notion of Hamiltonian deformation of Gabor frames, using ideas from semiclassical physics involving coherent states and Gaussian approximations. We will thereafter discuss possible applications and extensions of our method, which can be viewed – as the title suggests – as the very first steps towards a general deformation theory for Gabor frames. PMID:25892903

  17. Passive deformation analysis of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R; Sung, K L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Chien, S

    1988-02-01

    The following analysis presents an experimental and theoretical study of the passive viscoelastic behavior of human leukocytes. Individual neutrophils in EDTA were observed both during their partial aspiration into a small micropipette and after expulsion from a large micropipette where the cell had been totally aspirated and deformed into a sausage shape. To analyze the data, a passive model of leukocyte rheology has been developed consisting of a cortical shell containing a Maxwell fluid which describes the average properties of the cell cytoplasm. The cortical shell represents a crosslinked actin layer near the surface of the cell and is assumed to be under pre-stressed tension. This model can reproduce the results of experiments using micropipette for both short-time small deformation and slow recovery data after large deformation. In addition, a finite element scheme has been established for the same model which shows close agreement with the analytical solution.

  18. Searching for Nambu-Goldstone bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, Athanasios; Figy, Terrance; Höche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Underwood, Thomas E. J.

    2008-11-01

    Phenomenological implications of a minimal extension to the Standard Model are considered, in which a Nambu-Goldstone boson emerges from the spontaneous breaking of a global U(1) symmetry. This is felt only by a scalar field which is a singlet under all Standard Model symmetries, and possibly by neutrinos. Mixing between the Standard Model Higgs boson field and the new singlet field may lead to predominantly invisible Higgs boson decays. The ``natural'' region in the Higgs boson mass spectrum is determined, where this minimally extended Standard Model is a valid theory up to a high scale related with the smallness of neutrino masses. Surprisingly, this region may coincide with low visibility of all Higgs bosons at the LHC. Monte-Carlo simulation studies of this ``nightmare'' situation are performed and strategies to search for such Higgs boson to invisible (Nambu-Goldstone boson) decays are discussed. It is possible to improve the signal-to-background ratio by looking at the distribution of either the total transverse momentum of the leptons and the p-slash-subT, or by looking at the distribution of the azimuthal angle between the p-slash-subT and the momentum of the lepton pair for the Z- and Higgs-boson associated production. We also study variations of the model with non-Abelian symmetries and present approximate formulae for Higgs boson decay rates. Searching for Higgs bosons in such a scenario at the LHC would most likely be solely based on Higgs to ``invisible'' decays.

  19. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Junk, Thomas R.; Juste, Aurelio

    2015-02-17

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DØ. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV < mH < 200 GeV in all main production modes at the Tevatron: gluon–gluon fusion, WH and ZH associated production, vector boson fusion, and tt- H production, and in five main decay modes: H→ bb-, H→τ+τ-, H→WW(*), H→ZZ(*) and H→γγ. An excess of events was seen in the H→ bb- searches consistent with a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass inmore » the range 115 GeV < mH < 135 GeV. We assume a Higgs boson mass of mH = 125 GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times the branching ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.« less

  20. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, Thomas R.; Juste, Aurelio

    2015-02-17

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DØ. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV < mH < 200 GeV in all main production modes at the Tevatron: gluon–gluon fusion, WH and ZH associated production, vector boson fusion, and tt- H production, and in five main decay modes: H→ bb-, H→τ+τ-, H→WW(*), H→ZZ(*) and H→γγ. An excess of events was seen in the H→ bb- searches consistent with a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 115 GeV < mH < 135 GeV. We assume a Higgs boson mass of mH = 125 GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times the branching ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.

  1. Twin Signature Schemes, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäge, Sven

    In this paper, we revisit the twin signature scheme by Naccache, Pointcheval and Stern from CCS 2001 that is secure under the Strong RSA (SRSA) assumption and improve its efficiency in several ways. First, we present a new twin signature scheme that is based on the Strong Diffie-Hellman (SDH) assumption in bilinear groups and allows for very short signatures and key material. A big advantage of this scheme is that, in contrast to the original scheme, it does not require a computationally expensive function for mapping messages to primes. We prove this new scheme secure under adaptive chosen message attacks. Second, we present a modification that allows to significantly increase efficiency when signing long messages. This construction uses collision-resistant hash functions as its basis. As a result, our improvements make the signature length independent of the message size. Our construction deviates from the standard hash-and-sign approach in which the hash value of the message is signed in place of the message itself. We show that in the case of twin signatures, one can exploit the properties of the hash function as an integral part of the signature scheme. This improvement can be applied to both the SRSA based and SDH based twin signature scheme.

  2. Bosonic and graded color-flavor transformation for the special unitary group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yi

    The color-flavor transformation is an integral identity which first appeared in the study of disordered systems in condensed matter physics. Since then it has been successfully applied to many fields of physics. In this thesis, we study its applications in lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory to study the non-perturbative properties of strongly interacting particles. The advantage of this transformation is that it can simplify the numerical simulations as well as provide analytical insights into lattice gauge theory. We begin with an outline of the background and the motivation for this thesis. Then we briefly introduce a few general concepts of lattice gauge theory. Next we review the fermionic color-flavor transformation for SU( Nc), where Nc is the number of color degrees of freedom, and its applications in fermion-induced QCD. By studying the resulting baryon loop expansion, we recognize both the advantages of this transformation and the difficulties associated with fermion-induced QCD. We then introduce an alternative scheme, i.e., boson-induced Yang-Mills theory, in which the bosonic color-flavor transformation plays the role of a duality transformation. We proceed by explicitly deriving the bosonic color-flavor transformation for the gauge group SU(Nc), which has not been studied so far. However, the method we use, which has also been used by other authors, leads to a result with a limited range of applicability. We then introduce a new method which can extend the transformation, for both the U(Nc) and the SU(Nc) gauge groups, to a larger regime of applicability. Finally, we study the graded color-flavor transformation for the special unitary group, which is of interest in boson-induced QCD. An open problem in our result on the graded transformations is raised and discussed at the end.

  3. Signals of a 2 TeV $W'$ boson and a heavier $Z'$ boson

    DOE PAGES

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.

    2016-05-09

    We construct an SU(2)L x SU(2)R x U(1)B-L model with a Higgs sector that consists of a bidoublet and a doublet, and with a right-handed neutrino sector that includes one Dirac fermion and one Majorana fermion. This model explains the CMS and ATLAS excess events in the e+e-jj, jj, Wh0 and WZ channels in terms of a W' boson of mass near 1.9 TeV and of coupling gR in the 0.4-0.5 range (with the lower half preferred by the limits on tb-bar resonances). We found that the production cross section of this W' boson at the 13 TeV LHC ismore » in the 720-1100 fb range, allowing sensitivity in more than 17 final states. Furthermore, we determine that the Z' boson has a mass in the 2.9-4.5 TeV range and several decay channels that can be probed in Run 2 of the LHC, including cascade decays via heavy Higgs bosons. Interpreting the CMS e+e-event at 2.9 TeV as coming from the Z', the mass ratio of the Z' and W' bosons requires gR ≈0.48, which implies a pp →Z' → ℓ+ℓ-cross section of 2 fb at √s = 13 TeV.« less

  4. A Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $W$ Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Martin Johannes

    2011-05-01

    We present a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson using data collected with the CDF II detector from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The search is performed in the WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ channel. The two quarks usually fragment into two jets, but sometimes a third jet can be produced via gluon radiation, so we have increased the standard two-jet sample by including events that contain three jets. We reconstruct the Higgs boson using two or three jets depending on the kinematics of the event. We find an improvement in our search sensitivity using the larger sample together with this multijet reconstruction technique. Our data show no evidence of a Higgs boson, so we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the WH production rate. We set limits between 3.36 and 28.7 times the standard model prediction for Higgs boson masses ranging from 100 to 150 GeV/c2.

  5. Ian Hinchliffe Answers Your Higgs Boson Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    contingent with the ATLAS experiment at CERN, answers many of your questions about the Higgs boson. Ian invited viewers to send in questions about the Higgs via email, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube in an "Ask a Scientist" video posted July 3: http://youtu.be/xhuA3wCg06s CERN's July 4 announcement that the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have discovered a particle "consistent with the Higgs boson" has raised questions about what scientists have found and what still remains to be found -- and what it all means. If you have suggestions for future "Ask a Scientist" videos, post them below or send ideas to askascientist@lbl.gov

  6. Inflation and pseudo-Goldstone Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Sannino, Francesco; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2017-02-01

    We consider inflation within a model framework where the Higgs boson arises as a pseudo-Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of a global symmetry at a scale significantly larger than the electroweak one. We show that in such a model the scalar self-couplings can be parametrically suppressed and, consequently, the nonminimal couplings to gravity can be of order one or less, while the inflationary predictions of the model remain compatible with the precision cosmological observations. Furthermore, in the model we study, the existence of the electroweak scale is entirely due to the inflaton field. Our model therefore suggests that inflation and low energy particle phenomenology may be more entwined than assumed so far.

  7. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  8. Work fluctuations in bosonic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, R. G.; Palma, G. M.; De Chiara, G.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the first two moments and full probability distribution of the work performed on a system of bosonic particles in a two-mode Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian when the self-interaction term is varied instantaneously or with a finite-time ramp. In the instantaneous case, we show how the irreversible work scales differently depending on whether the system is driven to the Josephson or Fock regime of the bosonic Josephson junction. In the finite-time case, we use optimal control techniques to substantially decrease the irreversible work to negligible values. Our analysis can be implemented in present-day experiments with ultracold atoms and we show how to relate the work statistics to that of the population imbalance of the two modes.

  9. Simulating Bosonic Baths with Error Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, M. P.; Cramer, M.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    We derive rigorous truncation-error bounds for the spin-boson model and its generalizations to arbitrary quantum systems interacting with bosonic baths. For the numerical simulation of such baths, the truncation of both the number of modes and the local Hilbert-space dimensions is necessary. We derive superexponential Lieb-Robinson-type bounds on the error when restricting the bath to finitely many modes and show how the error introduced by truncating the local Hilbert spaces may be efficiently monitored numerically. In this way we give error bounds for approximating the infinite system by a finite-dimensional one. As a consequence, numerical simulations such as the time-evolving density with orthogonal polynomials algorithm (TEDOPA) now allow for the fully certified treatment of the system-environment interaction.

  10. Bottleneck Accumulation of Hybrid Magnetoelastic Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhko, Dmytro A.; Clausen, Peter; Melkov, Gennadii A.; L'vov, Victor S.; Pomyalov, Anna; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Chumak, Andrii V.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Serga, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    An ensemble of magnons, quanta of spin waves, can be prepared as a Bose gas of weakly interacting quasiparticles. Furthermore, the thermalization of the overpopulated magnon gas through magnon-magnon scattering processes, which conserve the number of particles, can lead to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate at the bottom of a spin-wave spectrum. However, magnon-phonon scattering can significantly modify this scenario and new quasiparticles are formed—magnetoelastic bosons. Our observations of a parametrically populated magnon gas in a single-crystal film of yttrium iron garnet by means of wave-vector-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy evidence a novel condensation phenomenon: A spontaneous accumulation of hybrid magnetoelastic bosonic quasiparticles at the intersection of the lowest magnon mode and a transversal acoustic wave.

  11. Ian Hinchliffe Answers Your Higgs Boson Questions

    ScienceCinema

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2016-07-12

    contingent with the ATLAS experiment at CERN, answers many of your questions about the Higgs boson. Ian invited viewers to send in questions about the Higgs via email, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube in an "Ask a Scientist" video posted July 3: http://youtu.be/xhuA3wCg06s CERN's July 4 announcement that the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have discovered a particle "consistent with the Higgs boson" has raised questions about what scientists have found and what still remains to be found -- and what it all means. If you have suggestions for future "Ask a Scientist" videos, post them below or send ideas to askascientist@lbl.gov

  12. Searching for displaced Higgs boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Lombardo, Salvator; Slone, Oren

    2015-10-01

    We study a simplified model of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to a degenerate pair of scalars which travel a macroscopic distance before decaying to SM particles. This is the leading signal for many well-motivated solutions to the hierarchy problem that do not propose additional light colored particles. Bounds for displaced Higgs boson decays below 10 cm are found by recasting existing tracker searches from Run I. New tracker search strategies, sensitive to the characteristics of these models and similar decays, are proposed with sensitivities projected for Run II at √{s }=13 TeV . With 20 fb-1 of data, we find that Higgs branching ratios down to 2 ×1 0-4 can be probed for centimeter decay lengths.

  13. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeck, Julian

    2016-07-01

    New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z‧ not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for h → μτ at CMS, the two-body decay mode τ → μZ‧ opens up and for MZ‧ < 2mμ gives better constraints than τ → 3 μ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  14. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-04

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model.

  15. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo; Martone, Mario; Tuckler, Douglas

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H /A →c c ,t c ,μ μ ,τ μ and H±→c b ,c s ,μ ν . Searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  16. Bosonic Analogue of Dirac Composite Fermi Liquid.

    PubMed

    Mross, David F; Alicea, Jason; Motrunich, Olexei I

    2016-09-23

    We introduce a particle-hole-symmetric metallic state of bosons in a magnetic field at odd-integer filling. This state hosts composite fermions whose energy dispersion features a quadratic band touching and corresponding 2π Berry flux protected by particle-hole and discrete rotation symmetries. We also construct an alternative particle-hole symmetric state-distinct in the presence of inversion symmetry-without Berry flux. As in the Dirac composite Fermi liquid introduced by Son [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015)], breaking particle-hole symmetry recovers the familiar Chern-Simons theory. We discuss realizations of this phase both in 2D and on bosonic topological insulator surfaces, as well as signatures in experiments and simulations.

  17. Dark side of the Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Ian; Schwaller, Pedro; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Current limits from the Large Hadron Collider exclude a standard model-like Higgs mass above 150 GeV, by placing an upper bound on the Higgs production rate. We emphasize that, alternatively, the limit could be interpreted as a lower bound on the total decay width of the Higgs boson. If the invisible decay width of the Higgs is of the same order as the visible decay width, a heavy Higgs boson could be consistent with null results from current searches. We propose a method to infer the invisible decay of the Higgs by using the width of the measured h→ZZ→4ℓ line shape, and study the effect on the width extraction due to a reduced signal strength. Assuming the invisible decay product is the dark matter, we show that minimal models are tightly constrained by limits from Higgs searches at the LHC and direct detection experiments of dark matter, unless the relic density constraint is relaxed.

  18. Standard model Higgs boson searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    We present recent results from searches for a standard model Higgs boson by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider with the full Run II data set. An excess of events above the expected background is observed and is the strongest in the associated production search channels where the Higgs is produced together with a W or Z boson, and then decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair, with a global significance of 2.5$\\sigma$. Both limits and best fit values of the Higgs production cross section are presented. For a Higgs mass of 125~GeV/c$^2$, the best agreement with data in the $(\\sigma_{WH}+\\sigma_{ZH})\\times Br(H\\rightarrow b\\overline{b})=291\\pm^{118}_{113}$~fb.

  19. Extending exchange symmetry beyond bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    We study quantum many-body states of particles subject to a more general exchange symmetry than the behavior under pairwise exchange obeyed by bosons and fermions. We refer to these hypothetical particles as immanons because the scalar product of states with the generalized exchange symmetry is the immanant of the matrix containing all mutual scalar products of the occupied single-particle states, a generalization of the determinant and permanent applied for fermions and bosons. Immanons are shown to obey a partial Pauli principle that forbids the occupation of single-particle states above certain threshold numbers. This has measurable consequences for their tendency to favor or oppose multiple occupation of single-particle modes, and it links conjectured mathematical properties of immanants to the expected outcome of a physical Gedanken experiment.

  20. D0 results on W boson properties

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, K.

    1997-06-01

    The D0 experiment collected {approx} 15 pb{sup -1} in run 1A (1992- 1993) and {approx}89 pb{sup -1} in run 1B (1994-1995) of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Results from analyses of events with W and Z bosons are presented for the run 1B data samples. From W {yields} e{nu}, {mu}{nu} and Z {yields} ee, {mu}{mu} decays, the W and Z production cross sections and the W width are determined. Events with W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays are used to determine the ratio of the electroweak gauge coupling constants as a measure of lepton universality. Using W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays, the W boson mass is measured.

  1. Stability, Higgs boson mass, and new physics.

    PubMed

    Branchina, Vincenzo; Messina, Emanuele

    2013-12-13

    Assuming that the particle with mass ∼126  GeV discovered at LHC is the standard model Higgs boson, we find that the stability of the electroweak (EW) vacuum strongly depends on new physics interaction at the Planck scale MP, despite of the fact that they are higher-dimensional interactions, apparently suppressed by inverse powers of MP. In particular, for the present experimental values of the top and Higgs boson masses, if τ is the lifetime of the EW vacuum, new physics can turn τ from τ≫TU to τ≪TU, where TU is the age of the Universe, thus, weakening the conclusions of the so called metastability scenario.

  2. Measurement of the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-11-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass using data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron during 1994-1995. We identify W bosons by their decays to eν final states. We extract the W mass MW by fitting the transverse mass and transverse electron momentum spectra from a sample of 28 323 W-->eν decay candidates. We use a sample of 3563 dielectron events, mostly due to Z-->ee decays, to constrain our model of the detector response. From the transverse mass fit we measure MW=80.44+/-0.10(stat)+/-0.07(syst) GeV. Combining this with our previously published result from data taken in 1992-1993, we obtain MW=80.43+/-0.11 GeV.

  3. Search for additional neutral gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; Nešić, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R. G.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V. D.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.; DØ Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    We have searched for a heavy neutral gauge boson, Z‧, using the decay channel Z‧ → ee. The data were collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron during the 1992-1993 p overlinep collider run at s=1.8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 15±1 pb -1. Limits are set on the cross section times brancing ratio for the process p overlinep → Z‧ → ee as a function of the Z‧ mass. We exclude the existence of a Z‧ of mass less than 490 GeV/c 2, assuming a Z‧ with the same coupling strengths to quarks and leptons as the standard model Z boson.

  4. Improved diffusion Monte Carlo propagators for bosonic systems using Itô calculus.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, P; Mella, M; Bressanini, Dario; Morosi, Gabriele; Patrone, Marta

    2006-11-14

    The construction of importance sampled diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) schemes accurate to second order in the time step is discussed. A central aspect in obtaining efficient second order schemes is the numerical solution of the stochastic differential equation (SDE) associated with the Fokker-Plank equation responsible for the importance sampling procedure. In this work, stochastic predictor-corrector schemes solving the SDE and consistent with Itô calculus are used in DMC simulations of helium clusters. These schemes are numerically compared with alternative algorithms obtained by splitting the Fokker-Plank operator, an approach that we analyze using the analytical tools provided by Ito; calculus. The numerical results show that predictor-corrector methods are indeed accurate to second order in the time step and that they present a smaller time step bias and a better efficiency than second order split-operator derived schemes when computing ensemble averages for bosonic systems. The possible extension of the predictor-corrector methods to higher orders is also discussed.

  5. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  6. Measurement of the W boson mass.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-10-02

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in W-->e(nu) decays using 1 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W-->e(nu) candidate events, we measure M(W)=80.401+/-0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  7. Coherent quantum effects through dispersive bosonic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Saiyun; Yang Zhenbiao; Zheng Shibiao; Serafini, Alessio

    2010-07-15

    The coherent evolution of two qubits mediated by a set of bosonic field modes is investigated. By assuming a specific asymmetric encoding of the quantum states in the internal levels of the qubits, we show that entangling quantum gates can be realized, with high fidelity, even when a large number of mediating modes is involved. The effect of losses and imperfections on the gates' operation is also considered in detail.

  8. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  9. Quantum Kinematics of Bosonic Vortex Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, G.A.; Owczarek, R.; Sharp, D.H.

    1999-05-06

    Poisson structure for vortex filaments (loops and arcs) in 2D ideal incompressible fluid is analyzed in detail. Canonical coordinates and momenta on coadjoint orbits of the area-preserving diffeomorphism group, associated with such vortices, are found. The quantum space of states in the simplest case of ''bosonic'' vortex loops is built within a geometric quantization approach to the description of a quantum fluid. Fock-like structure and non-local creation and annihilation operators of quantum vortex filaments are introduced.

  10. Oscillation of boson star in Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarwal, Bharti; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2017-03-01

    Boson star (BS) rotation is studied under Newtonian approximation. A Coulombian potential term is added as perturbation to the radial potential of the system without disturbing the angular momentum. The results of the stationary states of these ground state, first and second excited state are analyzed with the correction of Coulombian potential. It is found that the results with correction increased in the amplitude of oscillation of BS in comparison to potential without perturbation correction.

  11. Chiral anomaly, bosonization, and fractional charge

    SciTech Connect

    Mignaco, J.A.; Monteiro, M.A.R.

    1985-06-15

    We present a method to evaluate the Jacobian of chiral rotations, regulating determinants through the proper-time method and using Seeley's asymptotic expansion. With this method we compute easily the chiral anomaly for ..nu.. = 4,6 dimensions, discuss bosonization of some massless two-dimensional models, and handle the problem of charge fractionization. In addition, we comment on the general validity of Fujikawa's approach to regulate the Jacobian of chiral rotations with non-Hermitian operators.

  12. Search for horizontal bosons at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, C.H.; Deshpande, N.G.; Gunion, J.F.; Haber, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The production process anti p p ..-->.. l/sup -/l'/sup +/ + X, where the leptons belong to two different generations and X refers to spectator jets, provides a clear signature for horizontal (generation-changing) bosons when the leptons are emitted nearly back-to-back and p/sub T//sup miss/ = 0. Cross sections and p/sub T/ distributions for each lepton are presented, and discovery limits on M/sub H/ are extracted for several different channels.

  13. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Felix

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  14. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  15. General rules for bosonic bunching in multimode interferometers.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Sansoni, Linda; Maiorino, Enrico; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Brod, Daniel J; Galvão, Ernesto F; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto

    2013-09-27

    We perform a comprehensive set of experiments that characterize bosonic bunching of up to three photons in interferometers of up to 16 modes. Our experiments verify two rules that govern bosonic bunching. The first rule, obtained recently, predicts the average behavior of the bunching probability and is known as the bosonic birthday paradox. The second rule is new and establishes a n!-factor quantum enhancement for the probability that all n bosons bunch in a single output mode, with respect to the case of distinguishable bosons. In addition to its fundamental importance in phenomena such as Bose-Einstein condensation, bosonic bunching can be exploited in applications such as linear optical quantum computing and quantum-enhanced metrology.

  16. Role of fermion exchanges in statistical signatures of composite bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, M.; Dubin, F.; Dupertuis, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study statistical signatures of composite bosons made of two fermions by extending number states to these quantum particles. Two-particle correlations as well as the dispersion of the probability distribution are analyzed. We show that the particle composite nature reduces the antibunching effect predicted for elementary bosons. Furthermore, the probability distribution exhibits a dispersion that is greater for composite bosons than for elementary bosons. This dispersion corresponds to the one of sub-Poissonian processes, as for a quantum state but, unlike its elementary boson counterpart, it is not minimum. In general, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the Pauli exclusion principle, which acts between fermionic components of composite bosons - along the line used here - to possibly extract statistical properties in a precise way.

  17. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  18. On the structure, mass and thermodynamics of the Zo bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, A. S.; Vayenas, C. G.

    2016-12-01

    In a recent work we have shown that the mass of W± bosons can be computed from first principles by modeling these bosons as relativistic rotational bound states consisting of e±-νe pairs, and by employing the de Broglie wavelength equation together with Newton's universal gravitational law but with gravitational instead of rest masses (Vayenas et al., 2016). Here, we present similar calculations for the Zo boson which we model as a bound state of e+-νe-e- with an electron antineutrino at the center of the rotating ring. This appears consistent with the fact that Zo bosons are known to decay primarily to e+-e- pairs. The above models contain no adjustable parameters. The computed Zo boson mass (91.72 GeV /c2), as well as the ratio of the masses of Zo and W± bosons, differ by less than 0.6% and 0.9% respectively from the experimental values.

  19. Multi-Boson Interactions at the Run 1 LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel R.; Meade, Patrick; Pleier, Marc-Andre

    2016-10-24

    This review article covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion (VBF) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The data was taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering (VBS) yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which both have reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory (EFT) is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.

  20. High-efficiency multiphoton boson sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; He, Yu; Li, Yu-Huai; Su, Zu-En; Li, Bo; Huang, He-Liang; Ding, Xing; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Liu, Chang; Qin, Jian; Li, Jin-Peng; He, Yu-Ming; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Höfling, Sven; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Boson sampling is considered as a strong candidate to demonstrate 'quantum computational supremacy' over classical computers. However, previous proof-of-principle experiments suffered from small photon number and low sampling rates owing to the inefficiencies of the single-photon sources and multiport optical interferometers. Here, we develop two central components for high-performance boson sampling: robust multiphoton interferometers with 99% transmission rate and actively demultiplexed single-photon sources based on a quantum dot-micropillar with simultaneously high efficiency, purity and indistinguishability. We implement and validate three-, four- and five-photon boson sampling, and achieve sampling rates of 4.96 kHz, 151 Hz and 4 Hz, respectively, which are over 24,000 times faster than previous experiments. Our architecture can be scaled up for a larger number of photons and with higher sampling rates to compete with classical computers, and might provide experimental evidence against the extended Church-Turing thesis.

  1. Invisible Decays of Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Aparicio Mendez, M. del R; Guevara, J. E. Barradas; Beltran, O. Felix

    2009-04-20

    We study the detection of the complete spectrum of Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, through their decays into chargino ({chi}-tilde{sub i}{sup {+-}}) and neutralinos ({chi}-tilde{sub i}{sup o}), for several parametric scenarios. In the minimal supersymmetric model there are two charginos and four neutralinos, and the Higgs boson spectrum contains three neutral scalars, two CP-even (h{sup 0} and H{sup 0} with m{sub H{sup 0}}>m{sub h{sup 0}}) and one CP-odd (A{sup 0}, with m{sub A{sup 0}} as a free parameter); as well as a charged pair (H{sup {+-}}). An interesting signal comes from the decays of the Higgs bosons into invisible SUSY modes (h{sup 0}, H{sup 0},A{sup 0}{yields}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup o}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup o}), which could be detected at present and future high energy machines.

  2. Boson condensation in topologically ordered quantum liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, Titus; He, Huan; von Keyserlingk, Curt; Sierra, Germán; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Boson condensation in topological quantum field theories (TQFT) has been previously investigated through the formalism of Frobenius algebras and the use of vertex lifting coefficients. While general, this formalism is physically opaque and computationally arduous: analyses of TQFT condensation are practically performed on a case by case basis and for very simple theories only, mostly not using the Frobenius algebra formalism. In this paper, we provide a way of treating boson condensation that is computationally efficient. With a minimal set of physical assumptions, such as commutativity of lifting and the definition of confined particles, we can prove a number of theorems linking Boson condensation in TQFT with chiral algebra extensions, and with the factorization of completely positive matrices over Z+. We present numerically efficient ways of obtaining a condensed theory fusion algebra and S matrices; and we then use our formalism to prove several theorems for the S and T matrices of simple current condensation and of theories which upon condensation result in a low number of confined particles. We also show that our formalism easily reproduces results existent in the mathematical literature such as the noncondensability of five and ten layers of the Fibonacci TQFT.

  3. Light Z' bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Hooper, Dan; Kopp, Joachim; Neil, Ethan T.

    2011-06-10

    New gauge bosons with standard model-like couplings to leptons are constrained by collider searches to be heavier than approximately ~1 TeV. A Z' boson with suppressed couplings to leptons, however, could be much lighter and possess substantial couplings to standard model quarks. In this article, we consider a new leptophobic Z' gauge boson as a simple and well-motivated extension of the standard model, and discuss several of its possible signatures at the Tevatron. We find that three of the recent anomalies reported from the Tevatron—in particular, the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and excesses in the 3b and W+2 jets final states—could be explained by a new Z' with a mass of approximately 150 GeV, relatively large couplings to quarks, and suppressed couplings to electrons and muons. Moreover, we find that such a particle could also mediate the interactions of dark matter, leading to potentially interesting implications for direct detection experiments.

  4. Light Z' bosons at the Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Hooper, Dan; Kopp, Joachim; ...

    2011-06-10

    New gauge bosons with standard model-like couplings to leptons are constrained by collider searches to be heavier than approximately ~1 TeV. A Z' boson with suppressed couplings to leptons, however, could be much lighter and possess substantial couplings to standard model quarks. In this article, we consider a new leptophobic Z' gauge boson as a simple and well-motivated extension of the standard model, and discuss several of its possible signatures at the Tevatron. We find that three of the recent anomalies reported from the Tevatron—in particular, the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and excesses in the 3b and W+2 jets final states—couldmore » be explained by a new Z' with a mass of approximately 150 GeV, relatively large couplings to quarks, and suppressed couplings to electrons and muons. Moreover, we find that such a particle could also mediate the interactions of dark matter, leading to potentially interesting implications for direct detection experiments.« less

  5. Improved D0 W boson mass determination

    SciTech Connect

    V. M. Abazov et al.

    2001-10-03

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV based on a data sample of 82 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We utilize e{nu} events in which the electron shower is close to the phi edge of one of the 32 modules in the D0 central calorimeter. The electromagnetic calorimenter response and resolution in this region differs from that in the rest of the module and electrons in this region were not previously utilized. We determine the calorimeter response and resolution in this region using Z {yields} ee events. We extract the W boson mass by fitting to the transverse mass and to the electron and neutrino transverse momentum distributions. The result is combined with previous D0 results to obtain an improved measurement of the W boson mass: m{sub W} = 80.483 {+-} 0.084 GeV.

  6. Bosonic Dirac Materials in 2 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Black-Schaffer, A. M.; Fransson, J.; Agren, H.; Balatsky, A. V.

    We examine the low energy effective theory of phase oscillations in a two dimensional granular superconducting sheet where the grains are arranged in honeycomb lattice structure. Two different types of collective phase oscillations are obtained, which are analogous to the massive Leggett and massless Bogoliubov-Anderson-Gorkov modes for two-band superconductor. It is explicitly shown that the spectra of these collective Bosonic modes cross each other at K and K' points in the Brillouin zone and form a Dirac node. This Dirac node behavior in Bosonic excitations represent the case of Bosonic Dirac Materials (BDM). Dirac node is preserved in presence of an inter-grain interaction despite induced changes of the qualitative features of the two collective modes. Finally, breaking the sub lattice symmetry by choosing different on-site potentials for the two sub lattices leads to a gap opening near the Dirac node, in analogy with Fermionic Dirac material. Supported by US DOE E304, ERC DM 321031, KAW, VR2012-3447.

  7. Statistical benchmark for BosonSampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Kuipers, Jack; Urbina, Juan-Diego; Mayer, Klaus; Tichy, Malte Christopher; Richter, Klaus; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Boson samplers—set-ups that generate complex many-particle output states through the transmission of elementary many-particle input states across a multitude of mutually coupled modes—promise the efficient quantum simulation of a classically intractable computational task, and challenge the extended Church-Turing thesis, one of the fundamental dogmas of computer science. However, as in all experimental quantum simulations of truly complex systems, one crucial problem remains: how to certify that a given experimental measurement record unambiguously results from enforcing the claimed dynamics, on bosons, fermions or distinguishable particles? Here we offer a statistical solution to the certification problem, identifying an unambiguous statistical signature of many-body quantum interference upon transmission across a multimode, random scattering device. We show that statistical analysis of only partial information on the output state allows to characterise the imparted dynamics through particle type-specific features of the emerging interference patterns. The relevant statistical quantifiers are classically computable, define a falsifiable benchmark for BosonSampling, and reveal distinctive features of many-particle quantum dynamics, which go much beyond mere bunching or anti-bunching effects.

  8. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  9. Deformations of superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova, Clay; Dumitrescu, Thomas T.; Intriligator, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    We classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d ≥ 3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and non-central charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact that short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.

  10. Deformations of superconformal theories

    SciTech Connect

    Córdova, Clay; Dumitrescu, Thomas T.; Intriligator, Kenneth

    2016-11-22

    Here, we classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d ≥ 3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and noncentral charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact that short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.

  11. Search for a Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester Iii, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-01-16

    We present a search for a Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb;(-1) collected with the CDF II detector. We find no evidence for production of a Higgs boson with mass between 110 and 200 GeV/c;(2), and determine upper limits on the production cross section. For the mass of 160 GeV/c;(2), where the analysis is most sensitive, the observed (expected) limit is 0.7 pb (0.9 pb) at 95% Bayesian credibility level which is 1.7 (2.2) times the standard model cross section.

  12. Determining the CP properties of the Higgs boson.

    PubMed

    Bhupal Dev, P S; Djouadi, A; Godbole, R M; Mühlleitner, M M; Rindani, S D

    2008-02-08

    The search and the probe of the fundamental properties of Higgs boson(s) and, in particular, the determination of their charge conjugation and parity (CP) quantum numbers, are the main tasks of future high-energy colliders. We demonstrate that the CP properties of a standard model-like Higgs particle can be unambiguously assessed by measuring just the total cross section and the top polarization in associated Higgs boson production with top quark pairs in e(+)e(-) collisions.

  13. Towards an analytic construction of the wavefunction of boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix; Rajaraman, Arvind

    2017-08-01

    Light scalar fields can form gravitationally bound compact objects called boson stars. The profile of boson stars in the Newtonian limit is described by the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equations. We present a semianalytic solution to these equations and construct the profile of boson stars formed by a noninteracting scalar field. Our solution is stable with respect to numerical errors and has accuracy better than 10-6 over the entire range.

  14. OVERVIEW OF HIGGS BOSON STUDIES AT THE TEVATRON

    SciTech Connect

    Zivkovic, Lidija

    2014-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p¯p Collider collected data between 2002 and 2011, accumulating up to 10 fb-1 of data. During that time, an extensive search for the standard model Higgs boson was performed. Combined results from the searches for the standard model Higgs boson with the final dataset are presented, together with results on the Higgs boson couplings and spin and parity.

  15. Search for low-mass dark-sector Higgs bosons.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-05-25

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the standard model-dark-sector mixing angle and the dark-sector coupling constant.

  16. Alar Rim Deformities.

    PubMed

    Totonchi, Ali; Guyuron, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The alar rim plays an important role in nasal harmony. Alar rim flaws are common following the initial rhinoplasty. Classification of the deformities helps with diagnosis and successful surgical correction. Diagnosis of the deformity requires careful observation of the computerized or life-sized photographs. Techniques for treatment of these deformities can easily be learned with attention to detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in association with a W boson at D0.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Savanna Marie

    2013-01-01

    I present a search for the standard model Higgs boson, H, produced in association with a W boson in data events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing energy, and two or three jets. The data analysed correspond to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at a center-of-momentum energy of √s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider. This search uses algorithms to identify the signature of bottom quark production and multivariate techniques to improve the purity of H → b$\\bar{b}$ production. We validate our methodology by measuring WZ and ZZ production with Z → b$\\bar{b}$ and find production rates consistent with the standard model prediction. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we determine a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 4.8 times the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7 times the standard model production cross section. I also present a novel method for improving the energy resolution for charged particles within hadronic signatures. This is achieved by replacing the calorimeter energy measurement for charged particles within a hadronic signature with the tracking momentum measurement. This technique leads to a ~ 20% improvement in the jet energy resolution, which yields a ~ 7% improvement in the reconstructed dijet mass width for H → b$\\bar{b}$ events. The improved energy calculation leads to a ~ 5% improvement in our expected 95% C.L. upper limit on the Higgs boson production cross section.

  18. Search for the standard model higgs boson in association with a w boson at d0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Savanna Marie

    I present a search for the standard model Higgs boson, H, produced in association with a W boson in data events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing energy, and two or three jets. The data analysed correspond to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at a center-of-momentum energy of sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar collider. This search uses algorithms to identify the signature of bottom quark production and multivariate techniques to improve the purity of H→ bbbar production. We validate our methodology by measuring WZ and ZZ production with Z→ bbbar and find production rates consistent with the standard model prediction. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we determine a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 4.8 times the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7 times the standard model production cross section. I also present a novel method for improving the energy resolution for charged particles within hadronic signatures. This is achieved by replacing the calorimeter energy measurement for charged particles within a hadronic signature with the tracking momentum measurement. This technique leads to a 20% improvement in the jet energy resolution, which yields a 7% improvement in the reconstructed dijet mass width for H→ bbbar events. The improved energy calculation leads to a 5% improvement in our expected 95% C.L. upper limit on the Higgs boson production cross section.

  19. Total width of 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    PubMed

    Barger, Vernon; Ishida, Muneyuki; Keung, Wai-Yee

    2012-06-29

    By using the LHC and Tevatron measurements of the cross sections to various decay channels relative to the standard model Higgs boson, the total width of the putative 125 GeV Higgs boson is determined as 6.1(-2.9)(+7.7) MeV. We describe a way to estimate the branching fraction for the Higgs-boson decay to dark matter. We also discuss a no-go theorem for the γγ signal of the Higgs boson at the LHC.

  20. Higgs constraints from vector boson fusion and scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith

    2015-04-07

    We present results on 4-lepton + 2-jet production, the partonic processes most commonly described as vector boson pair production in the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) mode. That final state contains diagrams that are mediated by Higgs boson exchange. We focus particularly on the high-mass behaviour of the Higgs boson mediated diagrams, which unlike on-shell production, gives information about the Higgs couplings without assumptions on the Higgs boson total width. We assess the sensitivity of the high-mass region to Higgs coupling strengths, considering all vector boson pair channels, W - W +, W ± W ±, W ± Z and ZZ.more » Because of the small background, the most promising mode is W + W + which has sensitivity to Higgs couplings because of Higgs boson exchange in the t-channel. Furthermore, using the Caola-Melnikov (CM) method, the off-shell couplings can be interpreted as bounds on the Higgs boson total width. We estimate the bound that can be obtained with current data, as well as the bounds that could be obtained at √s=13 TeV in the VBF channel for data samples of 100 and 300 fb-1. The CM method has already been successfully applied in the gluon fusion (GGF) production channel. The VBF production channel gives important complementary information, because both production and decay of the Higgs boson occur already at tree graph level.« less

  1. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  2. Mixtures of Bosonic and Fermionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albus, Alexander

    2003-12-01

    The theory of atomic Boson-Fermion mixtures in the dilute limit beyond mean-field is considered in this thesis. Extending the formalism of quantum field theory we derived expressions for the quasi-particle excitation spectra, the ground state energy, and related quantities for a homogenous system to first order in the dilute gas parameter. In the framework of density functional theory we could carry over the previous results to inhomogeneous systems. We then determined to density distributions for various parameter values and identified three different phase regions: (i) a stable mixed regime, (ii) a phase separated regime, and (iii) a collapsed regime. We found a significant contribution of exchange-correlation effects in the latter case. Next, we determined the shift of the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature caused by Boson-Fermion interactions in a harmonic trap due to redistribution of the density profiles. We then considered Boson-Fermion mixtures in optical lattices. We calculated the criterion for stability against phase separation, identified the Mott-insulating and superfluid regimes both, analytically within a mean-field calculation, and numerically by virtue of a Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also found new frustrated ground states in the limit of very strong lattices. ----Anmerkung: Der Autor ist Träger des durch die Physikalische Gesellschaft zu Berlin vergebenen Carl-Ramsauer-Preises 2004 für die jeweils beste Dissertation der vier Universitäten Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Technische Universität Berlin und Universität Potsdam. Ziel der Arbeit war die systematische theoretische Behandlung von Gemischen aus bosonischen und fermionischen Atomen in einem Parameterbereich, der sich zur Beschreibung von aktuellen Experimenten mit ultra-kalten atomaren Gasen eignet. Zuerst wurde der Formalismus der Quantenfeldtheorie auf homogene, atomare Boson-Fermion Gemische erweitert, um grundlegende Größen wie Quasiteilchenspektren

  3. Explosive loading of deformable gas-permeable axisymmetric structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazova, E. G.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Kochetkov, A. V.; Krylov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which describes the interrelated processes of unsteady elastoplastic deformation of stacks of woven metal wire mesh and wave processes in pore gas in a two-dimensional axisymmetric approximation. The nonlinear equations of the dynamics of two interpenetrating continua are solved numerically using a modified Godunov's scheme. The problem of explosive loading of a multilayer shell with an internal permeable deformable layer is solved. The results of numerical solutions are compared with experimental data. The influence of the gas-permeable layer on shell deformation is determined.

  4. Deformable mirrors for open-loop adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer, A.; Vidal, F.; Gendron, E.; Hubert, Z.; Perret, D.; Rousset, G.

    2012-07-01

    We characterize the performance of deformable mirrors for use in open-loop regimes. This is especially relevant for Multi Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO), or for closed-loop schemes that require improved accuracies. Deformable mirrors are usually characterized by standard parameters, such as influence functions, linearity, hysteresis, etc. We show that these parameters are insufficient for characterizing open-loop performance and that a deeper analysis of the mirror's behavior is then required. The measurements on the deformable mirrors were performed in 2007 on the AO test bench of the Meudon observatory, SESAME.

  5. Spectral properties and phase diagram of correlated lattice bosons in an optical cavity within bosonic dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panas, Jaromir; Kauch, Anna; Byczuk, Krzysztof

    2017-03-01

    We use the Bose-Hubbard model with an effective infinite-range interaction to describe the correlated lattice bosons in an optical cavity. We study both static and spectral properties of such system within the bosonic dynamical mean-field theory, which is the state-of-the-art method for strongly correlated bosonic systems. Both similarities and differences are found and discussed between our results and those obtained within different theoretical methods and experiment.

  6. Determination of the deformation mechanism of Fe-Mn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Minho; Koo, Yang Mo; Kwon, Se Kyun

    2015-03-01

    The energy parameters of planar defects are decisive for understanding the deformation mechanisms of metals. The stacking fault energy has been regarded as a key parameter to determine the activation of the deformation mechanisms of the face-centered cubic metals and alloys. However, it is still under a long debate why the stacking fault energy can be treated to be such an exclusive parameter among the general planar fault energies. We have employed molecular dynamics method to examine the effects of Mn alloying on the deformation behavior of austenitic Fe-Mn systems. The energies of stable and unstable states are calculated by sliding the (111) plane and are analyzed in two different schemes, stacking fault energy and energy barriers, which leads to a contradiction between them. We show that a linear relationship can be identified among the energy barriers. This finding is used to identify the activated deformation mechanism. A new parameter is also suggested to characterize the material deformation.

  7. HSR Model Deformation Measurements from Subsonic to Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Erickson, G. E.; Goodman, W. L.; Fleming, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the video model deformation technique (VMD) used at five NASA facilities and the projection moire interferometry (PMI) technique used at two NASA facilities. Comparisons between the two techniques for model deformation measurements are provided. Facilities at NASA-Ames and NASA-Langley where deformation measurements have been made are presented. Examples of HSR model deformation measurements from the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel, Langley 16-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, and the Ames 12-foot Pressure Tunnel are presented. A study to improve and develop new targeting schemes at the National Transonic Facility is also described. The consideration of milled targets for future HSR models is recommended when deformation measurements are expected to be required. Finally, future development work for VMD and PMI is addressed.

  8. A new method to distinguish hadronically decaying boosted Z bosons from W bosons using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-04-28

    The distribution of particles inside hadronic jets produced in the decay of boosted W and Z bosons can be used to discriminate such jets from the continuum background. Given that a jet has been identified as likely resulting from the hadronic decay of a boosted W or Z boson, this paper presents a technique for further differentiating Z bosons from W bosons. The variables used are jet mass, jet charge, and a b-tagging discriminant. A likelihood tagger is constructed from these variables and tested in the simulation of W' → WZ for bosons in the transverse momentum range 200 GeV  boson tagging efficiencies of ϵZ = 90 , 50, and 10 % , one can achieve W + -boson tagging rejection factors (1 / ϵW+ ) of 1.7, 8.3 and 1000, respectively. It is not possible to measure these efficiencies in the data due to the lack of a pure sample of high pT , hadronically decaying Z bosons. However, the modelling of the tagger inputs for boosted W bosons is studied in data using a tt¯ -enriched sample of events in 20.3 fb - 1 of data at √s= 8 TeV. The inputs are well modelled within uncertainties, which builds confidence in the expected tagger performance.« less

  9. A new method to distinguish hadronically decaying boosted Z bosons from W bosons using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of particles inside hadronic jets produced in the decay of boosted W and Z bosons can be used to discriminate such jets from the continuum background. Given that a jet has been identified as likely resulting from the hadronic decay of a boosted W or Z boson, this paper presents a technique for further differentiating Z bosons from W bosons. The variables used are jet mass, jet charge, and a b-tagging discriminant. A likelihood tagger is constructed from these variables and tested in the simulation of W'→ WZ for bosons in the transverse momentum range 200 GeV boson tagging efficiencies of ɛ _Z=90, 50, and 10 %, one can achieve W^+-boson tagging rejection factors (1/ɛ _{W^+}) of 1.7, 8.3 and 1000, respectively. It is not possible to measure these efficiencies in the data due to the lack of a pure sample of high p_ {T}, hadronically decaying Z bosons. However, the modelling of the tagger inputs for boosted W bosons is studied in data using a tbar{t}-enriched sample of events in 20.3 fb{}^{-1} of data at √{s}=8 TeV. The inputs are well modelled within uncertainties, which builds confidence in the expected tagger performance.

  10. A new method to distinguish hadronically decaying boosted Z bosons from W bosons using the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Sahinsoy, M; Saimpert, M; Saito, T; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Salazar Loyola, J E; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sammel, D; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sato, K; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidebo, P E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; St Denis, R D; Stabile, A; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, Q; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of particles inside hadronic jets produced in the decay of boosted W and Z bosons can be used to discriminate such jets from the continuum background. Given that a jet has been identified as likely resulting from the hadronic decay of a boosted W or Z boson, this paper presents a technique for further differentiating Z bosons from W bosons. The variables used are jet mass, jet charge, and a b-tagging discriminant. A likelihood tagger is constructed from these variables and tested in the simulation of [Formula: see text] for bosons in the transverse momentum range 200 GeV [Formula: see text] 400 GeV in [Formula: see text] TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. For Z-boson tagging efficiencies of [Formula: see text], 50, and [Formula: see text], one can achieve [Formula: see text]-boson tagging rejection factors ([Formula: see text]) of 1.7, 8.3 and 1000, respectively. It is not possible to measure these efficiencies in the data due to the lack of a pure sample of high [Formula: see text], hadronically decaying Z bosons. However, the modelling of the tagger inputs for boosted W bosons is studied in data using a [Formula: see text]-enriched sample of events in 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] of data at [Formula: see text] TeV. The inputs are well modelled within uncertainties, which builds confidence in the expected tagger performance.

  11. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  12. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  13. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  14. Slave-boson study in the SU(2)-invariant representation: Coupled layers in the one-band Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, W.; Dieterich, P.; Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1996-01-01

    Using the spin-rotation-invariant form of the slave-boson formalism we emphasize formal aspects of this method concerning the SU(2) transformation properties and the physical content of the constraints which are necessary to project onto the physical subspace. As a result, a consistent scheme of coherent states within the functional integral of the SU(2)-invariant slave-boson theory is provided. As an application, a system of two Hubbard layers coupled by an interlayer hopping {ital t}{sub {perpendicular}} is investigated. Numerical results from a saddle-point approximation of the partition function are used to consider the magnetic order in and between the layers as a fact of {ital t}{sub {perpendicular}}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  16. Structural evolution in A ≈100 nuclei within the mapped interacting boson model based on the Gogny energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of even-even neutron-rich Ru, Mo, Zr, and Sr nuclei in the A ≈100 mass region is studied within the interacting boson model (IBM) with microscopic input from the self-consistent mean-field approximation based on the Gogny-D1M energy density functional. The deformation-energy surface in the quadrupole deformation space (β ,γ ) , computed within the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework, is mapped onto the expectation value of the appropriately chosen IBM Hamiltonian with configuration mixing in the boson condensate state. The mapped IBM Hamiltonian is used to study the spectroscopic properties of Ru-11498, Mo-11296, Zr-11094, and Sr-10892. Several cases of γ -soft behavior are predicted in Ru and Mo nuclei while a pronounced coexistence between strongly prolate and weakly oblate deformed shapes is found for Zr and Sr nuclei. The method describes well the evolution of experimental yrast and nonyrast states as well as selected B (E 2 ) transition probabilities.

  17. q-graded Heisenberg algebras and deformed supersymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Geloun, Joseph; Hounkonnou, Mahouton Norbert

    2010-02-15

    The notion of q-grading on the enveloping algebra generated by products of q-deformed Heisenberg algebras is introduced for q complex number in the unit disk. Within this formulation, we consider the extension of the notion of supersymmetry in the enveloping algebra. We recover the ordinary Z{sub 2} grading or Grassmann parity for associative superalgebra and a modified version of the usual supersymmetry. As a specific problem, we focus on the interesting limit q{yields}-1 for which the Arik and Coon deformation [J. Math. Phys. 17, 524 (1976)] of the Heisenberg algebra allows one to map fermionic modes to bosonic ones in a modified sense. Different algebraic consequences are discussed.

  18. Search for Standard Model Higgs Bosons Produced in Association with W Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report on the results of a search for standard model Higgs bosons produced in association with W bosons from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses a data sample corresponding to approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Events consistent with the W {yields} {ell}{nu} and H {yields} b{bar b} signature are selected by triggering on a high-p{sub T} electron or muon candidate and tagging one or two of the jet candidates as having originated from b quarks. A neural network filter rejects a fraction of tagged charm and light flavor jets, increasing the b-jet purity in the sample and thereby reducing the background to Higgs boson production. They observe no excess {ell}{nu}b{bar b} production beyond the background expectation, and they set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) {center_dot} Br(H {yields} b{bar b}) ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb, for specific Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  19. Anomalous gauge interactions of the Higgs boson: precision constraints and weak boson scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian; Kuang, Yu-Ping; Yuan, C.-P.; Zhang, Bin

    2003-02-01

    Interaction of Higgs scalar (H) with weak gauge bosons (V=W±,Z0) is the key to understand electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) mechanism. New physics effects in the HVV interactions, as predicted by models of compositeness, supersymmetry and extra dimensions, can be formulated as anomalous couplings via a generic effective Lagrangian. We first show that the existing electroweak precision data already impose nontrivial indirect constraints on the anomalous HVV couplings. Then, we systematically study VV→VV scatterings in the TeV region, via Gold-plated pure leptonic decay modes of the weak bosons. We demonstrate that, even for a light Higgs boson in the mass range 115 GeV≲mH≲300 GeV, this process can directly probe the anomalous HVV interactions at the LHC with an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1, which further supports the “no-lose” theorem for the LHC to uncover the EWSB mechanism. Comparisons with the constraints from measuring the cross section of VH associate production and the Higgs boson decay width are also presented.

  20. General variational many-body theory with complete self-consistency for trapped bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Alexej I.; Alon, Ofir E.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2006-06-15

    and show that the lack of self-consistency may lead to physically wrong predictions. The convergence of the general MCHB(M) scheme with a growing number M is validated in a specific case of two bosons trapped in a symmetric double well.

  1. Multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons: Many-body dynamics of bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-03-01

    The evolution of Bose-Einstein condensates is amply described by the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field theory which assumes all bosons to reside in a single time-dependent one-particle state throughout the propagation process. In this work, we go beyond mean field and develop an essentially exact many-body theory for the propagation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of N interacting identical bosons. In our theory, the time-dependent many-boson wave function is written as a sum of permanents assembled from orthogonal one-particle functions, or orbitals, where both the expansion coefficients and the permanents (orbitals) themselves are time-dependent and fully determined according to a standard time-dependent variational principle. By employing either the usual Lagrangian formulation or the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle we arrive at two sets of coupled equations of motion, one for the orbitals and one for the expansion coefficients. The first set comprises of first-order differential equations in time and nonlinear integrodifferential equations in position space, whereas the second set consists of first-order differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. We call our theory multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons, or MCTDHB(M) , where M specifies the number of time-dependent orbitals used to construct the permanents. Numerical implementation of the theory is reported and illustrative numerical examples of many-body dynamics of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates are provided and discussed. The convergence of the method with a growing number M of orbitals is demonstrated in a specific example of four interacting bosons in a double well.

  2. Searching for new heavy neutral gauge bosons using vector boson fusion processes at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez, Andrés; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Will; Oh, Young Do; Sheldon, Paul; Teague, Dylan; Weiler, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    New massive resonances are predicted in many extensions to the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics and constitutes one of the most promising searches for new physics at the LHC. We present a feasibility study to search for new heavy neutral gauge bosons using vector boson fusion (VBF) processes, which become especially important as the LHC probes higher collision energies. In particular, we consider the possibility that the discovery of a Z‧ boson may have eluded searches at the LHC. The coupling of the Z‧ boson to the SM quarks can be small, and thus the Z‧ would not be discoverable by the searches conducted thus far. In the context of a simplified phenomenological approach, we consider the Z‧ → ττ and Z‧ → μμ decay modes to show that the requirement of a dilepton pair combined with two high pT forward jets with large separation in pseudorapidity and with large dijet mass is effective in reducing SM backgrounds. The expected exclusion bounds (at 95% confidence level) are m (Z‧) < 1.8 TeV and m (Z‧) < 2.5 TeV in the ττjfjf and μμjfjf channels, respectively, assuming 1000 fb-1 of 13 TeV data from the LHC. The use of the VBF topology to search for massive neutral gauge bosons provides a discovery reach with expected significances greater than 5σ (3σ) for Z‧ masses up to 1.4 (1.6) TeV and 2.0 (2.2) TeV in the ττjfjf and μμjfjf channels.

  3. Searching for new heavy neutral gauge bosons using vector boson fusion processes at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Flórez, Andrés; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Will; ...

    2017-02-01

    Here, new massive resonances are predicted in many extensions to the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics and constitutes one of the most promising searches for new physics at the LHC. We present a feasibility study to search for new heavy neutral gauge bosons using vector boson fusion (VBF) processes, which become especially important as the LHC probes higher collision energies. In particular, we consider the possibility that the discovery of a Z' boson may have eluded searches at the LHC. The coupling of the Z' boson to the SM quarks can be small, and thus the Z' would notmore » be discoverable by the searches conducted thus far. In the context of a simplified phenomenological approach, we consider the Z'→ττ and Z'→μμ decay modes to show that the requirement of a dilepton pair combined with two high pT forward jets with large separation in pseudorapidity and with large dijet mass is effective in reducing SM backgrounds. The expected exclusion bounds (at 95% confidence level) are m(Z') < 1.8 TeV and m(Z')<2.5 TeV in the ττjfjf and μμjfjf channels, respectively, assuming 1000 fb–1 of 13 TeV data from the LHC. The use of the VBF topology to search for massive neutral gauge bosons provides a discovery reach with expected significances greater than 5σ (3σ) for Z' masses up to 1.4 (1.6) TeV and 2.0 (2.2) TeV in the ττjfjf and μμjfjf channels.« less

  4. Signals of a 2 TeV $W'$ boson and a heavier $Z'$ boson

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.

    2016-05-09

    We construct an SU(2)L x SU(2)R x U(1)B-L model with a Higgs sector that consists of a bidoublet and a doublet, and with a right-handed neutrino sector that includes one Dirac fermion and one Majorana fermion. This model explains the CMS and ATLAS excess events in the e+e-jj, jj, Wh0 and WZ channels in terms of a W' boson of mass near 1.9 TeV and of coupling gR in the 0.4-0.5 range (with the lower half preferred by the limits on tb-bar resonances). We found that the production cross section of this W' boson at the 13 TeV LHC is in the 720-1100 fb range, allowing sensitivity in more than 17 final states. Furthermore, we determine that the Z' boson has a mass in the 2.9-4.5 TeV range and several decay channels that can be probed in Run 2 of the LHC, including cascade decays via heavy Higgs bosons. Interpreting the CMS e+e-event at 2.9 TeV as coming from the Z', the mass ratio of the Z' and W' bosons requires gR ≈0.48, which implies a pp →Z' → ℓ+-cross section of 2 fb at √s = 13 TeV.

  5. ATLAS Search for the MSSM Charged Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Chris

    2008-11-23

    The discovery of a charged Higgs boson would be definitive evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The discovery potential of a MSSM charged Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. The study is based on the analysis of signal and background simulated in detail through the experimental apparatus.

  6. Boson mapping treatment of atoms-photon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reboiro, M.

    2007-02-12

    A system which consists of A identical atoms, each of them having three atomic levels, and one optical photon is analyzed in terms of an algebraic approach. The symmetries exhibit by the model are used to construct an exact boson mapping of the Hamiltonian. The image-Hamiltonian reduces to a form which contains one boson and two atomic levels.

  7. Two guage-boson physics at very high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1992-05-01

    Use of rapidity-gap signature can lead to observation of interesting processes involving collisions of gauge-bosons at the SSC. This includes production of the heavy Higgs boson (500 GeV-1 TeV), which appears straightforward.

  8. Boson-fermion confusion: the string path to supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramond, P.

    Reminiscences on the String origins of Supersymmetry are followed by a discussion of the importance of confusing bosons with fermions in building superstring theories in 9 + 1 dimensions. In eleven dimensions, the kinship between bosons and fermions is more subtle, and may involve the exceptional group F4.

  9. Simulating spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems (``spins'') to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. In many situations, the bosons are integrated out, leading to effective long-range interactions between the spins; however, strong spin-boson coupling invalidates this approach, and spin-boson entanglement degrades the fidelity of quantum simulation of spin models. We present a general numerical method for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of spin-boson systems based on matrix product states. While most efficient for weak coupling or small numbers of boson modes, our method applies for any spatial and operator dependence of the spin-boson coupling. In addition, our approach allows straightforward computation of many quantities of interest, such as the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and quantum simulation infidelity due to spin-boson entanglement. We apply our method to ongoing trapped ion quantum simulator experiments in analytically intractable regimes. This work is supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF- 1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, and the NRC.

  10. Studies of gauge boson pair production and trilinear couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-12-01

    The gauge boson pair production processes Wγ, WW, WZ, and Zγ were studied using pp¯ collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 14 pb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of s=1.8 TeV. Analysis of Wγ production with subsequent W boson decay to lν (l=e,μ) is reported, including a fit to the pT spectrum of the photons which leads to limits on anomalous WWγ couplings. A search for WW production with subsequent decay to ll¯νν¯ (l=e,μ) is presented, leading to an upper limit on the WW production cross section and limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings. A search for high pT W bosons in WW and WZ production is described, where one W boson decays to an electron and a neutrino and the second W boson or the Z boson decays to two jets. A maximum likelihood fit to the pT spectrum of W bosons resulted in limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings. A combined fit to the three data sets which provided the tightest limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings is also described. Limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented from an analysis of the photon ET spectrum in Zγ events in the decay channels (ee, μμ, and νν) of the Z boson.

  11. Finding the Higgs boson through supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O. J. P.; Magro, M. B.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2009-07-01

    The study of displaced vertices containing two b-jets may provide a double discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): we show how it may not only reveal evidence for supersymmetry, but also provide a way to uncover the Higgs boson necessary in the formulation of the electroweak theory in a large region of the parameter space. We quantify this explicitly using the simplest minimal supergravity model with bilinear breaking of R-parity, which accounts for the observed pattern of neutrino masses and mixings seen in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  12. Some useful combinatorial formulas for bosonic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Blasiak, P.; Penson, K.A.; Solomon, A.I.; Horzela, A.; Duchamp, G.H.E.

    2005-05-01

    We give a general expression for the normally ordered form of a function F[w(a,a{sup {dagger}})] where w is a function of boson creation and annihilation operators satisfying [a,a{sup {dagger}}]=1. The expectation value of this expression in a coherent state becomes an exact generating function of Feynman-type graphs associated with the zero-dimensional quantum field theory defined by F(w). This enables one to enumerate explicitly the graphs of given order in the realm of combinatorially defined sequences. We give several examples of the use of this technique, including the applications to Kerr-type and superfluidity-type Hamiltonians.

  13. Lectures on Non-Abelian Bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvelik, A. M.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Kac-Moody algebra * Conformal embedding. Sugawara Hamiltonian * SU(N)×SU(M) model * From the fermionic to WZNW model * The perturbed SUk(2) WZNW model * Correlation functions and Quasi Long Range order * Generalization from SU(2) to SU(N) * A model with Sp(2N) symmetry * Solution for the special case gcdw = gsc * Attraction in the orbital channel. Competing orders. Emergent integrability. ZN parafermions. * Parafermion zero modes * Conclusions and Acknowledgements * Appendix A. TBA equations for the Sp1(2N) model * Appendix B. Bosonization of of Z4 parafermions * References

  14. Massless gauge bosons other than the photon

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Gauge bosons associated with unbroken gauge symmetries, under which all standard model fields are singlets, may interact with ordinary matter via higher-dimensional operators. A complete set of dimension-six operators involving a massless U(1) field, {gamma}', and standard model fields is presented. The {mu} {yields} e{gamma}' decay, primordial nucleosynthesis, star cooling and other phenomena set lower limits on the scale of chirality-flip operators in the 1-15 TeV range, if the operators have coefficients given by the corresponding Yukawa couplings. Simple renormalizable models induce {gamma}' interactions with leptons or quarks at two loops, and may provide a cold dark matter candidate.

  15. Topological Physics of Little Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.; Hill, Richard J.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Topological interactions will generally occur in composite Higgs or Little Higgs theories, extra-dimensional gauge theories in which A5 plays the role of a Higgs boson, and among the pNGB's of technicolor. This phenomena arises from the chiral and anomaly structure of the underlying UV completion theory, and/or through chiral delocalization in higher dimensions. These effects are described by a full Wess-Zumino-Witten term involving gauge fields and pNGB's. We give a general discussion of these interactions, some of which may have novel signatures at future colliders, such as the LHC and ILC.

  16. Check-Digit Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the study of identification codes and check-digit schemes as a way to show students a practical application of mathematics and introduce them to coding theory. Examples include postal service money orders, parcel tracking numbers, ISBN codes, bank identification numbers, and UPC codes. (MKR)

  17. Features of the Kaiser effect in coal specimens at different stages of the triaxial axisymmetric deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratnik, V.L.; Filimonov, Y.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.

    2007-01-15

    The experimental data are presented for the features of formation and manifestation of the acoustic-emission and deformation memory effects in specimens of anthracite at different stages of the triaxial cyclic deformation by the Karman scheme in the pre-limiting and post-limiting zones.

  18. Ratio method of measuring the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DO experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → enu fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → enu data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → enu data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/M Z). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → enu and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb--1 DO Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 +/- 43(stat) +/- 26(sys)MeV.

  19. High-order correlation of chaotic bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Chao

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the high-order correlation functions of chaotic bosons and fermions. Based on the different parity of the Stirling number, the products of the first-order correlation functions are well classified and employed to represent the high-order correlation function. The correlation of bosons conduces a bunching effect, which will be enhanced as order N increases. Different from bosons, the anticommutation relation of fermions leads to the parity of the Stirling number, which thereby results in a mixture of bunching and antibunching behaviors in high-order correlation. By further investigating third-order ghost diffraction and ghost imaging, the differences between the high-order correlations of bosons and fermions are discussed in detail. A larger N will dramatically improve the ghost image quality for bosons, but a good strategy should be carefully chosen for the fermionic ghost imaging process due to its complex correlation components.

  20. Leptophobic Boson Signals with Leptons, Jets and Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    2015-06-14

    Color-singlet gauge bosons with renormalizable couplings to quarks but not to leptons must interact with additional fermions (''anomalons'') required to cancel the gauge anomalies. Analyzing the decays of such leptophobic bosons into anomalons, I show that they produce final states involving leptons at the LHC. Resonant production of a flavor-universal leptophobic Z' boson leads to cascade decays via anomalons, whose signatures include a leptonically decaying Z, missing energy and several jets. A Z' boson that couples to the right-handed quarks of the first and second generations undergoes cascade decays that violate lepton universality and include signals with two leptons and jets, or with a Higgs boson, a lepton, a W and missing energy.

  1. Optimizing Cubature for Efficient Integration of Subspace Deformations

    PubMed Central

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Theodore; James, Doug L.

    2009-01-01

    We propose an efficient scheme for evaluating nonlinear subspace forces (and Jacobians) associated with subspace deformations. The core problem we address is efficient integration of the subspace force density over the 3D spatial domain. Similar to Gaussian quadrature schemes that efficiently integrate functions that lie in particular polynomial subspaces, we propose cubature schemes (multi-dimensional quadrature) optimized for efficient integration of force densities associated with particular subspace deformations, particular materials, and particular geometric domains. We support generic subspace deformation kinematics, and nonlinear hyperelastic materials. For an r-dimensional deformation subspace with O(r) cubature points, our method is able to evaluate subspace forces at O(r2) cost. We also describe composite cubature rules for runtime error estimation. Results are provided for various subspace deformation models, several hyperelastic materials (St.Venant-Kirchhoff, Mooney-Rivlin, Arruda-Boyce), and multimodal (graphics, haptics, sound) applications. We show dramatically better efficiency than traditional Monte Carlo integration. CR Categories: I.6.8 [Simulation and Modeling]: Types of Simulation—Animation, I.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling—Physically based modeling G.1.4 [Mathematics of Computing]: Numerical Analysis—Quadrature and Numerical Differentiation PMID:19956777

  2. Calcaneo-valgus deformity.

    PubMed

    Evans, D

    1975-08-01

    A discussion of the essential deformity in calcaneo-valgus feet develops a theme originally put forward in 1961 on the relapsed club foot (Evans 1961). Whereas in the normal foot the medial and lateral columns are about equal in length, in talipes equino-varus the lateral column is longer and in calcaneo-valgus shorter than the medial column. The suggestion is that in the treatment of both deformities the length of the columns be made equal. A method is described of treating calcaneo-valgus deformity by inserting cortical bone grafts taken from the tibia to elongate the anterior end of the calcaneus.

  3. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observedmore » Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.« less

  4. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  5. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes.

    PubMed

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Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Wilken, R; Asavapibhop, B; Srimanobhas, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Ozpineci, A; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Günaydin, Y O; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Meng, Z; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Ilic, J; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Dunne, P; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Guneratne Bryer, A; Hall, G; Hatherell, Z; Hays, J; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Marrouche, J; Mathias, B; Nandi, R; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sparrow, A; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardle, N; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Heister, A; Lawson, P; 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Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; D'Agnolo, R T; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Kovalskyi, D; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Danielson, T; Dishaw, A; Flowers, K; Franco Sevilla, M; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Magaña Villalba, R; Mccoll, N; Pavlunin, V; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Kcira, D; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Jang, D W; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chu, J; Eggert, N; Gibbons, L K; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Gray, J; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Oliveros, S; Perera, L; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; 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Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Duric, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Woods, N

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a [Formula: see text] quark pair. The searches use the 8 [Formula: see text] pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 [Formula: see text]. Certain channels include data from 7 [Formula: see text] collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 [Formula: see text]. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95 % confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  6. S-matrices and quantum group symmetry of k-deformed sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Miramontes, J. Luis; Schmidtt, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, two kinds of integrable deformations of the string world sheet theory in the gauge/gravity correspondence have been constructed (Delduc et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 051601; Hollowood et al 2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 495402). One class of these, the k deformations associated to the more general q deformations but with q={{{e}}}{{i}π /k} a root of unity, has been shown to be related to a particular discrete deformation of the principal chiral models and (semi-)symmetric space sigma models involving a gauged WZW model. We conjecture a form for the exact S-matrices of the bosonic integrable field theories of this type. The S-matrices imply that the theories have a hidden infinite dimensional affine quantum group symmetry. We provide some evidence, via quantum inverse scattering techniques, that the theories do indeed possess the finite-dimensional part of this quantum group symmetry.

  7. Real analytic solutions for marginal deformations in open superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    We construct analytic solutions for marginal deformations satisfying the reality condition in open superstring field theory formulated by Berkovits when operator products made of the marginal operator and the associated superconformal primary field are regular. Our strategy is based on the recent observation by Erler that the problem of finding solutions for marginal deformations in open superstring field theory can be reduced to a problem in the bosonic theory of finding a finite gauge parameter for a certain pure-gauge configuration labeled by the parameter of the marginal deformation. We find a gauge transformation generated by a real gauge parameter which infinitesimally changes the deformation parameter and construct a finite gauge parameter by its path-ordered exponential. The resulting solution satisfies the reality condition by construction.

  8. A measurement of the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Richard John

    1999-11-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass is presented using data taken by the ALEPH detector during the 1997 running of the Large Electron-Positron Collider II (LEPII) at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland. A high efficiency, high purity analysis which selects and reconstructs semi-leptonic W+W- final states (W +W- --> jjlν) is employed to define the sample. To improve the mass resolution of the detector, a constrained kinematic fit is developed to impose four- momentum conservation on each selected event. An unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the constrained two dimensional WW mass distribution is then constructed to extract the W pole mass. With 56.84 pb-1 of data taken by the ALEPH detector near a center of mass energy of s = 183 GeV, the W boson is measured to have a mass of MW=80.20+/-0.19( stat)+/-0.06 (syst)GeV consistent with predictions from the Standard Model.

  9. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo; Martone, Mario; Tuckler, Douglas

    2016-12-30

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  10. Nonequilibrium functional bosonization of quantum wire networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo Dinh, Stephane; Bagrets, Dmitry A.; Mirlin, Alexander D.

    2012-11-15

    We develop a general approach to nonequilibrium nanostructures formed by one-dimensional channels coupled by tunnel junctions and/or by impurity scattering. The formalism is based on nonequilibrium version of functional bosonization. A central role in this approach is played by the Keldysh action that has a form reminiscent of the theory of full counting statistics. To proceed with evaluation of physical observables, we assume the weak-tunneling regime and develop a real-time instanton method. A detailed exposition of the formalism is supplemented by two important applications: (i) tunneling into a biased Luttinger liquid with an impurity, and (ii) quantum Hall Fabry-Perot interferometry. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nonequilibrium functional bosonization framework for quantum wire networks is developed Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the study of observables in the weak tunneling regime a real-time instanton method is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We consider tunneling into a biased Luttinger liquid with an impurity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze electronic Fabry-Perot interferometers in the integer quantum Hall regime.

  11. Vector boson production in joint resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzani, Simone; Theeuwes, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    We study the transverse momentum ( Q T ) distribution of an electro-weak vector boson produced via the Drell-Yan mechanism, in the context of joint resummation. This formalism allows for the simultaneous resummation of logarithmic contributions that are enhanced at small Q T and at partonic threshold. We extend joint resummation to next-to-next-to leading logarithmic accuracy and we present resummed and matched results for three different phenomenological setups. In particular, we study the production of a Z boson at the Tevatron and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as well as the production of a heavier Z ' at the LHC. We compare our findings to standard Q T resummation, as well as to fixed-order perturbation theory. We find that joint resummation provides a moderate (but not flat) correction with respect to Q T resummation and it leads to a reduction of the scale dependence of the results. However, our study also shows some limitations of this formalism. While the use of joint resummation for Z production at the Tevatron and Z ' production at the LHC appears to be justified, our implementation suffers from a stronger dependence on power corrections for processes which are further away from threshold, such as Z production at the LHC, for which we cannot claim an improvement over standard Q T resummation.

  12. Top quark and neutrino composite Higgs bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Adam

    2013-08-01

    In the context of top-quark condensation models, the top quark alone is too light to saturate the correct value of the electroweak scale by its condensate. Within the seesaw scenario the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates can provide a significant contribution to the value of the electroweak scale. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry. It is mandatory to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that we design a reasonably simplified effective model with two composite Higgs doublets. Additionally, we work with a general number N of right-handed neutrino flavor triplets participating on the seesaw mechanism. There are no experimental constraints limiting this number. The upper limit is set by the model itself. Provided that the condensation scale is of order 1017-18 GeV and the number of right-handed neutrinos is , the model predicts masses of additional Higgs bosons below 250 GeV and a suppression of the top-quark Yukawa coupling to the 125 GeV particle at the ˜60 % level of the Standard model value.

  13. Composite gauge-bosons made of fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of Abelian and non-Abelian local gauge theories that consist only of matter fields of fermions. The Lagrangian is local and does not contain an auxiliary vector field nor a subsidiary condition on the matter fields. It does not involve an extra dimension nor supersymmetry. This Lagrangian can be extended to non-Abelian gauge symmetry only in the case of SU(2) doublet matter fields. We carry out an explicit diagrammatic computation in the leading 1 /N order to show that massless spin-one bound states appear with the correct gauge coupling. Our diagram calculation exposes the dynamical features that cannot be seen in the formal auxiliary vector-field method. For instance, it shows that the s -wave fermion-antifermion interaction in the 3S1 channel (ψ ¯ γμψ ) alone cannot form the bound gauge bosons; the fermion-antifermion pairs must couple to the d -wave state too. One feature common to our class of Lagrangian is that the Noether current does not exist. Therefore it evades possible conflict with the no-go theorem of Weinberg and Witten on the formation of the non-Abelian gauge bosons.

  14. Family gauge boson production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Yoshio; Yamanaka, Masato; Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Family gauge boson production at the LHC is investigated according to a U (3) family gauge model with twisted family number assignment. In the model we study, a family gauge boson with the lowest mass, A11, interacts only with the first generation leptons and the third generation quarks. (The family numbers are assigned, for example, as (e1 ,e2 ,e3) = (e- ,μ- ,τ-) and (d1 ,d2 ,d3) = (b , d , s) [or (d1 ,d2 ,d3) = (b , s , d)].) In the model, the family gauge coupling constant is fixed by relating to the electroweak gauge coupling constant. Thus measurements of production cross sections and branching ratios of A11 clearly confirm or rule out the model. We calculate the cross sections of inclusive A11 production and b b bar (t t bar) associated A11 production at √{ s} = 14 TeV and 100 TeV. With the dielectron production cross section, we discuss the determination of diagonalizing matrix of quark mass matrix, Uu and Ud, respectively.

  15. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; ...

    2016-12-30

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarksmore » can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.« less

  16. Search for a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Northeastern U.

    2007-04-01

    We describe a search for the standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 105 GeV/c{sup 2} to 145 GeV/c{sup 2} in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 450 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Higgs boson is required to be produced in association with a Z boson, and the Z boson is required to decay to either electrons or muons with the Higgs boson decaying to a b{bar b} pair. The data are well described by the expected background, leading to 95% confidence level cross section upper limits {sigma}p{bar p} {yields} ZH x B(H {yields} b{bar b}) in the range of 3.1 pb to 4.4 pb.

  17. Casing deformation in Ekofisk

    SciTech Connect

    Yudovich, A. ); Chin, L.Y. ); Morgan, D.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Casing deformation resulting from reservoir compaction occurred in the Ekofisk field operated by Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway and is a serious problem in three of the fields. This study established a relationship between reservoir compaction and casing failure by statistical analyses, finite-element modeling (FEM), and the analyses of deformed casing and logs run through collapsed casings. Ekofisk casing deformation is related primarily to the near well incremental strain, well inclination, and casing diameter. Useful correlations to estimate future probabilities of casing deformation as a function of reservoir variables and well parameters were also obtained. The authors concluded that casing failure induced by reservoir compaction can be minimized through a pressure-maintenance program to reduce strain by drilling with the highest practical angle and by using the largest possible casing in the well.

  18. Rock Deformation Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Harry

    The Third Rock Deformation Colloquium was held December 4, 1989, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Steve Kirby of the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif., reported on actions taken by the rock deformation steering committee. Brian Wernicke of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., talked on the structural geology of the Great Basin.The steering committee voted for “Committee on Deformation of Earth Materials” as the name for the AGU technical committee on rock deformation, Kirby said. Considerable discussion has occurred in the steering committee over our relationship to the AGU Mineral Physics Committee. Indeed, Kirby will become chairman of that committee in 1990, underlining the overlap of the two groups. It was agreed that we will pursue closer association with Mineral Physics.

  19. Wrist deformities after fracture.

    PubMed

    Vanheest, Ann

    2006-02-01

    Wrist deformities can occur after fracture because of malunion of the fracture or injury to the growth plate leading to imbalance of growth. Prevention of malunion is paramount by early recognition with proper reduction and casting or fixation with casting. If a mal-union occurs, an osteotomy may be necessary if anticipated growth will not correct the deformity. Injury of the growth plate may lead to wrist deformity in two ways: angular growth or growth arrest. Angular growth deformities are corrected most commonly by osteotomy. Growth arrest of the radius or the ulna leads to an ulnar-positive or an ulnar-negative variance at the wrist. If the ulnar variance is symptomatic, treatment is centered on achieving a level joint. Options for joint leveling procedures include epiphysiodesis or physeal stapling of the longer bone, lengthening osteotomy of the shorter bone, or shortening osteotomy of the longer bone.

  20. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  1. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  2. Deformations of superconformal theories

    DOE PAGES

    Córdova, Clay; Dumitrescu, Thomas T.; Intriligator, Kenneth

    2016-11-22

    Here, we classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d ≥ 3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and noncentral charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact thatmore » short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.« less

  3. Parent Hamiltonians for lattice Halperin states from free-boson conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenbroich, Anna; Tu, Hong-Hao

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a family of many-body quantum states that describe interacting spin one-half hard-core particles with bosonic or fermionic statistics on arbitrary one- and two-dimensional lattices. The wave functions at lattice filling fraction ν = 2 / (2 m + 1) are derived from deformations of the Wess-Zumino-Witten model su (3)1 and are related to the (m + 1 , m + 1 , m) Halperin fractional quantum Hall states. We derive long-range SU(2) invariant parent Hamiltonians for these states which in two dimensions are chiral t-J-V models with additional three-body interaction terms. In one dimension we obtain a generalisation to open chains of a periodic inverse-square t-J-V model proposed in [25]. We observe that the gapless low-energy spectrum of this model and its open-boundary generalisation can be described by rapidity sets with the same generalised Pauli exclusion principle. A two-component compactified free boson conformal field theory is identified as the low-energy effective theory for the periodic inverse-square t-J-V model.

  4. Hybridization schemes for clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    The concept of an optimum hybridization scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed hybridization pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster hybridization pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.

  5. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debojyoti; Constantinescu, Emil M.; Brown, Jed

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  6. Topological Properties of Ultracold Bosons in One-Dimensional Quasiperiodic Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Fuyuki; Tezuka, Masaki; Kawakami, Norio

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the topological properties of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with a quasiperiodic superlattice potential. This system can be realized in interacting ultracold bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of an incommensurate superlattice potential. We first analyze the quasiperiodic superlattice formed by the cosine function, which we call the Harper-like Bose-Hubbard model. We compute the Chern number and observe gap-closing behavior as the interaction strength U is changed. Also, we discuss the bulk-edge correspondence in our system. Furthermore, we explore the phase diagram as a function of U and a continuous deformation parameter β between the Harper-like model and another important quasiperiodic lattice, the Fibonacci model. We numerically confirm that the incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW) phase is topologically nontrivial and that it is topologically equivalent in the whole ICDW region.

  7. Bosonization Theorem and a Model of High-Tc Superconductor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hai-Cang

    1996-03-01

    For a purely fermionic system on a lattice, there exists a different, but well defined system on the same lattice, consisting both of bona fide fermions and bosons with an interaction depending on a parameter G characterizing on-site repulsion between particles(R. Friedberg, T. D. Lee and H. C. Ren, Phys. Rev. B50, 10190 (1994).). The energy spectrum and the scattering matrix of the former are identical to those in the finite-energy sector of the latter in the hard-core limit, G→∞. This theorem is particularly useful for the description of a fermionic system whose low-lying spectrum consists of bosonic resonances. We argue that the high-Tc superconductors belong to this category and the long-range order in the superphase can be identified with the condensation of resonance bosons. A short coherence length, results from μSR experiments, measurements of the Hall number and the anomalous behavior of H_c2 near T=0 can be understood in terms of this resonance-boson model(R. Friedberg, T. D. Lee and H. C. Ren, Phys. Rev. B42, 4122 (1990).). We have also examined the possibility of a bosonic d-wave resonance(O.Tchernyshyov, A.S.Blaer and H.Ren, in the current Proceedings.). In this case, the bosonization theorem predicts coexistence of an s-wave bosonic condensate and a d-wave gap parameter for fermions.

  8. Simulating generic spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems ("spins") to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. We present a general numerical framework for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of such models based on matrix product states. Our approach applies for generic spin-boson systems: it treats any spatial and operator dependence of the two-body spin-boson coupling and places no restrictions on relative energy scales. We show that the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and infidelity of quantum simulation due to spin-boson entanglement, both of which are difficult to obtain by other techniques, are readily calculable in our approach. We benchmark our method using a recently developed exact solution for a particular spin-boson coupling relevant to trapped ion quantum simulators. Finally, we show how decoherence can be incorporated within our framework using the method of quantum trajectories, and study the dynamics of an open-system spin-boson model with spatially nonuniform spin-boson coupling relevant for trapped atomic ion crystals in the presence of molecular ion impurities.

  9. Boson Stars with Vector Meson Exchange Repulsive Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitrah, M.; Rangga Sakti, Alfian; Sulaksono, Anto

    2016-08-01

    Spherically symmetric static boson stars are solutions of the system of equations of Klein-Gordon equation which is coupled to the Einstein and Proca equation with complex scalar field with U(1) gauge symmetry. In this work, we do not solve these equations directly but first we solve simultaneous equations Klein-Gordon and Proca in flat space-time numerically to obtain interacting boson equation of state (EOS), then we ”boost” the corresponding EOS to curved space-time so that, we can solve Einstein equations. If we assume that the distribution of boson in boson stars is inhomogeneous, the boosted EOS is anisotropic in the sense that the pressure to the tangential direction is not the same as the one in the radial direction. We find numerically solutions to see the EOS which are formed in boson stars as the consequence of inhomogeneous assumption. We have found that there is no physically stable solution for inhomogeneous EOS. However, if we assume that the distribution of bosons in matter is homogeneous, we can get a stable solution for static boson stars.

  10. Testing Anomalous Gauge Couplings of the Higgs Boson via Weak-Boson Scatterings at the Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Kuang, Yu-Ping; He, Hong-Jian; Yuan, C.-P.

    2005-04-01

    We propose a sensitive way to test the anomalous HVV couplings (V = W±, Z0) of the Higgs boson (H), which can arise from the dimension-6 effective operators in a linearly realized Higgs sector, via studying the VV scattering processes at the CERN LHC. The gold-plated pure leptonic decay modes of the final state weak bosons in the processes pp → VVjj are studied. We show that, with an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1 and sufficient kinematical cuts for suppressing the backgrounds, studying the process pp → W+W+jj → l+νl+νjj can probe the anomalous HWW couplings at the level of 0.01 - 0.08TeV-1 for the linearly realized effective Lagrangian.

  11. Complete Boson-Fermion Model of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Llano, Manuel

    2003-03-01

    The unification of the 1957 BCS theory with that of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) that gives roughly good first-principles transition temperature Tc predictions in either 2D or 3D for all of the ``Uemura plot'' ``exotic'' or conventional superconductors without abandoning the much-maligned phonon interaction mechanism has recently been achieved [1]-[3]. The same dynamical mechanism also allows for room-temperature superconductivity. The only condition is that one depart moderately from the perfect electron (e)-/hole (h)-Cooper-pair (CP) symmetry to which BCS (and indeed also the somewhat more general BCS-Bose crossover) theory are restricted by construction. It now becomes feasible to explain, among other things, why largely all superconductors empirically have substantially higher T_c's if their normal-state charge carriers are holes rather than electrons. A complete (in the sense that 2h-CPs are not ignored) boson-fermion model (CBFM) has been developed that reduces in the appropriate special cases to: a) ordinary BCS theory for weak boson-fermion coupling; b) the BCS-Bose ``crossover'' theory dating back to 1967; and, for no 2h-CPs to: c) the 1989 boson-fermion (BF) BEC model by T.D. Lee et al. of superconductors which without 2h-CPs is unrelated to BCS theory; d) an ideal BF binary-gas model [4] predicting nonzero BEC T_c's even in 2D; and finally to e) ordinary BEC (1925). The CBFM is a BF statistical model similar to those developed in the mid-50's by Schafroth, Blatt & Butler but which now includes 2h-CPs on an equal footing with 2e-CPs, and which unlike these models also contains the empirically well-established fermionic energy gap. [1] V.V. Tolmachev, Phys. Lett. A 266, 400 (2000). [2] M. Fortes, M.A. Solis, M. de Llano & V.V. Tolmachev, Physica C 364, 95 (2001). [3] M. de Llano & V.V. Tolmachev, Physica A 317, 546 (2003). [4] M. Casas, N.J. Davidson, M. de Llano, T.A. Mamedov, A. Puente, R.M. Quick, A. Rigo & M.A. Solis, Physica A 295, 146 (2001

  12. Higgs constraints from vector boson fusion and scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith

    2015-04-07

    We present results on 4-lepton + 2-jet production, the partonic processes most commonly described as vector boson pair production in the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) mode. That final state contains diagrams that are mediated by Higgs boson exchange. We focus particularly on the high-mass behaviour of the Higgs boson mediated diagrams, which unlike on-shell production, gives information about the Higgs couplings without assumptions on the Higgs boson total width. We assess the sensitivity of the high-mass region to Higgs coupling strengths, considering all vector boson pair channels, W - W +, W ± W ±, W ± Z and ZZ. Because of the small background, the most promising mode is W + W + which has sensitivity to Higgs couplings because of Higgs boson exchange in the t-channel. Furthermore, using the Caola-Melnikov (CM) method, the off-shell couplings can be interpreted as bounds on the Higgs boson total width. We estimate the bound that can be obtained with current data, as well as the bounds that could be obtained at √s=13 TeV in the VBF channel for data samples of 100 and 300 fb-1. The CM method has already been successfully applied in the gluon fusion (GGF) production channel. The VBF production channel gives important complementary information, because both production and decay of the Higgs boson occur already at tree graph level.

  13. Z-Boson Production in Association with a Jet at Next-To-Next-To-Leading Order in Perturbative QCD.

    PubMed

    Boughezal, Radja; Campbell, John; Ellis, R Keith; Focke, Christfried; Giele, Walter; Liu, Xiaohui; Petriello, Frank

    2016-04-15

    We present the first complete calculation of Z-boson production in association with a jet in hadronic collisions through next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. Our computation uses the recently proposed N-jettiness subtraction scheme to regulate the infrared divergences that appear in the real-emission contributions. We present phenomenological results for 13 TeV proton-proton collisions with fully realistic fiducial cuts on the final-state particles. The remaining theoretical uncertainties after the inclusion of our calculations are at the percent level, making the Z+jet channel ready for precision studies at the LHC run II.

  14. Z-boson production in association with a jet at next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Boughezal, Radja; Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; ...

    2016-04-14

    Here, we present the first complete calculation of Z-boson production in association with a jet in hadronic collisions through next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. Our computation uses the recently proposed N-jettiness subtraction scheme to regulate the infrared divergences that appear in the real-emission contributions. We present phenomenological results for 13 TeV proton-proton collisions with fully realistic fiducial cuts on the final-state particles. The remaining theoretical uncertainties after the inclusion of our calculations are at the percent level, making the Z+jet channel ready for precision studies at the LHC run II.

  15. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  16. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a W Boson at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-03-01

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson in proton-antiproton collisions (p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b}) at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The search employs data collected with the CDF II detector which correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb{sup -1}. We select events consistent with a signature of a single lepton (e{sup {+-}}/{mu}{sup {+-}}), missing transverse energy, and two jets. Jets corresponding to bottom quarks are identified with a secondary vertex tagging method and a neural network filter technique. The observed number of events and the dijet mass distributions are consistent with the standard model background expectations, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb for Higgs boson masses from 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  17. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-08-01

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson in proton-antiproton collisions (p pmacr →W±H→ℓνb bmacr ) at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The search employs data collected with the CDF II detector which correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1fb-1. We select events consistent with a signature of a single lepton (e±/μ±), missing transverse energy, and two jets. Jets corresponding to bottom quarks are identified with a secondary vertex tagging method and a neural network filter technique. The observed number of events and the dijet mass distributions are consistent with the standard model background expectations, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb for Higgs boson masses from 110 to 150GeV/c2, respectively.

  18. Search for Standard Model Higgs Bosons Produced in Association with W Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyria, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the results of a search for standard model Higgs bosons produced in association with W bosons from pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV. The search uses a data sample corresponding to approximately 1fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Events consistent with the W→ℓν and H→bb¯ signature are selected by triggering on a high-pT electron or muon candidate and tagging one or two of the jet candidates as having originated from b quarks. A neural network filter rejects a fraction of tagged charm and light-flavor jets, increasing the b-jet purity in the sample. We observe no excess ℓνbb¯ production beyond the background expectation, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction σ(pp¯→WH)Br(H→bb¯) ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb, for specific Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 to 150GeV/c2, respectively.

  19. Search for standard model Higgs bosons produced in association with W bosons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S; Group, R C

    2008-02-01

    We report on the results of a search for standard model Higgs bosons produced in association with W bosons from pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. The search uses a data sample corresponding to approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity. Events consistent with the W-->lnu and H-->bb[over] signature are selected by triggering on a high-p(T) electron or muon candidate and tagging one or two of the jet candidates as having originated from b quarks. A neural network filter rejects a fraction of tagged charm and light-flavor jets, increasing the b-jet purity in the sample. We observe no excess lnubb[over] production beyond the background expectation, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction sigma(pp[over]-->WH)Br(H-->bb[over]) ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb, for specific Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 to 150 GeV/c2, respectively.

  20. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2003-01-01

    A search for pair-produced doubly charged Higgs bosons has been performed using the data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. No excess is observed in the data with respect to the Standard Model background. A lower limit for the mass of 97.3 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level has been set for doubly charged Higgs bosons in left-right symmetric models for any value of the Yukawa coupling between the Higgs bosons and the /τ leptons.

  1. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-01-01

    A search for pair-produced doubly charged Higgs bosons has been performed using the data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. No excess is observed in the data with respect to the Standard Model background. A lower limit for the mass of 97.3 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level has been set for doubly charged Higgs bosons in left-right symmetric models for any value of the Yukawa coupling between the Higgs bosons and the τ leptons.

  2. Hunting the Elusive Higgs Boson and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance

    2007-12-11

    For over 40 years, physicists have been trying to track down a hypothetical particle called the Higgs boson. This particle could explain how known elementary particles like the electron can have mass, and also why one of the basic forces, the weak interaction, is in fact so incredibly weak. However, the Higgs boson has escaped detection so far, even at the most powerful particle accelerators. The next big chance to 'bag' this particle will come when the Large Hadron Collider turns on next year. Will the Higgs boson finally be found? Or will an unexpected explanation for these mysteries be revealed?

  3. Effects of Radion Mixing on the Standard Model Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-09-09

    We discuss how mixing between the Standard Model Higgs boson and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model can lead to significant shifts in the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we show that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than about 5% for most of the parameter space volume. Precision measurements of Higgs boson properties at at a Linear Collider are shown to probe a large region of the Randall-Sundrum model parameter space.

  4. Kinetic Monte Carlo approach to nonequilibrium bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, T. C. H.; Flayac, H.; Poletti, D.; Savenko, I. G.; Laussy, F. P.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the use of a kinetic Monte Carlo approach for the description of nonequilibrium bosonic systems, taking nonresonantly excited exciton-polariton condensates and bosonic cascade lasers as examples. In the former case, the considered approach allows the study of the cross-over between incoherent and coherent regimes, which represents the formation of a quasicondensate that forms purely from the action of energy relaxation processes rather than interactions between the condensing particles themselves. In the latter case, we show theoretically that a bosonic cascade can develop an output coherent state.

  5. MAPLE Procedures For Boson Fields System On Curved Space - Time

    SciTech Connect

    Murariu, Gabriel

    2007-04-23

    Systems of interacting boson fields are an important subject in the last years. From the problem of dark matter to boson stars' study, boson fields are involved. In the general configuration, it is considered a Klein-Gordon-Maxwell-Einstein fields system for a complex scalar field minimally coupled to a gravitational one. The necessity of studying a larger number of space-time configurations and the huge volume of computations for each particular situation are some reasons for building a MAPLE procedures set for this kind of systems.

  6. Search for charged Higgs Bosons at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2008-11-23

    In both Supersymmetry and in generic Two Higgs Doublet models (2HDM), the charged Higgs boson H{sup {+-}} exhibits a unique phenomenological signature. We report on a search for charged Higgs bosons, performed using 0.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp-bar collider with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV. No evidence for a charged Higgs boson is found and we set limits on its production cross section or the branching fraction.

  7. Higgs Bosons in the NMSSM and its U(1) Extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, John F.

    2008-11-23

    I specify the characteristics of a Higgs boson that would be 'ideal' in the light of current data and theoretical attractiveness. I then review why it is that the Higgs bosons of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model cannot be ideal whereas the lightest Higgs boson of the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Model can be ideal. Experimental consequences for Higgs and supersymmetry discovery are then reviewed. I then examine the alternatives to the NMSSM in which the MSSM is extended via an extra U(1) symmetry.

  8. Doubly Dressed Bosons: Exciton Polaritons in a Strong Terahertz Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietka, B.; Bobrovska, N.; Stephan, D.; Teich, M.; Król, M.; Winnerl, S.; Pashkin, A.; Mirek, R.; Lekenta, K.; Morier-Genoud, F.; Schneider, H.; Deveaud, B.; Helm, M.; Matuszewski, M.; Szczytko, J.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a novel quasiparticle, an exciton in a semiconductor doubly dressed with two photons of different wavelengths: a near infrared cavity photon and terahertz (THz) photon, with the THz coupling strength approaching the ultrastrong coupling regime. This quasiparticle is composed of three different bosons, being a mixture of a matter-light quasiparticle. Our observations are confirmed by a detailed theoretical analysis, treating quantum mechanically all three bosonic fields. The doubly dressed quasiparticles retain the bosonic nature of their constituents, but their internal quantum structure strongly depends on the intensity of the applied terahertz field.

  9. QCD corrections to jet correlations in weak boson fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figy, Terrance; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion is sensitive to the tensor structure of the HVV (V=W,Z) couplings, which distinguishes loop induced vertices from SM expectations. At the CERN large hadron collider this information shows up most clearly in the azimuthal angle correlations of the two forward and backward quark jets which are typical for weak boson fusion. We calculate the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, in the presence of anomalous HVV couplings. Gluon emission does not significantly change the azimuthal jet correlations.

  10. Constraining the scalar septet model through vector boson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Mary-Jean; Logan, Heather E.

    2017-05-01

    The scalar septet model extends the standard model Higgs sector by an isospin septet with hypercharge chosen to preserve ρ ≡MW2/MZ2cos2θW=1 . In this paper we constrain the model at high septet masses using perturbative unitarity of longitudinal vector boson scattering amplitudes. We also apply the constraints from LHC searches for doubly-charged Higgs bosons produced in vector boson fusion, which constrain the model at lower septet masses. We point out some important differences between the septet model and extended Higgs models that preserve custodial symmetry in the scalar spectrum.

  11. A Remark on the Ground State Energy of Bosonic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogreve, H.

    2011-08-01

    Monotonicity properties of the ground state energy of bosonic atoms as established in a recent paper by M.K.H. Kiessling [J. Stat. Phys. 139:1063 (2009)] are studied. Symmetry and scaling arguments lead to a more direct proof of a slightly stronger result of this monotonicity and the behavior of the ground state energy as a function of the number of bosonic electrons. Furthermore, invoking appropriate lower and upper bounds on two-electron systems, the stability of the bosonics He- ion is rigorously demonstrated.

  12. Measurements of vector bosons with charm and beauty at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Miriam; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Several recent results from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider are presented, using proton-proton collisions = 7 TeV. Measurements of W bosons in association with b-jets and single c-quark jets are presented, in addition to a new measurement of the production of b-jets in association with Z bosons. These measurements allow QCD predictions to be tested and also probe the parton density of the proton. The associated production of quarkonia and vector bosons is observed in the J/Ψ + W channel, and compared to colour singlet and colour octet production models.

  13. Tevatron searches for Higgs bosons beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-06-01

    Theoretical frameworks beyond the standard model predict a rich Higgs sector with multiple charged and neutral Higgs bosons. Both the CDF II and D0 experiments at the Tevatron have analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV in search of Higgs boson production. A complete suite of results on searches for neutral, charged, and fermiophobic Higgs bosons limit the allowed production rates and constrain extended models, including the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  14. Bosonization of fermions coupled to topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Moreno, Enrique F.; Schaposnik, Fidel A.

    2014-03-01

    We establish a duality between massive fermions coupled to topologically massive gravity (TMG) in d=3 space-time dimensions and a purely gravity theory which also will turn out to be a TMG theory but with different parameters: the original graviton mass in the TMG theory coupled to fermions picks up a contribution from fermion bosonization. We obtain explicit bosonization rules for the fermionic currents and for the energy-momentum tensor showing that the identifications do not depend explicitly on the parameters of the theory. These results are the gravitational analog of the results for 2+1 Abelian and non-Abelian bosonization in flat space-time.

  15. Threshold region for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion.

    PubMed

    Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2012-09-07

    We provide a quantitative determination of the effective partonic kinematics for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion in terms of the collider energy at the LHC. We use the result to assess, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, whether the large m(t) approximation is adequate and Sudakov resummation advantageous. We argue that our results hold to all perturbative orders. Based on our results, we conclude that the full inclusion of finite top mass corrections is likely to be important for accurate phenomenology for a light Higgs boson with m(H)~125 GeV at the LHC with √s=14 TeV.

  16. Solving moving interface problems using a higher order accurate finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, H. V. R.; Ray, Rajendra K.

    2017-07-01

    A new finite difference scheme is applied to solve partial differential equations in domains with discontinuities due to the presence of time dependent moving or deforming interfaces. This scheme is an extension of the finite difference idea developed for solving incompressible, steady stokes equations in discontinuous domains with fixed interfaces [1]. This new idea is applied at the irregular points at each time step in conjunction with the Crank-Nicolson (CN) implicit scheme and a recently developed Higher Order Compact (HOC) scheme at regular points. For validation, Stefan's problem is considered with a moving interface in one dimension. In two dimensions, heat equation is considered on a square domain with a circular interface whose radius is continuously changing with time. HOC scheme is found to produce better results and the order of accuracy is slightly better than that of the CN scheme. However, both the schemes show around second order accuracy and good agreement with the analytical solution.

  17. Neutrino phenomenology, dark energy and leptogenesis from pseudo-Nambu Goldstone bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. T.; Mocioiu, I.; Paschos, E. A.; Sarkar, U.

    2007-07-01

    We consider a model of dynamical neutrino masses via the see-saw mechanism. Nambu-Goldstone bosons (majorons) arise associated with the formation of the heavy right-handed Majorana masses. These bosons then acquire naturally soft masses (become pNGB's) at loop level via the Higgs-Yukawa mass terms. These models, like the original neutrino pNGB quintessence schemes of the 1980's [C.T. Hill, D.N. Schramm, J.N. Fry, Nucl. Part. Phys. 19 (1989) 25; J.A. Frieman, C.T. Hill, R. Watkins, Phys. Rev. D 46 (1992) 1226; A.K. Gupta, C.T. Hill, R. Holman, E.W. Kolb, Phys. Rev. D 45 (1992) 441; J.A. Frieman, C.T. Hill, A. Stebbins, I. Waga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1995) 2077, astro-ph/9505060] that proceed through the Dirac masses, are natural, have cosmological implications through mass varying neutrinos, long range forces, and provide a soft potential for dark energy. We further argue that these models can explain leptogenesis naturally through the decays of the right-handed neutrinos.

  18. Negative-quench-induced excitation dynamics for ultracold bosons in one-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistakidis, S. I.; Cao, L.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-03-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics following a quench of strongly repulsive bosonic ensembles in one-dimensional finite lattices is investigated by employing interaction quenches and/or a ramp of the lattice potential. Both sudden and time-dependent quenches are analyzed in detail. For the case of interaction quenches we address the transition from the strong repulsive to the weakly interacting regime, suppressing in this manner the heating of the system. The excitation modes such as the cradle process and the local breathing mode are examined via local density observables. In particular, the cradle mode is inherently related to the initial delocalization and, following a negative interaction quench, can be excited only for incommensurate setups with filling larger than unity. Alternatively, a negative quench of the lattice depth which favors the spatial delocalization is used to access the cradle mode for setups with filling smaller than unity. Our results shed light on possible schemes to control the cradle and the breathing modes. Finally, employing the notion of fidelity we study the dynamical response of the system after a diabatic or adiabatic parameter modulation for short and long evolution times. The evolution of the system is obtained numerically using the ab initio multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons, which permits us to follow nonequilibrium dynamics including the corresponding investigation of higher-band effects.

  19. Positive and negative quenches induced excitation dynamics for ultracold bosons in one-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Cao, Lushuai; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The correlated non-equilibrium dynamics of few-boson systems in one-dimensional finite lattices is investigated. Focusing on the low-lying modes of the finite lattice we observe the emergence of density-wave tunneling, breathing and cradle-like processes. In particular, the tunneling induced by the quench leads to a global density-wave oscillation. The resulting breathing and cradle modes are inherent to the local intrawell dynamics and related to excited-band states. Positive interaction quenches couple the density-wave and the cradle modes allowing for resonance phenomena. Moreover, the cradle mode is associated with the initial delocalization and following a negative interaction quench can be excited for setups with filling larger than unity. For subunit fillings it can be accessed with the aid of a negative quench of the lattice depth. Finally, our results shed light to possible controlling schemes for the cradle and the breathing modes. The evolution of the system is obtained numerically using the ab-initio multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons. (1)Hamburgisches Gesetz zur Förderung des wissenschaftlichen und künstlerischen Nachwuchses (HmbNFG), (2,3) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  20. Analytical and numerical study of trapped strongly correlated bosons in two- and three-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-15

    We study the ground-state properties of trapped inhomogeneous systems of hardcore bosons in two- and three-dimensional lattices. We obtain results both numerically, using quantum Monte Carlo techniques, and via several analytical approximation schemes, such as the Gutzwiller mean-field approach, a cluster mean-field method, and a spin-wave analysis which takes quantum fluctuations into account. We first study the homogeneous case, for which simple analytical expressions are obtained for all observables of interest, and compare the results with the numerical ones. We obtain the equation of state of the system along with other thermodynamic properties such as the free energy, kinetic energy, superfluid density, condensate density, and compressibility. In the presence of a trap, there is in general a spatial coexistence of superfluid and insulating domains. We show that the spin-wave-based method reproduces the quantum Monte Carlo results for global as well as for local quantities with a high degree of accuracy. We also discuss the validity of the local density approximation. Our analysis can be used to describe bosons in optical lattices where the onsite interaction U is much larger than the hopping amplitude t.

  1. The X(3872) boson: Molecule or charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2005-08-01

    It has been argued that the mystery boson X(3872) is a molecular state consisting of primarily D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} + {bar D}{sup 0}D*{sup 0}. In contrast, apparent puzzles and potential difficulties have been pointed out for the charmonium assignment of X(3872). They examine several aspects of these alternatives by semi-quantitative methods since quantitatively accurate results are often hard to reach on them. they point out that some of the observed properties of X(3872), in particular, the binding and the production rates are incompatible with the molecule interpretation. Despite puzzles and obstacles, X(3872) may fit more likely to the excited {sup 3}P{sub 1} charmonium than to the molecule after the mixing of c{bar c} with D{bar D}* + {bar D}D* is taken into account.

  2. Phase diagrams of bosonic ABn chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, G. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-04-01

    The A B N - 1 chain is a system that consists of repeating a unit cell with N sites where between the A and B sites there is an energy difference of λ. We considered bosons in these special lattices and took into account the kinetic energy, the local two-body interaction, and the inhomogenous local energy in the Hamiltonian. We found the charge density wave (CDW) and superfluid and Mott insulator phases, and constructed the phase diagram for N = 2 and 3 at the thermodynamic limit. The system exhibited insulator phases for densities ρ = α/ N, with α being an integer. We obtained that superfluid regions separate the insulator phases for densities larger than one. For any N value, we found that for integer densities ρ, the system exhibits ρ + 1 insulator phases, a Mott insulator phase, and ρ CDW phases. For non-integer densities larger than one, several CDW phases appear.

  3. Spectral dimension of bosonic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. G.; Satheeshkumar, V. H.

    2014-07-01

    Given that the scale of quantum gravity is not experimentally accessible, one naturally resorts to mathematical consistency as a measure for a good candidate theory to replace general relativity at high energies. Reproducing the semiclassical results of black hole entropy has become a standard test for any prospective theory of quantum gravity. It is often argued that another such commonality, albeit less known, is the similar fractal behavior. It is shown that many, if not all, approaches to quantum gravity predict a spectral dimension of 2 in ultraviolet regime. In this paper, by computing the heat kernel, we show that the spectral dimension of closed bosonic string theory is 26. We discuss the implications of this disparity.

  4. Intense slow beams of bosonic potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, J.; Maioli, P.; de Sarlo, L.; Minardi, F.; Inguscio, M.

    2006-03-01

    We report on an experimental realization of a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D-MOT) that allows the generation of cold atomic beams of K39 and K41 bosonic potassium isotopes. The high measured fluxes up to 1.0×1011atoms/s and low atomic velocities around 33m/s are well suited for a fast and reliable three-dimensional magneto-optical trap loading, a basilar feature for new generation experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation of dilute atomic samples. We also present a simple multilevel theoretical model for the calculation of the light-induced force acting on an atom moving in a MOT. The model gives a good agreement between predicted and measured flux and velocity values for our 2D-MOT.

  5. Droplets of Trapped Quantum Dipolar Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macia, A.; Sánchez-Baena, J.; Boronat, J.; Mazzanti, F.

    2016-11-01

    Strongly interacting systems of dipolar bosons in three dimensions confined by harmonic traps are analyzed using the exact path integral ground-state Monte Carlo method. By adding a repulsive two-body potential, we find a narrow window of interaction parameters leading to stable ground-state configurations of droplets in a crystalline arrangement. We find that this effect is entirely due to the interaction present in the Hamiltonian without resorting to additional stabilizing mechanisms or specific three-body forces. We analyze the number of droplets formed in terms of the Hamiltonian parameters, relate them to the corresponding s -wave scattering length, and discuss a simple scaling model for the density profiles. Our results are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments showing a quantum Rosensweig instability in trapped Dy atoms.

  6. Cold bosons in noisy optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Pichler, Hannes; Zoller, Peter; Daley, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices open the possibility to experimentally study strongly interacting many-body quantum systems with controllable parameters. A key challenge to prepare interesting quantum states in these systems is to achieve sufficiently low temperatures. At these temperatures a deep theoretical understanding of possible heating processes and how they affect the characteristics of the quantum state becomes essential. In every realistic experiment there exist many sources of noise that cause phase and amplitude fluctuations in the standing laser waves that form the optical lattice potential. This classical noise can lead to heating and a significant change of the quantum state. We study the stochastic many-body non-equilibrium dynamics of bosons in an optical lattice and determine how the state changes depending on the characteristics of the noise. We do this by solving time-dependent stochastic many-body Schr"odinger equations, both analytically and numerically.

  7. Melatonin: a "Higgs boson" in human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Dragojevic Dikic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Ana Mitrovic; Dikic, Srdjan; Jovanovic, Tomislav; Jurisic, Aleksandar; Dobrosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    As the Higgs boson could be a key to unlocking mysteries regarding our Universe, melatonin, a somewhat mysterious substance secreted by the pineal gland primarily at night, might be a crucial factor in regulating numerous processes in human reproduction. Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant which has an essential role in controlling several physiological reactions, as well as biological rhythms throughout human reproductive life. Melatonin, which is referred to as a hormone, but also as an autocoid, a chronobiotic, a hypnotic, an immunomodulator and a biological modifier, plays a crucial part in establishing homeostatic, neurohumoral balance and circadian rhythm in the body through synergic actions with other hormones and neuropeptides. This paper aims to analyze the effects of melatonin on the reproductive function, as well as to shed light on immunological and oncostatic properties of one of the most powerful hormones.

  8. Spherical parametrization of the Higgs boson candidate.

    PubMed

    Gainer, James S; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2013-07-26

    The latest results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider unequivocally confirm the existence of a resonance X with mass near 125 GeV which could be the Higgs boson of the standard model. Measuring the properties (quantum numbers and couplings) of this resonance is of paramount importance. Initial analyses by the LHC Collaborations disfavor specific alternative benchmark hypotheses, e.g., pure pseudoscalars or gravitons. However, this is just the first step in a long-term program of detailed measurements. We consider the most general set of operators in the decay channels X→ZZ, WW, Zγ, γγ, and derive the constraint implied by the measured rate. This allows us to provide a useful parametrization of the orthogonal independent Higgs coupling degrees of freedom as coordinates on a suitably defined sphere.

  9. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  10. Proxy-SU(3) symmetry in heavy deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Assimakis, I. E.; Minkov, N.; Martinou, Andriana; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Blaum, K.

    2017-06-01

    Background: Microscopic calculations of heavy nuclei face considerable difficulties due to the sizes of the matrices that need to be solved. Various approximation schemes have been invoked, for example by truncating the spaces, imposing seniority limits, or appealing to various symmetry schemes such as pseudo-SU(3). This paper proposes a new symmetry scheme also based on SU(3). This proxy-SU(3) can be applied to well-deformed nuclei, is simple to use, and can yield analytic predictions. Purpose: To present the new scheme and its microscopic motivation, and to test it using a Nilsson model calculation with the original shell model orbits and with the new proxy set. Method: We invoke an approximate, analytic, treatment of the Nilsson model, that allows the above vetting and yet is also transparent in understanding the approximations involved in the new proxy-SU(3). Results: It is found that the new scheme yields a Nilsson diagram for well-deformed nuclei that is very close to the original Nilsson diagram. The specific levels of approximation in the new scheme are also shown, for each major shell. Conclusions: The new proxy-SU(3) scheme is a good approximation to the full set of orbits in a major shell. Being able to replace a complex shell model calculation with a symmetry-based description now opens up the possibility to predict many properties of nuclei analytically and often in a parameter-free way. The new scheme works best for heavier nuclei, precisely where full microscopic calculations are most challenged. Some cases in which the new scheme can be used, often analytically, to make specific predictions, are shown in a subsequent paper.

  11. Massive momentum-subtraction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Peter; Del Debbio, Luigi; Khamseh, Ava

    2017-03-01

    A new renormalization scheme is defined for fermion bilinears in QCD at nonvanishing quark masses. This new scheme, denoted RI/mSMOM, preserves the benefits of the nonexceptional momenta introduced in the RI/SMOM scheme and allows a definition of renormalized composite fields away from the chiral limit. Some properties of the scheme are investigated by performing explicit one-loop computation in dimensional regularization.

  12. Electroweak Boson Production in Association with Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, Christfried Hermann

    The high energies involved in modern collider experiments lead to hadronic final states that are often boosted inside collimated jets and surrounded by soft radiation. Together with tracking and energy information from leptons and photons, these jets contain essential information about a collision event. A good theoretical understanding is vital for measurements within the Standard Model (SM) as well as for background modeling required for new physics searches. Often one is interested in hadronic final states with cuts on jets in order to reduce backgrounds. For example, by imposing a central jet veto pcut in H → WW → lnulnu one can greatly reduce contamination from tt¯ → WW bb¯. Imposing such a jet veto comes at the cost of introducing potentially large logarithms L = ln pcut/Q into the cross section (Q is the hard scale), since the cuts restrict the cancellation of soft and collinear divergences between real and virtual diagrams. There are at most two powers of L for each power of the strong coupling constant alphas and this can spoil the convergence of the perturbative series when alpha sL2 ˜ 1 . We resume these logarithmically enhanced terms to all orders within the framework of Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) in order to recover the convergence and obtain reliable predictions for several processes. Another focus of this dissertation is the application of SCET in fixed order predictions of electroweak boson production in association with an exclusive number of final state jets. We employ the N-jettiness event-shape TN to resolve the infrared singularity structure of QCD in the presence of N signal jets. This allows us to obtain the first complete next-to-next-to leading order predictions for W, Z and Higgs boson production in association with one jet.

  13. A new method to distinguish hadronically decaying boosted Z bosons from W bosons using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

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S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-04-28

    The distribution of particles inside hadronic jets produced in the decay of boosted W and Z bosons can be used to discriminate such jets from the continuum background. Given that a jet has been identified as likely resulting from the hadronic decay of a boosted W or Z boson, this paper presents a technique for further differentiating Z bosons from W bosons. The variables used are jet mass, jet charge, and a b-tagging discriminant. A likelihood tagger is constructed from these variables and tested in the simulation of W' → WZ for bosons in the transverse momentum range 200 GeV  < pT < 400 GeV in s= 8 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. For Z-boson tagging efficiencies of ϵZ = 90 , 50, and 10 % , one can achieve W + -boson tagging rejection factors (1 / ϵW+ ) of 1.7, 8.3 and 1000, respectively. It is not possible to measure these efficiencies in the data due to the lack of a pure sample of high pT , hadronically decaying Z bosons. However, the modelling of the tagger inputs for boosted W bosons is studied in data using a tt¯ -enriched sample of events in 20.3 fb - 1 of data at √s= 8 TeV. The inputs are well modelled within uncertainties, which builds confidence in the expected tagger performance.

  14. Strong correlations in bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, Dagim

    If there is a general theme to this thesis, it is the effects of strong correlations in both bosons and fermions. The bosonic system considered here consists of ultracold alkali atoms trapped by interfering lasers, so called optical lattices. Strong interactions, realized by increasing the depth of the lattice potential, or through the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances induce strong correlations amongst the atoms, rendering attempts to describe the systems in terms of single particle type physics unsuccessful. Of course strong correlations are not the exclusive domain of bosons, and also are not caused only by strong interactions. Other factors such as reduced dimensionality, in one-dimensional electron gases, or strong magnetic fields, in two-dimensional electron gases are known to induce strong correlations. In this thesis, we explore the manifestations of strong correlations in ultracold atoms in optical lattices and interacting electron gases. Optical lattices provide a near-perfect realization of lattice models, such as the bosonic Hubbard model (BHM) that have been formulated to study solid state systems. This follows from the absence of defects or impurities that usually plague real solid state systems. Another novel feature of optical lattices is the unprecedented control experimenters have in tuning the different lattice parameters, such as the lattice spacing and the intensity of the lasers. This control enables one to study the model Hamiltonians over a wide range of variables, such as the interaction strength between the atoms, thereby opening the door towards the observation of diverse and interesting phenomena. The BHM, and also its variants, predict various quantum phases, such as the strongly correlated Mott insulator (MI) phase that appears as a function of the parameter t/U, the ratio of the nearest neighbor hopping amplitude to the on-site interaction, which one varies experimentally over a wide range of values simply by switching the intensity

  15. Coherence of interacting bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with a large number of subbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygiel, B.; Patucha, K.; Zaleski, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the behavior of interacting ultracold bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with wide range of in-cell fluxes α =p /q . The problem is similar to the one of an electron moving in a tight-binding scheme in the magnetic field and becomes difficult to tackle for a growing number of magnetic subbands, q . To overcome this, we focus on the interplay of the width, shape, and number of the subbands on the formation of the coherent state of cold bosons. Using the quantum rotor approach, which goes beyond the mean-field approximation, we are able to pinpoint the elements of the band structure, which are the most significant in a proper theoretical description of the synthetic magnetic field in a bosonic lattice system. As a result, we propose a method of reconstruction of the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum by replacing the magnetic subbands with renormalized bands of a square lattice. This allows us to effectively investigate the properties of the studied system for a wide range of magnetic fluxes and their impact on the Mott-insulator-superfluid transition.

  16. ESCAP mobile training scheme.

    PubMed

    Yasas, F M

    1977-01-01

    In response to a United Nations resolution, the Mobile Training Scheme (MTS) was set up to provide training to the trainers of national cadres engaged in frontline and supervisory tasks in social welfare and rural development. The training is innovative in its being based on an analysis of field realities. The MTS team consisted of a leader, an expert on teaching methods and materials, and an expert on action research and evaluation. The country's trainers from different departments were sent to villages to work for a short period and to report their problems in fulfilling their roles. From these grass roots experiences, they made an analysis of the job, determining what knowledge, attitude and skills it required. Analysis of daily incidents and problems were used to produce indigenous teaching materials drawn from actual field practice. How to consider the problems encountered through government structures for policy making and decisions was also learned. Tasks of the students were to identify the skills needed for role performance by job analysis, daily diaries and project histories; to analyze the particular community by village profiles; to produce indigenous teaching materials; and to practice the role skills by actual role performance. The MTS scheme was tried in Nepal in 1974-75; 3 training programs trained 25 trainers and 51 frontline workers; indigenous teaching materials were created; technical papers written; and consultations were provided. In Afghanistan the scheme was used in 1975-76; 45 participants completed the training; seminars were held; and an ongoing Council was created. It is hoped that the training program will be expanded to other countries.

  17. Convering ARQ schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, B.; Hsieh, J.

    1985-04-01

    The parity check matrix of an (n, k, t) linear error-correcting code provides a unique mapping between binary vectors of length n, whose Hamming weight does not exceed t, and binary vectors of length (n-k) which are the syndrome obtained by multiplying the vector of length n by the parity check matrix. This enables the 'compression' of binary vectors having a limited Hamming weight. It is shown in the paper how this principle can be applied in ARQ schemes, where, upon detection of an error in a received message, further retransmitted messages can be made shorter from one retransmission to the next.

  18. New LNG process scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Foglietta, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    A new LNG cycle has been developed for base load liquefaction facilities. This new design offers a different technical and economical solution comparing in efficiency with the classical technologies. The new LNG scheme could offer attractive business opportunities to oil and gas companies that are trying to find paths to monetize gas sources more effectively; particularly for remote or offshore locations where smaller scale LNG facilities might be applicable. This design offers also an alternative route to classic LNG projects, as well as alternative fuel sources. Conceived to offer simplicity and access to industry standard equipment, This design is a hybrid result of combining a standard refrigeration system and turboexpander technology.

  19. Higgs boson production via vector-boson fusion at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Maltoni, Fabio; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Zaro, Marco

    2010-07-02

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order in the strong coupling for Higgs boson production via weak-boson fusion. Our results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses.

  20. Vortex lattice phases in bosonic ladders in the presence of gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie; Greschner, Sebastian; Kolley, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Vekua, Temo

    2016-05-01

    We study vortex lattices in the interacting Bose-Hubbard model defined on two- and three-leg ladder geometries in the presence of a homogeneous flux. Our work is motivated by recent experiments using laser assisted-tunneling in optical lattices and lattices in synthetic dimensions, which studied the regime of weak interactions. We focus on the effects arising from stronger interactions, in both the real space optical lattice and the synthetic dimension schemes. Based on extensive density matrix renormalization group simulations and a bosonization analysis, we show that vortex lattices form at certain commensurate vortex densities. We identify the parameter space in which they emerge, and study their properties. Very interestingly, an enlarged unit cell forms in the vortex lattice phases, which can lead to the reversal of the current circulation-direction in both geometries. We demonstrate this effect in weak coupling and at sufficiently low temperature, and show that it is significant for intermediate interactions.

  1. Exact results in a slave boson saddle point approach for a strongly correlated electron model

    SciTech Connect

    Fresard, Raymond; Kopp, Thilo

    2008-08-15

    We revisit the Kotliar-Ruckenstein (KR) slave boson saddle point evaluation for a two-site correlated electron model. As the model can be solved analytically, it is possible to compare the KR saddle point results with the exact many-particle levels. The considered two-site cluster mimics an infinite-U single-impurity Anderson model with a nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction: one site is strongly correlated with an infinite local Coulomb repulsion, which hybridizes with the second site, on which the local Coulomb repulsion vanishes. Making use of the flexibility of the representation, we introduce appropriate weight factors in the KR saddle point scheme. Ground-state and all excitation levels agree with the exact diagonalization results. Thermodynamics and correlation functions may be recovered in a suitably renormalized saddle point evaluation.

  2. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  3. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  4. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  5. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to unders