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Sample records for deformed shapes analysed

  1. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  2. Shape memory composite deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with some of the critical aspects regarding Shape Memory Composite (SMC) design: firstly some technological aspects concerning embedding technique and their efficiency secondarily the lack of useful numerical tools for this peculiar design. It has been taken into account as a possible application a deformable panel which is devoted to act as a substrate for a deformable mirror. The activity has been mainly focused to the study of embedding technologies, activation and authority. In detail it will be presented the "how to" manufacturing of some smart panels with embedded NiTiNol wires in order to show the technology developed for SMC structures. The first part of the work compares non conventional pull-out tests on wires embedded in composites laminates (real condition of application), with standard pull-out in pure epoxy resin blocks. Considering the numerical approach some different modeling techniques to be implemented in commercial codes (ABAQUS) have been investigated. The Turner's thermo-mechanical model has been adopted for the modeling of the benchmark: A spherical panel devoted to work as an active substrate for a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) deformable mirror has been considered as a significant technological demonstrator and possible future application (f=240mm, r.o.c.=1996mm).

  3. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  4. Deformable segmentation via sparse shape representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dewan, Maneesh; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2011-01-01

    Appearance and shape are two key elements exploited in medical image segmentation. However, in some medical image analysis tasks, appearance cues are weak/misleading due to disease/artifacts and often lead to erroneous segmentation. In this paper, a novel deformable model is proposed for robust segmentation in the presence of weak/misleading appearance cues. Owing to the less trustable appearance information, this method focuses on the effective shape modeling with two contributions. First, a shape composition method is designed to incorporate shape prior on-the-fly. Based on two sparsity observations, this method is robust to false appearance information and adaptive to statistically insignificant shape modes. Second, shape priors are modeled and used in a hierarchical fashion. More specifically, by using affinity propagation method, our deformable surface is divided into multiple partitions, on which local shape models are built independently. This scheme facilitates a more compact shape prior modeling and hence a more robust and efficient segmentation. Our deformable model is applied on two very diverse segmentation problems, liver segmentation in PET-CT images and rodent brain segmentation in MR images. Compared to state-of-art methods, our method achieves better performance in both studies. PMID:21995060

  5. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces, which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties.Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces

  6. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  7. Deformation and shape changes in 167W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. B.; Ma, H. L.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Q. M.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, G. S.; Wu, Y. H.; Hu, S. P.; Li, H. W.; Luo, L. P.; Zhong, J.; Zhu, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    Lifetime measurements of yrast levels in 167W were measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The differential decay-curve method was applied for a lifetime determination. Excited states of the nucleus 167W were populated by the reaction 142Nd (28Si, 3 n ) at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The energy spectra and measured transition quadrupole moments inferred from the lifetimes of 167W are compared with the predictions of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov calculations. The changes of deformations and shapes with increasing spin due to the γ -polarization effect of aligned particles are discussed. The signature inversion visible in the negative parity yrast band is explained to be related to the triaxial shapes.

  8. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  9. Characterization of vibrating shape of a bimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shin; Minowa, Yosuke; Hattori, Masayuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Hayano, Yutaka; Itoh, Megru; Saito, Yoshihiko; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori; Guyon, Olivier; Colley, Stephen; Dinkins, Matthew; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras

    2008-07-01

    Actual measurement of vibrating shape of a bimorph deformable mirror is presented to discuss the characteristics of resonance. Understanding the vibration properties of a bimorph deformable mirror is a key issue to overcome resonance problem, a major drawback of this type of deformable mirror, and to make full use of its advantages. Two-dimensional vibrating shape of the deformable mirror surface, not only at a point, is essential to figure out the resonance behavior. The results are informative for improvement of mechanical design or control software.

  10. Physics-based shape deformations for medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McInerney, Tim

    2003-05-01

    Powerful, flexible shape models of anatomical structures are required for robust, automatic analysis of medical images. In this paper we investigate a physics-based shape representation and deformation method in an effort to meet these requirements. Using a medial-based spring-mass mesh model, shape deformations are produced via the application of external forces or internal spring actuation. The range of deformations includes bulging, stretching, bending, and tapering at different locations, scales, and with varying amplitudes. Springs are actuated either by applying deformation operators or by activating statistical modes of variation obtained via a hierarchical regional principal component analysis. We demonstrate results on both synthetic data and on a spring-mass model of the corpus callosum, obtained from 2D mid-sagittal brain Magnetic Resonance (MR) Images.

  11. Folded isometric deformations and banana-shaped seedpod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Etienne

    2016-08-01

    Thin vegetal shells have recently been a significant source of inspiration for the design of smart materials and soft actuators. Herein is presented a novel analytical family of isometric deformations with a family of θ-folds crossing a family of parallel z-folds; it contains the isometric deformations of a banana-shaped surface inspired by a seedpod, which converts a vertical closing into either an horizontal closing or an opening depending on the location of the fold. Similarly to the seedpod, optimum shapes for opening ease are the most elongated ones.

  12. Designing electron spin textures and spin interferometers by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zu-Jian; Gentile, Paola; Ortix, Carmine; Cuoco, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spin orientation of an electron propagating in a one-dimensional nanostructure with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling can be manipulated on demand by changing the geometry of the nanosystem. Shape deformations that result in a nonuniform curvature give rise to complex three-dimensional spin textures in space. We employ the paradigmatic example of an elliptically deformed quantum ring to unveil the way to get an all-geometrical and all-electrical control of the spin orientation. The resulting spin textures exhibit a tunable topological character with windings around the radial and the out-of-plane directions. We show that these topologically nontrivial spin patterns affect the spin interference effect in the deformed ring, thereby resulting in different geometry-driven ballistic electronic transport behaviors. Our results establish a deep connection between electronic spin textures, spin transport, and the nanoscale shape of the system.

  13. Information Geometry for Landmark Shape Analysis: Unifying Shape Representation and Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Adrian M.; Rangarajan, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Shape matching plays a prominent role in the comparison of similar structures. We present a unifying framework for shape matching that uses mixture models to couple both the shape representation and deformation. The theoretical foundation is drawn from information geometry wherein information matrices are used to establish intrinsic distances between parametric densities. When a parameterized probability density function is used to represent a landmark-based shape, the modes of deformation are automatically established through the information matrix of the density. We first show that given two shapes parameterized by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs), the well-known Fisher information matrix of the mixture model is also a Riemannian metric (actually, the Fisher-Rao Riemannian metric) and can therefore be used for computing shape geodesics. The Fisher-Rao metric has the advantage of being an intrinsic metric and invariant to reparameterization. The geodesic—computed using this metric—establishes an intrinsic deformation between the shapes, thus unifying both shape representation and deformation. A fundamental drawback of the Fisher-Rao metric is that it is not available in closed form for the GMM. Consequently, shape comparisons are computationally very expensive. To address this, we develop a new Riemannian metric based on generalized ϕ-entropy measures. In sharp contrast to the Fisher-Rao metric, the new metric is available in closed form. Geodesic computations using the new metric are considerably more efficient. We validate the performance and discriminative capabilities of these new information geometry-based metrics by pairwise matching of corpus callosum shapes. We also study the deformations of fish shapes that have various topological properties. A comprehensive comparative analysis is also provided using other landmark-based distances, including the Hausdorff distance, the Procrustes metric, landmark-based diffeomorphisms, and the bending energies of the

  14. Experiments on a turbulent plume: shape analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, S.; Sumita, I.

    2009-12-01

    Turbulent plume which is characterized by a large Reynolds number (Re >> 1) and buoyancy, is ubiquitous in nature, an example of which is a volcanic plume. As the turbulent plume rises, it entrains the ambient fluid and grows in size. There have been many laboratory experiments on turbulent plumes, but only few attempts were made to characterize the shape of the evolving plume as a function of source parameters (initial velocity and buoyancy). Here we report the results of laboratory experiments on a turbulent plume, a simplified model of a volcanic plume, to study how the shape of the plume changes as a function of time. Water and aqueous solutions of condensed milk, NaCl and CsCl, colored with a fluorescent dye are injected downward through an orifice (ID 1 mm) into a water contained in an acrylic tank with a cross-section of 30cm ¥times 30cm and a height of 50cm. Plumes with a density difference of 0.00 < ¥Delta ¥rho < 8.00 ¥times 10^ 2 (¥mbox{kg m}^ {-3}) and Re in the range and 210 < Re < 2850, are generated. These experimental parameters (initial Re, buoyancy) were chosen so that they cover the range from inertia-driven to buoyancy-driven regime. We find that the plume shape changes with time as instability and entrainment proceeds. In the beginning it is finger-like, but with time, plume head and vortices develop, and finally it transforms into a cone-like self-similar shape. After transforming a "cone-like" shape, sometimes a "head" appears again. We devise new methods to quantitatively characterize these changes of shape. Here we use (1) the height of the centroid of the plume shape and (2) the deviation from the self-similar triangular shape. Using these methods, we defined 4 regimes as a function of time. We find that the onset times of the 4 regimes have a negative power-law relations on initial Re, which scale better than using onset heights. Importantly, we find that the buoyancy causes the regime transitions to become earlier. Our experiments

  15. Shape Function-Based Estimation of Deformation with Moving Cameras Attached to the Deforming Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, O.; Ranta, I.; Haggrén, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a novel method to measure 3-D deformation of a large metallic frame structure of a crane under loading from one to several images, when the cameras need to be attached to the self deforming body, the structure sways during loading, and the imaging geometry is not optimal due to physical limitations. The solution is based on modeling the deformation with adequate shape functions and taking into account that the cameras move depending on the frame deformation. It is shown that the deformation can be estimated even from a single image of targeted points if the 3-D coordinates of the points are known or have been measured before loading using multiple cameras or some other measuring technique. The precision of the method is evaluated to be 1 mm at best, corresponding to 1:11400 of the average distance to the target.

  16. Parametric Deformation of Discrete Geometry for Aerodynamic Shape Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, George R.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2012-01-01

    We present a versatile discrete geometry manipulation platform for aerospace vehicle shape optimization. The platform is based on the geometry kernel of an open-source modeling tool called Blender and offers access to four parametric deformation techniques: lattice, cage-based, skeletal, and direct manipulation. Custom deformation methods are implemented as plugins, and the kernel is controlled through a scripting interface. Surface sensitivities are provided to support gradient-based optimization. The platform architecture allows the use of geometry pipelines, where multiple modelers are used in sequence, enabling manipulation difficult or impossible to achieve with a constructive modeler or deformer alone. We implement an intuitive custom deformation method in which a set of surface points serve as the design variables and user-specified constraints are intrinsically satisfied. We test our geometry platform on several design examples using an aerodynamic design framework based on Cartesian grids. We examine inverse airfoil design and shape matching and perform lift-constrained drag minimization on an airfoil with thickness constraints. A transport wing-fuselage integration problem demonstrates the approach in 3D. In a final example, our platform is pipelined with a constructive modeler to parabolically sweep a wingtip while applying a 1-G loading deformation across the wingspan. This work is an important first step towards the larger goal of leveraging the investment of the graphics industry to improve the state-of-the-art in aerospace geometry tools.

  17. Inelastic stress analyses at finite deformation through complementary energy approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Reed, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is based upon a generalization of de Veubeke's (1972) complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and the resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and an initial value problem (for total stress and deformation). A discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem is followed by a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability, and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  18. Improving the Accuracy of Stamping Analyses Including Springback Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firat, Mehmet; Karadeniz, Erdal; Yenice, Mustafa; Kaya, Mesut

    2013-02-01

    An accurate prediction of sheet metal deformation including springback is one of the main issues in an efficient finite element (FE) simulation in automotive and stamping industries. Considering tooling design for newer class of high-strength steels, in particular, this requirement became an important aspect for springback compensation practices today. The sheet deformation modeling accounting Bauschinger effect is considered to be a key factor affecting the accuracy of FE simulations in this context. In this article, a rate-independent cyclic plasticity model is presented and implemented into LS-Dyna software for an accurate modeling of sheet metal deformation in stamping simulations. The proposed model uses Hill's orthotropic yield surface in the description of yield loci of planar and transversely anisotropic sheets. The strain-hardening behavior is calculated based on an additive backstress form of the nonlinear kinematic hardening rule. The proposed model is applied in stamping simulations of a dual-phase steel automotive part, and comparisons are presented in terms of part strain and thickness distributions calculated with isotropic plasticity and the proposed model. It is observed that both models produce similar plastic strain and thickness distributions; however, there appeared to be considerable differences in computed springback deformations. Part shapes computed with both plasticity models were evaluated with surface scanning of manufactured parts. A comparison of FE computed geometries with manufactured parts proved the improved performance of proposed model over isotropic plasticity for this particular stamping application.

  19. Reversing the critical Casimir force by shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Emig, Thorsten; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-04-01

    The exact critical Casimir force between periodically deformed boundaries of a 2D semi-infinite strip is obtained for conformally invariant classical systems. Only two parameters (conformal charge, dimension of a boundary changing operator), along with the solution of an electrostatic problem, determine the Casimir force, rendering the theory practically applicable to any shape. The attraction between any two mirror symmetric objects follows directly from our general result. The possibility of purely shape induced reversal of the force, as well as occurrence of stable equilibrium is demonstrated for certain conformally invariant models, including the tricritical Ising model.

  20. Smart structures for deformable mirrors actuated by shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    Deformable mirrors actuated by smart structures are promising devices for next generation astronomical instrumentation. Thermal activated Shape Memory Alloys are materials able to recover their original shape, after an external deformation, if heated above a characteristic temperature. If the recovery of the shape is completely or partially prevented by the presence of constraints, the material can generate recovery stress. Thanks to this feature, these materials can be positively exploited in Smart Structures if properly embedded into host materials. This paper will show the technological processes developed for an efficient use of SMA-based actuators embedded in smart structures tailored to astronomical instrumentation. In particular the analysis of the interface with the host material. Some possible modeling approaches to the actuators behavior will be addressed taking into account trade-offs between detailed analysis and overall performance prediction as a function of the computational time. We developed a combined Finite Element and Raytracing analysis devoted to a parametric performance predictions of a SMA based substrate applicable to deformable mirrors. We took in detail into account the possibility to change the focal length of the mirror keeping a satisfactory image quality. Finally a possible approach with some preliminary results for an efficient control system for the strongly non-linear SMA actuators will be presented.

  1. Statistical Shape Modeling of Proximal Femoral Shape Deformities in Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elaine F.; Farnsworth, Christine L.; Koziol, James A.; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The current understanding of morphological deformities of the hip such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD), and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is based on 2-dimensional metrics, primarily involving the femoral head, that only partially describe the complex skeletal morphology. Objective This study aimed to improve the 3-dimensional understanding of shape variations during normal growth, and in LCPD and SCFE, through statistical shape modeling. Design Thirty-two patients with asymptomatic, LCPD, and SCFE hips, determined from physical and radiographic examination, were scanned using 3-D CT at a voxel size of (0.5–0.9mm)2 in-plane and 0.63mm slice thickness. Statistical shape modeling was performed on segmented proximal femoral surfaces to determine modes of variation and shape variables quantifying 3-D shape. In addition, conventional variables were determined for all femora. Results Proximal femur shape was described by 8 modes of variation and corresponding shape variables. Statistical shape variables were distinct with age and revealed coordinated, growth-associated differences in neck length-to-width ratio, femoral head medialization, and trochanter protrusion. After size and age-based shape adjustment, diseased proximal femora were characterized by shape variables distinct from those of asymptomatic hips. The shape variables defined morphology in health and disease, and were correlated with certain conventional variables of shape, including neck-shaft angle, head diameter, and neck diameter. Conclusion 3-D quantitative analyses of proximal femoral bone shape during growth and in disease are useful for furthering the understanding of normal and abnormal shape deviations which affect cartilage biomechanics and risk of developing osteoarthritis. PMID:23274103

  2. Grain size and shape evolution of experimentally deformed sediments: the role of slip rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Sediment deformation within fault zones occurs with a broad spectrum of mechanisms which, in turn, depend on intrinsic material properties (porosity, grain size and shape, etc.) and external factors (burial depth, fluid pressure, stress configuration, etc.). Fieldworks and laboratory measurements conducted in the last years in sediments faulted at shallow depth showed that cataclasis and grain size reduction can occur very close to the Earth surface (<1-2 km), and that fault displacement is one of the parameters controlling the amount of grain size, shape, and microtextural modifications in fault cores. In this contribution, we present a new set of microstructural observations combined with grain size and shape distribution data obtained from quart-feldspatic loose sediments (mean grain diameter 0.2 mm) experimentally deformed at different slip rates from subseismic (0.01 mm/s, 0.1 mm/s, 1 mm/s, 1 cm/s, and 10 cm/s) to coseismic slip rates (1 m/s). The experiments were originally performed at sigma n=14 MPa, with the same amount of slip (1.3 m), to constrain the frictional properties of such sediments at shallow confining pressures (<1 km). After the experiments, the granular materials deformed in the 0.1-1 mm-thick slip zones were prepared for both grain size distribution analyses and microstructural and textural analyses in thin sections. Grain size distribution analyses were obtained with a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 particle size laser-diffraction analyser, whereas grain shape data (angularity) were obtained by using image analysis technique on selected SEM-photomicrographs. Microstructural observations were performed at different scales with a standard optical microscope and with a SEM. Results indicate that mean grain diameter progressively decreases with increasing slip rates up to ~20-30 m, and that granulometric curves systematically modify as well, shifting toward finer grain sizes. Obtained fractal dimensions (D) indicate that D increases from ~2.3 up

  3. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  4. Synthesis of dual-offset shaped reflectors for arbitrary aperture shapes using continuous domain deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, B. S.; Wolton, I. C.; Graham, R. K.

    1986-02-01

    The systematic synthesis of an optically shaped dual-offset reflector antenna with uniformly phased aperture and with source and aperture power distributions independently prescribed is reviewed. A recent paper showed that a method for dealing with circular apertures could be extended to noncircular apertures by the use of conformal mapping. The present paper describes an alternative method in which the aperture boundary is continuously deformed to the required shape. Examples show that systems with elliptical apertures of high axial ratios (e.g. 4:1) can be successfully designed. The problem of interpolating points on the reflector surfaces has been addressed using bicubic splines.

  5. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in the same manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminate plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling) analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  6. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  7. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  8. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  9. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Phillips, Flip; Cheeseman, Jacob R; Thomason, Kelsey E; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped "glaven") for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object's shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions-e.g., the participants' performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  10. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  11. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface) reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons. PMID:21284872

  12. SUN2 Overexpression Deforms Nuclear Shape and Inhibits HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Sonia; di Nunzio, Francesca; Kieffer, Camille; Porrot, Françoise; Opp, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    strains of HIV before nuclear entry. Mutation of the viral capsid protein yielded SUN2-resistant HIV. Additionally, the inhibition of HIV infection by SUN2 involves cyclophilin A, a protein that binds the HIV capsid and directs subsequent steps of infection. We also found that SUN2 overexpression substantially changes the shape of the cell's nucleus, resulting in many flower-like nuclei. Both HIV inhibition and deformation of nuclear shape required the domain of SUN2 that interacts with the nuclear lamina. Our results demonstrate that SUN2 interferes with HIV infection and highlight novel links between nuclear shape and viral infection. PMID:26865710

  13. Synthesizing average 3D anatomical shapes using deformable templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Johnson, Hans J.; Haller, John W.; Melloy, Jenny; Vannier, Michael W.; Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    1999-05-01

    A major task in diagnostic medicine is to determine whether or not an individual has a normal or abnormal anatomy by examining medical images such as MRI, CT, etc. Unfortunately, there are few quantitative measures that a physician can use to discriminate between normal and abnormal besides a couple of length, width, height, and volume measurements. In fact, there is no definition/picture of what normal anatomical structures--such as the brain-- look like let alone normal anatomical variation. The goal of this work is to synthesize average 3D anatomical shapes using deformable templates. We present a method for empirically estimating the average shape and variation of a set of 3D medical image data sets collected from a homogeneous population of topologically similar anatomies. Results are shown for synthesizing the average brain image volume from a set of six normal adults and synthesizing the average skull/head image volume from a set of five 3 - 4 month old infants with sagittal synostosis.

  14. Correlation between distribution and shape of VMS deposits and regional deformation patterns, Skellefte district, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Tobias E.; Skyttä, Pietari; Hermansson, Tobias; Allen, Rodney L.; Weihed, Pär

    2014-06-01

    The Skellefte district in northern Sweden is host to abundant volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits comprising pyritic, massive, semi-massive and disseminated Zn-Cu-Au ± Pb ores surrounded by disseminated pyrite and with or without stockwork mineralisation. The VMS deposits are associated with Palaeoproterozoic upper crustal extension (D1) that resulted in the development of normal faults and related transfer faults. The VMS ores formed as sub-seafloor replacement in both felsic volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks and partly as exhalative deposits within the uppermost part of the volcanic stratigraphy. Subsequently, the district was subjected to deformation (D2) during crustal shortening. Comparing the distribution of VMS deposits with the regional fault pattern reveals a close spatial relationship of VMS deposits to the faults that formed during crustal extension (D1) utilising the syn-extensional faults as fluid conduits. Analysing the shape and orientation of VMS ore bodies shows how their deformation pattern mimics those of the hosting structures and results from the overprinting D2 deformation. Furthermore, regional structural transitions are imitated in the deformation patterns of the ore bodies. Plotting the aspect ratios of VMS ore bodies and the comparison with undeformed equivalents in the Hokuroko district, Japan allow an estimation of apparent strain and show correlation with the D2 deformation intensity of the certain structural domains. A comparison of the size of VMS deposits with their location shows that the smallest deposits are not related to known high-strain zones and the largest deposits are associated with regional-scale high-strain zones. The comparison of distribution and size with the pattern of high-strain zones provides an important tool for regional-scale mineral exploration in the Skellefte district, whereas the analysis of ore body shape and orientation can aid near-mine exploration activities.

  15. Using statistical deformable models to reconstruct vocal tract shape from magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, M J M; Rua Ventura, S M; Freitas, D R S; Tavares, J M R S

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in speech production are complex and have thus been subject to growing attention by the scientific community. It has been demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful means in the understanding of the morphology of the vocal tract. Over the last few years, statistical deformable models have been successfully used to identify and characterize bones and organs in medical images and point distribution models (PDMs) have gained particular relevance. In this work, the suitability of these models has been studied to characterize and further reconstruct the shape of the vocal tract in the articulation of Portuguese European (EP) speech sounds, one of the most spoken languages worldwide, with the aid of MR images. Therefore, a PDM has been built from a set of MR images acquired during the artificially sustained articulation of 25 EP speech sounds. Following this, the capacity of this statistical model to characterize the shape deformation of the vocal tract during the production of sounds was analysed. Next, the model was used to reconstruct five EP oral vowels and the EP fricative consonants. As far as a study on speech production is concerned, this study is considered to be the first approach to characterize and reconstruct the vocal tract shape from MR images by using PDMs. In addition, the findings achieved permit one to conclude that this modelling technique compels an enhanced understanding of the dynamic speech events involved in sustained articulations based on MRI, which are of particular interest for speech rehabilitation and simulation. PMID:21138233

  16. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the GIII Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The displacement transfer functions (DTFs) were applied to the GIII swept wing for the deformed shape prediction. The calculated deformed shapes are very close to the correlated finite element results as well as the measured data. The convergence study showed that using 17 strain stations, the wing-tip displacement prediction error was 1.6 percent, and that there is no need to use a large number of strain stations for G-III wing shape predictions.

  17. Quantifying Shape Changes and Tissue Deformation in Leaf Development1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle; Remmler, Lauren; Girard-Bock, Camille

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of biological shapes has applications in many areas of biology, and tools exist to quantify organ shape and detect shape differences between species or among variants. However, such measurements do not provide any information about the mechanisms of shape generation. Quantitative data on growth patterns may provide insights into morphogenetic processes, but since growth is a complex process occurring in four dimensions, growth patterns alone cannot intuitively be linked to shape outcomes. Here, we present computational tools to quantify tissue deformation and surface shape changes over the course of leaf development, applied to the first leaf of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The results show that the overall leaf shape does not change notably during the developmental stages analyzed, yet there is a clear upward radial deformation of the leaf tissue in early time points. This deformation pattern may provide an explanation for how the Arabidopsis leaf maintains a relatively constant shape despite spatial heterogeneities in growth. These findings highlight the importance of quantifying tissue deformation when investigating the control of leaf shape. More generally, experimental mapping of deformation patterns may help us to better understand the link between growth and shape in organ development. PMID:24710066

  18. Further examination of prolate-shape dominance in nuclear deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Mottelson, Ben R.

    2009-03-15

    The observed almost complete dominance of prolate over oblate deformations in the ground states of deformed even-even nuclei is related to the splitting of high l''surface'' orbits in the Nilsson diagram: on the oblate side the occurrence of numerous strongly avoided crossings which reduce the fanning out of the low {lambda} orbits, while on the prolate side the same interactions increase the fanning out. It is further demonstrated that the prolate dominance is rather special for the restricted particle number of available nuclei and is not generic for finite systems with mean-field potentials resembling those in atomic nuclei.

  19. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory. PMID:27176410

  20. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  1. Fast Electronic Relaxation in Metal Clusters via Excitation of Coherent Shape Deformations: Slipping Through a Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly; Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Kresin, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    We introduce and describe a fast electronic relaxation channel which is particular to free metallic nanoclusters. This channel overcomes the possibility of a phonon bottleneck by invoking the essential role of cluster shape deformations. Such a deformation entails the appearance of coherent surface phonon excitations and enables internal conversion at the level crossing point, thus allowing large energy transfer from an excited electron to the ionic subsystem. As a result, one can show that (unlike usual multiphonon processes) the shape deformation channel is capable of producing short electronic relaxation times, much less than a picosecond. The calculations are in agreement with recent pump-probe photoelectron measurements of relaxation in Aln^- clusters.

  2. Crystallographic Fabrics, Grain Boundary Microstructure and Shape Preferred Orientation of Deformed Banded Iron Formations and their Significance for Deformation Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Graça, Leonardo; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Ferreira, Filippe

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of grain boundaries and shapes along with crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) are a key aspect of investigations of rock microstructures for their correlation with deformation mechanisms. Rapid developments have occurred in the studying rock microstructures due to recent improvements in analytical techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). EBSD technique allows quick automated microtextural characteritzation. The deformed banded iron formations (BIFs) occurring in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) province in Brazil have been studied extensively with EBSD. All studies have focused mainly in CPOs. The general agreement is that dislocation creep was the dominant process of deformation, for the strong c-axis fabric of hematite crystals. This idea is substantiated by viscoplastic self-consistent models for deformation of hematite. However there are limitations to analyzing natural CPOs alone, or those generated by deformation models. The strong c-axis fabric could be taken as equally powerful an evidence for other known deformation mechanisms. Some grain boundary types in BIFs of the QF are irregular and comprise equant grains in granoblastic texture (Figure 1a). CPOs for this kind are strong and consistent with a predominance of dislocation creep. Others are very regular and long parallel to basal planes of hematites forming large elongated crystals (lepidoblastic texture, Figure 1b). Such crystals are called specularite, and their formation has been previously attributed to dislocation creep. This is erroneous because of the high strains which would be required. Their shape must be due to anisotropic grain growth. Other types lie between the above end-textures. Both types of grain shape microstructures have the same core deformation mechanism. Describing their genetic differences is crucial, since specularite owe its shape to anisotropic grain growth. It is not possible yet to confirm that dislocation creep was the

  3. Crystallographic Fabrics, Grain Boundary Microstructure and Shape Preferred Orientation of Deformed Banded Iron Formations and their Significance for Deformation Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, C. F.; Lagoeiro, L. E., Sr.; Ferreira, F. O.; Graça, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of grain boundaries and shapes along with crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) are a key aspect of investigations of rock microstructures for their correlation with deformation mechanisms. Rapid developments have occurred in the studying rock microstructures due to recent improvements in analytical techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). EBSD technique allows quick automated microtextural characteritzation. The deformed banded iron formations (BIFs) occurring in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) province in Brazil have been studied extensively with EBSD. All studies have focused mainly in CPOs. The general agreement is that dislocation creep was the dominant process of deformation, for the strong c-axis fabric of hematite crystals. This idea is substantiated by viscoplastic self-consistent models for deformation of hematite. However there are limitations to analyzing natural CPOs alone, or those generated by deformation models. The strong c-axis fabric could be taken as equally powerful an evidence for other known deformation mechanisms. Some grain boundary types in BIFs of the QF are irregular and comprise equant grains in granoblastic texture (Figure 1a). CPOs for this kind are strong and consistent with a predominance of dislocation creep. Others are very regular and long parallel to basal planes of hematites forming large elongated crystals (lepidoblastic texture, Figure 1b). Such crystals are called specularite, and their formation has been previously attributed to dislocation creep. This is erroneous because of the high strains which would be required. Their shape must be due to anisotropic grain growth. Other types lie between the above end-textures. Both types of grain shape microstructures have the same core deformation mechanism. Describing their genetic differences is crucial, since specularite owe its shape to anisotropic grain growth. It is not possible yet to confirm that dislocation creep was the

  4. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  5. Curvilinear transformation of z-shaped upper lip scar by diamond-shaped excision in secondary cleft lip deformities: a photogrammetric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihwan; Jeong, Hoijoon; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyung; Son, Daegu

    2015-03-01

    Purpose : The visible Z-shaped upper lip scar that occurs after the Tennison and Randall triangular flap technique remains a cleft stigma. Herein, we present our curvilinear transformation technique for the Z-shaped upper lip scar by diamond-shaped excision and evaluate the results using photogrammetric analyses. Patients and Methods : From 1997 to 2006, 23 patients with secondary cleft lip deformity with the visible Z-shaped upper lip scar underwent correction with the technique. The scar was excised in the diamond shape above the muscle. After curvilinear closure, the elongated length of the upper lip was excised just below the nostril sill, as the measured Cupid's bow height discrepancy. The result was assessed by the authors' standardized photogrammetry technique. Results : There was a statistically significant decrease between the preoperative central limb of the Z-shaped scar and the width of the postoperative curvilinear upper lip scar. The pre- and postoperative Cupid's bow height differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions : The curvilinear transformation of the Z-shaped scar is an efficient procedure that provides (1) a significant decrease in the width of an upper lip scar to make it less conspicuous, (2) incorporation of the scar into the philtral column, (3) a biconcave natural philtral column shape in frontal view, and (4) formation of the natural concave philtral contour in profile view. PMID:25714266

  6. Curvilinear transformation of z-shaped upper lip scar by diamond-shaped excision in secondary cleft lip deformities: a photogrammetric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihwan; Jeong, Hoijoon; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyung; Son, Daegu

    2015-03-01

    Purpose : The visible Z-shaped upper lip scar that occurs after the Tennison and Randall triangular flap technique remains a cleft stigma. Herein, we present our curvilinear transformation technique for the Z-shaped upper lip scar by diamond-shaped excision and evaluate the results using photogrammetric analyses. Patients and Methods : From 1997 to 2006, 23 patients with secondary cleft lip deformity with the visible Z-shaped upper lip scar underwent correction with the technique. The scar was excised in the diamond shape above the muscle. After curvilinear closure, the elongated length of the upper lip was excised just below the nostril sill, as the measured Cupid's bow height discrepancy. The result was assessed by the authors' standardized photogrammetry technique. Results : There was a statistically significant decrease between the preoperative central limb of the Z-shaped scar and the width of the postoperative curvilinear upper lip scar. The pre- and postoperative Cupid's bow height differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions : The curvilinear transformation of the Z-shaped scar is an efficient procedure that provides (1) a significant decrease in the width of an upper lip scar to make it less conspicuous, (2) incorporation of the scar into the philtral column, (3) a biconcave natural philtral column shape in frontal view, and (4) formation of the natural concave philtral contour in profile view.

  7. Supine to upright lung mechanics: do changes in lung shape influence lung tissue deformation?

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho-Fung; Tawhai, Merryn H; Levin, David L; Bartholmai, Brian B; Clark, Alys R

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyze lung shape change between the upright and supine postures and the effect of this shape change on the deformation of lung tissue under gravity. We use supine computed tomography images along with upright tomosynthesis images obtained on the same day to show that there is significant diaphragmatic movement between postures. Using a continuum model of lung tissue deformation under gravity we show that the shape changes due to this diaphragmatic movement could result in different lung tissue expansion patterns between supine and upright lungs. This is an essential consideration when interpreting imaging data acquired in different postures or translating data acquired in supine imaging to upright function.

  8. Hydrostar Thermal and Structural Deformation Analyses of Antenna Array Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Hope, Drew J.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed Hydrostar mission used a large orbiting antenna array to demonstrate synthetic aperture technology in space while obtaining global soil moisture data. In order to produce accurate data, the array was required to remain as close as possible to its perfectly aligned placement while undergoing the mechanical and thermal stresses induced by orbital changes. Thermal and structural analyses for a design concept of this antenna array were performed. The thermal analysis included orbital radiation calculations, as well as parametric studies of orbit altitude, material properties and coating types. The thermal results included predicted thermal distributions over the array for several cases. The structural analysis provided thermally-driven deflections based on these cases, as well as based on a 1-g inertial load. In order to minimize the deflections of the array in orbit, the use of XN70, a carbon-reinforced polycyanate composite, was recommended.

  9. 3D Segmentation of Rodent Brain Structures Using Hierarchical Shape Priors and Deformable Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Uzunbas, Mustafa; Shen, Tian; Delis, Foteini; Huang, Xiaolei; Volkow, Nora; Thanos, Panayotis; Metaxas, Dimitris N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to segment multiple rodent brain structures simultaneously. This method combines deformable models and hierarchical shape priors within one framework. The deformation module employs both gradient and appearance information to generate image forces to deform the shape. The shape prior module uses Principal Component Analysis to hierarchically model the multiple structures at both global and local levels. At the global level, the statistics of relative positions among different structures are modeled. At the local level, the shape statistics within each structure is learned from training samples. Our segmentation method adaptively employs both priors to constrain the intermediate deformation result. This prior constraint improves the robustness of the model and benefits the segmentation accuracy. Another merit of our prior module is that the size of the training data can be small, because the shape prior module models each structure individually and combines them using global statistics. This scheme can preserve shape details better than directly applying PCA on all structures. We use this method to segment rodent brain structures, such as the cerebellum, the left and right striatum, and the left and right hippocampus. The experiments show that our method works effectively and this hierarchical prior improves the segmentation performance. PMID:22003750

  10. 3D segmentation of rodent brain structures using hierarchical shape priors and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Uzunbas, Mustafa; Shen, Tian; Delis, Foteini; Huang, Xiaolei; Volkow, Nora; Thanos, Panayotis; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to segment multiple rodent brain structures simultaneously. This method combines deformable models and hierarchical shape priors within one framework. The deformation module employs both gradient and appearance information to generate image forces to deform the shape. The shape prior module uses Principal Component Analysis to hierarchically model the multiple structures at both global and local levels. At the global level, the statistics of relative positions among different structures are modeled. At the local level, the shape statistics within each structure is learned from training samples. Our segmentation method adaptively employs both priors to constrain the intermediate deformation result. This prior constraint improves the robustness of the model and benefits the segmentation accuracy. Another merit of our prior module is that the size of the training data can be small, because the shape prior module models each structure individually and combines them using global statistics. This scheme can preserve shape details better than directly applying PCA on all structures. We use this method to segment rodent brain structures, such as the cerebellum, the left and right striatum, and the left and right hippocampus. The experiments show that our method works effectively and this hierarchical prior improves the segmentation performance. PMID:22003750

  11. Bas-Relief Generation and Shape Editing through Gradient-Based Mesh Deformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Qi; Li, Xue-Lin; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to bas-relief generation and shape editing that uses gradient-based mesh deformation as the theoretical foundation. Our approach differs from image-based methods in that it operates directly on the triangular mesh, and ensures that the mesh topology remains unchanged during geometric processing. By implicitly deforming the input mesh through gradient manipulation, our approach is applicable to both plane surface bas-relief generation and curved surface bas-relief generation. We propose a series of gradient-based algorithms, such as height field deformation, high slope optimization, fine detail preservation, curved surface flattening and relief mapping. Additionally, we present two types of shape editing tools that allow the user to interactively modify the bas-relief to exhibit a desired shape. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach is effective in producing plausible and impressive bas-reliefs. PMID:26357065

  12. Gravity effect on lymphocyte deformation through cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Hung, R J; Tsao, Y D; Spauling, G F

    1995-01-01

    The effects on human cells (lymphocyte) immersed in a culture liquid under microgravity environment has been investigated. The study was based on the numerical simulation of the Morphology of human cells affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(-3) to 2 g(o) (g(o) = 9.81 m/s2) in 15 s. Both the free floating cells and the cells which came into contact with the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration were considered in this study. The results show that, when the gravity acceleration increased, the cell morphology changed from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cells and the stationary cells on the lower inclined wall while the cell morphology varied from spherical to vertically-elongated ellipsoid for the cells hanging on the upper inclined wall. A test of the deformation of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, carried out in the KC-135 free fall aircraft, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results will be useful for study of the behavior and morphology of cells in space.

  13. Shape-correlated deformation statistics for respiratory motion prediction in 4D lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Oguz, Ipek; Pizer, Stephen M.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2010-02-01

    4D image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for free-breathing lungs is challenging due to the complicated respiratory dynamics. Effective modeling of respiratory motion is crucial to account for the motion affects on the dose to tumors. We propose a shape-correlated statistical model on dense image deformations for patient-specic respiratory motion estimation in 4D lung IGRT. Using the shape deformations of the high-contrast lungs as the surrogate, the statistical model trained from the planning CTs can be used to predict the image deformation during delivery verication time, with the assumption that the respiratory motion at both times are similar for the same patient. Dense image deformation fields obtained by diffeomorphic image registrations characterize the respiratory motion within one breathing cycle. A point-based particle optimization algorithm is used to obtain the shape models of lungs with group-wise surface correspondences. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is adopted in training to maximize the linear correlation between the shape variations of the lungs and the corresponding dense image deformations. Both intra- and inter-session CT studies are carried out on a small group of lung cancer patients and evaluated in terms of the tumor location accuracies. The results suggest potential applications using the proposed method.

  14. Lipid Membrane Deformation Accompanied by Disk-to-Ring Shape Transition of Cholesterol-Rich Domains.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Yoo, Daehan; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Jordan, Luke R; Lee, Sin-Doo; Parikh, Atul N; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-07-15

    During vesicle budding or endocytosis, biomembranes undergo a series of lipid- and protein-mediated deformations involving cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts. If lipid rafts of high bending rigidities become confined to the incipient curved membrane topology such as a bud-neck interface, they can be expected to reform as ring-shaped rafts. Here, we report on the observation of a disk-to-ring shape morpho-chemical transition of a model membrane in the absence of geometric constraints. The raft shape transition is triggered by lateral compositional heterogeneity and is accompanied by membrane deformation in the vertical direction, which is detected by height-sensitive fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. Our results suggest that a flat membrane can become curved simply by dynamic changes in local chemical composition and shape transformation of cholesterol-rich domains.

  15. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  16. Behavior of rigid and deformable particles in deterministic lateral displacement devices with different post shapes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zunmin; Henry, Ewan; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2015-12-28

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices have great potential for the separation and sorting of various suspended particles based on their size, shape, deformability, and other intrinsic properties. Currently, the basic idea for the separation mechanism is that the structure and geometry of DLDs uniquely determine the flow field, which in turn defines a critical particle size and the particle lateral displacement within a device. We employ numerical simulations using coarse-grained mesoscopic methods and two-dimensional models to elucidate the dynamics of both rigid spherical particles and deformable red blood cells (RBCs) in different DLD geometries. Several shapes of pillars, including circular, diamond, square, and triangular structures, and a few particle sizes are considered. The simulation results show that a critical particle size can be well defined for rigid spherical particles and depends on the details of the DLD structure and the corresponding flow field within the device. However, non-isotropic and deformable particles such as RBCs exhibit much more complex dynamics within a DLD device, which cannot properly be described by a single parameter such as the critical size. The dynamics and deformation of soft particles within a DLD device become also important, indicating that not only size sorting, but additional sorting targets (e.g., shape, deformability, internal viscosity) are possible. PMID:26723630

  17. Behavior of rigid and deformable particles in deterministic lateral displacement devices with different post shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zunmin; Henry, Ewan; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

    2015-12-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices have great potential for the separation and sorting of various suspended particles based on their size, shape, deformability, and other intrinsic properties. Currently, the basic idea for the separation mechanism is that the structure and geometry of DLDs uniquely determine the flow field, which in turn defines a critical particle size and the particle lateral displacement within a device. We employ numerical simulations using coarse-grained mesoscopic methods and two-dimensional models to elucidate the dynamics of both rigid spherical particles and deformable red blood cells (RBCs) in different DLD geometries. Several shapes of pillars, including circular, diamond, square, and triangular structures, and a few particle sizes are considered. The simulation results show that a critical particle size can be well defined for rigid spherical particles and depends on the details of the DLD structure and the corresponding flow field within the device. However, non-isotropic and deformable particles such as RBCs exhibit much more complex dynamics within a DLD device, which cannot properly be described by a single parameter such as the critical size. The dynamics and deformation of soft particles within a DLD device become also important, indicating that not only size sorting, but additional sorting targets (e.g., shape, deformability, internal viscosity) are possible.

  18. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  19. Shape Memory Effect in Cast Versus Deformation-Processed NiTiNb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Reginald F.; Lanba, Asheesh; Ozbulut, Osman E.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2015-06-01

    The shape memory effect (SME) response of a deformation-processed NiTiNb shape memory alloy is benchmarked against the response of a cast alloy. The insoluble Nb element ternary addition is known to widen the hysteresis with respect to the binary NiTi alloy. Cast microstructures naturally consist of a cellular arrangement of characteristic eutectic microconstituents surrounding primary matrix regions. Deformation processing typically aligns the microconstituents such that the microstructure resembles discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites. Processed alloys are typically characterized for heat-to-recover applications and thus deformed at constant temperature and subsequently heated for SME recovery, and the critical stress levels are expected to facilitate plastic deformation of the microconstituents. The current work employs thermal cycling under constant bias stresses below those critical levels. This comparative study of cast versus deformation-processed NiTiNb alloys contrasts the strain-temperature responses in terms of forward Δ T F = M s - M f and reverse Δ T R = A f - A s temperature intervals, the thermal hysteresis, and the recovery ratio. The results underscore that the deformation-processed microstructure inherently promotes irreversibility and differential forward and reverse transformation pathways.

  20. 3D Shape and Pose Estimaion of Deformable Tapes from Multiple Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hitoshi; Ono, Masakazu; Takeshi, Masami; Saito, Hideo

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate 3D shape of deformable plastic tapes from multiple camera images. In this method, the tape is modeled as serial connection of multiple rectangular plates, where the size of each plate is previously known and node angles of between plates represent the shape of the object. The node angles of the object are estimated by 2D silhouette shapes taken in the multiple images. The estimation is performed by minimizing the difference of the silhouette shapes between the input images and synthesized images of the model shape. For demonstrating the proposed method, 3D shape of a tape is estimated with two camera images. The accuracy of the estimation is sufficient for making the assembling robot in our plant to handle the tape. Computation time is also sufficiently short for applying the proposed algorithm in the assembling plant.

  1. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-01

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  2. Further Development of Ko Displacement Theory for Deformed Shape Predictions of Nonuniform Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2009-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory previously formulated for deformed shape predictions of nonuniform beam structures is further developed mathematically. The further-developed displacement equations are expressed explicitly in terms of geometrical parameters of the beam and bending strains at equally spaced strain-sensing stations along the multiplexed fiber-optic sensor line installed on the bottom surface of the beam. The bending strain data can then be input into the displacement equations for calculations of local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles for generating the overall deformed shapes of the nonuniform beam. The further-developed displacement theory can also be applied to the deformed shape predictions of nonuniform two-point supported beams, nonuniform panels, nonuniform aircraft wings and fuselages, and so forth. The high degree of accuracy of the further-developed displacement theory for nonuniform beams is validated by finite-element analysis of various nonuniform beam structures. Such structures include tapered tubular beams, depth-tapered unswept and swept wing boxes, width-tapered wing boxes, and double-tapered wing boxes, all under combined bending and torsional loads. The Ko displacement theory, combined with the fiber-optic strain-sensing system, provide a powerful tool for in-flight deformed shape monitoring of unmanned aerospace vehicles by ground-based pilots to maintain safe flights.

  3. A deformed shape monitoring model for building structures based on a 2D laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible.

  4. Medical image segmentation using minimal path deformable models with implicit shape priors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pingkun; Kassim, Ashraf A

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for segmentation of medical images by extracting organ contours, using minimal path deformable models incorporated with statistical shape priors. In our approach, boundaries of structures are considered as minimal paths, i.e., paths associated with the minimal energy, on weighted graphs. Starting from the theory of minimal path deformable models, an intelligent "worm" algorithm is proposed for segmentation, which is used to evaluate the paths and finally find the minimal path. Prior shape knowledge is incorporated into the segmentation process to achieve more robust segmentation. The shape priors are implicitly represented and the estimated shapes of the structures can be conveniently obtained. The worm evolves under the joint influence of the image features, its internal energy, and the shape priors. The contour of the structure is then extracted as the worm trail. The proposed segmentation framework overcomes the short-comings of existing deformable models and has been successfully applied to segmenting various medical images. PMID:17044401

  5. Automatic 3D Shape Severity Quantification and Localization for Deformational Plagiocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati; Shapiro, Linda G.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Speltz, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the occurrence of deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly in children. This increase has coincided with the “Back to Sleep” campaign that was introduced to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). However, there has yet to be an objective quantification of the degree of severity for these two conditions. Most diagnoses are done on subjective factors such as patient history and physician examination. The existence of an objective quantification would help research in areas of diagnosis and intervention measures, as well as provide a tool for finding correlation between the shape severity and cognitive outcome. This paper describes a new shape severity quantification and localization method for deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Our results show that there is a positive correlation between the new shape severity measure and the scores entered by a human expert. PMID:21103039

  6. Precision linear shaped charge analyses for severance of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) design concept involves the independent fabrication and assembly of the liner (wedge of PLSC), the tamper/confinement, and explosive. The liner is the most important part of a linear shaped charge (LSC) and should be fabricated by a more quality controlled, precise process than the tamper material. Also, this concept allows the liner material to be different from the tamper material. The explosive can be loaded between the liner and tamper as the last step in the assembly process rather than the first step as in conventional LSC designs. PLSC designs have been shown to produce increased jet penetrations in given targets, more reproducible jet penetration, and more efficient explosive cross-section geometries using a minimum amount of explosive. The Linear Explosive Shaped Charge Analysis (LESCA) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories has been used to assist in the design of PLSCs. LESCA predictions for PLSC jet tip velocities, jet-target impact angles, and jet penetration in aluminum and steel targets are compared to measured data. The advantages of PLSC over conventional LSC are presented. As an example problem, the LESCA code was used to analytically develop a conceptual design for a PLSC component to sever a three-inch thick 1018 steel plate at a water depth of 500 feet (15 atmospheres).

  7. Cumulative mechanical moments and microstructure deformation induced by growth shape in columnar solidification.

    PubMed

    Billia, Bernard; Bergeon, Nathalie; Thi, Henri Nguyen; Jamgotchian, Haïk; Gastaldi, Joseph; Grange, Gérard

    2004-09-17

    The dynamical interaction between columnar interface microstructure and self-stress, resulting in unforeseen mechanical deformation phenomena, is brought to light by means of in situ and real-time synchrotron x-ray topography during directional solidification of dilute aluminum alloys. Beyond long-known local mechanical stresses, global mechanical constraints are found to be active. In particular, column rotation results from deformation caused by the mechanical moments associated with the very growth shape, namely, the cumulative torque acting together with the cumulative bending moment under gravity. A basic model allowing for a qualitative explanation of the observed distinctive features of the self-stress effects on microstructure dynamics is proposed.

  8. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  9. Shape evolution and finite deformation pattern in analog experiments of lithosphere necking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Yago; Storti, Fabrizio; Bedogni, Enrico; Cavozzi, Cristian

    2013-10-01

    necking evolution determines the 3-D architecture of crustal and upper mantle thinning and related basins, and the heat flow distribution in rifted regions. Despite a large number of studies, lithosphere necking evolution is still a matter of debate. We present the result from lithospheric-scale analog models designed for investigating the necking shape during extension and the vertical distribution of finite deformation in the mechanical lithosphere. In our experiments, lithosphere necking is asymmetric and, in particular, the 3-D distribution of thinning is cylindrical in the crust and very heterogeneous in the mantle. Overall, the evolution of rifting and necking progresses from delocalized to localized deformation.

  10. Shape phase transition in odd-even nuclei: From spherical to deformed gamma-unstable shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2010-07-15

    Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. The case of a single j=9/2 fermion coupled to an even-even boson core is considered. This boson core transits from spherical to gamma-unstable shapes depending on the value of a control parameter in the boson Hamiltonian. The effect of the coupling of the odd particle to this core along the shape transition and, in particular, at the critical point is discussed. For that purpose, the ground-state energy surface in terms of the beta and gamma shape variables for the even core and odd-even energy surfaces for the different K states coming from j=9/2 are constructed. The evolution of each individual coupled state along the transition from the spherical [U(5)] to the gamma-unstable [O(6)] situation is investigated. One finds that the core-fermion coupling gives rise to a smoother transition than in the even-core case.

  11. Deformation of the UI-14at%Nb shape memory alloy: experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Robert D; Tome, Carlos N; Mc Cabe, Rodney J; Clarke, Amy J; Brown, Donald W; Tupper, Catherine N

    2010-12-22

    U-14at%Nb is a shape memory effect (SME) alloy that undergoes deformation by the motion of complex twins and twin related lath boundaries up to the limit of SME deformation ({approx}7%). All of the twins present in the as-transformed martensite and active during SME deformation are derived from those of the orthorhombic alpha-U phase, modified for the monoclinic distortion of the alpha martensite phase. In the SME regime a simple Bain strain model qualitatively predicts variant selection, texture development in polycrystalline samples, and stress-strain behavior as a function of parent phase orientation in single crystal micropillars. In the post-SME regime, unrecoverable deformation occurs by a combination of slip and twinning, with the first few percent of strain in tension apparently governed by a twin species specifically associated with the monoclinic distortion (i.e. not present in the orthorhombic alpha-U phase). The situation in compression is more complicated, with a combination of slip and twinning systems believed responsible for deformation. A review of the Bain strain model for SME deformation will be presented in conjunction with experimental data. In addition, results from modeling of post-SME behavior using the Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent (VPSC) model will be compared to experimental texture measurements.

  12. Computing Smooth Time Trajectories for Camera and Deformable Shape in Structure from Motion with Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Gotardo, Paulo F U; Martinez, Aleix M

    2011-10-01

    We address the classical computer vision problems of rigid and nonrigid structure from motion (SFM) with occlusion. We assume that the columns of the input observation matrix W describe smooth 2D point trajectories over time. We then derive a family of efficient methods that estimate the column space of W using compact parameterizations in the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain. Our methods tolerate high percentages of missing data and incorporate new models for the smooth time trajectories of 2D-points, affine and weak-perspective cameras, and 3D deformable shape. We solve a rigid SFM problem by estimating the smooth time trajectory of a single camera moving around the structure of interest. By considering a weak-perspective camera model from the outset, we directly compute euclidean 3D shape reconstructions without requiring postprocessing steps such as euclidean upgrade and bundle adjustment. Our results on real SFM data sets with high percentages of missing data compared positively to those in the literature. In nonrigid SFM, we propose a novel 3D shape trajectory approach that solves for the deformable structure as the smooth time trajectory of a single point in a linear shape space. A key result shows that, compared to state-of-the-art algorithms, our nonrigid SFM method can better model complex articulated deformation with higher frequency DCT components while still maintaining the low-rank factorization constraint. Finally, we also offer an approach for nonrigid SFM when W is presented with missing data. PMID:21383398

  13. Shape-model-based adaptation of 3D deformable meshes for segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, Vladimir; Kaus, Michael R.; Lorenz, Cristian; Lobregt, Steven; Truyen, Roel; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation methods based on adaptation of deformable models have found numerous applications in medical image analysis. Many efforts have been made in the recent years to improve their robustness and reliability. In particular, increasingly more methods use a priori information about the shape of the anatomical structure to be segmented. This reduces the risk of the model being attracted to false features in the image and, as a consequence, makes the need of close initialization, which remains the principal limitation of elastically deformable models, less crucial for the segmentation quality. In this paper, we present a novel segmentation approach which uses a 3D anatomical statistical shape model to initialize the adaptation process of a deformable model represented by a triangular mesh. As the first step, the anatomical shape model is parametrically fitted to the structure of interest in the image. The result of this global adaptation is used to initialize the local mesh refinement based on an energy minimization. We applied our approach to segment spine vertebrae in CT datasets. The segmentation quality was quantitatively assessed for 6 vertebrae, from 2 datasets, by computing the mean and maximum distance between the adapted mesh and a manually segmented reference shape. The results of the study show that the presented method is a promising approach for segmentation of complex anatomical structures in medical images.

  14. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  15. Analyses of characteristics of ring-shaped electrostatic meter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.Y.; Xu, D.L.; Coulthard, J.; Xu, C.L.; Wang, S.M.

    2010-07-01

    This article describes the characteristics of ring-shaped electrostatic pulverized fuel meters and their applications. At the University of Teesside, UK, the electrostatic technique has been used to measure pulverized fuel flow concentration, velocity, and mass flow rate under lean-phase condition. The mathematic model has been developed to express the relationship between the root-mean-square (rms) value of the meter's output voltage and solids mass flow rate. The effects of solids velocity and particle size on measurements have also been reflected in the model. Furthermore, the model presents the sensitivity variations over the cross-sectional area of meter and along the pipe axis. The article also introduces the research carried out at Southeast University in China, where the technique has been extended to measure dense-phase flow of pulverized coal, which is common in gasification and blast furnaces.

  16. Post-traumatic guitar-shaped deformity of the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, K; Akagi, H; Ogawa, T; Yuen, K; Masuda, Y

    1998-06-01

    We report a unique case of post-traumatic guitar-shaped deformity of the tympanic membrane in an 8-year-old boy. After a traffic accident, he exhibited bleeding from the ear, incomplete facial palsy and a conductive hearing loss on the left side. Although his symptoms gradually improved, the deformity of the tympanic membrane and external auditory canal persisted. The tympanic membrane appeared to be duplicated. Careful examination using an otoscope was required for accurate diagnosis. Without knowledge of the deformity, the physician could easily misinterpret the appearance of the tympanic membrane. Formation of cholesteatoma was not observed and the normal migration of the epithelium in the external auditory canal seemed to be maintained. However, we were concerned that tubal dysfunction could eventually induce the retraction and atrophy of the tympanic membrane to ultimately form a cholesteatoma. We therefore recommend patients such as this to be evaluated periodically because of the risk of tubal dysfunction and cholesteatoma.

  17. Critical point symmetry for the spherical to triaxially deformed shape phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Feng; Luo, Yan-An; Draayer, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The critical point T(5) symmetry for the spherical to triaxially deformed shape phase transition is introduced from the Bohr Hamiltonian by approximately separating variables at a given γ deformation with 0 ° ≤ γ ≤ 30 °. The resulting spectral and E2 properties have been investigated in detail. The results indicate that the original X(5) and Z(5) critical point symmetries can be naturally realized within the T(5) model in the γ = 0 ° and γ = 30 ° limit, respectively, which thus provides a dynamical connection between the two symmetries. Comparison of the theoretical calculations for 148Ce, 160Yb, 192Pt and 194Pt with the corresponding experimental data is also made, which indicates that, to some extent, possible asymmetric deformation may be involved in these transitional nuclei.

  18. Experimental analysis of shape deformation of evaporating droplet using Legendre polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Apratim; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments involving heating of liquid droplets which are acoustically levitated, reveal specific modes of oscillations. For a given radiation flux, certain fluid droplets undergo distortion leading to catastrophic bag type breakup. The voltage of the acoustic levitator has been kept constant to operate at a nominal acoustic pressure intensity, throughout the experiments. Thus the droplet shape instabilities are primarily a consequence of droplet heating through vapor pressure, surface tension and viscosity. A novel approach is used by employing Legendre polynomials for the mode shape approximation to describe the thermally induced instabilities. The two dominant Legendre modes essentially reflect (a) the droplet size reduction due to evaporation, and (b) the deformation around the equilibrium shape. Dissipation and inter-coupling of modal energy lead to stable droplet shape while accumulation of the same ultimately results in droplet breakup.

  19. Computer aided segmentation of kidneys using locally shape constrained deformable models on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdt, Marius; Sakas, Georgios

    2010-03-01

    This work presents a novel approach for model based segmentation of the kidney in images acquired by Computed Tomography (CT). The developed computer aided segmentation system is expected to support computer aided diagnosis and operation planning. We have developed a deformable model based approach based on local shape constraints that prevents the model from deforming into neighboring structures while allowing the global shape to adapt freely to the data. Those local constraints are derived from the anatomical structure of the kidney and the presence and appearance of neighboring organs. The adaptation process is guided by a rule-based deformation logic in order to improve the robustness of the segmentation in areas of diffuse organ boundaries. Our work flow consists of two steps: 1.) a user guided positioning and 2.) an automatic model adaptation using affine and free form deformation in order to robustly extract the kidney. In cases which show pronounced pathologies, the system also offers real time mesh editing tools for a quick refinement of the segmentation result. Evaluation results based on 30 clinical cases using CT data sets show an average dice correlation coefficient of 93% compared to the ground truth. The results are therefore in most cases comparable to manual delineation. Computation times of the automatic adaptation step are lower than 6 seconds which makes the proposed system suitable for an application in clinical practice.

  20. Shape memory effect associated with a deformation at a temperature just below A[sub S] in a Fe-Mn-Cr-Si-Ni shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Federzoni, L.; Guenin, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The shape memory effect of Fe-Mn based shape memory alloys is due to the formation of stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite by deformation and to its reversion by heating over A[sub f], which permit it to recover a part of the original shape. The shape memory effect is directly associated with the [gamma][yields][var epsilon] transformation. For this reason, the authors have established the best conditions to induce the [var epsilon]-martensite inside an austenitic matrix: the deformation must take place at a temperature close to the M[sub s]. It has been established that a deformation made at a higher temperature degrades the shape memory effect. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the shape memory effect in the case of a deformation applied at a relatively high temperature (just below A[sub s]) on samples containing a high volume fraction of [var epsilon]-martensite before the deformation. It is shown that an other mechanism of shape memory effect occurs in these conditions and allows to reach an interesting shape memory effect ([approximately]2%).

  1. Fatigue behaviour of Nitinol peripheral stents: the role of plaque shape studied with computational structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Elena; Meoli, Alessio; Wu, Wei; Dubini, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2014-07-01

    Fatigue resistance of Nitinol stents implanted into femoro-popliteal arteries is a critical issue for the particular biomechanical environment of this district. Hip and knee joint movements due to the cyclic daily activity expose the superficial femoral artery (SFA), and therefore the implanted stents, to quite large and cyclic deformations influencing stent fatigue resistance. Objective of this work is to provide a tool based on finite element analysis able to evaluate the biomechanical effect of SFA on stent fatigue resistance. Computer simulations of the treatment of stenotic vessel by angioplasty and stenting and of the subsequent in vivo loading conditions (axial compression and bending) were carried out. Three different stenotic vessel models were defined, by keeping a constant stenosis rate and changing the plaque sharpness and number of stenoses. The fatigue behaviour was analysed comparing the amplitude and mean value distribution of the first principal strain in the whole stent for the different simulated conditions. Results showed that the maximum mean strain is similar in all the models, while the alternating strain is related to both plaque shape and loading conditions. In conclusion, this study confirms the requisite of replicating in vivo loading conditions. It also reveals the importance of taking into account the thickness variation of the vessel in the stenotic zone in the assessment of the stent fatigue resistance.

  2. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  3. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  4. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject’s complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). Results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modeling is able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that results remain significant even if the number of

  5. Displacement Theories for In-Flight Deformed Shape Predictions of Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. L.; Tran, Van t.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement theories are developed for a variety of structures with the goal of providing real-time shape predictions for aerospace vehicles during flight. These theories are initially developed for a cantilever beam to predict the deformed shapes of the Helios flying wing. The main structural configuration of the Helios wing is a cantilever wing tubular spar subjected to bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The displacement equations that are formulated are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. Displacement theories for other structures, such as tapered cantilever beams, two-point supported beams, wing boxes, and plates also are developed. The accuracy of the displacement theories is successfully validated by finite-element analysis and classical beam theory using input-strains generated by finite-element analysis. The displacement equations and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) create a powerful means for in-flight deformation monitoring of aerospace structures. This method serves multiple purposes for structural shape sensing, loads monitoring, and structural health monitoring. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed to the ground-based pilot or used as input to the control system to actively control the shape of structures during flight.

  6. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  7. Elastodynamic shape modeler: a tool for defining the deformation behavior of virtual tissues.

    PubMed

    Radetzky, A; Nürnberger, A; Pretschner, D P

    2000-01-01

    A main goal of surgical simulators is the creation of virtual training environments for prospective surgeons. Thus, students can rehearse the various steps of surgical procedures on a computer system without any risk to the patient. One main condition for realistic training is the simulated interaction with virtual medical devices, such as endoscopic instruments. In particular, the virtual deformation and transection of tissues are important. For this application, a neuro-fuzzy model has been developed, which allows the description of the visual and haptic deformation behavior of the simulated tissue by means of expert knowledge in the form of medical terms. Pathologic conditions affecting the visual and haptic tissue response can be easily changed by a medical specialist without mathematical knowledge. By using the personal computer-based program Elastodynamic Shape Modeler, these conditions can be adjusted via a graphical user interface. With a force feedback device, which is similar to a real laparoscopic instrument, virtual deformations can be performed and the resulting haptic feedback can be felt. Thus, use of neuro-fuzzy technologies for the definition and calculation of virtual deformations seems applicable to the simulation of surgical interventions in virtual environments.

  8. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  9. Cluster Emission and Extremely Deformed Shapes in the N=Z Nucleus 44Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papka, P.; Beck, C.; Haas, F.; Rauch, V.; Rousseau, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; Eddahbi, K.; Robin, J.; Zafra, A. Sanchez I.; Stezowski, O.; Prevost, A.

    2003-04-01

    Highly excited and rapidly rotating compound nuclei (CN) produced in fusion-evaporation (FE) reactions can be well investigated by using charged particle spectroscopy. In such hot nuclei, with excitation energies as high as E*CN = 80 MeV, the spectral shapes of α particles provide information on the nuclear deformation. We report here on in-plane light charged particle (LCP) -- heavy-ion (HI) coincident measurements for the 16{O} + 28Si reaction. The experiment was carried out at three bombarding energies, Elab(16{O}) = 76, 96 and 112 MeV with the multidetector array ICARE at the VIVITRON Tandem facility. The Monte Carlo version of the statistical-model code CASCADE, which describes the FE process, has been used to characterize the 44Ti CN. A unique set of deformability parameters reproduces well the experimental α spectra to the three bombarding energies. The discrepancies observed for the proton spectra are still to be explained.

  10. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  11. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  12. Numerical and experimental analyses of the translation of bubbles due to non-spherical interface deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igualada-Villodre, Elena; Fuster, Daniel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Dutilleul, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    Bubbles developing strong interface deformations (e.g. jetting) experience a strong net force that influences significantly their translational motion. In this work, the translation of bubbles as a result of non-spherical interface deformations is studied both numerically and experimentally. The Gerris flow solver is used to solve for a simplified model of the oscillation of a gas bubble in an incompressible liquid. In particular, we solve for the 3D conservation equations in both phases in a system where the total volume changes in the gas are imposed. Assuming a uniform pressure within the bubble, the conservation equations inside the bubble can be rewritten as a function of the temporal evolution of the bubble's volume. Thus, using volume change rates experimentally measured, we identify different regimes in which the bubble deformation induces a net translation velocity significantly larger than the one obtained with models assuming spherical symmetry. We explore the effect of three parameters: Weber number, dimensionless intensity of the pressure wave and relative distance of the source of the non-spherical perturbation. We support the conclusions extracted from the numerical analyses with experimental measurements of the bubble translational velocity exposed to shock waves.

  13. Shape deformations of giant unilamellar vesicles with a laser tweezer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Poole, Cory; Bradford, Peter; English, Doug

    2004-10-01

    Vesicles are phospholipid bilayers that form a surface enclosing a volume of water or solution. They are of importance as model systems to study cells, as well as having practical applications such as containers for performing nanochemistry and facilitating drug delivery. Their properties have been studied for decades. Using a holographic laser tweezer array (LTA), which converts a single laser beam into many laser tweezer points, we stretch the vesicles in controlled ways from several points at once, measuring each force applied. Here, we present data on shape deformations of simple, spherical vesicles and on membrane fracture.

  14. A Coupled CFD/FEM Structural Analysis to Determine Deformed Shapes of the RSRM Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1996-01-01

    Recent trends towards an increase in the stiffness of the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) insulation material used in the construction of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) propellant inhibitors prompted questions about possible effects on RSRM performance. The specific objectives of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) task included: (1) the definition of pressure loads to calculate the deformed shape of stiffer inhibitors, (2) the calculation of higher port velocities over the inhibitors to determine shifts in the vortex shedding or edge tone frequencies, and (3) the quantification of higher slag impingement and collection rates on the inhibitors and in the submerged nose nozzle cavity.

  15. CPM: a deformable model for shape recovery and segmentation based on charged particles.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Wilkinson, Michael H F; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2004-10-01

    A novel, physically motivated deformable model for shape recovery and segmentation is presented. The model, referred to as the charged-particle model (CPM), is inspired by classical electrodynamics and is based on a simulation of charged particles moving in an electrostatic field. The charges are attracted towards the contours of the objects of interest by an electrostatic field, whose sources are computed based on the gradient-magnitude image. The electric field plays the same role as the potential forces in the snake model, while internal interactions are modeled by repulsive Coulomb forces. We demonstrate the flexibility and potential of the model in a wide variety of settings: shape recovery using manual initialization, automatic segmentation, and skeleton computation. We perform a comparative analysis of the proposed model with the active contour model and show that specific problems of the latter are surmounted by our model. The model is easily extendable to 3D and copes well with noisy images.

  16. Objective speckle displacement: an extended theory for the small deformation of shaped objects.

    PubMed

    Charrett, Thomas O H; Tatam, Ralph P

    2014-10-20

    This paper describes an extended and improved theory of the displacement of the objective speckle pattern resulting from displacement and/or deformation of a coherently illuminated diffuse object. Using the theory developed by Yamaguchi [Opt. Acta 28, 1359 (1981)], extended expressions are derived that include the influence of surface shape/gradients via the first order approximation of the shape as linear surface gradients. Both the original Yamaguchi expressions and the extended form derived here are shown experimentally to break down as the detector position moves away from the z-axis. As such, improved forms of the expressions are then presented, which remove some of the approximations used by Yamaguchi and can be used to predict the objective speckle displacement over a wide range of detector positions and surface slopes. Finally, these expressions are then verified experimentally for the speckle shifts resulting from object translations.

  17. Role of B19' martensite deformation in stabilizing two-way shape memory behavior in NiTi

    DOE PAGES

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Noebe, R. D.; Sisneros, T. A.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2012-11-01

    Deformation of a B19' martensitic, polycrystallineNi49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) shape memoryalloy and its influence on the magnitude and stability of the ensuing two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) was investigated by combined ex situ mechanical experimentation and in situneutron diffraction measurements at stress and temperature. The microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were captured and compared to the bulk macroscopic response of the alloy. With increasing uniaxial strain, it was observed that B19' martensite deformed by reorientation and detwinning with preferred selection of the (1¯50)M and (010)M variants, (201¯)B19' deformation twinning, and dislocationmore » activity. These mechanisms were indicated by changes in bulk texture from the neutron diffraction measurements. Partial reversibility of the reoriented variants and deformation twins was also captured upon load removal and thermal cycling, which after isothermal deformation to strains between 6% and 22% resulted in a strong TWSME. Consequently, TWSME functional parameters including TWSME strain, strain reduction, and transformation temperatures were characterized and it was found that prior martensite deformation to 14% strain provided the optimum condition for the TWSME, resulting in a stable two-way shape memory strain of 2.2%. Thus, isothermal deformation of martensite was found to be a quick and efficient method for creating a strong and stable TWSME in Ni₄₉.₉Ti₅₀.₁.« less

  18. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    PubMed

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured. PMID:26713197

  19. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    PubMed

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured.

  20. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology

    PubMed Central

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object’s macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured. PMID:26713197

  1. A multi-branch finite deformation constitutive model for a shape memory polymer based syntactic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianping; Sun, Huiyu; Fang, Changqing

    2015-02-01

    A multi-branch thermoviscoelastic-themoviscoplastic finite deformation constitutive model incorporated with structural and stress relaxation is developed for a thermally activated shape memory polymer (SMP) based syntactic foam. In this paper, the total mechanical deformation of the foam is divided into the components of the SMP and the elastic glass microballoons by using the mixture rule. The nonlinear Adam-Gibbs model is used to describe the structural relaxation of the SMP as the temperature crosses the glass transition temperature (Tg). Further, a multi-branch model combined with the modified Eying model of viscous flow is used to capture the multitude of relaxation processes of the SMP. The deformation of the glass microballoons could be split into elastic and inelastic components. In addition, the phenomenological evolution rule is implemented in order to further characterize the macroscopic post-yield strain softening behaviors of the syntactic foam. A comparison between the numerical simulation and the thermomechanical experiment shows an acceptable agreement. Moreover, a parametric study is conducted to examine the predictability of the model and to provide guidance for reasonable design of the syntactic foam.

  2. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001).

    PubMed

    Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule-surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C-C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes.

  3. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  4. Optical Analyses of Flow in and Transformation of Deformable Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Turkaya, Semih; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of fluid flow through transforming porous media and the simultaneous transformation of the porous media itself. The motivation is to investigate how fluid flow and deformation of the porous media influence each other, which are complex feedback processes. As a source of data, we have performed controlled experiments of air injection into deformable porous media samples created in the lab. The samples are transparent, horizontal and quasi 2-dimensional, enabling us to visually observe fluid flow through a slice of deformable porous media. The experiments are recorded from above with a digital high-speed camera, providing the raw-data as image sequences with high framerates (250 - 1000 images/s). Analyses on the fluid flow are based on the spatial properties of the observed flow patterns. The spatial properties are derived digitally after the raw-images are transformed into binary images of the flow patterns. Analyses on the transformation of the porous media are based on the frame-to-frame displacement fields of the particles. Such displacement fields are obtained by evaluating a sequence of raw images with a Particle Image Velocimetry software. We aim to show connections between flow observations and porous media observations. Two different kinds of experiments are analyzed. The first is two-phase flow in deformable porous media, and the other is aerofracturing in dry, fine-grained granular packings. The samples for the two-phase flow experiments are created in a circular Hele-Shaw cell with the inlet in the center and the outlet along its rim. Inside the cell, glass beads form a monolayer of deformable porous media saturated with a viscous glycerol-water solution. During an experiment, air is injected into the center of the sample with a constant overpressure, which will force the air to drain the sample radially outwards. This two-phase flow is an unstable event creating fingering patterns of air, while at the same time

  5. Shape deformation of lipid membranes by banana-shaped protein rods: Comparison with isotropic inclusions and membrane rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The assembly of curved protein rods on fluid membranes is studied using implicit-solvent meshless membrane simulations. As the rod curvature increases, the rods on a membrane tube assemble along the azimuthal direction first and subsequently along the longitudinal direction. Here, we show that both transition curvatures decrease with increasing rod stiffness. For comparison, curvature-inducing isotropic inclusions are also simulated. When the isotropic inclusions have the same bending rigidity as the other membrane regions, the inclusions are uniformly distributed on the membrane tubes and vesicles even for large spontaneous curvature of the inclusions. However, the isotropic inclusions with much larger bending rigidity induce shape deformation and are concentrated on the region of a preferred curvature. For high rod density, high rod stiffness, and/or low line tension of the membrane edge, the rod assembly induces vesicle rupture, resulting in the formation of a high-genus vesicle. A gradual change in the curvature suppresses this rupture. Hence, large stress, compared to the edge tension, induced by the rod assembly is the key factor determining rupture. For rod curvature with the opposite sign to the vesicle curvature, membrane rupture induces inversion of the membrane, leading to division into multiple vesicles as well as formation of a high-genus vesicle.

  6. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Krempl, E.

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  7. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  8. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets. PMID:27026290

  9. Fast electronic relaxation in metal nanoclusters via excitation of coherent shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly V.; Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-phonon relaxation in size-quantized systems may become inhibited when the spacing of discrete electron energy levels exceeds the magnitude of the phonon frequency. We show, however, that nanoclusters can support a fast nonradiative relaxation channel which derives from their distinctive ability to undergo Jahn-Teller shape deformations. Such a deformation represents a collective and coherent vibrational excitation and enables electronic transitions to occur without a multiphonon bottleneck. We analyze this mechanism for a metal cluster within the analytical framework of a three-dimensional potential well undergoing a spheroidal distortion. An expression for the time evolution of the distortion parameter is derived, the electronic level crossing condition formulated, and the probability of electronic transition at a level crossing is evaluated. An application to electron-hole recombination in a closed-shell aluminum cluster with 40 electrons shows that the short (˜250fs) excitation lifetime observed in recent pump-probe experiments can be explained by the proposed mechanism.

  10. Shaped silicon wafers obtained by hot plastic deformation: performance evaluation for future astronomical x-ray telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Shirata, Takayuki; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Morishita, Kohei; Nakajima, Kazuo

    2009-07-01

    In order to develop lightweight and high angular resolution x-ray mirrors, we have investigated hot plastic deformation of 4 in. silicon (111) wafers. A sample wafer was deformed using hemispherical dies with a curvature radius of 1000 mm. The measured radius of the deformed wafer was 1030 mm, suggesting that further conditioning is indispensable for better shaping. For the first time to our knowledge, x-ray reflection on a deformed wafer was detected at Al K{alpha} 1.49 keV. An estimated surface roughness of <1 nm from the x-ray reflection profile was comparable to that of a bare silicon wafer without deformation. Hence, no significant degradation of the microroughness was seen.

  11. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Quantum oscillator and Kepler-Coulomb problems in curved spaces: Deformed shape invariance, point canonical transformations, and rational extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesne, C.

    2016-10-01

    The quantum oscillator and Kepler-Coulomb problems in d-dimensional spaces with constant curvature are analyzed from several viewpoints. In a deformed supersymmetric framework, the corresponding nonlinear potentials are shown to exhibit a deformed shape invariance property. By using the point canonical transformation method, the two deformed Schrödinger equations are mapped onto conventional ones corresponding to some shape-invariant potentials, whose rational extensions are well known. The inverse point canonical transformations then provide some rational extensions of the oscillator and Kepler-Coulomb potentials in curved space. The oscillator on the sphere and the Kepler-Coulomb potential in a hyperbolic space are studied in detail and their extensions are proved to be consistent with already known ones in Euclidean space. The partnership between nonextended and extended potentials is interpreted in a deformed supersymmetric framework. Those extended potentials that are isospectral to some nonextended ones are shown to display deformed shape invariance, which in the Kepler-Coulomb case is enlarged by also translating the degree of the polynomial arising in the rational part denominator.

  13. Applications of Ko Displacement Theory to the Deformed Shape Predictions of the Doubly-Tapered Ikhana Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. Lance; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2009-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory, formulated for weak nonuniform (slowly changing cross sections) cantilever beams, was applied to the deformed shape analysis of the doubly-tapered wings of the Ikhana unmanned aircraft. The two-line strain-sensing system (along the wingspan) was used for sensing the bending strains needed for the wing-deformed shapes (deflections and cross-sectional twist) analysis. The deflection equation for each strain-sensing line was expressed in terms of the bending strains evaluated at multiple numbers of strain-sensing stations equally spaced along the strain-sensing line. For the preflight shape analysis of the Ikhana wing, the strain data needed for input to the displacement equations for the shape analysis were obtained from the nodal-stress output of the finite-element analysis. The wing deflections and cross-sectional twist angles calculated from the displacement equations were then compared with those computed from the finite-element computer program. The Ko displacement theory formulated for weak nonlinear cantilever beams was found to be highly accurate in the deformed shape predictions of the doubly-tapered Ikhana wing.

  14. Local shape similarity and mean-shift curvature for deformable surface mapping of anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, Pietro; Manzotti, Alfonso; Vanzulli, Angelo; Baroni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a novel method for deformable registration of digital anatomical surfaces. The method capitalizes upon the iterative local affine iterative closest point (ICP) approach that applies an affine transformation per surface vertex along with a regularization constraint to force neighboring surface vertices to undergo similar transformations. More robust vertex correspondence with respect to simple closest point was obtained by exploiting local shape similarity metrics, which includes vertex distance, surface normal, and local curvature. The local curvature was mean shifted at run-time, during the iterative optimization, to make the point correspondence process less dependent upon the surface noise and resolution. The experimental validation was performed on three surface datasets (femur, hemi-pelvic bone, and liver). The registration results showed that the proposed method outperforms, across all the three surface datasets (rmse: 0.19 mm, 0.30 mm, 0.61 mm), global affine ICP (rmse: 2.89 mm, 3.95 mm, and 8.30 mm), local affine ICP (rmse: 0.31 mm, 1.61 mm, and 1.63 mm) and coherent point drift (rmse: 1.99 mm, 2.39 mm, and 4.78 mm) methods. As a whole, the mean-shifted curvature increased the registration accuracy by about 20%. PMID:23912461

  15. Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yu, Cun; Liu, Weilong; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ren, Yang; Cui, Lishan

    2015-08-18

    An in-situ nanowire Nb/TiNiCu composite is fabricated based on the concept of strain under-matching between a phase transforming matrix and high strength nanomaterials. The deformation behavior of the Nb nanowire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction when the TiNiCu matrix underwent different deformation modes. The maximum lattice strain of the Nb nanowires was about 5% when the matrix deformed via martensitic transformation or 1% when deforming plastically by dislocation slip. As a result, the Nb nanowires showed a lattice strain of 3.5% when the matrix deformed in the mixed mode of plastic deformation and martensitic transformation, whichmore » means that the occurrence of plastic deformation does not impede load transfer from the matrix to the nanowires.« less

  16. Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yu, Cun; Liu, Weilong; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ren, Yang; Cui, Lishan

    2015-08-18

    An in-situ nanowire Nb/TiNiCu composite is fabricated based on the concept of strain under-matching between a phase transforming matrix and high strength nanomaterials. The deformation behavior of the Nb nanowire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction when the TiNiCu matrix underwent different deformation modes. The maximum lattice strain of the Nb nanowires was about 5% when the matrix deformed via martensitic transformation or 1% when deforming plastically by dislocation slip. As a result, the Nb nanowires showed a lattice strain of 3.5% when the matrix deformed in the mixed mode of plastic deformation and martensitic transformation, which means that the occurrence of plastic deformation does not impede load transfer from the matrix to the nanowires.

  17. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  18. SU-F-BRF-02: Automated Lung Segmentation Method Using Atlas-Based Sparse Shape Composition with a Shape Constrained Deformable Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Yan, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, B; Lasio, G; Prado, K; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated lung segmentation method, which combines the atlas-based sparse shape composition with a shape constrained deformable model in thoracic CT for patients with compromised lung volumes. Methods: Ten thoracic computed tomography scans for patients with large lung tumors were collected and reference lung ROIs in each scan was manually segmented to assess the performance of the method. We propose an automated and robust framework for lung tissue segmentation by using single statistical atlas registration to initialize a robust deformable model in order to perform fine segmentation that includes compromised lung tissue. First, a statistical image atlas with sparse shape composition is constructed and employed to obtain an approximate estimation of lung volume. Next, a robust deformable model with shape prior is initialized from this estimation. Energy terms from ROI edge potential and interior ROI region based potential as well as the initial ROI are combined in this model for accurate and robust segmentation. Results: The proposed segmentation method is applied to segment right lung on three CT scans. The quantitative results of our segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.92–0.95), mean accuracy of (0.97,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.10,0.16) with 95% CI. The quantitative results of previously published RASM segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.74,0.96), mean accuracy of (0.66,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.04, 0.38) with 95% CI. The qualitative and quantitative comparisons show that our proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance compared with a robust active shape model method. Conclusion: The atlas-based segmentation approach achieved relatively high accuracy with less variance compared to RASM in the sample dataset and the proposed method will be useful in image analysis applications for lung nodule or lung cancer diagnosis and radiotherapy assessment in thoracic

  19. Computation of Static Shapes and Voltages for Micromachined Deformable Mirrors with Nonlinear Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In modeling micromachined deformable mirrors with electrostatic actuators whose gap spacings are of the same order of magnitude as those of the surface deformations, it is necessary to use nonlinear models for the actuators. In this paper, we consider micromachined deformable mirrors modeled by a membrane or plate equation with nonlinear electrostatic actuator characteristics. Numerical methods for computing the mirror deformation due to given actuator voltages and the actuator voltages required for producing the desired deformations at the actuator locations are presented. The application of the proposed methods to circular deformable mirrors whose surfaces are modeled by elastic membranes is discussed in detail. Numerical results are obtained for a typical circular micromachined mirror with electrostatic actuators.

  20. The influence of martensite shape, concentration, and phase transformation strain on the deformation behavior of stable dual-phase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Sakaki, T.; Weng, G. J.

    1993-02-01

    A continuum model is developed to examine the influence of martensite shape, volume fraction, phase transformation strain, and thermal mismatch on the initial plastic state of the ferrite matrix following phase transformation and on the subsequent stress-strain behavior of the dual-phase steels upon loading. The theory is developed based on a relaxed constraint in the ductile matrix and an energy criterion to define its effective stress. In addition, it also assumes the martensite islands to possess a spheroidal shape and to be randomly oriented and homogenously dispersed in the ferrite matrix. It is found that for a typical water-quenched process from an intercritical temperature of 760 °C, the critical martensite volume fraction needed to induce plastic deformation in the ferrite matrix is very low, typically below 1 pct, regardless of the martensite shape. Thus, when the two-phase system is subjected to an external load, plastic deformation commences immediately, resulting in the widely observed “continuous yielding” behavior in dual-phase steels. The subsequent deformation of the dual-phase system is shown to be rather sensitive to the martensite shape, with the disc-shaped morphology giving rise to a superior overall response (over the spherical type). The stress-strain relations are also dependent upon the magnitude of the prior phase transformation strain. The strength coefficient h and the work-hardening exponent n of the smooth, parabolic-type stress-strain curves of the dual-phase system also increase with increasing martensite content for each selected inclusion shape. Comparison with an exact solution and with one set of experimental data indicates that the theory is generally within a reasonable range of accuracy.

  1. Hanging-wall deformation above a normal fault: sequential limit analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Leroy, Yves M.; Maillot, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    The deformation in the hanging wall above a segmented normal fault is analysed with the sequential limit analysis (SLA). The method combines some predictions on the dip and position of the active fault and axial surface, with geometrical evolution à la Suppe (Groshong, 1989). Two problems are considered. The first followed the prototype proposed by Patton (2005) with a pre-defined convex, segmented fault. The orientation of the upper segment of the normal fault is an unknown in the second problem. The loading in both problems consists of the retreat of the back wall and the sedimentation. This sedimentation starts from the lowest point of the topography and acts at the rate rs relative to the wall retreat rate. For the first problem, the normal fault either has a zero friction or a friction value set to 25o or 30o to fit the experimental results (Patton, 2005). In the zero friction case, a hanging wall anticline develops much like in the experiments. In the 25o friction case, slip on the upper segment is accompanied by rotation of the axial plane producing a broad shear zone rooted at the fault bend. The same observation is made in the 30o case, but without slip on the upper segment. Experimental outcomes show a behaviour in between these two latter cases. For the second problem, mechanics predicts a concave fault bend with an upper segment dip decreasing during extension. The axial surface rooting at the normal fault bend sees its dips increasing during extension resulting in a curved roll-over. Softening on the normal fault leads to a stepwise rotation responsible for strain partitioning into small blocks in the hanging wall. The rotation is due to the subsidence of the topography above the hanging wall. Sedimentation in the lowest region thus reduces the rotations. Note that these rotations predicted by mechanics are not accounted for in most geometrical approaches (Xiao and Suppe, 1992) and are observed in sand box experiments (Egholm et al., 2007, referring

  2. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  3. Analyses of Transient and Tertiary Small Punch Creep Deformation of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2016-09-01

    Creep deformation behavior of 316LN stainless steel (SS) under small punch creep (SPC) and uniaxial creep test has been assessed and compared at 923 K (650 °C). The transient and tertiary creep deformation behaviors have been analyzed according to the equation proposed for SPC deflection, δ = δ0 + δ_{{T}} \\cdot (1 - {{e}}^{ - κ \\cdot t} ) + dot{δ }_{{s}} t + δ3 {{e}}^{{[ {φ ( {t - t_{{r}} } )} ]}} on the basis of Dobes and Cadek equation for uniaxial creep strain. Trends in the variations of (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( κ) with steady-state deflection rate ( dot{δ }_{{s}} ) (ii) ` κ' with time to attain steady-state deflection rate, and (iii) initial creep deflection rate with steady-state deflection rate implied that transient SPC deformation obeyed first-order reaction rate theory. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( r') values that were determined from uniaxial creep tests were correlated with those obtained from SPC tests. Master curves representing transient creep deformation in both SPC and uniaxial creep tests have been derived and their near coincidence brings unique equivalence between both the test techniques. The relationships between (i) rate of acceleration of tertiary creep ( φ) and steady-state deflection rate, (ii) ` φ' and time spent in tertiary stage, and (iii) final creep deflection rate and steady-state deflection rate revealed that first-order reaction rate theory governed SPC deformation throughout the tertiary region also. Interrelationship between the transient, secondary, and tertiary creep parameters indicated that the same mechanism prevailed throughout the SPC deformation.

  4. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y. He, Z. B.; Li, L. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Nie, Z. H.; Wang, Z. L.; Ren, Y.

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drastically increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ∼520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. It is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.

  5. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strenthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y.; Nie, Z. H.; He, Z. B.; Wang, Z. L.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Y. D.; Li, L. F.

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni4Ti3 precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drastically increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ~520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. Lastly, it is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.

  6. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strenthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y.; Nie, Z. H.; He, Z. B.; Wang, Z. L.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Y. D.; Li, L. F.

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni4Ti3 precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drasticallymore » increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ~520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. Lastly, it is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.« less

  7. A new method of tree structure for analysing nested watershed shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-Gang; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chen, Xiao-Yin; Ma, Tian-Wu; Wang, Li; Du, Jing-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    A new method based on tree structure is proposed to study the relationship of multi-scale watershed shapes. Considering the nested relationship of watershed characteristics, the method uses a tree structure to reflect different watershed scales. We investigated the Loess Plateau of Shanxi Province, China, using 30-m resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). The study consists of three stages: (1) by using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, different scale watersheds were extracted from the DEMs and used to build a tree structure model based on spatial inclusion relationships; (2) the tree structure was transformed into a table based on the size of watershed area; and (3) the shape was quantified by roundness and tightness coefficients to analyse shape relationships among different scales of watersheds. The application of the method to 15 types of geomorphological features suggests that the smaller the watersheds are, the rounder they tend to be. The new tree structure method introduced here provides a good understanding of nested relationships between watershed characteristics.

  8. Three-dimensional shape restoration using virtual grating phase detection from deformed grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoxiang; Jiang, Jinyou; Wang, Qimin

    1991-04-01

    A quasi-real-time phase detection method for restoring three-dimentional profile is proposed based on phase shifting technique. A deformed grating is formed on the surface of an object under test with the aid of projecting a Ronchi grating. The phase distribution of the deformed fringes corresponds to the profile of the objct. Four scanning moire patterns, having phase difference of itI 2 successively, are generated by means of a virtual grating shifting. The phase values are available at every pixel location from the deformed grating. The principle ofthe method and some experimental results are presented in this paper.

  9. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  10. Aging preserves the ability to perceive 3D object shape from static but not deforming boundary contours.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Bartholomew, Ashley N; Burton, Cory L

    2008-09-01

    A single experiment investigated how younger (aged 18-32 years) and older (aged 62-82 years) observers perceive 3D object shape from deforming and static boundary contours. On any given trial, observers were shown two smoothly-curved objects, similar to water-smoothed granite rocks, and were required to judge whether they possessed the "same" or "different" shape. The objects presented during the "different" trials produced differently-shaped boundary contours. The objects presented during the "same" trials also produced different boundary contours, because one of the objects was always rotated in depth relative to the other by 5, 25, or 45 degrees. Each observer participated in 12 experimental conditions formed by the combination of 2 motion types (deforming vs. static boundary contours), 2 surface types (objects depicted as silhouettes or with texture and Lambertian shading), and 3 angular offsets (5, 25, and 45 degrees). When there was no motion (static silhouettes or stationary objects presented with shading and texture), the older observers performed as well as the younger observers. In the moving object conditions with shading and texture, the older observers' performance was facilitated by the motion, but the amount of this facilitation was reduced relative to that exhibited by the younger observers. In contrast, the older observers obtained no benefit in performance at all from the deforming (i.e., moving) silhouettes. The reduced ability of older observers to perceive 3D shape from motion is probably due to a low-level deterioration in the ability to detect and discriminate motion itself.

  11. Natural growth, otolith shape and diet analyses of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Atherinopsidae) from southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuca, M. E.; Lozano, I. E.; Brown, D. R.; Renzi, M.; Luizon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Age and growth, otolith shape and diet of Odontesthes nigricans were analysed in order to provide an insight into the life history of the species and furthermore, to assess their possible use as a tool for discriminating silverside populations from the South Atlantic Ocean (Punta María) and Beagle Channel waters (Varela Bay). The age and growth analysis was performed by counting daily increments and annual marks in sagittae otoliths. Length-at-age data of individuals <65 mm standard length (SL) were fitted to the Laird-Gompertz model (SLt = 6.22 exp 2.45 [1-exp (-0.02t)]), which provided an excellent description of the pattern of daily growth for O. nigricans juveniles from Varela Bay. The spawning period was also assessed through back-calculation of hatching dates and it extended from November to February. The count of annual marks in larger individuals identified 7 year classes (0+ to 6+) in Varela Bay and 6 year classes (0+ to 5+) in Punta María. The von Bertalanffy growth model explained more than 95% of the growth patterns observed in O. nigricans from Varela Bay (SLt = 245.49 [1 - exp -0.24(t+0.46)]) and Punta María (SLt = 345.09 [1 - exp -0.15(t+0.31)]). Particularly, k and SL∞ varied significantly between sampling sites; reaching Punta María a larger SL∞ value with a lower k. Otolith shape variation was also explored using elliptical Fourier analysis and it showed significant differences between Varela Bay and Punta María populations. Furthermore, gut content analysis characterized O. nigricans as an invertebrate predator, being benthic organisms the most important components of its diet, which also showed significant site dependence. The use of all these analyses contributed to a holistic approach which maximized the likelihood of correctly identifying both O. nigricans populations in the southernmost limit of the species distribution.

  12. Structural deformation of a ring-shaped Re(I) diimine dinuclear complex in the excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Matsubara, Yoshitaka; Asatani, Tsuyoshi; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Ishitani, Osamu; Onda, Ken

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the excited state of a ring-shaped dinuclear Re(I) diimine bis-carbonyl complex that shows promise with regard to efficient photosensitized reactions and multi-electron storage, using time-resolved infrared (TR-IR) vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Anomalous peaks in the CO stretching region of the TR-IR spectrum were well reproduced by the calculations. It was found that metal-to-ligand charge transfer occurs only in one of the Re complex units, and that the excited state geometry is deformed relative to the ground state in order to relax the associated steric tension. This structural deformation generates the unique photophysical properties of the complex.

  13. Deformation behavior of metallic glass composites reinforced with shape memory nanowires studied via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şopu, D.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the deformation behavior and mechanism of Cu64Zr36 composite structures reinforced with B2 CuZr nanowires are strongly influenced by the martensitic phase transformation and distribution of these crystalline precipitates. When nanowires are distributed in the glassy matrix along the deformation direction, a two-steps stress-induced martensitic phase transformation is observed. Since the martensitic transformation is driven by the elastic energy release, the strain localization behavior in the glassy matrix is strongly affected. Therefore, the composite materials reinforced with a crystalline phase, which shows stress-induced martensitic transformation, represent a route for controlling the properties of glassy materials.

  14. Analysing Post-Seismic Deformation of Izmit Earthquake with Insar, Gnss and Coulomb Stress Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alac Barut, R.; Trinder, J.; Rizos, C.

    2016-06-01

    On August 17th 1999, a Mw 7.4 earthquake struck the city of Izmit in the north-west of Turkey. This event was one of the most devastating earthquakes of the twentieth century. The epicentre of the Izmit earthquake was on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) which is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults on earth. However, this earthquake offers an opportunity to study how strain is accommodated in an inter-segment region of a large strike slip fault. In order to determine the Izmit earthquake post-seismic effects, the authors modelled Coulomb stress changes of the aftershocks, as well as using the deformation measurement techniques of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The authors have shown that InSAR and GNSS observations over a time period of three months after the earthquake combined with Coulomb Stress Change Modelling can explain the fault zone expansion, as well as the deformation of the northern region of the NAF. It was also found that there is a strong agreement between the InSAR and GNSS results for the post-seismic phases of investigation, with differences less than 2mm, and the standard deviation of the differences is less than 1mm.

  15. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  16. Effects of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, U. Kirindi, T.

    2008-07-15

    In Cu-11.92 wt.%Al-3.78 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy, the influence of deformation and thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties under the compression test were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experiments show that the mechanical properties of the alloy can be enhanced by convenient heat treatments. The alloy exhibits good mechanical properties with high ultimate compression strength and ductility after annealing at high temperature. However, it exhibits brittle fracture and dramatic strain hardening, with linear stress-strain behavior after annealing at low temperature. The changes in the mechanical properties have been linked to the evolution of the degree of order, occurrence of precipitation, and variation of the grain size. From microstructural observations, it is seen that the {beta}{sub 1}' (18R) and {gamma}{sub 1}' (2H) martensite phases coexist at different fractions in the undeformed and deformed states. Deformation induces the changes between the {beta}{sub 1}' and {gamma}{sub 1}' martensites and deformation-induced martensites form at preferred orientations as mechanical twins. The {beta}{sub 1}' martensite variants are twin-related with respect to the (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub 18R} mirror plane and a new orientation relationship for these twin variants is derived as (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub A}-parallel (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub C}: [4-bar 61] {sub A}-parallel [4-bar 61]{sub C}. Additionally, an increase in the amount of deformation causes martensite reorientation, de-twinning, and dislocation generation; also, the martensite plates are seen to have rearranged in the same orientation to be parallel with each other.

  17. Analyses of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic bodies by a new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is base upon a generalization of de Veubeke's complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and thg resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a complete separation of the boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and the initial value problem (for total stress and deformation); hence, their numerical treatments are essentially independent. After a fairly comprehensive discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem, we launch into a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  18. Selective Invocation of Shape Priors for Deformable Segmentation and Morphologic Classification of Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all 3 terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images from 40 patient studies. Nuclear shape based, architectural and textural features extracted from these segmentations were extracted and found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 86% via a quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 60% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid active contour model involving a shape prior. PMID:25466771

  19. Ab initio studies of magnetism at extreme volume and shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sob, Mojmir; Friak, Martin; Legut, Dominik; Cak, Miroslav; Zeleny, Martin

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic solids constitute a basis of many technologically important materials, however, very little is known how their magnetic behavior changes when a high-strain deformation is applied (as it is, for example, in heavily deformed regions of extended defects, such as grain boundaries, dislocation cores, crack tips etc.). In the present talk, we report on magnetic behavior of iron, nickel, FeCo, Ni3Al and Fe3Al at the extreme volume as well as tetragonal and trigonal deformation. The total energies are calculated by spin-polarized full-potential LAPW method and are displayed in contour plots as functions of tetragonal or trigonal distortion c/a and volume; borderlines between various magnetic phases are shown. Stability of tetragonal magnetic phases of γ-Fe is discussed. In case of Fe, Ni and FeCo, the calculated phase boundaries are used to predict the lattice parameters and magnetic states of overlayers from these materials on various (001) substrates. Whereas magnetism does not play an important role in stabilization of the L12 structure in Ni3Al, the magnetic effects in Fe and Fe3Al are vital.

  20. Real-time motion compensated patient positioning and non-rigid deformation estimation using 4-D shape priors.

    PubMed

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years, range imaging (RI) techniques have been proposed for patient positioning and respiration analysis in motion compensation. Yet, current RI based approaches for patient positioning employ rigid-body transformations, thus neglecting free-form deformations induced by respiratory motion. Furthermore, RI based respiration analysis relies on non-rigid registration techniques with run-times of several seconds. In this paper we propose a real-time framework based on RI to perform respiratory motion compensated positioning and non-rigid surface deformation estimation in a joint manner. The core of our method are pre-procedurally obtained 4-D shape priors that drive the intra-procedural alignment of the patient to the reference state, simultaneously yielding a rigid-body table transformation and a free-form deformation accounting for respiratory motion. We show that our method outperforms conventional alignment strategies by a factor of 3.0 and 2.3 in the rotation and translation accuracy, respectively. Using a GPU based implementation, we achieve run-times of 40 ms. PMID:23286095

  1. Real-time motion compensated patient positioning and non-rigid deformation estimation using 4-D shape priors.

    PubMed

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years, range imaging (RI) techniques have been proposed for patient positioning and respiration analysis in motion compensation. Yet, current RI based approaches for patient positioning employ rigid-body transformations, thus neglecting free-form deformations induced by respiratory motion. Furthermore, RI based respiration analysis relies on non-rigid registration techniques with run-times of several seconds. In this paper we propose a real-time framework based on RI to perform respiratory motion compensated positioning and non-rigid surface deformation estimation in a joint manner. The core of our method are pre-procedurally obtained 4-D shape priors that drive the intra-procedural alignment of the patient to the reference state, simultaneously yielding a rigid-body table transformation and a free-form deformation accounting for respiratory motion. We show that our method outperforms conventional alignment strategies by a factor of 3.0 and 2.3 in the rotation and translation accuracy, respectively. Using a GPU based implementation, we achieve run-times of 40 ms.

  2. The Shape of Parotid DVH Predicts the Entity of Gland Deformation During IMRT for Head and Neck Cancers.

    PubMed

    Broggi, S; Scalco, E; Fiorino, C; Belli, M L; Sanguineti, G; Ricchetti, F; Dell'Oca, I; Dinapoli, N; Valentini, V; Di Muzio, N; Cattaneo, G M; Rizzo, G

    2015-12-01

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of the registration between images taken during Radiotherapy is a measure of compression/expansion of the voxels within an organ. The Jacobian mean value was applied to investigate possible correlations between parotid deformation and anatomical, clinical and dosimetric parameters. Data of 84 patients were analyzed. Parotid deformation was evaluated through Jacobian maps of images taken at the start and at the end of the treatment. Several clinical, geometrical and dosimetric factors were considered. Correlation between Jacobian mean value and these parameters was assessed through Spearman's test. Univariate and multivariate logistic analyses were performed by considering as the end point the first quartile value of the Jacobian mean value. Parotid dose volume histograms were stratified according to gland deformation, assessing the most predictive dose-volume combination. At multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.02), overlap between tumor volume and parotid gland (p = 0.0006) and the parotid volume receiving more than 10 Gy (p = 0.02) were found as the best independent predictors, by considering Jacobian mean value fist quartile, the parotid volume receiving more than 10 Gy and 40 Gy were found as the most predictive dosimetric parameters. Parotid glands were divided in three different sub-groups (bad-, medium- and good dose volume histogram). The risk to have Jacobian means value lower than first quartile was 39.6% versus 19.6% versus 11.3% in these three groups. By including in the multivariate analysis this "dose volume grouping" parameter, age and bad dose volume histogram were found as the most predictive parameters for large shrinkage. The pattern of parotid deformation may be well predicted by some pre-treatment variables; a bad dose volume histogram seems the most important predictor.

  3. Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions for Converting Surface Strains into Deflections for Structural Deformed Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated for shape predictions of complex wing structures, for which surface strain-sensing stations must be properly distributed to avoid jointed junctures, and must be increased in the high strain gradient region. Each embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into small variable domains. Thus, the surface strain distribution can be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. Through discretization, the embedded beam curvature equation can be piece-wisely integrated to obtain the Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions (for each embedded beam), which are expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the embedded beam and the surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By inputting the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, slopes and deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. A long tapered cantilever tubular beam was chosen for shape prediction analysis. The input surface strains were analytically generated from finite-element analysis. The shape prediction accuracies of the Variable- Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were then determined in light of the finite-element generated slopes and deflections, and were fofound to be comparable to the accuracies of the constant-domain Displacement Transfer Functions

  4. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the G-III Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge [ACTE] project at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, displacement transfer functions were applied to the swept wing of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) to obtain deformed shape predictions. Four strainsensing lines (two on the lower surface, two on the upper surface) were used to calculate the deformed shape of the G III wing under bending and torsion. There being an insufficient number of surface strain sensors, the existing G III wing box finite element model was used to generate simulated surface strains for input to the displacement transfer functions. The resulting predicted deflections have good correlation with the finite-element generated deflections as well as the measured deflections from the ground load calibration test. The convergence study showed that the displacement prediction error at the G III wing tip can be reduced by increasing the number of strain stations (for each strain-sensing line) down to a minimum error of l.6 percent at 17 strain stations; using more than 17 strain stations yielded no benefit because the error slightly increased to 1.9% when 32 strain stations were used.

  5. Deformation Monitoring and Bathymetry Analyses in Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey has 595 dams constructed between 1936 and 2013 for the purposes of irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric energy and drinking water. A major portion of the dam basins in Turkey are deprived of vegetation and have slope topography on near surrounding area. However, landscaping covered with forest around the dam basin is desirable for erosion control. In fact; the dams, have basins deprived of vegetation, fill up quickly due to sediment transport. Erosion control and forestation are important factors, reducing the sediment, to protect the water basins of the dams and increase the functioning life of the dams. The functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Dams are very large and critical structures and they demand the use or application of precise measuring systems. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. Monitoring is an essential component of the dam after construction and during operation and must en­able the timely detection of any behavior that could deteriorate the dam, potentially result in its shutdown or failure. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the dams, dam safety and related analysis. The case study is the deformation measurements of Atatürk Dam in Turkey which is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Brief information is given about the

  6. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Bramanti, E; Cecchetti, F; Scappaticci, L; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type "Toronto", evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient's discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  7. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution

    PubMed Central

    CICCIÙ, M.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; SCAPPATICCI, L.; GUGLIELMINO, E.; RISITANO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type “Toronto”, evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient’s discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  8. Analyses of heterogeneous deformation and subsurface fatigue crack generation in alpha titanium alloy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, Osamu; Morita, Motoaki; Yuasa, Takayuki; Morooka, Satoshi; Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio

    2014-01-27

    Subsurface crack initiation in high-cycle fatigue has been detected as (0001) transgranular facet in titanium alloys at low temperature. The discussion on the subsurface crack generation was reviewed. Analyses by neutron diffraction and full constraints model under tension mode as well as crystallographic identification of the facet were focused. The accumulated tensile stress along <0001> may be responsible to initial microcracking on (0001) and the crack opening.

  9. A micro-compression study of shape-memory deformation in U-13at%Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Field, Robert D; Dickerson, Patricia O; Mccabe, Rodney J

    2008-01-01

    Micro-compression specimens, 1O-15{mu}m in diameter by 20-30{mu}m in height, were produced from individual parent grains in a polycrystalline U-13at%Nb shape-memory alloy using the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The specimens were tested in a nanoindentation instrument with a flat diamond tip to investigate stress-strain behavior as a function of crystallographic orientation. The results are in qualitative agreement with a single-crystal accommodation strain (Bain strain) model of the shape-memory effect for this alloy.

  10. Biomimetic mushroom-shaped microfibers for dry adhesives by electrically induced polymer deformation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Tian, Hongmiao; Li, Xiangming; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Liu, Hongzhong; An, Ningli

    2014-08-27

    The studies on bioinspired dry adhesion have demonstrated the biomimetic importance of a surface arrayed with mushroom-shaped microfibers among other artificially textured surfaces. The generation of a mushroom-shaped microfiber array with a high aspect ratio and a large tip diameter remains to be investigated. In this paper we report a three-step process for producing mushroom-shaped microfibers with a well-controlled aspect ratio and tip diameter. First, a polymer film coated on an electrically conductive substrate is prestructured into a low-aspect-ratio micropillar array by hot embossing. In the second step, an electrical voltage is applied to an electrode pair composed of the substrate and another conductive planar plate, sandwiching an air clearance. The Maxwell force induced on the air-polymer interface by the electric field electrohydrodynamically pulls the preformed micropillars upward to contact the upper electrode. Finally, the micropillars spread transversely on this electrode due to the electrowetting effect, forming the mushroom tip. In this paper we have demonstrated a polymer surface arrayed with mushroom-shaped microfibers with a large tip diameter (3 times the shaft diameter) and a large aspect ratio (above 10) and provided the testing results for dry adhesion.

  11. Deformation and mixing of coexisting shapes in neutron-deficient polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesteloot, N.; Bastin, B.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Auranen, K.; Bauer, C.; Bender, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Damyanova, A.; Darby, I.; De Witte, H.; Di Julio, D.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, C.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Laurent, B.; Lecesne, N.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Piselli, E.; Próchniak, L.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Sferrazza, M.; Siebeck, B.; Sjodin, M.; Tornqvist, H.; Traykov, E.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; Zielińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments are performed with postaccelerated beams of neutron-deficient Po 196 ,198 ,200 ,202 isotopes at the REX-ISOLDE facility. A set of matrix elements, coupling the low-lying states in these isotopes, is extracted. In the two heaviest isotopes, Po,202200, the transitional and diagonal matrix elements of the 21+ state are determined. In Po,198196 multistep Coulomb excitation is observed, populating the 41+,02+ , and 22+ states. The experimental results are compared to the results from the measurement of mean-square charge radii in polonium isotopes, confirming the onset of deformation from 196Po onwards. Three model descriptions are used to compare to the data. Calculations with the beyond-mean-field model, the interacting boson model, and the general Bohr Hamiltonian model show partial agreement with the experimental data. Finally, calculations with a phenomenological two-level mixing model hint at the mixing of a spherical structure with a weakly deformed rotational structure.

  12. Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

  13. A finite element technique for non-deterministic thermal deformation analyses including temperature dependent material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, W. R., Jr.; Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A technique utilizing the finite element displacement method is developed for the static analysis of structures subjected to non-deterministic thermal loading in which the material properties, assumed isotropic, are temperature dependent. Matrix equations are developed for the first two statistical moments of the displacements using a third order series expansion for the displacements in terms of the random temperatures. Sample problems are included to demonstrate the range of applicability of the third order series solutions. These solutions are compared with results from Monte Carlo analyses and also, for some problems, with solutions obtained by numerically integrating equations for the statistical properties of the displacements. In general, it is shown that the effect of temperature dependent material properties can have a significant effect on the covariances of the displacements.

  14. A thermomechanical model accounting for the behavior of shape memory alloys in finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Laviniu; Nedjar, Boumedienne; Moumni, Ziad; Vedinaş, Ioan; Trană, Eugen

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) comport an interesting behavior. They can undertake large strains and then recover their undeformed shape by heating. In this context, one of the aspects that challenged many researchers was the development of a mathematical model to predict the behavior of a known SMA under real-life conditions, or finite strain. This paper is aimed at working out a finite strain mathematical model for a Ni-Ti SMA, under the superelastic experiment conditions and under uniaxial mechanical loading, based on the Zaki-Moumni 3D mathematical model developed under the small perturbations assumption. Within the current article, a comparison between experimental findings and calculated results is also investigated. The proposed finite strain mathematical model shows good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Microstructure, Cyclic Deformation and Corrosion Behavior of Laser Welded NiTi Shape Memory Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Kermanpur, A.; Saatchi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Soleymani, A. P.

    2015-09-01

    The present paper reports the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the microstructure, phase transformation, cyclic deformation behavior, and corrosion resistance of Ti-55 wt.% Ni wire. The results showed that the laser welding altered the microstructure of the weld metal which mainly composed of columnar dendrites grown epitaxially from the fusion line. DSC results indicated that the onset of the transformation temperatures of the weld metal differed from that of the base metal. Cyclic stress-strain behavior of laser-welded NiTi wire was comparable to the as-received material; while a little reduction in the pseudo-elastic property was noted. The weld metal exhibited higher corrosion potential, lower corrosion current density, higher breakdown potential and wider passive region than the base metal. The weld metal was therefore more resistant to corrosion than the base metal.

  16. Deformability-based circulating tumor cell separation with conical-shaped microfilters: Concept, optimization, and design criteria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) separation technology has made positive impacts on cancer science in many aspects. The ability of detecting and separating CTCs can play a key role in early cancer detection and treatment. In recent years, there has been growing interest in using deformability-based CTC separation microfilters due to their simplicity and low cost. Most of the previous studies in this area are mainly based on experimental work. Although experimental research provides useful insights in designing CTC separation devices, there is still a lack of design guidelines based on fundamental understandings of the cell separation process in the filters. While experimental efforts face challenges, especially microfabrication difficulties, we adopt numerical simulation here to study conical-shaped microfilters using deformability difference between CTCs and blood cells for the separation process. We use the liquid drop model for modeling a CTC passing through such microfilters. The accuracy of the model in predicting the pressure signature of the system is validated by comparing it with previous experiments. Pressure-deformability analysis of the cell going through the channel is then carried out in detail in order to better understand how a CTC behaves throughout the filtration process. Different system design criteria such as system throughput and unclogging of the system are discussed. Specifically, pressure behavior under different system throughput is analyzed. Regarding the unclogging issue, we define pressure ratio as a key parameter representing the ability to overcome clogging in such CTC separation devices and investigate the effect of conical angle on the optimum pressure ratio. Finally, the effect of unclogging applied pressure on the system performance is examined. Our study provides detailed understandings of the cell separation process and its characteristics, which can be used for developing more efficient CTC separation devices. PMID:26064193

  17. Simple description of odd-A nuclei around the critical point of the spherical to axially deformed shape phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Pan Feng; Liu Yuxin; Luo Yanan; Draayer, J. P.

    2011-09-15

    An analytically solvable model, X(3/2j+1), is proposed to describe odd-A nuclei near the X(3) critical point. The model is constructed based on a collective core described by the X(3) critical point symmetry coupled to a spin-j particle. A detailed analysis of the spectral patterns for cases j=1/2 and j=3/2 is provided to illustrate dynamical features of the model. By comparing theory with experimental data and results of other models, it is found that the X(3/2j+1) model can be taken as a simple yet very effective scheme to describe those odd-A nuclei with an even-even core at the critical point of the spherical to axially deformed shape phase transition.

  18. Analytical description of odd-A nuclei near the critical point of the spherical to axially deformed shape transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Pan Feng; Liu Yuxin; Hou Zhanfeng; Draayer, J. P.

    2010-09-15

    A coupling scheme for even-even nuclei with the X(5) critical point symmetry coupled to a single valence nucleon in a j orbit is proposed to approximately describe the critical point phenomena of spherical to axially deformed shape (phase) transition in odd-A nuclear systems. The corresponding scheme, which can be solved analytically, is called the X(5/(2j+1)) model. A special case with j=1/2 is analyzed in detail to show its level structure and transition patterns. It is further shown that {sup 189}Au and {sup 155}Tb may be possible X(5/(2j+1)) symmetry candidates with j=1/2 and j=3/2, respectively.

  19. Analytical model for instantaneous lift and shape deformation of an insect-scale flapping wing in hover.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In the analysis of flexible flapping wings of insects, the aerodynamic outcome depends on the combined structural dynamics and unsteady fluid physics. Because the wing shape and hence the resulting effective angle of attack are a priori unknown, predicting aerodynamic performance is challenging. Here, we show that a coupled aerodynamics/structural dynamics model can be established for hovering, based on a linear beam equation with the Morison equation to account for both added mass and aerodynamic damping effects. Lift strongly depends on the instantaneous angle of attack, resulting from passive pitch associated with wing deformation. We show that both instantaneous wing deformation and lift can be predicted in a much simplified framework. Moreover, our analysis suggests that resulting wing kinematics can be explained by the interplay between acceleration-related and aerodynamic damping forces. Interestingly, while both forces combine to create a high angle of attack resulting in high lift around the midstroke, they offset each other for phase control at the end of the stroke.

  20. Analytical model for instantaneous lift and shape deformation of an insect-scale flapping wing in hover

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In the analysis of flexible flapping wings of insects, the aerodynamic outcome depends on the combined structural dynamics and unsteady fluid physics. Because the wing shape and hence the resulting effective angle of attack are a priori unknown, predicting aerodynamic performance is challenging. Here, we show that a coupled aerodynamics/structural dynamics model can be established for hovering, based on a linear beam equation with the Morison equation to account for both added mass and aerodynamic damping effects. Lift strongly depends on the instantaneous angle of attack, resulting from passive pitch associated with wing deformation. We show that both instantaneous wing deformation and lift can be predicted in a much simplified framework. Moreover, our analysis suggests that resulting wing kinematics can be explained by the interplay between acceleration-related and aerodynamic damping forces. Interestingly, while both forces combine to create a high angle of attack resulting in high lift around the midstroke, they offset each other for phase control at the end of the stroke. PMID:25297319

  1. Analytical model for instantaneous lift and shape deformation of an insect-scale flapping wing in hover.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In the analysis of flexible flapping wings of insects, the aerodynamic outcome depends on the combined structural dynamics and unsteady fluid physics. Because the wing shape and hence the resulting effective angle of attack are a priori unknown, predicting aerodynamic performance is challenging. Here, we show that a coupled aerodynamics/structural dynamics model can be established for hovering, based on a linear beam equation with the Morison equation to account for both added mass and aerodynamic damping effects. Lift strongly depends on the instantaneous angle of attack, resulting from passive pitch associated with wing deformation. We show that both instantaneous wing deformation and lift can be predicted in a much simplified framework. Moreover, our analysis suggests that resulting wing kinematics can be explained by the interplay between acceleration-related and aerodynamic damping forces. Interestingly, while both forces combine to create a high angle of attack resulting in high lift around the midstroke, they offset each other for phase control at the end of the stroke. PMID:25297319

  2. Post-deformation shape-recovery behavior of vitamin E-diffused, radiation crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Shishido, Takaaki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2016-10-01

    The in-vivo progression of creep and wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular liners has been clinically evaluated by measuring radiographic penetration of femoral heads. In such clinical assessments, however, viscoelastic strain relaxation has been rarely considered after a removal of hip joint loading, potentially leading to an underestimation of the penetrated thickness. The objective of this study was to investigate shape-recovery behavior of pre-compressed, radiation crosslinked and antioxidant vitamin E-diffused UHMWPE acetabular liners, and also to characterize the effects of varying their internal diameter (ID) and wall thickness (WT). We applied uniaxial compression to the UHMWPE specimens of various ID (28, 32, 36mm) and WT (4.8, 6.8, 8.9mm) for 4320min under the constant load of 3000N, and subsequently monitored the strain-relaxation behavior as a function of time after unloading. It was observed that there was a considerable shape recovery of the components after removal of the external static load. Reducing ID and WT significantly accelerated the rate of creep strain recovery, and varying WT was more sensitive to the recovery behavior than ID. Creep deformation of the tested liners recovered mostly within the first 300min after unloading. Note that approximately half of the total recovery amount proceeded just within 5min after unloading. These results suggest a remarkably high capability of shape recovery of vitamin E-diffused highly crosslinked UHMWPE. In conclusion, the time-dependent shape recovering and the diameter-thickness effect on its behavior should be carefully considered when the postoperative penetration is quantified in highly crosslinked UHMWPE acetabular liners (especially on the non-weight bearing radiographs). PMID:27454526

  3. Deformability of red blood cells from different species studied by resistive pulse shape analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, O K

    1996-01-01

    The Cell Transit Analyzer (CTA) is now being used widely in clinical hemorheology. Most of the data obtained by CTA are limited to human blood, although the CTA has an important potential to be used in experimental studies on animal models. However, behavior of red blood cells (RBC) from various species might be different in CTA. Eight parameters reflecting different aspects of cell passage through pores with 5 microns diameter and 15 microns length were determined or human, guinea pig, dog, rabbit, rat, mouse and sheep RBC, together with instrument precision and biological variation. These parameters have a wide range when measured in different species and correlate with cell volume. Sensitivity of these parameters to the glutaraldehyde-induced alterations in RBC deformability was not same for different laboratory mammals. The main reason for this difference seems to be related to the cell size and thus sensitivity might be significantly limited if 5 microns pore-size filters are used to test the smaller RBC. The results of this study may help in designing experimental studies on laboratory mammals using the CTA. PMID:8679963

  4. Ultrasmooth, extremely deformable and shape recoverable Ag nanowire embedded transparent electrode.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sanggil; Song, Myungkwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Cho, Byungjin; Lee, Hye Moon; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sung-Gyu; Nam, Kee-Seok; Jeong, Yongsoo; Kwon, Se-Hun; Park, Yun Chang; Jin, Sung-Ho; Kang, Jae-Wook; Jo, Sungjin; Kim, Chang Su

    2014-01-01

    Transparent electrodes have been widely used in electronic devices such as solar cells, displays, and touch screens. Highly flexible transparent electrodes are especially desired for the development of next generation flexible electronic devices. Although indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most commonly used material for the fabrication of transparent electrodes, its brittleness and growing cost limit its utility for flexible electronic devices. Therefore, the need for new transparent conductive materials with superior mechanical properties is clear and urgent. Ag nanowire (AgNW) has been attracting increasing attention because of its effective combination of electrical and optical properties. However, it still suffers from several drawbacks, including large surface roughness, instability against oxidation and moisture, and poor adhesion to substrates. These issues need to be addressed before wide spread use of metallic NW as transparent electrodes can be realized. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of a flexible transparent electrode with superior mechanical, electrical and optical properties by embedding a AgNW film into a transparent polymer matrix. This technique can produce electrodes with an ultrasmooth and extremely deformable transparent electrode that have sheet resistance and transmittance comparable to those of an ITO electrode. PMID:24763248

  5. Ultrasmooth, extremely deformable and shape recoverable Ag nanowire embedded transparent electrode.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sanggil; Song, Myungkwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Cho, Byungjin; Lee, Hye Moon; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sung-Gyu; Nam, Kee-Seok; Jeong, Yongsoo; Kwon, Se-Hun; Park, Yun Chang; Jin, Sung-Ho; Kang, Jae-Wook; Jo, Sungjin; Kim, Chang Su

    2014-04-25

    Transparent electrodes have been widely used in electronic devices such as solar cells, displays, and touch screens. Highly flexible transparent electrodes are especially desired for the development of next generation flexible electronic devices. Although indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most commonly used material for the fabrication of transparent electrodes, its brittleness and growing cost limit its utility for flexible electronic devices. Therefore, the need for new transparent conductive materials with superior mechanical properties is clear and urgent. Ag nanowire (AgNW) has been attracting increasing attention because of its effective combination of electrical and optical properties. However, it still suffers from several drawbacks, including large surface roughness, instability against oxidation and moisture, and poor adhesion to substrates. These issues need to be addressed before wide spread use of metallic NW as transparent electrodes can be realized. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of a flexible transparent electrode with superior mechanical, electrical and optical properties by embedding a AgNW film into a transparent polymer matrix. This technique can produce electrodes with an ultrasmooth and extremely deformable transparent electrode that have sheet resistance and transmittance comparable to those of an ITO electrode.

  6. Ultrasmooth, extremely deformable and shape recoverable Ag nanowire embedded transparent electrode

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sanggil; Song, Myungkwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Cho, Byungjin; Lee, Hye Moon; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sung-Gyu; Nam, Kee-Seok; Jeong, Yongsoo; Kwon, Se-Hun; Park, Yun Chang; Jin, Sung-Ho; Kang, Jae-Wook; Jo, Sungjin; Kim, Chang Su

    2014-01-01

    Transparent electrodes have been widely used in electronic devices such as solar cells, displays, and touch screens. Highly flexible transparent electrodes are especially desired for the development of next generation flexible electronic devices. Although indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most commonly used material for the fabrication of transparent electrodes, its brittleness and growing cost limit its utility for flexible electronic devices. Therefore, the need for new transparent conductive materials with superior mechanical properties is clear and urgent. Ag nanowire (AgNW) has been attracting increasing attention because of its effective combination of electrical and optical properties. However, it still suffers from several drawbacks, including large surface roughness, instability against oxidation and moisture, and poor adhesion to substrates. These issues need to be addressed before wide spread use of metallic NW as transparent electrodes can be realized. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of a flexible transparent electrode with superior mechanical, electrical and optical properties by embedding a AgNW film into a transparent polymer matrix. This technique can produce electrodes with an ultrasmooth and extremely deformable transparent electrode that have sheet resistance and transmittance comparable to those of an ITO electrode. PMID:24763248

  7. Microstructure and Properties of Deformation Processed Polycrystalline Ni47Ti44Nb9 Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, XiangQian; Mi, Xujun; Li, Yanfeng; Gao, Baodong

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relationships between process and microstructure and property in polycrystalline Ni47Ti44Nb9 alloy. Three processes: (1) hot-forged, (2) cold-drawn, and (3) cold-rolled were investigated. The microstructure was tested by means of optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, and electron backscatter diffraction, and then crystalline orientation distribution functions and inverse pole figures were measured. The results indicated that hot-forging eliminated dendritic microstructure and fined the eutectic structure. It also induced a <113> fiber texture, which paralleled to the axial direction. The cold drawing and cold-rolling had a further effect in grain refinement. And the cold-drawn specimens contained a strong <111> fiber texture paralleling to the deformation direction, while the cold-rolled tubes formed <111> crystalline directions paralleling the axial direction and <110> crystalline directions of crystalline arranged along the circumferential direction. The notably distinctive recoverability of different processed materials was observed and discussed.

  8. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  9. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Fermin, C

    1996-05-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  10. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  11. Integrated Aerodynamic/Structural/Dynamic Analyses of Aircraft with Large Shape Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Horta, Lucas G.; Piatak, David J.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual and preliminary design processes for aircraft with large shape changes are generally difficult and time-consuming, and the processes are often customized for a specific shape change concept to streamline the vehicle design effort. Accordingly, several existing reports show excellent results of assessing a particular shape change concept or perturbations of a concept. The goal of the current effort was to develop a multidisciplinary analysis tool and process that would enable an aircraft designer to assess several very different morphing concepts early in the design phase and yet obtain second-order performance results so that design decisions can be made with better confidence. The approach uses an efficient parametric model formulation that allows automatic model generation for systems undergoing radical shape changes as a function of aerodynamic parameters, geometry parameters, and shape change parameters. In contrast to other more self-contained approaches, the approach utilizes off-the-shelf analysis modules to reduce development time and to make it accessible to many users. Because the analysis is loosely coupled, discipline modules like a multibody code can be easily swapped for other modules with similar capabilities. One of the advantages of this loosely coupled system is the ability to use the medium-to high-fidelity tools early in the design stages when the information can significantly influence and improve overall vehicle design. Data transfer among the analysis modules are based on an accurate and automated general purpose data transfer tool. In general, setup time for the integrated system presented in this paper is 2-4 days for simple shape change concepts and 1-2 weeks for more mechanically complicated concepts. Some of the key elements briefly described in the paper include parametric model development, aerodynamic database generation, multibody analysis, and the required software modules as well as examples for a telescoping wing, a

  12. Flocculation of deformable emulsion droplets. 1: Droplet shape and line tension effects

    SciTech Connect

    Denkov, N.D.; Petsev, D.N.; Danov, K.D.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theoretical model which allows the study of the configuration and the interaction energy of a doublet of flocculated Brownian droplets was recently proposed (Denkov et al., Phys, Rev. Lett. 71, 3226 (1993)). In this model the equilibrium film radius and thickness are determined by minimizing the total pair interaction energy which is presented as a sum of explicit expressions for the different contributions (van der Waals, electrostatic, steric, depletion, surface extension, etc.). In the present study this simplified model is numerically verified by comparison with the results stemming from the real shape of the interacting droplets. In order to determine the real configuration of two drops in contact the authors solve numerically the augmented Laplace equation of capillarity which accounts for the interaction between the droplets. Then the total interaction energy is alteratively calculated by integrating the energy density along the surfaces of the droplets. The numerical comparison shows that the equilibrium film radius and thickness, as well as the interaction energy calculated by means of the simplified model, are in very good agreement with the results from the more detailed (but more complex) approach. Numerical calculations of the equilibrium line tensions acting at the film periphery, a function of the droplet radius, are performed. The obtained results are relevant also to flocs containing more than two particles since the theory predicts pairwise additivity of the interaction energy in most cases. The results can be useful in gaining a deeper understanding of the processes of stabilization of flocculation in emulsions. Emulsions of great importance in many areas of human activity such as oil recovery.

  13. Vesta: its shape and deformed equatorial belt predicted by the wave planetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    At EPSC2011 we stated: "Expected detailed images of Vesta sent by DAWN spacecraft certainly will show a prominent tectonic (must be also compositional) dichotomy of this large asteroid. The assuredness is based on some mainly the HST photos and the wave planetology fundamental conception: Theorem 1 - " Ce lestial bodies are dichotomous""[1]. Now a convexo-concave shape of Vesta is well known but the huge deep depression of the south hemisphere is assigned to two random large impacts almost at one place [2, 3]. This supposition has a very small probability, besides the largest asteroid Ceres also has a large depression at one side (the Piazzi basin). The theorem 1 of the wave planetology explains that all celestial bodies (not only small ones) are subjected to a warping action of the fundamental wave1 uplifting one side and subsiding (pressing in) the opposite one. This is a manifestation of the orbital energy acting in any body moving in keplerian noncircular orbit with changing acceleration (a). Arising inertia-gravity force F= (a1 - a2) x m is very important because of large planetary masses (m) and large cosmic speeds. Increase and decrease of accelerations were much larger in the beginning of planetary formation when orbits were more elliptical. Thus, pressing in of the subsiding hemisphere-segment is so strong that it often squeezes out some mantle material appearing as elevation-mound (compare to the Hawaii in the Pacific basin and look at Hyperion with a large basin and a mound at its center, Fig, 1, 2). Vesta's prominent subsiding equatorial belt with graben systems [4] (Fig. 4, 5) is a manifestation of another general planetary rule : " Rotating celestial body tends to even angular momenta of tropics and extra-tropics by regulating mass distribution and distance to the rotation axis " [5-7]. Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-tropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets

  14. Ore body shapes versus regional deformation patterns as a base for 3D prospectivity mapping in the Skellefte Mining District, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, T.; Skyttä, P.; Hermansson, T.; Weihed, P.

    2012-04-01

    The current work in progress is based on detailed structural analysis carried out during the last years, which unravels the crustal evolution of the ore bearing Palaeoproterozoic Skellefte District in northern Sweden. The shape and orientation of the volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VMS) ore bodies through the district is modeled in three dimensions and reflected against the regional deformation patterns. By doing this we aim to understand the coupling between the transposition of the ore bodies and the deformation structures in the host rocks, honoring both local deformation features and regional structural transitions. The VMS ore bodies are modeled in gOcad (Paradigm) visualizing both the strike and dip of the ore lenses as well as their dimensions. 25 deposits are currently available in 3D and modelling of the remaining 55 deposits is planned or partly in progress. The ore deposits and mineralizations are classified according to their shape and size. The complexly deformed ore bodies are described each independently. Subsequently, the VMS deposits are plotted on the structural map of the Skellefte district displaying their size and strike, dip and plunge values in order to show their spatial distribution and their relationship with shear zones. The preliminary results show a good correlation between the shape and orientation of the ore bodies and the related structures. Plotting the VMS deposits on a structural map clearly demonstrates the close spatial relation of the ore deposits and regional scale shear zones. Furthermore, the deformation style within the ore deposits generally mimics the deformation style of the shear zones, e.g. the plunge of elongate ore bodies parallels the mineral lineation of the related shear zone. Based on these results, the location and shape of ore deposits may be estimated, which is an important tool for prospectivity mapping and near mine exploration of ore districts.

  15. Detection of degradation in polyester implants by analysing mode shapes of structure vibration.

    PubMed

    Samami, Hassan; Pan, Jingzhe

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on using vibration analysis to detect degradation in degrading polyesters. A numerical model of a degrading plate sample is considered. The plate is assumed to degrade following the typical behaviour of amorphous copolymers of polylactide and polyglycolide. Due to the well-known autocatalytic effect in the degradation of these polyesters, the inner core of the plate degrades faster than outer surface region, forming layers of materials with varying Young׳s modulus. Firstly the change in molecular weight and corresponding change in Young׳s modulus at different times are calculated using the mathematical models developed in our previous work. Secondly the first four mode shapes of transverse vibration of the plate are calculated using the finite element method. Finally the curvature of the mode shapes are calculated and related to the spatial distribution of the polymer degradation. It is shown that the curvature of the mode shapes can be used to detect the onset and distribution of polymer degradation. The level of measurement accuracy required in an experiment is presented to guide practical applications of the method. At the end of this paper a demonstration case of coronary stent is presented showing how the method can be used to detect degradation in an implant of sophisticated structure. PMID:27235780

  16. Right Ventricle Functional Parameters Estimation in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Using a Robust Shape Based Deformable Model

    PubMed Central

    Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich; Dehlaghi, Vahab; Zadeh, Ali Mohammad; Fallahi, Alireza; Pooyan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac right-ventricle functions plays an essential role in diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD). Among clinical tests, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now becoming the most valid imaging technique to diagnose ARVD. Fatty infiltration of the right ventricular free wall can be visible on cardiac MRI. Finding right-ventricle functional parameters from cardiac MRI images contains segmentation of right-ventricle in each slice of end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle and calculation of end diastolic and end systolic volume and furthermore other functional parameters. The main problem of this task is the segmentation part. We used a robust method based on deformable model that uses shape information for segmentation of right-ventricle in short axis MRI images. After segmentation of right-ventricle from base to apex in end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle, volume of right-ventricle in these phases calculated and then, ejection fraction calculated. We performed a quantitative evaluation of clinical cardiac parameters derived from the automatic segmentation by comparison against a manual delineation of the ventricles. The manually and automatically determined quantitative clinical parameters were statistically compared by means of linear regression. This fits a line to the data such that the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the residuals is minimized. The results show low RMSE for Right Ventricle Ejection Fraction and Volume (≤ 0.06 for RV EF, and ≤ 10 mL for RV volume). Evaluation of segmentation results is also done by means of four statistical measures including sensitivity, specificity, similarity index and Jaccard index. The average value of similarity index is 86.87%. The Jaccard index mean value is 83.85% which shows a good accuracy of segmentation. The average of sensitivity is 93.9% and mean value of the specificity is 89.45%. These results show the reliability of proposed

  17. Numerical analyses of radiative heat transfer in any arbitrarily-shaped axisymmetric enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, M. Ben; Askri, F.; Jemni, A.; Nasrallah, S. Ben

    2006-02-01

    A numerical approach for the treatment of radiative heat transfer in any irregularly-shaped axisymmetric enclosure filled with absorbing, emitting and scattering gray media is developed. Radiative transfer equation (RTE) is formulated for a general axisymmetric geometrical configurations, and the discretized equation is conducted using an unstructured meshes, generated by an appropriate computer algorithm, and the control volume finite element method which frequently adopted in CFD problems. A computer procedure has been done to solve the discretized RTE and to examine the accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed numerical approach. By using this computer algorithm, five test cases, a cylindrical enclosure with absorbing and emitting medium, a diffuser shaped axisymmetric enclosure, a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure with a curved wall, a furnace with axially varying medium temperature and a rocket nozzle, are treated and the obtained results agree very well with other published works. Furthermore, the developed computer procedure has an accurate CPU time and it can be coupled easily with CFD codes.

  18. A technique for recording polycrystalline structure and orientation during in situ deformation cycles of rock analogues using an automated fabric analyser.

    PubMed

    Peternell, M; Russell-Head, D S; Wilson, C J L

    2011-05-01

    Two in situ plane-strain deformation experiments on norcamphor and natural ice using synchronous recording of crystal c-axis orientations have been performed with an automated fabric analyser and a newly developed sample press and deformation stage. Without interrupting the deformation experiment, c-axis orientations are determined for each pixel in a 5 × 5 mm sample area at a spatial resolution of 5 μm/pixel. In the case of norcamphor, changes in microstructures and associated crystallographic information, at a strain rate of ∼2 × 10(-5) s(-1), were recorded for the first time during a complete in situ deformation-cycle experiment that consisted of an annealing, deformation and post-deformation annealing path. In the case of natural ice, slower external strain rates (∼1 × 10(-6) s(-1)) enabled the investigation of small changes in the polycrystal aggregate's crystallography and microstructure for small amounts of strain. The technical setup and first results from the experiments are presented.

  19. Label-fusion-segmentation and deformation-based shape analysis of deep gray matter in multiple sclerosis: the impact of thalamic subnuclei on disability.

    PubMed

    Magon, Stefano; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Amann, Michael; Weier, Katrin; Naegelin, Yvonne; Andelova, Michaela; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stippich, Christoph; Lerch, Jason P; Kappos, Ludwig; Sprenger, Till

    2014-08-01

    Deep gray matter (DGM) atrophy has been reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) already at early stages of the disease and progresses throughout the disease course. We studied DGM volume and shape and their relation to disability in a large cohort of clinically well-described MS patients using new subcortical segmentation methods and shape analysis. Structural 3D magnetic resonance images were acquired at 1.5 T in 118 patients with relapsing remitting MS. Subcortical structures were segmented using a multiatlas technique that relies on the generation of an automatically generated template library. To localize focal morphological changes, shape analysis was performed by estimating the vertex-wise displacements each subject must undergo to deform to a template. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the volume of specific thalamic nuclei (the ventral nuclear complex) together with normalized gray matter volume explains a relatively large proportion of expanded disability status scale (EDSS) variability. The deformation-based displacement analysis confirmed the relation between thalamic shape and EDSS scores. Furthermore, white matter lesion volume was found to relate to the shape of all subcortical structures. This novel method for the analysis of subcortical volume and shape allows depicting specific contributions of DGM abnormalities to neurological deficits in MS patients. The results stress the importance of ventral thalamic nuclei in this respect.

  20. Thermal deformation of cryogenically cooled silicon crystals under intense X-ray beams: measurement and finite-element predictions of the surface shape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Sánchez del Río, Manuel; Monaco, Giulio; Detlefs, Carsten; Roth, Thomas; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    X-ray crystal monochromators exposed to white-beam X-rays in third-generation synchrotron light sources are subject to thermal deformations that must be minimized using an adequate cooling system. A new approach was used to measure the crystal shape profile and slope of several cryogenically cooled (liquid nitrogen) silicon monochromators as a function of beam power in situ and under heat load. The method utilizes multiple angular scans across the Bragg peak (rocking curve) at various vertical positions of a narrow-gap slit downstream from the monochromator. When increasing the beam power, the surface of the liquid-nitrogen-cooled silicon crystal deforms from a concave shape at low heat load to a convex shape at high heat load, passing through an approximately flat shape at intermediate heat load. Finite-element analysis is used to calculate the crystal thermal deformations. The simulated crystal profiles and slopes are in excellent agreement with experiments. The parameters used in simulations, such as material properties, absorbed power distribution on the crystal and cooling boundary conditions, are described in detail as they are fundamental for obtaining accurate results. PMID:23765298

  1. Inferences of Diplodocoid (Sauropoda: Dinosauria) Feeding Behavior from Snout Shape and Microwear Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background As gigantic herbivores, sauropod dinosaurs were among the most important members of Mesozoic communities. Understanding their ecology is fundamental to developing a complete picture of Jurassic and Cretaceous food webs. One group of sauropods in particular, Diplodocoidea, has long been a source of debate with regard to what and how they ate. Because of their long lineage duration (Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous) and cosmopolitan distribution, diplodocoids formed important parts of multiple ecosystems. Additionally, fortuitous preservation of a large proportion of cranial elements makes them an ideal clade in which to examine feeding behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings Hypotheses of various browsing behaviors (selective and nonselective browsing at ground-height, mid-height, or in the upper canopy) were examined using snout shape (square vs. round) and dental microwear. The square snouts, large proportion of pits, and fine subparallel scratches in Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, Nigersaurus, and Rebbachisaurus suggest ground-height nonselective browsing; the narrow snouts of Dicraeosaurus, Suuwassea, and Tornieria and the coarse scratches and gouges on the teeth of Dicraeosaurus suggest mid-height selective browsing in those taxa. Comparison with outgroups (Camarasaurus and Brachiosaurus) reinforces the inferences of ground- and mid-height browsing and the existence of both non-selective and selective browsing behaviors in diplodocoids. Conclusions/Significance These results reaffirm previous work suggesting the presence of diverse feeding strategies in sauropods and provide solid evidence for two different feeding behaviors in Diplodocoidea. These feeding behaviors can subsequently be tied to paleoecology, such that non-selective, ground-height behaviors are restricted to open, savanna-type environments. Selective browsing behaviors are known from multiple sauropod clades and were practiced in multiple environments. PMID:21494685

  2. Quantitative evaluation of grain shapes by utilizing elliptic Fourier and principal component analyses: Implications for sedimentary environment discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Ohta, T.

    2013-12-01

    Fourier analysis has allowed new advancements in determining the shape of sand grains. However, the full quantification of grain shapes has not as yet been accomplished, because Fourier expansion produces numerous descriptors, making it difficult to give a comprehensive interpretation to the results of Fourier analysis. In order to overcome this difficulty, this study focuses on the combined application of elliptic Fourier and principal component analyses (EF-PCA). The EF-PCA method allows to reduce the number of extracted Fourier variables and enables a visual inspection of the results of Fourier analysis. Thus, this approach would facilitate the understanding of the sedimentological significances of the results obtained using Fourier expansion. 0.250-0.355 mm sized quartz grains collected from glacial, foreshore, fluvial and aeolian environments were scanned by digitalizing microscope in 200 magnification ratio. Then the elliptic Fourier coefficients of grain outlines were analyzed using a program package SHAPE (Iwata and Ukai, 2002). In order to examine the degree of roundness and surface smoothness of grains, principal component analysis was then performed on both unstandardized and standardized data matrices obtained by elliptic Fourier analysis. The result of EF-PCA based on unstandardized data matrix extracted descriptors describing overall form and shape of grains because unstandardized data matrix would enhance the contribution of large amplitude and low frequency trigonometric functions. The shape descriptors extracted by this method can be interpreted as elongation index (REF1) and multiple bump indices (REF2, REF3, and REF2 + REF3). These descriptors indicate that aeolian, foreshore, and fluvial sediments contain grains with shapes similar to circles, ellipses, and cylinders, respectively. Meanwhile, the result of EF-PCA based on standardized data matrix enhanced the contribution of low amplitude and high frequency trigonometric functions, meaning that

  3. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation near Hualien City, eastern Taiwan Analysed By Persistent Scatterer InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Lin, M.; Yen, J.; Chang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Hualien is located in eastern part of Taiwan, and is the collision boundary in the northern of Huatung Longitudinal Valley between the Philippine Sea tectonic plate and Eurasian tectonic plate(Biq, 1981; Barrier and Angelier, 1986). There are several active faults, such as Milun fault, Beipu fault and Minyi fault, pass through the Hualien city, and create many crustal deformation. According to previous researches (Hsu, 1956; Lin, 1962; Yu, 1997) we know Milun fault is a thrust and left lateral fault, and the fault plane incline to east. Minyi fault also is a left lateral and a slight reverse fault, but it's fault plane incline to west. (Chang, 1994; Yu, 1997) We applied the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR, Hooper, 2007) to observe temporally-variable processes of Hualien city between 2004 to 2008. At the same time, precise leveling and GPS data were taken for the auxiliary data to verify the deformation rate and pattern in this area. In the Hualien city area, our observation showed that the active faults separate this area into several distinct blocks. Most of the blocks moved slowly, but the hanging wall of the Milun fault decreases 5- 8mm in line of sight (LOS) direction between 15 May 2004 to 24 Feb 2007, then increases 3-6mm in LOS between 1 Dec 2007 to 5 Jan 2008. The deformation reversed its direction in 2007. The western surface of Hualien City displays continuous deformation about 1.5-2mm/yr , which spread along the Beipu fault. Our preliminary investigation indicated that between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an abrupt increase in seismicity, which coincided with PSInSAR observation of a large displacement. The distribution of shallow source earthquakes correlate with the area with large deformation. Our following works include continuing observation of the Hualien City, and decipher the relationship between earthquakes and surface deformation, and model the fault action in Hualien City with time series.

  4. Combined magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses provide a powerful tool for in vivo assessment of deformation along human muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Karakuzu, Agah; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle fiber direction strain provides invaluable information for characterizing muscle function. However, methods to study this for human muscles in vivo are lacking. Using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based deformation analyses and diffusion tensor (DT) imaging based tractography combined, we aimed to assess muscle fiber direction local tissue deformations within the human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. Healthy female subjects (n=5, age=27±1 years) were positioned prone within the MR scanner in a relaxed state with the ankle angle fixed at 90°. The knee was brought to flexion (140.8±3.0°) (undeformed state). Sets of 3D high resolution MR, and DT images were acquired. This protocol was repeated at extended knee joint position (177.0±1.0°) (deformed state). Tractography and Demons nonrigid registration algorithm was utilized to calculate local deformations along muscle fascicles. Undeformed state images were also transformed by a synthetic rigid body motion to calculate strain errors. Mean strain errors were significantly smaller then mean fiber direction strains (lengthening: 0.2±0.1% vs. 8.7±8.5%; shortening: 3.3±0.9% vs. 7.5±4.6%). Shortening and lengthening (up to 23.3% and 116.7%, respectively) occurs simultaneously along individual fascicles despite imposed GM lengthening. Along-fiber shear strains confirm the presence of much shearing between fascicles. Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also show non-uniform distribution. Inhomogeneity of fiber strain indicates epimuscular myofascial force transmission. We conclude that MR and DT imaging analyses combined provide a powerful tool for quantifying deformation along human muscle fibers in vivo. This can help substantially achieving a better understanding of normal and pathological muscle function and mechanisms of treatment techniques. PMID:27429070

  5. Combined magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses provide a powerful tool for in vivo assessment of deformation along human muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Karakuzu, Agah; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle fiber direction strain provides invaluable information for characterizing muscle function. However, methods to study this for human muscles in vivo are lacking. Using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based deformation analyses and diffusion tensor (DT) imaging based tractography combined, we aimed to assess muscle fiber direction local tissue deformations within the human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. Healthy female subjects (n=5, age=27±1 years) were positioned prone within the MR scanner in a relaxed state with the ankle angle fixed at 90°. The knee was brought to flexion (140.8±3.0°) (undeformed state). Sets of 3D high resolution MR, and DT images were acquired. This protocol was repeated at extended knee joint position (177.0±1.0°) (deformed state). Tractography and Demons nonrigid registration algorithm was utilized to calculate local deformations along muscle fascicles. Undeformed state images were also transformed by a synthetic rigid body motion to calculate strain errors. Mean strain errors were significantly smaller then mean fiber direction strains (lengthening: 0.2±0.1% vs. 8.7±8.5%; shortening: 3.3±0.9% vs. 7.5±4.6%). Shortening and lengthening (up to 23.3% and 116.7%, respectively) occurs simultaneously along individual fascicles despite imposed GM lengthening. Along-fiber shear strains confirm the presence of much shearing between fascicles. Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also show non-uniform distribution. Inhomogeneity of fiber strain indicates epimuscular myofascial force transmission. We conclude that MR and DT imaging analyses combined provide a powerful tool for quantifying deformation along human muscle fibers in vivo. This can help substantially achieving a better understanding of normal and pathological muscle function and mechanisms of treatment techniques.

  6. MRI analyses show that kinesio taping affects much more than just the targeted superficial tissues and causes heterogeneous deformations within the whole limb.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Yucesoy, Can A

    2015-12-16

    Kinesio taping (KT) is widely used in the treatment of sports injuries and various neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is considered as selectively effective on targeted tissues and its mechanical effects have not been quantified objectively. Ascribed to continuity of muscular and connective tissues, mechanical loading imposed can have widespread heterogeneous effects. The aim was to characterize the mechanical effects of KT objectively and to test the hypotheses that KT causes acutely, local deformations not necessarily (I) in agreement with tape adhering direction and (II) limited to the directly targeted tissues. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance image sets were acquired in healthy human subjects (n=5) prior to and acutely after KT application over the skin along m. tibialis anterior (TA). Hip, knee and ankle angles were kept constant. Demons image registration algorithm was used to calculate local tissue deformations within the lower leg, in vivo. Mean peak tissue strains were significantly higher than strain artifacts. Only KT-to-TA region in part shows local deformations in agreement with tape adhering direction whereas, superficial skin, the rest of KT-to-TA and TA regions show deformations (up to 51.5% length change) in other directions. Non-targeted tissues also show sizable heterogeneous deformations, but in smaller amplitudes. Inter-subject variability is notable. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for a detailed assessment of local tissue deformation occurring acutely after KT application. The findings confirm our hypotheses and characterize how KT affects the underlying tissues, both immediately targeted and distant. This allows revealing mechanisms that can affect clinical outcomes of KT objectively. PMID:26556717

  7. MRI analyses show that kinesio taping affects much more than just the targeted superficial tissues and causes heterogeneous deformations within the whole limb.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Yucesoy, Can A

    2015-12-16

    Kinesio taping (KT) is widely used in the treatment of sports injuries and various neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is considered as selectively effective on targeted tissues and its mechanical effects have not been quantified objectively. Ascribed to continuity of muscular and connective tissues, mechanical loading imposed can have widespread heterogeneous effects. The aim was to characterize the mechanical effects of KT objectively and to test the hypotheses that KT causes acutely, local deformations not necessarily (I) in agreement with tape adhering direction and (II) limited to the directly targeted tissues. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance image sets were acquired in healthy human subjects (n=5) prior to and acutely after KT application over the skin along m. tibialis anterior (TA). Hip, knee and ankle angles were kept constant. Demons image registration algorithm was used to calculate local tissue deformations within the lower leg, in vivo. Mean peak tissue strains were significantly higher than strain artifacts. Only KT-to-TA region in part shows local deformations in agreement with tape adhering direction whereas, superficial skin, the rest of KT-to-TA and TA regions show deformations (up to 51.5% length change) in other directions. Non-targeted tissues also show sizable heterogeneous deformations, but in smaller amplitudes. Inter-subject variability is notable. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for a detailed assessment of local tissue deformation occurring acutely after KT application. The findings confirm our hypotheses and characterize how KT affects the underlying tissues, both immediately targeted and distant. This allows revealing mechanisms that can affect clinical outcomes of KT objectively.

  8. Low temperature nickel titanium iron shape memory alloys: Actuator engineering and investigation of deformation mechanisms using in situ neutron diffraction at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vinu B.

    Shape memory alloys are incorporated as actuator elements due to their inherent ability to sense a change in temperature and actuate against external loads by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. The cubic so-called austenite to the trigonal so-called R-phase transformation in NiTiFe shape memory alloys offers a practical temperature range for actuator operation at low temperatures, as it exhibits a narrow temperature-hysteresis with a desirable fatigue response. Overall, this work is an investigation of selected science and engineering aspects of low temperature NiTiFe shape memory alloys. The scientific study was performed using in situ neutron diffraction measurements at the newly developed low temperature loading capability on the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory and encompasses three aspects of the behavior of Ni46.8Ti50Fe3.2 at 92 K (the lowest steady state temperature attainable with the capability). First, in order to study deformation mechanisms in the R-phase in NiTiFe, measurements were performed at a constant temperature of 92 K under external loading. Second, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in one-time, high-stroke, actuator applications (such as in safety valves), a NiTiFe sample was strained to approximately 5% (the R-phase was transformed to B19' phase in the process) at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under a load. Third, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in cyclic, low-stroke, actuator applications (such as in cryogenic thermal switches), a NiTiFe sample was strained to 1% at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under load. Neutron diffraction spectra were recorded at selected time and stress intervals during these experiments. The spectra were subsequently used to obtain quantitative information related to the phase-specific strain, texture and phase fraction evolution using the

  9. Shape Memory Characteristics of Ti(sub 49.5)Ni(sub 25)Pd(sub 25)Sc(sub 0.5) High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy After Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Garg, A.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Kireeva, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    A Ti(49.5)Ni25Pd25Sc(0.5) high-temperature shape memory alloy is thermomechanically processed to obtain enhanced shape-memory characteristics: in particular, dimensional stability upon repeated thermal cycles under constant loads. This is accomplished using severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) and post-processing annealing heat treatments. The results of the thermomechanical experiments reveal that the processed materials display enhanced shape memory response, exhibiting higher recoverable transformation and reduced irrecoverable strain levels upon thermal cycling compared with the unprocessed material. This improvement is attributed to the increased strength and resistance of the material against defect generation upon phase transformation as a result of the microstructural refinement due to the ECAE process, as supported by the electron microscopy observations.

  10. High-spin states in {sup 191,193}Au and {sup 192}Pt: Evidence for oblate deformation and triaxial shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Oktem, Y.; Akkus, B.; Bostan, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Erduran, M. N.; Balabanski, D. L.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Kruecken, R.; Novak, J. R.; Danchev, M.; Djongolov, M.; Riedinger, L. L.; Zeidan, O.; Erturk, S.; Gladniski, K. A.; Rainovski, G.; Guerdal, G.; Goon, J. Tm.; Hartley, D. J.

    2007-10-15

    High-spin states of {sup 191,193}Au and {sup 192}Pt have been populated in the {sup 186}W({sup 11}B, xn) and {sup 186}W({sup 11}B, p4n) reactions, respectively, at a beam energy of 68 MeV and their {gamma} decay was studied using the YRAST Ball detector array at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. The level scheme of {sup 193}Au has been extended up to I{sup {pi}}=55/2{sup +}. New transitions were observed also in {sup 191}Au and {sup 192}Pt. Particle-plus-Triaxial-Rotor (PTR) and Total Routhian Surface (TRS) calculations were performed to determine the equilibrium deformations of the Au isotopes. The predictions for oblate deformations in these nuclei are in agreement with the experimental data. Development of nonaxial shapes is discussed within the framework of the PTR model.

  11. In vitro investigation of the cleaning efficacy, shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of continuous rotary, reciprocating rotary and manual instrumentations in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Nahid; Mohammadi, Abbas; Amirabadi, Foroogh; Ramazani, Mohsen; Ehsani, Farzane

    2016-01-01

    Background. Efficient canal preparation is the key to successful root canal treatment. This study aimed to assess the cleaning and shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of rotary, reciprocating and manual instrumentation in canal preparation of primary molars. Methods. The mesiobuccal canals of 64 extracted primary mandibular second molars were injected with India ink. The samples were randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups. Experimental groups were instrumented with K-file, Mtwo in continuous rotation and Reciproc in reciprocating motion, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The files were discarded after four applications. Shaping ability was evaluated using CBCT. After clearing, ink removal was scored. Preparation time and file fracture or deformation was also recorded. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19 using chi-squared, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results. Considering cleanliness, at coronal third Reciproc was better than K-file (P < 0.001), but not more effective than Mtwo (P = 0.080). Furthermore, Mtwo leaved the canal cleaner than K-file (P = 0.001). In the middle third, only Reciproc exhibited better cleaning efficacy than K-file (P = 0.005). In the apical third, no difference was detected between the groups (P = 0.794). Regarding shaping ability, no differences were found between Reciproc and Mtwo (P = 1.00). Meanwhile, both displayed better shaping efficacy than K-file (P < 0.05). Between each two groups, there were differences in preparation time (P < 0.05), with Reciproc being the fastest. No file failure occurred. Conclusion. Fast and sufficient cleaning and shaping could be achieved with Mtwo and especially with Reciproc. PMID:27092215

  12. In vitro investigation of the cleaning efficacy, shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of continuous rotary, reciprocating rotary and manual instrumentations in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Nahid; Mohammadi, Abbas; Amirabadi, Foroogh; Ramazani, Mohsen; Ehsani, Farzane

    2016-01-01

    Background. Efficient canal preparation is the key to successful root canal treatment. This study aimed to assess the cleaning and shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of rotary, reciprocating and manual instrumentation in canal preparation of primary molars. Methods. The mesiobuccal canals of 64 extracted primary mandibular second molars were injected with India ink. The samples were randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups. Experimental groups were instrumented with K-file, Mtwo in continuous rotation and Reciproc in reciprocating motion, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The files were discarded after four applications. Shaping ability was evaluated using CBCT. After clearing, ink removal was scored. Preparation time and file fracture or deformation was also recorded. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19 using chi-squared, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results. Considering cleanliness, at coronal third Reciproc was better than K-file (P < 0.001), but not more effective than Mtwo (P = 0.080). Furthermore, Mtwo leaved the canal cleaner than K-file (P = 0.001). In the middle third, only Reciproc exhibited better cleaning efficacy than K-file (P = 0.005). In the apical third, no difference was detected between the groups (P = 0.794). Regarding shaping ability, no differences were found between Reciproc and Mtwo (P = 1.00). Meanwhile, both displayed better shaping efficacy than K-file (P < 0.05). Between each two groups, there were differences in preparation time (P < 0.05), with Reciproc being the fastest. No file failure occurred. Conclusion. Fast and sufficient cleaning and shaping could be achieved with Mtwo and especially with Reciproc.

  13. In vitro investigation of the cleaning efficacy, shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of continuous rotary, reciprocating rotary and manual instrumentations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Mohammadi, Abbas; Amirabadi, Foroogh; Ramazani, Mohsen; Ehsani, Farzane

    2016-01-01

    Background. Efficient canal preparation is the key to successful root canal treatment. This study aimed to assess the cleaning and shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of rotary, reciprocating and manual instrumentation in canal preparation of primary molars. Methods. The mesiobuccal canals of 64 extracted primary mandibular second molars were injected with India ink. The samples were randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups. Experimental groups were instrumented with K-file, Mtwo in continuous rotation and Reciproc in reciprocating motion, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The files were discarded after four applications. Shaping ability was evaluated using CBCT. After clearing, ink removal was scored. Preparation time and file fracture or deformation was also recorded. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19 using chi-squared, Fisher’s exact test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results. Considering cleanliness, at coronal third Reciproc was better than K-file (P < 0.001), but not more effective than Mtwo (P = 0.080). Furthermore, Mtwo leaved the canal cleaner than K-file (P = 0.001). In the middle third, only Reciproc exhibited better cleaning efficacy than K-file (P = 0.005). In the apical third, no difference was detected between the groups (P = 0.794). Regarding shaping ability, no differences were found between Reciproc and Mtwo (P = 1.00). Meanwhile, both displayed better shaping efficacy than K-file (P < 0.05). Between each two groups, there were differences in preparation time (P < 0.05), with Reciproc being the fastest. No file failure occurred. Conclusion. Fast and sufficient cleaning and shaping could be achieved with Mtwo and especially with Reciproc. PMID:27092215

  14. The Gis of The Central Apennines Geodetic Network (ca-geonet): Database Description and Application For Crustal Deformation Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.; Baldi, P.; Basili, R.; Casula, G.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.; Serpelloni, E.

    During the last few years we set up and surveyed a GPS geodetic network to inves- tigate the active tectonic areas of the Central Apennine, using a combination of per- manent and not-permanent geodetic stations. The final goal is to evaluate the geodetic strain rate and the coseismic deformations of this seismically active area. For an op- timal management and mapping of the CA-GeoNet (Central Apennine Geodetic Net- work) a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been developed. It has been real- ized on PC platform using MapInfo 6.0 and ArcGIS8.1 software. The GIS manages a database consisting of different classes (Geodesy, Topography, Geography, Seismicity and Geology) administrated according to Thematic Layers. A GIS is required for the multidisciplinary approach and management of large multi-scaled data set, geographi- cally referenced and with continuos or discrete coverage; it is particularly designed to analyze GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis related with tectonic structures and seismicity. Through GIS we can display site displacements, strain rate maps and create new layers gained by numerical and spatial analysis. A tailor-made application to support co-seismic deformation scenarios related with historical and instrumental earthquakes and seismic sources, has been created. Our procedures can be successfully applied to design new geodetic networks in seismically active areas with respect to the known seismotectonic features. This dynamic approach in plan- ning and managing GPS networks for geodynamic applications provides a useful tool for geophysical research, earthquake impact and civil protection management.

  15. Lattice-Preferred Orientation in Deformed Novaculite - Comparison of in-situ Results Using BEARTEX and Post-Mortem EBSD Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenweber, A.; Thomas, S.; Burnley, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Berkeley Texture Package BEARTEX is a Windows-based computer software that combines various algorithms to analyze lattice-preferred orientation in polycrystalline materials. BEARTEX was initially designed to interpret diffraction intensity data from pole figure goniometers. Recently it has been successfully used to process synthetic forsterite powder diffraction data from in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction taken during deformation (Bollinger et al. 2012). Our study aims to test the practicability of using BEARTEX to analyze the evolution of lattice-preferred orientation in natural polycrystalline quartz (novaculite) during deformation. In-situ X-ray diffraction data was collected during the deformation of novaculite at 2.5 GPa and up to 1000 °C in a D-DIA apparatus using the ten-element energy-dispersive detector at the NSLS beamline X17B2. Diffraction intensities are a function of crystal orientation, expressed in azimuth angle η and pole distance ψ. The latter is the angle between the normal of a given diffraction plane and the vertical direction of the D-DIA apparatus - our principal stress direction during compression. Orientation-dependent diffraction intensities were corrected for different responses of the single detectors and x-ray absorption effects of the anvils. Orientation distributions (ODs) and inverse pole figures were calculated using BEARTEX. In addition, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses were carried out on the deformed novaculite samples. Generated pole figures were compared with those derived from BEARTEX. Textural properties of our novaculite starting material complicated the BEARTEX analyses. The relatively strong variation of grain sizes in our natural specimens caused non-random diffraction intensity distributions. Those lead to non-random distributions of crystal orientations when analyzed with BEARTEX, although pole figures from EBSD data clearly show random crystal orientations. In an attempt to solve this problem

  16. Elasto-plastic finite element analyses of two-dimensional rolling and sliding contact deformation of bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Hahn, G. T.; Bhargava, V.; Rubin, C.

    1989-01-01

    An elastoplastic finite element analysis of repeated rolling-plus-sliding contact is presented for the elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic properties of hardened bearing steel at room temperature. Contacts in the absence of frictional heating are found to produce peak cyclic strain ranges and residual stresses that are similar to the values obtained for pure rolling. For the cases considered, the energy dissipated as heat by plastic deformation is found to be 3-15 percent of the energy dissipated at the surface by friction.

  17. Competition between Zener's double exchange and p-d exchange in δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se with shape deformation: LDA + U calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Liu, T.; Wei, X. Y.; Zhu, Y.; Shi, D. N.; Ma, C. L.; Zhang, K. C.; Yang, Z. Q.

    2015-11-01

    By local-density approximation plus U (LDA + U) calculations, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se are dominated by Zener's p-d exchange, which is different from Zener's double exchange mechanism by PBE calculations. The main peak of Mn d states is shifted to lower energy -3.9 eV versus Fermi energy. All configurations under shape deformation are strong ferromagnetic (FM) ones due to the large splitting of Mn d states. Because of the two-dimensional (2D) ordered Mn atoms with hole and long ranged effect of p-d exchange coupling, exchange energy of the supercell with crystal constant is much larger with p-d exchange than that with double exchange. The largest exchange energy is around the crystal constant. Fermi level across the valley of FM Mn d states makes the FM state much stable. Comparing with pure ZnSe, p-type co-doping of Li in δ-(Zn, Mn, Li)Se has a significant effect on the atomic structure. These results are useful in the research of DMS with shape deformation and p-type co-doping for spintronic applications.

  18. Terrestrial LiDAR analyses of coseismic surface deformation from the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapa Earthquake (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Elliott, A. J.; Oskin, M. E.; Taylor, M. H.; Herrs, A. J.; Hinojosa, A.; Kreylos, O.; Bernardin, T. S.; Cowgill, E.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution terrestrial LiDAR (t-LiDAR) datasets collected 12-18 days after the 4 April 2010, Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in northern Mexico demonstrate the capability of t-LiDAR to rapidly quantify and preserve details of coseismic surface deformation at high resolution. Though the quantity of equipment required even for highly portable t-LiDAR systems remains a limitation, where data acquisition can be accomplished the resulting cm-resolution topography can uniquely enhance understanding of how earthquakes deform the earth’s surface. Our surveys of the El Mayor-Cucapah surface rupture, totaling ~2 km in length, quantify fresh meter-scale fault scarps, centimeter- to decimeter-scale distributed slip, and striations on the fault face. To visualize and interpret the data, we use the KeckCAVES immersive 3D virtual reality space and a 3D-enabled desktop computer. We emphasize the importance of interacting with the full resolution point data, even when mapping on gridded digital elevation models (DEMs). An important component of our analysis is to manually de-vegetate the point clouds to improve resolution of fine topographic features. Using the point-cloud data, we measured lineations on near-vertical bedrock fault faces. Populations of data from two sites independently resolve two southeast plunging slip-vectors that differ in rake by ~25°. The shallower set of lineations (30±5° rake) closely matches the 34±8° rake of the 2010 slip vector we measured from displaced landforms. Thus, we conclude that the steeper and more poorly preserved set of lineations (55±10° rake) indicate the slip direction in the penultimate surface-rupturing event. To constrain displacement during the previous earthquake, we reconstructed the pre-rupture topography and collected profiles across a prominent paleo-fault scarp. These profiles yield an average throw of 3.3 m, from which we estimate an oblique right-normal displacement during the penultimate event of ~4 m along a

  19. The environmental rule in the shape of soft-sediment deformation structures in the shelf to base of slope settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnerat de Oliveira, Carlos M.

    2015-04-01

    Soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS) can be divided into in situ and detached structures. The latter include slides, slumps, and debrites (mass transport deposits) and dominate the literature compared to processes and products of deformation that takes place in situ. This study addresses in detail the origin and development of in situ SSDS and their stratigraphic and depositional context in well exposed shelf edge and upper to lower slope successions of the Karoo and the Neuquén basins. In the study areas, in situ SSDS occur preferentially in shelf-edge/upper-slope settings, but can also develop in middle and lower slope settings in association with detached structures. Flame and load structures are the most common in situ features and a systematic quantitative study of flame structures shows that they are elongated and have preferential orientation. The relationship between morphometric parameters, such as height, width and spacing, is statistically proven to be independent of the scale of occurrence and depositional environment in the majority of the cases. This indicates that similar physical and rheological conditions occurred during their formation in both shallow and deepwater environments. Divergence in the trends can indicate changes in the boundary conditions. Comparison of statistical results from Karoo and Neuquén datasets indicates a grain size influence on the dimension of structures; the greater the grain size the shorter the flame structures. Morphology of flame structures is independent of outcrop scale, as shown by statistical relationships. This characteristic allows prediction of the dimension/geometry of flame structures at outcrop scale. Extrapolation to scales below or above the range of outcrop limits must be done with care. The methodological basis for the evaluation of these out of outcrop scale situations are initiated here but still need to be effectively evaluated.

  20. Surface deformation as a guide to kinematics and three-dimensional shape of slow-moving, clay-rich landslides, Honolulu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, R.L.; Messerich, J.; Fleming, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Two slow-moving landslides in Honolulu, Hawaii, were the subject of photogrammetric measurements, field mapping, and subsurface investigation to learn whether surface observations can yield useful information consistent with results of subsurface investigation. Mapping focused on structural damage and on surface features such as scarps, shears, and toes. The x-y-z positions of photo-identifiable points were obtained from aerial photographs taken at three different times. The measurements were intended to learn if the shape of the landslide failure surface can be determined from systematic surface observations and whether surface observations about deformation are consistent with photogrammetrically-obtained displacement gradients. Field and aerial photographic measurements were evaluated to identify the boundaries of the landslides, distinguish areas of incipient landslide enlargement, and identify zones of active and passive failure in the landslides. Data reported here apply mainly to the Alani-Paty landslide, a translational, earth-block landslide that damaged property in a 3.4-ha residential area. It began moving in the 1970s and displacement through 1991 totaled 4 m. Thickness, determined from borehole data, ranges from about 7 to 10 m; and the slope of the ground surface averages about 9??. Field evidence of deformation indicated areas of potential landslide enlargement outside the well-formed landslide boundaries. Displacement gradients obtained photogrammetrically and deformation mapping both identified similar zones of active failure (longitudinal stretching) and passive failure (longitudinal shortening) within the body of the landslide. Surface displacement on the landslide is approximately parallel to the broadly concave slip surface.

  1. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina M.; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie A.; Hall, John K.; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abdelrahmem; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-12-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat, providing the first multibeam imaging of the seafloor across the entire gulf head spanning both Israeli and Jordanian territorial waters. Analyses of the seafloor morphology show that the gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba Fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi ’Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault zone to the west and the Ayla Fault zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water

  2. Effects of microstructure and deformation conditions on the hot formability of Ni-Ti-Hf shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeoung Han; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Seong Woong; Hong, Jae Keun; Oh, Chang-Seok; Jeon, Yeong Min; Kim, Kyong Min; Yeom, Jong Taek

    2014-12-01

    Ingots of Ni-Ti-Hf shape memory alloys were prepared by vacuum arc re-melting. Isothermal hot compression tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 degrees C and at strain rates from 10(-2) s(-1) to 1.0 s(-1). A decrease in the Ni content below 50.2 at.% significantly deteriorated the hot workability due to the formation of a brittle second phase. Also, the low Ni content alloy showed poor workability when the temperature exceeded 900 degrees C. Additional compression tests were conducted under various conditions to clarify the effects of the chemical composition, solidification anisotropy, and the strain rate.

  3. Three-dimensional deformation response of a NiTi shape memory helical-coil actuator during thermomechanical cycling: experimentally validated numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, B.; Nicholson, D. E.; Saleeb, A. F.; Padula, S. A., II; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2016-09-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators often operate under a complex state of stress for an extended number of thermomechanical cycles in many aerospace and engineering applications. Hence, it becomes important to account for multi-axial stress states and deformation characteristics (which evolve with thermomechanical cycling) when calibrating any SMA model for implementation in large-scale simulation of actuators. To this end, the present work is focused on the experimental validation of an SMA model calibrated for the transient and cyclic evolutionary behavior of shape memory Ni49.9Ti50.1, for the actuation of axially loaded helical-coil springs. The approach requires both experimental and computational aspects to appropriately assess the thermomechanical response of these multi-dimensional structures. As such, an instrumented and controlled experimental setup was assembled to obtain temperature, torque, degree of twist and extension, while controlling end constraints during heating and cooling of an SMA spring under a constant externally applied axial load. The computational component assesses the capabilities of a general, multi-axial, SMA material-modeling framework, calibrated for Ni49.9Ti50.1 with regard to its usefulness in the simulation of SMA helical-coil spring actuators. Axial extension, being the primary response, was examined on an axially-loaded spring with multiple active coils. Two different conditions of end boundary constraint were investigated in both the numerical simulations as well as the validation experiments: Case (1) where the loading end is restrained against twist (and the resulting torque measured as the secondary response) and Case (2) where the loading end is free to twist (and the degree of twist measured as the secondary response). The present study focuses on the transient and evolutionary response associated with the initial isothermal loading and the subsequent thermal cycles under applied constant axial load. The experimental

  4. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie; Hall, John; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abed; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-05-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat (gulf head). The gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi 'Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault Zone to the west and the Ayla Fault Zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water depths line the southwest margin of the gulf. These terraces are truncated by faulting along their northern end. Fossil coral reefs, which have a similar

  5. Effects of the regimes of heat treatment and of the magnitude and temperature of the inducing deformation on the characteristics of the shape-memory effect in the 43Ti-46Ni-9Nb-2Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. N.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Shchedrina, E. V.; Presnyakov, D. V.; Grishin, E. N.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of the types and regimes of heat treatment, as well as of the temperature and magnitude of the shape-memory-inducing deformation on the structural changes, martensitic transformations, parameters of the crystal lattice and substructure, and the mechanical and thermomechanical characteristics have been studied in the new shape-memory alloy of composition 43Ti-46Ni-9Nb-2Zr (at %). The conditions of the appearance and realization of the shape-memory effect have been determined. The relationship between the structural features and the values of the thermomechanical characteristics of the alloy has been revealed. The regimes of the heat treatment and of the deformation that induces the shape-memory effect, which provide in this alloy the obtaining of high thermomechanical characteristics, have been determined.

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Severe Plastic Deformation and Thermomechanical Training on the Functional Stability of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Maier, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of a conventional thermomechanical training procedure and severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion to achieve improved functional stability in a Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy. Thermomechanical testing indicates that both methods result in enhanced shape memory characteristics, such as reduced irrecoverable strain and thermal hysteresis. The mechanisms responsible for the improvements are discussed in light of microstructural findings from transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Experimental mapping of DNA duplex shape enabled by global lineshape analyses of a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Tham, Kenneth W; Qin, Peter Z

    2014-10-01

    Sequence-dependent variation in structure and dynamics of a DNA duplex, collectively referred to as 'DNA shape', critically impacts interactions between DNA and proteins. Here, a method based on the technique of site-directed spin labeling was developed to experimentally map shapes of two DNA duplexes that contain response elements of the p53 tumor suppressor. An R5a nitroxide spin label, which was covalently attached at a specific phosphate group, was scanned consecutively through the DNA duplex. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor rotational motions of R5a, which report on DNA structure and dynamics at the labeling site. An approach based on Pearson's coefficient analysis was developed to collectively examine the degree of similarity among the ensemble of R5a spectra. The resulting Pearson's coefficients were used to generate maps representing variation of R5a mobility along the DNA duplex. The R5a mobility maps were found to correlate with maps of certain DNA helical parameters, and were capable of revealing similarity and deviation in the shape of the two closely related DNA duplexes. Collectively, the R5a probe and the Pearson's coefficient-based lineshape analysis scheme yielded a generalizable method for examining sequence-dependent DNA shapes.

  8. Design and analyses of an ultra-thin flat lens for wave front shaping in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Li, Yiyan; Tian, Xuelong; Zeng, Dajun; Gao, Xueli

    2015-12-01

    An ultra-thin flat lens is proposed for focusing circularly polarized light in the visible range. Anisotropic C-shaped nanoantennas with phase discontinuities are used to form the metasurface of the lens. The phase response of the C-shaped nanoantennas can be manipulated by simply rotating the angle of the unit nanoantenna. A 600 nm incident circularly polarized light is focused by the proposed techniques. Good agreements are observed by using our MoM and a commercial FDTD software package. The computation time spent by using MoM is approximately 10-100 times smaller than using FDTD. All the results show the proposed nanoantenna array has a great potential for nanoscale optical microscopy, solar cell energy conversion enhancement, as well as integrated optical circuits.

  9. Grain-size and grain-shape analyses using digital imaging technology: Application to the fluvial formation of the Ngandong paleoanthropological site in Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipola, Maija

    2013-04-01

    This study implements grain-size and grain-shape analyses to better understand the fluvial processes responsible for forming the Ngandong paleoanthropological site along the Solo River in Central Java. The site was first discovered and excavated by the Dutch Geological Survey in the early 1930's, during which fourteen Homo erectus fossils and thousands of other macrofaunal remains were uncovered. The Homo erectus fossils discovered at Ngandong are particularly interesting to paleoanthropologists because the morphology of the excavated crania suggests they are from a recently-living variety of the species. The primary scientific focus for many years has been to determine the absolute age of the Ngandong fossils, while the question of exactly how the Ngandong site itself formed has been frequently overlooked. In this study I use Retsch CAMSIZER digital imaging technology to conduct grain-size and grain-shape analyses of sediments from the terrace stratigraphy at the Ngandong site to understand if there are significant differences between sedimentary layers in grain-size and/or grain-shape, and what these differences mean in terms of local paleoflow dynamics over time. Preliminary analyses indicate there are four distinct sedimentary layers present at Ngandong with regard to size sorting, with the fossil-bearing layers proving to be the most poorly-sorted and most similar to debris-flow deposits. These results support hypotheses by geoarchaeologists that the fossil-bearing layers present at Ngandong were deposited during special flow events rather than under normal stream flow conditions.

  10. Experimental mapping of DNA duplex shape enabled by global lineshape analyses of a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Tham, Kenneth W.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-dependent variation in structure and dynamics of a DNA duplex, collectively referred to as ‘DNA shape’, critically impacts interactions between DNA and proteins. Here, a method based on the technique of site-directed spin labeling was developed to experimentally map shapes of two DNA duplexes that contain response elements of the p53 tumor suppressor. An R5a nitroxide spin label, which was covalently attached at a specific phosphate group, was scanned consecutively through the DNA duplex. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor rotational motions of R5a, which report on DNA structure and dynamics at the labeling site. An approach based on Pearson's coefficient analysis was developed to collectively examine the degree of similarity among the ensemble of R5a spectra. The resulting Pearson's coefficients were used to generate maps representing variation of R5a mobility along the DNA duplex. The R5a mobility maps were found to correlate with maps of certain DNA helical parameters, and were capable of revealing similarity and deviation in the shape of the two closely related DNA duplexes. Collectively, the R5a probe and the Pearson's coefficient-based lineshape analysis scheme yielded a generalizable method for examining sequence-dependent DNA shapes. PMID:25092920

  11. Evolution of opercle bone shape along a macrohabitat gradient: species identification using mtDNA and geometric morphometric analyses in neotropical sea catfishes (Ariidae).

    PubMed

    Stange, Madlen; Aguirre-Fernández, Gabriel; Cooke, Richard G; Barros, Tito; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2016-08-01

    Transitions between the marine and freshwater macrohabitat have occurred repeatedly in the evolution of teleost fishes. For example, ariid catfishes have moved from freshwater to marine environments, and vice versa. Opercles, a skeletal feature that has been shown to change during such transitions, were subjected to 2D geometric morphometric analyses in order to investigate evolutionary shape changes during habitat transition in ariid catfishes and to test the influence of habitat on shape changes. A mtDNA marker, which proved useful in previous studies, was used to verify species identities. It greatly improved the assignment of specimens to a species, which are difficult to assign by morphology alone. The application of a mtDNA marker confirmed the occurrence of Notarius biffi in Central America, South of El Salvador. Molecular identification together with principal component analysis (PCA) and further morphological inspection of neurocrania indicated the existence of a cryptic species within Bagre pinnimaculatus. Principal component (PC) scores of individual specimens clustered in morphospace by genus rather than by habitat. Strong phylogenetic structure was detected using a permutation test of PC scores of species means on a phylogenetic tree. Calculation of Pagel's λ suggested that opercle shape evolved according to a Brownian model of evolution. Yet canonical variate analysis (CVA) conducted on the habitat groups showed significant differences in opercle shapes among freshwater and marine species. Overall, opercle shape in tropical American Ariidae appears to be phylogenetically constrained. This verifies the application of opercle shape as a taxonomic tool for species identification in fossil ariid catfishes. At the same time, adaptation to freshwater habitats shows characteristic opercle shape trajectories in ariid catfishes, which might be used to detect habitat preferences in fossils. PMID:27547357

  12. Volumetric and shape analyses of subcortical structures in United States service members with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tate, David F; Wade, Benjamin S C; Velez, Carmen S; Drennon, Ann Marie; Bolzenius, Jacob; Gutman, Boris A; Thompson, Paul M; Lewis, Jeffrey D; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Shenton, Martha E; Ritter, John L; York, Gerald E

    2016-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant health concern. The majority who sustain mTBI recover, although ~20 % continue to experience symptoms that can interfere with quality of life. Accordingly, there is a critical need to improve diagnosis, prognostic accuracy, and monitoring (recovery trajectory over time) of mTBI. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been successfully utilized to examine TBI. One promising improvement over standard volumetric approaches is to analyze high-dimensional shape characteristics of brain structures. In this study, subcortical shape and volume in 76 Service Members with mTBI was compared to 59 Service Members with orthopedic injury (OI) and 17 with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) only. FreeSurfer was used to quantify structures from T1-weighted 3 T MRI data. Radial distance (RD) and Jacobian determinant (JD) were defined vertex-wise on parametric mesh-representations of subcortical structures. Linear regression was used to model associations between morphometry (volume and shape), TBI status, and time since injury (TSI) correcting for age, sex, intracranial volume, and level of education. Volumetric data was not significantly different between the groups. JD was significantly increased in the accumbens and caudate and significantly reduced in the thalamus of mTBI participants. Additional significant associations were noted between RD of the amygdala and TSI. Positive trend-level associations between TSI and the amygdala and accumbens were observed, while a negative association was observed for third ventricle. Our findings may aid in the initial diagnosis of mTBI, provide biological targets for functional examination, and elucidate regions that may continue remodeling after injury.

  13. Mechanical and deformation analyses of pile foundation for supporting structure of off-shore wind turbine at Changhua coast in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. C.; Lin, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the bearing capacities and mechanical behaviors of pile foundation installed on the seabed of wind farm near Chang-Hua coast of western Taiwan for the supporting structure of offshore wind turbine. A series of three-dimensional (3-D) numerical modeling of pile foundation subjected to various types of combined loading were carried out using Plaix-3D finite element program to investigate the interactive behaviors between soil and pile. In the numerical modeling, pile diameter, pile length and pile spacing were selected as design parameters to inspect their effects on the bearing capacities and deformation behaviors of the pile foundation. For a specific design parameter combination, one can obtain the corresponding loading-displacement curve, various ultimate bearing capacities, V-H (Vertical-Horizontal combined loading) ultimate bearing capacity envelope, and p-ycurve of pile foundation. Numerical results indicate that: (1) Large displacement and plastic points at ultimate state mostly distribute and concentrate in the topsoil of seabed and around pile head. (2) The soil resistance on the soil-pile interface is ascending with the increases of depth, pile diameter and pile length. (3) The vertical and horizontal bearing capacities of pile group increase significantly with the increase of pile diameter. (4) The vertical and bending moment capacities of pile group increase greatly with the increase of pile length whereas the horizontal capacity is almost insensitive to pile length. (5) The bending moment of pile is highly influenced by the pile spacing. (6) For different design parameters, the shape of ultimate bearing capacity envelopes of pile group on V-H plane is similar while the envelopes will expand as the design parameters increase. For different loading levels of bending moment, the envelopes on V-H plane will contract gradually as the bending moment loading increasing.

  14. Effect of Temperature on the Deformation Behavior of B2 Austenite in a Polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at.Percent) Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Superelasticity in austenitic B2-NiTi is of great technical interest and has been studied in the past by several researchers [1]. However, investigation of temperature dependent deformation in B2-NiTi is equally important since competing mechanisms of stress-induced martensite (SIM), retained martensite, plastic and deformation twinning can lead to unusual mechanical behaviors. Identification of the role of various mechanisms contributing to the overall deformation response of B2-NiTi is imperative to understanding and maturing SMA-enabled technologies. Thus, the objective of this work was to study the deformation of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) above A(sub f) (105 C) in the B2 state at temperatures between 165-440 C, and generate a B2 deformation map showing active deformation mechanisms in different temperature-stress regimes.

  15. Inferences of Integrated Lithospheric Strength from Plate-Scale Analyses of Deformation Observed in the Aegean-Anatolian Region and the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In the context of a comprehensive review of the rheology and strength of the lithosphere (Marine and Petroleum Geology, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2011.05.008), Evgene Burov described the difficulty of extrapolating rock deformation laws derived from laboratory experiments to the time and length scales that apply when the Earth's lithosphere is deformed. Not only does the extrapolation introduce a large uncertainty, but even the relative importance of different possible mechanisms of deformation may be uncertain. Even though lithospheric deformation has a strong conceptual and theoretical basis, it is therefore essential, as Burov argued, that deformation laws for the lithosphere must be calibrated by using observations of deformation that occurs on a lithospheric length scale and at geological strain rates. The influence of regionally varying factors like crustal thickness, geothermal gradient and tectonic environment may induce large variations in how rapidly the lithosphere may deform in response to an applied load, not least in the contrast from continent to ocean. Plates may be deformed by different loading mechanisms but, when deformation is distributed over a broad region, the strain-rate field may be approximately constant with depth and we may integrate the in-plane stress components across the thickness of the lithosphere to derive a depth-averaged constitutive law for the deformation. This approximation is the basis for the thin viscous sheet formulation of lithospheric deformation and, in combination with appropriate observations, it allows us to calibrate the integrated resistance to processes like regional extension or convergence. In this talk I will summarise what we learn about effective lithospheric rheology from two recent studies of the distribution and rates of diffuse deformation of the lithosphere in, firstly the Anatolian-Aegean region, and secondly the Central Indian Ocean. In the first case the distribution of deformation is consistent

  16. 40Ar/ 39Ar and RbSr analyses from ductile shear zones from the Atacama Fault Zone, northern Chile: the age of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuber, Ekkehard; Hammerschmidt, Konrad; Friedrichsen, Hans

    1995-11-01

    The influence of deformation on the K-Ar and the Rb-Sr isotope system is investigated. It is assumed that, due to the diffusion processes involved, deformation has a similar effect on isotopic equilibrium as has temperature. In order to examine the influence of deformation on the K-Ar and the Rb-Sr isotope systems two shear zones from the Atacama Fault Zone (AFZ), situated in the north Chilean Coastal Cordillera, have been investigated. The AFZ, which was active as a sinistral strike-slip fault during the Mesozoic, has two sets of shear zones, one formed under amphibolite (SZ1), one under greenschist facies conditions (SZ2), Rb-Sr and 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations were conducted on samples from cross sections of each set. In SZ1 the hornblendes and bioties from a weakly deformed sample reveal cooling ages of 153-152 and 150 ± 1 Ma, respectively. Biotite from the center of the shear zone of SZ1 gave an isochron of 143.9 ± 0.3 Ma (MSWD = 0.04) which is interpreted as the age of deformation which produced resetting of the mineral system. In SZ2 hornblendes yielded 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau (cooling) ages of ˜ 138 Ma. Biotites from undeformed samples gave Rb-Sr and 40Ar/ 39Ar total degassing ages of 130 ± 1 Ma, whereas biotite from the mylonitic rocks yielded 126-125 Ma which dates the time of deformation. Sr isotope homogenization occurred in the mylonitic rocks, and is most likely a result of deformation. The formation of SZ1 can be correlated to the Araucanian (= Nevadan) phase. The deformation in SZ2 is related to the onset of uplift and cooling of the Coastal Cordilleran magmatic arc.

  17. A novel orthogonal transmission-virtual grating method and its applications in measuring micro 3-D shape of deformed liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Huang, Xianfu; Xie, Huimin

    2013-02-01

    Deformed liquid surface directly involves the surface tension, which can always be used to account for the kinematics of aquatic insects in gas-liquid interface and the light metal floating on the water surface. In this paper a novel method based upon deformed transmission-virtual grating is proposed for determination of deformed liquid surface. By addressing an orthogonal grating (1-5 line/mm) under the transparent water groove and then capturing images from upset of the deformed water surface, a displacement vector of full-field which directly associates the 3-D deformed liquid surface then can be evaluated by processing the recorded deformed fringe pattern in the two directions (x- and y-direction). Theories and equations for the method are thoroughly delivered. Validation test to measure the deformed water surface caused by a Chinese 1-cent coin has been conducted to demonstrate the ability of the developed method. The obtained results show that the method is robust in determination of micro 3-D surface of deformed liquid with a submicron scale resolution and with a wide range application scope.

  18. Polyphase deformation history and strain analyses of the post-amalgamation depositional basins in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: Evidence from Fatima, Ablah and Hammamat Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimi, Zakaria; El-Fakharani, Abdelhamid; Abdeen, Mamdouh M.

    2014-11-01

    Post-amalgamation depositional basins <650 Ma (PADBs), dominated by volcano-sedimentary assemblages, unconformably overlying Neoproterozoic juvenile (mantle-derived) arcs, represent one of the main collage in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). In this work, three distinguished PADBs; namely Fatima, Ablah and Hammamat PADBs, are the subject matter of detailed field investigations and quantitative strain analysis in an attempt to highlight the polyphase deformation history of these PADBs and to discern whether the ANS's PADBs were deformed at the same time or not. The Fatima PADB is studied in its type locality along the northwestern flank of Wadi Fatima; between Jabal Abu Ghurrah and Jabal Daf, in Jeddah tectonic terrane. The Ablah PADB is examined around Wadi Yiba, further south of its type locality near Jabal Ablah in Al-Aqiq Quadrangle, in Asir tectonic terrane. The Hammamat PADB is investigated in Wadi Umm Gheig, Wadi Allaqi and Wadi Hodein in the Egyptian Eastern Desert tectonic terrane. It is supposed that the Fatima is a basin controlled by dextral transcurrent shearing occurred along the NE-oriented Wadi Fatima Shear Zone and the Ablah is a strike-slip pull-apart basin, and both basins were believed to be deposited during and soon after the Nabitah Orogeny (680-640 Ma) that marked suturing of the Afif terrane with the oceanic ANS terranes to the west. They were affected by at least three Neoproterozoic deformation phases and show geometric and kinematic relationships between folding and thrusting. The Hammamat PADB is a fault-bounded basin affected by a NW-SE- to NNW-SSE-oriented shortening phase just after the deposition of the molasse sediments, proved by NW- to NNW-verging folds and SE- to SSE-dipping thrusts that were refolded and thrusted in the same direction. The shortening phase in the Hammamat was followed by a transpressional wrenching phase related to the Najd Shear System, which resulted in the formation of NW-SE sinistral-slip faults associated

  19. Three-dimensional analyses of facial soft tissue configuration of Japanese females with jaw deformity--a trial of polygonal view of facial soft tissue deformity in orthognathic patients.

    PubMed

    Shimomatsu, Kouta; Nozoe, Etsuro; Ishihata, Kiyohide; Okawachi, Takako; Nakamura, Norifumi

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue configuration of Japanese females with/without jaw deformity in order to establish the polygonal view of facial soft tissue deformity three-dimensionally. A polygonal chart was applied to assess the outcomes of orthognathic surgery for patients with mandibular hyperplasia with/without deviation. The study included 20 Japanese females with mandibular hyperplasia with/without deviation. All patients received mandibular setback surgery, and 3D measurements were carried out pre-operation, and at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively using a non-contact laser scanning system. Eighteen soft tissue landmarks were set on each 3D image and used to calculate a set of selected parameters. As controls, 20 Japanese females with class I occlusion were included. A polygonal chart was constructed based on the mean and S.D. of the control group. Patients with mandibular protrusion characteristically demonstrated significant variances in the items around the lower face. In asymmetric patients, deviation in the mental area disappeared postoperatively, but a small deviation remained when compared to the controls. The method used in this study seems to be a useful index for diagnosis and as a treatment plan for patients with mandibular hyperplasia with/without deviation.

  20. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians’ Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians’ expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers’ effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians’ perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis – proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes – of a marimbists’ expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer’s expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants’ individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants’ attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception–action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication. PMID

  1. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians' Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians' expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers' effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians' perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis - proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes - of a marimbists' expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer's expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants' individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants' attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception-action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication.

  2. The use of a new laser particle sizer and shape analyser to detect and evaluate gelatinous microparticles suspended in reconstituted anthracycline infusion solutions.

    PubMed

    Confalonieri, C; Cristina, G; Farina, M

    1991-01-01

    The anthracyclines are an important group of antitumour drugs: the best known anthracyclines are doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and epirubicin (Pharmorubicin), both of which are very active against a wide range of solid tumours and haematological malignancies. They are marketed as lyophilized formulations that need to be reconstituted for administration with water for injections or sodium chloride injection. With the aim of reducing the risks of contamination during reconstitution (spillage, spray formation, etc.) and of enhancing the rate of dissolution (that is otherwise slow because of the formation of conglomerates and gelatinous masses), a new formulation (rapid dissolution formula, RDF) containing parabens (hydroxybenzoate esters) as anti-aggregants has been developed; the formulation is a freeze-dried product and is characterized by a practically instantaneous and complete reconstitution. A valid estimate of the completeness of dissolution has been objectively achieved by means of an instrument (Galai CIS-1) that acts both as a particle sizer and a shape analyser; the instrument is equipped with a rotating laser system that defines a toroidal-cylindrical space inside the solution in which every moving particle is measured and, at the same time, visualized on a monitor by an electronically driven video microscope. The instrument has been applied with very satisfactory results to the visualization of the reconstitutional behaviour of commercial lots of Adriamycin and Pharmorubicin lyophilized products, reconstituted at a concentration of 2 mg ml-1 with sodium chloride injection. PMID:2043716

  3. Spectral shape deformation in inverse spin Hall voltage in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}|Pt bilayers at high microwave power levels

    SciTech Connect

    Lustikova, J. Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-21

    We report on the deformation of microwave absorption spectra and of the inverse spin Hall voltage signals in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave power levels in a 9.45-GHz TE{sub 011} cavity. As the microwave power increases from 0.15 to 200 mW, the resonance field shifts to higher values, and the initially Lorentzian spectra of the microwave absorption intensity as well as the inverse spin Hall voltage signals become asymmetric. The contributions from opening of the magnetization precession cone and heating of YIG cannot well reproduce the data. Control measurements of inverse spin Hall voltages on thin-film YIG|Pt systems with a range of line widths underscore the role of spin-wave excitations in spectral deformation.

  4. Upper crustal emplacement and deformation of granitoids inside the Uppermost Unit of the Cretan nappe stack: constraints from U-Pb zircon dating, microfabrics and paleostress analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneuker, Tilo; Dörr, Wolfgang; Petschick, Rainer; Zulauf, Gernold

    2015-03-01

    The present study is dealing with the emplacement and deformation of diorite and quartz diorite exposed along new road cuts between Agios Nikolaos and Sitia (Uppermost Unit, eastern Crete). Mingling of both melt types is indicated by enclaves of diorite inside quartz diorite and vice versa. The diorite and quartz diorite intruded into coarse-grained white marble, which is in lateral contact to, but also forms the roof of, the intrusive body. Evidence for contact metamorphism is indicated by increasing grain size of calcite in the marble with decreasing distance from the diorite. U-Pb (TIMS) dating of zircons, separated from quartz diorite, yielded a concordant age at 74.0 ± 0.25 Ma, which is interpreted as emplacement age. As this age is close to published K-Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite, the melt should have intruded and cooled down rapidly at upper structural levels, which is not common for granitoids of the Uppermost Unit of Crete. Upper crustal melt emplacement is also documented by stoped blocks and by the lack of any ductile (viscous) deformation. The diorite and quartz diorite, however, are affected by strong post-Oligocene brittle faulting. Paleostress analysis, based on these faults, revealed a change in stress field from N-S and NNW-SSE shortening by thrusting (convergence between African and European plates) to NNE-SSW and NE-SW shortening accommodated by strike-slip (SW-ward extrusion of the Anatolian microplate). Calcite-twin density indicates high differential stress (260 ± 20 MPa) related to these phases of crustal shortening.

  5. Three-dimensional finite-element models on the deformation of forearcs caused by aseismic ridge subduction: The role of ridge shape, friction coefficient of the plate interface and mechanical properties of the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Geological and geophysical data show that the forearc of subduction zones experiences strong deformation during the subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges. In order to better understand ridge-related forearc deformation patterns, we performed a series of three-dimensional finite-element models, in which we varied the ridge shape, the friction coefficient of the plate interface and the mechanical strength of the forearc. Experiments were carried out for migrating/non-migrating ridges and accretive/erosive margins, respectively. Our results show that the subducting ridge uplifts the forearc and induces horizontal displacements that alter the strain regime of both erosive and accretive forearcs. Generally, shortening prevails in front of the ridge, while domains of shortening and extension exist above the ridge. Models with stationary ridges show high uplift rates only above the ridge tip, whereas the forearc above migrating ridges experiences uplift above the leading ridge flank and subsequent subsidence above the trailing flank. The height and width of the ridge as well as the friction coefficient of the plate interface have the largest effect on the forearc deformation patterns, whereas the mechanical strength of the forearc plays a lesser role. Forearc indentation at the trench is largest for high and broad ridges, high friction coefficients and/or weak forearc material. Shortening and extension of the forearc above the ridge are more intense for high and narrow ridges. Our model results provide information about the distribution of ridge-induced displacements and strain fields and hence help to identify deformation patterns caused by subducting aseismic ridges in nature.

  6. Microsphiltration: a microsphere matrix to explore erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Lavazec, Catherine; Deplaine, Guillaume; Safeukui, Innocent; Perrot, Sylvie; Milon, Geneviève; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; David, Peter H; Buffet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The altered deformability of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum is central in malaria -pathogenesis, as it influences the hemodynamic properties of the infected cell and its retention in the spleen. Exported parasite proteins, as well as the shape and volume of the parasite itself, influence the deformability of the infected erythrocyte. To explore changes in erythrocyte deformability, we have developed a new method, called microsphiltration, based on filtration of erythrocytes through a mixture of metal microspheres that mimic the geometry of inter-endothelial splenic slits. As P. falciparum develops in its host cell, the retention rates observed in microspheres correlate with the progressive decrease of erythrocyte deformability and with the retention rates in the spleen. The yields of microsphiltration separation allow for molecular analyses of subpopulations with distinct mechanical phenotypes.

  7. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  8. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this paper, I present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in the analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  9. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  10. Interaction of a screw dislocation with a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity with interface stresses under anti-plane deformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Schiavone, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We propose an elegant and concise general method for the solution of a problem involving the interaction of a screw dislocation and a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped, elastic inhomogeneity in which the contribution of interface/surface elasticity is incorporated using a version of the Gurtin-Murdoch model. The analytic function inside the arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity is represented in the form of a Faber series. The real periodic function arising from the contribution of the surface mechanics is then expanded as a Fourier series. The resulting system of linear algebraic equations is solved through the use of simple matrix algebra. When the elastic inhomogeneity represents a hole, our solution method simplifies considerably. Furthermore, we undertake an analytical investigation of the challenging problem of a screw dislocation interacting with two closely spaced nano-sized holes of arbitrary shape in the presence of surface stresses. Our solutions quite clearly demonstrate that the induced elastic fields and image force acting on the dislocation are indeed size-dependent. PMID:25294965

  11. Evolution of chevron folds by profile shape changes: comparison between multilayer deformation experiments and folds of the Bendigo-Castlemaine goldfields, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. J.; Winsor, C. N.

    1996-06-01

    The Bendigo-Castlemaine goldfields lie within the well-known chevron-folded Ordovician turbidites of Victoria, Australia. Detailed re-examination of surface and subsurface maps indicates that there are other common fold shapes (boxfolds and flat-topped folds with subsidiary hinges) which are enclosed within chevron folded layers and are traceable into them. Plasticine multilayer experiments were performed to examine the fold profile shape evolution of chevrons and associated folds. In the experiments chevrons evolved from sinusoidal folds or boxfolds. Sinusoidal folds became chevrons mainly via hinge sharpening, while boxfolds evolved into chevrons via hinge migration and fusion of the hinges. For boxfolds, hinge migration rates controlled rates of limb steepening versus median segment (i.e., the flat top of the boxfold) length reduction during bulk shortening. Periodic slowing or "jamming" of hinge migration led to stepwise) limb-dip increases, and buckling of median segments producing analogous fold styles to those seen in the Bendigo-Castlemaine folds. Limb steepening in a boxfolded multilayer must lead to dilations spanning the median segment and/or curving of boxfold axial planes. The latter dilations experience the same shape changes as their enclosing folded layers. In nature such dilation may be represented by bedding-parallel veins which are subsequently incorporated onto chevron limbs as a result of hinge migration. Thus bedding-parallel veins which are continuous over chevron hinges and are folded in the hinge zones need not be pre-folding or early-folding.

  12. Conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective motions in the critical point of the phase transition from spherical to deformed nuclear shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, R.; Budaca, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Based on the competition between γ-stable and γ-rigid collective motions mediated by a rigidity parameter, a two-parameter exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian is proposed. The γ-stable part of the Hamiltonian is restricted to stiff oscillations around the γ value of the rigid motion. The separated potential for β and γ shape variables is chosen such that in the lower limit of this parameter, the model recovers exactly the ES-X(5) model, while in the upper limit it tends to the prolate γ-rigid solution X(3). The combined effect of the rigidity and stiffness parameters on the energy spectrum and wave function is duly investigated. Numerical results are given for few nuclei showing such ambiguous behaviour.

  13. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  14. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  15. True polar wander of a quasi-fluid planet with a fossil shape: Effect of strain energy due to tidal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, temporal variation of a paleo-pole position due to TPW is formulated and calculated based on strain energy in a previous study. Especially, quasi-fluid approximation is suitable to deal with large-scale and long-term variation of a paleo-pole position. Thus, an orientation of a paleo-rotation axis in each time step is estimated in here by following conventional formulation with the quasi-fluid approximation for TPW, and simultaneously by taking total energy minimization into account. In practice, this procedure is physically same as to incorporate elastic torque due to tidal deformation of a lithosphere into the Liouville equation including the quasi-fluid approximation. In this study, like the previous one, only one symmetric surface load is regarded as a driving force of TPW for convenience sake. In this calculation, variable parameters are defined as follows: a location of emplacement, duration of formation, and maximum of intensity of a load. The result with strain energy is compared with that without strain energy. As a result, the case with the strain energy indicates different characteristics from that without the strain energy in the following points. First, the paleo-poles under steady states are different each other in the cases for same parameters. These results are not consistent even with the previous results concerning just the final condition. Second, also in the cases for same parameters, time scales when the paleo-poles reach the static limits are different. These results demonstrate the fact that strain energy within a lithosphere effectively weakens influence of a load on TPW. Although this kind of influence has already been pointed out by the previous results just in the cases of the steady states, the present results further revealed similar effect also on a characteristic time scale of TPW. Strictly speaking, however, it is impossible to estimate this exact time scale only by reducing an effective size of a load. This is

  16. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  17. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  18. Study of muscular deformation based on surface slope estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, M.; Goffredo, M.; Schmid, M.; Neri, A.

    2006-02-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is very important to take into account these phenomena. The aim of this work is the evaluation of skin and muscular deformation, and the modeling of body segment elastic behavior obtained by analysing video sequences that capture a muscle contraction. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using non linear operators. Experimental results, obtained by applying the proposed method to several video sequences, where biceps brachial isometric contraction was present, show the effectiveness of this technique.

  19. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  20. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  1. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  2. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  3. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  4. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Henon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  5. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-01

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Hénon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  6. Two refractory Wild 2 terminal particles from a carrot-shaped track characterized combining MIR/FIR/Raman microspectroscopy and FE-SEM/EDS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Ferrari, M.; Della Corte, V.; Baratta, G. A.; Brunetto, R.; Dartois, E.; Djouadi, Z.; Merouane, S.; Borg, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, M. E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present the analyses results of two bulk Terminal Particles, C2112,7,171,0,0 and C2112,9,171,0,0, derived from the Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2 returned by the Stardust mission. Each particle embedded in a slab of silica aerogel was pressed in a diamond cell. This preparation, as expected, made it difficult to identify the minerals and organic materials present in these particles. This problem was overcome using a combination of three different analytical techniques, viz. FE-SEM/EDS, IR, and Raman microspectroscopy that allowed identifying the minerals and small amounts of amorphous carbon present in both particles. TP2 and TP3 were dominated by Ca-free and low-Ca, Mg-rich, Mg,Fe-olivine. The presence of melilite in both particles is supported by IR microspectroscopy, but is not confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy, possibly because the amounts are too small to be detected. TP2 and TP3 show similar silicate mineral compositions, but Ni-free and low-Ni, subsulfur (Fe,Ni)S grains are present in TP2 only. TP2 contains indigenous amorphous carbon hot spots; no indigenous carbon was identified in TP3. These nonchondritic particles probably originated in a differentiated body. This work found an unanticipated carbon contamination following the FE-SEM/EDS analyses. It is suggested that organic materials in the embedding silica aerogel are irradiated during FE-SEM/EDS analyses creating a carbon gas that develops a strong fluorescence continuum. The combination of the selected analytical techniques can be used to characterize bulk Wild 2 particles without the need of extraction and removal of the encapsulating aerogel. This approach offers a relatively fast sample preparation procedure, but compressing the samples can cause spurious artifacts, viz. silica contamination. Because of the combination of techniques, we account for these artifacts.

  7. MOLECULAR EVIDENCE CONFIRMS SISTER RELATIONSHIP OF ARDISSONEA, CLIMACOSPHENIA, AND TOXARIUM WITHIN THE BIPOLAR CENTRIC DIATOMS (BACILLARIOPHYTA, MEDIOPHYCEAE), AND CLADISTIC ANALYSES CONFIRM THAT EXTREMELY ELONGATED SHAPE HAS ARISEN TWICE IN THE DIATOMS(1).

    PubMed

    Medlin, Linda K; Sato, Shinya; Mann, David G; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F

    2008-10-01

    With the use of a new kit from Qiagen to amplify total genome quantity, DNA was bulked up from two diatoms that are difficult to grow (Ardissonea and Climacosphenia), and the nuclear SSU rRNA gene was successfully amplified. Results of Bayesian analyses showed that these diatoms are sister to Toxarium and belong to the bi- and multipolar centric diatoms. The results indicate that extremely elongate shape has arisen at least twice in diatoms, in the true pennates, and in the bipolar centrics. The two lateral pattern centers of Ardissonea and Climacosphenia likely represent a modified annulus that subtends ribs internally as well as externally. Studies of sexual reproduction are needed to determine whether Ardissonea, Climacosphenia, and Toxarium achieve their elongate shape by similar means to each other and to true pennates, that is, by controlling the expansion of the auxospores by sequential addition of silicified bands (to form a properizonium or perizonium).

  8. Radioactive 198Au-doped nanostructures with different shapes for in vivo analyses of their biodistribution, tumor uptake, and intratumoral distribution.

    PubMed

    Black, Kvar C L; Wang, Yucai; Luehmann, Hannah P; Cai, Xin; Xing, Wenxin; Pang, Bo; Zhao, Yongfeng; Cutler, Cathy S; Wang, Lihong V; Liu, Yongjian; Xia, Younan

    2014-05-27

    With Au nanocages as an example, we recently demonstrated that radioactive (198)Au could be incorporated into the crystal lattice of Au nanostructures for simple and reliable quantification of their in vivo biodistribution by measuring the γ radiation from (198)Au decay and for optical imaging by detecting the Cerenkov radiation. Here we extend the capability of this strategy to synthesize radioactive (198)Au nanostructures with a similar size but different shapes and then compare their biodistribution, tumor uptake, and intratumoral distribution using a murine EMT6 breast cancer model. Specifically, we investigated Au nanospheres, nanodisks, nanorods, and cubic nanocages. After PEGylation, an aqueous suspension of the radioactive Au nanostructures was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse intravenously, and their biodistribution was measured from the γ radiation while their tumor uptake was directly imaged using the Cerenkov radiation. Significantly higher tumor uptake was observed for the Au nanospheres and nanodisks relative to the Au nanorods and nanocages at 24 h postinjection. Furthermore, autoradiographic imaging was performed on thin slices of the tumor after excision to resolve the intratumoral distributions of the nanostructures. While both the Au nanospheres and nanodisks were only observed on the surfaces of the tumors, the Au nanorods and nanocages were distributed throughout the tumors.

  9. Porosity reduction within shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2016-04-01

    Deformation bands are important structural elements that occur in the upper crust and develop in porous sandstones and even in unconsolidated sands. In contrast to discrete surfaces such as faults, deformation bands represent tabular zones of continuous displacement over several centimeters (Fossen et al., 2007). We present an outcrop-based study on the internal fabric of shear deformation bands that developed in Pleistocene unconsolidated sands in northern Germany. The deformation bands formed in an extensional stress regime, have a normal sense of displacement in a range of centimeters to decimeters, and form conjugate sets that intersect at angles between 70° and 90° (Brandes & Tanner, 2012). Due to their near-surface position, they are a perfect target for the study of deformation band formation prior to burial and diagenesis. Thin section analysis show a significant pore space reduction from the host sediment to the shear deformation band. The boundary between the host sediment and the shear deformation bands can be very sharp. The grains within the deformation band are of the same grain size as the host sediment. Grain shape varies from angular to well-rounded. Many elliptic grains have a long-axis orientation parallel to the trend of the deformation band. The grains in the analysed thin sections are all intact, i.e., there is no evidence for cataclasis. We believe the shear deformation bands are created by a grain-sliding process that decreases the porosity and leads to a denser packing of the sand. This is a porosity reduction mechanism in sandstone that occurs prior to burial without cataclasis. This can have an impact on fluid-flow in unconsolidated sediments in the near-surface. References: Brandes, C. & Tanner, D.C. (2012) Three-dimensional geometry and fabric of shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments. Tectonophysics, 518-521, 84-92. Fossen, H., Schultz, R.A., Shipton, Z.K., & Mair, K. (2007) Deformation bands in sandstone: a

  10. FAME: Software for analysing rock microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammes, Daniel M.; Peternell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Determination of rock microstructures leads to a better understanding of the formation and deformation of polycrystalline solids. Here, we present FAME (Fabric Analyser based Microstructure Evaluation), an easy-to-use MATLAB®-based software for processing datasets recorded by an automated fabric analyser microscope. FAME is provided as a MATLAB®-independent Windows® executable with an intuitive graphical user interface. Raw data from the fabric analyser microscope can be automatically loaded, filtered and cropped before analysis. Accurate and efficient rock microstructure analysis is based on an advanced user-controlled grain labelling algorithm. The preview and testing environments simplify the determination of appropriate analysis parameters. Various statistic and plotting tools allow a graphical visualisation of the results such as grain size, shape, c-axis orientation and misorientation. The FAME2elle algorithm exports fabric analyser data to an elle (modelling software)-supported format. FAME supports batch processing for multiple thin section analysis or large datasets that are generated for example during 2D in-situ deformation experiments. The use and versatility of FAME is demonstrated on quartz and deuterium ice samples.

  11. Deformable micro torque swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modeled as a capsule with a hyper elastic membrane enclosing Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modeled as torques distributed above the cell body. Effects of the membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of cell's reference shape and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like heart shape when Capillary number (Ca) was sufficiently large, and the swimming velocity decreased as Ca was increased. The gravity effect on the membrane tension suggested that the upwards and downwards swimming velocities of Paramecium might be reglated by the calcium ion channels distributed locally around the anterior end. Moreover, the gravity induced deformation made a cell directed vertically downwards, which resulted in a positive geotaxis like behavior with physical origin. These results are important to understand physiology of ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli.

  12. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  13. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  14. Shape control of composite plates and shells with embedded actuators. 2: Desired shape specified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koconis, David B.; Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George S.

    The changes in shapes of fiber-reinforced composite beams, plates and shells affected by embedded piezoelectric actuators were investigated. An analytical method was developed to determine the voltages needed to achieve a specified desired shape. The method is formulated on the basis of mathematical models using two-dimensional, linear, shallow shell theory including transverse shear effects which are important in the case of sandwich construction. The solution technique is a minimization of an error function which is a measure of the difference between the deformed shape caused by the application of voltages and the desired shape. A computationally efficient, user-friendly computer code was written which is suitable for performing the numerical calculations. The code, designated as SHAPE2, gives the voltages needed to achieve specified changes in shape. To validate the method and the computer code, results generated by the code were compared to existing analytical and experimental results. The predictions provided by the SHAPE2 code were in excellent agreement with the results of the other analyses and data.

  15. Microstructure evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B anisotropic magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Hono, K.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.

    2014-05-07

    The microstructural evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets in each stage of hot-deformation process was studied using transmission electron microscopy and three dimensional atom probe (3DAP). The anisotropic growth of initially isotropic grains in rapidly solidified alloy occurs by annealing without pressing. 3DAP analyses showed a higher concentration of rare-earth elements in the intergranular phase parallel to the flat surface of platelet shaped Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains compared to that in the intergranular phase at the side of platelets.

  16. A geometric representation scheme suitable for shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    A geometric representation scheme is outlined which utilizes the natural design variable concept. A base configuration with distinct topological features is created. This configuration is then deformed to define components with similar topology but different geometry. The values of the deforming loads are the geometric entities used in the shape representation. The representation can be used for all geometric design studies; it is demonstrated here for structural optimization. This technique can be used in parametric design studies, where the system response is defined as functions of geometric entities. It can also be used in shape optimization, where the geometric entities of an original design are modified to maximize performance and satisfy constraints. Two example problems are provided. A cantilever beam is elongated to meet new design specifications and then optimized to reduce volume and satisfy stress constraints. A similar optimization problem is presented for an automobile crankshaft section. The finite element method is used to perform the analyses.

  17. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  18. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  19. Physics-based deformable organisms for medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McIntosh, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Previously, "Deformable organisms" were introduced as a novel paradigm for medical image analysis that uses artificial life modelling concepts. Deformable organisms were designed to complement the classical bottom-up deformable models methodologies (geometrical and physical layers), with top-down intelligent deformation control mechanisms (behavioral and cognitive layers). However, a true physical layer was absent and in order to complete medical image segmentation tasks, deformable organisms relied on pure geometry-based shape deformations guided by sensory data, prior structural knowledge, and expert-generated schedules of behaviors. In this paper we introduce the use of physics-based shape deformations within the deformable organisms framework yielding additional robustness by allowing intuitive real-time user guidance and interaction when necessary. We present the results of applying our physics-based deformable organisms, with an underlying dynamic spring-mass mesh model, to segmenting and labelling the corpus callosum in 2D midsagittal magnetic resonance images.

  20. Subsurface deformation in hypervelocity cratering experiments into high-porosity tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Rebecca; Poelchau, Michael H.; Moser, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments on porous tuff targets were carried out to determine the effect of porosity on deformation mechanisms in the crater's subsurface. Blocks of Weibern Tuff with about 43% porosity were impacted by 2.5 mm and 12.0 mm diameter steel spheres with velocities between 4.8 km s-1 and 5.6 km s-1. The postimpact subsurface damage was quantified with computer tomography as well as with meso- and microscale analyses of the bisected crater subsurface. The intensity and style of deformation in mineral clasts and the tuff matrix were mapped and their decay with subsurface depth was determined. Subsurface deformation styles include pore space compaction, clast rotation, as well as microfracture formation. Evaluation of the deformation indicates near-surface energy coupling at a calculated depth of burial of ~2 projectile diameters (dp), which is in conflict with the crater shape, which displays a deep, central penetration tube. Subsurface damage extends to ~2 dp beneath the crater floor in the experiments with 2.5 mm projectiles and increases to ~3 dp for 12 mm projectiles. Based on overprinting relationships and the geometrical orientation of deformation features, a sequence of subsurface deformation events was derived (1) matrix compaction, (2) intragranular crack formation in clasts, (3) deformation band formation in the compacted matrix, (4) tensile fracturing.

  1. Occurrence of oral deformities in larval anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.L.; Altig, R.; Grace, J.B.; Walls, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    We quantified deformities in the marginal papillae, tooth rows, and jaw sheaths of tadpoles from 13 population samples representing three families and 11 sites in the southeastern United States. Oral deformities were observed in all samples and in 13.5-98% of the specimens per sample. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (chytrid) infections were detected in three samples. There was high variability among samples in the pattern and number of discovered deformities. Pairwise associations between oral structures containing deformities were nonrandom for several populations, especially those with B. dendrobatidis infections or high total numbers of deformities. Comparisons of deformities among samples using multivariate analyses revealed that tadpole samples grouped together by family. Analyses of ordination indicated that three variables, the number of deformities, the number of significant associations among deformity types within populations, and whether populations were infected with B. dendrobatidis, were significantly correlated with the pattern of deformities. Our data indicate that the incidence of oral deformities can be high in natural populations and that phylogeny and B. dendrobatidis infection exert a strong influence on the occurrence and type of oral deformities in tadpoles. ?? by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herperologists.

  2. Adaptive PVDF piezoelectric deformable mirror system.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Ishida, H; Ikeda, O

    1980-05-01

    An adaptive mirror system whose surface deforms smoothly according to the desired curve has been made of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric film and laminar glass plate. One surface of the glass plate was evaporated with silver, and this side was used as the mirror surface. A PVDF film, whose shape was determined by the deformation curve, was pasted tightly on the other surface. The mirror deforms smoothly along this curve with the application of a single voltage to the film. Holographic filter and feedback were lso considered to improve the static and dynamic characteristics. Typically, deformation along ax(2)+bx(3) was obtained. PMID:20221054

  3. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  4. Microstructures Resulting from Uniaxial Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers rely on the magnetic record preserved in magnetite when investigating magnetic field reversals, reconstructing past tectonic plate locations, and studying changes in the strength of the earth's magnetic field. Despite the extensive use of magnetite in scientific studies, the effects of dislocations on magnetite's remanence and magnetic stability are poorly understood, yet are crucial to understanding how magnetite records and maintains past magnetic field directions and intensities. To begin to address this need, we have studied the dislocation and defect structures in magnetite that form after controlled deformation. We have also measured major hysteresis loops to investigate the changes in remanence and coercivity that result from each of these deformation events. A single magnetite octahedron was cut into roughly equal bar-shaped pieces, and each was deformed uniaxially along a <121> direction at one atmosphere using a variety of temperature and pressure conditions, each selected to fall within the dislocation glide regime. Slices were cut from each deformed bar after deformation and investigated using a transmission electron microscope to characterize the types of deformation structures resulting from each of the temperature-pressure combinations. A variety of deformation structures were observed, especially dislocations and deformation bands. Dislocations were more common in samples deformed below 875°C. Hysteresis loops were measured for each sample with a field direction perpendicular to the deformation axis. Surprisingly, there is no significant difference in the bulk coercivity of a deformed and undeformed piece of magnetite.

  5. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  6. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  7. Method for Real-Time Structure Shape-Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L. (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention is a method for obtaining the displacement of a flexible structure by using strain measurements obtained by stain sensor,. By obtaining the displacement of structures in this manner, one may construct the deformed shape of the structure and display said deformed shape in real-time, enabling active control of the structure shape if desired.

  8. Mesh Deformation Based on Fully Stressed Design: The Method and Two-Dimensional Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined boundary geometry is a frequently encountered task in shape optimization and analysis of fluid-structure interaction. We propose a simple and concise method for deforming meshes defined with three-node triangular or four-node tetrahedral elements. The mesh deformation method is suitable for large boundary movement. The approach requires two consecutive linear elastic finite-element analyses of an isotropic continuum using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries. The first analysis is performed with homogeneous elastic property and the second with inhomogeneous elastic property. The fully stressed design is employed with a vanishing Poisson s ratio and a proposed form of equivalent strain (modified Tresca equivalent strain) to calculate, from the strain result of the first analysis, the element-specific Young s modulus for the second analysis. The theoretical aspect of the proposed method, its convenient numerical implementation using a typical linear elastic finite-element code in conjunction with very minor extra coding for data processing, and results for examples of large deformation of two-dimensional meshes are presented in this paper. KEY WORDS: Mesh deformation, shape optimization, fluid-structure interaction, fully stressed design, finite-element analysis, linear elasticity, strain failure, equivalent strain, Tresca failure criterion

  9. Breathing Life into Shapes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Alec

    2015-01-01

    Shape articulation transforms a lifeless geometric object into a vibrant character. Computers enrich artists' toolsets dramatically. They not only endow artists with the power to manipulate virtual 2D and 3D scenes, but they also eliminate tedium and expedite prototyping, freeing artists to focus on creative aspects. With such power comes a temptation to lean entirely on the computer. Computationally intensive animation systems sacrifice real-time feedback for physical accuracy. How can we leverage modern computational power to create the best possible shape deformations while maintaining real-time performance as a mandatory invariant? This article summarizes efforts to answer this, culminating in a deformation system with the quality of slow, nonlinear optimization, but at lightning speed. PMID:26416366

  10. Breathing Life into Shapes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Alec

    2015-01-01

    Shape articulation transforms a lifeless geometric object into a vibrant character. Computers enrich artists' toolsets dramatically. They not only endow artists with the power to manipulate virtual 2D and 3D scenes, but they also eliminate tedium and expedite prototyping, freeing artists to focus on creative aspects. With such power comes a temptation to lean entirely on the computer. Computationally intensive animation systems sacrifice real-time feedback for physical accuracy. How can we leverage modern computational power to create the best possible shape deformations while maintaining real-time performance as a mandatory invariant? This article summarizes efforts to answer this, culminating in a deformation system with the quality of slow, nonlinear optimization, but at lightning speed.

  11. Deformation of square objects and boudins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2004-08-01

    Some geological objects, such as clasts and boudins, may have had original shapes close to square, that have been modified by ductile deformation. We demonstrate through finite element models presented here and in earlier papers that square objects in a matrix with contrasting viscosity can deform to a variety of curved shapes. The maximum shape change is where the square edges are parallel to the principal bulk strains. Competent objects with viscosity ratio to matrix ( m) of 2-20 become barrel shaped, showing concave 'fish mouth' shortened edges. Incompetent objects ( m<1) show a narrower variety of shapes with m, all becoming smoothed to bone, dumb-bell or lobate shapes, and losing the original corners. We compare the results for square objects with linear and non-linear rheology (power law, stress exponent n=1, 3 or 10), and with previous modelling with different object-matrix proportions. Competent objects with higher n values deform slightly less, and more irregularly, than linearly viscous ( n=1) objects, but the distinctions between n=3 and 10 are only slight. The differences are even slighter (in the opposite sense) for incompetent objects. The proportion of object to matrix is as important, if not more, in controlling the deformation and shape of these objects. The results are compared via graphs of object strain and concavity versus bulk strain. The concavity graph for competent square objects with linear viscosity up to very high strain can be compared with examples of ductile boudins with barrel or fish mouth shapes. Subject to a number of assumptions, this provides a method of estimating boudin-matrix viscosity ratios and post-boudinage ductile strain, of potential use in highly deformed rocks lacking other strain markers. The approach may also be suitable for deformed porphyroblasts, but is more difficult to apply to single clasts in breccias and conglomerates.

  12. Self-shaping of bioinspired chiral composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qing-Qing; Cui, Yu-Hong; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jian-Shan; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2014-08-01

    Self-shaping materials such as shape memory polymers have recently drawn considerable attention owing to their high shape-changing ability in response to changes in ambient conditions, and thereby have promising applications in the biomedical, biosensing, soft robotics and aerospace fields. Their design is a crucial issue of both theoretical and technological interest. Motivated by the shape-changing ability of Towel Gourd tendril helices during swelling/deswelling, we present a strategy for realizing self-shaping function through the deformation of micro/nanohelices. To guide the design and fabrication of self-shaping materials, the shape equations of bent configurations, twisted belts, and helices of slender chiral composite are developed using the variation method. Furthermore, it is numerically shown that the shape changes of a chiral composite can be tuned by the deformation of micro/nanohelices and the fabricated fiber directions. This work paves a new way to create self-shaping composites.

  13. Nonparametric joint shape learning for customized shape modeling

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Gozde

    2010-01-01

    We present a shape optimization approach to compute patient-specific models in customized prototyping applications. We design a coupled shape prior to model the transformation between a related pair of surfaces, using a nonparametric joint probability density estimation. The coupled shape prior forces with the help of application-specific data forces and smoothness forces drive a surface deformation towards a desired output surface. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method for generating customized shape models in applications of hearing aid design and pre-operative to intra-operative anatomic surface estimation. PMID:20044237

  14. Evaluation of skin and muscular deformations in a non-rigid motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Michela; Carli, Marco; Conforto, Silvia; Bibbo, Daniele; Neri, Alessandro; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2005-04-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is indispensable to take into account this phenomenon and thus approximating body limbs to rigid structures appears as restrictive. The present work aims at evaluating skin and muscular deformation, and at modeling body segment elastic behavior by analysing video sequences that capture a sport gesture. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using the technique based on Gauss Laguerre Expansion. Promising results have been obtained by applying the proposed method to a video sequence, where an upper arm isometric contraction was present.

  15. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  16. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  17. Quantifying torso deformity in scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter O.; Kumar, Anish; Durdle, Nelson G.; Raso, V. James

    2006-03-01

    Scoliosis affects the alignment of the spine and the shape of the torso. Most scoliosis patients and their families are more concerned about the effect of scoliosis on the torso than its effect on the spine. There is a need to develop robust techniques for quantifying torso deformity based on full torso scans. In this paper, deformation indices obtained from orthogonal maps of full torso scans are used to quantify torso deformity in scoliosis. 'Orthogonal maps' are obtained by applying orthogonal transforms to 3D surface maps. (An 'orthogonal transform' maps a cylindrical coordinate system to a Cartesian coordinate system.) The technique was tested on 361 deformed computer models of the human torso and on 22 scans of volunteers (8 normal and 14 scoliosis). Deformation indices from the orthogonal maps correctly classified up to 95% of the volunteers with a specificity of 1.00 and a sensitivity of 0.91. In addition to classifying scoliosis, the system gives a visual representation of the entire torso in one view and is viable for use in a clinical environment for managing scoliosis.

  18. Including die and press deformations in sheet metal forming simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilthammar, Johan; Sigvant, Mats; Kao-Walter, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis, in Abaqus, of a stamping die and subsequent morphing of the tool surfaces in AutoForm were performed to improve a sheet metal forming simulation. First, the tool surfaces of the XC90 rear door inner were scanned. They were not matching when the die was unloaded and could therefore not give any satisfying results in sheet metal forming simulations. Scanned surface geometries were then added to a structural FE-model of the complete stamping die and some influential parts of the production press. The structural FE- model was analysed with Abaqus to obtain the structural deformations of the die. The calculated surface shapes were then transferred to AutoForm where a forming simulation was performed. Results from the different sheet metal forming simulations were compared to measured draw in curves and showed a substantial increase in accuracy and ability to analyse dies in running production when the morphed surfaces were used.

  19. Shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, Andreas; Kelch, Steffen

    2002-06-17

    Material scientists predict a prominent role in the future for self-repairing and intelligent materials. Throughout the last few years, this concept has found growing interest as a result of the rise of a new class of polymers. These so-called shape-memory polymers by far surpass well-known metallic shape-memory alloys in their shape-memory properties. As a consequence of the relatively easy manufacture and programming of shape-memory polymers, these materials represent a cheap and efficient alternative to well-established shape-memory alloys. In shape-memory polymers, the consequences of an intended or accidental deformation caused by an external force can be ironed out by heating the material above a defined transition temperature. This effect can be achieved because of the given flexibility of the polymer chains. When the importance of polymeric materials in our daily life is taken into consideration, we find a very broad, additional spectrum of possible applications for intelligent polymers that covers an area from minimally invasive surgery, through high-performance textiles, up to self-repairing plastic components in every kind of transportation vehicles.

  20. Optical tweezer for probing erythrocyte membrane deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Soni, Harsh; Sood, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    We report that the average rotation speed of optically trapped crenated erythrocytes is direct signature of their membrane deformability. When placed in hypertonic buffer, discocytic erythrocytes are subjected to crenation. The deformation of cells brings in chirality and asymmetry in shape that makes them rotate under the scattering force of a linearly polarized optical trap. A change in the deformability of the erythrocytes, due to any internal or environmental factor, affects the rotation speed of the trapped crenated cells. Here we show how the increment in erythrocyte membrane rigidity with adsorption of Ca++ ions can be exhibited through this approach.

  1. On the geometric relationship between deformation microstructures in zircon and the kinematic framework of the shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs; Habler, Gerlinde

    2016-10-01

    We present novel microstructural analyses of zircon from a variety of strained rocks. For the first time, multiple plastically deformed zircon crystals were analyzed in a kinematic context of the respective host shear zones. Our aim was to derive how the orientation of zircon grains in a shear zone affects their deformation, based on careful in situ observations. For sampling, we selected zircon-bearing rocks that were deformed by simple shear. Samples covered a range of P-T conditions and lithologies, including various meta-igneous and meta-sedimentary gneisses. Microstructural analyses of zircon crystals in situ with scanning electron backscatter diffraction mapping show strong geometrical relationships between orientations of: (i) the long axes of plastically deformed zircon crystals, (ii) the crystallographic orientation of misorientation axes in plastically deformed zircon crystals and (iii) the foliation and lineation directions of the respective samples. We assume that zircon crystals did not experience post-deformation rigid body rotation, and thus the true geometric link can be observed. The relationships are the following: (a) plastically deformed zircon crystals usually have long axes parallel to the mylonitic foliation plane; (b) crystals with < c > axes oriented at an angle > 15° to the foliation plane are undeformed or fractured. Zircon crystals that have < c > axes aligned parallel or normal to the stretching lineation within the foliation plane develop misorientation and rotation axes parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. Zircon grains with the < c > axis aligned at 30-60° to the lineation within the foliation plane often develop either two low Miller indices misorientation axes or one high Miller indices misorientation axis. Host phases have a significant influence on deformation mechanisms. In a relatively soft matrix, zircon is more likely to develop low Miller indices misorientation axes than in a relatively strong matrix. These

  2. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  3. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  4. Ko Displacement Theory for Structural Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Ko displacement theory for predictions of structure deformed shapes was motivated in 2003 by the Helios flying wing, which had a 247-ft (75-m) wing span with wingtip deflections reaching 40 ft (12 m). The Helios flying wing failed in midair in June 2003, creating the need to develop new technology to predict in-flight deformed shapes of unmanned aircraft wings for visual display before the ground-based pilots. Any types of strain sensors installed on a structure can only sense the surface strains, but are incapable to sense the overall deformed shapes of structures. After the invention of the Ko displacement theory, predictions of structure deformed shapes could be achieved by feeding the measured surface strains into the Ko displacement transfer functions for the calculations of out-of-plane deflections and cross sectional rotations at multiple locations for mapping out overall deformed shapes of the structures. The new Ko displacement theory combined with a strain-sensing system thus created a revolutionary new structure- shape-sensing technology.

  5. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2014-09-23

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  6. Dielectric elastomer membranes undergoing inhomogeneous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhu; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang

    2009-10-01

    Dielectric elastomers are capable of large deformation subject to an electric voltage and are promising for use as actuators, sensors, and generators. Because of large deformation, nonlinear equations of states, and diverse modes of failure, modeling the process of electromechanical transduction has been challenging. This paper studies a membrane of a dielectric elastomer deformed into an out-of-plane axisymmetric shape, a configuration used in a family of commercial devices known as the universal muscle actuators. The kinematics of deformation and charging, together with thermodynamics, leads to equations that govern the state of equilibrium. Numerical results indicate that the field in the membrane can be very inhomogeneous, and that the membrane is susceptible to several modes of failure, including electrical breakdown, loss of tension, and rupture by stretch. Care is needed in the design to balance the requirements of averting various modes of failure while using the material efficiently.

  7. Saddle point shapes of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D. N.; Plonski, I. H.; Greiner, W.

    2007-04-23

    Very general reflection asymmetrical saddle point nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. This equation is derived as an Euler-Lagrange relationship associated to the variational problem of minimizing the potential energy with constraints (constant volume and given deformation parameter). The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to ternary fission are outlined.

  8. Primary mirror back surface shape research of GEO laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weida; Zhang, Li-zhong; Meng, Li-xin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser communication system primary mirror deformation caused by back surface shape variation was done in this paper. The usual mirror back surface shapes were sphere, double arch, flat and biconcave shape and so on. Based on the four shape mirror, with the center hole rim support pattern, the four shape mirror temperature distribution equation was inferred by thermal elastic theory, deformation are compared in 1-5℃ radius direction temperature difference, in the case of minor weight gap and equal maximum thickness. As a result, the deformation of sphere back surface shape mirror is minimal. So sphere back surface shape is fit for the primary mirror.

  9. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau–de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  10. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-08-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau-de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  11. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E. Beyer's "Educational Studies and…

  12. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Park, Jinah

    2016-01-01

    Background Structural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition, as an interhemispheric structure, it needs to be aligned to the midsagittal plane to assess its asymmetric and regional deformation. Method To address these issues, we propose a model-based shape assessment. Our template model of the third ventricle consists of a midplane and a symmetric mesh of generic shape. By mapping the template's midplane to the individuals’ brain midsagittal plane, we align the symmetric mesh on the midline of the brain before quantifying the third ventricle shape. To build the vertex-wise correspondence between the individual third ventricle and the template mesh, we employ a minimal-distortion surface deformation framework. In addition, to account for topological variations, we implement geometric constraints guiding the template mesh to have zero width where the inter-thalamic adhesion passes through, preventing vertices crossing between left and right walls of the third ventricle. The individual shapes are compared using a vertex-wise deformity from the symmetric template. Results Experiments on imaging and demographic data from a study of aging showed that our model was sensitive in assessing morphological differences between individuals in relation to brain volume (i.e. proxy for general brain atrophy), gender and the fluid intelligence at age 72. It also revealed that the proposed method can detect the regional and asymmetrical deformation unlike the conventional measures: volume (median 1.95 ml, IQR 0.96 ml) and width of the third

  13. Lagrangian volume deformations around simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, S.; Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Oñorbe, J.; Martínez-Serrano, F. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the local evolution of 206 Lagrangian Volumes (LVs) selected at high redshift around galaxy seeds, identified in a large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) hydrodynamical simulation. The LVs have a mass range of 1-1500 × 1010 M⊙. We follow the dynamical evolution of the density field inside these initially spherical LVs from z = 10 up to zlow = 0.05, witnessing highly non-linear, anisotropic mass rearrangements within them, leading to the emergence of the local cosmic web (CW). These mass arrangements have been analysed in terms of the reduced inertia tensor I_{ij}^r, focusing on the evolution of the principal axes of inertia and their corresponding eigendirections, and paying particular attention to the times when the evolution of these two structural elements declines. In addition, mass and component effects along this process have also been investigated. We have found that deformations are led by dark matter dynamics and they transform most of the initially spherical LVs into prolate shapes, i.e. filamentary structures. An analysis of the individual freezing-out time distributions for shapes and eigendirections shows that first most of the LVs fix their three axes of symmetry (like a skeleton) early on, while accretion flows towards them still continue. Very remarkably, we have found that more massive LVs fix their skeleton earlier on than less massive ones. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications our findings could have, including the galaxy mass-morphology relation and the effects on the galaxy-galaxy merger parameter space, among others.

  14. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S; Østergaard, Lars

    2016-09-15

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  15. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S.

    2016-01-01

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  16. Microstructures in the 6060 aluminium alloy after various severe plastic deformation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk-Cieslak, Boguslawa Mizera, Jaroslaw; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents the results concerning the microstructural refinement of the industrial 6060 aluminium alloy processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD). The high level of plastic deformation was achieved using the three methods: hydrostatic extrusion (HE), equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) and extrusion torsion (ET), which differed in the dynamics of the loading, intensity and homogeneity of the plastic strain field. Microstructure analyses were performed before and after SPD deformation using a transmission (TEM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The refined microstructures were examined qualitatively and quantitatively by the stereological methods and computer image analyses. The microstructure of the industrial 6060 aluminium alloy after deformation was characterized by an average grain size of about 0.4 {mu}m. The results show that the precipitates strongly affect the degree of refinement and the mechanism of microstructural transformations. During the SPD, the second phase particles break apart and homogenize. The HE method generates the largest increase of the volume fraction of the small primary particles. Moreover, the HE process is most effective in reducing the primary particle size. During HE and ECAE processes the second phase precipitates dissolve partially and change their shape. - Research Highlights: {yields} SPD results in a significant increase in the density of the small primary particles. {yields} SPD homogenizes the particle size distribution. {yields} HE and ECAE processes bring nano-grains in the vicinity of the primary particles. {yields} HE and ECAE processing results in the {beta}' precipitates partial dissolutions. {yields} During HE and ECAE processes the {beta}' particles change their shape.

  17. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  18. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  19. Jumpwise deformation of polymethyl methacrylate in the microplasticity region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpeizman, V. V.; Yakushev, P. N.; Mukhina, Zh. V.; Kuznetsov, E. V.; Smolyanskii, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The deformation rate with a step of 325 nm has been measured under uniaxial compression at the initial stage of creep and shape recovery of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sample after unloading. The effect of low γ-ray doses and magnetic fields on the deformation has been studied. It has been shown that a weak pre-exposure of the PMMA sample structure to radiation and magnetic fields can cause a slight hardening in the microplasticity region. The deformation jump sizes have been determined on micro- and nanoscales. The effect of irradiation and magnetic fields manifests itself as redistributed contributions of various jumps to the deformation.

  20. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Neville, Robin M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-05

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson's ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  1. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Robin M.; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson’s ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  2. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Neville, Robin M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson's ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures. PMID:27491945

  3. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  4. Validation and application of three-dimensional discontinuous deformation analysis with tetrahedron finite element meshed block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Nan, Zheng; Yi, Ping

    2012-12-01

    In the last decade, three dimensional discontinuous deformation analyses (3D DDA) has attracted more and more attention of researchers and geotechnical engineers worldwide. The original DDA formulation utilizes a linear displacement function to describe the block movement and deformation, which would cause block expansion under rigid body rotation and thus limit its capability to model block deformation. In this paper, 3D DDA is coupled with tetrahedron finite elements to tackle these two problems. Tetrahedron is the simplest in the 3D domain and makes it easy to implement automatic discretization, even for complex topology shape. Furthermore, element faces will remain planar and element edges will remain straight after deformation for tetrahedron finite elements and polyhedral contact detection schemes can be used directly. The matrices of equilibrium equations for this coupled method are given in detail and an effective contact searching algorithm is suggested. Validation is conducted by comparing the results of the proposed coupled method with that of physical model tests using one of the most common failure modes, i.e., wedge failure. Most of the failure modes predicted by the coupled method agree with the physical model results except for 4 cases out of the total 65 cases. Finally, a complex rockslide example demonstrates the robustness and versatility of the coupled method.

  5. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  6. Optical Detection Of Deformations Of An Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem generates small aiming-bias signals to correct for deviations of 70-m-diameter reflector of microwave antenna from its ideal shape. Takes optical measurements to determine deformations produced by such environmental factors as wind, gravity, and thermal differentials. Using these measurements, subsystem estimates misalignment of radiation pattern caused by deformations. Signals to correct for estimated misalignment added to angle-command signals of main antenna-aiming system. To measure deviations laser ranging devices placed at base of feed on rigid intermediate reference structure, white retroreflectors placed on parts that deviate from assigned positions relative to intermediate reference structure.

  7. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  8. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  9. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  10. Compliant deformable mirror approach for wavefront improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Penado, F. Ernesto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a compliant static deformable mirror approach to reduce the wavefront concavity at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). A single actuator pressing on the back surface of just one of the relay mirrors deforms the front surface in a correcting convex shape. Our design uses the mechanical advantage gained from a force actuator sandwiched between a rear flexure plate and the back surface of the mirror. We superimpose wavefront contour measurements with our finite element deformed mirror model. An example analysis showed improvement from 210-nm concave-concave wavefront to 51-nm concave-concave wavefront. With our present model, a 100-nm actuator increment displaces the mirror surface by 1.1 nm. We describe the need for wavefront improvement that arises from the NPOI reconfigurable array, offer a practical design approach, and analyze the support structure and compliant deformable mirror using the finite element method. We conclude that a 20.3-cm-diameter, 1.9-cm-thick Zerodur® mirror shows that it is possible to deform the reflective surface and cancel out three-fourths of the wavefront deformation without overstressing the material.

  11. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  12. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  13. Two-Stage Deformation of Olivine Aggregates with Changing Deformation Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, B. M.; Skemer, P. A.; Griera, A.

    2011-12-01

    Two-stage deformation experiments have been conducted on synthetic olivine aggregates to investigate the influence of pre-existing fabric on the evolution of lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), seismic anisotropy, and grain morphology. This study is motivated by recent work on naturally and experimentally deformed peridotites, which suggest that the alignment of olivine axes with the shear plane requires more strain in samples with a strong pre-existing LPO than in samples with weak or random LPO. In the first stage of deformation, aggregates synthesized from San Carlos olivine are deformed at P = 1 GPa and T = 1500 K in a triaxial geometry to produce axi-symmetric LPOs of varying strength. In a second stage of deformation, the aggregates are re-deformed in simple shear to varying shear strains. Microstructural analyses are performed after each step (synthesis, triaxial deformation, simple shear deformation) using optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). These results are compared to numerical models of microstructural evolution. Our results provide constraints on the evolution of LPO and consequent seismic signature as a function of preexisting rock fabric. These data are necessary to interpret seismic anisotropy in settings where kinematics are complex, such as mid-ocean ridges and subduction zones.

  14. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  15. Microscopic and self-consistent description for neutron halo in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lulu; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui

    2013-05-06

    A deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuum has been developed for the study of neutron halos in deformed nuclei and the halo phenomenon in deformed weakly bound nuclei is investigated. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and some results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nuclei {sup 44}Mg and {sup 36}Ne. The core of the former nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the existence of halos in deformed nuclei and for the occurrence of this decoupling effect are discussed.

  16. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  17. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  18. Tensile deformation of NiTi wires.

    PubMed

    Gall, Ken; Tyber, Jeff; Brice, Valerie; Frick, Carl P; Maier, Hans J; Morgan, Neil

    2005-12-15

    We examine the structure and properties of cold drawn Ti-50.1 at % Ni and Ti-50.9 at % Ni shape memory alloy wires. Wires with both compositions possess a strong <111> fiber texture in the wire drawing direction, a grain size on the order of micrometers, and a high dislocation density. The more Ni rich wires contain fine second phase precipitates, while the wires with lower Ni content are relatively free of precipitates. The wire stress-strain response depends strongly on composition through operant deformation mechanisms, and cannot be explained based solely on measured differences in the transformation temperatures. We provide fundamental connections between the material structure, deformation mechanisms, and resulting stress-strain responses. The results help clarify some inconsistencies and common misconceptions in the literature. Ramifications on materials selection and design for emerging biomedical applications of NiTi shape memory alloys are discussed.

  19. Deformation of a micro-torque swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    The membrane tension of some kinds of ciliates has been suggested to regulate upward and downward swimming velocities under gravity. Despite its biological importance, deformation and membrane tension of a ciliate have not been clarified fully. In this study, we numerically investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modelled as a capsule with a hyperelastic membrane enclosing a Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modelled as torques distributed above the cell body. The effects of membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of the cell's reference shape, and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like a heart shape, when the capillary number was sufficiently large. Under the influence of gravity, the membrane tension at the anterior end decreased in the upward swimming while it increased in the downward swimming. Moreover, gravity-induced deformation caused the cells to move gravitationally downwards or upwards, which resulted in a positive or negative geotaxis-like behaviour with a physical origin. These results are important in understanding the physiology of a ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26997893

  20. Shock Deformation Features in Monazite: Implications for Dating Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, T. M.; Cavosie, A. J.; Timms, N. E.; Pearce, M. A.; Kirkland, C. L.; Tohver, E.; Reddy, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents detailed microstructural and U-Th-Pb analyses of shock deformed monazites from the Vredefort Dome, South Africa and Araguainha, Brazil impact structures, with significant insights on its use as impact indicator and geochronometer.

  1. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  2. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  3. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  4. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements. PMID:23286031

  5. Fluorinated Azobenzenes for Shape-Persistent Liquid Crystal Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Anger, Emmanuel; Aßhoff, Sarah Jane; Depauw, Alexis; Fletcher, Stephen P; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2016-08-16

    Liquid crystal polymer networks respond with an anisotropic deformation to a range of external stimuli. When doped with molecular photoswitches, these materials undergo complex shape modifications under illumination. As the deformations are reversed when irradiation stops, applications where the activated shape is required to have thermal stability have been precluded. Previous attempts to incorporate molecular switches into thermally stable photoisomers were unsuccessful at photogenerating macroscopic shapes that are retained over time. Herein, we show that to preserve photoactivated molecular deformation on the macroscopic scale, it is important not only to engineer the thermal stability of the photoswitch but also to adjust the cross-linking density in the polymer network and to optimize the molecular orientations in the material. Our strategy resulted in materials containing fluorinated azobenzenes that retain their photochemical shape for more than eight days, which constitutes the first demonstration of long-lived photomechanical deformation in liquid-crystal polymer networks. PMID:27430357

  6. Quantum chemistry of macromolecular shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    Some of the new developments in the quantum-chemical study of macromolecular shapes are reviewed, with special emphasis on the additive fuzzy electron density fragmentation methods and on the algebraic-topological shape group analysis of global and local shape features of fuzzy three-dimensional bodies of electron densities of macromolecules. Earlier applications of these methods to actual macromolecules are reviewed, including studies on the anticancer drug taxol, the proteins bovine insulin and HIV protease, and other macromolecules. The results of test calculations establishing the accuracy of these methods are also reviewed. The spherically weighted affine transformation technique is described and proposed for the deformation of electron densities approximating the changes occurring in small conformational displacements of atomic nuclei in macromolecules.

  7. Deformed ellipsoidal diffraction grating blank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decew, Alan E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Deformed Ellipsoidal Grating Blank (DEGB) is the primary component in an ultraviolet spectrometer. Since one of the major concerns for these instruments is throughput, significant efforts are made to reduce the number of components and subsequently reflections. Each reflection results in losses through absorption and scattering. It is these two sources of photon loss that dictated the requirements for the DEGB. The first goal is to shape the DEGB in such a way that the energy at the entrance slit is focused as well as possible on the exit slit. The second goal is to produce a surface smooth enough to minimize the photon loss due to scattering. The program was accomplished in three phases. The first phase was the fabrication planning. The second phase was the actual fabrication and initial testing. The last phase was the final testing of the completed DEGB.

  8. Equilibrium shapes of acoustically levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C.-J.

    1986-05-01

    The quantitative determination of the shape of liquid drops levitated in an ultrasonic standing wave has provided experimental data on the radiation pressure-induced deformations of freely suspended liquids. Within the limits of small deviations from the spherical shape and small drop diameter relative to the acoustic wavelength, an existing approximate theory yields a good agreement with experimental evidence. The data were obtained for millimeter and submillimeter drops levitated in air under 1 g, where g is the sea level gravitational acceleration.

  9. Three-dimensional shape measurements using endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei-Hung; Hsu, Tzu-Chien; Kuo, Cho-Yo

    2015-08-01

    We present a fringe projection system embedded into an endoscope to describe the absolute shape of an inspected object. A fringe pattern generated by launching incoherent light waves into a volume hologram is projected on the inspected surface. The endoscope observes the projected fringes at another point of view. Fringes on the obtained image are deformed both by the topography of the object, and are analyzable to retrieve the 3D shape.

  10. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Birge, Noah; Erler, Jochen; Nazarewicz, Witek; Perhac, Alex; Schunck, Nicolas; Stoitsov, Mario; Nuclei Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. Overall, 140 even-even nuclei (near and among the lantanides and actinides and in the superheavy region near N = 184) were predicted by all 6 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation. The case of 112Xe also proved curious as it was predicted by 5 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation despite its proximity to the two-proton drip line. Deceased.

  11. Nonaxial hexadecapole deformation effects on the fission barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, A.; Nejati, S.

    2016-06-01

    Fission barrier of the heavy nucleus 250Cf is analyzed in a multi-dimensional deformation space. This space includes two quadrupole (ɛ2,γ) and three hexadecapole deformation (ɛ40,ɛ42,ɛ44) parameters. The analysis is performed within an unpaired macroscopic-microscopic approach. Special attention is given to the effects of the axial and non-axial hexadecapole deformation shapes. It is found that the inclusion of the nonaxial hexadecapole shapes does not change the fission barrier heights, so it should be sufficient to minimize the energy in only one degree of freedom in the hexadecapole space ɛ4. The role of hexadecapole deformation parameters is also discussed on the Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) macroscopic and the Strutinsky shell energies.

  12. Deformable segmentation via sparse representation and dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-10-01

    "Shape" and "appearance", the two pillars of a deformable model, complement each other in object segmentation. In many medical imaging applications, while the low-level appearance information is weak or mis-leading, shape priors play a more important role to guide a correct segmentation, thanks to the strong shape characteristics of biological structures. Recently a novel shape prior modeling method has been proposed based on sparse learning theory. Instead of learning a generative shape model, shape priors are incorporated on-the-fly through the sparse shape composition (SSC). SSC is robust to non-Gaussian errors and still preserves individual shape characteristics even when such characteristics is not statistically significant. Although it seems straightforward to incorporate SSC into a deformable segmentation framework as shape priors, the large-scale sparse optimization of SSC has low runtime efficiency, which cannot satisfy clinical requirements. In this paper, we design two strategies to decrease the computational complexity of SSC, making a robust, accurate and efficient deformable segmentation system. (1) When the shape repository contains a large number of instances, which is often the case in 2D problems, K-SVD is used to learn a more compact but still informative shape dictionary. (2) If the derived shape instance has a large number of vertices, which often appears in 3D problems, an affinity propagation method is used to partition the surface into small sub-regions, on which the sparse shape composition is performed locally. Both strategies dramatically decrease the scale of the sparse optimization problem and hence speed up the algorithm. Our method is applied on a diverse set of biomedical image analysis problems. Compared to the original SSC, these two newly-proposed modules not only significant reduce the computational complexity, but also improve the overall accuracy. PMID:22959839

  13. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  14. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  15. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  16. Determination of Visual Figure and Ground in Dynamically Deforming Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenholtz, Elan; Feldman, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Figure/ground assignment--determining which part of the visual image is foreground and which background--is a critical step in early visual analysis, upon which much later processing depends. Previous research on the assignment of figure and ground to opposing sides of a contour has almost exclusively involved static geometric factors--such as…

  17. CO2-stimulated diversiform deformations of polymer assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiang; Zhao, Yue

    2013-11-01

    Use of a given physiological stimulus to delicately deform polymer assemblies is a challenging topic. Here we develop synthetic block copolymers to construct a series of CO2-sensitive self-assembled nanostructures that can simulate controllable deformations of the organelles in different ways. By controlling the CO2 stimulation levels, one can modulate the size, shape, and morphology of the polymer aggregates, which is conducive to understanding the stimuli-triggered dynamic reshaping process of polymer assemblies in aqueous solution.

  18. Synthesis of the first heterometalic star-shaped oxido-bridged MnCu3 complex and its conversion into trinuclear species modulated by pseudohalides (N3(-), NCS- and NCO-): structural analyses and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Naiya, Subrata; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2012-01-14

    A tetra-nuclear, star-shaped hetero-metallic copper(II)-manganese(II) complex, [{CuL(H(2)O)}(2)(CuL)Mn](ClO(4))(2) (1) has been synthesized by reacting the "complex as ligand" [CuL] with Mn(ClO(4))(2) where H(2)L is the tetradentate di-Schiff base derived from 1,3-propanediamine and 2-hydroxyacetophenone. Upon treatment with the polyatomic anions azide, cyanate, or thiocyanate in methanol medium, complex 1 transforms into the corresponding trinuclear species [(CuL)(2)Mn(N(3))(2)] (2), [(CuL)(2)Mn(NCO)(2)] (3) and [(CuL)(2)Mn(NCS)(2)] (4). All four complexes have been structurally and magnetically characterized. In complex 1 the central Mn(II) ion is encapsulated by three terminal [CuL] units through the formation of double phenoxido bridges between Mn(II) and each Cu(II). In complexes 2-4 one of the CuL units is replaced by a couple of terminal azide, N-bonded cyanate or N-bonded thiocyanate ions respectively and the central Mn(II) ion is connected to two terminal Cu(II) ions through a double asymmetric phenoxido bridge. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements show the presence of moderate ferrimagnetic exchange interactions in all the cases mediated through the double phenoxido bridges with J values (H = -JS(i)S(i + 1)) of -41.2, -39.8 and -12.6 cm(-1) (or -40.5 and -12.7 cm(-1) if we use a model with two different exchange coupling constants) for the tetranuclear MnCu(3) cluster in compound 1 and -20.0, -17.3 and -32.5 cm(-1) for the symmetric trinuclear MnCu(2) compounds 2-4. These ferrimagnetic interactions lead to spin ground states of 1 (5/2 - 3*1/2) for compound 1 and 3/2 (5/2 - 2*1/2) for compounds 2-4.

  19. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  20. YAP is essential for tissue tension to ensure vertebrate 3D body shape.

    PubMed

    Porazinski, Sean; Wang, Huijia; Asaoka, Yoichi; Behrndt, Martin; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Morita, Hitoshi; Hata, Shoji; Sasaki, Takashi; Krens, S F Gabriel; Osada, Yumi; Asaka, Satoshi; Momoi, Akihiro; Linton, Sarah; Miesfeld, Joel B; Link, Brian A; Senga, Takeshi; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Urrutia, Araxi O; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Nagase, Hideaki; Matsuura, Shinya; Bagby, Stefan; Kondoh, Hisato; Nishina, Hiroshi; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto

    2015-05-14

    Vertebrates have a unique 3D body shape in which correct tissue and organ shape and alignment are essential for function. For example, vision requires the lens to be centred in the eye cup which must in turn be correctly positioned in the head. Tissue morphogenesis depends on force generation, force transmission through the tissue, and response of tissues and extracellular matrix to force. Although a century ago D'Arcy Thompson postulated that terrestrial animal body shapes are conditioned by gravity, there has been no animal model directly demonstrating how the aforementioned mechano-morphogenetic processes are coordinated to generate a body shape that withstands gravity. Here we report a unique medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) mutant, hirame (hir), which is sensitive to deformation by gravity. hir embryos display a markedly flattened body caused by mutation of YAP, a nuclear executor of Hippo signalling that regulates organ size. We show that actomyosin-mediated tissue tension is reduced in hir embryos, leading to tissue flattening and tissue misalignment, both of which contribute to body flattening. By analysing YAP function in 3D spheroids of human cells, we identify the Rho GTPase activating protein ARHGAP18 as an effector of YAP in controlling tissue tension. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognised function of YAP in regulating tissue shape and alignment required for proper 3D body shape. Understanding this morphogenetic function of YAP could facilitate the use of embryonic stem cells to generate complex organs requiring correct alignment of multiple tissues.

  1. Reverse Kirner's deformity: case report.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeong J; Tonkin, Michael A

    2009-03-01

    Kirner's deformity is a rare congenital deformity, usually of the little finger, with volar and radial bowing of the distal phalanx. The etiology of this deformity is unclear. We describe a case of a 9-year-old girl with radiographic changes classic for Kirner's deformity but with the curvature and nail changes in the dorsal direction.

  2. Void deformation and breakup in shearing silica glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2009-07-17

    We study shear deformation and breakup of voids in silica glass using molecular dynamics simulations. With an increase in the shear strain, two kinds of defects--threefold-coordinated silicon and nonbridging oxygen atoms--appear as spherical voids deform elastically into ellipsoidal shapes. For shear strains epsilon>15%, nanocracks appear on void surfaces and voids deform plastically into a threadlike structure. Nanocracks are nucleated by the migration of threefold-coordinated Si and nonbridging O on -Si-O-Si-O- rings. For epsilon>40%, the threadlike structures break up into several fragments. PMID:19659293

  3. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  4. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-14

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  5. Biomedical applications of thermally activated shape memory polymers†

    PubMed Central

    Small, Ward; Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs. PMID:21258605

  6. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  7. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-02-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension.

  8. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  9. Effects of magnetic field on the shape memory behavior of single and polycrystalline magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turabi, Ali Sadi

    Shape memory alloys and polymers have been extensively researched recently because of their unique ability to recover large deformations. Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are able to recover large deformations compared to shape memory alloys (SMAs), although SMAs have higher strength and are able to generate more stress during recovery. This project focuses on procedure for fabrication and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) of a shape memory composite actuator. First, SMP was characterized to reveal its mechanical properties. Specifically, glass transition temperature, the effects of temperature and strain rate on compressive response and recovery properties of shape memory polymer were studied. Then, shape memory properties of a NiTi wire, including transformation temperatures and stress generation, were investigated. SMC actuator was fabricated by using epoxy based SMP and NiTi SMA wire. Experimental tests confirmed the reversible behavior of fabricated shape memory composites. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. Deformation field heterogeneity in punch indentation

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Tejas G.; Saldana, Christopher; Hudspeth, Matthew; M'Saoubi, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Plastic heterogeneity in indentation is fundamental for understanding mechanics of hardness testing and impression-based deformation processing methods. The heterogeneous deformation underlying plane-strain indentation was investigated in plastic loading of copper by a flat punch. Deformation parameters were measured, in situ, by tracking the motion of asperities in high-speed optical imaging. These measurements were coupled with multi-scale analyses of strength, microstructure and crystallographic texture in the vicinity of the indentation. Self-consistency is demonstrated in description of the deformation field using the in situ mechanics-based measurements and post-mortem materials characterization. Salient features of the punch indentation process elucidated include, among others, the presence of a dead-metal zone underneath the indenter, regions of intense strain rate (e.g. slip lines) and extent of the plastic flow field. Perhaps more intriguing are the transitions between shear-type and compression-type deformation modes over the indentation region that were quantified by the high-resolution crystallographic texture measurements. The evolution of the field concomitant to the progress of indentation is discussed and primary differences between the mechanics of indentation for a rigid perfectly plastic material and a strain-hardening material are described. PMID:24910521

  11. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  12. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  14. Deformed Quantum Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Akira

    1997-03-01

    To understand possible physical consequences of quantum deformation, we investigate statistical behaviors of a quon gas. The quon is an object which obeys the minimally deformed commutator (or q-mutator): a a† - q a†a=1 with -1≤ q≤ 1. Although q=1 and q=-1 appear to correspond respectively to boson and fermion statistics, it is not easy to create a gas which unifies the boson gas and the fermion gas. We present a model which is able to interpolates between the two limits. The quon gas shows the Bose-Einstein condensation near the Boson limit in two dimensions.

  15. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient.

  16. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient. PMID:24992861

  17. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Ward, L.; Fanning, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex. We have investigated the relationships between deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the Delamerian orogeny on Kangaroo Island. Several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt (D1-D4) and we describe how magma segregation, accumulation and extraction changes with deformation style. During an early upright folding event (D2), magma was channelled towards the hinge of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root that link towards a central axial planar channel, marking the main magma extraction paths. Extraction was associated with limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption. During a later deformation phase (D4), diatexites were sheared so that schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes. Foliations in the magmatic matrix and schollen asymmetry indicate dextral shearing. During flow, magma accumulated in shear planes, indicating a dilational component during shearing (transtension) and on strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned (post-D4), magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels, similar to those developed during folding. The funnel-shape networks are interpreted as magma extraction networks and indicate magma flow direction. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those developed during dewatering of soft sediments. The magmatic rocks from migmatites formed early, during folding, and formed late after deformation waned were dated. Both have two monazite (U-Pb, SHRIMP) age groups of ~490Ma and ~505-520Ma. The older sample has a well-defined peak at 505-510Ma and trails into the younger ages. The younger sample has the opposite, with few old spots and a well-defined young peak at ~490Ma. The age range indicates the duration of anatexis, and well-defined peaks are interpreted to mark the age of individual magma batch

  18. Shape-memory alloy micro-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, John D. (Inventor); Johnson, Alfred D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing an integral piece of thermo-sensitive material, which is responsive to a shift in temperature from below to above a phase transformation temperature range to alter the material's condition to a shape-memory condition and move from one position to another. The method is characterized by depositing a thin film of shape-memory material, such as Nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) onto a substrate by vacuum deposition process such that the alloy exhibits an amorphous non-crystalline structure. The coated substrate is then annealed in a vacuum or in the presence of an inert atmosphere at a selected temperature, time and cool down rate to produce an ordered, partially disordered or fully disordered BCC structure such that the alloy undergoes thermoelastic, martinsetic phase transformation in response to alteration in temperature to pass from a martinsetic phase when at a temperature below a phase transformation range and capable of a high level of recoverable strain to a parent austenitic phase in a memory shape when at a temperature above the phase transformation range. Also disclosed are actuator devices employing shape-memory material actuators that deform from a set shape toward an original shape when subjected to a critical temperature level after having been initially deformed from the original shape into the set shape while at a lower temperature. The actuators are mechanically coupled to one or more movable elements such that the temperature-induce deformation of the actuators exerts a force or generates a motion of the mechanical element(s).

  19. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, Pavlina; Weinberg, Roberto; Ward, Lindsay; Fanning, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex because of strong rheological contrast between layers with different melt contents and because of magma migration leading to volume changes. Migmatite deformation is intimately linked with magma extraction and the origin of granitoids. We investigate here the relationships between an evolving deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the ca. 500Ma Delamerian orogeny, exposed on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Here, several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt. During an early upright, non-cylindrical folding event, magma was channeled towards the hinge zones of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root zone that link up towards a central axial planar channel, forming the main magma extraction paths during folding. Extraction was associated with fold limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption by magma accumulation and transfer. During a later deformation phase, melt-rich diatexites were deformed, and schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes indicative of dextral shearing flow. During flow, magma accumulated preferentially along shear planes, indicating a dilatational component during shearing (transtension) and in strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned, magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to N-trending, steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels not associated to any deformational feature. The funnel-shape of these structures indicates the direction of magma flow. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those formed during dewatering of soft sediments. Despite a high degree of complexity, magma migration and extraction features record distinct responses to the evolving deformation which can be used to understand deformation, and nature and direction of melt extraction. The oldest and youngest magmatic rocks from migmatites were dated (U-Pb monazite, SHRIMP

  20. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  1. Universal shape and pressure inside bubbles appearing in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khestanova, E.; Guinea, F.; Fumagalli, L.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Trapped substances between a two-dimensional (2D) crystal and an atomically flat substrate lead to the formation of bubbles. Their size, shape and internal pressure are determined by the competition between van der Waals attraction of the crystal to the substrate and the elastic energy needed to deform it, allowing to use bubbles to study elastic properties of 2D crystals and conditions of confinement. Using atomic force microscopy, we analysed a variety of bubbles formed by monolayers of graphene, boron nitride and MoS2. Their shapes are found to exhibit universal scaling, in agreement with our analysis based on the theory of elasticity of membranes. We also measured the hydrostatic pressure induced by the confinement, which was found to reach tens of MPa inside submicron bubbles. This agrees with our theory estimates and suggests that for even smaller, sub-10 nm bubbles the pressure can be close to 1 GPa and may modify properties of a trapped material.

  2. Is microrheometry affected by channel deformation?

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2016-07-01

    Microrheometry is very important for exploring rheological behaviours of several systems when conventional techniques fail. Microrheometrical measurements are usually carried out in microfluidic devices made of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Although PDMS is a very cheap material, it is also very easy to deform. In particular, a liquid flowing in a PDMS device, in some circumstances, can effectively deform the microchannel, thus altering the flow conditions. The measure of the fluid relaxation time might be performed through viscoelasticity induced particle migration in microfluidics devices. If the channel walls are deformed by the flow, the resulting measured value of the relaxation time could be not reliable. In this work, we study the effect of channel deformation on particle migration in square-shaped microchannel. Experiments are carried out in several PolyEthylene Oxyde solutions flowing in two devices made of PDMS and Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). The relevance of wall rigidity on particle migration is investigated, and the corresponding importance of wall rigidity on the determination of the relaxation time of the suspending liquid is examined. PMID:27098237

  3. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  4. Topography on satellite surfaces and the shape of asteroids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Mcgetchin, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of the topography and shape of incompressible, nonrotating, isothermal, spherical objects as an approach to the study of the topography and shape of smaller planetary bodies. A static model and a creep deformation model are applied in the process. Factors and forces which may have a bearing on the geometry and topography of small planetary bodies are discussed.

  5. Distinct magnetic fabric in weakly deformed sediments from extensional basins and fold-and-thrust structures in the Northern Apennine orogenic belt (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Chiara; Cifelli, Francesca; Kissel, Catherine; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Mattei, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    We report on results from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analyses carried out on weakly deformed fine-grained sediments from the Northern Apennine orogenic system (Italy). We sampled 63 sites from preorogenic, synorogenic, and postorogenic sequences, which differ in age, composition, depositional environment, degrees of deformation, and tectonic regimes. The magnetic fabric is typical of weakly deformed sediments, with a magnetic foliation subparallel to the bedding plane and a magnetic lineation well defined in this plane. Northern Apennine chain deposits are characterized by strongly oblate magnetic susceptibility ellipsoids, indicating that the magnetic fabric is the result of both compaction process and tectonic load experienced by the sediments during diagenesis and orogenic events. The orientation of magnetic lineation is significantly different depending whether the studied sites underwent extensional or compressional tectonic regimes. In the Northern Apennine chain, the magnetic lineation is mostly oriented NNW-SSE, parallel to the main compressional structures. It suggests a tectonic origin of the magnetic lineation with an acquisition related to the Apennines compressional phases. In the extensional Tuscan Tyrrhenian margin, magnetic lineation is oriented ENE-WSW, almost perpendicular to the main extensional faults, which represent the main deformation elements of the area. Our results demonstrate a close relationship between the shape and orientation of magnetic fabric and the tectonic history of rocks, confirming that AMS represents a valuable tool to investigate the tectonic history of weakly deformed sedimentary rocks.

  6. Preliminary investigation and application of a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Juang, T; Newton, J; Das, S; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2013-01-01

    Deformable 3D dosimeters have potential applications in validating deformable dose mapping algorithms. This study evaluates a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter and its application toward validating the deformable algorithm employed by VelocityAI. The deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter exhibited a linear dose response with a sensitivity of 0.0032 ΔOD/(Gy/cm). Comparison of an experimental dosimeter irradiated with an MLC pencilbeam checkerboard pattern under lateral compression up to 27% to a non-deformed control dosimeter irradiated with the same pattern verified dose tracking under deformation. CTs of the experimental dosimeter prior to and during compression were exported into VelocityAI and used to map an Eclipse dose distribution calculated on the compressed dosimeter to its original shape. A comparison between the VelocityAI dose distribution and the distribution from the dosimeter showed field displacements up to 7.3 mm and up to a 175% difference in field dimensions. These results highlight the need for validating deformable dose mapping algorithms to ensure patient safety and quality of care. PMID:24454522

  7. Gauge Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: a Theory of Something.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapere, Alfred Dudley

    The treatment of the motion of deformable bodies requires a specification of axes for each shape. We present a natural kinematic formulation of this problem in terms of a gauge structure over the space of shapes that the body may assume. Our first and simplest application is to a freely -falling self-deforming body. We show how deformations of a body with angular momentum zero can result in a change in orientation, and we give a general expression for the gauge potential describing the net rotation due to an arbitrary change of shape. The problem of swimming at low Reynolds number may also be formulated in terms of a gauge potential. Effective methods for computing it, by solving a linear boundary value problem, are described. We employ conformal mapping techniques to calculate swimming motions for cylinders with a variety of cross-sections. We also determine the net translational motions due to arbitrary infinitesimal deformations of the sphere and the circular cylinder. The solution is compactly expressed in terms of the field strength tensor of the gauge potential. Having solved for all cyclic swimming motions of a nearly spherical body, it makes sense to ask which motions are the best. We define a notion of efficiency and use it to determine optimal swimming strokes. These strokes are composed of propagating waves, symmetric about the axis of propulsion. Qualitatively, they resemble the swimming strokes of ciliated micro-organisms, such as the Paramecium. The solution of Stokes' equations is not feasible analytically, except for the simplest shapes. Two approximation schemes may help in studying more general swimming strokes. We discuss and test a short-wavelength analytic approximation, valid when the scales associated with a deformation are small relative to the radius of curvature of the average shape. The complementary domain of large deformations is probably best dealt with on a computer. We sketch a general method for solving Stokes' equations numerically.

  8. Thermoviscoplastic behaviors of anisotropic shape memory elastomeric composites for cold programmed non-affine shape change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Robertson, Jaimee M.; Mu, Xiaoming; Mather, Patrick T.; Jerry Qi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can fix a temporary shape and recover their permanent shape upon activation by an external stimulus. Most SMPs require programming at above their transition temperatures, normally well above the room temperature. In addition, most SMPs are programmed into shapes that are affine to the high temperature deformation. Recently, a cold-programmed anisotropic shape memory elastomeric composite was developed and showed interesting low temperature stretching induced shape memory behavior. There, simple, uniaxial stretching at low temperature transformed the composites into curled temporary shapes upon unloading. The exact geometry of the curled state depended on the microstructure of the composite, and the curled shape showed no affinity to the deformed shape. Heating the sample recovered the sample back to its original shape. This new composite consisted of an elastomeric matrix reinforced by aligned amorphous polymer fibers. By utilizing the plastic-like behavior of the amorphous polymer phase at low temperatures, a temporary shape could be fixed upon unloading since the induced plastic-like strain resists the recovery of the elastomer matrix. After heating to a high temperature, the permanent shape was recovered when the amorphous polymer softened and the elastomer matrix contracted. To set a theoretical foundation for capturing the cold-programmed shape memory effects and the dramatic non-affine shape change of this composite, a 3D anisotropic thermoviscoelastic constitutive model is developed in this paper. In this model, the matrix is modeled as a hyperelastic solid, and the amorphous phase of the fibrous mat is considered as a nonlinear thermoviscoplastic solid, whose viscous flow resistance is sensitive to both temperature and stress. The plastic-deformation like behavior demonstrated in the fiber is treated as nonlinear viscoplasticity with extremely high viscosity or long relaxation time at zero-stress state at low temperature. The

  9. Mesh parameterization opens the door to FEM-based inverse methods for estimating nonlinear source parameters of volcano deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J.; Masterlark, T.; Feigl, K.

    2010-12-01

    Migration of magma within an active volcano produces a deformation signature at the Earth’s surface. The internal structure of a volcano and specific movements of the magma control the actual deformation that we observe. Relatively simple models that simulate magma injection as a pressurized body embedded in a half-space with uniform elastic properties (e.g., Mogi) describe the characteristic radially-symmetric deformation patterns that are commonly observed for episodes of volcano inflation or deflation. Inverse methods based on Mogi-type models can precisely and efficiently estimate the non-linear parameters that describe the geometry (position and shape) of the deformation source, as well as the linear parameter that describes the strength (pressure) of the deformation source. Although such models mimic the observed deformation, they assume a rheologic structure that drastically oversimplifies the plumbing beneath a volcano. This incompatibility can lead to biases in estimating the parameters of the model. Alternatively, Finite Element Models (FEMs) can simulate a pressurized body embedded in a problem domain having an arbitrary distribution of material properties that better corresponds to the internal structure of an active volcano. FEMs have been used in inverse methods for estimating linear deformation source parameters, such as the source pressure. However, perturbations of the non-linear parameters that describe the geometry of the source require automated re-meshing of the problem domain -a significant obstacle to implementing FEM-based nonlinear inverse methods in volcano deformation studies. We present a parametric executable (C++ source code), which automatically generates Abaqus FEMs that simulate a pressurized ellipsoid embedded in an axisymmetric problem domain, having an a priori distribution of material properties. We demonstrate this executable by analyzing InSAR-observed deformation of the 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska as an example

  10. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  11. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  13. Plastic deformation at surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of 304 stainless-steel surface slid against an aluminum oxide rider were observed by using a scanning electron microscope and an optical microscope. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of 0.000001 Pa and in an environment of 0.0005 Pa chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step-shaped protuberances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. These observations result from both adhesion and an adhesive wear mechanism.

  14. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature (above 0.5 Tm) deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Temperature sensitivity of the yield stress, as well as high (compared to self diffusion) apparent tensile activation enthalpies were the result of the internal stress not being proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and, to a lesser extent, increasing grain diameter, reaching high values which may be apparent values. The thoria particle dispersion may have been altered by elevated temperature tensile and creep deformation.

  15. Metabolic dependence of red cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Robert I.; LaCelle, Paul L.; Merrill, Edward W.

    1969-01-01

    The contribution of the metabolic state of human erythrocytes to maintenance of cellular deformability was studied during and after in vitro incubation in serum for periods up to 28 hr. An initial loss of membrane deformability became apparent between 4 and 6 hr when cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were approximately 70% of initial values. Membrane deformability then remained stable between 6 and 10 hr. After 10 hr, when cellular ATP had decreased to < 15% of initial values, progressive parallel changes occurred in red cell calcium which increased 400% by 24 hr and in the viscosity of red cell suspensions which had risen 500-750% at 24 hr. A further progressive decrease in membrane deformability also occurred and was reflected by a 1000% increase in negative pressure required to deform the membrane. Red cell filterability decreased to zero as the disc-sphere shape transformation ensued. These changes were accompanied by an increase in ghost residual hemoglobin and nonhemoglobin protein. Regeneration of ATP in depleted cells by incubation with adenosine produced significant reversal of these changes, even in the presence of ouabain. Introduction of calcium into reconstituted ghosts prepared from fresh red cells mimicked the depleted state, and introduction of ATP, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and magnesium into depleted cells mimicked the adenosine effects in intact depleted cells. ATP added externally to 24-hr depleted cells was without effect. Simultaneous introduction of EDTA, ATP, or magnesium along with calcium into reconstituted ghosts prevented the marked decrease in deformability produced by calcium alone. Incorporation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), NAD phosphate (NADP), NADP, reduced form (NADPH), glutatione, reduced form (GSH), inosine triphosphate (ITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP) was without effect. These data suggest that a major role of ATP in maintenance

  16. Numerical modeling of land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in Aguascalientes Valley using regional coefficients of deformation determined by InSAR analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J.; Cabral, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernandez-Marin, M.; Ortíz, J. Á.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater over-exploitation is a deformation process affecting many cities around the world. This type of subsidence develops gradual vertical deformations reaching only a few centimeters per year, but can affect large areas. Consequently, inhabitants of subsiding areas are not aware of the process until others effects are observed, such as ground surface faulting, damage to building, or changes in the natural superficial drain. In order to mitigate and forecast subsidence consequences, it is useful to conduct numerical modeling of the subsidence process. Modeling the subsidence includes the following three basic tasks: a) Delimitation of the shape of the deforming body; b) Determination of the forces that are causing the deformations; and c) Determination of the mechanical properties of the deforming body according with an accepted rheological model. In the case of a land subsidence process, the deforming body is the aquifer system that is being drained. Usually, stratigraphic information from pumping wells, and other geophysical data are used to define the boundaries and shape of the aquifer system. The deformation governing forces, or stresses, can be calculated using the theory of "effective stress". Mechanical properties are usually determined with laboratory testing of samples from shallow strata, because the determination of these properties in samples from the deepest strata is economically or technically unviable. Consequently, the results of the numerical modeling do not necessarily match the observed subsidence evolution and ground faulting. We present in this work numerical simulation results of the land subsiding of the Valley of Aguascalientes, Mexico. Two analyses for the same subsiding area are presented. In the first of them, we used the mechanical properties of only the shallow strata, whereas in the second analysis we used "macroscopic" mechanical properties data determined for the whole aquifer system using In

  17. Nonlinear deformations of microcapsules in elongation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Julien; de Loubens, Clément; Boedec, Gwenn; Georgelin, Marc; Leonetti, Marc; Soft Matter; Biophysics Group Team

    2014-11-01

    Soft microcapsules are drops bounded by a thin elastic shell made of cross-linked proteins. They have numerous applications for drug delivery in bioengineering, pharmaceutics and medicine, where their mechanical stability and their dynamics under flow are crucial. They can also be used as red blood cells models. Here, we investigate the mechanical behaviour of microcapsules made of albumine in strong elongational flow, up to a stretching of 180% just before breaking. The set-up allows us to visualize the deformed shape in the two perpendicular main fields of view, to manage high capillary number and to manipulate soft microcapsules. The steady-state shape of a capsule in the planar elongational flow is non-axisymmetric. In each cross section, the shape is an ellipse but with different small axis which vary in opposite sense with the stretching. Whatever the degree of cross-linking and the size of the capsules, the deformations followed the same master-curve. Comparisons between numerical predictions and experimental results permit to conclude unambiguously that the more properly strain-energy model of membrane is the generalized Hooke model.

  18. A large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping solution for diffusion spectrum imaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chin; Hsu, Ching-Han; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2012-11-01

    Spatial transformation for diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is an important step for group analyses of DSI datasets. In this study, we developed a transformation method for DSI datasets under the framework of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM), which is termed LDDMM-DSI. The proposed method made use of the fact that a DSI dataset is 6D, and generalized the original 2D/3D LDDMM algorithm to the 6D case with some modifications made for the DSI datasets. In this manner, the conventional reorientation problem that arises from transforming diffusion-weighted datasets was avoided by making the DSI datasets capable of being freely deformed in the q-space. The algorithm treated the data-matching task as a variational problem under the LDDMM framework and sought optimal velocity fields from which the generated transformations were diffeomorphic and the transformation curve was a geodesic. The mathematical materials and numerical implementation are detailed in the paper, and experiments were performed to analyze the proposed method on real brain DSI datasets. The results showed that the method was capable of registering different DSI datasets in both global structural shapes and local diffusion profiles. In conclusion, the proposed method can facilitate group analyses of DSI datasets and the generation of a DSI template.

  19. Shape Control of Solar Collectors Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Grossman, J. W.; Allen, J. J.; Rice, T. M.; Liang, C.; Davidson, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Solar collectors that are focused on a central receiver are designed with a mechanism for defocusing the collector or disabling it by turning it out of the path of the sun's rays. This is required to avoid damaging the receiver during periods of inoperability. In either of these two cases a fail-safe operation is very desirable where during power outages the collector passively goes to its defocused or deactivated state. This paper is principally concerned with focusing and defocusing the collector in a fail-safe manner using shape memory alloy actuators. Shape memory alloys are well suited to this application in that once calibrated the actuators can be operated in an on/off mode using a minimal amount of electric power. Also, in contrast to other smart materials that were investigated for this application, shape memory alloys are capable of providing enough stroke at the appropriate force levels to focus the collector. Design and analysis details presented, along with comparisons to test data taken from an actual prototype, demonstrate that the collector can be repeatedly focused and defocused within accuracies required by typical solar energy systems. In this paper the design, analysis and testing of a solar collector which is deformed into its desired shape by shape memory alloy actuators is presented. Computations indicate collector shapes much closer to spherical and with smaller focal lengths can be achieved by moving the actuators inward to a radius of approximately 6 inches. This would require actuators with considerably more stroke and some alternate SMA actuators are currently under consideration. Whatever SMA actuator is finally chosen for this application, repeatability and fatigue tests will be required to investigate the long term performance of the actuator.

  20. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  1. q-Deformed and c-Deformed Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, I. S.; Koizumi, K.; Mir-Kasimov, R. M.

    2003-10-01

    Hamilton functions of classical deformed oscillators (c-deformed oscillators) are derived from Hamiltonians of q-deformed oscillators of the Macfarlane and Dubna types. A new scale parameter, lq, with the dimension of length, is introduced to relate a dimensionless parameter characterizing the deformation with the natural length of the harmonic oscillator. Contraction from q-deformed oscillators to c-deformed oscillators is accomplished by keeping lq finite while taking the limit hbar → 0. The c-deformed Hamilton functions for both types of oscillators are found to be invariant under discrete translations: the step of the translation for the Dubna oscillator is half of that for the Macfarlane oscillator. The c-deformed oscillator of the Macfarlane type has propagating solutions in addition to localized ones. Reinvestigation of the q-deformed oscillator carried out in the light of these findings for the c-deformed systems proves that the q-deformed systems are invariant under the same translation symmetries as the c-deformed systems and have propagating waves of the Bloch type.

  2. Deformation of rectangular thin glass plate coated with magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Yao, Youwei; Liu, Tianchen; Liu, Chian; Ulmer, M. P.; Cao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    As magnetic smart materials (MSMs), magnetostrictive materials have great potential to be selected as coating materials for lightweight x-ray telescope mirrors due to their capability to tune the mirror profile to the desired shape under a magnetic field. To realize this potential, it is necessary to study the deformation of the mirror substrate with the MSM coating subjected to a localized magnetic field. In this paper, an analytical model is developed to calculate the deformation of rectangular coated samples locally affected by magnetostrictive strains driven by an external magnetic field. As a specific case to validate the model, a square glass sample coated with MSMs is prepared, and its deformation is measured in a designed experimental setup by applying a magnetic field. The measured deformation of the sample is compared with the results calculated from the analytical model. The comparison results demonstrate that the analytical model is effective in calculating the deformation of a coated sample with the localized mismatch strains between the film and the substrate. In the experiments, different shape patterns of surface profile changes are achieved by varying the direction of the magnetic field. The analytical model and the experimental method proposed in this paper can be utilized to further guide the application of magnetostrictive coating to deformable lightweight x-ray mirrors in the future.

  3. Snout Shape in Extant Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Jonathan P.; MacLeod, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Snout shape is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout shape, with grazing and browsing species characterised by ‘blunt’ and ‘pointed’ snouts respectively, often with specification of an ‘intermediate’ sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout shape morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile shape alone. Profile shapes in our sample form a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile shapes to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is ‘unknown’ can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout shape varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The shape variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout shape, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout shape, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation

  4. Snout shape in extant ruminants.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Jonathan P; MacLeod, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Snout shape is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout shape, with grazing and browsing species characterised by 'blunt' and 'pointed' snouts respectively, often with specification of an 'intermediate' sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout shape morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile shape alone. Profile shapes in our sample form a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile shapes to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is 'unknown' can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout shape varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The shape variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout shape, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout shape, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation when repeating the

  5. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough. PMID:25152901

  6. Generalized models for rock joint surface shapes.

    PubMed

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  7. Study of Magnetic Fabrics and Deformation across Meta-granite along Heping River, NE Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, E. C.; Yu-Kai, L.; Lee, T. Q.; Chou, Y. M.; Chen, C. C.; Chang, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Heping area of Hualien in the NE Taiwan is located at the region of subduction flip of oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian Plates. The ductile deformation in the region is consisted of the development of N65E-striking foliation and N60W-trending stretching lineation with top-to-southeastern shear. Distinguished mylonitic gneissosity is observed near the lithology contact between the marble and meta-granite but the flow occurrence of granite is still found in the downstream area of meta-granite core. To investigate the deformation pattern and the development of mylonization of meta-granite, study of magnetic fabrics across the meta-granite body is conducted via anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to evaluate the strain path of gneissosity development. AMS results show that the attitude of magnetic foliation and lineation is consistent with that of genissosity and stretching lineation. From the core to the lithology contact of meta-granite, generally anisotropy is increasing and susceptibility ellipsoids change from prolate to oblate. However due to different shearing on gneissosity, the anisotropy and magnetic ellipsoid vary pretty much even in the same site. Based on current analyses among meta-granitic and mylonitic samples, it suggested that strain path of mylonitization is evolved from prolate shape with low-anisotropy in the meta-granitic core through oblate shape with low-anisotropy in weakly gneissic samples to various ellipsoids from oblate to prolate with high-anisotropy in mylonitic samples. Our findings provide insights into understanding the deformation pattern across the meta-granite body and further establishing the strain path of mylonitic gneissosity development. Further studies of identifying magnetic carrier(s) and domain size to evaluate influences of magnetic minerals to the AMS pattern are needed.

  8. Flexydos3D: A new deformable anthropomorphic 3D dosimeter readout with optical CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Hill, Robin; Skyt, Peter S.; Booth, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    A new deformable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dosimeter is proposed that can be cast in an anthropomorphic shape and that can be used for 3D radiation dosimetry of deformable targets. The new material has additional favorable characteristics as it is tissue equivalent for high-energy photons, easy to make and is non-toxic. In combination with dual wavelength optical scanning, it is a powerful dosimeter for dose verification of image gated or organ tracked radiotherapy with moving and deforming targets.

  9. Statistical representation of high-dimensional deformation fields with application to statistically constrained 3D warping.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhong; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos

    2006-10-01

    This paper proposes a 3D statistical model aiming at effectively capturing statistics of high-dimensional deformation fields and then uses this prior knowledge to constrain 3D image warping. The conventional statistical shape model methods, such as the active shape model (ASM), have been very successful in modeling shape variability. However, their accuracy and effectiveness typically drop dramatically in high-dimensionality problems involving relatively small training datasets, which is customary in 3D and 4D medical imaging applications. The proposed statistical model of deformation (SMD) uses wavelet-based decompositions coupled with PCA in each wavelet band, in order to more accurately estimate the pdf of high-dimensional deformation fields, when a relatively small number of training samples are available. SMD is further used as statistical prior to regularize the deformation field in an SMD-constrained deformable registration framework. As a result, more robust registration results are obtained relative to using generic smoothness constraints on deformation fields, such as Laplacian-based regularization. In experiments, we first illustrate the performance of SMD in representing the variability of deformation fields and then evaluate the performance of the SMD-constrained registration, via comparing a hierarchical volumetric image registration algorithm, HAMMER, with its SMD-constrained version, referred to as SMD+HAMMER. This SMD-constrained deformable registration framework can potentially incorporate various registration algorithms to improve robustness and stability via statistical shape constraints.

  10. Large Deformation Dynamic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Samuel w.; Beisinger, Zelma E.; Krieg, Raymond D.

    1993-08-23

    HONDO2-SLA is used to compute the time-dependent displacements, velocities, accelerations, and stresses within elastic or inelastic, two-dimensional or axisymmetric or planar bodies of arbitrary shape and materials.

  11. Probing deformed quantum commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Giani, Tommaso; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Several quantum gravity theories predict a minimal length at the order of magnitude of the Planck length, under which the concepts of space and time lose their physical meaning. In quantum mechanics, the insurgence of such a minimal length can be described by introducing a modified position-momentum commutator, which in turn yields a generalized uncertainty principle, where the uncertainty on position measurements has a lower bound. The value of the minimal length is not predicted by theories and must be estimated experimentally. In this paper, we address the quantum bound to the estimability of the minimal uncertainty length by performing measurements on a harmonic oscillator, which is analytically solvable in the deformed algebra induced by the deformed commutation relations.

  12. Deformed wing virus.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Joachim R; Genersch, Elke

    2010-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV; Iflaviridae) is one of many viruses infecting honeybees and one of the most heavily investigated due to its close association with honeybee colony collapse induced by Varroadestructor. In the absence of V.destructor DWV infection does not result in visible symptoms or any apparent negative impact on host fitness. However, for reasons that are still not fully understood, the transmission of DWV by V.destructor to the developing pupae causes clinical symptoms, including pupal death and adult bees emerging with deformed wings, a bloated, shortened abdomen and discolouration. These bees are not viable and die soon after emergence. In this review we will summarize the historical and recent data on DWV and its relatives, covering the genetics, pathobiology, and transmission of this important viral honeybee pathogen, and discuss these within the wider theoretical concepts relating to the genetic variability and population structure of RNA viruses, the evolution of virulence and the development of disease symptoms.

  13. Congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P; Stark, S L

    1995-03-01

    Clubfoot is a birth defect that is marked primarily by a deformed talus (ie, ankle) and calcaneous (ie, heel) that give the foot a characteristic "club-like" appearance. In congenital idiopathic clubfoot (ie, talipes equinovarus), the infant's foot points downward (ie, equinus) and turns inward (ie, varus), while the forefoot curls toward the heel (ie, adduction). This congenital disorder has an incidence of 1 in 400 live births, with boys affected twice as often as girls. Unilateral clubfoot is somewhat more common than bilateral clubfoot and may occur as an isolated defect or in association with other disorders (eg, chromosomal aberrations, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, arthrogryposis). Infantile clubfoot deformity is painless and is correctable with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:7778903

  14. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  15. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  16. Plastic deformation and sintering of alumina under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fangming; Liu, Pingping; Wang, Haikuo; Xu, Chao; Yin, Shuai; Yin, Wenwen; Li, Yong; He, Duanwei

    2013-12-21

    Plastic deformation of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) under high pressure was investigated by observing the shape changes of spherical particles, and the near fully dense transparent bulks were prepared at around 5.5 GPa and 900 °C. Through analyzing the deformation features, densities, and residual micro-strain of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compacts prepared under high pressures and temperatures (2.0–5.5 GPa and 600–1200 °C), the effects of plastic deformation on the sintering behavior of alumina have been demonstrated. Under compression, the microscopic deviatoric stress caused by grain-to-grain contact could initiate the plastic deformation of individual particles, eliminate pores of the polycrystalline samples, and enhance the local atomic diffusion at the grain boundaries, thus produced transparent alumina bulks.

  17. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  18. Postlaminectomy cervical deformity.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel; Haid, Regis W; Rodts, Gerald E; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2003-09-15

    Postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis is an important consideration when performing surgery. Identifying factors predisposing to postoperative deformity is essential. The goal is to prevent postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis while exposing the patient to minimal additional morbidity. When postlaminectomy kyphosis does occur, surgical correction is often required and performed via an anterior, posterior, or combined approach. The authors discuss the indications for surgical approaches as well as clinical results. PMID:15347223

  19. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-07-04

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of "smart" materials that have the ability to change from a fixed, temporary shape to a pre-determined permanent shape upon the application of a stimulus such as heat(1-5). In a typical shape memory cycle, the SMP is first deformed at an elevated temperature that is higher than its transition temperature, T(trans;) [either the melting temperature (T(m;)) or the glass transition temperature (T(g;))]. The deformation is elastic in nature and mainly leads to a reduction in conformational entropy of the constituent network chains (following the rubber elasticity theory). The deformed SMP is then cooled to a temperature below its T(trans;) while maintaining the external strain or stress constant. During cooling, the material transitions to a more rigid state (semi-crystalline or glassy), which kinetically traps or "freezes" the material in this low-entropy state leading to macroscopic shape fixing. Shape recovery is triggered by continuously heating the material through T(trans;) under a stress-free (unconstrained) condition. By allowing the network chains (with regained mobility) to relax to their thermodynamically favored, maximal-entropy state, the material changes from the temporary shape to the permanent shape. Cells are capable of surveying the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment(6). The mechanisms through which mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment control cell behavior are areas of active research. Substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools in the investigation of these mechanisms. Mesoscale, microscale, and nanoscale patterns of substrate topography have been shown to direct cell alignment, cell adhesion, and cell traction forces(7-14). These findings have underscored the potential for substrate topography to control and assay the mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment during cell culture, but the substrates used to date

  20. Deformation of wrinkled graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Kinloch, Ian A; Young, Robert J; Novoselov, Kostya S; Anagnostopoulos, George; Parthenios, John; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Lu, Ching-Yu; Britnell, Liam

    2015-04-28

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  1. Deformation of Wrinkled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  2. Treatment of Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Saffar, P; Badina, A

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Madelung's deformity is still controversial. We reviewed retrospectively 19 patients with Madelung's deformity (two bilateral, 21 cases) who underwent surgery to the radius and ulna to improve range of motion, decrease pain and improve appearance of the wrist. Nineteen patients underwent 21 distal radial osteotomy procedures using three different techniques: subtraction, addition or dome osteotomy. Ulnar shortening and redirection of the distal ulna was performed in 12 cases; a long oblique osteotomy was used in 10 of these cases. The Sauvé-Kapandji technique was performed in five cases, an ulnar distal epiphysiodesis in two cases and a combination of osteotomy and epiphysiodesis in one case. The aim was to reduce the distal radial slope and to restore the orientation and congruity of the distal radio-ulnar joint and to improve its function. Pain was reduced as a result of the procedure: more than 75% of the cases had no or intermittent pain at the review. Pronation improved from 63° to 68° (P=0.467, not significant) and supination improved from 48° to 72° on average (P=0.034, significant). Grip strength increased from 11 to 18 kgf (P=0.013, significant). Madelung's deformity is not always a benign condition and it responds well to corrective osteotomies. PMID:26525609

  3. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  4. Multiscale Numerical Simulation of the Shaped Charge Jet Generated from Tungsten-Copper Powder Liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jintao, Liu; Hongnian, Cai; Fuchi, Wang; Qunbo, Fan

    2013-03-01

    Formation process of the shaped charge jet of W-Cu powder liner was simulated with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method of LS-DYNA software. With the digital image process technique and macro-micro coupling method, a multiscale finite element model was established, and the high speed deformation process of the microstructure driven by explosive detonation in the liner of shaped charge was successfully simulated. The Cu phases were susceptible to serious deformation while the tungsten phase has less deformation. Besides, the temperature field of the microstructure during the shaped charge deforming was calculated, and a discussion of the deformation mechanism of the liner was given. The methods proposed in this paper would be of help in microstructure design of shaped charge materials.

  5. Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term for the Davidson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Georgoudis, P. E.; Lenis, D.; Minkov, N.; Quesne, C.

    2011-04-15

    Analytical expressions for spectra and wave functions are derived for a Bohr Hamiltonian, describing the collective motion of deformed nuclei, in which the mass is allowed to depend on the nuclear deformation. Solutions are obtained for separable potentials consisting of a Davidson potential in the {beta} variable, in the cases of {gamma}-unstable nuclei, axially symmetric prolate deformed nuclei, and triaxial nuclei, implementing the usual approximations in each case. The solution, called the deformation-dependent mass (DDM) Davidson model, is achieved by using techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), involving a deformed shape invariance condition. Spectra and B(E2) transition rates are compared to experimental data. The dependence of the mass on the deformation, dictated by SUSYQM for the potential used, reduces the rate of increase of the moment of inertia with deformation, removing a main drawback of the model.

  6. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  7. Deformation of the Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Kruglov, Sergey I.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we will first clarify the physical meaning of having a minimum measurable time. Then we will combine the deformation of the Dirac equation due to the existence of minimum measurable length and time scales with its deformation due to the doubly special relativity. We will also analyze this deformed Dirac equation in curved spacetime, and observe that this deformation of the Dirac equation also leads to a nontrivial modification of general relativity. Finally, we will analyze the stochastic quantization of this deformed Dirac equation on curved spacetime.

  8. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  9. Microscopic analysis of pear-shaped nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sd f interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  10. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Deformation of a Roman Aqueduct (II-III Century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Florindo, F.; Marra, F.

    2002-12-01

    Along the modern trace of the Tiburtina road, approximately 20 km north-east of the city of Rome, recent archaeological diggings have brought to light a system of aqueduct galleries constructed by roman engineers (II-III century A.D). Two narrow water channels (A and B) of this aqueduct system were strongly deformed by tectonic movement that occurred subsequent to their construction. The archaeological site falls inside the Acque Albule basin (AAB): a travertine plateau, upper Pleistocene in age with a medium thickness of approximately 60 m. The AAB has been interpreted as a rhomb-shaped pull-apart basin (7 km long, 4 km wide) created by strike-slip faulting within a N-S shear zone that crosses the Rome area. Its evolution is attributed to Middle-Upper Pleistocene times. The principal N-S water channel (A) evidences both brittle (extensive) and ductile (compressive) deformations, whereas the shorter channel (B) to the south-west reveals predominantly ductile deformations associated with compression. A detailed survey of the A channel indicates a segmented course along the length of the entire structure, with orientations ranging between N10°E and N10°W, and with one section oriented at N35°W. The smaller B channel situated to the south-west of the principal excavation indicates that deformation can be linked to transverse compression resulting in a restriction and rotation of the structure. The geometry of the deformation pattern and the brittle structures affecting the surrounding rock, the presence of sections deformed in a ductile manner, the segmentation of the two channels into tracts rotated in different directions, the narrowing of an internal section of the B channel orientated N15°W, are all elements compatible with strike-slip tectonics. To provide additional quantitative support for these observations, 3 sites (35 samples) were drilled, for paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analyses, in the "Pozzolane Rosse" Formation (457

  12. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  13. Shape memory alloys: New materials for future engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Shape memory is a new material property. An alloy which experiences relative severe plastic deformation resumes its original shape again after heating by 10 to 100 C. Besides simple shape memory, in similar alloys there is the second effect where the change in shape is caused exclusively by little temperature change. In pseudo-elasticity, the alloy exhibits a rubber-like behavior, i.e., large, reversible deformation at little change in tension. Beta Cu and beta NiTi alloys have been used in practice. The probability is that soon alloys based on Fe will become available. Recently increasing applications for this alloy were found in various areas of technology, even medical technology. A review with 24 references is given, including properties, production, applications and fundamental principles of the shape memory effect.

  14. Shape memory and pseudoelasticity in metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Park, Harold S; Gall, Ken; Zimmerman, Jonathan A

    2005-12-16

    Structural reorientations in metallic fcc nanowires are controlled by a combination of size, thermal energy, and the type of defects formed during inelastic deformation. By utilizing atomistic simulations, we show that certain fcc nanowires can exhibit both shape memory and pseudoelastic behavior. We also show that the formation of defect-free twins, a process related to the material stacking fault energy, nanometer size scale, and surface stresses is the mechanism that controls the ability of fcc nanowires of different materials to show a reversible transition between two crystal orientations during loading and thus shape memory and pseudoelasticity. PMID:16384469

  15. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  16. Elastomeric Photopolymers: Shaping Polymer Gels with Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfield, Julia

    2008-03-01

    Polymer gels that possess a latent ability to change shape, which can be triggered in a spatially resolved manner using light---``elastomeric photopolymers''---have been developed to meet the need for materials that can be reshaped without direct contact, e.g., to non-invasively adjust an implanted lens in the human eye. The physics of diffusion and swelling in elastomers are applied to create a transparent silicone suitable for making a foldable intraocular lens that can be reshaped using near ultraviolet light. A crosslinked silicone matrix dictates the initial shape of the lens, while ``macromers''--short silicone chains with polymerizable end groups—and photoinitiator enable shape adjustment using light: polymerization of the macromer in the irradiated regions, followed by diffusion of free macromer causes local swelling. To predict shape change directly from irradiation profile, a theoretical treatment is presented that captures 1. shape change with no external forces, 2. coupling between diffusion and deformation, and 3. connection between thermodynamics, constitutive equations and equations of motion. Using continuum mechanics complemented with thermodynamics within the auspices of the finite element method, we develop a steady-state model which successfully captures the coupling between diffusion and deformation. Parameter values are drawn from our prior experimental studies of the mechanical properties, equilibrium swelling, penetrant diffusivities and interaction parameters in systematically varied polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks and acrylate endcapped PDMS macromers. Preliminary computational studies show qualitative agreement with experimentally observed phenomena.

  17. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  18. Shock propagation over a deformable particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Thomas; Sridharan, Prashanth; Zhang, Ju; Balachandar, Siva

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of strong shock waves with a deformable particle is an important fundamental problem in applications of multiphase flow; e.g., volcanic blasts, shock past a bubble, or explosives loaded with particles. In these applications the shock strength is greater than the yield strength of the particles, and as a result the particles will move and deform. We consider the impedance and shock-speed ratios, which define the nature of the deformation, for a variety of materials. Understanding the dynamic behavior of isolated particles at the microscale is important for developing point-particle models at the macroscale. Numerical results will be presented using the axisymmetric assumption to reduce computational costs. For a variety of shock strengths, we plot as a function of time a number of quantities, such as maximum particle temperature and pressure, mass integrated temperature and pressure, particle position. We also show results for non-spherical particles to determine the effect of particle shape. Here, we consider an ellipsoid align along or normal to the flow direction. Finally, preliminary results using a fully 3-D code will be presented.

  19. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  20. Deformable mirrors based on magnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Phil R.; Borra, Ermanno F.; Bergamasco, Rosangela; Gingras, Julie; Truong, Long; Ritcey, Anna

    2004-10-01

    The trend towards ever larger telescopes and more advanced adaptive optics systems such as multi-conjugate adaptive optics is driving the need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low cost actuators. Other applications require strokes larger than those readily available from conventional mirrors. Magnetically deformable liquid mirrors are a potential solution to both these problems. Depositing a thin silver colloid known as a metal liquid-like film (MELLF) on the ferrofluid surface solves the problem of low reflectivity of pure ferrofluids. This combination provides a liquid optical surface that can be precisely shaped in a magnetic field. We have demonstrated a reflective coating that is stable for more than 30 days with a reflectivity of 50% in the near infrared. Additional experiments indicate that MELLF coatings can provide near infrared reflectivity values in excess of 80%. We also report on recent response time measurements of liquid deformable mirrors. We have demonstrated liquid mirror actuators with slew rates of 800 μm/s, corresponding to an actuator bandwidth of approximately 40 Hz and 80 Hz for strokes of 10 μm and 5 μm respectively.

  1. Technologies for antenna shape and vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, Edward; Scheid, Robert; Eldred, Daniel

    1988-05-01

    This paper describes the application of advanced control methods and techniques to the second- and third-generation mobile satellite (MSAT) configurations having wrap-rib offset feed construction. The technologies are generically applicable to other designs such as hoop-column and other elastically deformable non-rigid structures. The focus of the discussion is on reflector shape determination and control, dynamics identification, and pointing jitter suppression.

  2. A Survey of Shape Parameterization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of shape parameterization techniques for multidisciplinary optimization and highlights some emerging ideas. The survey focuses on the suitability of available techniques for complex configurations, with suitability criteria based on the efficiency, effectiveness, ease of implementation, and availability of analytical sensitivities for geometry and grids. The paper also contains a section on field grid regeneration, grid deformation, and sensitivity analysis techniques.

  3. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  4. Shape memory effect of the Ni-Ti-Hf high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.H.; Pu, Z.; Tseng, H.K.; Biancaniello, F.S.

    1995-11-17

    The one-way shape memory effect of the newly-developed TiNi-Hf high temperature shape memory alloys has been investigated. The results of the study show that TiNi-Hf high temperature alloys possess a relatively high shape memory effect. All the alloys, even those with an Hf content as high as 30at%, exhibit complete strain recovery behavior. However, as the Hf content increases, the fully reversible strain of the alloys decreases. The increase of the second phase as the Hf content increases is the primary reason for the deterioration of the shape memory effect and ductility. The shape memory properties also deteriorate as the deformation temperature increases.

  5. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  6. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V<αL(3)/6π(2), with α≈0.21, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance. PMID:26565252

  7. A Novel Shape Parameterization Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a novel parameterization approach for complex shapes suitable for a multidisciplinary design optimization application. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft objects animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity analysis tools (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling). This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, and camber. The results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, performance, and a simple propulsion module.

  8. Dynamics of Brownian motors in deformable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulaché, Rosalie Laure; Kepnang Pebeu, Fabrice Maxime; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2016-10-01

    The directed transport in a one-dimensional overdamped, Brownian motor subjected to a travelling wave potential with variable shape and exposed to an external bias is studied numerically. We focus our attention on the class of Remoissenet-Peyrard parametrized on-site potentials with slight modification, whose shape can be varied as a function of a parameter s, recovering the sine-Gordon shape as the special case. We demonstrate that in the presence of the travelling wave potential the observed dynamical properties of the Brownian motor which crucially depends on the travelling wave speed, the intensity of the noise and the external load is significantly influenced also by the geometry of the system. In particular, we notice that systems with sharp wells and broad barriers favour the transport under the influence of an applied load. The efficiency of transport of Brownian motors in deformable systems remains equal to 1 (in the absence of an applied load) up to a critical value of the travelling wave speed greater than that of the pure sine-Gordon shape.

  9. Interactive Streamline Exploration and Manipulation Using Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-12

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing three-dimensional flow fields with streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines at once makes it difficult to locate interesting regions, but displaying too few streamlines risks missing important features. A more ideal streamline exploration model is to allow the viewer to freely move across the field that has been populated with interesting streamlines and pull away the streamlines that cause occlusion so that the viewer can inspect the hidden ones in detail. In this paper, we present a streamline deformation algorithm that supports such user-driven interaction with three-dimensional flow fields. We define a view-dependent focus+context technique that moves the streamlines occluding the focus area using a novel displacement model. To preserve the context surrounding the user-chosen focus area, we propose two shape models to define the transition zone for the surrounding streamlines, and the displacement of the contextual streamlines is solved interactively with a goal of preserving their shapes as much as possible. Based on our deformation model, we design an interactive streamline exploration tool using a lens metaphor. Our system runs interactively so that users can move their focus and examine the flow field freely.

  10. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  11. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  12. Effects of high-order deformation on high-K isomers in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. L.; Bertulani, C. A.; Xu, F. R.; Walker, P. M.

    2011-01-15

    Using, for the first time, configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations with the inclusion of {beta}{sub 6} deformation, we find remarkable effects of the high-order deformation on the high-K isomers in {sup 254}No, the focus of recent spectroscopy experiments on superheavy nuclei. For shapes with multipolarity six, the isomers are more tightly bound and, microscopically, have enhanced deformed shell gaps at N=152 and Z=100. The inclusion of {beta}{sub 6} deformation significantly improves the description of the very heavy high-K isomers.

  13. Ultrasoft, highly deformable microgels.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Haylee; Brown, Ashley C; Clarke, Kimberly C; Dhada, Kabir S; Douglas, Alison; Hansen, Caroline E; Herman, Emily; Hyatt, John S; Kodlekere, Purva; Meng, Zhiyong; Saxena, Shalini; Spears, Mark W; Welsch, Nicole; Lyon, L Andrew

    2015-03-14

    Microgels are colloidally stable, hydrogel microparticles that have previously been used in a range of (soft) material applications due to their tunable mechanical and chemical properties. Most commonly, thermo and pH-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgels can be fabricated by precipitation polymerization in the presence of the co-monomer acrylic acid (AAc). Traditionally pNIPAm microgels are synthesized in the presence of a crosslinking agent, such as N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), however, microgels can also be synthesized under 'crosslinker free' conditions. The resulting particles have extremely low (<0.5%), core-localized crosslinking resulting from rare chain transfer reactions. AFM nanoindentation of these ultralow crosslinked (ULC) particles indicate that they are soft relative to crosslinked microgels, with a Young's modulus of ∼10 kPa. Furthermore, ULC microgels are highly deformable as indicated by a high degree of spreading on glass surfaces and the ability to translocate through nanopores significantly smaller than the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles. The size and charge of ULCs can be easily modulated by altering reaction conditions, such as temperature, monomer, surfactant and initiator concentrations, and through the addition of co-monomers. Microgels based on the widely utilized, biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) can also be synthesized under crosslinker free conditions. Due to their softness and deformability, ULC microgels are a unique base material for a wide variety of biomedical applications including biomaterials for drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  14. Quantitative analysis on the non-similarity of thermal deformation of the gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guihua; Fei, Yetai; Ma, Xiushui; Fei, Wen

    2008-12-01

    Gears as common machine elements are deformed when its temperature varies. One direct result is that the tooth shape of meshing gear is changed. Using the theory of heat and elastic mechanics, the involute cylindrical gear is taken for example. Calculation makes it clear that the total profile of gear after thermal deformation is different from the shape before thermal deformation. That is named non-similarity, and the non-similarity error is given. For proving the non-similarity existed in thermal deformation of Gear, a four-dimension equipment is adopted for experiment, which is able to realize rotated motion and rectilinear motion. The experimental result also shows that the non-similarity does exist in thermal deformation of involute cylindrical gear. Shared a common theory, the non-similarity is existed in the circular gear.

  15. Increased rigidly triaxial deformations in neutron-rich Mo, Ru isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, WuYang; Jiao, ChangFeng; Xu, FuRong; Fu, XiMing

    2016-09-01

    Pairing-deformation-frequency self-consistent crankingWoods-Saxon model is employed to investigate the triaxiality in the ground states of the neutron-rich even-even Mo, Ru isotopes. Deformation evolutions and transition probabilities have been studied, giving the triaxial shapes in their ground states. The kinematic moments of inertia have been calculated to illustrate the gradually rigid deformation. To understand the origin of the asymmetry shape in this region, we analyze the evolution of single-particle orbits with changing γ deformation. The present calculations reveal the importance of the triaxial deformation in describing not only static property, but also rotational behaviors in this mass region, providing significant probes into the shell structure around.

  16. Deformability analysis of sickle blood using ektacytometry.

    PubMed

    Rabai, Miklos; Detterich, Jon A; Wenby, Rosalinda B; Hernandez, Tatiana M; Toth, Kalman; Meiselman, Herbert J; Wood, John C

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by decreased erythrocyte deformability, microvessel occlusion and severe painful infarctions of different organs. Ektacytometry of SCD red blood cells (RBC) is made difficult by the presence of rigid, poorly-deformable irreversibly sickled cells (ISC) that do not align with the fluid shear field and distort the elliptical diffraction pattern seen with normal RBC. In operation, the computer software fits an outline to the diffraction pattern, then reports an elongation index (EI) at each shear stress based on the length and width of the fitted ellipse: EI=(length-width)/(length+width). Using a commercial ektacytometer (LORCA, Mechatronics Instruments, The Netherlands) we have approached the problem of ellipse fitting in two ways: (1) altering the height of the diffraction image on a computer monitor using an aperture within the camera lens; (2) altering the light intensity level (gray level) used by the software to fit the image to an elliptical shape. Neither of these methods affected deformability results (elongation index-shear stress relations) for normal RBC but did markedly affect results for SCD erythrocytes: (1) decreasing image height by 15% and 30% increased EI at moderate to high stresses; (2) progressively increasing the light level increased EI over a wide range of stresses. Fitting data obtained at different image heights using the Lineweaver-Burke routine yielded percentage ISC results in good agreement with microscopic cell counting. We suggest that these two relatively simple approaches allow minimizing artifacts due to the presence of rigid discs or ISC and also suggest the need for additional studies to evaluate the physiological relevance of deformability data obtained via these methods.

  17. Canal Shaping with One Shape File and Twisted Files: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vedati Santosh; Aravind, Kumbakonam; Kumar, Harish TVS; Vishal M, Bharath; Vizaikumar, Vasudha Nelluri; Das, Rupali; Vamsilatha, K

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of two different rotary Nickel –Titanium (Ni-Ti) files, One shape file and Twisted files in a simulated artificial canals. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 endodontic training blocks were used in this study and divided in two groups consisting of 20 each ( n = 20) and the shaping ability was accessed based on the left over ink stain in the artificial canal. Results: Image proplus analysis software and stereomicroscope were used for analysing the shaping ability of the files and statistical analysis was done by SPSS software. Twisted files showed better shaping ability compared to one shape file both experimentally and statistically. Conclusion: It can be concluded that twisted files shaped the canals better then one shape file. PMID:25654059

  18. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory R; Buck, Taraz E; Sullivan, Devin P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  19. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  20. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  1. Hot compression deformation behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj, Mehdi; Mansouri, Hojjatollah; Vafaei, Reza; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Kanani, Ali

    2013-06-01

    The hot compression behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel was studied at the temperatures of 950-1100°C and the strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1 using a Baehr DIL-805 deformation dilatometer. The hot deformation equations and the relationship between hot deformation parameters were obtained. It is found that strain rate and deformation temperature significantly influence the flow stress behavior of the steel. The work hardening rate and the peak value of flow stress increase with the decrease of deformation temperature and the increase of strain rate. In addition, the activation energy of deformation ( Q) is calculated as 433.343 kJ/mol. The microstructural evolution during deformation indicates that, at the temperature of 950°C and the strain rate of 0.01 s-1, small circle-like precipitates form along grain boundaries; but at the temperatures above 950°C, the dissolution of such precipitates occurs. Energy-dispersive X-ray analyses indicate that the precipitates are complex carbides of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Ti.

  2. Shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  3. Shape coexistence and triaxiality in nuclei near 80Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. J.; Xu, F. R.; Shen, S. F.; Liu, H. L.; Wyss, R.; Yan, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Total-Routhian-surface calculations have been performed to investigate the shape evolutions of A ˜80 nuclei: Zr-8480,Sr-8076 , and Mo,8684 . Shape coexistences of spherical, prolate, and oblate deformations have been found in these nuclei. Particularly for the nuclei 80Sr and 82Zr , the energy differences between two shape-coexisting states are less than 220 keV. At high spins, the g9 /2 shell plays an important role in shape evolutions. It has been found that the alignment of the g9 /2 quasiparticles drives nuclei to be triaxial.

  4. Deformable models with sparsity constraints for cardiac motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Shaoting; Li, Kang; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2014-08-01

    Deformable models integrate bottom-up information derived from image appearance cues and top-down priori knowledge of the shape. They have been widely used with success in medical image analysis. One limitation of traditional deformable models is that the information extracted from the image data may contain gross errors, which adversely affect the deformation accuracy. To alleviate this issue, we introduce a new family of deformable models that are inspired from the compressed sensing, a technique for accurate signal reconstruction by harnessing some sparseness priors. In this paper, we employ sparsity constraints to handle the outliers or gross errors, and integrate them seamlessly with deformable models. The proposed new formulation is applied to the analysis of cardiac motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI), where the automated tagging line tracking results are very noisy due to the poor image quality. Our new deformable models track the heart motion robustly, and the resulting strains are consistent with those calculated from manual labels. PMID:24721617

  5. Late-Paleozoic-Mesozoic deformational and deformation related metamorphic structures of Kuznetsk-Altai region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Kuznetsk-Altai region is a part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The nature and formation mechanisms of the observed structure of Kuznetsk-Altai region are interpreted by the author as the consequence of convergence of Tuva-Mongolian and Junggar lithospheric block structures and energy of collision interaction between the blocks of crust in Late-Paleozoic-Mesozoic period. Tectonic zoning of Kuznetsk-Altai region is based on the principle of adequate description of geological medium (without methods of 'primary' state recovery). The initial indication of this convergence is the crust thickening in the zone of collision. On the surface the mechanisms of lateral compression form a regional elevation; with this elevation growth the 'mountain roots' start growing. With an approach of blocks an interblock elevation is divided into various fragments, and these fragments interact in the manner of collision. The physical expression of collision mechanisms are periodic pulses of seismic activity. The main tectonic consequence of the block convergence and collision of interblock units is formation of an ensemble of regional structures of the deformation type on the basis of previous 'pre-collision' geological substratum [Chikov et al., 2012]. This ensemble includes: 1) allochthonous and autochthonous blocks of weakly deformed substratum; 2) folded (folded-thrust) systems; 3) dynamic metamorphism zones of regional shears and main faults. Characteristic of the main structures includes: the position of sedimentary, magmatic and PT-metamorphic rocks, the degree of rock dynamometamorphism and variety rock body deformation, as well as the styles and concentrations of mechanic deformations. 1) block terranes have weakly elongated or isometric shape in plane, and they are the systems of block structures of pre-collision substratum separated by the younger zones of interblock deformations. They stand out among the main deformation systems, and the smallest are included into the

  6. Styrene-based shape memory foam: fabrication and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Zhou, Tianyang; Qin, Chao; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory polymer foam is a promising kind of structure in the biomedical and aerospace field. Shape memory styrene foam with uniform and controlled open-cell structure was successfully fabricated using a salt particulate leaching method. Shape recovery capability exists for foam programming in both high-temperature compression and low-temperature compression (deformation processes. Such a property could expand its potential application in the self-healing field. The mechanical property at different temperatures was thoroughly studied. Shape recovery properties such as shape fixing property and shape recovery ratio were also characterized. In order to provide guidance for the future fabrication of shape memory foam, the theories of Gibson and Ashby as well as differential micromechanics theory were applied to predict Young’s modulus and the mechanical behavior of SMP styrene foams during the compression process.

  7. Experimental deformation of rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handin, J.; Russell, J. E.; Carter, N. L.

    Using newly designed apparatus for triaxial-compression testing of 10 by 20-cm cores of Avery Island rocksalt at constant strain-rates between 10-4 and 10-6/s, temperatures between 100° and 200°C, and confining pressures of 3.4 and 20 MPa, comparing our data with those of other workers on the same material, and observing natural deformations of rocksalt, we find that (1) constant-strain-rate and quasi-constant stress-rate tests (both often called quasi-static compression tests) yield essentially similar stress-strain relations, and these depend strongly on strain rate and temperature, but not confining pressure; (2) fracture excluded, the deformation mechanisms observed for differential stresses between 0.5 and 20 MPa are intracrystal-line slip (dislocation glide and cross-slip) and polygonization (dislocation glide and climb by ion-vacancy pipe diffusion); (3) the same steady-state strain rate ɛ., and flow stress are reached at the same temperature in both constant-strain-rate and constant-stress (creep) tests, but the strain-time data from transient creep tests do not match the strain-hardening data unless the initial strain, ɛ0 (time-dependent in rocksalt) is accounted for; in creep tests the clock is not started until the desired constant stress is reached; (4) because the stress-strain curve contains the entire history of the deformation, the constant-strain-rate test rather than the creep test may well be preferred as the source of constitutive data; (5) furthermore, if the stress or temperature of the creep test is too low to achieve the steady state in laboratory time, one cannot predict the steady-state flow stress or strain rate from the transient response alone, whereas we can estimate them rather well from constant-strain-rate data even when strain rates are too high or temperatures too low to reach the steady state within a few hours; (6) the so-called "baseline creep law", giving creep strain, ɛ = ea[1-exp(-ξt)]+ɛ. ss t, where ea, ξ, and

  8. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  9. Active compressive intraoceanic deformation: early stages of ophiolites emplacement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias; Montési, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is strong and continental lithosphere is weak. As a result, there is relatively little deformation in the oceanic domain away from plate boundaries. However, the interior of oceanic lithosphere does deform when highly stressed. We review here places where intraoceanic compression is at work. In the more than 30 years since the first observations of active compressive intraplate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean through seismic profiling (Eittreim et al., 1972), compressive deformation has been identified in a variety of other oceanic tectonic settings: as a result of small differential motion between large plates (between North America and South America in the Central Atlantic; between Eurasia and Nubia offshore Gibraltar; between Macquarie and Australia plates in the Southern Ocean), within back-arcs (northwest Celebes Sea, Okushiri Ridge in the Japan Sea, on the eastern border of the Caroline plate), and ahead of subduction (Zenisu Ridge off Nankai Trough). Deformation appears to be more diffuse when larger plates are involved, and more localized for younger plates, perhaps in relation with the increasing rigidity of oceanic plates with age. The best example of diffuse deformation studied so far remains the Central Indian Ocean. Numerous marine data have been collected in this area, including shallow and deep seismic, heat flow measurements, multibeam bathymetry. The present-day deformation field has been modeled using GPS and earthquakes as far field and near field constraints respectively. Reactivation of the oceanic fabric (including for portions of the Indo-Australian plate which are now in subduction as evidenced by the September 2009 Padang earthquake), selective fault abandonment (Delescluse et al., 2008) and serpentinization (Delescluse and Chamot-Rooke, 2008) are some of the important processes that shape the present-day pattern of deformation. These rare intraplate deformation areas constitute excellent natural laboratories to

  10. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  11. Global and Local Stress Analyses of McDonnell Douglas Stitched/RFI Composite Wing Stub Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains results of structural analyses performed in support of the NASA structural testing of an all-composite stitched/RFI (resin film infusion) wing stub box. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Company designed and fabricated the wing stub box. The analyses used a global/local approach. The global model contains the entire test article. It includes the all-composite stub box, a metallic load-transition box and a metallic wing-tip extension box. The two metallic boxes are connected to the inboard and outboard ends of the composite wing stub box, respectively. The load-transition box was attached to a steel and concrete vertical reaction structure and a load was applied at the tip of the extension box to bend the wing stub box upward. The local model contains an upper cover region surrounding three stringer runouts. In that region, a large nonlinear deformation was identified by the global analyses. A more detailed mesh was used for the local model to obtain more accurate analysis results near stringer runouts. Numerous analysis results such as deformed shapes, displacements at selected locations, and strains at critical locations are included in this report.

  12. Extracting Cell Stiffness from Real-Time Deformability Cytometry: Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mietke, Alexander; Otto, Oliver; Girardo, Salvatore; Rosendahl, Philipp; Taubenberger, Anna; Golfier, Stefan; Ulbricht, Elke; Aland, Sebastian; Guck, Jochen; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth

    2015-11-17

    Cell stiffness is a sensitive indicator of physiological and pathological changes in cells, with many potential applications in biology and medicine. A new method, real-time deformability cytometry, probes cell stiffness at high throughput by exposing cells to a shear flow in a microfluidic channel, allowing for mechanical phenotyping based on single-cell deformability. However, observed deformations of cells in the channel not only are determined by cell stiffness, but also depend on cell size relative to channel size. Here, we disentangle mutual contributions of cell size and cell stiffness to cell deformation by a theoretical analysis in terms of hydrodynamics and linear elasticity theory. Performing real-time deformability cytometry experiments on both model spheres of known elasticity and biological cells, we demonstrate that our analytical model not only predicts deformed shapes inside the channel but also allows for quantification of cell mechanical parameters. Thereby, fast and quantitative mechanical sampling of large cell populations becomes feasible.

  13. Controls on Dune Deformation Patterns in White Sands, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. B.; Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Eolian dune fields exhibit a variety of pattern transitions, including: the ab initio appearance of dunes from no dunes; transverse to barchan and unvegetated barchan to vegetated parabolic. Recent model predictions offer some insight into the mechanisms underlying some of these transitions. However, there are few direct observations, and tests providing empirical verification are sparse. The White Sands dune field exhibits all three of the aforementioned transitions in sequence, from the upwind to downwind margin, and has the potential to be a testing ground for these predictions. Repeat LiDAR data at White Sands provide an excellent opportunity to study not only dune structure, but also dune dynamics, which can provide insight into how dunes destabilize from one dune morphology into another. We employ a recently developed method for decomposing dune migration into two components: "translation" of a dune, and changes in dune shape referred to as "deformation". We find that the fastest moving dunes (i.e. the dunes translating most quickly) have the largest amount of deformation. Patterns of deformation also vary depending on dune type: transverse dunes experience coherent deformation, while parabolic dunes exhibit highly localized and apparently random deformation. Only a fraction of the deformation can be explained by the migration rate. A significant amount of deformation appears to be attributable to dune-dune interactions, which destabilize dune patterns in locations where dune density is high. At the interface between the transverse to barchan dune patterns, we describe how transverse dunes break up into barchans and compare it to published model results. Regarding the barchan to parabolic transition, we find that the onset of vegetation drives a gradual slowdown in migration rates, while the magnitude of deformation drops and becomes localized to dune crests as the arms are stabilized by plants.

  14. Shape trends and triaxiality in neutron-rich odd-mass Y and Nbisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.X.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Gelberg, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hwang, J.K.; Zhu, S.J.; Gore, P.M.; Fong,D.; Jones, E.F.; Wu, S.C.; Lee, I.Y.; Ginter, T.N.; Ma, W.C.; Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Stoyer, M.A.; Donangelo, R.

    2004-09-28

    New level schemes of Y and Nb isotopes are proposed based on measurements of prompt gamma rays from 252Cf fission at Gammasphere. Shape trends regarding triaxiality and quadrupole deformations are studied.

  15. Structural shape optimization in multidisciplinary system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    Structural shape optimization couples with other discipline optimization in the design of complex engineering systems. For instance, the wing structural weight and elastic deformations couple to aerodynamic loads and aircraft performance through drag. This coupling makes structural shape optimization a subtask in the overall vehicle synthesis. Decomposition methods for optimization and sensitivity analysis allow the specialized disciplinary methods to be used while the disciplines are temporarily decoupled, after which the interdisciplinary couplings are restored at the system level. Application of decomposition methods to structures-aerodynamics coupling in aircraft is outlined and illustrated with a numerical example of a transport aircraft. It is concluded that these methods may integrate structural and aerodynamic shape optimizations with the unified objective of the maximum aircraft performance.

  16. Formation of bowl-shaped craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    High-explosive charges are used to form, in several types of granular media, laboratory-scale examples of the bowl-shaped craters that are found to be the largest and simplest class of impact structure on planetary and lunar surfaces. High-speed films of the experiments yield crater growth rate and particle displacement data, including quantitative stress, strain, displacement, and velocity data. These results are compared with the particle displacement and velocity data from large explosion experiments which have produced bowl-shaped craters. A time-sequence description of large, bowl-shaped impact crater formation is developed from the results of these comparisons, as well as those of the morphological features and structural deformations of large explosions and impact craters.

  17. Age-Related Changes in Corneal Deformation Dynamics Utilizing Scheimpflug Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rogowska, Marta E.; Iskander, D. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study age-related changes in corneal deformation response to air-puff applanation tonometry. Methods Fifty healthy subjects were recruited for a prospective study and divided into two equal age groups (≤ 28 and ≥ 50 years old). Up to three measurements by a corneal deformation analyser based on the Scheimpflug principle were performed on the left eye of each subject. Raw Scheimpflug images were used to extract changes in anterior and posterior corneal profiles, which were further modelled by an orthogonal series of Chebyshev polynomial functions. Time series of the polynomial coefficients of even order exhibited a dynamic behavior in which three distinct stages were recognized. A bilinear function was used to model the first and the third stage of corneal dynamics. Slope parameters of the bilinear fit were then tested between the two age groups using Wilcoxon rank sum test and two-way non-parametric ANOVA (Friedman) test. Results Statistically significant changes (Wilcoxon test, P<0.05) between the age groups were observed in the phase of the second applanation dynamics for the posterior corneal profile. In a two-way comparison, in which the corneal profile was used as a dependent variable, statistically significant changes (ANOVA/Friedman test, P = 0.017) between the groups were also observed for that phase. Conclusion Corneal biomechanics depend on age. The changes in corneal deformation dynamics, which correspond to mostly free return of the cornea to its original shape after the air pulse, indicate that the age related differences in corneal biomechanics are subtle but observable with high speed imaging. PMID:26460972

  18. Deformation Above an Extensional Lateral Ramp, Crater Flat, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. P.; Ferrill, D. A.; Sims, D. W.; Stamatakos, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Tectonic models of Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, site of the USA's proposed high-level nuclear waste repository, are based on understanding the nature of deformation affecting the site. Using mapped fault dips (50° in the north to 70° in the south) from the Bare Mountain fault (BMF, 15 to 25 km [9.3 to 15.5 mi] west of YM) and the surface geology of Crater Flat (CF, immediately west of YM) and YM itself, we constructed cross-sections across northern and southern CF. The sections indicate that the BMF has a listric shape detaching at a depth of about 6 km (3.7 mi) under northern CF and 12 km (7.5 mi) under southern CF. We present the results of physical analog modeling that tests the hypothesis that the BMF has a lateral ramp linking a shallow detachment under northern CF with a deeper detachment under southern CF. We constructed a footwall with two contrasting profiles based on cross sections generated using a constant thickness algorithm. The northern profile had a horizontal detachment at half the depth of the southern profile and the two fault surfaces were linked by a steep, S-dipping lateral ramp. The hanging wall of the model consisted of a plastic sheet conforming to the footwall shape, overlain by dry sand. To prevent frictional edge effects, the sand pack was large and laterally unconstrained. Undyed and acrylic-dyed sand simulated mechanically passive layering. Dry sand was chosen because of its ability to represent the brittle crust, and the ease with which it can be sectioned. The entire hanging wall moved in concert, constant velocity displacement was driven by a stepper motor attached via a rigid, strike-parallel assembly to the plastic sheet. After 2.8 cm (1.1 in) of horizontal displacement, synkinematic growth layers of sand were added to the model. After 5 cm (2 in) of horizontal displacement the model was stopped and sand added to stabilize the model prior to saturation and sectioning. Hanging wall deformation in the model was dominated by the

  19. Thin-skinned deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Joannah; Grotzinger, John; Okubo, Chris; Milliken, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Deformation of sedimentary rocks is widespread within Valles Marineris, characterized by both plastic and brittle deformation identified in Candor, Melas, and Ius Chasmata. We identified four deformation styles using HiRISE and CTX images: kilometer-scale convolute folds, detached slabs, folded strata, and pull-apart structures. Convolute folds are detached rounded slabs of material with alternating dark- and light-toned strata and a fold wavelength of about 1 km. The detached slabs are isolated rounded blocks of material, but they exhibit only highly localized evidence of stratification. Folded strata are composed of continuously folded layers that are not detached. Pull-apart structures are composed of stratified rock that has broken off into small irregularly shaped pieces showing evidence of brittle deformation. Some areas exhibit multiple styles of deformation and grade from one type of deformation into another. The deformed rocks are observed over thousands of kilometers, are limited to discrete stratigraphic intervals, and occur over a wide range in elevations. All deformation styles appear to be of likely thin-skinned origin. CRISM reflectance spectra show that some of the deformed sediments contain a component of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Several mechanisms could be responsible for the deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, such as subaerial or subaqueous gravitational slumping or sliding and soft sediment deformation, where the latter could include impact-induced or seismically induced liquefaction. These mechanisms are evaluated based on their expected pattern, scale, and areal extent of deformation. Deformation produced from slow subaerial or subaqueous landsliding and liquefaction is consistent with the deformation observed in Valles Marineris.

  20. Strain-Induced Deformation in Magnesia-Alumina Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Soo; Lombardo, Stephen J; Winholtz, Robert A

    2008-06-18

    Ceramic beams are induced in situ to form complex shapes at elevated temperature without the application of an external stress. This process has been demonstrated for thin alumina substrates coated with a layer of magnesia. The internal strain causing the substrates to deform at elevated temperature arises as a consequence of strain mismatch accompanying the penetration of the coating into the substrate. The magnitude of the deformation depends on the amount of coating applied, on the thickness of the substrate, on the density of the substrate, and on the temperature. During exposure of the beams to elevated temperature, the magnesia coating reacts with the alumina substrate to form the spinel phase; the resulting volume change accompanying the phase transformation is likely the predominant driving force for deformation.

  1. Uncertainties in tomographic reconstructions based on deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Kenneth M.; Cunningham, Gregory S.; McKee, Robert J.

    1997-04-01

    Deformable geometric models fit very naturally into the context of Bayesian analysis. The prior probability of boundary shapes is taken to proportional to the negative exponential of the deformation energy used to control the boundary. This probabilistic interpretation is demonstrated using a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) technique, which permits one to generate configurations that populate the prior. One of may uses for deformable models is to solve ill-posed tomographic reconstruction problems, which we demonstrate by reconstructing a two-dimensional object from two orthogonal noisy projections. We show how MCMC samples drawn from the posterior can be used to estimate uncertainties in the location of the edge of the reconstructed object.

  2. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  3. Understanding Gas-Induced Structural Deformation of ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Ania, Conchi O; García-Pérez, E; Haro, M; Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J J; Valdés-Solís, T; Parra, J B; Calero, S

    2012-05-01

    ZIF-8 is a zeolitic imidazolate framework with very good thermal and chemical stability that opens up many applications that are not feasible by other metal-organic frameowrks (MOFs) and zeolites. Several works report the adsorption properties of ZIF-8 for strategic gases. However, despite the vast experimental corpus of data reported, there seems yet to be a dearth in the understanding of the gas adsorption properties. In this work we provide insights at a molecular level on the mechanisms governing the ZIF-8 structural deformation during molecular adsorption. We demonstrate that the ZIF-8 structural deformation during the adsorption of different molecules at cryogenic temperature goes beyond the gas-induced rotation of the imidazolate linkers. We combine experimental and simulation studies to demonstrate that this deformation is governed by the polarizability and molecular size and shape of the gases, and that the stepped adsorption behavior is defined by the packing arrangement of the guest inside the host. PMID:26288051

  4. Testing of thermally piezoelectric deformable mirror with buried functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Gebhardt, S.; Gutzeit, N.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced mirror deformation and thermal lensing in optical high power systems shall be compensated by a thermally-piezoelectric deformable mirror (DM). In our device, the laser-induced thermal lensing is compensated by heating of the DM as previously described with compound loading. We experimentally show the capability of this mirror for wavefront shaping of up to 6.2 kW laser power and power densities of 2 kW/cm2. The laser-induced defocussing of the membrane is compensated by mirror heating. We introduce a new mirror setup with buried heater and temperature sensor elements. Therewith, the compensation of laser-induced mirror deformation is possible within the same time scale. The piezoelectric stroke of the single actuators depends on their position on the membrane, and is not affected by the reflected laser power.

  5. Dynamic Sensing of Cornea Deformation during an Air Puff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Yamasaki, Naoyuki; Gosho, Takumi; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Takenaka, Jouji; Higashimori, Mitsuru; Kaneko, Makoto

    In early diagnosis of glancoma, intraocular pressure measurement is one of an important method. Non-contact method has measured eye pressure through the deformation of cornea during the increase of the force due to air puff. The deformation is influenced by the cornea stiffness as well as the eye internal pressure. Since the cornea stiffness is unknown in general, it is difficult to evaluate the ture eye pressure. The dynamic behavior of cornea under air puff may provide us with a good hint for evaluating the cornea stiffness appropriately. For this purpose, we develop the sensing system composed of a high speed camera, a mirror for producing a virtual camera, a non-contact tonometer and a slit light source. This system enables us to measure the cornea deformation under concave shape. We show the experimental data for human eyes as well as an artificial eye made by transparent material.

  6. Possible excited deformed rotational bands in {sup 82}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.

    2011-08-15

    Excited states of neutron-rich nucleus {sup 82}Ge were studied from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Eleven new transitions and seven new levels in {sup 82}Ge were identified by using X(Dy)-{gamma}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma}-{gamma} triple coincidences. Possible excited deformed rotational bands are observed, for the first time, in this nuclear region. Coexistence of the spherical ground and deformed excited shapes is proposed in {sup 82}Ge. These deformed rotational bands can be formed by two-particle, two-hole excitations with the 0{sup +} pairing energy states of the {nu}9/2[404]{sup -2} x 1/2[431]{sup 2} configuration across the N=50 closed shell.

  7. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  8. A microscopic study on shape transition and shape coexistence in superdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanthimathi, G.; Boomadevi, N.; Rajasekaran, T. R.

    2012-08-15

    Superdeformed nuclei at high-spin states in several mass regions are investigated within a microscopic approach using cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism to explore the equilibrium deformations in the ground state and their evolution with spin. Shape transition from normal deformed to superdeformed states with increasing spin is studied and a clear picture of shape coexistence is provided. Detailed information on spin, rotational energy, dynamical moment of inertia, and rotational frequency of superdeformed rotational bands is presented and the general features of superdeformed bands in certain mass regions are outlined. Rotational energy and dynamical moment of inertia are compared with available experimental data and the impact of temperature and pairing on superdeformed configuration are discussed.

  9. Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2008-03-31

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light. (laser biology)

  10. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation.

  11. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation. PMID:22007412

  12. Analysis of dynamic deformation processes with adaptive KALMAN-filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the approach of a full system analysis is shown quantifying a dynamic structural ("white-box"-) model for the calculation of thermal deformations of bar-shaped machine elements. The task was motivated from mechanical engineering searching new methods for the precise prediction and computational compensation of thermal influences in the heating and cooling phases of machine tools (i.e. robot arms, etc.). The quantification of thermal deformations under variable dynamic loads requires the modelling of the non-stationary spatial temperature distribution inside the object. Based upon FOURIERS law of heat flow the high-grade non-linear temperature gradient is represented by a system of partial differential equations within the framework of a dynamic Finite Element topology. It is shown that adaptive KALMAN-filtering is suitable to quantify relevant disturbance influences and to identify thermal parameters (i.e. thermal diffusivity) with a deviation of only 0,2%. As result an identified (and verified) parametric model for the realistic prediction respectively simulation of dynamic temperature processes is presented. Classifying the thermal bend as the main deformation quantity of bar-shaped machine tools, the temperature model is extended to a temperature deformation model. In lab tests thermal load steps are applied to an aluminum column. Independent control measurements show that the identified model can be used to predict the columns bend with a mean deviation (r.m.s.) smaller than 10 mgon. These results show that the deformation model is a precise predictor and suitable for realistic simulations of thermal deformations. Experiments with modified heat sources will be necessary to verify the model in further frequency spectra of dynamic thermal loads.

  13. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  14. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-31

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  15. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-09-18

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  16. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  17. Shape-Controlled Deterministic Assembly of Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Yao, Jun; Xu, Lin; Mankin, Max N; Zhu, Yinbo; Wu, Hengan; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-04-13

    Large-scale, deterministic assembly of nanowires and nanotubes with rationally controlled geometries could expand the potential applications of one-dimensional nanomaterials in bottom-up integrated nanodevice arrays and circuits. Control of the positions of straight nanowires and nanotubes has been achieved using several assembly methods, although simultaneous control of position and geometry has not been realized. Here, we demonstrate a new concept combining simultaneous assembly and guided shaping to achieve large-scale, high-precision shape controlled deterministic assembly of nanowires. We lithographically pattern U-shaped trenches and then shear transfer nanowires to the patterned substrate wafers, where the trenches serve to define the positions and shapes of transferred nanowires. Studies using semicircular trenches defined by electron-beam lithography yielded U-shaped nanowires with radii of curvature defined by inner surface of the trenches. Wafer-scale deterministic assembly produced U-shaped nanowires for >430,000 sites with a yield of ∼90%. In addition, mechanistic studies and simulations demonstrate that shaping results in primarily elastic deformation of the nanowires and show clearly the diameter-dependent limits achievable for accessible forces. Last, this approach was used to assemble U-shaped three-dimensional nanowire field-effect transistor bioprobe arrays containing 200 individually addressable nanodevices. By combining the strengths of wafer-scale top-down fabrication with diverse and tunable properties of one-dimensional building blocks in novel structural configurations, shape-controlled deterministic nanowire assembly is expected to enable new applications in many areas including nanobioelectronics and nanophotonics. PMID:26999059

  18. Deforming the hippocampal map.

    PubMed

    Touretzky, David S; Weisman, Wendy E; Fuhs, Mark C; Skaggs, William E; Fenton, Andre A; Muller, Robert U

    2005-01-01

    To investigate conjoint stimulus control over place cells, Fenton et al. (J Gen Physiol 116:191-209, 2000a) recorded while rats foraged in a cylinder with 45 degrees black and white cue cards on the wall. Card centers were 135 degrees apart. In probe trials, the cards were rotated together or apart by 25 degrees . Firing field centers shifted during these trials, stretching and shrinking the cognitive map. Fenton et al. (2000b) described this deformation with an ad hoc vector field equation. We consider what sorts of neural network mechanisms might be capable of accounting for their observations. In an abstract, maximum likelihood formulation, the rat's location is estimated by a conjoint probability density function of landmark positions. In an attractor neural network model, recurrent connections produce a bump of activity over a two-dimensional array of cells; the bump's position is influenced by landmark features such as distances or bearings. If features are chosen with appropriate care, the attractor network and maximum likelihood models yield similar results, in accord with previous demonstrations that recurrent neural networks can efficiently implement maximum likelihood computations (Pouget et al. Neural Comput 10:373-401, 1998; Deneve et al. Nat Neurosci 4:826-831, 2001). PMID:15390166

  19. Fast virtual stenting with deformable meshes: application to intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Larrabide, Ignacio; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial stents are medical devices that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. A methodology that predicts the released stent configuration prior to intervention has the potential to support the physician in the selection of the optimal approach for a specific patient. This paper proposes a fast virtual stenting technique based on constrained simplex deformable models that is able to virtually release stents in arbitrarily shaped vessel and aneurysm models. The technique effectively embeds the geometrical properties of the stent (cell design, strut size and shape and angles between struts) and achieves favorable execution times of the order of one minute.

  20. Simultaneous concentration and purification through gradient deformation chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velayudhan, A.; Hendrickson, R. L.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Mobile-phase additives, commonly used to modulate absorbate retention in gradient elution chromatography, are usually assumed to be either linearly retained or unretained. Previous theoretical work from our laboratory has shown that these modulators, such as salts in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography and organic modifiers in reversed-phase chromatography, can absorb nonlinearly, giving rise to gradient deformation. Consequently, adsorbate peaks that elute in the vicinity of the head of the deformed gradient may exhibit unusual shapes, form shoulders, and/or be concentrated. These effects for a reversed-phase sorbent with aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) as the modulator are verified experimentally. Gradient deformation is demonstrated experimentally and agrees with simulations based on ACN isotherm parameters that are independently determined from batch equilibrium studies using the layer model. Unusual absorbate peak shapes were found experimentally for single-component injections of phenylalanine, similar to those calculated by the simulations. A binary mixture of tryptophan and phenylalanine is used to demonstrate simultaneous concentration and separation, again in agreement with simulations. The possibility of gradient deformation in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography is discussed.

  1. Supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Traikia, M. H.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    A supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics is studied in the weak deformation approximation of the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. The corresponding supersymmetric q-deformed hamiltonians and charges are constructed explicitly.

  2. Involvement of valgus hindfoot deformity in hallux valgus deformity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shutaro; Hirao, Makoto; Tsuboi, Hideki; Akita, Shosuke; Matsushita, Masato; Ohshima, Shiro; Saeki, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2014-09-01

    The involvement of valgus hindfoot deformity in hallux valgus deformity was confirmed in a rheumatoid arthritis case with a destructive valgus hindfoot deformity. Correction of severe valgus, calcaneal lateral offset, and pronated foot deformity instantly normalized hallux valgus deformities postoperatively. Thus, careful hindfoot status evaluation is important when assessing forefoot deformity, including hallux valgus, in rheumatoid arthritis cases.

  3. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect

  4. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  5. The Shape of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape--a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the…

  6. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  7. Perceptual transparency from image deformation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-08-18

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid's surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of "invisible" transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  8. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  9. Critical experiments and analyses at cryogenic temperature to promote a better understanding of mechanical properties in high-strength alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Osamu; Nagai, Kotobu

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical test at cryogenic temperature shows the advantages on characterization of deformation and cracking behavior in alloys from the viewpoint of microstructure. Microstructural crack initiation in high-cycle fatigue is clearly detected at the specimen interior. The high-strength alloys also show higher strain rate dependence on tensile deformation and low temperature creep deformation under thermal activation process. Not only microstructural analyses using noble techniques but also modeling works on the subsurface crack generation and tensile deformation are focused.

  10. The analysis of progressive deformation in rock analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Jesseli, Mark W.; Passchier, Cees W.

    1993-05-01

    Two-dimensional deformation experiments using analogue materials such as octachloropropane and camphor have proven to be a powerful tool in the investigation of microstructural development, since they make it possible to observe the specimen throughout its deformation history. The addition of dispersed marker particles makes it possible to trace the movement of material points during deformation. From this information the flow and deformation can be interpolated for any point within the specimen at any time. The geometry of the flow and deformation can then be visualized in the form of grids, contour-plots, strain ellipses and other methods. Despite this apparently ideal setting for studying flow and deformation, the need to use marker particles to trace material points introduces unexpected problems in the analysis. We present a computer program to analyse the movement of marker particles. Digitization of the positions of the particles is improved by the use of video input and semi-automatic digitization. The use of polynomials to describe the complete path of marker particles and least-squares best-fit solving improves the analysis of the data.

  11. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  12. Nonlinear optimization simplified by hypersurface deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stillinger, F.H.; Weber, T.A.

    1988-09-01

    A general strategy is advanced for simplifying nonlinear optimization problems, the ant-lion method. This approach exploits shape modifications of the cost-function hypersurface which distend basins surrounding low-lying minima (including global minima). By intertwining hypersurface deformations with steepest-descent displacements, the search is concentrated on a small relevant subset of all minima. Specific calculations demonstrating the value of this method are reported for the partitioning of two classes of irregular but nonrandom graphs, the prime-factor graphs and the pi graphs. We also indicate how this approach can be applied to the traveling salesman problem and to design layout optimization, and that it may be useful in combination with simulated annealing strategies.

  13. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual clutter in 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely. PMID:26600061

  14. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  15. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation. Additionally, we study capsules pushed or pulled by a point force, where we always find capsule shapes to transform smoothly without bifurcations. PMID:26465552

  16. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation. Additionally, we study capsules pushed or pulled by a point force, where we always find capsule shapes to transform smoothly without bifurcations.

  17. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation. Additionally, we study capsules pushed or pulled by a point force, where we always find capsule shapes to transform smoothly without bifurcations.

  18. Finite-element analyses and fracture simulation in thin-sheet aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional, elastic-plastic finite-element analysis was used with a critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to model stable crack growth in thin-sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under monotonic loading after precracking at different cyclic stress levels. Tests were conducted on three types of specimens: middle-crack, three-hole-crack and blunt-notch tensile specimens. An experiment technique was developed to measure CTOA during crack growth initiation and stable tearing using a high-resolution video camera and recorder. Crack front shapes were also measured during initiation and stable tearing using a fatigue marker-load technique. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of these crack shapes for stationary cracks were conducted to study the crack-front opening displacements. Predicted load against crack extension on middle-crack tension specimens agreed well with test results even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were able to predict the effects of specimen size and precracking stress history on stable tearing. Predicted load against load-line displacements agreed well with test results up to maximum load bu the analyses tended to overpredict displacements as crack grew beyond the maximum load under displacement-controlled conditions. During the initiation phase, the measured CTOA values were high but decreased and remained nearly constant after a small amount of stable tearing. The constant value of CTOA agree well with the calculated value from the finite-element analysis. The larger CTOA values measured at the sheet surface during the initiation phase may be associated with the crack tunneling observed in the tests. Three-dimensional analyses for nonstraight crack fronts predicted much higher displacements near the free surface than in the interior.

  19. Plastically deformed region around indentations on Si angle crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.

    1994-12-01

    Expansion of a hemispherical shell by inner pressure has been widely applied for the model of the deformation by an indentation on a flat surface; however, the deformed region is not necessarily spherically symmetric, especially in anisotropic materials such as single crystals. Therefore, whether the spherical model is applicable in an indentation process for objective materials must always be kept in mind. Indentations have been made on the (111) surface of silicon crystal at various temperatures. The three-dimensional shape of the plastically deformed region was experimentally measured by means of an etching technique and its difference from the hemisphere was observed. It was never spherical but much more complicated, similar to a bottle gourd. The slip mechanism, which resulted in the observed shape of the plastic region, is discussed further. The plastic region was analytically obtained also on the assumption that the stress distribution was spherically symmetrical. The result is approximately in accordance with the observed shape. It is therefore concluded that the stress distribution is nearly spherical although the plastic region is far from it. The yield strength of silicon crystals and their temperature dependence were obtained based on the spherical model.

  20. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future.