Science.gov

Sample records for deformed shapes analysed

  1. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; de Ruijter, N. C. A.; van Valenberg, H.

    2013-05-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.

  2. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  3. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces, which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties.Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces

  4. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  5. Deformed Shape Analysis of Coupled Glazing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    blast tests, the mullions were covered with the speckle pattern and discrete markers to track the deformed shape of the mullion. However, only limited...to track areas of interest, thereby providing thousands of strain and 3D displacement measure- ments; or to track discrete targets, which provides a...mounted in a stereoscopic orientation on two tripods and were tethered together to ensure synchronized frame capture. Various combinations of speckle

  6. Deformation and shape changes in 167W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. B.; Ma, H. L.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Q. M.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, G. S.; Wu, Y. H.; Hu, S. P.; Li, H. W.; Luo, L. P.; Zhong, J.; Zhu, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    Lifetime measurements of yrast levels in 167W were measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The differential decay-curve method was applied for a lifetime determination. Excited states of the nucleus 167W were populated by the reaction 142Nd (28Si, 3 n ) at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The energy spectra and measured transition quadrupole moments inferred from the lifetimes of 167W are compared with the predictions of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov calculations. The changes of deformations and shapes with increasing spin due to the γ -polarization effect of aligned particles are discussed. The signature inversion visible in the negative parity yrast band is explained to be related to the triaxial shapes.

  7. Meshless Modeling of Deformable Shapes and their Motion

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Bart; Ovsjanikov, Maks; Wand, Michael; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for interactive shape deformation modeling and key frame interpolation based on a meshless finite element formulation. Starting from a coarse nodal sampling of an object’s volume, we formulate rigidity and volume preservation constraints that are enforced to yield realistic shape deformations at interactive frame rates. Additionally, by specifying key frame poses of the deforming shape and optimizing the nodal displacements while targeting smooth interpolated motion, our algorithm extends to a motion planning framework for deformable objects. This allows reconstructing smooth and plausible deformable shape trajectories in the presence of possibly moving obstacles. The presented results illustrate that our framework can handle complex shapes at interactive rates and hence is a valuable tool for animators to realistically and efficiently model and interpolate deforming 3D shapes. PMID:24839614

  8. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  9. Quantifying Shape Changes and Tissue Deformation in Leaf Development.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle; Remmler, Lauren; Girard-Bock, Camille

    2014-06-01

    The analysis of biological shapes has applications in many areas of biology, and tools exist to quantify organ shape and detect shape differences between species or among variants. However, such measurements do not provide any information about the mechanisms of shape generation. Quantitative data on growth patterns may provide insights into morphogenetic processes, but since growth is a complex process occurring in four dimensions, growth patterns alone cannot intuitively be linked to shape outcomes. Here, we present computational tools to quantify tissue deformation and surface shape changes over the course of leaf development, applied to the first leaf of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The results show that the overall leaf shape does not change notably during the developmental stages analyzed, yet there is a clear upward radial deformation of the leaf tissue in early time points. This deformation pattern may provide an explanation for how the Arabidopsis leaf maintains a relatively constant shape despite spatial heterogeneities in growth. These findings highlight the importance of quantifying tissue deformation when investigating the control of leaf shape. More generally, experimental mapping of deformation patterns may help us to better understand the link between growth and shape in organ development.

  10. Physics-based shape deformations for medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McInerney, Tim

    2003-05-01

    Powerful, flexible shape models of anatomical structures are required for robust, automatic analysis of medical images. In this paper we investigate a physics-based shape representation and deformation method in an effort to meet these requirements. Using a medial-based spring-mass mesh model, shape deformations are produced via the application of external forces or internal spring actuation. The range of deformations includes bulging, stretching, bending, and tapering at different locations, scales, and with varying amplitudes. Springs are actuated either by applying deformation operators or by activating statistical modes of variation obtained via a hierarchical regional principal component analysis. We demonstrate results on both synthetic data and on a spring-mass model of the corpus callosum, obtained from 2D mid-sagittal brain Magnetic Resonance (MR) Images.

  11. Shape-based image reconstruction using linearized deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öktem, Ozan; Chen, Chong; Onur Domaniç, Nevzat; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a reconstruction framework that can account for shape related prior information in imaging-related inverse problems. It is a variational scheme that uses a shape functional, whose definition is based on deformable template machinery from computational anatomy. We prove existence and, as a proof of concept, we apply the proposed shape-based reconstruction to 2D tomography with very sparse and/or highly noisy measurements.

  12. Approach to analyze a deformable moving target by using the shape deformation model and morphological operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiguo; Asai, Take; Akatsuka, Takao

    1995-10-01

    The measurement of the characteristic parameters for a moving object with deformation is often an important problem. Here, an approach to analyze the shape change of a ball, when it is kicked in soccer, is proposed by using a simple shape deformation model to evaluate the shape change from the image sequence. Moreover, to determine the parameters of the model which apply to actual ball deformation, the detection of ball is necessary, and the pattern spectrum based on morphological operators is considered. Here, we assume that the deformation surface of the ball is a circular arc, when it is kicked by foot, and the arc is always convex when it is observed from the kicking side. To obtain the parameters of the arc, the preprocessing of the ball image such as local binarization, the region filling and noisy smoothing with morphological operators, is performed from actual image sequence. In order to detect the ball, the pattern spectrum with morphological operators is measured, and then circumscribed circle of the ball is extracted. So, the center and radius of the ball from circumscribed circle and the arc of the deformation surface of the model are obtained. Finally, the characteristic parameters of a moving ball such as the deformation are measured by using the shape deformation model. To demonstrate the effect of this method, we show an application to extract the deformation of the ball in football for the actual sports skill training.

  13. Folded isometric deformations and banana-shaped seedpod.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Etienne

    2016-08-01

    Thin vegetal shells have recently been a significant source of inspiration for the design of smart materials and soft actuators. Herein is presented a novel analytical family of isometric deformations with a family of θ-folds crossing a family of parallel z-folds; it contains the isometric deformations of a banana-shaped surface inspired by a seedpod, which converts a vertical closing into either an horizontal closing or an opening depending on the location of the fold. Similarly to the seedpod, optimum shapes for opening ease are the most elongated ones.

  14. Folded isometric deformations and banana-shaped seedpod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Etienne

    2016-08-01

    Thin vegetal shells have recently been a significant source of inspiration for the design of smart materials and soft actuators. Herein is presented a novel analytical family of isometric deformations with a family of θ-folds crossing a family of parallel z-folds; it contains the isometric deformations of a banana-shaped surface inspired by a seedpod, which converts a vertical closing into either an horizontal closing or an opening depending on the location of the fold. Similarly to the seedpod, optimum shapes for opening ease are the most elongated ones.

  15. Stationary shapes of deformable particles moving at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2016-11-01

    We introduce an iterative solution scheme in order to calculate stationary shapes of deformable elastic capsules which are steadily moving through a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. The iterative solution scheme couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid governed by the Stokes equation. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical resting shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force.

  16. Parametric Deformation of Discrete Geometry for Aerodynamic Shape Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, George R.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2012-01-01

    We present a versatile discrete geometry manipulation platform for aerospace vehicle shape optimization. The platform is based on the geometry kernel of an open-source modeling tool called Blender and offers access to four parametric deformation techniques: lattice, cage-based, skeletal, and direct manipulation. Custom deformation methods are implemented as plugins, and the kernel is controlled through a scripting interface. Surface sensitivities are provided to support gradient-based optimization. The platform architecture allows the use of geometry pipelines, where multiple modelers are used in sequence, enabling manipulation difficult or impossible to achieve with a constructive modeler or deformer alone. We implement an intuitive custom deformation method in which a set of surface points serve as the design variables and user-specified constraints are intrinsically satisfied. We test our geometry platform on several design examples using an aerodynamic design framework based on Cartesian grids. We examine inverse airfoil design and shape matching and perform lift-constrained drag minimization on an airfoil with thickness constraints. A transport wing-fuselage integration problem demonstrates the approach in 3D. In a final example, our platform is pipelined with a constructive modeler to parabolically sweep a wingtip while applying a 1-G loading deformation across the wingspan. This work is an important first step towards the larger goal of leveraging the investment of the graphics industry to improve the state-of-the-art in aerospace geometry tools.

  17. Shape and volume of craniofacial cavities in intentional skull deformations.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, R H; Friess, M; Nysjö, J; Odri, G; Malmberg, F; Nyström, I; Messo, E; Hirsch, J M; Cabanis, E A M; Kunzelmann, K H; Salagnac, J M; Corre, P; Ohazama, A; Sharpe, P T; Charlier, P; Olszewski, R

    2013-05-01

    Intentional cranial deformations (ICD) have been observed worldwide but are especially prevalent in preColombian cultures. The purpose of this study was to assess the consequences of ICD on three cranial cavities (intracranial cavity, orbits, and maxillary sinuses) and on cranial vault thickness, in order to screen for morphological changes due to the external constraints exerted by the deformation device. We acquired CT-scans for 39 deformed and 19 control skulls. We studied the thickness of the skull vault using qualitative and quantitative methods. We computed the volumes of the orbits, of the maxillary sinuses, and of the intracranial cavity using haptic-aided semi-automatic segmentation. We finally defined 3D distances and angles within orbits and maxillary sinuses based on 27 anatomical landmarks and measured these features on the 58 skulls. Our results show specific bone thickness patterns in some types of ICD, with localized thinning in regions subjected to increased pressure and thickening in other regions. Our findings confirm that volumes of the cranial cavities are not affected by ICDs but that the shapes of the orbits and of the maxillary sinuses are modified in circumferential deformations. We conclude that ICDs can modify the shape of the cranial cavities and the thickness of their walls but conserve their volumes. These results provide new insights into the morphological effects associated with ICDs and call for similar investigations in subjects with deformational plagiocephalies and craniosynostoses.

  18. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Based on Free-form Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a free-form deformation technique suitable for aerodynamic shape optimization. Because the proposed technique is independent of grid topology, we can treat structured and unstructured computational fluid dynamics grids in the same manner. The proposed technique is an alternative shape parameterization technique to a trivariate volume technique. It retains the flexibility and freedom of trivariate volumes for CFD shape optimization, but it uses a bivariate surface representation. This reduces the number of design variables by an order of magnitude, and it provides much better control for surface shape changes. The proposed technique is simple, compact, and efficient. The analytical sensitivity derivatives are independent of the design variables and are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. The paper includes the complete formulation and aerodynamics shape optimization results.

  19. Compound dislocation models (CDMs) for volcano deformation analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul R.; Prats-Iraola, Pau

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic crises are often preceded and accompanied by volcano deformation caused by magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Fast and efficient model identification and parameter estimation techniques for various sources of deformation are crucial for process understanding, volcano hazard assessment and early warning purposes. As a simple model that can be a basis for rapid inversion techniques, we present a compound dislocation model (CDM) that is composed of three mutually orthogonal rectangular dislocations (RDs). We present new RD solutions, which are free of artefact singularities and that also possess full rotational degrees of freedom. The CDM can represent both planar intrusions in the near field and volumetric sources of inflation and deflation in the far field. Therefore, this source model can be applied to shallow dikes and sills, as well as to deep planar and equidimensional sources of any geometry, including oblate, prolate and other triaxial ellipsoidal shapes. In either case the sources may possess any arbitrary orientation in space. After systematically evaluating the CDM, we apply it to the co-eruptive displacements of the 2015 Calbuco eruption observed by the Sentinel-1A satellite in both ascending and descending orbits. The results show that the deformation source is a deflating vertical lens-shaped source at an approximate depth of 8 km centred beneath Calbuco volcano. The parameters of the optimal source model clearly show that it is significantly different from an isotropic point source or a single dislocation model. The Calbuco example reflects the convenience of using the CDM for a rapid interpretation of deformation data.

  20. Skuller: A volumetric shape registration algorithm for modeling skull deformities.

    PubMed

    Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Kavan, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    We present an algorithm for volumetric registration of 3D solid shapes. In comparison to previous work on image based registration, our technique achieves higher efficiency by leveraging a template tetrahedral mesh. In contrast to point- and surface-based registration techniques, our method better captures volumetric nature of the data, such as bone thickness. We apply our algorithm to study pathological skull deformities caused by a particular condition, i.e., craniosynostosis. The input to our system is a pair of volumetric 3D shapes: a tetrahedral mesh and a voxelized object represented by a set of voxel cells segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans. Our general framework first performs a global registration and then launches a novel elastic registration process that uses as much volumetric information as possible while deforming the generic template tetrahedral mesh of a healthy human skull towards the underlying geometry of the voxel cells. Both data are high-resolution and differ by large non-rigid deformations. Our fully-automatic solution is fast and accurate, as compared with the state of the arts from the reconstruction and medical image registration fields. We use the resulting registration to match the ground-truth surfaces extracted from the medical data as well as to quantify the severity of the anatomical deformity.

  1. Eggs illusion: Local shape deformation generated by a grid pattern.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Mitsudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we report a new visual shape illusion, the eggs illusion, in which circular disks located at the midpoints between adjacent grid intersections are perceived as being deformed to ellipses. In Experiment 1, we examined the eggs illusion by using a matching method and found that grid luminance and patch size play a critical role in producing the illusory deformation. In Experiment 2, we employed several types of elliptic or circular patches to examine the conditions in which the illusory deformation was cancelled or weakened. We observed that the illusory deformation was dependent on local grid orientation. Based on these results, we found several common features between the eggs illusion and the scintillating grid illusion. This resemblance suggests a possibility that similar mechanisms underlie the two phenomena. In addition to the scintillating grid illusion, we also considered several known perceptual phenomena that might be related to the eggs illusion, i.e., the apparent size illusion, the shape-contrast effect, and the Orbison illusion. Finally, we discuss the role of orientation processing in generating the eggs illusion.

  2. Determination of visual figure and ground in dynamically deforming shapes.

    PubMed

    Barenholtz, Elan; Feldman, Jacob

    2006-10-01

    Figure/ground assignment - determining which part of the visual image is foreground and which background - is a critical step in early visual analysis, upon which much later processing depends. Previous research on the assignment of figure and ground to opposing sides of a contour has almost exclusively involved static geometric factors - such as convexity, symmetry, and size - in non-moving images. Here, we introduce a new class of cue to figural assignment based on the motion of dynamically deforming contours. Subjects viewing an animated, deforming shape tended to assign figure and ground so that articulating curvature extrema - i.e., "hinging" vertices - had negative (concave) contour curvature. This articulating-concavity bias is present when all known static cues to figure/ground are absent or neutral in each of the individual frames of the animation, and even seems to override a number of well-known static cues when they are in opposition to the motion cue. We propose that the phenomenon reflects the visual system's inbuilt expectations about the way shapes will deform - specifically, that deformations tend to involve rigid parts articulating at concavities.

  3. Deformed Structures and Shape Coexistence in Zr-98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; 8pi Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear structure of the zirconium isotopes evolves from a mid-open neutron shell deformed region (80Zr), through a closed shell (90Zr), to a closed subshell (96Zr), and then to a sudden reappearance of deformation (100Zr). This rapid onset of deformation across the Zr isotopes is unprecedented, and the issue of how collectivity appears and disappears in these isotopes is of special interest. Until recently, only 98Zr (and maybe 100Zr) had indirect and weak evidence for shape coexistence, with only speculative interpretation of the experiments. Recent results from high precision B(E2) measurements provided direct evidence of shape coexistence in 94Zr and suggested that it may happen in many other nuclei in this region. In order to provide direct evidence of shape coexistence in 98Zr a high-statistical-quality γγ experiment was carried out with the 8 π spectrometer at ISAC-TRIUMF. The array consists of 20 Compton-suppressed hyper-pure germanium detectors plus β particle and conversion electron detectors. Excited states up to ~ 5 MeV in 98Zr were populated in the β- decay of 98Y Jπ = (0-) and 98mY J = (4,5). Preliminary results on key branching ratios will be presented. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  4. Curved Displacement Transfer Functions for Geometric Nonlinear Large Deformation Structure Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    For shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations, Curved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated based on a curved displacement, traced by a material point from the undeformed position to deformed position. The embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into multiple small domains, with domain junctures matching the strain-sensing stations. Thus, the surface strain distribution could be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. The discretization approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded-beam curvature equations to yield the Curved Displacement Transfer Functions, expressed in terms of embedded beam geometrical parameters and surface strains. By entering the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated at multiple points for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes. Finite-element linear and nonlinear analyses of a tapered cantilever tubular beam were performed to generate linear and nonlinear surface strains and the associated deflections to be used for validation. The shape prediction accuracies were then determined by comparing the theoretical deflections with the finiteelement- generated deflections. The results show that the newly developed Curved Displacement Transfer Functions are very accurate for shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations.

  5. Deformation and shape of flexible, microscale helices in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan T.; Morozov, Alexander; Crosby, Alfred J.; Lindner, Anke; du Roure, Olivia

    2015-07-01

    We examine experimentally the deformation of flexible, microscale helical ribbons with nanoscale thickness subject to viscous flow in a microfluidic channel. Two aspects of flexible microhelices are quantified: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive-force theory. The deformation of helices by viscous flow is well described by nonlinear finite extensibility. Under distributed loading, the pitch distribution is nonuniform, and from this we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Moreover, flexible helices are found to display reversible global to local helical transitions at a high flow rate.

  6. Failure and deformation analyses of smart laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2012-09-01

    The present study focuses on the failure analysis and shape control of smart composite laminates under coupled thermal (hygro), electric, and mechanical stimuli. A linear thermo(hygro)electroelastic constitutive model for transversely isotropic materials is used for each ply in the composite laminate and for the piezoelectric materials that are integrated with laminates of the composite. Piezoelectric materials, such as lead zirconate titanate, and piezoelectric fiber composites, such as an active fiber composite or a microfiber composite, are considered as actuators for controlling unwanted bending deformations to avoid failure in such composite laminates. Due to the high stress concentrations at the interfaces between an active layer and the host structure, which may cause debonding, embedded actuators in which the active material is placed as part of the plies to form geometrically continuous plies are considered in order to minimize the stress concentration while improving the actuation capability. The first-ply failure and the ultimate laminate failure criteria of composite laminates are used to predict the failure stress and mode of the smart composite laminates, where commonly known macroscopic failure criteria, such as the Tsai-Hill, Tsai-Wu, and maximum stress criteria, are employed for each lamina. Piezoelectric materials can be used to prevent the failure from hygrothermal and mechanical loadings by applying an electric voltage in order to counteract laminate deformations. Based on the deformation and failure analyzes of smart composite laminates having various stacking sequences, fiber and matrix constituents, and piezoelectric materials, we could estimate the overall properties and failure envelopes of the laminates, which is useful in the preliminary design of smart composite structures.

  7. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  8. Multicamera fusion for shape estimation and visibility analysis of unknown deforming objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuger, Evgeny; Benhabib, Beno

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed for fused three-dimensional (3-D) shape estimation and visibility analysis of an unknown, markerless, deforming object through a multicamera vision system. Complete shape estimation is defined herein as the process of 3-D reconstruction of a model through fusion of stereo triangulation data and a visual hull. The differing accuracies of both methods rely on the number and placement of the cameras. Stereo triangulation yields a high-density, high-accuracy reconstruction of a surface patch from a small surface area, while a visual hull yields a complete, low-detail volumetric approximation of the object. The resultant complete 3-D model is, then, temporally projected based on the tracked object's deformation, yielding a robust deformed shape prediction. Visibility and uncertainty analyses, on the projected model, estimate the expected accuracy of reconstruction at the next sampling instant. In contrast to common techniques that rely on a priori known models and identities of static objects, our method is distinct in its direct application to unknown, markerless, deforming objects, where the object model and identity are unknown to the system. Extensive simulations and comparisons, some of which are presented herein, thoroughly demonstrate the proposed method and its benefits over individual reconstruction techniques.

  9. Shape changes and deformability in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Schrier, S L

    1987-12-01

    To evaluate the membrane events that take place during red blood cell shape change, the deformability of resealed ghosts was studied in the ektacytometer while alterations in ghost shapes were produced. By studying ghosts in the ektacytometer it is possible to assess small changes in membrane dynamic rigidity free of the complicating factors that exist in intact red blood cells, such as concerns over the ratio of surface area to volume and the internal viscosity. Ghosts resealed in isotonic buffers are echinocytic, but addition of magnesium-adenosine triphosphate converts them to discocytes. This conversion to discocytosis was accompanied by an increase in membrane rigidity. Addition of vanadate along with magnesium-adenosine triphosphate blocked the conversion of echinocytic ghosts to discocytes, and in parallel blocked the accompanying increase in rigidity. Monospecific rabbit antispectrin antibody was resealed within ghosts and produced the anticipated increase in membrane rigidity. Morphologic evaluation revealed that such ghosts had changed from echinocytes to discocytes. Therefore two very different methods were used to convert normally echinocytic ghosts into discocytic ghosts, and in both cases the shape change was accompanied by an increase in ghost rigidity. These experiments indicate that in isotonically resealed ghosts, the discocytic shape is achieved as a consequence of membrane protein changes that produce an increase in membrane rigidity.

  10. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  11. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in the same manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminate plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling) analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  12. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  13. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  14. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  15. SUN2 Overexpression Deforms Nuclear Shape and Inhibits HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Sonia; di Nunzio, Francesca; Kieffer, Camille; Porrot, Françoise; Opp, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    strains of HIV before nuclear entry. Mutation of the viral capsid protein yielded SUN2-resistant HIV. Additionally, the inhibition of HIV infection by SUN2 involves cyclophilin A, a protein that binds the HIV capsid and directs subsequent steps of infection. We also found that SUN2 overexpression substantially changes the shape of the cell's nucleus, resulting in many flower-like nuclei. Both HIV inhibition and deformation of nuclear shape required the domain of SUN2 that interacts with the nuclear lamina. Our results demonstrate that SUN2 interferes with HIV infection and highlight novel links between nuclear shape and viral infection. PMID:26865710

  16. Shape-dependent global deformation modes of large protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-05-01

    Conformational changes are central to the functioning of pore-forming proteins that open and close their molecular gates in response to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength, membrane voltage or ligand binding. Normal mode analysis (NMA) is used to identify and characterize the slowest motions in the gA, KcsA, ClC-ec1, LacY and LeuT Aa proteins at the onset of gating. Global deformation modes of the essentially cylindrical gA, KcsA, LacY and LeuT Aa biomolecules are reminiscent of global twisting, transverse and longitudinal motions in a homogeneous elastic rod. The ClC-ec1 protein executes a splaying motion in the plane perpendicular to the lipid bilayer. These global collective deformations are determined by protein shape. New methods, all-atom Monte Carlo Normal Mode Following and its simplification using a rotation-translation of protein blocks (RTB), are described and applied to gain insight into the nature of gating transitions in gA and KcsA. These studies demonstrate the severe limitations of standard NMA in characterizing the structural rearrangements associated with gating transitions. Comparison of all-atom and RTB transition pathways in gA clearly illustrates the impact of the rigid protein block approximation and the need to include all degrees of freedom and their relaxation in computational studies of protein gating. The effects of atomic level structure, pH, hydrogen bonding and charged residues on the large-scale conformational changes associated with gating transitions are discussed.

  17. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the GIII Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The displacement transfer functions (DTFs) were applied to the GIII swept wing for the deformed shape prediction. The calculated deformed shapes are very close to the correlated finite element results as well as the measured data. The convergence study showed that using 17 strain stations, the wing-tip displacement prediction error was 1.6 percent, and that there is no need to use a large number of strain stations for G-III wing shape predictions.

  18. Effects of shape and size on red blood cell deformability: a static bending analysis.

    PubMed

    Engström, G; Täljedal, I B

    1985-12-01

    When flowing down a tapered tube, such as a narrow capillary, red blood cells (RBCs) are subject to deformation, the first event of which is folding in a pancake manner. The RBC deformability is reduced during cell ageing, a phenomenon that may reflect alterations in intracellular viscosity, membrane rigidity or RBC shape. Age related shape changes and their importance for increased RBC rigidity were theoretically analysed. The average empirically observed RBC profile is shown to offer little resistance to bending as compared to other, theoretically possible profiles of the same membrane area and RBC volume. Because of a decrease in projected area (diameter size), and therefore in pressure load, the pressure needed to initiate folding of an old RBC is between 20 and 55% higher than that required to fold a young one if, during RBC ageing, membrane area to cell volume ratio is constant as empirically observed. This difference exists whether the RBC is mathematically treated as a solid body or as a membrane shell.

  19. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  20. Hydrostar Thermal and Structural Deformation Analyses of Antenna Array Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Hope, Drew J.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed Hydrostar mission used a large orbiting antenna array to demonstrate synthetic aperture technology in space while obtaining global soil moisture data. In order to produce accurate data, the array was required to remain as close as possible to its perfectly aligned placement while undergoing the mechanical and thermal stresses induced by orbital changes. Thermal and structural analyses for a design concept of this antenna array were performed. The thermal analysis included orbital radiation calculations, as well as parametric studies of orbit altitude, material properties and coating types. The thermal results included predicted thermal distributions over the array for several cases. The structural analysis provided thermally-driven deflections based on these cases, as well as based on a 1-g inertial load. In order to minimize the deflections of the array in orbit, the use of XN70, a carbon-reinforced polycyanate composite, was recommended.

  1. Shaping light: MOEMS deformable mirrors for microscopes and telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) have enabled rapid advances in applications ranging from large telescope astronomy and free space laser communication to biological microscopy and retinal imaging over the past decade. In this talk I describe our efforts at Boston University and at Boston Micromachines Corporation to design, fabricate, and control MOEMS DMs for adaptive optics (AO) applications. Integration of the DMs in AO systems is described, along with results demonstrating unprecedented advances in resolution and contrast in microscopes and telescopes challenged by unavoidable wavefront aberrations. MEMS-DM research offers the rare opportunity to introduce technology that is both more economical and more capable than the state-of-the-art.

  2. The Impact of Martensite Deformation on Shape Memory Effect Recovery Strain Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanba, Asheesh; Hamilton, Reginald F.

    2015-08-01

    The one-way shape memory effect of polycrystalline NiTi is investigated after differential levels of martensite deformation. Martensite naturally forms an energy-minimizing configuration, referred to as self-accommodated, of differently oriented martensite variants, which are internally twinned. Stress preferentially orients a select variant that eventually detwins and plastically deforms at the highest stress levels. In this work, the underlying morphology is ascertained based on the evolution of micro-scale deformation measurements using digital image correlation analysis of three characteristic material responses. An initial martensitic structure is deformed at constant temperature. The forward austenite-to-martensite and reverse martensite-to-austenite phase transformations take place during temperature cycling under a constant stress. The austenite-to-martensite transformation is tensile stress induced at a constant temperature and initiates via a localized strain band. For the conversion of self-accommodated martensite to orientated morphology and further deformation, spatially heterogeneous strains accrue over the entire specimen surface. Shape memory recovery during heating, on the other hand, culminates with a centralized strain localization that persists as recovery approaches completion. The recovery temperature differential ( A f - A s) depends on the extent of deformation. This work characterizes the influence of stress on phase transformation and martensite deformation morphology for deformation in the martensitic state compared to the stress-induced phase transformation.

  3. Gravity effect on lymphocyte deformation through cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Hung, R J; Tsao, Y D; Spauling, G F

    1995-01-01

    The effects on human cells (lymphocyte) immersed in a culture liquid under microgravity environment has been investigated. The study was based on the numerical simulation of the Morphology of human cells affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(-3) to 2 g(o) (g(o) = 9.81 m/s2) in 15 s. Both the free floating cells and the cells which came into contact with the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration were considered in this study. The results show that, when the gravity acceleration increased, the cell morphology changed from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cells and the stationary cells on the lower inclined wall while the cell morphology varied from spherical to vertically-elongated ellipsoid for the cells hanging on the upper inclined wall. A test of the deformation of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, carried out in the KC-135 free fall aircraft, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results will be useful for study of the behavior and morphology of cells in space.

  4. Deformation of Brillouin gain spectrum shape caused by strain varying linearly with respect to time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Ayako; Tateda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The shape of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) that is produced in an optical fiber undergoing strain varying linearly with respect to time, which is a typical example of temporally non-uniform strain, is theoretically derived through an analysis similar to that by which the BGS under spatially non-uniform strain would be derived. The BGS shape that is theoretically derived agrees well with the shape experimentally observed. The characteristics of the BGS deformation and strain measurement error under the temporally linear strain are discussed based on their similarity to the BGS shape derived under spatially linear strain.

  5. Effect of the influence function of deformable mirrors on laser beam shaping.

    PubMed

    González-Núñez, Héctor; Béchet, Clémentine; Ayancán, Boris; Neichel, Benoit; Guesalaga, Andrés

    2017-02-20

    The continuous membrane stiffness of a deformable mirror propagates the deformation of the actuators beyond their neighbors. When phase-retrieval algorithms are used to determine the desired shape of these mirrors, this cross-coupling-also known as influence function (IF)-is generally disregarded. We study this problem via simulations and bench tests for different target shapes to gain further insight into the phenomenon. Sound modeling of the IF effect is achieved as highlighted by the concurrence between the modeled and experimental results. In addition, we observe that the actuators IF is a key parameter that determines the accuracy of the output light pattern. Finally, it is shown that in some cases it is possible to achieve better shaping by modifying the input irradiance of the phase-retrieval algorithm. The results obtained from this analysis open the door to further improvements in this type of beam-shaping systems.

  6. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  7. Behavior of rigid and deformable particles in deterministic lateral displacement devices with different post shapes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zunmin; Henry, Ewan; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2015-12-28

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices have great potential for the separation and sorting of various suspended particles based on their size, shape, deformability, and other intrinsic properties. Currently, the basic idea for the separation mechanism is that the structure and geometry of DLDs uniquely determine the flow field, which in turn defines a critical particle size and the particle lateral displacement within a device. We employ numerical simulations using coarse-grained mesoscopic methods and two-dimensional models to elucidate the dynamics of both rigid spherical particles and deformable red blood cells (RBCs) in different DLD geometries. Several shapes of pillars, including circular, diamond, square, and triangular structures, and a few particle sizes are considered. The simulation results show that a critical particle size can be well defined for rigid spherical particles and depends on the details of the DLD structure and the corresponding flow field within the device. However, non-isotropic and deformable particles such as RBCs exhibit much more complex dynamics within a DLD device, which cannot properly be described by a single parameter such as the critical size. The dynamics and deformation of soft particles within a DLD device become also important, indicating that not only size sorting, but additional sorting targets (e.g., shape, deformability, internal viscosity) are possible.

  8. Behavior of rigid and deformable particles in deterministic lateral displacement devices with different post shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zunmin; Henry, Ewan; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

    2015-12-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices have great potential for the separation and sorting of various suspended particles based on their size, shape, deformability, and other intrinsic properties. Currently, the basic idea for the separation mechanism is that the structure and geometry of DLDs uniquely determine the flow field, which in turn defines a critical particle size and the particle lateral displacement within a device. We employ numerical simulations using coarse-grained mesoscopic methods and two-dimensional models to elucidate the dynamics of both rigid spherical particles and deformable red blood cells (RBCs) in different DLD geometries. Several shapes of pillars, including circular, diamond, square, and triangular structures, and a few particle sizes are considered. The simulation results show that a critical particle size can be well defined for rigid spherical particles and depends on the details of the DLD structure and the corresponding flow field within the device. However, non-isotropic and deformable particles such as RBCs exhibit much more complex dynamics within a DLD device, which cannot properly be described by a single parameter such as the critical size. The dynamics and deformation of soft particles within a DLD device become also important, indicating that not only size sorting, but additional sorting targets (e.g., shape, deformability, internal viscosity) are possible.

  9. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  10. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-07

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  11. Further Development of Ko Displacement Theory for Deformed Shape Predictions of Nonuniform Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2009-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory previously formulated for deformed shape predictions of nonuniform beam structures is further developed mathematically. The further-developed displacement equations are expressed explicitly in terms of geometrical parameters of the beam and bending strains at equally spaced strain-sensing stations along the multiplexed fiber-optic sensor line installed on the bottom surface of the beam. The bending strain data can then be input into the displacement equations for calculations of local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles for generating the overall deformed shapes of the nonuniform beam. The further-developed displacement theory can also be applied to the deformed shape predictions of nonuniform two-point supported beams, nonuniform panels, nonuniform aircraft wings and fuselages, and so forth. The high degree of accuracy of the further-developed displacement theory for nonuniform beams is validated by finite-element analysis of various nonuniform beam structures. Such structures include tapered tubular beams, depth-tapered unswept and swept wing boxes, width-tapered wing boxes, and double-tapered wing boxes, all under combined bending and torsional loads. The Ko displacement theory, combined with the fiber-optic strain-sensing system, provide a powerful tool for in-flight deformed shape monitoring of unmanned aerospace vehicles by ground-based pilots to maintain safe flights.

  12. A Deformed Shape Monitoring Model for Building Structures Based on a 2D Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible. PMID:23698269

  13. Automatic 3D shape severity quantification and localization for deformational plagiocephaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati; Shapiro, Linda G.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Speltz, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the occurrence of deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly in children. This increase has coincided with the "Back to Sleep" campaign that was introduced to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). However, there has yet to be an objective quantification of the degree of severity for these two conditions. Most diagnoses are done on subjective factors such as patient history and physician examination. The existence of an objective quantification would help research in areas of diagnosis and intervention measures, as well as provide a tool for finding correlation between the shape severity and cognitive outcome. This paper describes a new shape severity quantification and localization method for deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Our results show that there is a positive correlation between the new shape severity measure and the scores entered by a human expert.

  14. Precision linear shaped charge analyses for severance of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) design concept involves the independent fabrication and assembly of the liner (wedge of PLSC), the tamper/confinement, and explosive. The liner is the most important part of a linear shaped charge (LSC) and should be fabricated by a more quality controlled, precise process than the tamper material. Also, this concept allows the liner material to be different from the tamper material. The explosive can be loaded between the liner and tamper as the last step in the assembly process rather than the first step as in conventional LSC designs. PLSC designs have been shown to produce increased jet penetrations in given targets, more reproducible jet penetration, and more efficient explosive cross-section geometries using a minimum amount of explosive. The Linear Explosive Shaped Charge Analysis (LESCA) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories has been used to assist in the design of PLSCs. LESCA predictions for PLSC jet tip velocities, jet-target impact angles, and jet penetration in aluminum and steel targets are compared to measured data. The advantages of PLSC over conventional LSC are presented. As an example problem, the LESCA code was used to analytically develop a conceptual design for a PLSC component to sever a three-inch thick 1018 steel plate at a water depth of 500 feet (15 atmospheres).

  15. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  16. Shape phase transition in odd-even nuclei: From spherical to deformed gamma-unstable shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2010-07-15

    Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. The case of a single j=9/2 fermion coupled to an even-even boson core is considered. This boson core transits from spherical to gamma-unstable shapes depending on the value of a control parameter in the boson Hamiltonian. The effect of the coupling of the odd particle to this core along the shape transition and, in particular, at the critical point is discussed. For that purpose, the ground-state energy surface in terms of the beta and gamma shape variables for the even core and odd-even energy surfaces for the different K states coming from j=9/2 are constructed. The evolution of each individual coupled state along the transition from the spherical [U(5)] to the gamma-unstable [O(6)] situation is investigated. One finds that the core-fermion coupling gives rise to a smoother transition than in the even-core case.

  17. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  18. Analyses of characteristics of ring-shaped electrostatic meter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.Y.; Xu, D.L.; Coulthard, J.; Xu, C.L.; Wang, S.M.

    2010-07-01

    This article describes the characteristics of ring-shaped electrostatic pulverized fuel meters and their applications. At the University of Teesside, UK, the electrostatic technique has been used to measure pulverized fuel flow concentration, velocity, and mass flow rate under lean-phase condition. The mathematic model has been developed to express the relationship between the root-mean-square (rms) value of the meter's output voltage and solids mass flow rate. The effects of solids velocity and particle size on measurements have also been reflected in the model. Furthermore, the model presents the sensitivity variations over the cross-sectional area of meter and along the pipe axis. The article also introduces the research carried out at Southeast University in China, where the technique has been extended to measure dense-phase flow of pulverized coal, which is common in gasification and blast furnaces.

  19. Tissue deformation and shape models in image-guided interventions: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D J; Barratt, D; Blackall, J M; Chan, C; Edwards, P J; Rhode, K; Penney, G P; McClelland, J; Hill, D L G

    2005-04-01

    This paper promotes the concept of active models in image-guided interventions. We outline the limitations of the rigid body assumption in image-guided interventions and describe how intraoperative imaging provides a rich source of information on spatial location of anatomical structures and therapy devices, allowing a preoperative plan to be updated during an intervention. Soft tissue deformation and variation from an atlas to a particular individual can both be determined using non-rigid registration. Established methods using free-form deformations have a very large number of degrees of freedom. Three examples of deformable models--motion models, biomechanical models and statistical shape models--are used to illustrate how prior information can be used to restrict the number of degrees of freedom of the registration algorithm and thus provide active models for image-guided interventions. We provide preliminary results from applications for each type of model.

  20. Post-traumatic guitar-shaped deformity of the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, K; Akagi, H; Ogawa, T; Yuen, K; Masuda, Y

    1998-06-01

    We report a unique case of post-traumatic guitar-shaped deformity of the tympanic membrane in an 8-year-old boy. After a traffic accident, he exhibited bleeding from the ear, incomplete facial palsy and a conductive hearing loss on the left side. Although his symptoms gradually improved, the deformity of the tympanic membrane and external auditory canal persisted. The tympanic membrane appeared to be duplicated. Careful examination using an otoscope was required for accurate diagnosis. Without knowledge of the deformity, the physician could easily misinterpret the appearance of the tympanic membrane. Formation of cholesteatoma was not observed and the normal migration of the epithelium in the external auditory canal seemed to be maintained. However, we were concerned that tubal dysfunction could eventually induce the retraction and atrophy of the tympanic membrane to ultimately form a cholesteatoma. We therefore recommend patients such as this to be evaluated periodically because of the risk of tubal dysfunction and cholesteatoma.

  1. Deformable Model-Based Methods for Shape Control of a Haptic Jamming Surface.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2017-02-01

    Haptic Jamming, the approach of simultaneously controlling mechanical properties and surface deformation of a tactile display via particle jamming and pneumatics, shows promise as a tangible, shape-changing human-computer interface. Previous research introduced device design and described the force-displacement interactions for individual jamming cells. The work in this article analyzes the shape output capabilities of a multi-cell array. A spring-mass deformable body simulation combines models of the three actuation inputs of a Haptic Jamming surface: node pinning, chamber pressurization, and cell jamming. Surface measurements of a 12-cell prototype from a depth camera fit the mass and stiffness parameters to the device during pressurization tests and validate the accuracy of the model for various actuation sequences. The simulator is used to develop an algorithm that generates a sequence of actuation inputs for a Haptic Jamming array of any size in order to match a desired surface output shape. Data extracted from topographical maps and three-dimensional solid object models are used to evaluate the shape-matching algorithm and assess the utility of increasing array size and resolution. Results show that a discrete Laplace operator applied to the input is a suitable predictor of the correlation coefficient between the desired shape and the device output.

  2. Pulse shaping in the mid-infrared by a deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Cartella, Andrea; Bonora, Stefano; Först, Michael; Cerullo, Giulio; Cavalleri, Andrea; Manzoni, Cristian

    2014-03-15

    We present a pulse-shaping scheme operating in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range up to 20 μm. The spectral phase is controlled by a specially designed large stroke 32-actuator deformable mirror in a grating-based 4f configuration. We demonstrate the shaper capability of compressing the MIR pulses, imparting parabolic and third-order spectral phases and splitting the spectral content to create two independent pulses.

  3. Effect of Dummy Block Shape on Deformation of Oxide Film of Billet in Copper Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Y.; Hoshino, M.

    2010-06-01

    There are some problems in the copper hot extrusion. One is the mixture of impurities in the product, for example, the oxide film in the side of billet comes to the outer of product and the oxide film in the back-end of billet is inserted in the material and extruded into the center of product, which is called as "piping". Then, it has been investigated that dummy block shape effects on deformation of oxide film by experiment and numerical simulation.

  4. Analysis of the finite deformation response of shape memory polymers: I. Thermomechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Brent L.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2010-07-01

    This study presents the analysis of the finite deformation response of a shape memory polymer (SMP). This two-part paper addresses the thermomechanical characterization of SMPs, the derivation of material parameters for a finite deformation phenomenological model, the numerical implementation of such a model, and the predictions from the model with comparisons to experimental data. Part I of this work presents the thermomechanical characterization of the material behavior of a shape memory polymer. In this experimental investigation, the vision image correlation system, a visual-photographic apparatus, was used to measure displacements in the gauge area. A series of tensile tests, which included nominal values of the extension of 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, were performed on SMP specimens. The effects on the free recovery behavior of increasing the value of the applied deformation and temperature rate were considered. The stress-extension relationship was observed to be nonlinear for increasing values of the extension, and the shape recovery was observed to occur at higher temperatures upon increasing the temperature rate. The experimental results, aided by the advanced experimental apparatus, present components of the material behavior which are critical for the development and calibration of models to describe the response of SMPs.

  5. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject’s complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). Results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modeling is able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that results remain significant even if the number of

  6. Observation and prediction of the deformation and fracture of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuziger, Adam

    This thesis explores the deformation and fracture behavior of two common shape memory alloys (SMAs), CuAlNi and NiTi. Millimeter, micrometer and nanometer scale features are observed and compared with crystallographic theory of martensite (CTM) predictions and finite element models. Observed fracture behavior, in conjunction with theory and modeling, shed light on the fracture behavior and deformation in shape memory materials. The in plane and out of plane deformations are quantitatively measured and compared with good agreement to predictions from the CTM. For deformation where the stress state was unknown, predicted martensite plates correlated well with observed features. When the stress state could be calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), an available work criterion was used to predict which type of martensite plate would form; with good agreement in arbitrarily oriented, notched CuAlNi samples. The out of plane deformation caused during transformation was quantitatively investigated and agrees well with the average strain of twinned martensite. Using a FEA model of a tapered martensite, the effect of boundary conditions on the out of plane deformation angle was explored. Some limitations on the available work criterion were found. The direction of the out of plane deformation near the notch is consistently such that the area directly ahead of the notch sinks downward. This effect, and the wide martensite plates observed after fracture occurs, indicate the role boundary conditions have on the transformation observed. These effects are not taken into account in the current available work criterion. In single crystal NiTi, the available work criterion was not predictive of the deformations observed in uniaxial tension or in notched samples. However, available work predictions were useful in predicting the fracture properties of notched single crystal NiTi samples, a capability not previously demonstrated. Investigation into the grain boundary fracture

  7. Displacement Theories for In-Flight Deformed Shape Predictions of Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. L.; Tran, Van t.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement theories are developed for a variety of structures with the goal of providing real-time shape predictions for aerospace vehicles during flight. These theories are initially developed for a cantilever beam to predict the deformed shapes of the Helios flying wing. The main structural configuration of the Helios wing is a cantilever wing tubular spar subjected to bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The displacement equations that are formulated are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. Displacement theories for other structures, such as tapered cantilever beams, two-point supported beams, wing boxes, and plates also are developed. The accuracy of the displacement theories is successfully validated by finite-element analysis and classical beam theory using input-strains generated by finite-element analysis. The displacement equations and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) create a powerful means for in-flight deformation monitoring of aerospace structures. This method serves multiple purposes for structural shape sensing, loads monitoring, and structural health monitoring. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed to the ground-based pilot or used as input to the control system to actively control the shape of structures during flight.

  8. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset.

  9. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: Where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset. PMID:25610773

  10. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  11. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  12. Investigations of a nanostructured FeMnSi shape memory alloy produced via severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Gheorghe; Gurau, Carmela; Sampath, Vedamanickam; Bujoreanu, Leandru Gheorghe

    2016-11-01

    Low-cost iron-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) show great potential for engineering applications. The developments of new processing techniques have recently enabled the production of nanocrystalline materials with improved properties. These developments have opened avenues for newer applications for SMAs. The influence of severe plastic deformation induced by the high-speed high-pressure torsion (HSHPT) process on the microstructural evolution of an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr alloy was investigated. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of the alloy revealed the existence of nanoscale grains with an abundance of stacking faults. The high density of dislocations characteristic of severe plastic deformation was not observed in this alloy. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the presence of ɛ-martensite with an HCP crystal structure and γ-phase with an FCC structure.

  13. A simplified constitutive model for predicting shape memory polymers deformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunxin; Guo, Siu-Siu; He, Yuhao; Liu, Zishun

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can keep a temporary shape after pre-deformation at a higher temperature and subsequent cooling. When they are reheated, their original shapes can be recovered. Such special characteristics of SMPs make them widely used in aerospace structures, biomedical devices, functional textiles and other devices. Increasing usefulness of SMPs motivates us to further understand their thermomechanical properties and deformation behavior, of which the development of appropriate constitutive models for SMPs is imperative. There is much work in literatures that address constitutive models of the thermo-mechanical coupling in SMPs. However, due to their complex forms, it is difficult to apply these constitutive models in the real world. In this paper, a three-element model with simple form is proposed to investigate the thermo-mechanical small strain (within 10%) behavior of polyurethane under uniaxial tension. Two different cases of heated recovery are considered: (1) unconstrained free strain recovery and (2) stress recovery under full constraint at a strain level fixed during low temperature unloading. To validate the model, simulated and predicted results are compared with Tobushi's experimental results and good agreement can be observed.

  14. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  15. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  16. Shape deformations of giant unilamellar vesicles with a laser tweezer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Poole, Cory; Bradford, Peter; English, Doug

    2004-10-01

    Vesicles are phospholipid bilayers that form a surface enclosing a volume of water or solution. They are of importance as model systems to study cells, as well as having practical applications such as containers for performing nanochemistry and facilitating drug delivery. Their properties have been studied for decades. Using a holographic laser tweezer array (LTA), which converts a single laser beam into many laser tweezer points, we stretch the vesicles in controlled ways from several points at once, measuring each force applied. Here, we present data on shape deformations of simple, spherical vesicles and on membrane fracture.

  17. A Coupled CFD/FEM Structural Analysis to Determine Deformed Shapes of the RSRM Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1996-01-01

    Recent trends towards an increase in the stiffness of the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) insulation material used in the construction of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) propellant inhibitors prompted questions about possible effects on RSRM performance. The specific objectives of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) task included: (1) the definition of pressure loads to calculate the deformed shape of stiffer inhibitors, (2) the calculation of higher port velocities over the inhibitors to determine shifts in the vortex shedding or edge tone frequencies, and (3) the quantification of higher slag impingement and collection rates on the inhibitors and in the submerged nose nozzle cavity.

  18. Role of B19' martensite deformation in stabilizing two-way shape memory behavior in NiTi

    DOE PAGES

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Noebe, R. D.; ...

    2012-11-01

    Deformation of a B19' martensitic, polycrystallineNi49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) shape memoryalloy and its influence on the magnitude and stability of the ensuing two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) was investigated by combined ex situ mechanical experimentation and in situneutron diffraction measurements at stress and temperature. The microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were captured and compared to the bulk macroscopic response of the alloy. With increasing uniaxial strain, it was observed that B19' martensite deformed by reorientation and detwinning with preferred selection of the (1¯50)M and (010)M variants, (201¯)B19' deformation twinning, and dislocationmore » activity. These mechanisms were indicated by changes in bulk texture from the neutron diffraction measurements. Partial reversibility of the reoriented variants and deformation twins was also captured upon load removal and thermal cycling, which after isothermal deformation to strains between 6% and 22% resulted in a strong TWSME. Consequently, TWSME functional parameters including TWSME strain, strain reduction, and transformation temperatures were characterized and it was found that prior martensite deformation to 14% strain provided the optimum condition for the TWSME, resulting in a stable two-way shape memory strain of 2.2%. Thus, isothermal deformation of martensite was found to be a quick and efficient method for creating a strong and stable TWSME in Ni₄₉.₉Ti₅₀.₁.« less

  19. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology

    PubMed Central

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object’s macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured. PMID:26713197

  20. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    PubMed

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured.

  1. A multi-branch finite deformation constitutive model for a shape memory polymer based syntactic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianping; Sun, Huiyu; Fang, Changqing

    2015-02-01

    A multi-branch thermoviscoelastic-themoviscoplastic finite deformation constitutive model incorporated with structural and stress relaxation is developed for a thermally activated shape memory polymer (SMP) based syntactic foam. In this paper, the total mechanical deformation of the foam is divided into the components of the SMP and the elastic glass microballoons by using the mixture rule. The nonlinear Adam-Gibbs model is used to describe the structural relaxation of the SMP as the temperature crosses the glass transition temperature (Tg). Further, a multi-branch model combined with the modified Eying model of viscous flow is used to capture the multitude of relaxation processes of the SMP. The deformation of the glass microballoons could be split into elastic and inelastic components. In addition, the phenomenological evolution rule is implemented in order to further characterize the macroscopic post-yield strain softening behaviors of the syntactic foam. A comparison between the numerical simulation and the thermomechanical experiment shows an acceptable agreement. Moreover, a parametric study is conducted to examine the predictability of the model and to provide guidance for reasonable design of the syntactic foam.

  2. Static deformation modeling and analysis of flexure hinges made of a shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhijiang; Yang, Miao; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Dan

    2016-11-01

    The flexure hinge is a key element in compliant mechanisms to achieve continuous motion; however the motion range of a flexure hinge is severely restricted by the material’s allowable strain. Due to the superelasticity effect, shape memory alloys (SMAs) can undergo much larger strain than other metals; this means that they are excellent candidates for the fabrication of flexure hinges with a large motion range. In this paper, a simple static deformation modeling approach is proposed for a flexure hinge made of a SMA. The superelastic behavior of the SMA is described by Brinson’s constitutive model. The flexure hinge is considered as a non-prismatic cantilever beam associated with geometrical and material nonlinearities. Govern equations of the flexure hinge are derived and solved numerically by applying the nonlinear bending theory of the Euler-Bernoulli beam. Experimental tests show that the proposed modeling approach can predict the deformation of the flexure hinge precisely; the maximum relative error is less than 6.5%. Based on the static deformation model, the motion capacity, the stiffness characteristic and the rotational error of the flexure hinge are also investigated. The results reveal that the flexure hinge made of a SMA has great potential to construct compliant mechanisms with a large motion range.

  3. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  4. Electrostatic shape control of single crystal silicon (SCS), free standing, thin plate deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Terry L.

    This research involved the creation and investigation of a low cost design for a MEMS platform capable of controlled shape morphing using very simple mechanical design and manufacturing processes. The platform is made of single crystal silicon and loaded with multiple in-plane forces and moments from three fixed positions on the plate boundary, and with distributed electrostatic forces across the platform surface. This work is important because such a platform could be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics systems used in laser communications, vision science, precision beam shaping, and many other important applications. The work involved the development and experimental validation of analytical models that can map the displacement field of a thin flat SCS plate subject to complex loading on the boundary and distributed electrostatic forces. The achievement of these goals included experimentally mapping the platform surface after deformation into three-dimensional geometries defined by the Zernike polynomials. These are relatively large elastic deflections requiring a highly nonlinear analysis. The current analysis applies to circular plates supported on buckled flexures, which have been designed based an model results, fabricated using common microelectronic fabrication processes, and characterized using optical and interference microscopy. Of special interest is the investigation of post-buckling behavior which enhances the range and robustness of operation of the device by providing local upward motion for some modes. The prototypes have been tested and the results compared well with the theoretical results. The first 15 Zernike modes were examined with successful mode shape generation of 13, and fitting errors less than unity were achieved for all 15. From continued analysis of the experimental results the models can be further enhanced to create a commercially viable real time control algorithm for the device.

  5. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Krempl, E.

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  6. Shape deformation of lipid membranes by banana-shaped protein rods: Comparison with isotropic inclusions and membrane rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The assembly of curved protein rods on fluid membranes is studied using implicit-solvent meshless membrane simulations. As the rod curvature increases, the rods on a membrane tube assemble along the azimuthal direction first and subsequently along the longitudinal direction. Here, we show that both transition curvatures decrease with increasing rod stiffness. For comparison, curvature-inducing isotropic inclusions are also simulated. When the isotropic inclusions have the same bending rigidity as the other membrane regions, the inclusions are uniformly distributed on the membrane tubes and vesicles even for large spontaneous curvature of the inclusions. However, the isotropic inclusions with much larger bending rigidity induce shape deformation and are concentrated on the region of a preferred curvature. For high rod density, high rod stiffness, and/or low line tension of the membrane edge, the rod assembly induces vesicle rupture, resulting in the formation of a high-genus vesicle. A gradual change in the curvature suppresses this rupture. Hence, large stress, compared to the edge tension, induced by the rod assembly is the key factor determining rupture. For rod curvature with the opposite sign to the vesicle curvature, membrane rupture induces inversion of the membrane, leading to division into multiple vesicles as well as formation of a high-genus vesicle.

  7. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets. PMID:27026290

  8. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Shape-Induced Deformation, Capillary Bridging, and Self-Assembly of Cuboids at the Fluid-Fluid Interface.

    PubMed

    Anjali, Thriveni G; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-01-24

    The controlled assembly of anisotropic particles through shape-induced interface deformations is shown to be a potential route for the fabrication of novel functional materials. In this article, the shape-induced interface deformation, capillary bridging, and directed self-assembly of cuboidal-shaped hematite particles at fluid-fluid interfaces are reported. The multipolar nature of the interface distortions is directly visualized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and 3D optical surface profiling. The nature of the interface deformations around cuboidal particles vary from monopolar to octupolar types depending on their orientation and position with respect to the interface. The deformations are of either hexapolar or octupolar type in the face-up orientation, quadrupolar or monopolar type in the edge-up orientation, and monopolar type in the vertex-up orientation. The particles adsorbed at the interface interact through the interface deformations, forming capillary bridges that lead to isolated assemblies of two or more particles. The arrangement of particles in any assembly is such that the condition for capillary attraction is satisfied, that is, in accordance with predictions based on the nature of interface deformations. At sufficient particle concentrations, these isolated structures interact to form a percolating network of cuboids. Furthermore, the difference in the nature of the assembly structures formed at the air-water interface and in the bulk water phase indicates that the interfacial assembly of these particles is controlled by the capillary interactions.

  10. A chest-shape target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mo; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Automatic weapon platform is one of the important research directions at domestic and overseas, it needs to accomplish fast searching for the object to be shot under complex background. Therefore, fast detection for given target is the foundation of further task. Considering that chest-shape target is common target of shoot practice, this paper treats chestshape target as the target and studies target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models. The algorithm computes Histograms of Oriented Gradient(HOG) features of the target and trains a model using Latent variable Support Vector Machine(SVM); In this model, target image is divided into several parts then we can obtain foot filter and part filters; Finally, the algorithm detects the target at the HOG features pyramid with method of sliding window. The running time of extracting HOG pyramid with lookup table can be shorten by 36%. The result indicates that this algorithm can detect the chest-shape target in natural environments indoors or outdoors. The true positive rate of detection reaches 76% with many hard samples, and the false positive rate approaches 0. Running on a PC (Intel(R)Core(TM) i5-4200H CPU) with C++ language, the detection time of images with the resolution of 640 × 480 is 2.093s. According to TI company run library about image pyramid and convolution for DM642 and other hardware, our detection algorithm is expected to be implemented on hardware platform, and it has application prospect in actual system.

  11. Adjoint analyses of enhanced solidification for shape optimization in conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Suzuki, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, an adjoint-based shape-optimization method has been developed for designing extended heat transfer surfaces in conjugate heat transfer problems. Here we specifically consider heat conduction-dominated solidification problem under different thermal boundary conditions: (i) the isothermal condition, and (ii) the conjugate condition with thermal coupling between the solidified liquid and the solid wall inside the domain bounded by the extended heat transfer surface. In the present shape-optimization scheme, extended heat transfer surfaces are successively refined in a local way based on the variational information of a cost functional with respect to the shape modification. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless method is employed for dealing with the complex boundary shape. For high-resolution analyses with boundary-fitted node arrangement, we have introduced a bubble-mesh method combined with a high-efficiency algorithm for searching neighboring bubbles within a cut-off distance. The present technique can be easily applied to convection problems including high Reynolds number flow. We demonstrate, for the isothermal boundary condition, that the present optimization leads to tree-like fin shapes, which achieve the temperature field with global similarity for different initial fin shapes. We will also show the computational results for the conjugate condition, which would regularize the present optimization due to the fin-efficiency effect.

  12. Applications of Ko Displacement Theory to the Deformed Shape Predictions of the Doubly-Tapered Ikhana Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. Lance; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2009-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory, formulated for weak nonuniform (slowly changing cross sections) cantilever beams, was applied to the deformed shape analysis of the doubly-tapered wings of the Ikhana unmanned aircraft. The two-line strain-sensing system (along the wingspan) was used for sensing the bending strains needed for the wing-deformed shapes (deflections and cross-sectional twist) analysis. The deflection equation for each strain-sensing line was expressed in terms of the bending strains evaluated at multiple numbers of strain-sensing stations equally spaced along the strain-sensing line. For the preflight shape analysis of the Ikhana wing, the strain data needed for input to the displacement equations for the shape analysis were obtained from the nodal-stress output of the finite-element analysis. The wing deflections and cross-sectional twist angles calculated from the displacement equations were then compared with those computed from the finite-element computer program. The Ko displacement theory formulated for weak nonlinear cantilever beams was found to be highly accurate in the deformed shape predictions of the doubly-tapered Ikhana wing.

  13. Three-dimensional shape, deformation, and motion analysis of mitral annuli using transesophageal echocardiographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddipatti, Ajeetkumar; Chandra, Shalabh; Flachskampf, Frank A.; Powell, Kimerly; Thomas, James D.

    1998-07-01

    Deformation and motion of the Mitral Annulus (MA) is closely related to the left ventricular function. Measurement and visualization of the characteristic parameters in 3D will help in understanding the relationship. Data for this study was acquired from patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiographic examination with the transducer aligned along the axis roughly perpendicular to the annuli, and rotated automatically to cover 360 degrees. ECG gated images were acquired at 24 angles for each phase of the cardiac cycle. The annuli hinge points were identified from each echo image and the annuli reconstructed. The parameters measured to characterize the annuli were: (1) area of projection, (2) non- planarity, (3) excursion of annulus centroid, (4) change in the annulus orientation. We validated the method using a wire loop shaped in the form of a saddle and a planar rubber ring imaged in a water bath at different orientations. Four MAs were reconstructed using this method. Two were patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and two were patients with normal ventricular function. The change in parameters was measured from systole to diastole. Percentage change in area (29% vs. 16%) and excursion (8 mm vs. 3 mm) were much larger for normals than for patients. While, changes in non-planarity (20%) and orientation (6 deg) were similar. These preliminary results show that MA parameters do reflect the abnormality, and could be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients with bad ventricles.

  14. Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yu, Cun; ...

    2015-08-18

    An in-situ nanowire Nb/TiNiCu composite is fabricated based on the concept of strain under-matching between a phase transforming matrix and high strength nanomaterials. The deformation behavior of the Nb nanowire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction when the TiNiCu matrix underwent different deformation modes. The maximum lattice strain of the Nb nanowires was about 5% when the matrix deformed via martensitic transformation or 1% when deforming plastically by dislocation slip. As a result, the Nb nanowires showed a lattice strain of 3.5% when the matrix deformed in the mixed mode of plastic deformation and martensitic transformation, whichmore » means that the occurrence of plastic deformation does not impede load transfer from the matrix to the nanowires.« less

  15. Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yu, Cun; Liu, Weilong; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ren, Yang; Cui, Lishan

    2015-08-18

    An in-situ nanowire Nb/TiNiCu composite is fabricated based on the concept of strain under-matching between a phase transforming matrix and high strength nanomaterials. The deformation behavior of the Nb nanowire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction when the TiNiCu matrix underwent different deformation modes. The maximum lattice strain of the Nb nanowires was about 5% when the matrix deformed via martensitic transformation or 1% when deforming plastically by dislocation slip. As a result, the Nb nanowires showed a lattice strain of 3.5% when the matrix deformed in the mixed mode of plastic deformation and martensitic transformation, which means that the occurrence of plastic deformation does not impede load transfer from the matrix to the nanowires.

  16. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  17. SU-F-BRF-02: Automated Lung Segmentation Method Using Atlas-Based Sparse Shape Composition with a Shape Constrained Deformable Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Yan, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, B; Lasio, G; Prado, K; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated lung segmentation method, which combines the atlas-based sparse shape composition with a shape constrained deformable model in thoracic CT for patients with compromised lung volumes. Methods: Ten thoracic computed tomography scans for patients with large lung tumors were collected and reference lung ROIs in each scan was manually segmented to assess the performance of the method. We propose an automated and robust framework for lung tissue segmentation by using single statistical atlas registration to initialize a robust deformable model in order to perform fine segmentation that includes compromised lung tissue. First, a statistical image atlas with sparse shape composition is constructed and employed to obtain an approximate estimation of lung volume. Next, a robust deformable model with shape prior is initialized from this estimation. Energy terms from ROI edge potential and interior ROI region based potential as well as the initial ROI are combined in this model for accurate and robust segmentation. Results: The proposed segmentation method is applied to segment right lung on three CT scans. The quantitative results of our segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.92–0.95), mean accuracy of (0.97,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.10,0.16) with 95% CI. The quantitative results of previously published RASM segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.74,0.96), mean accuracy of (0.66,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.04, 0.38) with 95% CI. The qualitative and quantitative comparisons show that our proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance compared with a robust active shape model method. Conclusion: The atlas-based segmentation approach achieved relatively high accuracy with less variance compared to RASM in the sample dataset and the proposed method will be useful in image analysis applications for lung nodule or lung cancer diagnosis and radiotherapy assessment in thoracic

  18. Computation of Static Shapes and Voltages for Micromachined Deformable Mirrors with Nonlinear Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In modeling micromachined deformable mirrors with electrostatic actuators whose gap spacings are of the same order of magnitude as those of the surface deformations, it is necessary to use nonlinear models for the actuators. In this paper, we consider micromachined deformable mirrors modeled by a membrane or plate equation with nonlinear electrostatic actuator characteristics. Numerical methods for computing the mirror deformation due to given actuator voltages and the actuator voltages required for producing the desired deformations at the actuator locations are presented. The application of the proposed methods to circular deformable mirrors whose surfaces are modeled by elastic membranes is discussed in detail. Numerical results are obtained for a typical circular micromachined mirror with electrostatic actuators.

  19. Hanging-wall deformation above a normal fault: sequential limit analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Leroy, Yves M.; Maillot, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    The deformation in the hanging wall above a segmented normal fault is analysed with the sequential limit analysis (SLA). The method combines some predictions on the dip and position of the active fault and axial surface, with geometrical evolution à la Suppe (Groshong, 1989). Two problems are considered. The first followed the prototype proposed by Patton (2005) with a pre-defined convex, segmented fault. The orientation of the upper segment of the normal fault is an unknown in the second problem. The loading in both problems consists of the retreat of the back wall and the sedimentation. This sedimentation starts from the lowest point of the topography and acts at the rate rs relative to the wall retreat rate. For the first problem, the normal fault either has a zero friction or a friction value set to 25o or 30o to fit the experimental results (Patton, 2005). In the zero friction case, a hanging wall anticline develops much like in the experiments. In the 25o friction case, slip on the upper segment is accompanied by rotation of the axial plane producing a broad shear zone rooted at the fault bend. The same observation is made in the 30o case, but without slip on the upper segment. Experimental outcomes show a behaviour in between these two latter cases. For the second problem, mechanics predicts a concave fault bend with an upper segment dip decreasing during extension. The axial surface rooting at the normal fault bend sees its dips increasing during extension resulting in a curved roll-over. Softening on the normal fault leads to a stepwise rotation responsible for strain partitioning into small blocks in the hanging wall. The rotation is due to the subsidence of the topography above the hanging wall. Sedimentation in the lowest region thus reduces the rotations. Note that these rotations predicted by mechanics are not accounted for in most geometrical approaches (Xiao and Suppe, 1992) and are observed in sand box experiments (Egholm et al., 2007, referring

  20. Deformation induced martensite in NiTi and its shape memory effects generated by low temperature laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yiliang; Ye, Chang; Lin, Dong; Suslov, Sergey; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, laser shock peening (LSP) was utilized to generate localized deformation induced martensite (DIM) in NiTi shape memory alloy. The DIM was investigated by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of temperature and laser intensity on DIM transformation were investigated. It has been found that higher laser intensity and lower processing temperature leads to higher volume fraction of DIM. This is attributed to the increase of the chemical driving force and the increase in the density of potential martensite variant for martensite nucleation at low temperatures. The localized shape memory effect in micrometer scale after low temperature LSP has been evaluated.

  1. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  2. Analyses of Transient and Tertiary Small Punch Creep Deformation of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2016-09-01

    Creep deformation behavior of 316LN stainless steel (SS) under small punch creep (SPC) and uniaxial creep test has been assessed and compared at 923 K (650 °C). The transient and tertiary creep deformation behaviors have been analyzed according to the equation proposed for SPC deflection, δ = δ0 + δ_{{T}} \\cdot (1 - {{e}}^{ - κ \\cdot t} ) + dot{δ }_{{s}} t + δ3 {{e}}^{{[ {φ ( {t - t_{{r}} } )} ]}} on the basis of Dobes and Cadek equation for uniaxial creep strain. Trends in the variations of (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( κ) with steady-state deflection rate ( dot{δ }_{{s}} ) (ii) ` κ' with time to attain steady-state deflection rate, and (iii) initial creep deflection rate with steady-state deflection rate implied that transient SPC deformation obeyed first-order reaction rate theory. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( r') values that were determined from uniaxial creep tests were correlated with those obtained from SPC tests. Master curves representing transient creep deformation in both SPC and uniaxial creep tests have been derived and their near coincidence brings unique equivalence between both the test techniques. The relationships between (i) rate of acceleration of tertiary creep ( φ) and steady-state deflection rate, (ii) ` φ' and time spent in tertiary stage, and (iii) final creep deflection rate and steady-state deflection rate revealed that first-order reaction rate theory governed SPC deformation throughout the tertiary region also. Interrelationship between the transient, secondary, and tertiary creep parameters indicated that the same mechanism prevailed throughout the SPC deformation.

  3. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strenthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y.; Nie, Z. H.; ...

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni4Ti3 precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drasticallymore » increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ~520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. Lastly, it is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.« less

  4. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y. He, Z. B.; Li, L. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Nie, Z. H.; Wang, Z. L.; Ren, Y.

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drastically increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ∼520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. It is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.

  5. Stress transfer during different deformation stages in a nano-precipitate-strenthened Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Y. H.; Cong, D. Y.; Nie, Z. H.; He, Z. B.; Wang, Z. L.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Y. D.; Li, L. F.

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the role of fine coherent precipitates in the micromechanical behavior of precipitate-strengthened shape memory alloys (SMAs), which still remains a mystery heretofore, is of crucial importance to the design of advanced SMAs with optimal functional and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the lattice strain evolution of, and the stress partition between the nanoscale Ni4Ti3 precipitates and the matrix in a precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMA during different deformation stages by in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. We found that, during R-phase reorientation and stress-induced martensitic transformation, which both involve the shear deformation process, the lattice strain of the nanoscale precipitates drastically increases by a magnitude of 0.5%, which corresponds to an abrupt increase of ~520 MPa in internal stress. This indicates that stress repartition occurs and most of the stress is transferred to the precipitates during the shear deformation of the matrix. Lastly, it is further revealed that the nanoscale precipitates which only have a low volume fraction bear a considerable amount of applied stress during all deformation stages investigated, implying that the nanoscale precipitates play an important role in the deformation behavior of the precipitate-strengthened Ni-Ti SMAs.

  6. A new method of tree structure for analysing nested watershed shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-Gang; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chen, Xiao-Yin; Ma, Tian-Wu; Wang, Li; Du, Jing-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    A new method based on tree structure is proposed to study the relationship of multi-scale watershed shapes. Considering the nested relationship of watershed characteristics, the method uses a tree structure to reflect different watershed scales. We investigated the Loess Plateau of Shanxi Province, China, using 30-m resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). The study consists of three stages: (1) by using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, different scale watersheds were extracted from the DEMs and used to build a tree structure model based on spatial inclusion relationships; (2) the tree structure was transformed into a table based on the size of watershed area; and (3) the shape was quantified by roundness and tightness coefficients to analyse shape relationships among different scales of watersheds. The application of the method to 15 types of geomorphological features suggests that the smaller the watersheds are, the rounder they tend to be. The new tree structure method introduced here provides a good understanding of nested relationships between watershed characteristics.

  7. Diminished spectrin extraction from ATP-depleted human erythrocytes. Evidence relating spectrin to changes in erythrocyte shape and deformability.

    PubMed

    Lux, S E; John, K M; Ukena, T E

    1978-03-01

    We measured spectrin "extractability" in erythrocytes which were metabolically depleted by incubation at 37 degrees C in plasma or glucose-free buffers. Membranes were extracted with 1 mM EDTA (pH 8, 40 h, 4 degrees C) and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. This procedure solubilized 85--90% of the spectrin, actin, and residual hemoglobin from ghosts of fresh erythrocytes. In incubated erythrocytes, inextractable spectrin rapidly accumulated when ATP concentrations fell below 0--15% of normal. In severely depleted cells, 60--90% of the total ghost spectrin became inextractable. Inextractability was not abolished by physically disrupting the ghost before extraction, but was reversed when erythrocyte ATP was replenished with adenosine. The accumulation of inextractable spectrin correlated temporally with the increase in apparent membrane deformability and the increases in erythrocyte vicosity, calcium content, sodium gain, and potassium loss characteristic of ATP-depleted erythrocytes. No change in integral membrane protein topography (assessed by the distribution of intramembranous particles and concanavalin A surface-binding sites) was detected in depleted cells. Analogous changes were observed in erythrocytes exposed to extremes of pH and temperature. When the pH in the erythrocyte interior fell below 5.5, a pH where spectrin was aggregated and isoelectrically precipitated, erythrocyte and ghost viscosity increased coincident with a marked decrease in spectrin extractability. Similarly above 49 degrees C, a temperature where spectrin was denatured and precipitated, erythrocyte viscosity rose as inextractable spectrin accumulated. These observations provide direct evidence of a change in the physical state of spectrin associated with a change in erythrocyte shape and deformability. They support the concept that erythrocyte shape and deformability are largely determined by the shape and deformability of the spectrin

  8. Diminished spectrin extraction from ATP-depleted human erythrocytes. Evidence relating spectrin to changes in erythrocyte shape and deformability.

    PubMed Central

    Lux, S E; John, K M; Ukena, T E

    1978-01-01

    We measured spectrin "extractability" in erythrocytes which were metabolically depleted by incubation at 37 degrees C in plasma or glucose-free buffers. Membranes were extracted with 1 mM EDTA (pH 8, 40 h, 4 degrees C) and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. This procedure solubilized 85--90% of the spectrin, actin, and residual hemoglobin from ghosts of fresh erythrocytes. In incubated erythrocytes, inextractable spectrin rapidly accumulated when ATP concentrations fell below 0--15% of normal. In severely depleted cells, 60--90% of the total ghost spectrin became inextractable. Inextractability was not abolished by physically disrupting the ghost before extraction, but was reversed when erythrocyte ATP was replenished with adenosine. The accumulation of inextractable spectrin correlated temporally with the increase in apparent membrane deformability and the increases in erythrocyte vicosity, calcium content, sodium gain, and potassium loss characteristic of ATP-depleted erythrocytes. No change in integral membrane protein topography (assessed by the distribution of intramembranous particles and concanavalin A surface-binding sites) was detected in depleted cells. Analogous changes were observed in erythrocytes exposed to extremes of pH and temperature. When the pH in the erythrocyte interior fell below 5.5, a pH where spectrin was aggregated and isoelectrically precipitated, erythrocyte and ghost viscosity increased coincident with a marked decrease in spectrin extractability. Similarly above 49 degrees C, a temperature where spectrin was denatured and precipitated, erythrocyte viscosity rose as inextractable spectrin accumulated. These observations provide direct evidence of a change in the physical state of spectrin associated with a change in erythrocyte shape and deformability. They support the concept that erythrocyte shape and deformability are largely determined by the shape and deformability of the spectrin

  9. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  10. Natural growth, otolith shape and diet analyses of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Atherinopsidae) from southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuca, M. E.; Lozano, I. E.; Brown, D. R.; Renzi, M.; Luizon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Age and growth, otolith shape and diet of Odontesthes nigricans were analysed in order to provide an insight into the life history of the species and furthermore, to assess their possible use as a tool for discriminating silverside populations from the South Atlantic Ocean (Punta María) and Beagle Channel waters (Varela Bay). The age and growth analysis was performed by counting daily increments and annual marks in sagittae otoliths. Length-at-age data of individuals <65 mm standard length (SL) were fitted to the Laird-Gompertz model (SLt = 6.22 exp 2.45 [1-exp (-0.02t)]), which provided an excellent description of the pattern of daily growth for O. nigricans juveniles from Varela Bay. The spawning period was also assessed through back-calculation of hatching dates and it extended from November to February. The count of annual marks in larger individuals identified 7 year classes (0+ to 6+) in Varela Bay and 6 year classes (0+ to 5+) in Punta María. The von Bertalanffy growth model explained more than 95% of the growth patterns observed in O. nigricans from Varela Bay (SLt = 245.49 [1 - exp -0.24(t+0.46)]) and Punta María (SLt = 345.09 [1 - exp -0.15(t+0.31)]). Particularly, k and SL∞ varied significantly between sampling sites; reaching Punta María a larger SL∞ value with a lower k. Otolith shape variation was also explored using elliptical Fourier analysis and it showed significant differences between Varela Bay and Punta María populations. Furthermore, gut content analysis characterized O. nigricans as an invertebrate predator, being benthic organisms the most important components of its diet, which also showed significant site dependence. The use of all these analyses contributed to a holistic approach which maximized the likelihood of correctly identifying both O. nigricans populations in the southernmost limit of the species distribution.

  11. Enhancing ablation efficiency in micro structuring using a deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, M.; Dickmann, K.

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for the generation of microstructures results in a high flexible tool for free form geometries in the micro range. Increasing laser power and repetition rates increase as well the demand of high flexible and efficient process strategies. To increase the ablation efficiency the optimal fluency can be determined, which is a material specific value. By varying the beam shape, the ablation efficiency can be enhanced. In this study a deformable mirror was used to vary the beam shape. This mirror is built by combining a piezo-electric ceramic and a mirror substrate. The ceramic is divided into several segments, which can be controlled independently. This results in a high flexible deformable mirror which influences the beam shape and can be used to vary the spot size or generate line geometries. The ablation efficiency and roughness of small generated cavities were analyzed in this study as well as the dimensions of the cavity. This can be used to optimize process strategies to combine high volume ablation and fine detail generation.

  12. Combination of 3-D deformation and shape measurement by electronic speckle pattern interferometry for quantitative strain-stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Laser speckle interferometry as a full-field noncontact measuring technique offers interesting opportunities for strain-stress analysis on components. While its application in material testing and material research has already achieved some acceptance in research and industry, its application to complex industrial components like car bodies, gear boxes, engines, and suspensions has been limited. Basic difficulties have arisen from the relatively large rigid-body movements of components under test, harsh environmental conditions in the real test world, and the often complex shape of the analyzed component, especially in the most interesting areas. The commercial availability of a radically miniaturized 3D speckle interferometer has led to the new laser-optical measuring device, the MicroStarTM, which can be used for quantitative strain-stress measurement on nearly any industrial component. The device uses 3D speckle interferometry to measure the shape and the 3D deformation in the area of interest. The combination of shape and deformation provides all necessary data for quantitative 3D strain analysis. The principle stresses as well as the bending and tensile components of the strains can be easily determined. In this paper, the principle and applications of this new system are presented.

  13. Deformation behavior of metallic glass composites reinforced with shape memory nanowires studied via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şopu, D.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the deformation behavior and mechanism of Cu64Zr36 composite structures reinforced with B2 CuZr nanowires are strongly influenced by the martensitic phase transformation and distribution of these crystalline precipitates. When nanowires are distributed in the glassy matrix along the deformation direction, a two-steps stress-induced martensitic phase transformation is observed. Since the martensitic transformation is driven by the elastic energy release, the strain localization behavior in the glassy matrix is strongly affected. Therefore, the composite materials reinforced with a crystalline phase, which shows stress-induced martensitic transformation, represent a route for controlling the properties of glassy materials.

  14. Effects of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, U. Kirindi, T.

    2008-07-15

    In Cu-11.92 wt.%Al-3.78 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy, the influence of deformation and thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties under the compression test were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experiments show that the mechanical properties of the alloy can be enhanced by convenient heat treatments. The alloy exhibits good mechanical properties with high ultimate compression strength and ductility after annealing at high temperature. However, it exhibits brittle fracture and dramatic strain hardening, with linear stress-strain behavior after annealing at low temperature. The changes in the mechanical properties have been linked to the evolution of the degree of order, occurrence of precipitation, and variation of the grain size. From microstructural observations, it is seen that the {beta}{sub 1}' (18R) and {gamma}{sub 1}' (2H) martensite phases coexist at different fractions in the undeformed and deformed states. Deformation induces the changes between the {beta}{sub 1}' and {gamma}{sub 1}' martensites and deformation-induced martensites form at preferred orientations as mechanical twins. The {beta}{sub 1}' martensite variants are twin-related with respect to the (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub 18R} mirror plane and a new orientation relationship for these twin variants is derived as (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub A}-parallel (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub C}: [4-bar 61] {sub A}-parallel [4-bar 61]{sub C}. Additionally, an increase in the amount of deformation causes martensite reorientation, de-twinning, and dislocation generation; also, the martensite plates are seen to have rearranged in the same orientation to be parallel with each other.

  15. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  16. Processing Ultra Fine Grained Net-Shaped MEMS Parts Using Severe Plastic Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Raab, Georgy I.; Estrin, Yuri; Zi, Aikaterini; Janecek, Milos

    2007-04-07

    This paper presents the results of investigation of the process of severe plastic deformation by means of ECAP method for producing the mini billets of pure aluminium. The strain state of the process and peculiarities of structure formation have been studied. The achieved results testify to the high efficiency of the process.

  17. Analyses of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic bodies by a new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is base upon a generalization of de Veubeke's complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and thg resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a complete separation of the boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and the initial value problem (for total stress and deformation); hence, their numerical treatments are essentially independent. After a fairly comprehensive discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem, we launch into a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  18. Shape Recovery of Elastic Red Blood Cells from Shear Flow Induced Deformation in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Gounley, John

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells undergo substantial shape changes in vivo. Modeled as an elastic capsule, the shape recovery of a three dimensional biconcave capsule from shear flow is studied for different preferred elastic and bending configuration. The fluid-structure interaction is modeled using the multiple-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann (LBM) and immersed boundary (IBM) methods. Based on the studies of the limited shape memory observed in three dimensions, the shape recovery is caused by the preferred elastic configuration, at least when paired with a constant spontaneous curvature. For these capsules, the incompleteness of the shape recovery observed precludes any conjecture about whether a single or multiple phase(s) are necessary to describe the recovery process. Longer simulations and a more stable methodology will be necessary. Y. Peng acknowledges support from Old Dominion University Research Foundation Grant #503921 and National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1319078.

  19. Selective invocation of shape priors for deformable segmentation and morphologic classification of prostate cancer tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan I; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-04-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all three terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images from 40 patient studies. Nuclear shape based, architectural and textural features extracted from these segmentations were extracted and found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 86% via a quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 60% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid active contour model involving a shape prior.

  20. A subdivision-based parametric deformable model for surface extraction and statistical shape modeling of the knee cartilages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripp, Jurgen; Crozier, Stuart; Warfield, Simon K.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2006-03-01

    Subdivision surfaces and parameterization are desirable for many algorithms that are commonly used in Medical Image Analysis. However, extracting an accurate surface and parameterization can be difficult for many anatomical objects of interest, due to noisy segmentations and the inherent variability of the object. The thin cartilages of the knee are an example of this, especially after damage is incurred from injuries or conditions like osteoarthritis. As a result, the cartilages can have different topologies or exist in multiple pieces. In this paper we present a topology preserving (genus 0) subdivision-based parametric deformable model that is used to extract the surfaces of the patella and tibial cartilages in the knee. These surfaces have minimal thickness in areas without cartilage. The algorithm inherently incorporates several desirable properties, including: shape based interpolation, sub-division remeshing and parameterization. To illustrate the usefulness of this approach, the surfaces and parameterizations of the patella cartilage are used to generate a 3D statistical shape model.

  1. Deformation Monitoring and Bathymetry Analyses in Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey has 595 dams constructed between 1936 and 2013 for the purposes of irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric energy and drinking water. A major portion of the dam basins in Turkey are deprived of vegetation and have slope topography on near surrounding area. However, landscaping covered with forest around the dam basin is desirable for erosion control. In fact; the dams, have basins deprived of vegetation, fill up quickly due to sediment transport. Erosion control and forestation are important factors, reducing the sediment, to protect the water basins of the dams and increase the functioning life of the dams. The functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Dams are very large and critical structures and they demand the use or application of precise measuring systems. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. Monitoring is an essential component of the dam after construction and during operation and must en­able the timely detection of any behavior that could deteriorate the dam, potentially result in its shutdown or failure. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the dams, dam safety and related analysis. The case study is the deformation measurements of Atatürk Dam in Turkey which is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Brief information is given about the

  2. Application of stereo vision to three-dimensional deformation analyses in fracture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.F. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Chao, Y.J.; Sutton, M.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    Based on a pinhole camera model, camera model equations that account for the radial lens distortion are used to map three-dimensional (3-D) world coordinates to two-dimensional (2-D) computer image coordinates. Using two cameras to form a stereo vision, the 3-D information can be obtained. It is demonstrated that such stereo imaging systems can be used to measure the 3-D displacement field around the crack tip of a fracture specimen. To compare with the available 2-D theory of fracture mechanics, the measured displacement fields expressed in the world coordinates are converted, through coordinate transformations, to the displacement fields expressed in specimen crack tip coordinates. By using a smoothing technique, the in-plane displacement components are smoothed and the total strains are obtained. Rigid body motion is eliminated from the smoothed in-plane displacement components and unsmoothed out-of-plane displacement. Compared with the theoretical elastic-plastic field at a crack tip, the results appear to be consistent with expected trends, which indicates that the stereo imaging system is viable tool for the 3-D deformation analysis of fracture specimens.

  3. Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions for Converting Surface Strains into Deflections for Structural Deformed Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated for shape predictions of complex wing structures, for which surface strain-sensing stations must be properly distributed to avoid jointed junctures, and must be increased in the high strain gradient region. Each embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into small variable domains. Thus, the surface strain distribution can be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. Through discretization, the embedded beam curvature equation can be piece-wisely integrated to obtain the Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions (for each embedded beam), which are expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the embedded beam and the surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By inputting the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, slopes and deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. A long tapered cantilever tubular beam was chosen for shape prediction analysis. The input surface strains were analytically generated from finite-element analysis. The shape prediction accuracies of the Variable- Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were then determined in light of the finite-element generated slopes and deflections, and were fofound to be comparable to the accuracies of the constant-domain Displacement Transfer Functions

  4. The effect of martensite plasticity on the cyclic deformation of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2014-01-01

    Based on stress-controlled cyclic tension-unloading experiments with different peak stresses, the effect of martensite plasticity on the cyclic deformation of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes is investigated and discussed. The experimental results show that the reverse transformation from the induced martensite phase to the austenite phase is gradually restricted by the plastic deformation of the induced martensite phase caused by an applied peak stress that is sufficiently high (higher than 900 MPa), and the extent of such restriction increases with further increasing the peak stress. The residual and peak strains of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy accumulate progressively, i.e., transformation ratchetting occurs during the cyclic tension-unloading with peak stresses from 600 to 900 MPa, and the transformation ratchetting strain increases with the increase of the peak stress. When the peak stress is higher than 900 MPa, the peak strain becomes almost unchanged, but the residual strain accumulates and the dissipation energy per cycle decreases very quickly with the increasing number of cycles due to the restricted reverse transformation by the martensite plasticity. Furthermore, a quantitative relationship between the applied stress and the stabilized residual strain is obtained to reasonably predict the evolution of the peak strain and the residual strain.

  5. A novel 2nd-order shape function based digital image correlation method for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruixiang; Jiang, Hao; Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Weikang

    2017-03-01

    Compared with the traditional forward compositional matching strategy, the inverse compositional matching strategy has almost the same accuracy, but has an obviously higher efficiency than the former in digital image correlation (DIC) algorithms. Based on the inverse compositional matching strategy and the auxiliary displacement functions, a more accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton (IC-GN2) algorithm with a new second-order shape operator is proposed for nonuniform and large deformation measurements. A theoretical deduction showed that the new proposed second-order shape operator is invertible and can steadily attain second-order precision. The result of the numerical simulation showed that the matching accuracy of the new IC-GN2 algorithm is the same as that of the forward compositional Gauss-Newton (FC-GN2) algorithm and is relatively better than in IC-GN2 algorithm. Finally, a rubber tension experiment with a large deformation of 27% was performed to validate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the G-III Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge [ACTE] project at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, displacement transfer functions were applied to the swept wing of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) to obtain deformed shape predictions. Four strainsensing lines (two on the lower surface, two on the upper surface) were used to calculate the deformed shape of the G III wing under bending and torsion. There being an insufficient number of surface strain sensors, the existing G III wing box finite element model was used to generate simulated surface strains for input to the displacement transfer functions. The resulting predicted deflections have good correlation with the finite-element generated deflections as well as the measured deflections from the ground load calibration test. The convergence study showed that the displacement prediction error at the G III wing tip can be reduced by increasing the number of strain stations (for each strain-sensing line) down to a minimum error of l.6 percent at 17 strain stations; using more than 17 strain stations yielded no benefit because the error slightly increased to 1.9% when 32 strain stations were used.

  7. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution

    PubMed Central

    CICCIÙ, M.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; SCAPPATICCI, L.; GUGLIELMINO, E.; RISITANO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type “Toronto”, evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient’s discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  8. Subgrain boundary analyses in deformed orthopyroxene by TEM/STEM with EBSD-FIB sample preparation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Kumamoto, Akihito; Fujii, Eiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution structure analyses using electron beam techniques have been performed for the investigation of subgrain boundaries (SGBs) in deformed orthopyroxene (Opx) in mylonite from Hidaka Metamorphic Belt, Hokkaido, Japan, to understand ductile deformation mechanism of silicate minerals in shear zones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of Opx porphyroclasts in the mylonitic rock indicated that the crystal orientation inside the Opx crystals gradually changes by rotation about the b-axis by SGBs and crystal folding. In order to observe the SGBs along the b-axis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM), the following sample preparation protocol was adopted. First, petrographic thin sections were slightly etched with hydrofluoric acid to identify SGBs in SEM. The Opx crystals whose b-axes were oriented close to the normal of the surface were identified by EBSD, and the areas containing SGBs were picked and thinned for (S) TEM analysis with a focused ion beam instrument with micro-sampling system. High-resolution TEM imaging of the SGBs in Opx revealed various boundary structures from a periodic array of dissociated (100) [001] edge dislocations to partially or completely incoherent crystals, depending on the misorientation angle. Atomic-resolution STEM imaging clearly confirmed the formation of clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure between the dissociated partial dislocations. Moreover, X-ray microanalysis in STEM revealed that the Cpx contains a considerable amount of calcium replacing iron. Such chemical inhomogeneity may limit glide motion of the dislocation and eventually the plastic deformation of the Opx porphyroclasts at a low temperature. Chemical profiles across the high-angle incoherent SGB also showed an enrichment of the latter in calcium at the boundary, suggesting that SGBs are an efficient diffusion pathway of calcium out of host Opx grain during cooling.

  9. Deformation and mixing of coexisting shapes in neutron-deficient polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesteloot, N.; Bastin, B.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Auranen, K.; Bauer, C.; Bender, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Damyanova, A.; Darby, I.; De Witte, H.; Di Julio, D.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, C.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Laurent, B.; Lecesne, N.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Piselli, E.; Próchniak, L.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Sferrazza, M.; Siebeck, B.; Sjodin, M.; Tornqvist, H.; Traykov, E.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; Zielińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments are performed with postaccelerated beams of neutron-deficient Po 196 ,198 ,200 ,202 isotopes at the REX-ISOLDE facility. A set of matrix elements, coupling the low-lying states in these isotopes, is extracted. In the two heaviest isotopes, Po,202200, the transitional and diagonal matrix elements of the 21+ state are determined. In Po,198196 multistep Coulomb excitation is observed, populating the 41+,02+ , and 22+ states. The experimental results are compared to the results from the measurement of mean-square charge radii in polonium isotopes, confirming the onset of deformation from 196Po onwards. Three model descriptions are used to compare to the data. Calculations with the beyond-mean-field model, the interacting boson model, and the general Bohr Hamiltonian model show partial agreement with the experimental data. Finally, calculations with a phenomenological two-level mixing model hint at the mixing of a spherical structure with a weakly deformed rotational structure.

  10. Using Dual Regression to Investigate Network Shape and Amplitude in Functional Connectivity Analyses.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Lisa D; Smith, Stephen M; Öngür, Döst; Beckmann, Christian F

    2017-01-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is one of the most popular techniques for the analysis of resting state FMRI data because it has several advantageous properties when compared with other techniques. Most notably, in contrast to a conventional seed-based correlation analysis, it is model-free and multivariate, thus switching the focus from evaluating the functional connectivity of single brain regions identified a priori to evaluating brain connectivity in terms of all brain resting state networks (RSNs) that simultaneously engage in oscillatory activity. Furthermore, typical seed-based analysis characterizes RSNs in terms of spatially distributed patterns of correlation (typically by means of simple Pearson's coefficients) and thereby confounds together amplitude information of oscillatory activity and noise. ICA and other regression techniques, on the other hand, retain magnitude information and therefore can be sensitive to both changes in the spatially distributed nature of correlations (differences in the spatial pattern or "shape") as well as the amplitude of the network activity. Furthermore, motion can mimic amplitude effects so it is crucial to use a technique that retains such information to ensure that connectivity differences are accurately localized. In this work, we investigate the dual regression approach that is frequently applied with group ICA to assess group differences in resting state functional connectivity of brain networks. We show how ignoring amplitude effects and how excessive motion corrupts connectivity maps and results in spurious connectivity differences. We also show how to implement the dual regression to retain amplitude information and how to use dual regression outputs to identify potential motion effects. Two key findings are that using a technique that retains magnitude information, e.g., dual regression, and using strict motion criteria are crucial for controlling both network amplitude and motion-related amplitude effects

  11. Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

  12. Shape memory alloy actuation effect on subsonic static aeroelastic deformation of composite cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. M. H.; Majid, D. L. Abdul; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is one of the smart materials that have unique properties and used recently in several aerospace applications. SMAs are metallic alloys that can recover permanent strains when they are heated above a certain temperature. In this study, the effects of SMA actuation on the composite plate under subsonic aeroelastic conditions are examined. The wind tunnel test is carried out for two configurations of a cantilever shape memory alloy composite plate with a single SMA wire fixed eccentrically. Strain gage data for both bending and torsional strain are recorded and demonstrated during the aeroelastic test for active and non-active SMA wire in two locations. The cyclic actuation of the SMA wire embedded inside the composite plate is also investigated during the aeroelastic test. The results show reduction in both bending and torsional strain of the composite plate after activation of the SMA wire during the wind tunnel test.

  13. A thermomechanical model accounting for the behavior of shape memory alloys in finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Laviniu; Nedjar, Boumedienne; Moumni, Ziad; Vedinaş, Ioan; Trană, Eugen

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) comport an interesting behavior. They can undertake large strains and then recover their undeformed shape by heating. In this context, one of the aspects that challenged many researchers was the development of a mathematical model to predict the behavior of a known SMA under real-life conditions, or finite strain. This paper is aimed at working out a finite strain mathematical model for a Ni-Ti SMA, under the superelastic experiment conditions and under uniaxial mechanical loading, based on the Zaki-Moumni 3D mathematical model developed under the small perturbations assumption. Within the current article, a comparison between experimental findings and calculated results is also investigated. The proposed finite strain mathematical model shows good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Deformability-based circulating tumor cell separation with conical-shaped microfilters: Concept, optimization, and design criteria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) separation technology has made positive impacts on cancer science in many aspects. The ability of detecting and separating CTCs can play a key role in early cancer detection and treatment. In recent years, there has been growing interest in using deformability-based CTC separation microfilters due to their simplicity and low cost. Most of the previous studies in this area are mainly based on experimental work. Although experimental research provides useful insights in designing CTC separation devices, there is still a lack of design guidelines based on fundamental understandings of the cell separation process in the filters. While experimental efforts face challenges, especially microfabrication difficulties, we adopt numerical simulation here to study conical-shaped microfilters using deformability difference between CTCs and blood cells for the separation process. We use the liquid drop model for modeling a CTC passing through such microfilters. The accuracy of the model in predicting the pressure signature of the system is validated by comparing it with previous experiments. Pressure-deformability analysis of the cell going through the channel is then carried out in detail in order to better understand how a CTC behaves throughout the filtration process. Different system design criteria such as system throughput and unclogging of the system are discussed. Specifically, pressure behavior under different system throughput is analyzed. Regarding the unclogging issue, we define pressure ratio as a key parameter representing the ability to overcome clogging in such CTC separation devices and investigate the effect of conical angle on the optimum pressure ratio. Finally, the effect of unclogging applied pressure on the system performance is examined. Our study provides detailed understandings of the cell separation process and its characteristics, which can be used for developing more efficient CTC separation devices. PMID:26064193

  15. Deformability-based circulating tumor cell separation with conical-shaped microfilters: Concept, optimization, and design criteria.

    PubMed

    Aghaamoo, Mohammad; Zhang, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) separation technology has made positive impacts on cancer science in many aspects. The ability of detecting and separating CTCs can play a key role in early cancer detection and treatment. In recent years, there has been growing interest in using deformability-based CTC separation microfilters due to their simplicity and low cost. Most of the previous studies in this area are mainly based on experimental work. Although experimental research provides useful insights in designing CTC separation devices, there is still a lack of design guidelines based on fundamental understandings of the cell separation process in the filters. While experimental efforts face challenges, especially microfabrication difficulties, we adopt numerical simulation here to study conical-shaped microfilters using deformability difference between CTCs and blood cells for the separation process. We use the liquid drop model for modeling a CTC passing through such microfilters. The accuracy of the model in predicting the pressure signature of the system is validated by comparing it with previous experiments. Pressure-deformability analysis of the cell going through the channel is then carried out in detail in order to better understand how a CTC behaves throughout the filtration process. Different system design criteria such as system throughput and unclogging of the system are discussed. Specifically, pressure behavior under different system throughput is analyzed. Regarding the unclogging issue, we define pressure ratio as a key parameter representing the ability to overcome clogging in such CTC separation devices and investigate the effect of conical angle on the optimum pressure ratio. Finally, the effect of unclogging applied pressure on the system performance is examined. Our study provides detailed understandings of the cell separation process and its characteristics, which can be used for developing more efficient CTC separation devices.

  16. Analytical model for instantaneous lift and shape deformation of an insect-scale flapping wing in hover.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2014-12-06

    In the analysis of flexible flapping wings of insects, the aerodynamic outcome depends on the combined structural dynamics and unsteady fluid physics. Because the wing shape and hence the resulting effective angle of attack are a priori unknown, predicting aerodynamic performance is challenging. Here, we show that a coupled aerodynamics/structural dynamics model can be established for hovering, based on a linear beam equation with the Morison equation to account for both added mass and aerodynamic damping effects. Lift strongly depends on the instantaneous angle of attack, resulting from passive pitch associated with wing deformation. We show that both instantaneous wing deformation and lift can be predicted in a much simplified framework. Moreover, our analysis suggests that resulting wing kinematics can be explained by the interplay between acceleration-related and aerodynamic damping forces. Interestingly, while both forces combine to create a high angle of attack resulting in high lift around the midstroke, they offset each other for phase control at the end of the stroke.

  17. Analytical model for instantaneous lift and shape deformation of an insect-scale flapping wing in hover

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In the analysis of flexible flapping wings of insects, the aerodynamic outcome depends on the combined structural dynamics and unsteady fluid physics. Because the wing shape and hence the resulting effective angle of attack are a priori unknown, predicting aerodynamic performance is challenging. Here, we show that a coupled aerodynamics/structural dynamics model can be established for hovering, based on a linear beam equation with the Morison equation to account for both added mass and aerodynamic damping effects. Lift strongly depends on the instantaneous angle of attack, resulting from passive pitch associated with wing deformation. We show that both instantaneous wing deformation and lift can be predicted in a much simplified framework. Moreover, our analysis suggests that resulting wing kinematics can be explained by the interplay between acceleration-related and aerodynamic damping forces. Interestingly, while both forces combine to create a high angle of attack resulting in high lift around the midstroke, they offset each other for phase control at the end of the stroke. PMID:25297319

  18. Post-deformation shape-recovery behavior of vitamin E-diffused, radiation crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Shishido, Takaaki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2016-10-01

    The in-vivo progression of creep and wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular liners has been clinically evaluated by measuring radiographic penetration of femoral heads. In such clinical assessments, however, viscoelastic strain relaxation has been rarely considered after a removal of hip joint loading, potentially leading to an underestimation of the penetrated thickness. The objective of this study was to investigate shape-recovery behavior of pre-compressed, radiation crosslinked and antioxidant vitamin E-diffused UHMWPE acetabular liners, and also to characterize the effects of varying their internal diameter (ID) and wall thickness (WT). We applied uniaxial compression to the UHMWPE specimens of various ID (28, 32, 36mm) and WT (4.8, 6.8, 8.9mm) for 4320min under the constant load of 3000N, and subsequently monitored the strain-relaxation behavior as a function of time after unloading. It was observed that there was a considerable shape recovery of the components after removal of the external static load. Reducing ID and WT significantly accelerated the rate of creep strain recovery, and varying WT was more sensitive to the recovery behavior than ID. Creep deformation of the tested liners recovered mostly within the first 300min after unloading. Note that approximately half of the total recovery amount proceeded just within 5min after unloading. These results suggest a remarkably high capability of shape recovery of vitamin E-diffused highly crosslinked UHMWPE. In conclusion, the time-dependent shape recovering and the diameter-thickness effect on its behavior should be carefully considered when the postoperative penetration is quantified in highly crosslinked UHMWPE acetabular liners (especially on the non-weight bearing radiographs).

  19. Quantitative analyses of cross-sectional shape of the distal radius in three species of macaques.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro

    2004-04-01

    I conducted quantitative analyses of the cross-sectional shape of the distal radial shaft in three species of macaques, which differ in locomotor behavior: semi-terrestrial Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata), arboreal long tailed macaques ( M. fascicularis), and relatively terrestrial rhesus macaques ( M. mulatta). I took CT scans of the distal radial shafts of a total of 180 specimens at the level of the inferior radio-ulnar articulation. From each CT image, the periosteal outline of the radius was traced automatically by a digital imaging technique. I determined five points (landmarks) on the outline by developing a standardized morphometric technique. Bone surface lengths were measured by using these landmarks and their soft tissue correlates were investigated. The results of this study were as follows: (1) Semi-terrestrial M. fuscata has features that are approximately intermediate between those of the other two species. M. fuscata has a relatively small groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a large groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. These characters resemble those of M. fascicularis. On the other hand, the ulnar notch of M. fuscata is relatively large, a character which is similar to that of M. mulatta. Moreover, compared to the other two macaques, the surface of the flexor muscles of M. fuscata is intermediate in size. (2) The more terrestrial M. mulatta has a relatively large groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a small groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. Moreover, M. mulatta has a relatively large ulnar notch and a small surface for the flexor muscles. (3) The arboreal M. fascicularis has similar features to those of M. fuscata for the first and second relative size index. However, in the ulnar notch, M. fascicularis has a peculiar character and the surface for the flexor muscles is relatively large compared to those of the other two species. These results can be interpreted in terms of positional

  20. Deformability of red blood cells from different species studied by resistive pulse shape analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, O K

    1996-01-01

    The Cell Transit Analyzer (CTA) is now being used widely in clinical hemorheology. Most of the data obtained by CTA are limited to human blood, although the CTA has an important potential to be used in experimental studies on animal models. However, behavior of red blood cells (RBC) from various species might be different in CTA. Eight parameters reflecting different aspects of cell passage through pores with 5 microns diameter and 15 microns length were determined or human, guinea pig, dog, rabbit, rat, mouse and sheep RBC, together with instrument precision and biological variation. These parameters have a wide range when measured in different species and correlate with cell volume. Sensitivity of these parameters to the glutaraldehyde-induced alterations in RBC deformability was not same for different laboratory mammals. The main reason for this difference seems to be related to the cell size and thus sensitivity might be significantly limited if 5 microns pore-size filters are used to test the smaller RBC. The results of this study may help in designing experimental studies on laboratory mammals using the CTA.

  1. Closed Analytical Solutions of the D-Dimensional Schrödinger Equation with Deformed Woods-Saxon Potential Plus Double Ring-Shaped Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, Mohamed; El Batoul, Abdelwahed; Oulne, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    By employing the Pekeris approximation, the D-dimensional Schrödinger equation is solved for the nuclear deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus double ring-shaped potential within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). The energy eigenvalues are given in a closed form, and the corresponding normalised eigenfunctions are obtained in terms of hypergeometric functions. Our general results reproduce many predictions obtained in the literature, using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method (NU) and the improved quantisation rule approach, particularly those derived by considering Woods-Saxon potential without deformation and/or without ring shape interaction.

  2. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  3. The effect of matrix microstructure and reinforcement shape on the creep deformation of near-{gamma} titanium aluminide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kampe, S.L.; Christodoulou, J.; Feng, C.R.; Michel, D.J.; Christodoulou, L.

    1998-05-01

    The influences of composite matrix microstructure, reinforcement shape, and processing methodology have been evaluated for a series of near-gamma (Ti{sub 3}Al + TiAl) titanium aluminide matrix composites evaluated in tension and tensile-creep at 800 C. Specifically, heat treatments were imposed to evolve either fully-equiaxed or fully-lamellar composite matrices containing either dispersed particulate or high-aspect-ratio short-fiber boride reinforcement. The results indicate that the highest creep rates are associated with composites containing particulate reinforcement in equiaxed matrices, whereas the lowest rates were obtained for short-fiber reinforcement in lamellar matrices. The mechanisms controlling creep deformation are observed to rely only on the morphology and details of the matrix microstructure and are independent of the type and shape of the reinforcing phase. The enhanced work hardening tendencies of the lamellar microstructure is shown to improve creep resistance as manifested by a reduced steady state creep rate as well as prolonging primary creep to higher values of accumulated strain.

  4. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  5. Integrated Aerodynamic/Structural/Dynamic Analyses of Aircraft with Large Shape Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Horta, Lucas G.; Piatak, David J.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual and preliminary design processes for aircraft with large shape changes are generally difficult and time-consuming, and the processes are often customized for a specific shape change concept to streamline the vehicle design effort. Accordingly, several existing reports show excellent results of assessing a particular shape change concept or perturbations of a concept. The goal of the current effort was to develop a multidisciplinary analysis tool and process that would enable an aircraft designer to assess several very different morphing concepts early in the design phase and yet obtain second-order performance results so that design decisions can be made with better confidence. The approach uses an efficient parametric model formulation that allows automatic model generation for systems undergoing radical shape changes as a function of aerodynamic parameters, geometry parameters, and shape change parameters. In contrast to other more self-contained approaches, the approach utilizes off-the-shelf analysis modules to reduce development time and to make it accessible to many users. Because the analysis is loosely coupled, discipline modules like a multibody code can be easily swapped for other modules with similar capabilities. One of the advantages of this loosely coupled system is the ability to use the medium-to high-fidelity tools early in the design stages when the information can significantly influence and improve overall vehicle design. Data transfer among the analysis modules are based on an accurate and automated general purpose data transfer tool. In general, setup time for the integrated system presented in this paper is 2-4 days for simple shape change concepts and 1-2 weeks for more mechanically complicated concepts. Some of the key elements briefly described in the paper include parametric model development, aerodynamic database generation, multibody analysis, and the required software modules as well as examples for a telescoping wing, a

  6. Comparing parametric solid modelling/reconfiguration, global shape modelling and free-form deformation for the generation of 3D digital models of femurs from X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Stefano; Motyl, Barbara; Bandera, Camillo

    2009-02-01

    At present, computer assisted surgery systems help orthopaedic surgeons both plan and perform surgical procedures. To enable these systems to function, it is crucial to have at one's disposal 3D models of anatomical structures, surgical tools and prostheses (if required). This paper analyses and compares three methods for generating 3D digital models of anatomical structures starting from X-ray images: parametric solid modelling/reconfiguration, global shape modelling and free-form deformation. Seven experiences involving the generation of a femur model were conducted by software developers and different skilled users. These experiences are described in detail and compared at different stages and from different points of view.

  7. Flocculation of deformable emulsion droplets. 1: Droplet shape and line tension effects

    SciTech Connect

    Denkov, N.D.; Petsev, D.N.; Danov, K.D.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theoretical model which allows the study of the configuration and the interaction energy of a doublet of flocculated Brownian droplets was recently proposed (Denkov et al., Phys, Rev. Lett. 71, 3226 (1993)). In this model the equilibrium film radius and thickness are determined by minimizing the total pair interaction energy which is presented as a sum of explicit expressions for the different contributions (van der Waals, electrostatic, steric, depletion, surface extension, etc.). In the present study this simplified model is numerically verified by comparison with the results stemming from the real shape of the interacting droplets. In order to determine the real configuration of two drops in contact the authors solve numerically the augmented Laplace equation of capillarity which accounts for the interaction between the droplets. Then the total interaction energy is alteratively calculated by integrating the energy density along the surfaces of the droplets. The numerical comparison shows that the equilibrium film radius and thickness, as well as the interaction energy calculated by means of the simplified model, are in very good agreement with the results from the more detailed (but more complex) approach. Numerical calculations of the equilibrium line tensions acting at the film periphery, a function of the droplet radius, are performed. The obtained results are relevant also to flocs containing more than two particles since the theory predicts pairwise additivity of the interaction energy in most cases. The results can be useful in gaining a deeper understanding of the processes of stabilization of flocculation in emulsions. Emulsions of great importance in many areas of human activity such as oil recovery.

  8. Vesta: its shape and deformed equatorial belt predicted by the wave planetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    At EPSC2011 we stated: "Expected detailed images of Vesta sent by DAWN spacecraft certainly will show a prominent tectonic (must be also compositional) dichotomy of this large asteroid. The assuredness is based on some mainly the HST photos and the wave planetology fundamental conception: Theorem 1 - " Ce lestial bodies are dichotomous""[1]. Now a convexo-concave shape of Vesta is well known but the huge deep depression of the south hemisphere is assigned to two random large impacts almost at one place [2, 3]. This supposition has a very small probability, besides the largest asteroid Ceres also has a large depression at one side (the Piazzi basin). The theorem 1 of the wave planetology explains that all celestial bodies (not only small ones) are subjected to a warping action of the fundamental wave1 uplifting one side and subsiding (pressing in) the opposite one. This is a manifestation of the orbital energy acting in any body moving in keplerian noncircular orbit with changing acceleration (a). Arising inertia-gravity force F= (a1 - a2) x m is very important because of large planetary masses (m) and large cosmic speeds. Increase and decrease of accelerations were much larger in the beginning of planetary formation when orbits were more elliptical. Thus, pressing in of the subsiding hemisphere-segment is so strong that it often squeezes out some mantle material appearing as elevation-mound (compare to the Hawaii in the Pacific basin and look at Hyperion with a large basin and a mound at its center, Fig, 1, 2). Vesta's prominent subsiding equatorial belt with graben systems [4] (Fig. 4, 5) is a manifestation of another general planetary rule : " Rotating celestial body tends to even angular momenta of tropics and extra-tropics by regulating mass distribution and distance to the rotation axis " [5-7]. Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-tropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets

  9. Hydration, charge, size, and shape characteristics of peptides from their CZE analyses.

    PubMed

    Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V; Deiber, Julio A

    2008-02-01

    A CZE model is presented for peptide characterization on the basis of well-established physicochemical equations. The effective mobility is used as basic data in the model to estimate relevant peptide properties such as, for instance, hydration, net and total electrical charge numbers, hydrodynamic size and shape, particle average orientation, and pH-microenvironment from the charge regulation phenomenon. Therefore 102 experimental effective mobilities of different peptides are studied and discussed in relation to previous work. An equation for the estimation of peptide hydration as a function of ionizing, polar, and non-polar amino acid residues is included in the model. It is also shown that the shape-orientation factor of peptides may be either lower or higher than one, and its value depends on a complex interplay among total charge number, molar mass, hydration, and amino acid sequence.

  10. Detection of degradation in polyester implants by analysing mode shapes of structure vibration.

    PubMed

    Samami, Hassan; Pan, Jingzhe

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on using vibration analysis to detect degradation in degrading polyesters. A numerical model of a degrading plate sample is considered. The plate is assumed to degrade following the typical behaviour of amorphous copolymers of polylactide and polyglycolide. Due to the well-known autocatalytic effect in the degradation of these polyesters, the inner core of the plate degrades faster than outer surface region, forming layers of materials with varying Young׳s modulus. Firstly the change in molecular weight and corresponding change in Young׳s modulus at different times are calculated using the mathematical models developed in our previous work. Secondly the first four mode shapes of transverse vibration of the plate are calculated using the finite element method. Finally the curvature of the mode shapes are calculated and related to the spatial distribution of the polymer degradation. It is shown that the curvature of the mode shapes can be used to detect the onset and distribution of polymer degradation. The level of measurement accuracy required in an experiment is presented to guide practical applications of the method. At the end of this paper a demonstration case of coronary stent is presented showing how the method can be used to detect degradation in an implant of sophisticated structure.

  11. A technique for recording polycrystalline structure and orientation during in situ deformation cycles of rock analogues using an automated fabric analyser.

    PubMed

    Peternell, M; Russell-Head, D S; Wilson, C J L

    2011-05-01

    Two in situ plane-strain deformation experiments on norcamphor and natural ice using synchronous recording of crystal c-axis orientations have been performed with an automated fabric analyser and a newly developed sample press and deformation stage. Without interrupting the deformation experiment, c-axis orientations are determined for each pixel in a 5 × 5 mm sample area at a spatial resolution of 5 μm/pixel. In the case of norcamphor, changes in microstructures and associated crystallographic information, at a strain rate of ∼2 × 10(-5) s(-1), were recorded for the first time during a complete in situ deformation-cycle experiment that consisted of an annealing, deformation and post-deformation annealing path. In the case of natural ice, slower external strain rates (∼1 × 10(-6) s(-1)) enabled the investigation of small changes in the polycrystal aggregate's crystallography and microstructure for small amounts of strain. The technical setup and first results from the experiments are presented.

  12. Right Ventricle Functional Parameters Estimation in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Using a Robust Shape Based Deformable Model

    PubMed Central

    Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich; Dehlaghi, Vahab; Zadeh, Ali Mohammad; Fallahi, Alireza; Pooyan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac right-ventricle functions plays an essential role in diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD). Among clinical tests, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now becoming the most valid imaging technique to diagnose ARVD. Fatty infiltration of the right ventricular free wall can be visible on cardiac MRI. Finding right-ventricle functional parameters from cardiac MRI images contains segmentation of right-ventricle in each slice of end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle and calculation of end diastolic and end systolic volume and furthermore other functional parameters. The main problem of this task is the segmentation part. We used a robust method based on deformable model that uses shape information for segmentation of right-ventricle in short axis MRI images. After segmentation of right-ventricle from base to apex in end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle, volume of right-ventricle in these phases calculated and then, ejection fraction calculated. We performed a quantitative evaluation of clinical cardiac parameters derived from the automatic segmentation by comparison against a manual delineation of the ventricles. The manually and automatically determined quantitative clinical parameters were statistically compared by means of linear regression. This fits a line to the data such that the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the residuals is minimized. The results show low RMSE for Right Ventricle Ejection Fraction and Volume (≤ 0.06 for RV EF, and ≤ 10 mL for RV volume). Evaluation of segmentation results is also done by means of four statistical measures including sensitivity, specificity, similarity index and Jaccard index. The average value of similarity index is 86.87%. The Jaccard index mean value is 83.85% which shows a good accuracy of segmentation. The average of sensitivity is 93.9% and mean value of the specificity is 89.45%. These results show the reliability of proposed

  13. Shape information mediating basic- and subordinate-level object recognition revealed by analyses of eye movements.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Lina I; Cristino, Filipe; Wong, Alan C-N; Leek, E Charles

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the kinds of shape features that mediate basic- and subordinate-level object recognition. Observers were trained to categorize sets of novel objects at either a basic (between-families) or subordinate (within-family) level of classification. We analyzed the spatial distributions of fixations and compared them to model distributions of different curvature polarity (regions of convex or concave bounding contour), as well as internal part boundaries. The results showed a robust preference for fixation at part boundaries and for concave over convex regions of bounding contour, during both basic- and subordinate-level classification. In contrast, mean saccade amplitudes were shorter during basic- than subordinate-level classification. These findings challenge models of recognition that do not posit any special functional status to part boundaries or curvature polarity. We argue that both basic- and subordinate-level classification are mediated by object representations. These representations make explicit internal part boundaries, and distinguish concave and convex regions of bounding contour. The classification task constrains how shape information in these representations is used, consistent with the hypothesis that both parts-based, and image-based, operations support object recognition in human vision.

  14. Inferences of Diplodocoid (Sauropoda: Dinosauria) Feeding Behavior from Snout Shape and Microwear Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background As gigantic herbivores, sauropod dinosaurs were among the most important members of Mesozoic communities. Understanding their ecology is fundamental to developing a complete picture of Jurassic and Cretaceous food webs. One group of sauropods in particular, Diplodocoidea, has long been a source of debate with regard to what and how they ate. Because of their long lineage duration (Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous) and cosmopolitan distribution, diplodocoids formed important parts of multiple ecosystems. Additionally, fortuitous preservation of a large proportion of cranial elements makes them an ideal clade in which to examine feeding behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings Hypotheses of various browsing behaviors (selective and nonselective browsing at ground-height, mid-height, or in the upper canopy) were examined using snout shape (square vs. round) and dental microwear. The square snouts, large proportion of pits, and fine subparallel scratches in Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, Nigersaurus, and Rebbachisaurus suggest ground-height nonselective browsing; the narrow snouts of Dicraeosaurus, Suuwassea, and Tornieria and the coarse scratches and gouges on the teeth of Dicraeosaurus suggest mid-height selective browsing in those taxa. Comparison with outgroups (Camarasaurus and Brachiosaurus) reinforces the inferences of ground- and mid-height browsing and the existence of both non-selective and selective browsing behaviors in diplodocoids. Conclusions/Significance These results reaffirm previous work suggesting the presence of diverse feeding strategies in sauropods and provide solid evidence for two different feeding behaviors in Diplodocoidea. These feeding behaviors can subsequently be tied to paleoecology, such that non-selective, ground-height behaviors are restricted to open, savanna-type environments. Selective browsing behaviors are known from multiple sauropod clades and were practiced in multiple environments. PMID:21494685

  15. Influence of partial shape memory deformation on the burst character of its recovery in heated Ni-Fe-Ga-Co alloy crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, V. I.; Yakushev, P. N.; Malygin, G. A.; Averkin, A. I.; Pulnev, S. A.; Zograf, G. P.; Kustov, S. B.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2016-04-01

    Room-temperature stress-strain curves of Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6 alloy single crystals possessing shape memory (SM) have been studied. Specific features of these diagrams are revealed upon compressive loading of these single crystals in the [110] A direction. The influence of preliminary SM deformation on the process of its recovery during the reverse martensite transformation has been studied. It is established that SM deformation above 4.2% leads to a sharp increase in the shape recovery on heating and the process exhibits a burst character, involving motion of the entire crystal. The experimental data are analyzed and stress-strain curves are simulated in the framework of the theory of diffuse martensitic transitions.

  16. Nuclear shape phase transition within a conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective behaviors in deformation-dependent mass formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Batoul, A.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical study of a conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective motions in critical point symmetries of the phase transitions from spherical to deformed shapes of nuclei using an exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term. The deformation-dependent mass is applied simultaneously to γ-rigid and γ-stable parts of this famous collective Hamiltonian. Moreover, the β part of the problem is described by means of Davidson potential, while the γ-angular part corresponding to axially symmetric shapes is treated by a harmonic oscillator potential. The energy eigenvalues and normalized eigenfunctions of the problem are obtained in compact forms by making use of the asymptotic iteration method. The combined effect of the deformation-dependent mass and rigidity as well as harmonic oscillator stiffness parameters on the energy spectrum and wave functions is duly investigated. Also, the electric quadrupole transition ratios and energy spectrum of some γ-stable and prolate nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data as well as with other theoretical models.

  17. Analyses of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic bodies by a new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm suitable for analyzing large quasistatic deformations of inelastic solids is presented and its feasibility and performance are demonstrated with examples. The algorithm provides extremely accurate bifurcation analysis which is stable with respect to variation in the finite element mesh, so long as the same type of element is used in every mesh. When the mesh element is varied, the result changes in a predictable manner. The method does not necessarily lead to an upper or lower bound for the critical load. An explicit forward gradient scheme is used to improve stability and is shown to be useful also for elongation-dominated deformations. The application of the method to the onset of necking in plane extension and to deformation and stress in plane extension of an elasticoviscous fluid with an array of cylindrical voids is given in detail.

  18. Using Dual Regression to Investigate Network Shape and Amplitude in Functional Connectivity Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Lisa D.; Smith, Stephen M.; Öngür, Döst; Beckmann, Christian F.

    2017-01-01

    effects, respectively, in resting state connectivity analyses. We illustrate these concepts using realistic simulated resting state FMRI data and in vivo data acquired in healthy subjects and patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. PMID:28348512

  19. Confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific modeling for large deformation analyses in cellular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Noa; Gefen, Amit

    2010-06-18

    This study introduces a new confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology for simulating cellular mechanics experiments involving large cell deformations. Three-dimensional FE models of undifferentiated skeletal muscle cells were developed by scanning C2C12 myoblasts using a confocal microscope, and then building FE model geometries from the z-stack images. Strain magnitudes and distributions in two cells were studied when the cells were subjected to compression and stretching, which are used in pressure ulcer and deep tissue injury research to induce large cell deformations. Localized plasma membrane and nuclear surface area (NSA) stretches were observed for both the cell compression and stretching simulation configurations. It was found that in order to induce large tensile strains (>5%) in the plasma membrane and NSA, one needs to apply more than approximately 15% of global cell deformation in cell compression tests, or more than approximately 3% of tensile strains in the elastic plate substrate in cell stretching experiments. Utilization of our modeling can substantially enrich experimental cellular mechanics studies in classic cell loading designs that typically involve large cell deformations, such as static and cyclic stretching, cell compression, micropipette aspiration, shear flow and hydrostatic pressure, by providing magnitudes and distributions of the localized cellular strains specific to each setup and cell type, which could then be associated with the applied stimuli.

  20. Combined magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses provide a powerful tool for in vivo assessment of deformation along human muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Karakuzu, Agah; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle fiber direction strain provides invaluable information for characterizing muscle function. However, methods to study this for human muscles in vivo are lacking. Using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based deformation analyses and diffusion tensor (DT) imaging based tractography combined, we aimed to assess muscle fiber direction local tissue deformations within the human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. Healthy female subjects (n=5, age=27±1 years) were positioned prone within the MR scanner in a relaxed state with the ankle angle fixed at 90°. The knee was brought to flexion (140.8±3.0°) (undeformed state). Sets of 3D high resolution MR, and DT images were acquired. This protocol was repeated at extended knee joint position (177.0±1.0°) (deformed state). Tractography and Demons nonrigid registration algorithm was utilized to calculate local deformations along muscle fascicles. Undeformed state images were also transformed by a synthetic rigid body motion to calculate strain errors. Mean strain errors were significantly smaller then mean fiber direction strains (lengthening: 0.2±0.1% vs. 8.7±8.5%; shortening: 3.3±0.9% vs. 7.5±4.6%). Shortening and lengthening (up to 23.3% and 116.7%, respectively) occurs simultaneously along individual fascicles despite imposed GM lengthening. Along-fiber shear strains confirm the presence of much shearing between fascicles. Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also show non-uniform distribution. Inhomogeneity of fiber strain indicates epimuscular myofascial force transmission. We conclude that MR and DT imaging analyses combined provide a powerful tool for quantifying deformation along human muscle fibers in vivo. This can help substantially achieving a better understanding of normal and pathological muscle function and mechanisms of treatment techniques.

  1. MRI analyses show that kinesio taping affects much more than just the targeted superficial tissues and causes heterogeneous deformations within the whole limb.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Yucesoy, Can A

    2015-12-16

    Kinesio taping (KT) is widely used in the treatment of sports injuries and various neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is considered as selectively effective on targeted tissues and its mechanical effects have not been quantified objectively. Ascribed to continuity of muscular and connective tissues, mechanical loading imposed can have widespread heterogeneous effects. The aim was to characterize the mechanical effects of KT objectively and to test the hypotheses that KT causes acutely, local deformations not necessarily (I) in agreement with tape adhering direction and (II) limited to the directly targeted tissues. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance image sets were acquired in healthy human subjects (n=5) prior to and acutely after KT application over the skin along m. tibialis anterior (TA). Hip, knee and ankle angles were kept constant. Demons image registration algorithm was used to calculate local tissue deformations within the lower leg, in vivo. Mean peak tissue strains were significantly higher than strain artifacts. Only KT-to-TA region in part shows local deformations in agreement with tape adhering direction whereas, superficial skin, the rest of KT-to-TA and TA regions show deformations (up to 51.5% length change) in other directions. Non-targeted tissues also show sizable heterogeneous deformations, but in smaller amplitudes. Inter-subject variability is notable. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for a detailed assessment of local tissue deformation occurring acutely after KT application. The findings confirm our hypotheses and characterize how KT affects the underlying tissues, both immediately targeted and distant. This allows revealing mechanisms that can affect clinical outcomes of KT objectively.

  2. Investigation of the influence of mechanical stiffness on caldera deformation: results from generic case analyses and implications for the 1971-1984 uplift at Rabaul (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, J.; Geyer, A.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical models provide a link between measured ground deformation and the inaccessible deformation source, and here we present a systematic set of new results from numerical forward modelling using a Finite Element Method with application to volcano geodesy. We first provide generic case analyses and then evaluate ground deformation data from the Rabaul caldera in Papua New Guinea. The generic cases simulate surface displacements in a flat-topped caldera setting due to pressure changes in a shallow (at 5 km depth) oblate reservoir overlain by host rock with variable mechanical stiffness. Our main findings are: i) the amplitude and wavelength of resultant ground deformation is dependent on the distribution of mechanically stiff and soft lithologies and their relative distribution above the reservoir, ii) for a given pressure change, surface displacement may be amplified by the presence of soft layers compared to generic simulations using a homogenous background medium, and iii) the ratio of maximum horizontal over maximum vertical deformation (uxxmax/uyymax) is particularly sensitive to the presence of rock heterogeneity. In assessing the influence of mechanical heterogeneities (as derived form seismic data) in caldera-fill successions on ground deformation at Rabaul we apply our model to inform on the source causing uplift between 1971 and 1984. The best-fit model (see Figure below) involves a simple oblate source at 3 km depth beneath the centre of the caldera undergoing a reasonable pressure increment (~30 MPa), compared to unrealistically high pressurization if modelled using a homogeneous background medium. a) Uplift recorded via levelling versus distance from the inflation centre near Matupit Island, Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea between 1971 and 1984 (data from McKee et al., Bulletin of Volcanology, 47: 397-411, 1985) and fits to observables from forward models assuming an isotropic elastic homogeneous medium and an elastic heterogeneous medium. b) shows

  3. Shape Memory Characteristics of Ti(sub 49.5)Ni(sub 25)Pd(sub 25)Sc(sub 0.5) High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy After Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Garg, A.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Kireeva, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    A Ti(49.5)Ni25Pd25Sc(0.5) high-temperature shape memory alloy is thermomechanically processed to obtain enhanced shape-memory characteristics: in particular, dimensional stability upon repeated thermal cycles under constant loads. This is accomplished using severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) and post-processing annealing heat treatments. The results of the thermomechanical experiments reveal that the processed materials display enhanced shape memory response, exhibiting higher recoverable transformation and reduced irrecoverable strain levels upon thermal cycling compared with the unprocessed material. This improvement is attributed to the increased strength and resistance of the material against defect generation upon phase transformation as a result of the microstructural refinement due to the ECAE process, as supported by the electron microscopy observations.

  4. In vitro investigation of the cleaning efficacy, shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of continuous rotary, reciprocating rotary and manual instrumentations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Mohammadi, Abbas; Amirabadi, Foroogh; Ramazani, Mohsen; Ehsani, Farzane

    2016-01-01

    Background. Efficient canal preparation is the key to successful root canal treatment. This study aimed to assess the cleaning and shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of rotary, reciprocating and manual instrumentation in canal preparation of primary molars. Methods. The mesiobuccal canals of 64 extracted primary mandibular second molars were injected with India ink. The samples were randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups. Experimental groups were instrumented with K-file, Mtwo in continuous rotation and Reciproc in reciprocating motion, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The files were discarded after four applications. Shaping ability was evaluated using CBCT. After clearing, ink removal was scored. Preparation time and file fracture or deformation was also recorded. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19 using chi-squared, Fisher’s exact test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results. Considering cleanliness, at coronal third Reciproc was better than K-file (P < 0.001), but not more effective than Mtwo (P = 0.080). Furthermore, Mtwo leaved the canal cleaner than K-file (P = 0.001). In the middle third, only Reciproc exhibited better cleaning efficacy than K-file (P = 0.005). In the apical third, no difference was detected between the groups (P = 0.794). Regarding shaping ability, no differences were found between Reciproc and Mtwo (P = 1.00). Meanwhile, both displayed better shaping efficacy than K-file (P < 0.05). Between each two groups, there were differences in preparation time (P < 0.05), with Reciproc being the fastest. No file failure occurred. Conclusion. Fast and sufficient cleaning and shaping could be achieved with Mtwo and especially with Reciproc. PMID:27092215

  5. In vitro investigation of the cleaning efficacy, shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of continuous rotary, reciprocating rotary and manual instrumentations in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Nahid; Mohammadi, Abbas; Amirabadi, Foroogh; Ramazani, Mohsen; Ehsani, Farzane

    2016-01-01

    Background. Efficient canal preparation is the key to successful root canal treatment. This study aimed to assess the cleaning and shaping ability, preparation time and file deformation of rotary, reciprocating and manual instrumentation in canal preparation of primary molars. Methods. The mesiobuccal canals of 64 extracted primary mandibular second molars were injected with India ink. The samples were randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups. Experimental groups were instrumented with K-file, Mtwo in continuous rotation and Reciproc in reciprocating motion, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The files were discarded after four applications. Shaping ability was evaluated using CBCT. After clearing, ink removal was scored. Preparation time and file fracture or deformation was also recorded. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19 using chi-squared, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results. Considering cleanliness, at coronal third Reciproc was better than K-file (P < 0.001), but not more effective than Mtwo (P = 0.080). Furthermore, Mtwo leaved the canal cleaner than K-file (P = 0.001). In the middle third, only Reciproc exhibited better cleaning efficacy than K-file (P = 0.005). In the apical third, no difference was detected between the groups (P = 0.794). Regarding shaping ability, no differences were found between Reciproc and Mtwo (P = 1.00). Meanwhile, both displayed better shaping efficacy than K-file (P < 0.05). Between each two groups, there were differences in preparation time (P < 0.05), with Reciproc being the fastest. No file failure occurred. Conclusion. Fast and sufficient cleaning and shaping could be achieved with Mtwo and especially with Reciproc.

  6. Appearance of the two-way shape-memory effect in a nitinol spring subjected to temperature and deformation cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, A. G.; Barnov, V. A.; Jorjishvili, L. I.; Sobolevskaya, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The properties of a cylindrical spiral spring of nitinol (shape-memory alloy) are studied. When this spring is used as a working element in a rotary martensitic engine, the appearance of the two-way shape-memory effect in it is shown to decrease the engine operation efficiency.

  7. Constraints on Neogene deformation in the southern Terror Rift from calcite twinning analyses of veins within the ANDRILL MIS core, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, T. S.; Demosthenous, C.; Wilson, T. J.; Millan, C.

    2009-12-01

    The ANDRILL MIS (McMurdo Ice Shelf) Drilling Project obtained over 1200 meters of Neogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks in 2006/2007. Systematic fracture logging of the AND-1B core identified 1,475 natural fractures, i.e. pre-existing fractures in the rock intersected by coring. The most abundant natural fractures are normal faults and calcite veins; reverse faults, brecciated zones, and sedimentary intrusions are also present. In order to better understand Neogene deformation patterns within the southern Terror Rift, we have been conducting strain analyses on mechanically twinned calcite within healed fractures in the drill core. Twinning strains using all of the data from each sample studied to date range from 2% to 10%. The cleaned data (20% of the largest magnitude deviations removed) typically show ≤30% negative expected values, consistent with a single deformation episode or multiple ~coaxial deformation episodes. The majority of the samples record horizontal extension, similar to strain patterns expected in a normal fault regime and/or vertical sedimentary compaction in a continental rift system. The morphology, width, and intensity of twins in the samples suggest that twinning typically occurred at temperatures <170° C. Twinning intensities suggest differential stress magnitudes that caused the twinning ranged from 216 to 295 MPa.

  8. Second order phase transitions from octupole-nondeformed to octupole-deformed shape in the alternating parity bands of nuclei around 240Pu based on data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; von Brentano, P.; Jolie, J.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Shape phase transitions in finite quantal systems are very interesting phenomena of general physical interest. There is a very restricted number of the examples of nuclei demonstrating this phenomenon.Purpose: Based on experimental excitation spectra, there is a second order phase transition in the alternating parity bands of some actinide nuclei.Method: The mathematical techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, two-center octupole wave functions ansatz, and the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to analyze the experimental data on alternating parity bands.Results: The potential energy of the octupole collective motion is determined and analyzed for all observed values of the angular momentum of the alternating parity band states in 232Th, 238U, and 240Pu.Conclusion: It is shown that as a function of increasing angular momentum there is a second order phase transition from the octupole-nondeformed to the octupole-deformed shape in the considered nuclei.

  9. Analysis of thrust shear zones in curve-shaped belts: Deformation mode and timing of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini thrust (Central/Northern Apennines of Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, F.; Satolli, S.; Turtù, A.

    2012-11-01

    This work reports the results of our analysis of the brittle-ductile shear zone associated with the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini (OAS) curved-shape thrust in the Central/Northern Apennines of Italy. Its southern sector is characterized by NNW-SSE trending footwall anticlines, which also affect the OAS thrust surface. S tectonites in the NNE-SSW trending sector are crenulated by conjugate extensional surfaces (extensional crenulation cleavage). The NW-SE trending segment of the OAS thrust is characterized by SC tectonites developed along the thrust-related shear zone. Both the SC and S tectonites are consistent with a top-to-the N60-70°E direction of tectonic transport. The SC tectonites are associated with a simple-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.86-0.98). On the other hand, the S tectonites and their related extensional shear planes document two stages of strain: (i) sub-simple shear (Wn = 0.34-0.50, related to OAS thrusting contemporaneous to growing incipient footwall anticlines, and (ii) pure-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.17-0.00), subsequent to the OAS thrusting and caused by the definitive growth of footwall anticlines within an in-sequence deformation context. The present study proposes the analysis of shear zones to: (i) discriminate in-sequence against out-of-sequence evolution, and (ii) use as a tool to constrain the modes and timing of the curved belt's development.

  10. A Tectonic Model for the Midcontinent U.S. Lithosphere Based on Structural Analyses of Mesoproterozoic Through Cenozoic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R.; Schultz, A.

    2008-12-01

    Insights into the tectonic fabric of the midcontinent U.S. lithosphere are provided by structural investigations of exposed basement and its supra-crustal sedimentary cover sequences. Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of the St. Francois terrane possess an orthogonal pattern of vertical NW- and NE-trending strike-slip fault zones. The NW trend dominates Mesoproterozoic deformation and is inherent from an older fabric that controlled the location of Mesoproterozoic igneous activity. Two of these NW-trending zones appear to have from 60 to 75 km and 30 to 75 km of accumulative left slip. Pre-Late Cambrian vertical, right-lateral, strike-slip faulting on NW-trending structures in the St. Francois terrane, emplacement of dominantly NE-trending, 1.33 Ga mafic dikes, and uplift and erosion of ~2 to 4 km of rocks represents the assembly and breakup of Rodinia in the rock record of the midcontinent basement. Re-activation of NE-trending structures in the Late Cambrian resulted in formation of the Reelfoot rift and was accompanied by re-activation of vertical NW- trending structures with left-lateral displacement. Faulting in the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic cover sequences document re-activation of both vertical trends as far-field strike-slip faults during the Acadian, Taconic, Ouachita, Alleghany, and Laramide orogenies. Step overs from one strike-slip fault strand to another during these orogenies produced local uplift along restraining bends and subsidence in pull-apart grabens and basins. The New Madrid seismic zone and other sites of Quaternary deformation in the midcontinent also are attributed to re-activation of inherited vertical fabric. In summary, a tectonic model of the midcontinent lithosphere is best portrayed as consisting of an orthogonal mosaic of vertical zones of shear that presumably penetrate the crust and upper mantle, and are therefore long lived and prone to reactivation under lithospheric stresses. Much worldwide intraplate seismicity is

  11. Red blood cell shape and deformability in the context of the functional evolution of its membrane structure.

    PubMed

    Svetina, Saša

    2012-06-01

    It is proposed that it is possible to identify some of the problems that had to be solved in the course of evolution for the red blood cell (RBC) to achieve its present day effectiveness, by studying the behavior of systems featuring different, partial characteristics of its membrane. The appropriateness of the RBC volume to membrane area ratio for its circulation in the blood is interpreted on the basis of an analysis of the shape behavior of phospholipid vesicles. The role of the membrane skeleton is associated with preventing an RBC from transforming into a budded shape, which could form in its absence due to curvature-dependent transmembrane protein-membrane interaction. It is shown that, by causing the formation of echinocytes, the skeleton also acts protectively when, in vesicles with a bilayer membrane, the budded shapes would form due to increasing difference between the areas of their outer and inner layers.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of a profile shape and deformation of an object by processing projected pattern and texture pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Toru; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ikeda, Takahiro

    2005-08-01

    Non-contact displacement measurement is one of important topics to analyze materials strength and structural deformation. In addition to the industrial applications in mechanical engineering, some research works in such fields as medical and dental fields, life science, textile industry, and even in cosmetics industry require non-contact methods for their specified research areas. Here we propose that both displacement of surface points and profile of an objective are able to be captured by processing textured random pattern on the surface and projected fringe pattern onto the sample. A few potentiall applications to dental and cosmetics fields using our proposal are included.

  13. A coordinate transformation approach for efficient repeated solution of Helmholtz equation pertaining to obstacle scattering by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgun, Ozlem; Kuzuoglu, Mustafa

    2014-06-01

    A computational model is developed for efficient solutions of electromagnetic scattering from obstacles having random surface deformations or irregularities (such as roughness or randomly-positioned bump on the surface), by combining the Monte Carlo method with the principles of transformation electromagnetics in the context of finite element method. In conventional implementation of the Monte Carlo technique in such problems, a set of random rough surfaces is defined from a given probability distribution; a mesh is generated anew for each surface realization; and the problem is solved for each surface. Hence, this repeated mesh generation process places a heavy burden on CPU time. In the proposed approach, a single mesh is created assuming smooth surface, and a transformation medium is designed on the smooth surface of the object. Constitutive parameters of the medium are obtained by the coordinate transformation technique combined with the form-invariance property of Maxwell's equations. At each surface realization, only the material parameters are modified according to the geometry of the deformed surface, thereby avoiding repeated mesh generation process. In this way, a simple, single and uniform mesh is employed; and CPU time is reduced to a great extent. The technique is demonstrated via various finite element simulations for the solution of two-dimensional, Helmholtz-type and transverse magnetic scattering problems.

  14. Investigating how vesicle size influences vesicle adsorption on titanium oxide: a competition between steric packing and shape deformation.

    PubMed

    Ferhan, Abdul Rahim; Jackman, Joshua A; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-01-18

    Understanding the adsorption behavior of lipid vesicles at solid-liquid interfaces is important for obtaining fundamental insights into soft matter adsorbates as well as for practical applications such as supported lipid bilayer (SLB) fabrication. While the process of SLB formation has been highly scrutinized, less understood are the details of vesicle adsorption without rupture, especially at high surface coverages. Herein, we tackle this problem by employing simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) measurements in order to investigate the effect of vesicle size (84-211 nm diameter) on vesicle adsorption onto a titanium oxide surface. Owing to fundamental differences in the measurement principles of the two techniques as well as a mismatch in probing volumes, it was possible to determine both the lipid mass adsorbed near the sensor surface as well as the total mass of adsorbed lipid and hydrodynamically coupled solvent in the adsorbed vesicle layer as a whole. With increasing vesicle size, the QCM-D frequency signal exhibited monotonic behavior reaching an asymptotic value, whereas the QCM-D energy dissipation signal continued to increase according to the vesicle size. In marked contrast, the LSPR-tracked lipid mass near the sensor surface followed a parabolic trend, with the greatest corresponding measurement response occurring for intermediate-size vesicles. The findings reveal that the maximum extent of adsorbed vesicles contacting a solid surface occurs at an intermediate vesicle size due to the competing influences of vesicle deformation and steric packing. Looking forward, such information can be applied to control the molecular self-assembly of phospholipid assemblies as well as provide the basis for investigating deformable, soft matter adsorbates.

  15. Evaluation of the pseudostatic analyses of earth dams using Fe simulation and observed earthquake-induced deformations: case studies of Upper San Fernando and Kitayama dams.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Tohid; Nikkar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the accuracy of the pseudostatic approach is governed by the accuracy with which the simple pseudostatic inertial forces represent the complex dynamic inertial forces that actually exist in an earthquake. In this study, the Upper San Fernando and Kitayama earth dams, which have been designed using the pseudostatic approach and damaged during the 1971 San Fernando and 1995 Kobe earthquakes, were investigated and analyzed. The finite element models of the dams were prepared based on the detailed available data and results of in situ and laboratory material tests. Dynamic analyses were conducted to simulate the earthquake-induced deformations of the dams using the computer program Plaxis code. Then the pseudostatic seismic coefficient used in the design and analyses of the dams were compared with the seismic coefficients obtained from dynamic analyses of the simulated model as well as the other available proposed pseudostatic correlations. Based on the comparisons made, the accuracy and reliability of the pseudostatic seismic coefficients are evaluated and discussed.

  16. Evaluation of the Pseudostatic Analyses of Earth Dams Using FE Simulation and Observed Earthquake-Induced Deformations: Case Studies of Upper San Fernando and Kitayama Dams

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Tohid

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the accuracy of the pseudostatic approach is governed by the accuracy with which the simple pseudostatic inertial forces represent the complex dynamic inertial forces that actually exist in an earthquake. In this study, the Upper San Fernando and Kitayama earth dams, which have been designed using the pseudostatic approach and damaged during the 1971 San Fernando and 1995 Kobe earthquakes, were investigated and analyzed. The finite element models of the dams were prepared based on the detailed available data and results of in situ and laboratory material tests. Dynamic analyses were conducted to simulate the earthquake-induced deformations of the dams using the computer program Plaxis code. Then the pseudostatic seismic coefficient used in the design and analyses of the dams were compared with the seismic coefficients obtained from dynamic analyses of the simulated model as well as the other available proposed pseudostatic correlations. Based on the comparisons made, the accuracy and reliability of the pseudostatic seismic coefficients are evaluated and discussed. PMID:24616636

  17. Surface deformation as a guide to kinematics and three-dimensional shape of slow-moving, clay-rich landslides, Honolulu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, R.L.; Messerich, J.; Fleming, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Two slow-moving landslides in Honolulu, Hawaii, were the subject of photogrammetric measurements, field mapping, and subsurface investigation to learn whether surface observations can yield useful information consistent with results of subsurface investigation. Mapping focused on structural damage and on surface features such as scarps, shears, and toes. The x-y-z positions of photo-identifiable points were obtained from aerial photographs taken at three different times. The measurements were intended to learn if the shape of the landslide failure surface can be determined from systematic surface observations and whether surface observations about deformation are consistent with photogrammetrically-obtained displacement gradients. Field and aerial photographic measurements were evaluated to identify the boundaries of the landslides, distinguish areas of incipient landslide enlargement, and identify zones of active and passive failure in the landslides. Data reported here apply mainly to the Alani-Paty landslide, a translational, earth-block landslide that damaged property in a 3.4-ha residential area. It began moving in the 1970s and displacement through 1991 totaled 4 m. Thickness, determined from borehole data, ranges from about 7 to 10 m; and the slope of the ground surface averages about 9??. Field evidence of deformation indicated areas of potential landslide enlargement outside the well-formed landslide boundaries. Displacement gradients obtained photogrammetrically and deformation mapping both identified similar zones of active failure (longitudinal stretching) and passive failure (longitudinal shortening) within the body of the landslide. Surface displacement on the landslide is approximately parallel to the broadly concave slip surface.

  18. Relativistic Bound States in the Presence of Spherically Ring-Shaped q-DEFORMED Woods-Saxon Potential with Arbitrary l-STATES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Hamzavi, Majid; Rajabi, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    Approximate bound-state solutions of the Dirac equation with q-deformed Woods-Saxon (WS) plus a new generalized ring-shaped (RS) potential are obtained for any arbitrary l-state. The energy eigenvalue equation and corresponding two-component wave functions are calculated by solving the radial and angular wave equations within a shortcut of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method. The solutions of the radial and polar angular parts of the wave function are expressed in terms of the Jacobi polynomials. A new approximation being expressed in terms of the potential parameters is carried out to deal with the strong singular centrifugal potential term l(l+1)r-2. Under some limitations, we can obtain solution for the RS Hulthén potential and the standard usual spherical WS potential (q = 1).

  19. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  20. Effects of microstructure and deformation conditions on the hot formability of Ni-Ti-Hf shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeoung Han; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Seong Woong; Hong, Jae Keun; Oh, Chang-Seok; Jeon, Yeong Min; Kim, Kyong Min; Yeom, Jong Taek

    2014-12-01

    Ingots of Ni-Ti-Hf shape memory alloys were prepared by vacuum arc re-melting. Isothermal hot compression tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 degrees C and at strain rates from 10(-2) s(-1) to 1.0 s(-1). A decrease in the Ni content below 50.2 at.% significantly deteriorated the hot workability due to the formation of a brittle second phase. Also, the low Ni content alloy showed poor workability when the temperature exceeded 900 degrees C. Additional compression tests were conducted under various conditions to clarify the effects of the chemical composition, solidification anisotropy, and the strain rate.

  1. Three-dimensional deformation response of a NiTi shape memory helical-coil actuator during thermomechanical cycling: experimentally validated numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, B.; Nicholson, D. E.; Saleeb, A. F.; Padula, S. A., II; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2016-09-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators often operate under a complex state of stress for an extended number of thermomechanical cycles in many aerospace and engineering applications. Hence, it becomes important to account for multi-axial stress states and deformation characteristics (which evolve with thermomechanical cycling) when calibrating any SMA model for implementation in large-scale simulation of actuators. To this end, the present work is focused on the experimental validation of an SMA model calibrated for the transient and cyclic evolutionary behavior of shape memory Ni49.9Ti50.1, for the actuation of axially loaded helical-coil springs. The approach requires both experimental and computational aspects to appropriately assess the thermomechanical response of these multi-dimensional structures. As such, an instrumented and controlled experimental setup was assembled to obtain temperature, torque, degree of twist and extension, while controlling end constraints during heating and cooling of an SMA spring under a constant externally applied axial load. The computational component assesses the capabilities of a general, multi-axial, SMA material-modeling framework, calibrated for Ni49.9Ti50.1 with regard to its usefulness in the simulation of SMA helical-coil spring actuators. Axial extension, being the primary response, was examined on an axially-loaded spring with multiple active coils. Two different conditions of end boundary constraint were investigated in both the numerical simulations as well as the validation experiments: Case (1) where the loading end is restrained against twist (and the resulting torque measured as the secondary response) and Case (2) where the loading end is free to twist (and the degree of twist measured as the secondary response). The present study focuses on the transient and evolutionary response associated with the initial isothermal loading and the subsequent thermal cycles under applied constant axial load. The experimental

  2. Influence of strain localization on deformation mechanisms and fracture of 12Cr1MoV steel with various notch shape under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, S. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Maruschak, P. O.; Moiseenko, D. D.; Berto, F.; Vinogradov, A.; Bischak, R. T.; Maksimov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The energy of 12Cr1MoV steel specimen fracture with V-, U- and I-shaped notches under impact loading was measured and analyzed. The results were described using common energy-based approach to ductile-brittle fracture. Within the stage-wise approach of physical mesomechanics of materials, the rate of increase/decrease of load at the stage of initiation and propagation of a macroscopic defect was evaluated, providing a good correlation with the work of fracture. The excitable cellular automata technique was applied to simulate the deformational behavior of the specimens with different shape of notches. It was demonstrated that in the case of the blunted notch, the maximum impact toughness is facilitated by a more uniform distribution of the load along the notch, which hinders brittle fracture at lower testing temperature. For the specimen with the sharp I-notch, the bands of localized shear are oriented normally to the loading axis, inhibiting macrolocalization of strain and crack propagation. For this reason, the impact toughness of the specimen with the I-notch appeared to be higher than that of the V-notched one.

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Severe Plastic Deformation and Thermomechanical Training on the Functional Stability of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Maier, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of a conventional thermomechanical training procedure and severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion to achieve improved functional stability in a Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy. Thermomechanical testing indicates that both methods result in enhanced shape memory characteristics, such as reduced irrecoverable strain and thermal hysteresis. The mechanisms responsible for the improvements are discussed in light of microstructural findings from transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Design and analyses of an ultra-thin flat lens for wave front shaping in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Li, Yiyan; Tian, Xuelong; Zeng, Dajun; Gao, Xueli

    2015-12-01

    An ultra-thin flat lens is proposed for focusing circularly polarized light in the visible range. Anisotropic C-shaped nanoantennas with phase discontinuities are used to form the metasurface of the lens. The phase response of the C-shaped nanoantennas can be manipulated by simply rotating the angle of the unit nanoantenna. A 600 nm incident circularly polarized light is focused by the proposed techniques. Good agreements are observed by using our MoM and a commercial FDTD software package. The computation time spent by using MoM is approximately 10-100 times smaller than using FDTD. All the results show the proposed nanoantenna array has a great potential for nanoscale optical microscopy, solar cell energy conversion enhancement, as well as integrated optical circuits.

  5. Mechanical and deformation analyses of pile foundation for supporting structure of off-shore wind turbine at Changhua coast in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. C.; Lin, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the bearing capacities and mechanical behaviors of pile foundation installed on the seabed of wind farm near Chang-Hua coast of western Taiwan for the supporting structure of offshore wind turbine. A series of three-dimensional (3-D) numerical modeling of pile foundation subjected to various types of combined loading were carried out using Plaix-3D finite element program to investigate the interactive behaviors between soil and pile. In the numerical modeling, pile diameter, pile length and pile spacing were selected as design parameters to inspect their effects on the bearing capacities and deformation behaviors of the pile foundation. For a specific design parameter combination, one can obtain the corresponding loading-displacement curve, various ultimate bearing capacities, V-H (Vertical-Horizontal combined loading) ultimate bearing capacity envelope, and p-ycurve of pile foundation. Numerical results indicate that: (1) Large displacement and plastic points at ultimate state mostly distribute and concentrate in the topsoil of seabed and around pile head. (2) The soil resistance on the soil-pile interface is ascending with the increases of depth, pile diameter and pile length. (3) The vertical and horizontal bearing capacities of pile group increase significantly with the increase of pile diameter. (4) The vertical and bending moment capacities of pile group increase greatly with the increase of pile length whereas the horizontal capacity is almost insensitive to pile length. (5) The bending moment of pile is highly influenced by the pile spacing. (6) For different design parameters, the shape of ultimate bearing capacity envelopes of pile group on V-H plane is similar while the envelopes will expand as the design parameters increase. For different loading levels of bending moment, the envelopes on V-H plane will contract gradually as the bending moment loading increasing.

  6. Orogen-parallel deformation of the Himalayan midcrust: Insights from structural and magnetic fabric analyses of the Greater Himalayan Sequence, Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Ferré, E. C.; Law, R. D.; Lloyd, G. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The metamorphic core of the Himalaya (Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS), in the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri region, central Nepal, recorded orogen-parallel stretching during midcrustal evolution. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and field-based structural analyses suggest that midcrustal deformation of the amphibolite facies core of the GHS occurred under an oblate/suboblate strain regime with associated formation of low-angle northward dipping foliation. Magnetic and mineral stretching lineations lying within this foliation from the top of the GHS record right-lateral orogen-parallel stretching. We propose that oblate strain within a midcrustal flow accommodated oblique convergence between India and the arcuate orogenic front without the need for strain partitioning in the upper crust. Oblate flattening may have also promoted orogen-parallel melt migration and development of melt-depleted regions between km3 scale leucogranite culminations at 50-100 km intervals along orogen strike. Following the cessation of flow, continued oblique convergence led to upper crustal strain partitioning between orogen-perpendicular convergence on thrust faults and orogen-parallel extension on normal and strike-slip faults. In the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, orogen-parallel stretching lineations are interpreted as a record of transition from midcrustal orogen-perpendicular extrusion to upper crustal orogen-parallel stretching. Our findings suggest that midcrustal flow and upper crustal extension could not be maintained simultaneously and support other studies from across the Himalaya, which propose an orogen-wide transition from midcrustal orogen-perpendicular extrusion to upper crustal orogen-parallel extension during the mid-Miocene. The 3-D nature of oblate strain and orogen-parallel stretching cannot be replicated by 2-D numerical simulations of the Himalayan orogen.

  7. Effect of Temperature on the Deformation Behavior of B2 Austenite in a Polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at.Percent) Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Superelasticity in austenitic B2-NiTi is of great technical interest and has been studied in the past by several researchers [1]. However, investigation of temperature dependent deformation in B2-NiTi is equally important since competing mechanisms of stress-induced martensite (SIM), retained martensite, plastic and deformation twinning can lead to unusual mechanical behaviors. Identification of the role of various mechanisms contributing to the overall deformation response of B2-NiTi is imperative to understanding and maturing SMA-enabled technologies. Thus, the objective of this work was to study the deformation of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) above A(sub f) (105 C) in the B2 state at temperatures between 165-440 C, and generate a B2 deformation map showing active deformation mechanisms in different temperature-stress regimes.

  8. Inferences of Integrated Lithospheric Strength from Plate-Scale Analyses of Deformation Observed in the Aegean-Anatolian Region and the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In the context of a comprehensive review of the rheology and strength of the lithosphere (Marine and Petroleum Geology, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2011.05.008), Evgene Burov described the difficulty of extrapolating rock deformation laws derived from laboratory experiments to the time and length scales that apply when the Earth's lithosphere is deformed. Not only does the extrapolation introduce a large uncertainty, but even the relative importance of different possible mechanisms of deformation may be uncertain. Even though lithospheric deformation has a strong conceptual and theoretical basis, it is therefore essential, as Burov argued, that deformation laws for the lithosphere must be calibrated by using observations of deformation that occurs on a lithospheric length scale and at geological strain rates. The influence of regionally varying factors like crustal thickness, geothermal gradient and tectonic environment may induce large variations in how rapidly the lithosphere may deform in response to an applied load, not least in the contrast from continent to ocean. Plates may be deformed by different loading mechanisms but, when deformation is distributed over a broad region, the strain-rate field may be approximately constant with depth and we may integrate the in-plane stress components across the thickness of the lithosphere to derive a depth-averaged constitutive law for the deformation. This approximation is the basis for the thin viscous sheet formulation of lithospheric deformation and, in combination with appropriate observations, it allows us to calibrate the integrated resistance to processes like regional extension or convergence. In this talk I will summarise what we learn about effective lithospheric rheology from two recent studies of the distribution and rates of diffuse deformation of the lithosphere in, firstly the Anatolian-Aegean region, and secondly the Central Indian Ocean. In the first case the distribution of deformation is consistent

  9. Cold pressure welding by incremental rolling: Deformation zone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Homberg, Werner; Hoppe, Christian; Grundmeier, Guido; Hordych, Illia; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the deformation zone that forms during cold welding of metal pairs by incremental rolling. The tool geometry has great influence on the forming behaviour and the overall shape of the metal part. In order to improve the process, an increase in surface exposure is aspired since it should lead to an increased weld strength. Six tool geometries were tested by means of FEA and analysed based on the surface exposure created between the surfaces in contact.

  10. A combination of experimental and finite element analyses of needle-tissue interaction to compute the stresses and deformations during injection at different angles.

    PubMed

    Halabian, Mahdi; Beigzadeh, Borhan; Karimi, Alireza; Shirazi, Hadi Asgharzadeh; Shaali, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-12-01

    One of the main clinical applications of the needles is its practical usage in the femoral vein catheterization. Annually more than two million peoples in the United States are exposed to femoral vein catheterization. How to use the input needles into the femoral vein has a key role in the sense of pain in post-injection and possible injuries, such as tissue damage and bleeding. It has been shown that there might be a correlation between the stresses and deformations due to femoral injection to the tissue and the sense of pain and, consequently, injuries caused by needles. In this study, the stresses and deformations induced by the needle to the femoral tissue were experimentally and numerically investigated in response to an input needle at four different angles, i.e., 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90°, via finite element method. In addition, a set of experimental injections at different angles were carried out to compare the numerical results with that of the experimental ones, namely pain score. The results revealed that by increasing the angle of injection up to 60°, the strain at the interaction site of the needle-tissue is increased accordingly while a significant falling is observed at the angle of 90°. In contrast, the stress due to injection was decreased at the region of needle-tissue interaction with showing the lowest one at the angle of 90°. Experimental results were also well confirmed the numerical observations since the lowest pain score was seen at the angle of 90°. The results suggest that the most effective angle of injection would be 90° due to a lower amount of stresses and deformations compared to the other angles of injection. These findings may have implications not only for understating the stresses and deformations induced during injection around the needle-tissue interaction, but also to give an outlook to the doctors to implement the most suitable angle of injection in order to reduce the pain as well as post injury of the patients.

  11. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians' Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians' expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers' effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians' perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis - proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes - of a marimbists' expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer's expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants' individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants' attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception-action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication.

  12. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians’ Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians’ expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers’ effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians’ perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis – proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes – of a marimbists’ expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer’s expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants’ individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants’ attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception–action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication. PMID

  13. Spectral shape deformation in inverse spin Hall voltage in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}|Pt bilayers at high microwave power levels

    SciTech Connect

    Lustikova, J. Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-21

    We report on the deformation of microwave absorption spectra and of the inverse spin Hall voltage signals in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave power levels in a 9.45-GHz TE{sub 011} cavity. As the microwave power increases from 0.15 to 200 mW, the resonance field shifts to higher values, and the initially Lorentzian spectra of the microwave absorption intensity as well as the inverse spin Hall voltage signals become asymmetric. The contributions from opening of the magnetization precession cone and heating of YIG cannot well reproduce the data. Control measurements of inverse spin Hall voltages on thin-film YIG|Pt systems with a range of line widths underscore the role of spin-wave excitations in spectral deformation.

  14. Shape Coexistence Near Neutron Number N=20: First Identification of the E0 Decay from the Deformed First Excited J{sup p}i=0{sup +} State in {sup 30}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, W.; Thirolf, P. G.; Wimmer, K.; Habs, D.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Morgan, T.; Mach, H.; Rodriguez, T. R.; Egido, J. L.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Fraile, L. M.; Heyde, K.; Hoff, P.; Huebel, H.; Koester, U.

    2009-07-03

    The 1789 keV state in {sup 30}Mg was identified as the first excited 0{sup +} state via its electric monopole (E0) transition to the ground state. The measured small value of rho{sup 2}(E0,0{sub 2}{sup +}->0{sub 1}{sup +})=(26.2+-7.5)x10{sup -3} implies within a two-level model a small mixing of competing configurations with largely different intrinsic quadrupole deformation near the neutron shell closure at N=20. Axially symmetric configuration mixing calculations identify the ground state of {sup 30}Mg to be based on neutron configurations below the N=20 shell closure, while the excited 0{sup +} state mainly consists of two neutrons excited into the nu 1f{sub 7/2} orbital. The experimental result represents the first case where an E0 back decay from a strongly deformed second to the normal deformed first nuclear potential minimum well has been unambiguously identified, thus directly proving shape coexistence at the borderline of the much-debated 'island of inversion.'

  15. Three-dimensional finite-element models on the deformation of forearcs caused by aseismic ridge subduction: The role of ridge shape, friction coefficient of the plate interface and mechanical properties of the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Geological and geophysical data show that the forearc of subduction zones experiences strong deformation during the subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges. In order to better understand ridge-related forearc deformation patterns, we performed a series of three-dimensional finite-element models, in which we varied the ridge shape, the friction coefficient of the plate interface and the mechanical strength of the forearc. Experiments were carried out for migrating/non-migrating ridges and accretive/erosive margins, respectively. Our results show that the subducting ridge uplifts the forearc and induces horizontal displacements that alter the strain regime of both erosive and accretive forearcs. Generally, shortening prevails in front of the ridge, while domains of shortening and extension exist above the ridge. Models with stationary ridges show high uplift rates only above the ridge tip, whereas the forearc above migrating ridges experiences uplift above the leading ridge flank and subsequent subsidence above the trailing flank. The height and width of the ridge as well as the friction coefficient of the plate interface have the largest effect on the forearc deformation patterns, whereas the mechanical strength of the forearc plays a lesser role. Forearc indentation at the trench is largest for high and broad ridges, high friction coefficients and/or weak forearc material. Shortening and extension of the forearc above the ridge are more intense for high and narrow ridges. Our model results provide information about the distribution of ridge-induced displacements and strain fields and hence help to identify deformation patterns caused by subducting aseismic ridges in nature.

  16. The Interplay Between Deformation and Volcanism on Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos: A Multidisciplinary Study Using Structural, Geophysical, and Geochronological Analyses of Faults and Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. M.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Cruz Island is one of the oldest volcanoes in the Galápagos Archipelago; little is known about its history or its evolutionary relationship to the younger western shield volcanoes. Of particular note, the island's northern and southern flanks are deformed by a series of major normal faults of unknown origin. Using an array of multidisciplinary tools, including field mapping, GPS, gravity, Ar-Ar and geochronology, and 3He exposure dating, we construct a structural and volcanic history of Santa Cruz. The Ar-Ar ages reveal that since ~1.5 Ma, the island has experienced two phases of volcanism, separated by ~0.4 My. The first occurred from 1620 ± 15 to 1160 ± 35 ka (1σ); the second lasted from 699 ± 45 to 74 ± 19 ka. Volcanism during the second phase was focused along an E-W trending summit vent system, from which all <200 ka lavas were deposited on the southern flank. Structural observations suggest that the island has experienced two major faulting episodes. North flank faults formed after 1160 ± 35 ka, whereas the southern faults were initiated between 416 ± 18 and 27 ± 16 ka. Gravity results indicate two E-W trending, intrusive complexes; one is centered north of the island's summit and the other is beneath the southern flank. When integrated, our data are consistent with a model wherein the northern faults are associated with regional uplift occurring after 1.1 Ma and before 0.78 Ma (paleomag.; Bow, 1979). This deformation event may be related to the formation of the summit vent system and the initiation of the second phase of volcanism. The second volcanism phase is coincident with the formation of the southern faults. Southward spreading along the island's southern flank accommodated extension initiated by intrusions, which ceased with volcanism at ~20 ka. The extended volcanic activity characteristic of Santa Cruz and of other older Galapagos Islands may be the result of rejuvenated volcanism linked to regional uplift event(s); it may also

  17. Influence of notch shape on deformation mechanisms and energy parameters of fracture of 12Cr1MoV steel under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, S. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Maruschak, P. O.; Moiseenko, D. D.; Berto, F.; Vinogradov, A.; Bischak, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    Impact loading curves and fracture energy of the notched 12Cr1MoV ductile steel specimens are analyzed. The qualitative description and quantitative parameters are obtained for major stages of ductile and brittle fracture depending on the shape of the notch and the stress stiffness ahead. It is shown that a zone with enhanced plasticity is formed in the vicinity of V-, U-, and I-shaped notches at 20°C testing temperature, giving rise to ductile fracture. The stress stiffness at the notch tip increased with testing temperature reduced to -40°C. Using the quantitative description of fracture surfaces, a physical-mechanical scheme of the specimen fracture was suggested for the case of enhanced and localized (constrained) plasticity near the stress concentrator tip.

  18. Variations in hip shape are associated with radiographic knee osteoarthritis: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, AE; Golightly, YM; Renner, JB; Schwartz, TA; Liu, F; Lynch, JA; Gregory, JS; Aspden, RM; Lane, NE; Jordan, JM

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hip shape by statistical shape modeling (SSM) is associated with hip radiographic OA (rOA); we examined associations between hip shape and knee rOA given the biomechanical inter-relationships between these joints. Methods Bilateral baseline hip shape assessments (for those with at least 1 hip with Kellgren-Lawrence grade [KLG] 0 or 1) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project were available. Proximal femur shape was defined on baseline pelvis radiographs and evaluated by SSM, producing mean shape and continuous variables representing independent modes of variation (14 modes=95% of shape variance). Outcomes included prevalent (baseline KLG >=2 or total knee replacement [TKR]), incident (baseline KLG 0/1 with follow-up >=2), and progressive (KLG increase of >=1 or TKR) knee rOA. Limb-based logistic regression models for ipsilateral and contralateral comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and hip rOA, accounting for intra-person correlations. Results We evaluated 681 hips and 682 knees from 342 individuals (61% women, 82% white, mean age 62 years, BMI 29 kg/m2). Ninety-nine knees (15%) had prevalent rOA (4 knees with TKR). Lower mode 2 and 3 scores were associated with ipsilateral prevalent knee rOA; only lower mode 3 scores were associated with contralateral prevalent knee rOA. No statistically significant associations were seen for incident or progressive knee rOA. Conclusions Variations in hip shape were associated with prevalent, but not incident or progressive, knee rOA in this cohort, and may reflect biomechanical differences between limbs, genetic influences, or common factors related to both hip shape and knee rOA. PMID:26669914

  19. Interaction of a screw dislocation with a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity with interface stresses under anti-plane deformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Schiavone, Peter

    2014-10-08

    We propose an elegant and concise general method for the solution of a problem involving the interaction of a screw dislocation and a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped, elastic inhomogeneity in which the contribution of interface/surface elasticity is incorporated using a version of the Gurtin-Murdoch model. The analytic function inside the arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity is represented in the form of a Faber series. The real periodic function arising from the contribution of the surface mechanics is then expanded as a Fourier series. The resulting system of linear algebraic equations is solved through the use of simple matrix algebra. When the elastic inhomogeneity represents a hole, our solution method simplifies considerably. Furthermore, we undertake an analytical investigation of the challenging problem of a screw dislocation interacting with two closely spaced nano-sized holes of arbitrary shape in the presence of surface stresses. Our solutions quite clearly demonstrate that the induced elastic fields and image force acting on the dislocation are indeed size-dependent.

  20. A simplified algorithm for measuring erythrocyte deformability dispersion by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Yurchuk, Yu S

    2015-08-31

    The possibility of measuring the dispersion of red blood cell deformability by laser diffractometry in shear flow (ektacytometry) is analysed theoretically. A diffraction pattern parameter is found, which is sensitive to the dispersion of erythrocyte deformability and to a lesser extent – to such parameters as the level of the scattered light intensity, the shape of red blood cells, the concentration of red blood cells in the suspension, the geometric dimensions of the experimental setup, etc. A new algorithm is proposed for measuring erythrocyte deformability dispersion by using data of laser ektacytometry. (laser applications in medicine)

  1. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    PubMed

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-03-02

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992-2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011-2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements.

  2. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A.; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992–2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011–2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements.

  3. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    PubMed Central

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A.; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992–2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011–2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements. PMID:28252103

  4. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  5. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  6. True polar wander of a quasi-fluid planet with a fossil shape: Effect of strain energy due to tidal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, temporal variation of a paleo-pole position due to TPW is formulated and calculated based on strain energy in a previous study. Especially, quasi-fluid approximation is suitable to deal with large-scale and long-term variation of a paleo-pole position. Thus, an orientation of a paleo-rotation axis in each time step is estimated in here by following conventional formulation with the quasi-fluid approximation for TPW, and simultaneously by taking total energy minimization into account. In practice, this procedure is physically same as to incorporate elastic torque due to tidal deformation of a lithosphere into the Liouville equation including the quasi-fluid approximation. In this study, like the previous one, only one symmetric surface load is regarded as a driving force of TPW for convenience sake. In this calculation, variable parameters are defined as follows: a location of emplacement, duration of formation, and maximum of intensity of a load. The result with strain energy is compared with that without strain energy. As a result, the case with the strain energy indicates different characteristics from that without the strain energy in the following points. First, the paleo-poles under steady states are different each other in the cases for same parameters. These results are not consistent even with the previous results concerning just the final condition. Second, also in the cases for same parameters, time scales when the paleo-poles reach the static limits are different. These results demonstrate the fact that strain energy within a lithosphere effectively weakens influence of a load on TPW. Although this kind of influence has already been pointed out by the previous results just in the cases of the steady states, the present results further revealed similar effect also on a characteristic time scale of TPW. Strictly speaking, however, it is impossible to estimate this exact time scale only by reducing an effective size of a load. This is

  7. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  8. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  9. Study of muscular deformation based on surface slope estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, M.; Goffredo, M.; Schmid, M.; Neri, A.

    2006-02-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is very important to take into account these phenomena. The aim of this work is the evaluation of skin and muscular deformation, and the modeling of body segment elastic behavior obtained by analysing video sequences that capture a muscle contraction. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using non linear operators. Experimental results, obtained by applying the proposed method to several video sequences, where biceps brachial isometric contraction was present, show the effectiveness of this technique.

  10. Shapes of rotating superfluid helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernando, Charles; Tanyag, Rico Mayro P.; Jones, Curtis; Bacellar, Camila; Bucher, Maximilian; Ferguson, Ken R.; Rupp, Daniela; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Gomez, Luis F.; Chatterley, Adam S.; Gorkhover, Tais; Müller, Maria; Bozek, John; Carron, Sebastian; Kwok, Justin; Butler, Samuel L.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2017-02-01

    Rotating superfluid He droplets of approximately 1 μm in diameter were obtained in a free nozzle beam expansion of liquid He in vacuum and were studied by single-shot coherent diffractive imaging using an x-ray free electron laser. The formation of strongly deformed droplets is evidenced by large anisotropies and intensity anomalies (streaks) in the obtained diffraction images. The analysis of the images shows that in addition to previously described axially symmetric oblate shapes, some droplets exhibit prolate shapes. Forward modeling of the diffraction images indicates that the shapes of rotating superfluid droplets are very similar to their classical counterparts, giving direct access to the droplet angular momenta and angular velocities. The analyses of the radial intensity distribution and appearance statistics of the anisotropic images confirm the existence of oblate metastable superfluid droplets with large angular momenta beyond the classical bifurcation threshold.

  11. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  12. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  13. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  14. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Henon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  15. Two refractory Wild 2 terminal particles from a carrot-shaped track characterized combining MIR/FIR/Raman microspectroscopy and FE-SEM/EDS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Ferrari, M.; Della Corte, V.; Baratta, G. A.; Brunetto, R.; Dartois, E.; Djouadi, Z.; Merouane, S.; Borg, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, M. E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present the analyses results of two bulk Terminal Particles, C2112,7,171,0,0 and C2112,9,171,0,0, derived from the Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2 returned by the Stardust mission. Each particle embedded in a slab of silica aerogel was pressed in a diamond cell. This preparation, as expected, made it difficult to identify the minerals and organic materials present in these particles. This problem was overcome using a combination of three different analytical techniques, viz. FE-SEM/EDS, IR, and Raman microspectroscopy that allowed identifying the minerals and small amounts of amorphous carbon present in both particles. TP2 and TP3 were dominated by Ca-free and low-Ca, Mg-rich, Mg,Fe-olivine. The presence of melilite in both particles is supported by IR microspectroscopy, but is not confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy, possibly because the amounts are too small to be detected. TP2 and TP3 show similar silicate mineral compositions, but Ni-free and low-Ni, subsulfur (Fe,Ni)S grains are present in TP2 only. TP2 contains indigenous amorphous carbon hot spots; no indigenous carbon was identified in TP3. These nonchondritic particles probably originated in a differentiated body. This work found an unanticipated carbon contamination following the FE-SEM/EDS analyses. It is suggested that organic materials in the embedding silica aerogel are irradiated during FE-SEM/EDS analyses creating a carbon gas that develops a strong fluorescence continuum. The combination of the selected analytical techniques can be used to characterize bulk Wild 2 particles without the need of extraction and removal of the encapsulating aerogel. This approach offers a relatively fast sample preparation procedure, but compressing the samples can cause spurious artifacts, viz. silica contamination. Because of the combination of techniques, we account for these artifacts.

  16. MOLECULAR EVIDENCE CONFIRMS SISTER RELATIONSHIP OF ARDISSONEA, CLIMACOSPHENIA, AND TOXARIUM WITHIN THE BIPOLAR CENTRIC DIATOMS (BACILLARIOPHYTA, MEDIOPHYCEAE), AND CLADISTIC ANALYSES CONFIRM THAT EXTREMELY ELONGATED SHAPE HAS ARISEN TWICE IN THE DIATOMS(1).

    PubMed

    Medlin, Linda K; Sato, Shinya; Mann, David G; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F

    2008-10-01

    With the use of a new kit from Qiagen to amplify total genome quantity, DNA was bulked up from two diatoms that are difficult to grow (Ardissonea and Climacosphenia), and the nuclear SSU rRNA gene was successfully amplified. Results of Bayesian analyses showed that these diatoms are sister to Toxarium and belong to the bi- and multipolar centric diatoms. The results indicate that extremely elongate shape has arisen at least twice in diatoms, in the true pennates, and in the bipolar centrics. The two lateral pattern centers of Ardissonea and Climacosphenia likely represent a modified annulus that subtends ribs internally as well as externally. Studies of sexual reproduction are needed to determine whether Ardissonea, Climacosphenia, and Toxarium achieve their elongate shape by similar means to each other and to true pennates, that is, by controlling the expansion of the auxospores by sequential addition of silicified bands (to form a properizonium or perizonium).

  17. Microstructural Analysis of Welding: Deformation and Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S. L.; Russell, K.

    2003-12-01

    Welding in pyroclastic deposits involves the sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles and is attended by systematic changes in physical properties. Welded materials contain implicit information regarding the total accumulated strain as well as the mechanisms of deformation. Here, we use detailed microstructural analysis of synthetic and natural welded materials to make quantitative estimates of strain and constrain the rheology of these materials during the welding process. Part one of our study comprises microstructural analysis of end products from unconfined high temperature deformation experiments on sintered cores of soda-lime silica glass spheres. This analogue material has relatively simple and well-characterized starting properties. Furthermore, the initially spherical shapes of particles provide excellent strain markers. Experiments were run at a variety of temperatures, strain rates and stresses resulting in end products with varying degrees of total strain. The nature of strain partitioning and accumulation are evaluated using image analysis techniques on scanned images and photomicrographs of thin sections cut perpendicular to the loading direction of each experimental product. Shapes of the individual deformed particles (e.g., oblate spheroids) were determined and the Scion image analysis program was used to create a best-fit ellipse for each particle. Statistics collected on each particle include: axial dimension (a), vertical dimension (c) and angle from the horizontal. The data are used to calculate the oblateness of each particle (1-c/a) and the angle of deformation induced foliation. Furthermore, the relative proportions of visible blue epoxy in the sample scans determine bulk porosity. The average oblateness of the particles is a direct, independent measure of the accumulated strain in each sample. Results indicate that these measured values are equal to calculated theoretical values of oblateness for spheroids undergoing the

  18. Material and Geometric Analysis of Structures Subjected to Large Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranto, Justin

    The two major focuses of this dissertation are: (1) Studying the structural behaviors of hyper-elastic membranes subjected to extremely large deformation. These membranes are used in a reconfigurable tooling system (RTS) which was under development during the course of this study. (2) Establishing a continuum constitutive model for fabric materials under in-plane large deformation through theoretical and numerical analyses. This model may also be applied to study a class of materials which involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during deformation. The RTS allows quick onsite fabrication of high temperature composite parts. RTS applications include rapid onsite repair of aircraft components. The RTS uses a hyperelastic membrane as an interface between the state-change material and model. This membrane may be subjected to 800% engineering strain during operation. In this part of the study, material properties of the membranes have been characterized through three tests: simple tension, equal biaxial tension and planar tension. Nine-term Money-Rivlin constants are obtained through data regression. Finite element simulations have been conducted to simulate the deformed shapes of a membrane around several representative geometries under various vacuum pressure and constraint conditions. Experimental results have been compared with predictions from finite element simulations. This study contributes to understanding the behavior of membrane structures under large deformations in general; the results are used to generate design guidelines for RTS applicability. Fabric materials are widely used in industry for numerous applications. They exhibit a meso-scale complexity and involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during large deformation, which prohibits the direct application of the theory of continuum mechanics when studying these materials. In the second part of this work, a unique meso-scale FEA model, utilizing new modeling techniques and

  19. Deformable micro torque swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modeled as a capsule with a hyper elastic membrane enclosing Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modeled as torques distributed above the cell body. Effects of the membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of cell's reference shape and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like heart shape when Capillary number (Ca) was sufficiently large, and the swimming velocity decreased as Ca was increased. The gravity effect on the membrane tension suggested that the upwards and downwards swimming velocities of Paramecium might be reglated by the calcium ion channels distributed locally around the anterior end. Moreover, the gravity induced deformation made a cell directed vertically downwards, which resulted in a positive geotaxis like behavior with physical origin. These results are important to understand physiology of ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli.

  20. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  1. Microstructure evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B anisotropic magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Hono, K.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.

    2014-05-07

    The microstructural evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets in each stage of hot-deformation process was studied using transmission electron microscopy and three dimensional atom probe (3DAP). The anisotropic growth of initially isotropic grains in rapidly solidified alloy occurs by annealing without pressing. 3DAP analyses showed a higher concentration of rare-earth elements in the intergranular phase parallel to the flat surface of platelet shaped Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains compared to that in the intergranular phase at the side of platelets.

  2. Microstructure evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B anisotropic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.; Hono, K.

    2014-05-01

    The microstructural evolution of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets in each stage of hot-deformation process was studied using transmission electron microscopy and three dimensional atom probe (3DAP). The anisotropic growth of initially isotropic grains in rapidly solidified alloy occurs by annealing without pressing. 3DAP analyses showed a higher concentration of rare-earth elements in the intergranular phase parallel to the flat surface of platelet shaped Nd2Fe14B grains compared to that in the intergranular phase at the side of platelets.

  3. Shape control of composite plates and shells with embedded actuators. 2: Desired shape specified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koconis, David B.; Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George S.

    The changes in shapes of fiber-reinforced composite beams, plates and shells affected by embedded piezoelectric actuators were investigated. An analytical method was developed to determine the voltages needed to achieve a specified desired shape. The method is formulated on the basis of mathematical models using two-dimensional, linear, shallow shell theory including transverse shear effects which are important in the case of sandwich construction. The solution technique is a minimization of an error function which is a measure of the difference between the deformed shape caused by the application of voltages and the desired shape. A computationally efficient, user-friendly computer code was written which is suitable for performing the numerical calculations. The code, designated as SHAPE2, gives the voltages needed to achieve specified changes in shape. To validate the method and the computer code, results generated by the code were compared to existing analytical and experimental results. The predictions provided by the SHAPE2 code were in excellent agreement with the results of the other analyses and data.

  4. Highly deformable nanofilaments in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowska, S.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental analysis of hydrogel nanofilaments conveyed by flow is conducted to help in understanding physical phenomena responsible for transport properties and shape deformations of long bio-objects, like DNA or proteins. Investigated hydrogel nanofilaments exhibit typical macromolecules-like behavior, as spontaneous conformational changes and cross-flow migration. Results of the experiments indicate critical role of thermal fluctuations behavior of single filaments.

  5. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  6. Physics-based deformable organisms for medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McIntosh, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Previously, "Deformable organisms" were introduced as a novel paradigm for medical image analysis that uses artificial life modelling concepts. Deformable organisms were designed to complement the classical bottom-up deformable models methodologies (geometrical and physical layers), with top-down intelligent deformation control mechanisms (behavioral and cognitive layers). However, a true physical layer was absent and in order to complete medical image segmentation tasks, deformable organisms relied on pure geometry-based shape deformations guided by sensory data, prior structural knowledge, and expert-generated schedules of behaviors. In this paper we introduce the use of physics-based shape deformations within the deformable organisms framework yielding additional robustness by allowing intuitive real-time user guidance and interaction when necessary. We present the results of applying our physics-based deformable organisms, with an underlying dynamic spring-mass mesh model, to segmenting and labelling the corpus callosum in 2D midsagittal magnetic resonance images.

  7. Subsurface deformation in hypervelocity cratering experiments into high-porosity tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Rebecca; Poelchau, Michael H.; Moser, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments on porous tuff targets were carried out to determine the effect of porosity on deformation mechanisms in the crater's subsurface. Blocks of Weibern Tuff with about 43% porosity were impacted by 2.5 mm and 12.0 mm diameter steel spheres with velocities between 4.8 km s-1 and 5.6 km s-1. The postimpact subsurface damage was quantified with computer tomography as well as with meso- and microscale analyses of the bisected crater subsurface. The intensity and style of deformation in mineral clasts and the tuff matrix were mapped and their decay with subsurface depth was determined. Subsurface deformation styles include pore space compaction, clast rotation, as well as microfracture formation. Evaluation of the deformation indicates near-surface energy coupling at a calculated depth of burial of 2 projectile diameters (dp), which is in conflict with the crater shape, which displays a deep, central penetration tube. Subsurface damage extends to 2 dp beneath the crater floor in the experiments with 2.5 mm projectiles and increases to 3 dp for 12 mm projectiles. Based on overprinting relationships and the geometrical orientation of deformation features, a sequence of subsurface deformation events was derived (1) matrix compaction, (2) intragranular crack formation in clasts, (3) deformation band formation in the compacted matrix, (4) tensile fracturing.

  8. Occurrence of oral deformities in larval anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.L.; Altig, R.; Grace, J.B.; Walls, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    We quantified deformities in the marginal papillae, tooth rows, and jaw sheaths of tadpoles from 13 population samples representing three families and 11 sites in the southeastern United States. Oral deformities were observed in all samples and in 13.5-98% of the specimens per sample. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (chytrid) infections were detected in three samples. There was high variability among samples in the pattern and number of discovered deformities. Pairwise associations between oral structures containing deformities were nonrandom for several populations, especially those with B. dendrobatidis infections or high total numbers of deformities. Comparisons of deformities among samples using multivariate analyses revealed that tadpole samples grouped together by family. Analyses of ordination indicated that three variables, the number of deformities, the number of significant associations among deformity types within populations, and whether populations were infected with B. dendrobatidis, were significantly correlated with the pattern of deformities. Our data indicate that the incidence of oral deformities can be high in natural populations and that phylogeny and B. dendrobatidis infection exert a strong influence on the occurrence and type of oral deformities in tadpoles. ?? by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herperologists.

  9. Deformation measurements of smart aerodynamic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    1999-10-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F platform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flat, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  10. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  11. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  12. Mesh Deformation Based on Fully Stressed Design: The Method and Two-Dimensional Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined boundary geometry is a frequently encountered task in shape optimization and analysis of fluid-structure interaction. We propose a simple and concise method for deforming meshes defined with three-node triangular or four-node tetrahedral elements. The mesh deformation method is suitable for large boundary movement. The approach requires two consecutive linear elastic finite-element analyses of an isotropic continuum using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries. The first analysis is performed with homogeneous elastic property and the second with inhomogeneous elastic property. The fully stressed design is employed with a vanishing Poisson s ratio and a proposed form of equivalent strain (modified Tresca equivalent strain) to calculate, from the strain result of the first analysis, the element-specific Young s modulus for the second analysis. The theoretical aspect of the proposed method, its convenient numerical implementation using a typical linear elastic finite-element code in conjunction with very minor extra coding for data processing, and results for examples of large deformation of two-dimensional meshes are presented in this paper. KEY WORDS: Mesh deformation, shape optimization, fluid-structure interaction, fully stressed design, finite-element analysis, linear elasticity, strain failure, equivalent strain, Tresca failure criterion

  13. Method for Real-Time Structure Shape-Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L. (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention is a method for obtaining the displacement of a flexible structure by using strain measurements obtained by stain sensor,. By obtaining the displacement of structures in this manner, one may construct the deformed shape of the structure and display said deformed shape in real-time, enabling active control of the structure shape if desired.

  14. Bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  15. Deformation of square objects and boudins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2004-08-01

    Some geological objects, such as clasts and boudins, may have had original shapes close to square, that have been modified by ductile deformation. We demonstrate through finite element models presented here and in earlier papers that square objects in a matrix with contrasting viscosity can deform to a variety of curved shapes. The maximum shape change is where the square edges are parallel to the principal bulk strains. Competent objects with viscosity ratio to matrix ( m) of 2-20 become barrel shaped, showing concave 'fish mouth' shortened edges. Incompetent objects ( m<1) show a narrower variety of shapes with m, all becoming smoothed to bone, dumb-bell or lobate shapes, and losing the original corners. We compare the results for square objects with linear and non-linear rheology (power law, stress exponent n=1, 3 or 10), and with previous modelling with different object-matrix proportions. Competent objects with higher n values deform slightly less, and more irregularly, than linearly viscous ( n=1) objects, but the distinctions between n=3 and 10 are only slight. The differences are even slighter (in the opposite sense) for incompetent objects. The proportion of object to matrix is as important, if not more, in controlling the deformation and shape of these objects. The results are compared via graphs of object strain and concavity versus bulk strain. The concavity graph for competent square objects with linear viscosity up to very high strain can be compared with examples of ductile boudins with barrel or fish mouth shapes. Subject to a number of assumptions, this provides a method of estimating boudin-matrix viscosity ratios and post-boudinage ductile strain, of potential use in highly deformed rocks lacking other strain markers. The approach may also be suitable for deformed porphyroblasts, but is more difficult to apply to single clasts in breccias and conglomerates.

  16. Evaluation of skin and muscular deformations in a non-rigid motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Michela; Carli, Marco; Conforto, Silvia; Bibbo, Daniele; Neri, Alessandro; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2005-04-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is indispensable to take into account this phenomenon and thus approximating body limbs to rigid structures appears as restrictive. The present work aims at evaluating skin and muscular deformation, and at modeling body segment elastic behavior by analysing video sequences that capture a sport gesture. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using the technique based on Gauss Laguerre Expansion. Promising results have been obtained by applying the proposed method to a video sequence, where an upper arm isometric contraction was present.

  17. Self-shaping of bioinspired chiral composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qing-Qing; Cui, Yu-Hong; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jian-Shan; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2014-08-01

    Self-shaping materials such as shape memory polymers have recently drawn considerable attention owing to their high shape-changing ability in response to changes in ambient conditions, and thereby have promising applications in the biomedical, biosensing, soft robotics and aerospace fields. Their design is a crucial issue of both theoretical and technological interest. Motivated by the shape-changing ability of Towel Gourd tendril helices during swelling/deswelling, we present a strategy for realizing self-shaping function through the deformation of micro/nanohelices. To guide the design and fabrication of self-shaping materials, the shape equations of bent configurations, twisted belts, and helices of slender chiral composite are developed using the variation method. Furthermore, it is numerically shown that the shape changes of a chiral composite can be tuned by the deformation of micro/nanohelices and the fabricated fiber directions. This work paves a new way to create self-shaping composites.

  18. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  19. Including die and press deformations in sheet metal forming simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilthammar, Johan; Sigvant, Mats; Kao-Walter, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis, in Abaqus, of a stamping die and subsequent morphing of the tool surfaces in AutoForm were performed to improve a sheet metal forming simulation. First, the tool surfaces of the XC90 rear door inner were scanned. They were not matching when the die was unloaded and could therefore not give any satisfying results in sheet metal forming simulations. Scanned surface geometries were then added to a structural FE-model of the complete stamping die and some influential parts of the production press. The structural FE- model was analysed with Abaqus to obtain the structural deformations of the die. The calculated surface shapes were then transferred to AutoForm where a forming simulation was performed. Results from the different sheet metal forming simulations were compared to measured draw in curves and showed a substantial increase in accuracy and ability to analyse dies in running production when the morphed surfaces were used.

  20. Tracking of object deformations in color and depth video: deformation models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordt, Andreas; Reinhold, Stefan; Koch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The research on deformation tracking based on color image data has continuously gained a wide interest in the last 15 years. In addition, using depth sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect, allows to mitigate the ambiguity problems that arise when trying to solve the deformation tracking tasks on color images only, by adding depth information. However, the fusion of color and depth data is not straight forward, and the deformation tracking task is still ill-posed due to the lack of a general deformation model. The problem is usually circumvented by providing special deformation functions for the task at hand, e.g., skeleton-based for reconstructing people or triangle-based for tracking planar surfaces. In this article we summarize the Analysis by Synthesis (AbS) approach for deformation tracking in depth and color video and show some successful applications of specialized deformation functions. To overcome the issues with NURBS based deformation tracking we propose a new geodesic RBF-based deformation model, which can adapt to any surface topology and shape, while keeping the number of deformation parameters low. Example deformations for objects of different topologies are given, showing the versatility and efficiency of the proposed model.

  1. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the deformation produced by micro-droplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Due to the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, there are two angles that define the droplet/membrane geometry: the angle the liquid surface makes with the film and the angle the deformed bulge makes with the film. The contact line geometry is well captured by a Neumann construction which includes contributions from interfacial and mechanical tensions. Finally, we show that a droplet atop a film with biaxial tension assumes an equilibrium shape which is elongated along the axis of high tension.

  2. Dynamic grain growth during superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M.Kh.; Trifonov, V.G.

    1996-05-01

    Superplastic deformation (SPD) causes the accelerated anisotropic grain growth. This process results in the formation of structure which is quasistable during superplastic deformation and unstable after deformation. The degree of instability is determined by the size of grains, their shape coefficient which depends on the nature of an alloy and is equal to 1.1--1.5 after SPD, and by the unbalance of triple junctions at boundaries. Alloying of metals can affect the thermodynamic force and mechanism of dynamic anisotropic grain growth and correspondingly influence the parameters of superplasticity in alloys.

  3. In Vivo study of naturally deformed Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tavaddod, Sharareh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A combination of light-microscopy and image processing has been applied to study naturally deformed Escherichia coli under in vivo condition and at the order of sub-pixel high-resolution accuracy. To classify deflagellated non-dividing E. coli cells to the rod-shape and bent-shape, a geometrical approach has been applied. From the analysis of the geometrical data which were obtained of image processing, we estimated the required effective energy for shaping a rod-shape to a bent-shape with the same size. We evaluated the energy of deformation in the naturally deformed bacteria with minimum cell manipulation, under in vivo condition, and with minimum influence of any external force, torque and pressure. Finally, we have also elaborated on the possible scenario to explain how naturally deformed bacteria are formed from initial to final-stage.

  4. On the geometric relationship between deformation microstructures in zircon and the kinematic framework of the shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs; Habler, Gerlinde

    2016-10-01

    We present novel microstructural analyses of zircon from a variety of strained rocks. For the first time, multiple plastically deformed zircon crystals were analyzed in a kinematic context of the respective host shear zones. Our aim was to derive how the orientation of zircon grains in a shear zone affects their deformation, based on careful in situ observations. For sampling, we selected zircon-bearing rocks that were deformed by simple shear. Samples covered a range of P-T conditions and lithologies, including various meta-igneous and meta-sedimentary gneisses. Microstructural analyses of zircon crystals in situ with scanning electron backscatter diffraction mapping show strong geometrical relationships between orientations of: (i) the long axes of plastically deformed zircon crystals, (ii) the crystallographic orientation of misorientation axes in plastically deformed zircon crystals and (iii) the foliation and lineation directions of the respective samples. We assume that zircon crystals did not experience post-deformation rigid body rotation, and thus the true geometric link can be observed. The relationships are the following: (a) plastically deformed zircon crystals usually have long axes parallel to the mylonitic foliation plane; (b) crystals with < c > axes oriented at an angle > 15° to the foliation plane are undeformed or fractured. Zircon crystals that have < c > axes aligned parallel or normal to the stretching lineation within the foliation plane develop misorientation and rotation axes parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. Zircon grains with the < c > axis aligned at 30-60° to the lineation within the foliation plane often develop either two low Miller indices misorientation axes or one high Miller indices misorientation axis. Host phases have a significant influence on deformation mechanisms. In a relatively soft matrix, zircon is more likely to develop low Miller indices misorientation axes than in a relatively strong matrix. These

  5. a Visualization Model of Flower Based on Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xuedong

    We present a simple and effective modeling method for flowers. It starts with an initial geometric shape, such as ellipsoid, cylinder, or plane surface et al., and then simulates flower components (such as pedicel, receptacle, pistils, stamens, petals and sepals) by addition deformation to the basic geometric shape. The detailed geometry of flower component is defined by basic equation for the basic shape along with a deformation function. A variety of flower can be produced by varying the deformation parameters. A number of examples are given in the paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  6. Plastic Deformation of Accreted Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadish, J.

    2005-08-01

    The early stages of planetesimal growth follow an accretion model (Weidenschilling, Icarus 2000), which influences the intrinsic strength of a body and may control how its shape evolves after growth. In previous work we have determined the stress field of an accreted planetesimal accounting for possible variation in the object's spin as it accretes (Kadish et al., IJSS In Press) At the end of growth, these objects are subject to transport mechanisms that can distribute them throughout the solar system. As they are transported these objects can be spun-up by tidal forces (Scheeres et al, Icarus 2000), YORP (Bottke et al., Asteroids III 2002), and collisions (Binzel et al., Asteroids II 1989). Such an increase of spin will cause perturbations to the initial stress field and may lead to failure. We are able to show analytically that failure is initiated on the object's surface and a plastic zone propagates inward as the object's spin is increased. If we model an accreted body as a conglomeration of rocks similar to a gravel or sand, the deformation in the region of failure is characterized using a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion with negligible cohesion and zero hardening(e.g. Holsapple, Icarus 2001). Such a response is highly non-linear and must be solved using finite elements and iterative methods (Simo and Hughes, Computational Inelasticity 1998). Using the commercial finite element code ABAQUS, we present the shape deformation resulting from an elasto-plastic analysis of a spinning, self-gravitating accreted sphere that is spun-up after growth is complete. The methodology can be extended to model plastic deformation due to local failure for more complex planetesimal shapes, such as for the asteroid Kleopatra. This work has implications for the evolution of planetesimal shapes, the creation of binary and contact binary asteroids, and for the maximum spin rate of small planetary bodies.

  7. Mechanisms of membrane deformation by lipid-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2009-09-01

    Among an increasing number of lipid-binding domains, a group that not only binds to membrane lipids but also changes the shape of the membrane has been found. These domains are characterized by their strong ability to transform globular liposomes as well as flat plasma membranes into elongated membrane tubules both in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical studies on the structures of these proteins have revealed the importance of the amphipathic helix, which potentially intercalates into the lipid bilayer to induce and/or sense membrane curvature. Among such membrane-deforming domains, BAR and F-BAR/EFC domains form crescent-shaped dimers, suggesting a preference for a curved membrane, which is important for curvature sensing. Bioinformatics in combination with structural analyses has been identifying an increasing number of novel families of lipid-binding domains. This review attempts to summarize the evidence obtained by recent studies in order to gain general insights into the roles of membrane-deforming domains in a variety of biological events.

  8. Shape analysis applied in heavy ion reactions near Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Huang, M.; Wada, R.; Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Wang, J.

    2017-03-01

    A new method is proposed to perform shape analyses and to evaluate their validity in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. In order to avoid erroneous values of shape parameters in the calculation, a test particle method is utilized in which each nucleon is represented by n test particles, similar to that used in the Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations. The method is applied to the events simulated by an antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model. The geometrical shape of fragments is reasonably extracted when n = 100 is used. A significant deformation is observed for all fragments created in the multifragmentation process. The method is also applied to the shape of the momentum distribution for event classification. In the momentum case, the errors in the eigenvalue calculation become much smaller than those of the geometrical shape analysis and the results become similar between those with and without the test particle method, indicating that in intermediate heavy ion collisions the shape analysis of momentum distribution can be used for the event classification without the test particle method.

  9. Estimating volcanic deformation source parameters with a finite element inversion: The 2001-2002 unrest at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Mothes, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Deformation at Cotopaxi was observed between 2001 and 2002 along with recorded seismicity beneath the northeast (NE) flank, despite the fact that the last eruption occurred in 1942. We use electronic distance meter deformation data along with the patterns of recorded seismicity to constrain the cause of this unrest episode. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we employ inverse finite element (FE) models that account for material heterogeneities and surface topography. For a range of source shapes the models converge on a shallow reservoir beneath the southwest (SW) flank. The individual best fit model is a small oblate-shaped source, approximately 4-5 km beneath the summit, with a volume increase of roughly 20 × 106 m3. This SW source location contrasts with the NE seismicity locations. Subsequently, further FE models that additionally account for temperature-dependent viscoelasticity are used to reconcile the deformation and seismicity simultaneously. Comparisons of elastic and viscous timescales allude to aseismic pressurization of a small magma reservoir in the SW. Seismicity in the NE is then explained through a mechanism of fluid migration from the SW to the NE along fault systems. We extend our analyses to further show that if future unrest crises are accompanied by measurable seismicity around the deformation source, this could indicate a higher magma supply rate and increased likelihood of a forthcoming eruption.

  10. Origin of deformed halite hopper crystals, pseudomorphic anhydrite cubes and polyhalite in Alpine evaporites (Austria, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, C.; Neubauer, F.; Marschallinger, R.; Genser, J.; Bernroider, M.

    2013-04-01

    The Alpine Haselgebirge Formation represents an Upper Permian to Lower Triassic evaporitic rift succession of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Eastern Alps). Although the rocksalt body deposits are highly tectonised, consisting mainly of protocataclasites and mylonites of halite and mudrock, the early diagenetic history can be established from non-tectonised mudrock bodies: Cm-sized euhedral halite hopper crystals formed as displacive cubes within mud just during shallow burial. The crystals were deformed by subsequent compaction. Later, migrating fluids led to the replacement of halite by anhydrite retaining the shapes of deformed halite cubes. Polyhalite formed from subsequent enhanced fluid migration. Mudrock provided water by dewatering, while potassium and magnesium were dissolved from primary salt minerals. When these fluids interacted with sulphates, polyhalite precipitated. 40Ar/39Ar analyses date the polyhalite from within the retaining shapes of deformed halite hopper-shaped cubes from two localities to ca. 235-232 Ma (Middle Triassic). At this time, ca. 20-25 Ma after sedimentation, polyhalite crystallised at shallow levels.

  11. Origin of deformed halite hopper crystals, pseudomorphic anhydrite cubes and polyhalite in Alpine evaporites (Austria, Germany).

    PubMed

    Leitner, C; Neubauer, F; Marschallinger, R; Genser, J; Bernroider, M

    The Alpine Haselgebirge Formation represents an Upper Permian to Lower Triassic evaporitic rift succession of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Eastern Alps). Although the rocksalt body deposits are highly tectonised, consisting mainly of protocataclasites and mylonites of halite and mudrock, the early diagenetic history can be established from non-tectonised mudrock bodies: Cm-sized euhedral halite hopper crystals formed as displacive cubes within mud just during shallow burial. The crystals were deformed by subsequent compaction. Later, migrating fluids led to the replacement of halite by anhydrite retaining the shapes of deformed halite cubes. Polyhalite formed from subsequent enhanced fluid migration. Mudrock provided water by dewatering, while potassium and magnesium were dissolved from primary salt minerals. When these fluids interacted with sulphates, polyhalite precipitated. (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses date the polyhalite from within the retaining shapes of deformed halite hopper-shaped cubes from two localities to ca. 235-232 Ma (Middle Triassic). At this time, ca. 20-25 Ma after sedimentation, polyhalite crystallised at shallow levels.

  12. Effects of multi-scale roughness and frictional heating on solid body contact deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Solid body contact is restricted to a discrete number of randomly distributed microscopic areas resulting from the deformation of interacting surface protrusions (asperities). The deformation mode of these asperity contacts can be elastic, elastic-plastic, or fully plastic, depending on the local surface interference, asperity radius of curvature, coefficient of friction, and mechanical properties of the solid surfaces. Traditionally, the surface topography has been described by statistical models which rely on unrealistic simplifications of the shape, height, and size of the asperities. Such assumptions were avoided in contemporary contact mechanics analyses, which use fractal geometry to accomplish a surface topography description over a wide range of length scales. The main objective of this article is to provide an assessment of the role of multi-scale topography (roughness) and frictional heating in contact deformation of elastic-plastic solid bodies. Contact relationships, derived at the asperity level, which include the mechanical properties of surface layer and substrate medium, layer thickness, local surface interference, and equivalent asperity radius of curvature, are presented for different modes of deformation. These asperity-level relationships and a fractal model of the surface topography are incorporated into a numerical integration scheme to analyze multi-scale thermomechanical contact deformation over the entire real contact area of homogeneous and layered media possessing realistic surface topographies. To cite this article: K. Komvopoulos, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  14. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2014-09-23

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  15. Simultaneous quadrupole and octupole shape phase transitions in Thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Song, B. Y.; Yao, J. M.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of quadrupole and octupole shapes in Th isotopes is studied in the framework of nuclear Density Functional Theory. Constrained energy maps and observables calculated with microscopic collective Hamiltonians indicate the occurrence of a simultaneous quantum shape phase transition between spherical and quadrupole-deformed prolate shapes, and between non-octupole and octupole-deformed shapes, as functions of the neutron number. The nucleus 224Th is closest to the critical point of a double phase transition. A microscopic mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed in terms of the evolution of single-nucleon orbitals with deformation.

  16. Deformed proximity potential for heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A.J.

    1989-09-01

    The proximity potential is discussed for the inelastic scattering of a spherical nucleus on a deformed nucleus or the mutual interaction of two deformed nuclei. It is shown that the proximity potential is, in general, geometrically more correct than the usual centerline prescription used in inelastic scattering analyses. For the cases where the proximity potential is inadequate a folding model approach is advocated. Techniques to facilitate the coupled channels analysis are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  18. Deformation mechanisms of plasticized starch materials.

    PubMed

    Mikus, P-Y; Alix, S; Soulestin, J; Lacrampe, M F; Krawczak, P; Coqueret, X; Dole, P

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this paper is to understand the influence of plasticizer and plasticizer amount on the mechanical and deformation behaviors of plasticized starch. Glycerol, sorbitol and mannitol have been used as plasticizers. After extrusion of the various samples, dynamic mechanical analyses and video-controlled tensile tests have been performed. It was found that the nature of plasticizer, its amount as well as the aging of the material has an impact on the involved deformation mechanism. The variations of volume deformation could be explained by an antiplasticization effect (low plasticizer amount), a phase-separation phenomenon (excess of plasticizer) and/or by the retrogradation of starch.

  19. Ko Displacement Theory for Structural Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Ko displacement theory for predictions of structure deformed shapes was motivated in 2003 by the Helios flying wing, which had a 247-ft (75-m) wing span with wingtip deflections reaching 40 ft (12 m). The Helios flying wing failed in midair in June 2003, creating the need to develop new technology to predict in-flight deformed shapes of unmanned aircraft wings for visual display before the ground-based pilots. Any types of strain sensors installed on a structure can only sense the surface strains, but are incapable to sense the overall deformed shapes of structures. After the invention of the Ko displacement theory, predictions of structure deformed shapes could be achieved by feeding the measured surface strains into the Ko displacement transfer functions for the calculations of out-of-plane deflections and cross sectional rotations at multiple locations for mapping out overall deformed shapes of the structures. The new Ko displacement theory combined with a strain-sensing system thus created a revolutionary new structure- shape-sensing technology.

  20. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2012-04-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  1. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2011-11-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  2. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau–de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  3. Geological and structural characterisation of deformation zones of deep seated rockslides in metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, T.; Zangerl, C.; Fellin, W.; Brandner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Generally, deep-seated slowly moving rockslides, characterised by average slope velocities in the range of some mm to dm per year, are frequently observed in foliated metamorphic rock masses such as gneisses, schists and phyllites. Many case studies show that this activity behaviour results from deformation, i.e. sliding/creeping along one or several discrete deformation zones which originate from initial rockslide formation processes. From a geological and structural point of view such deformation zones are extremely heterogeneous and are composed of uncemented fault breccias and gouges. The material that is newly formed through cataclasis and fragmentation of the rock during shearing processes possesses soil-like mechanical as well as hydraulical properties. Consequently, slope stability and temporal deformation behaviour of rockslides is dominated by hydro-mechanical deformation zone characteristics rather than by the properties of the overall mass movement. In this study preliminary investigation results about the geological structure and mechanical behaviour of deformation zones of deep-seated rock slides are presented. The case studies herein are located in paragneissic rock masses of the polymetamorphic Austroalpine Ötztal-Stubai complex (Tyrol, Austria). In order to focus on the characterisation of the structure of deformation zones the degree of fragmentation, the spatial distribution of clay-gouges and breccias, moisture content and porosity, the distribution of shear planes, the mineralogical composition and grain shapes as well as grain alignment are investigated. Furthermore the shear strength properties (residual friction angles) are determined by ring shear tests. The results obtained are analysed in combination with geological, structural and geometrical observations of the rockslides from detailed field mapping, borehole and investigation adit data as well as slope deformation measurements. Preliminary results show a complex geological and

  4. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E.…

  5. Saddle point shapes of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D. N.; Plonski, I. H.; Greiner, W.

    2007-04-23

    Very general reflection asymmetrical saddle point nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. This equation is derived as an Euler-Lagrange relationship associated to the variational problem of minimizing the potential energy with constraints (constant volume and given deformation parameter). The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to ternary fission are outlined.

  6. Nuclear shape isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Bengtsson, R.; Sagawa, H.; Ichikawa, T.

    2012-03-01

    We calculate potential-energy surfaces as functions of spheroidal (ɛ2), hexadecapole (ɛ4), and axial-asymmetry (γ) shape coordinates for 7206 nuclei from A=31 to A=290. We tabulate the deformations and energies of all minima deeper than 0.2 MeV and of the saddles between all pairs of minima. The tabulation is terminated at N=160. Our study is based on the FRLDM macroscopic-microscopic model defined in ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES [P. Möller, J.R. Nix, W.D. Myers, W.J. Swiatecki, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 59 (1995) 185]. We also present potential-energy contour plots versus ɛ2 and γ for 1224 even-even nuclei in the region studied. We can identify nuclei for which a necessary condition for shape isomers occurs, namely multiple minima in the calculated potential-energy surface. We find that the vast majority of nuclear shape isomers occur in the A=80 region, the A=100 region, and in a more extended region centered around 208Pb. A calculated region of shape isomers that has so far not been extensively explored is the region of neutron-deficient actinides "north-east" of 208Pb.

  7. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Park, Jinah

    2016-01-01

    Background Structural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition, as an interhemispheric structure, it needs to be aligned to the midsagittal plane to assess its asymmetric and regional deformation. Method To address these issues, we propose a model-based shape assessment. Our template model of the third ventricle consists of a midplane and a symmetric mesh of generic shape. By mapping the template's midplane to the individuals’ brain midsagittal plane, we align the symmetric mesh on the midline of the brain before quantifying the third ventricle shape. To build the vertex-wise correspondence between the individual third ventricle and the template mesh, we employ a minimal-distortion surface deformation framework. In addition, to account for topological variations, we implement geometric constraints guiding the template mesh to have zero width where the inter-thalamic adhesion passes through, preventing vertices crossing between left and right walls of the third ventricle. The individual shapes are compared using a vertex-wise deformity from the symmetric template. Results Experiments on imaging and demographic data from a study of aging showed that our model was sensitive in assessing morphological differences between individuals in relation to brain volume (i.e. proxy for general brain atrophy), gender and the fluid intelligence at age 72. It also revealed that the proposed method can detect the regional and asymmetrical deformation unlike the conventional measures: volume (median 1.95 ml, IQR 0.96 ml) and width of the third

  8. Microstructures in the 6060 aluminium alloy after various severe plastic deformation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk-Cieslak, Boguslawa Mizera, Jaroslaw; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents the results concerning the microstructural refinement of the industrial 6060 aluminium alloy processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD). The high level of plastic deformation was achieved using the three methods: hydrostatic extrusion (HE), equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) and extrusion torsion (ET), which differed in the dynamics of the loading, intensity and homogeneity of the plastic strain field. Microstructure analyses were performed before and after SPD deformation using a transmission (TEM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The refined microstructures were examined qualitatively and quantitatively by the stereological methods and computer image analyses. The microstructure of the industrial 6060 aluminium alloy after deformation was characterized by an average grain size of about 0.4 {mu}m. The results show that the precipitates strongly affect the degree of refinement and the mechanism of microstructural transformations. During the SPD, the second phase particles break apart and homogenize. The HE method generates the largest increase of the volume fraction of the small primary particles. Moreover, the HE process is most effective in reducing the primary particle size. During HE and ECAE processes the second phase precipitates dissolve partially and change their shape. - Research Highlights: {yields} SPD results in a significant increase in the density of the small primary particles. {yields} SPD homogenizes the particle size distribution. {yields} HE and ECAE processes bring nano-grains in the vicinity of the primary particles. {yields} HE and ECAE processing results in the {beta}' precipitates partial dissolutions. {yields} During HE and ECAE processes the {beta}' particles change their shape.

  9. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-08-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  10. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S.

    2016-01-01

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  11. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  12. Learning a hierarchical deformable template for rapid deformable object parsing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long Leo; Chen, Yuanhao; Yuille, Alan

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we address the tasks of detecting, segmenting, parsing, and matching deformable objects. We use a novel probabilistic object model that we call a hierarchical deformable template (HDT). The HDT represents the object by state variables defined over a hierarchy (with typically five levels). The hierarchy is built recursively by composing elementary structures to form more complex structures. A probability distribution--a parameterized exponential model--is defined over the hierarchy to quantify the variability in shape and appearance of the object at multiple scales. To perform inference--to estimate the most probable states of the hierarchy for an input image--we use a bottom-up algorithm called compositional inference. This algorithm is an approximate version of dynamic programming where approximations are made (e.g., pruning) to ensure that the algorithm is fast while maintaining high performance. We adapt the structure-perceptron algorithm to estimate the parameters of the HDT in a discriminative manner (simultaneously estimating the appearance and shape parameters). More precisely, we specify an exponential distribution for the HDT using a dictionary of potentials, which capture the appearance and shape cues. This dictionary can be large and so does not require handcrafting the potentials. Instead, structure-perceptron assigns weights to the potentials so that less important potentials receive small weights (this is like a "soft" form of feature selection). Finally, we provide experimental evaluation of HDTs on different visual tasks, including detection, segmentation, matching (alignment), and parsing. We show that HDTs achieve state-of-the-art performance for these different tasks when evaluated on data sets with groundtruth (and when compared to alternative algorithms, which are typically specialized to each task).

  13. Deformations of superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova, Clay; Dumitrescu, Thomas T.; Intriligator, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    We classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d ≥ 3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and non-central charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact that short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.

  14. Static and dynamic micro deformable mirror characterization by phase-shifting and time-averaged interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frédéric

    2004-06-01

    The micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS), based on mature technologies of micro-electronics, are essential in the design of future astronomical instruments. One of these key-components is the micro-deformable mirror for wave-front correction. Very challenging topics like search of exo-planets could greatly benefit from this technology. Design, realization and characterization of micro-Deformable Mirrors are under way at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) in collaboration with Laboratoire d'Analyse et d'Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS). In order to measure the surface shape and the deformation parameters during operation of these devices, a high-resolution Twyman-Green interferometer has been developed. Measurements have been done on a tiltable micro-mirror (170×100μm2) designed by LAM-LAAS and realized by an American foundry, and also on an OKO deformable mirror (15mm diameter). Static characterization is made by phase shifting interferometry and dynamic measurements have been made by quantitative time-averaged interferometry. The OKO mirror has an actuator stroke of 370+/-10nm for 150V applied and its resonant frequency is 1170+/-50 Hz, and the tiltable mirror has a rotation cut-off frequency of 31±3kHz.

  15. Optical Detection Of Deformations Of An Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem generates small aiming-bias signals to correct for deviations of 70-m-diameter reflector of microwave antenna from its ideal shape. Takes optical measurements to determine deformations produced by such environmental factors as wind, gravity, and thermal differentials. Using these measurements, subsystem estimates misalignment of radiation pattern caused by deformations. Signals to correct for estimated misalignment added to angle-command signals of main antenna-aiming system. To measure deviations laser ranging devices placed at base of feed on rigid intermediate reference structure, white retroreflectors placed on parts that deviate from assigned positions relative to intermediate reference structure.

  16. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Robin M.; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson’s ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  17. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Neville, Robin M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-05

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson's ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  18. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Robin M.; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson’s ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures. PMID:27491945

  19. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  20. Dissipation in deforming chaotic billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alexander Harvey

    Chaotic billiards (hard-walled cavities) in two or more dimensions are paradigm systems in the fields of classical and quantum chaos. We study the dissipation (irreversible heating) rate in such billiard systems due to general shape deformations which are periodic in time. We are motivated by older studies of one-body nuclear dissipation and by anticipated mesoscopic applications. We review the classical and quantum linear response theories of dissipation rate and demonstrate their correspondence in the semiclassical limit. In both pictures, heating is a result of stochastic energy spreading. The heating rate can be expressed as a frequency-dependent friction coefficient μ(ω), which depends on billiard shape and deformation choice. We show that there is a special class of deformations for which μ vanishes as like a power law in the small- ω limit. Namely, for deformations which cause translations and dilations μ ~ ω4 whereas for those which cause rotations μ ~ ω2. This contrasts the generic case for which μ ~ ω4 We show how a systematic treatment of this special class leads to an improved version of the `wall formula' estimate for μ(0). We show that the special nature of dilation (a new result) is semiclassically equivalent to a quasi- orthogonality relation between the (undeformed) billiard quantum eigenstates on the boundary. This quasi- orthogonality forms the heart of a `scaling method' for the numerical calculation of quantum eigenstates, invented recently by Vergini and Saraceno. The scaling method is orders of magnitude more efficient than any other known billiard quantization method, however an adequate explanation for its success has been lacking until now. We explain the scaling method, its errors, and applications. We also present improvements to Heller's plane wave method. Two smaller projects conclude the thesis. Firstly, we give a new formalism for quantum point contact (QPC) conductance in terms of scattering cross-section in the half

  1. Relativistic extension of the complex scaled Green's function method for resonances in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Min; Shi, Xin-Xing; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Sun, Ting-Ting; Guo, Jian-You

    2017-03-01

    We have extended the complex scaled Green's function method to the relativistic framework describing deformed nuclei with the theoretical formalism presented in detail. We have checked the applicability and validity of the present formalism for exploration of the resonances in deformed nuclei. Furthermore, we have studied the dependences of resonances on nuclear deformations and the shape of potential, which are helpful to recognize the evolution of resonant levels from stable nuclei to exotic nuclei with axially quadruple deformations.

  2. Microscopic and self-consistent description for neutron halo in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lulu; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui

    2013-05-06

    A deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuum has been developed for the study of neutron halos in deformed nuclei and the halo phenomenon in deformed weakly bound nuclei is investigated. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and some results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nuclei {sup 44}Mg and {sup 36}Ne. The core of the former nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the existence of halos in deformed nuclei and for the occurrence of this decoupling effect are discussed.

  3. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  4. Passive deformation analysis of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R; Sung, K L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Chien, S

    1988-02-01

    The following analysis presents an experimental and theoretical study of the passive viscoelastic behavior of human leukocytes. Individual neutrophils in EDTA were observed both during their partial aspiration into a small micropipette and after expulsion from a large micropipette where the cell had been totally aspirated and deformed into a sausage shape. To analyze the data, a passive model of leukocyte rheology has been developed consisting of a cortical shell containing a Maxwell fluid which describes the average properties of the cell cytoplasm. The cortical shell represents a crosslinked actin layer near the surface of the cell and is assumed to be under pre-stressed tension. This model can reproduce the results of experiments using micropipette for both short-time small deformation and slow recovery data after large deformation. In addition, a finite element scheme has been established for the same model which shows close agreement with the analytical solution.

  5. A Geometric Classification of Jaw Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Gateno, Jaime; Alfi, David; Xia, James J.; Teichgraeber, John F.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, the most widely used classification system for jaw deformities is the one provided by the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-CM), a taxonomy scheme that is based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD). The last iteration of ICD-CM, version 10, sorts jaw deformities according to geometry, into 3 groups: anomalies of jaw size, anomalies of jaw-cranial base relationship, or unspecified. Yet these deformities can affect 6 different geometric attributes: size, position, orientation, shape, symmetry, and completeness. In clinical practice and in teaching we have found the ICD-CM classification to be incomplete and disjointed. With this in mind, we have developed a better classification system. The purpose of this paper is to present it. PMID:26608152

  6. High-resolution 3D analyses of the shape and internal constituents of small volcanic ash particles: The contribution of SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonlanthen, Pierre; Rausch, Juanita; Ketcham, Richard A.; Putlitz, Benita; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Grobéty, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of small volcanic ash particles is fundamental to our understanding of magma fragmentation, and in transport modeling of volcanic plumes and clouds. Until recently, the analysis of 3D features in small objects (< 250 μm) was either restricted to extrapolations from 2D approaches, partial stereo-imaging, or CT methods having limited spatial resolution and/or accessibility. In this study, an X-ray computed-tomography technique known as SEM micro-CT, also called 3D X-ray ultramicroscopy (3D XuM), was used to investigate the 3D morphology of small volcanic ash particles (125-250 μm sieve fraction), as well as their vesicle and microcrystal distribution. The samples were selected from four stratigraphically well-established tephra layers of the Meerfelder Maar (West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany). Resolution tests performed on a Beametr v1 pattern sample along with Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray emission volumes indicated that a spatial resolution of 0.65 μm was obtained for X-ray shadow projections using a standard thermionic SEM and a bulk brass target as X-ray source. Analysis of a smaller volcanic ash particle (64-125 μm sieve fraction) showed that features with volumes > 20 μm3 (~ 3.5 μm in diameter) can be successfully reconstructed and quantified. In addition, new functionalities of the Blob3D software were developed to allow the particle shape factors frequently used as input parameters in ash transport and dispersion models to be calculated. This study indicates that SEM micro-CT is very well suited to quantify the various aspects of shape in fine volcanic ash, and potentially also to investigate the 3D morphology and internal structure of any object < 0.1 mm3.

  7. Multifunctional shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Behl, Marc; Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Lendlein, Andreas

    2010-08-17

    The thermally-induced shape-memory effect (SME) is the capability of a material to change its shape in a predefined way in response to heat. In shape-memory polymers (SMP) this shape change is the entropy-driven recovery of a mechanical deformation, which was obtained before by application of external stress and was temporarily fixed by formation of physical crosslinks. The high technological significance of SMP becomes apparent in many established products (e.g., packaging materials, assembling devices, textiles, and membranes) and the broad SMP development activities in the field of biomedical as well as aerospace applications (e.g., medical devices or morphing structures for aerospace vehicles). Inspired by the complex and diverse requirements of these applications fundamental research is aiming at multifunctional SMP, in which SME is combined with additional functions and is proceeding rapidly. In this review different concepts for the creation of multifunctionality are derived from the various polymer network architectures of thermally-induced SMP. Multimaterial systems, such as nanocomposites, are described as well as one-component polymer systems, in which independent functions are integrated. Future challenges will be to transfer the concept of multifunctionality to other emerging shape-memory technologies like light-sensitive SMP, reversible shape changing effects or triple-shape polymers.

  8. Tensile deformation of NiTi wires.

    PubMed

    Gall, Ken; Tyber, Jeff; Brice, Valerie; Frick, Carl P; Maier, Hans J; Morgan, Neil

    2005-12-15

    We examine the structure and properties of cold drawn Ti-50.1 at % Ni and Ti-50.9 at % Ni shape memory alloy wires. Wires with both compositions possess a strong <111> fiber texture in the wire drawing direction, a grain size on the order of micrometers, and a high dislocation density. The more Ni rich wires contain fine second phase precipitates, while the wires with lower Ni content are relatively free of precipitates. The wire stress-strain response depends strongly on composition through operant deformation mechanisms, and cannot be explained based solely on measured differences in the transformation temperatures. We provide fundamental connections between the material structure, deformation mechanisms, and resulting stress-strain responses. The results help clarify some inconsistencies and common misconceptions in the literature. Ramifications on materials selection and design for emerging biomedical applications of NiTi shape memory alloys are discussed.

  9. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  10. Deformation of a micro-torque swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    The membrane tension of some kinds of ciliates has been suggested to regulate upward and downward swimming velocities under gravity. Despite its biological importance, deformation and membrane tension of a ciliate have not been clarified fully. In this study, we numerically investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modelled as a capsule with a hyperelastic membrane enclosing a Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modelled as torques distributed above the cell body. The effects of membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of the cell's reference shape, and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like a heart shape, when the capillary number was sufficiently large. Under the influence of gravity, the membrane tension at the anterior end decreased in the upward swimming while it increased in the downward swimming. Moreover, gravity-induced deformation caused the cells to move gravitationally downwards or upwards, which resulted in a positive or negative geotaxis-like behaviour with a physical origin. These results are important in understanding the physiology of a ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26997893

  11. Deformed ellipsoidal diffraction grating blank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decew, Alan E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Deformed Ellipsoidal Grating Blank (DEGB) is the primary component in an ultraviolet spectrometer. Since one of the major concerns for these instruments is throughput, significant efforts are made to reduce the number of components and subsequently reflections. Each reflection results in losses through absorption and scattering. It is these two sources of photon loss that dictated the requirements for the DEGB. The first goal is to shape the DEGB in such a way that the energy at the entrance slit is focused as well as possible on the exit slit. The second goal is to produce a surface smooth enough to minimize the photon loss due to scattering. The program was accomplished in three phases. The first phase was the fabrication planning. The second phase was the actual fabrication and initial testing. The last phase was the final testing of the completed DEGB.

  12. Calcaneo-valgus deformity.

    PubMed

    Evans, D

    1975-08-01

    A discussion of the essential deformity in calcaneo-valgus feet develops a theme originally put forward in 1961 on the relapsed club foot (Evans 1961). Whereas in the normal foot the medial and lateral columns are about equal in length, in talipes equino-varus the lateral column is longer and in calcaneo-valgus shorter than the medial column. The suggestion is that in the treatment of both deformities the length of the columns be made equal. A method is described of treating calcaneo-valgus deformity by inserting cortical bone grafts taken from the tibia to elongate the anterior end of the calcaneus.

  13. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  14. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  15. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  16. Fluorinated Azobenzenes for Shape-Persistent Liquid Crystal Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Anger, Emmanuel; Aßhoff, Sarah Jane; Depauw, Alexis; Fletcher, Stephen P; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2016-08-16

    Liquid crystal polymer networks respond with an anisotropic deformation to a range of external stimuli. When doped with molecular photoswitches, these materials undergo complex shape modifications under illumination. As the deformations are reversed when irradiation stops, applications where the activated shape is required to have thermal stability have been precluded. Previous attempts to incorporate molecular switches into thermally stable photoisomers were unsuccessful at photogenerating macroscopic shapes that are retained over time. Herein, we show that to preserve photoactivated molecular deformation on the macroscopic scale, it is important not only to engineer the thermal stability of the photoswitch but also to adjust the cross-linking density in the polymer network and to optimize the molecular orientations in the material. Our strategy resulted in materials containing fluorinated azobenzenes that retain their photochemical shape for more than eight days, which constitutes the first demonstration of long-lived photomechanical deformation in liquid-crystal polymer networks.

  17. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Birge, Noah; Erler, Jochen; Nazarewicz, Witek; Perhac, Alex; Schunck, Nicolas; Stoitsov, Mario; Nuclei Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. Overall, 140 even-even nuclei (near and among the lantanides and actinides and in the superheavy region near N = 184) were predicted by all 6 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation. The case of 112Xe also proved curious as it was predicted by 5 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation despite its proximity to the two-proton drip line. Deceased.

  18. Feature-driven deformation for dense correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Deboshmita; Sharf, Andrei; Amenta, Nina

    2009-02-01

    Establishing reliable correspondences between object surfaces is a fundamental operation, required in many contexts such as cleaning up and completing imperfect captured data, texture and deformation trans- fer, shape-space analysis and exploration, and the automatic generation of realistic distributions of objects. We present a method for matching a template to a collection of possibly target meshes. Our method uses a very small number of user-placed landmarks, which we augment with automatically detected feature correspondences, found using spin images. We deform the template onto the data using an ICP-like framework, smoothing the noisy correspondences at each step so as to produce an averaged motion. The deformation uses a dierential representation of the mesh, with which the deformation can be computed at each iteration by solving a sparse linear system. We have applied our algorithm to a variety of data sets. Using only 11 landmarks between a template and one of the scans from the CEASAR data set, we are able to deform the template, and correctly identify and transfer distinctive features, which are not identied by user-supplied landmarks. We have also successfully established correspondences between several scans of monkey skulls, which have dangling triangles, non-manifold vertices, and self intersections. Our algorithm does not require a clean target mesh, and can even generate correspondence without trimming our extraneous pieces from the target mesh, such as scans of teeth.

  19. Beam Shaped Single Mode Spiral Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-31

    directionality; he showed that suitably deformed (Limaçon shaped) resonators can partially circumvent this problem and also achieve higher optical power. He...volume, highly directional light sources possible in the future for many important applications, e.g. photonic integrated circuits, optical ...communications, and medical/biological high-sensitive sensors.Quantum cascade laser, limacon shaped, microcavity semiconductor lasers, ray optics , wave

  20. The Numba ductile deformation zone (northwest Cameroon): A geometric analysis of folds based on the Fold Profiler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, T.; Chatué, C. Njiki; Kwékam, M.; Nké, B. E. Bella; Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Fozing, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Numba ductile deformation zone (NDDZ) is characterised by folds recorded during the three deformation phases that affected the banded amphibole gneiss. Fold-shape analyses using the program Fold Profiler with the aim to show the importance of folding events in the structural analysis of the NDDZ and its contribution to the Pan-African orogeny in central Africa have been made. Classical field method, conic sections method and Ramsay's fold classification method were applied to (i) have the general orientation of folds, (ii) analyze the fold shapes and (iii) classify the geometry of the folded bands. Fold axes in banded amphibole gneiss plunge moderately (<15°) towards the NNE or SSW. The morphology of F1, F2 and F3 folds in the study area clearly points to (i) Z-shape folds with SE vergence and (ii) a dextral sense of shear motion. Conic section method reveals two dominant families: F1 and F3 folds belong to parabolic shape folds, while F2 folds belong to parabolic shape and hyperbolic shape folds. Ramsay's scheme emphasizes class 1C (for F1, F2 and F3 folds) and class 3 (for F2 folds) as main fold classes. The co-existence of the various fold shapes can be explained by (i) the structuration of the banded gneiss, (ii) the folding mechanisms that associate shear with a non-least compressive or flattening component in a ductile shear zone and (iii) the change in rheological properties of the band during the period of fold formation. These data allow us to conclude that the Numba region underwent ductile dextral shear and can be integrated (i) in a correlation model with the Central Cameroon Shear Zone (CCSZ) and associated syn-kinematic intrusions and (ii) into the tectonic model of Pan-African belt of central Africa in Cameroon.

  1. Rock Deformation Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Harry

    The Third Rock Deformation Colloquium was held December 4, 1989, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Steve Kirby of the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif., reported on actions taken by the rock deformation steering committee. Brian Wernicke of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., talked on the structural geology of the Great Basin.The steering committee voted for “Committee on Deformation of Earth Materials” as the name for the AGU technical committee on rock deformation, Kirby said. Considerable discussion has occurred in the steering committee over our relationship to the AGU Mineral Physics Committee. Indeed, Kirby will become chairman of that committee in 1990, underlining the overlap of the two groups. It was agreed that we will pursue closer association with Mineral Physics.

  2. Wrist deformities after fracture.

    PubMed

    Vanheest, Ann

    2006-02-01

    Wrist deformities can occur after fracture because of malunion of the fracture or injury to the growth plate leading to imbalance of growth. Prevention of malunion is paramount by early recognition with proper reduction and casting or fixation with casting. If a mal-union occurs, an osteotomy may be necessary if anticipated growth will not correct the deformity. Injury of the growth plate may lead to wrist deformity in two ways: angular growth or growth arrest. Angular growth deformities are corrected most commonly by osteotomy. Growth arrest of the radius or the ulna leads to an ulnar-positive or an ulnar-negative variance at the wrist. If the ulnar variance is symptomatic, treatment is centered on achieving a level joint. Options for joint leveling procedures include epiphysiodesis or physeal stapling of the longer bone, lengthening osteotomy of the shorter bone, or shortening osteotomy of the longer bone.

  3. Nonaxial hexadecapole deformation effects on the fission barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, A.; Nejati, S.

    2016-06-01

    Fission barrier of the heavy nucleus 250Cf is analyzed in a multi-dimensional deformation space. This space includes two quadrupole (ɛ2,γ) and three hexadecapole deformation (ɛ40,ɛ42,ɛ44) parameters. The analysis is performed within an unpaired macroscopic-microscopic approach. Special attention is given to the effects of the axial and non-axial hexadecapole deformation shapes. It is found that the inclusion of the nonaxial hexadecapole shapes does not change the fission barrier heights, so it should be sufficient to minimize the energy in only one degree of freedom in the hexadecapole space ɛ4. The role of hexadecapole deformation parameters is also discussed on the Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) macroscopic and the Strutinsky shell energies.

  4. Molecular basis for erythrocyte shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgsaeter, A.; Mikkelsen, A.

    1991-05-01

    The isolated plasma membrane of the human erythrocytes displays the same shape and shape transformations as the intact cells. It is therefore generally believed that the plasma membrane plays a dominant role in determining erythrocyte shape. The plasma membrane consists of a fluid lipid bilayer to the surface of which is attached a protein skeleton. The two halves of the lipid bilayer and the protein network (gel) are tighly coupled, but at the same time elastically deformable and can slide relative to one another in the plane of the cell membrane. The equilibrium shape of such a structure is determined by the combined mechano-chemical properties of the individual layers and equals the cell shape that for the given cell volume corresponds to the lowest total elastic free energy. The elastic free energy of the lipid bilayer is mainly associated with bending and change in surface area for each of the two lipid monolayer. For the protein membrane skeleton the elastic free energy mainly equals the sum of the local contributions due to shear deformation and surface change. When the mechano-chemical properties of each of the layers are known, calculation of the equilibrium shape is in principle just an exercise in standard continuum mechanics. The elastic properties of pure lipid monolayers have long been qualitatively fairly well known. The changes in lipid bilayer elastic properties resulting from the presence of integral membrane proteins have just recently become better understood. The detailed molecular basis for the elastic properties of the protein membrane skeleton remains unresolved despite many attempts to elucidate the problem. It is widely agreed that the elastic properties are largely accounted for by the highly elongated spectrin molecules, but whether the membrane skelton elasticity is mainly of entropic or entalphic origin is still unsettled.

  5. Deformable segmentation via sparse representation and dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-10-01

    "Shape" and "appearance", the two pillars of a deformable model, complement each other in object segmentation. In many medical imaging applications, while the low-level appearance information is weak or mis-leading, shape priors play a more important role to guide a correct segmentation, thanks to the strong shape characteristics of biological structures. Recently a novel shape prior modeling method has been proposed based on sparse learning theory. Instead of learning a generative shape model, shape priors are incorporated on-the-fly through the sparse shape composition (SSC). SSC is robust to non-Gaussian errors and still preserves individual shape characteristics even when such characteristics is not statistically significant. Although it seems straightforward to incorporate SSC into a deformable segmentation framework as shape priors, the large-scale sparse optimization of SSC has low runtime efficiency, which cannot satisfy clinical requirements. In this paper, we design two strategies to decrease the computational complexity of SSC, making a robust, accurate and efficient deformable segmentation system. (1) When the shape repository contains a large number of instances, which is often the case in 2D problems, K-SVD is used to learn a more compact but still informative shape dictionary. (2) If the derived shape instance has a large number of vertices, which often appears in 3D problems, an affinity propagation method is used to partition the surface into small sub-regions, on which the sparse shape composition is performed locally. Both strategies dramatically decrease the scale of the sparse optimization problem and hence speed up the algorithm. Our method is applied on a diverse set of biomedical image analysis problems. Compared to the original SSC, these two newly-proposed modules not only significant reduce the computational complexity, but also improve the overall accuracy.

  6. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  7. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  8. Ordered Patterns of Cell Shape and Orientational Correlation during Spontaneous Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Iwaya, Suguru; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. Methodology We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion) and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion). We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin) and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. Conclusions/Significance We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K) and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli. PMID:19011688

  9. Synthesis of the first heterometalic star-shaped oxido-bridged MnCu3 complex and its conversion into trinuclear species modulated by pseudohalides (N3(-), NCS- and NCO-): structural analyses and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Naiya, Subrata; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2012-01-14

    A tetra-nuclear, star-shaped hetero-metallic copper(II)-manganese(II) complex, [{CuL(H(2)O)}(2)(CuL)Mn](ClO(4))(2) (1) has been synthesized by reacting the "complex as ligand" [CuL] with Mn(ClO(4))(2) where H(2)L is the tetradentate di-Schiff base derived from 1,3-propanediamine and 2-hydroxyacetophenone. Upon treatment with the polyatomic anions azide, cyanate, or thiocyanate in methanol medium, complex 1 transforms into the corresponding trinuclear species [(CuL)(2)Mn(N(3))(2)] (2), [(CuL)(2)Mn(NCO)(2)] (3) and [(CuL)(2)Mn(NCS)(2)] (4). All four complexes have been structurally and magnetically characterized. In complex 1 the central Mn(II) ion is encapsulated by three terminal [CuL] units through the formation of double phenoxido bridges between Mn(II) and each Cu(II). In complexes 2-4 one of the CuL units is replaced by a couple of terminal azide, N-bonded cyanate or N-bonded thiocyanate ions respectively and the central Mn(II) ion is connected to two terminal Cu(II) ions through a double asymmetric phenoxido bridge. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements show the presence of moderate ferrimagnetic exchange interactions in all the cases mediated through the double phenoxido bridges with J values (H = -JS(i)S(i + 1)) of -41.2, -39.8 and -12.6 cm(-1) (or -40.5 and -12.7 cm(-1) if we use a model with two different exchange coupling constants) for the tetranuclear MnCu(3) cluster in compound 1 and -20.0, -17.3 and -32.5 cm(-1) for the symmetric trinuclear MnCu(2) compounds 2-4. These ferrimagnetic interactions lead to spin ground states of 1 (5/2 - 3*1/2) for compound 1 and 3/2 (5/2 - 2*1/2) for compounds 2-4.

  10. YAP is essential for tissue tension to ensure vertebrate 3D body shape.

    PubMed

    Porazinski, Sean; Wang, Huijia; Asaoka, Yoichi; Behrndt, Martin; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Morita, Hitoshi; Hata, Shoji; Sasaki, Takashi; Krens, S F Gabriel; Osada, Yumi; Asaka, Satoshi; Momoi, Akihiro; Linton, Sarah; Miesfeld, Joel B; Link, Brian A; Senga, Takeshi; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Urrutia, Araxi O; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Nagase, Hideaki; Matsuura, Shinya; Bagby, Stefan; Kondoh, Hisato; Nishina, Hiroshi; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto

    2015-05-14

    Vertebrates have a unique 3D body shape in which correct tissue and organ shape and alignment are essential for function. For example, vision requires the lens to be centred in the eye cup which must in turn be correctly positioned in the head. Tissue morphogenesis depends on force generation, force transmission through the tissue, and response of tissues and extracellular matrix to force. Although a century ago D'Arcy Thompson postulated that terrestrial animal body shapes are conditioned by gravity, there has been no animal model directly demonstrating how the aforementioned mechano-morphogenetic processes are coordinated to generate a body shape that withstands gravity. Here we report a unique medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) mutant, hirame (hir), which is sensitive to deformation by gravity. hir embryos display a markedly flattened body caused by mutation of YAP, a nuclear executor of Hippo signalling that regulates organ size. We show that actomyosin-mediated tissue tension is reduced in hir embryos, leading to tissue flattening and tissue misalignment, both of which contribute to body flattening. By analysing YAP function in 3D spheroids of human cells, we identify the Rho GTPase activating protein ARHGAP18 as an effector of YAP in controlling tissue tension. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognised function of YAP in regulating tissue shape and alignment required for proper 3D body shape. Understanding this morphogenetic function of YAP could facilitate the use of embryonic stem cells to generate complex organs requiring correct alignment of multiple tissues.

  11. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  12. Wavefront correction with a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F; Thibault, Simon

    2007-12-24

    This paper discusses an innovative low-cost deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid) whose surface is actuated by an hexagonal array of small current carrying coils. Predicted and experimental performances of a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror are presented along with wavefront correction examples. We show the validity of the model used to compute the actuators currents to obtain a desired wavefront shape. We demonstrate that the ferrofluid deformable mirror can correct a 11 microm low order aberrated wavefront to a residual RMS error of 0.05 microm corresponding to a Strehl ratio of 0.82.

  13. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  14. The most general form of deformation of the Heisenberg algebra from the generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Syed; Faizal, Mir; Zaz, Zaid; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Raza, Jamil; Shah, Mushtaq B.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we will propose the most general form of the deformation of Heisenberg algebra motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle. This deformation of the Heisenberg algebra will deform all quantum mechanical systems. The form of the generalized uncertainty principle used to motivate these results will be motivated by the space fractional quantum mechanics, and non-locality in quantum mechanical systems. We also analyse a specific limit of this generalized deformation for one dimensional system, and in that limit, a nonlocal deformation of the momentum operator generates a local deformation of all one dimensional quantum mechanical systems. We analyse the low energy effects of this deformation on a harmonic oscillator, Landau levels, Lamb shift, and potential barrier. We also demonstrate that this deformation leads to a discretization of space.

  15. Deformable Mirror Materials Issue Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2008-05-27

    It was a pleasure to speak with you and Dr. Olivier Guyon about your project to develop a coronagraph and in particular about materials science considerations in the development of the deformable mirror (DM) for the coronagraph. The coronagraph application will demand more of a DM than previous applications with regard to precision, and since the characterization and modeling tools are currently under development, you asked me to comment on materials issues that might impact the DM design and testing. I have not conducted research on this question, and my own research on modeling MEMS has not included DM systems. I am only in a position to discuss some general considerations that may help in developing a research plan for the DM system. As I understand it, the relevant points about the DM system are as follows. The DM surface needs to be positioned to less than 1 {angstrom} RMS of the desired shape, and be stable to 0.3 {angstrom} RMS for an hour. In the ultimate application in space the stability requirements may be greater. For example, the DM shape can be set using a bright star and then allow the coronagraph to be turned to a dim star to collect data for several hours, counting on the mirror shape to be stable. The DM is made of a polysilicon membrane coated with one or more metal layers for the reflective surface and actuated by 32x32 or 64x64 electrostatic actuators on the back side. The uncertainty in the position of any one actuator should be at the few-picometer level or less averaged over the 300-{micro}m region of the actuator. Currently, experiments are conducted that can characterize the surface shape to the 1 nm level, and it is anticipated that the experiments will be able to characterize the shape at the sub-Angstrom level but not in the immediate future. Regarding stability, under relatively large deformations (10's of nm), the DM mirror surface shows no hysteresis at the measurable nm level. Let me begin by saying that I am not aware of any

  16. Biomedical image segmentation using geometric deformable models and metaheuristics.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Pablo; Valsecchi, Andrea; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Cagnoni, Stefano; Damas, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a hybrid level set approach for medical image segmentation. This new geometric deformable model combines region- and edge-based information with the prior shape knowledge introduced using deformable registration. Our proposal consists of two phases: training and test. The former implies the learning of the level set parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm, while the latter is the proper segmentation, where another metaheuristic, in this case Scatter Search, derives the shape prior. In an experimental comparison, this approach has shown a better performance than a number of state-of-the-art methods when segmenting anatomical structures from different biomedical image modalities.

  17. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Large Monotonic Deformations of Superelastic Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebner, Aaron P.; Paranjape, Harshad M.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brinson, L. Catherine; Pelton, Alan R.

    2015-06-01

    Superelastic Nitinol micromechanics are studied well into plastic deformation regimes using neutron diffraction. Insights are made into the nature of initial transformation, bulk transformation, plastic deformation, and unloading. Schmid factor predictions based on habit plane variants are found to best describe the very first grains that transform, prior to the transformation plateaus. However, the bulk transformation behavior that gives rise to transformation plateaus violates single crystal Schmid factor analyses, indicating that in bulk polycrystals, it is the effect of grain neighborhoods, not the orientations of individual grains, that drives transformation behaviors. Beyond the plateaus, a sudden shift in micromechanical deformation mechanisms is observed at ~8.50 %/4.75 % tension/compression engineering strain. This mechanism results in reverse-phase transformation in both cases, indicating a strong relaxation in internal stresses of the samples. It is inferred that this mechanism is most likely initial bulk plastic flow, and postulated that it is the reason for a transition from fatigue life enhancement to detriment when pre-straining superelastic Nitinol. The data presented in this work provide critical datasets for development and verification of both phenomenological internal variable-driven and micromechanical theories of transformation-plasticity coupling in shape memory alloys.

  18. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  19. Biomedical applications of thermally activated shape memory polymers†

    PubMed Central

    Small, Ward; Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs. PMID:21258605

  20. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  1. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar "pearling instability."

  2. Deformation field heterogeneity in punch indentation

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Tejas G.; Saldana, Christopher; Hudspeth, Matthew; M'Saoubi, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Plastic heterogeneity in indentation is fundamental for understanding mechanics of hardness testing and impression-based deformation processing methods. The heterogeneous deformation underlying plane-strain indentation was investigated in plastic loading of copper by a flat punch. Deformation parameters were measured, in situ, by tracking the motion of asperities in high-speed optical imaging. These measurements were coupled with multi-scale analyses of strength, microstructure and crystallographic texture in the vicinity of the indentation. Self-consistency is demonstrated in description of the deformation field using the in situ mechanics-based measurements and post-mortem materials characterization. Salient features of the punch indentation process elucidated include, among others, the presence of a dead-metal zone underneath the indenter, regions of intense strain rate (e.g. slip lines) and extent of the plastic flow field. Perhaps more intriguing are the transitions between shear-type and compression-type deformation modes over the indentation region that were quantified by the high-resolution crystallographic texture measurements. The evolution of the field concomitant to the progress of indentation is discussed and primary differences between the mechanics of indentation for a rigid perfectly plastic material and a strain-hardening material are described. PMID:24910521

  3. Effects of magnetic field on the shape memory behavior of single and polycrystalline magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turabi, Ali Sadi

    Shape memory alloys and polymers have been extensively researched recently because of their unique ability to recover large deformations. Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are able to recover large deformations compared to shape memory alloys (SMAs), although SMAs have higher strength and are able to generate more stress during recovery. This project focuses on procedure for fabrication and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) of a shape memory composite actuator. First, SMP was characterized to reveal its mechanical properties. Specifically, glass transition temperature, the effects of temperature and strain rate on compressive response and recovery properties of shape memory polymer were studied. Then, shape memory properties of a NiTi wire, including transformation temperatures and stress generation, were investigated. SMC actuator was fabricated by using epoxy based SMP and NiTi SMA wire. Experimental tests confirmed the reversible behavior of fabricated shape memory composites. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  4. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  5. Study of a Ray Casting Technique for the Visualization of Deformable Volumes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Imanol; Buchart, Carlos; Aguinaga, Iker; Borro, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Deformable models are widely used in many disciplines such as engineering and medicine. Real objects are usually scanned to create models in such applications. In many cases the shape of the object is extracted from volumetric data acquired during the scanning phase. At the same time, this volume can be used to define the model's appearance. In order to achieve a visualization that unifies the shape (physical model) and appearance (scanned volume) specially adapted volume rendering techniques are required. One of the most common volumetric visualization techniques is ray casting, which also enables the use of different corrections or improvements such as adaptive sampling or stochastic jittering. This paper presents an extensive study about a ray casting method for tetrahedral meshes with an underlying structured volume. This allows a direct visualization of the deformed model without losing the information contained in the volume. The aim of this study is to analyse and compare the different methods for ray traversal and illumination correction, resulting in a comprehensive relation of the different methods, their computational cost and visual performance.

  6. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  8. Deformation behaviour of a large underground cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukoshi, Tatsuo; Mimaki, Youichi

    1985-10-01

    The Imaichi underground power station, with a cross sectional area of 1420 m2, which is now under construction by Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., is one of the largest underground caverns in the world. Due to the considerable depth of the over-burden of 400 m, the horseshoe-shaped section was adopted for the first time in Japan to minimize excesive stress concentration on the surrounding bedrock and keep loosened zones to a minimum. The bedrock consists of sandstone, slate, siliceous sandstone and breccia. The rock is generally hard and compact, with few fractured zones which may have an adverse influence on the excavation of the cavern. The supporting system of the cavern consists of prestressed rock anchors, rock bolts and shotcrete. Approximately 800 instruments, mainly multiple stage extensometers, were used to monitor behaviour of the surrounding rock during excavation of the cavern. With the exception of some cracks which occurred in a portion of the shotcrete when about half the height of the cavern had been excavated, excavation work was completed without any major trouble. In spite of the symmetrical shape of the cavern, the deformation behaviour of the surrounding rock during excavation was remarkedly asymmetric. The reason for this was concluded to be the peculiar deformation behaviour exhibited by Breccia during stress relief, as shown by in-situ rock tests, etc., and analysis of deformation data after completion of the excavation work.

  9. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  10. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Ward, L.; Fanning, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex. We have investigated the relationships between deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the Delamerian orogeny on Kangaroo Island. Several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt (D1-D4) and we describe how magma segregation, accumulation and extraction changes with deformation style. During an early upright folding event (D2), magma was channelled towards the hinge of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root that link towards a central axial planar channel, marking the main magma extraction paths. Extraction was associated with limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption. During a later deformation phase (D4), diatexites were sheared so that schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes. Foliations in the magmatic matrix and schollen asymmetry indicate dextral shearing. During flow, magma accumulated in shear planes, indicating a dilational component during shearing (transtension) and on strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned (post-D4), magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels, similar to those developed during folding. The funnel-shape networks are interpreted as magma extraction networks and indicate magma flow direction. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those developed during dewatering of soft sediments. The magmatic rocks from migmatites formed early, during folding, and formed late after deformation waned were dated. Both have two monazite (U-Pb, SHRIMP) age groups of ~490Ma and ~505-520Ma. The older sample has a well-defined peak at 505-510Ma and trails into the younger ages. The younger sample has the opposite, with few old spots and a well-defined young peak at ~490Ma. The age range indicates the duration of anatexis, and well-defined peaks are interpreted to mark the age of individual magma batch

  11. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, Pavlina; Weinberg, Roberto; Ward, Lindsay; Fanning, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex because of strong rheological contrast between layers with different melt contents and because of magma migration leading to volume changes. Migmatite deformation is intimately linked with magma extraction and the origin of granitoids. We investigate here the relationships between an evolving deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the ca. 500Ma Delamerian orogeny, exposed on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Here, several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt. During an early upright, non-cylindrical folding event, magma was channeled towards the hinge zones of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root zone that link up towards a central axial planar channel, forming the main magma extraction paths during folding. Extraction was associated with fold limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption by magma accumulation and transfer. During a later deformation phase, melt-rich diatexites were deformed, and schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes indicative of dextral shearing flow. During flow, magma accumulated preferentially along shear planes, indicating a dilatational component during shearing (transtension) and in strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned, magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to N-trending, steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels not associated to any deformational feature. The funnel-shape of these structures indicates the direction of magma flow. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those formed during dewatering of soft sediments. Despite a high degree of complexity, magma migration and extraction features record distinct responses to the evolving deformation which can be used to understand deformation, and nature and direction of melt extraction. The oldest and youngest magmatic rocks from migmatites were dated (U-Pb monazite, SHRIMP

  12. Is microrheometry affected by channel deformation?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Microrheometry is very important for exploring rheological behaviours of several systems when conventional techniques fail. Microrheometrical measurements are usually carried out in microfluidic devices made of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Although PDMS is a very cheap material, it is also very easy to deform. In particular, a liquid flowing in a PDMS device, in some circumstances, can effectively deform the microchannel, thus altering the flow conditions. The measure of the fluid relaxation time might be performed through viscoelasticity induced particle migration in microfluidics devices. If the channel walls are deformed by the flow, the resulting measured value of the relaxation time could be not reliable. In this work, we study the effect of channel deformation on particle migration in square-shaped microchannel. Experiments are carried out in several PolyEthylene Oxyde solutions flowing in two devices made of PDMS and Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). The relevance of wall rigidity on particle migration is investigated, and the corresponding importance of wall rigidity on the determination of the relaxation time of the suspending liquid is examined. PMID:27098237

  13. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  14. Preliminary investigation and application of a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Juang, T; Newton, J; Das, S; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2013-01-01

    Deformable 3D dosimeters have potential applications in validating deformable dose mapping algorithms. This study evaluates a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter and its application toward validating the deformable algorithm employed by VelocityAI. The deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter exhibited a linear dose response with a sensitivity of 0.0032 ΔOD/(Gy/cm). Comparison of an experimental dosimeter irradiated with an MLC pencilbeam checkerboard pattern under lateral compression up to 27% to a non-deformed control dosimeter irradiated with the same pattern verified dose tracking under deformation. CTs of the experimental dosimeter prior to and during compression were exported into VelocityAI and used to map an Eclipse dose distribution calculated on the compressed dosimeter to its original shape. A comparison between the VelocityAI dose distribution and the distribution from the dosimeter showed field displacements up to 7.3 mm and up to a 175% difference in field dimensions. These results highlight the need for validating deformable dose mapping algorithms to ensure patient safety and quality of care. PMID:24454522

  15. Gauge Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: a Theory of Something.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapere, Alfred Dudley

    The treatment of the motion of deformable bodies requires a specification of axes for each shape. We present a natural kinematic formulation of this problem in terms of a gauge structure over the space of shapes that the body may assume. Our first and simplest application is to a freely -falling self-deforming body. We show how deformations of a body with angular momentum zero can result in a change in orientation, and we give a general expression for the gauge potential describing the net rotation due to an arbitrary change of shape. The problem of swimming at low Reynolds number may also be formulated in terms of a gauge potential. Effective methods for computing it, by solving a linear boundary value problem, are described. We employ conformal mapping techniques to calculate swimming motions for cylinders with a variety of cross-sections. We also determine the net translational motions due to arbitrary infinitesimal deformations of the sphere and the circular cylinder. The solution is compactly expressed in terms of the field strength tensor of the gauge potential. Having solved for all cyclic swimming motions of a nearly spherical body, it makes sense to ask which motions are the best. We define a notion of efficiency and use it to determine optimal swimming strokes. These strokes are composed of propagating waves, symmetric about the axis of propulsion. Qualitatively, they resemble the swimming strokes of ciliated micro-organisms, such as the Paramecium. The solution of Stokes' equations is not feasible analytically, except for the simplest shapes. Two approximation schemes may help in studying more general swimming strokes. We discuss and test a short-wavelength analytic approximation, valid when the scales associated with a deformation are small relative to the radius of curvature of the average shape. The complementary domain of large deformations is probably best dealt with on a computer. We sketch a general method for solving Stokes' equations numerically.

  16. Shape-memory alloy micro-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, John D. (Inventor); Johnson, Alfred D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing an integral piece of thermo-sensitive material, which is responsive to a shift in temperature from below to above a phase transformation temperature range to alter the material's condition to a shape-memory condition and move from one position to another. The method is characterized by depositing a thin film of shape-memory material, such as Nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) onto a substrate by vacuum deposition process such that the alloy exhibits an amorphous non-crystalline structure. The coated substrate is then annealed in a vacuum or in the presence of an inert atmosphere at a selected temperature, time and cool down rate to produce an ordered, partially disordered or fully disordered BCC structure such that the alloy undergoes thermoelastic, martinsetic phase transformation in response to alteration in temperature to pass from a martinsetic phase when at a temperature below a phase transformation range and capable of a high level of recoverable strain to a parent austenitic phase in a memory shape when at a temperature above the phase transformation range. Also disclosed are actuator devices employing shape-memory material actuators that deform from a set shape toward an original shape when subjected to a critical temperature level after having been initially deformed from the original shape into the set shape while at a lower temperature. The actuators are mechanically coupled to one or more movable elements such that the temperature-induce deformation of the actuators exerts a force or generates a motion of the mechanical element(s).

  17. Bubble shapes in steady axisymmetric flows at intermediate Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryskin, G.; Leal, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    The shape of a gas bubble which rises through a quiescent incompressible, Newtonian fluid at intermediate Reynolds numbers is considered. Exact numerical solutions for the velocity and pressure fields, as well as the bubble shape, are obtained using finite difference techniques and a numerically generated transformation to an orthogonal, boundary-fitted coordinate system. No restriction is placed on the allowable magnitude of deformation.

  18. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their…

  19. Dynamic Recrystallization: The Dynamic Deformation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Pizaña, C.

    2007-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (PD), especially involving high strain rates (>103 s 1), occurs through solid-state flow, which is accommodated by dynamic recrystallization (DRX), either in a continuous or discontinuous mode. This flow can be localized in shear instability zones (or adiabatic shear bands (ASBs)) with dimensions smaller than 5 μ, or can include large volumes with flow zone dimensions exceeding centimeters. This article illustrates these microstructural features using optical and electron metallography to examine a host of dynamic deformation examples: shaped charge jet formation, high-velocity and hypervelocity impact crater formation, rod penetration into thick targets (which includes rod and target DRX flow and mixing), large projectile-induced target plug formation and failure, explosive welding, and friction-stir welding and processing. The DRX is shown to be a universal mechanism that accommodates solid-state flow in extreme (or severe) PD regimes.

  20. Perturbation theory for asymmetric deformed microdisk cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullig, Julius; Wiersig, Jan

    2016-10-01

    In an article by Dubertrand et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77, 013804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.77.013804] the perturbation theory for slightly deformed optical microcavities with a mirror-reflection symmetry was developed. However, in real experiments such a mirror-reflection symmetry is often not present either intended or unintended via production tolerances. In this paper we therefore extended the perturbation theory to asymmetric boundary deformations. Consequently, we are able to describe interesting non-Hermitian phenomena like copropagation of optical modes in the (counter-)clockwise direction inside the cavity. The derived analytic formulas are demonstrated at two generic boundary shapes, the spiral and the double-notched circle where a good agreement to the numerical boundary element method is observed.

  1. Explicit Seesaw Model and Deformed Fermion Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolikowski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    In the simple model of neutrino texture presented in this paper, the Majorana lefthanded mass matrix is zero, the Majorana righthanded mass matrix --- diagonal and degenerate, and the Dirac mass matrix has a hierarchical structure, deformed unitarily by nearly bimaximal mixing. In the case, when the Majorana righthanded term dominates over the Dirac term, the familiar seesaw mechanism leads effectively to the nearly bimaximal oscillations of active neutrinos, consistent with solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. If the Dirac term, before its unitary deformation, is similar in shape to the known charged-lepton mass matrix, then parameters for solar ν e's and atmospheric ν μ 's become related to each other, predicting from the SuperKamiokande value of Δ m322 a tiny Δ m212 typical for MSW LOW solar solution rather than for MSW Large Mixing Angle solution. The predicted mass spectrum is then hierarchical. In Appendix a suggestive form of nearly bimaximal effective mass matrix is derived.

  2. Metabolic dependence of red cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Robert I.; LaCelle, Paul L.; Merrill, Edward W.

    1969-01-01

    The contribution of the metabolic state of human erythrocytes to maintenance of cellular deformability was studied during and after in vitro incubation in serum for periods up to 28 hr. An initial loss of membrane deformability became apparent between 4 and 6 hr when cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were approximately 70% of initial values. Membrane deformability then remained stable between 6 and 10 hr. After 10 hr, when cellular ATP had decreased to < 15% of initial values, progressive parallel changes occurred in red cell calcium which increased 400% by 24 hr and in the viscosity of red cell suspensions which had risen 500-750% at 24 hr. A further progressive decrease in membrane deformability also occurred and was reflected by a 1000% increase in negative pressure required to deform the membrane. Red cell filterability decreased to zero as the disc-sphere shape transformation ensued. These changes were accompanied by an increase in ghost residual hemoglobin and nonhemoglobin protein. Regeneration of ATP in depleted cells by incubation with adenosine produced significant reversal of these changes, even in the presence of ouabain. Introduction of calcium into reconstituted ghosts prepared from fresh red cells mimicked the depleted state, and introduction of ATP, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and magnesium into depleted cells mimicked the adenosine effects in intact depleted cells. ATP added externally to 24-hr depleted cells was without effect. Simultaneous introduction of EDTA, ATP, or magnesium along with calcium into reconstituted ghosts prevented the marked decrease in deformability produced by calcium alone. Incorporation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), NAD phosphate (NADP), NADP, reduced form (NADPH), glutatione, reduced form (GSH), inosine triphosphate (ITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP) was without effect. These data suggest that a major role of ATP in maintenance

  3. Numerical modeling of land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in Aguascalientes Valley using regional coefficients of deformation determined by InSAR analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J.; Cabral, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernandez-Marin, M.; Ortíz, J. Á.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater over-exploitation is a deformation process affecting many cities around the world. This type of subsidence develops gradual vertical deformations reaching only a few centimeters per year, but can affect large areas. Consequently, inhabitants of subsiding areas are not aware of the process until others effects are observed, such as ground surface faulting, damage to building, or changes in the natural superficial drain. In order to mitigate and forecast subsidence consequences, it is useful to conduct numerical modeling of the subsidence process. Modeling the subsidence includes the following three basic tasks: a) Delimitation of the shape of the deforming body; b) Determination of the forces that are causing the deformations; and c) Determination of the mechanical properties of the deforming body according with an accepted rheological model. In the case of a land subsidence process, the deforming body is the aquifer system that is being drained. Usually, stratigraphic information from pumping wells, and other geophysical data are used to define the boundaries and shape of the aquifer system. The deformation governing forces, or stresses, can be calculated using the theory of "effective stress". Mechanical properties are usually determined with laboratory testing of samples from shallow strata, because the determination of these properties in samples from the deepest strata is economically or technically unviable. Consequently, the results of the numerical modeling do not necessarily match the observed subsidence evolution and ground faulting. We present in this work numerical simulation results of the land subsiding of the Valley of Aguascalientes, Mexico. Two analyses for the same subsiding area are presented. In the first of them, we used the mechanical properties of only the shallow strata, whereas in the second analysis we used "macroscopic" mechanical properties data determined for the whole aquifer system using In

  4. Deformation Timescales of Porous Volcanic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S.; Friedlander, B.; Robert, G.; Lynn, H.

    2007-12-01

    We describe results from 20 high-temperature, constant strain rate and constant load deformation experiments on natural pyroclastic materials. Experiments were run unconfined and under variable H2O confining pressures at temperatures between 650 and 900 C. Starting materials comprised 4.3 cm diameter, 6 cm length cores of sintered Rattlesnake Tuff rhyolite ash with starting porosities of 70 percent. Experimental displacement was controlled to achieve total strain values between 10 and 90 percent. In thin section, the deformed experimental end products exhibit striking similarities to all facies of natural welded pyroclastic rocks including variably flattened pumice fiamme and systematically deformed bubble wall shards. To quantify the amount of strain accumulation, we placed three manually rounded 1 cm diameter pumice lapilli at different heights in each experimental product. Axial ratios (x-axis dimension/y-axis dimension) of the deformed lapilli (fiamme) show a systematic increase with increased deformation. To further quantify strain, we measured flattening ratios of originally spherical bubble wall shards. These analyses are compared to similar measurements on natural samples to evaluate current methods of quantifying deformation in welded pyroclastic facies. Stress-strain and strain-time experimental results indicate that the glassy, porous aggregates have a strain- dependent rheology; the effective viscosity of the mixture increases non-linearly with decreasing porosity. Temperature, rather than stress is the dominant factor controlling the rheology of these materials. Results also indicate that the presence of moderate H2O pressure allows for viscous deformation (e.g., welding) to occur at significantly lower temperatures than in anhydrous conditions. Results from these experiments are used to develop a constitutive relationship in which the effective viscosity of the experimental cores is predicted using melt viscosity, sample porosity and an empirically

  5. New inverse method of centrifugal pump blade based on free form deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. H.; Guo, M.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Li, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    In this research, a new inverse method for centrifugal pump blade based on free form deformation is proposed, the free form deformation is used to parametric the pump blade. The blade is implanted to a trivariate control volume which is equally subdivided by control lattice. The control volume can be deformed by moving the control lattice, thereupon the object is deformed. The flow in pump is solved by using a three dimensional turbulent model. The lattice deformation function is constructed according to the gradient distribution of fluid energy along the blade and its objective distribution. Deform the blade shape continually according to the flow solve, and we can get the objective blade shape. The calculation case shows that the proposed inverse method based on FFD method is rational.

  6. Nonlinear deformations of microcapsules in elongation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Julien; de Loubens, Clément; Boedec, Gwenn; Georgelin, Marc; Leonetti, Marc; Soft Matter; Biophysics Group Team

    2014-11-01

    Soft microcapsules are drops bounded by a thin elastic shell made of cross-linked proteins. They have numerous applications for drug delivery in bioengineering, pharmaceutics and medicine, where their mechanical stability and their dynamics under flow are crucial. They can also be used as red blood cells models. Here, we investigate the mechanical behaviour of microcapsules made of albumine in strong elongational flow, up to a stretching of 180% just before breaking. The set-up allows us to visualize the deformed shape in the two perpendicular main fields of view, to manage high capillary number and to manipulate soft microcapsules. The steady-state shape of a capsule in the planar elongational flow is non-axisymmetric. In each cross section, the shape is an ellipse but with different small axis which vary in opposite sense with the stretching. Whatever the degree of cross-linking and the size of the capsules, the deformations followed the same master-curve. Comparisons between numerical predictions and experimental results permit to conclude unambiguously that the more properly strain-energy model of membrane is the generalized Hooke model.

  7. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Deformation of rectangular thin glass plate coated with magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Yao, Youwei; Liu, Tianchen; Liu, Chian; Ulmer, M. P.; Cao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    As magnetic smart materials (MSMs), magnetostrictive materials have great potential to be selected as coating materials for lightweight x-ray telescope mirrors due to their capability to tune the mirror profile to the desired shape under a magnetic field. To realize this potential, it is necessary to study the deformation of the mirror substrate with the MSM coating subjected to a localized magnetic field. In this paper, an analytical model is developed to calculate the deformation of rectangular coated samples locally affected by magnetostrictive strains driven by an external magnetic field. As a specific case to validate the model, a square glass sample coated with MSMs is prepared, and its deformation is measured in a designed experimental setup by applying a magnetic field. The measured deformation of the sample is compared with the results calculated from the analytical model. The comparison results demonstrate that the analytical model is effective in calculating the deformation of a coated sample with the localized mismatch strains between the film and the substrate. In the experiments, different shape patterns of surface profile changes are achieved by varying the direction of the magnetic field. The analytical model and the experimental method proposed in this paper can be utilized to further guide the application of magnetostrictive coating to deformable lightweight x-ray mirrors in the future.

  9. Shape Control of Solar Collectors Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Grossman, J. W.; Allen, J. J.; Rice, T. M.; Liang, C.; Davidson, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Solar collectors that are focused on a central receiver are designed with a mechanism for defocusing the collector or disabling it by turning it out of the path of the sun's rays. This is required to avoid damaging the receiver during periods of inoperability. In either of these two cases a fail-safe operation is very desirable where during power outages the collector passively goes to its defocused or deactivated state. This paper is principally concerned with focusing and defocusing the collector in a fail-safe manner using shape memory alloy actuators. Shape memory alloys are well suited to this application in that once calibrated the actuators can be operated in an on/off mode using a minimal amount of electric power. Also, in contrast to other smart materials that were investigated for this application, shape memory alloys are capable of providing enough stroke at the appropriate force levels to focus the collector. Design and analysis details presented, along with comparisons to test data taken from an actual prototype, demonstrate that the collector can be repeatedly focused and defocused within accuracies required by typical solar energy systems. In this paper the design, analysis and testing of a solar collector which is deformed into its desired shape by shape memory alloy actuators is presented. Computations indicate collector shapes much closer to spherical and with smaller focal lengths can be achieved by moving the actuators inward to a radius of approximately 6 inches. This would require actuators with considerably more stroke and some alternate SMA actuators are currently under consideration. Whatever SMA actuator is finally chosen for this application, repeatability and fatigue tests will be required to investigate the long term performance of the actuator.

  10. Shape Coexistence in 69Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, Daniel; Crider, Benjamin; Prokop, Chris; Liddick, Sean

    2016-09-01

    The rapid change in nuclear properties with the addition or removal of a few nucleons can provide a wealth of information on nuclear structure. One such example of rapid changes is shape coexistence which has been observed in numerous regions of the nuclear chart. Evidence for coexistence between normal and deformed configurations in the vicinity of the Ni isotopes near N = 40 has been identified in various isotopes of Co, Ni, and Cu. Levels attributed to the cross-shell proton excitations have been observed as a function of neutron number in all three isotopic chain and are observed to systematically decrease in energy with increasing neutron number. Recently, two β-decaying states in 2769Cohave been identified. However, their relative energy separation is unknown and there are some suggestions that the deformed configuration is the ground state. Observance of a weak γ-ray would, at a minimum, fix the energy difference between the two states of 2769Co.However, the search for the γ-ray transition is difficult due to the long half-life of 750-ms, a strong competition from β decay, and possibly high conversion coefficient. Observance would allow for a better understanding of the systematics of deformation in the Ni region as a function of neutron number.

  11. Nanoscale deformation mechanisms in bone.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himadri S; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Zickler, Gerald A; Raz-Ben Aroush, D; Funari, Sérgio S; Roschger, Paul; Wagner, H Daniel; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Deformation mechanisms in bone matrix at the nanoscale control its exceptional mechanical properties, but the detailed nature of these processes is as yet unknown. In situ tensile testing with synchrotron X-ray scattering allowed us to study directly and quantitatively the deformation mechanisms at the nanometer level. We find that bone deformation is not homogeneous but distributed between a tensile deformation of the fibrils and a shearing in the interfibrillar matrix between them.

  12. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Effler, Janet C; Kutscher, Brett L; Sullivan, Sarah E; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis. PMID:18652669

  13. Deformation Parameters and Fatigue of the Recycled Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šrámek, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    The deformational properties of asphalt mixtures measured by dynamic methods and fatigue allow a design the road to suit the expected traffic load. Quality of mixtures is also expressed by the resistance to permanent deformation. Complex modulus of stiffness and fatigue can reliably characterize the proposed mixture of asphalt pavement. The complex modulus (E*) measurement of asphalt mixtures are carried out in laboratory of Department of Construction Management at University of Žilina by two-point bending test method on trapezoid-shaped samples. Today, the fatigue is verified on trapezoid-shaped samples and is assessed by proportional strain at 1 million cycles (ɛ6). The test equipment and software is used to evaluate fatigue and deformation characteristics.

  14. Tidal deformation of planets: experience in experimental modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobryakov, A. P.; Revuzhenko, A. F.; Shemyakin, E. I.

    1992-06-01

    Two types of apparatus are described for laboratory modeling of tidal deformation. Plane deformation occurs in the first, and the model of the body has the shape of an elliptical cylinder; in the second three-dimensional deformation occurs, and the model is spheroidal in shape. In both cases displacements simulating motion of the tidal wave are assigned on the boundary. A global mechanism of directed mass transfer has been discovered. It is connected with transformation of vertical displacements to horizontal ones. The internal particles describe almost closed trajectories in one complete rotation of the tidal wave, but do not return to their original position. Residual displacements accumulate with increasing number of cycles and lead to differential rotation of internal masses. Questions surrounding experimental measurement of energy dissipation and the role of an internal rigid core are investigated. The effect of directed transfer on the physical fields of planets is discussed.

  15. Snout Shape in Extant Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Jonathan P.; MacLeod, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Snout shape is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout shape, with grazing and browsing species characterised by ‘blunt’ and ‘pointed’ snouts respectively, often with specification of an ‘intermediate’ sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout shape morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile shape alone. Profile shapes in our sample form a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile shapes to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is ‘unknown’ can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout shape varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The shape variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout shape, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout shape, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation

  16. Snout shape in extant ruminants.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Jonathan P; MacLeod, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Snout shape is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout shape, with grazing and browsing species characterised by 'blunt' and 'pointed' snouts respectively, often with specification of an 'intermediate' sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout shape morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile shape alone. Profile shapes in our sample form a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile shapes to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is 'unknown' can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout shape varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The shape variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout shape, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout shape, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation when repeating the

  17. Increased incidence of thoracic wall deformities in related Bengal kittens.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Timothy M; Sturgess, Christopher P

    2012-06-01

    Clinical records made during routine vaccinations were compared between populations of domestic shorthair cats and Bengal kittens. An increased incidence (12/244) of thoracic wall deformity was detected amongst the Bengal kittens. Deformities detected were: pectus excavatum (five), unilateral thoracic wall concavity (six) and scoliosis (one). Five-generation pedigrees were analysed for the affected kittens that showed a high degree of common ancestry indicating the likelihood of a familial cause.

  18. Tests of strain analysis by experimental deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; McArthur, J.

    1991-01-01

    The linearisation method and Robin's method of strain analysis of granular materials yield accurate strain estimates for a variety of materials deformed experimentally in pure shear. The breakdown of continuum behaviour at high pore fluid pressures causes the methods to overestimate the strain because they do not take added rigid-body rotation into account. Both methods tolerate some variation in initial shape ratio and some degree of initial preferred orientation at modest strains. Results of tests on polymict sandstone indicate that the lower than average ductility of competent clasts may be balanced against an unfavourable degree of preferred orientation to yield an improved strain estimate.

  19. Correction of neglected clubfoot deformity in children with Moebius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purushothamdas, Sanjay; Rayan, Faizal; Gayner, Allan

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to present the functional results of treatment of neglected clubfoot in children with Moebius syndrome. A prospective analysis of seven patients with Moebius syndrome who had corrective surgery for clubfoot deformity was performed. Functional result using a modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) questionnaire at an average follow-up of 58 months was analysed. Five children were able to have their foot flat on the ground. Additional corrective surgery was required in eight feet. Our experience of treating neglected clubfoot deformity in children with Moebius syndrome shows that correction of the deformity allows them to have a reasonable independent living.

  20. Probing deformed quantum commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Giani, Tommaso; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Several quantum gravity theories predict a minimal length at the order of magnitude of the Planck length, under which the concepts of space and time lose their physical meaning. In quantum mechanics, the insurgence of such a minimal length can be described by introducing a modified position-momentum commutator, which in turn yields a generalized uncertainty principle, where the uncertainty on position measurements has a lower bound. The value of the minimal length is not predicted by theories and must be estimated experimentally. In this paper, we address the quantum bound to the estimability of the minimal uncertainty length by performing measurements on a harmonic oscillator, which is analytically solvable in the deformed algebra induced by the deformed commutation relations.

  1. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  2. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  3. Plastic deformation and sintering of alumina under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fangming; Liu, Pingping; Wang, Haikuo; Xu, Chao; Yin, Shuai; Yin, Wenwen; Li, Yong; He, Duanwei

    2013-12-21

    Plastic deformation of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) under high pressure was investigated by observing the shape changes of spherical particles, and the near fully dense transparent bulks were prepared at around 5.5 GPa and 900 °C. Through analyzing the deformation features, densities, and residual micro-strain of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compacts prepared under high pressures and temperatures (2.0–5.5 GPa and 600–1200 °C), the effects of plastic deformation on the sintering behavior of alumina have been demonstrated. Under compression, the microscopic deviatoric stress caused by grain-to-grain contact could initiate the plastic deformation of individual particles, eliminate pores of the polycrystalline samples, and enhance the local atomic diffusion at the grain boundaries, thus produced transparent alumina bulks.

  4. Triangles bridge the scales: Quantifying cellular contributions to tissue deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Popović, Marko; Salbreux, Guillaume; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we propose a general framework to study the dynamics and topology of cellular networks that capture the geometry of cell packings in two-dimensional tissues. Such epithelia undergo large-scale deformation during morphogenesis of a multicellular organism. Large-scale deformations emerge from many individual cellular events such as cell shape changes, cell rearrangements, cell divisions, and cell extrusions. Using a triangle-based representation of cellular network geometry, we obtain an exact decomposition of large-scale material deformation. Interestingly, our approach reveals contributions of correlations between cellular rotations and elongation as well as cellular growth and elongation to tissue deformation. Using this triangle method, we discuss tissue remodeling in the developing pupal wing of the fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. Simulation of erythrocyte deformation in a high shear flow.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanori; Bessho, Sadao; Wada, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    Deformation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a high-shear flow was investigated. The RBC was modeled as a closed shell membrane consisting of spring networks in the framework of the energy minimum concept. The simulation of RBC in a parallel shear flow showed deformation parameters of RBC were well agreed with experimental results. The simulation of RBC behavior in various flow fields demonstrated that the shape was determined not only by instantaneous fluid force acting on it but also its deformation history. No consistency was found between the maximum of the first principal strain and conventionally used hemolysis index. Those results addressed the importance of considering an RBC deformation for accurately predicting hemolysis.

  6. Origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules. I. Hydrodynamics simulations of rotating droplet exposed to high-velocity rarefied gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi; Doi, Masao

    2008-09-01

    The origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules is an important information to identify their formation mechanism in the early solar nebula. The measurement of their shapes by using X-ray computed topography suggested that they are usually close to perfect spheres, however, some of them have rugby-ball-like (prolate) shapes [Tsuchiyama, A., Shigeyoshi, R., Kawabata, T., Nakano, T., Uesugi, K., Shirono, S., 2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34, 1271-1272]. We considered that the prolate shapes reflect the deformations of chondrule precursor dust particles when they are heated and melted in the high velocity gas flow. In order to reveal the origin of chondrule shapes, we carried out the three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of a rotating molten chondrule exposed to the gas flow in the framework of the shock-wave heating model for chondrule formation. We adopted the gas ram pressure acting on the chondrule surface of p=10 dyncm in a typical shock wave. Considering that the chondrule precursor dust particle has an irregular shape before melting, the ram pressure causes a net torque to rotate the particle. The estimated angular velocity is ω=140 rads for the precursor radius of r=1 mm, though it has a different value depending on the irregularity of the shape. In addition, the rotation axis is likely to be perpendicular to the direction of the gas flow. Our calculations showed that the rotating molten chondrule elongates along the rotation axis, in contrast, shrinks perpendicularly to it. It is a prolate shape. The reason why the molten chondrule is deformed to a prolate shape was clearly discussed. Our study gives a complementary constraint for chondrule formation mechanisms, comparing with conventional chemical analyses and dynamic crystallization experiments that have mainly constrained the thermal evolutions of chondrules.

  7. Osteotomies for bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Weil, Lowell; Weil, Lowell Scott

    2011-12-01

    A variety of surgical osteotomy procedures have been described for the bunionette deformity.Metatarsal osteotomies narrow the forefoot, maintain the length of the metatarsal, and preserve function of the metatarsophalangeal joint. Distal metatarsal osteotomies produce less correction and reduce postoperative disability; however, they pose a risk of inadequate correction because of the small width of the fifth metatarsal head and transfer lesions if shortened or dorsiflexed excessively. The sliding oblique metaphyseal osteotomy described by Smith and Weil (without fixation) and later by Steinke (with fixation) is easy to perform and provides good cancellous bone contact. Fixation is sometimes difficult and bone healing can take a few months owing to the unstable construct of this osteotomy. Kitaoka described a distal chevron osteotomy, which provides lateral pressure relief and reduced plantar pressure. This osteotomy is currently the most common procedure used; however, it may prove difficult to perform if the deformity is large and the bone is narrow. Diaphyseal osteotomies are indicated when greater correction is needed; however, they require more dissection and there is greater postoperative convalescence with non–weight bearing for several weeks. Proximal base osteotomies may be used to address significantly increased 4–5 IMAs or when a large degree of sagittal plane correction is required. Approaches that have been described include opening and closing base wedges and basal chevrons. Advantages to this approach are the ability to avoid epiphyseal plates in pediatric patients and maintain function of the MTPJ, while disadvantages include inherent instability of the location of the osteotomy, embarrassment of intraosseous and extraosseus blood supply of the metatarsal, and technical demand. Non–weight bearing is essential for several weeks. The Scarfette procedure is a combination head–shaft procedure, which is indicated to treat mild to moderate

  8. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  9. Advanced Curvature Deformable Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    designs using just a glass wafer and a wafer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ). In both cases minimum bend radius decreases and the resonant... matrix is consequently nearly diagonal. The long actuators at the outer edge of the deformable mirror are largely outside the working pupil so their...formal reconstruction of the wave front either explicitly or implicitly in the control matrix . The WFS-DM combination is acting like an analog computer

  10. A novel methodology for 3D deformable dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Smith, R. L.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-04-15

    three dimensions occurring as a result of the change in shape of the target between irradiations, even for a relatively simple deformation. Discrepancies of up to 30% of the maximum dose were evident from dose difference maps for three orthogonal planes taken through the isocenter of a stereotactic field. Conclusions: This paper describes the first use of a tissue-equivalent, 3D dose-integrating deformable phantom that yields integrated or redistributed dosimetric information. The proposed methodology readily yields three-dimensional (3D) dosimetric data from radiation delivery to the DEFGEL phantom in deformed and undeformed states. The impacts of deformation on dose distributions were readily seen in the isodose contours and line profiles from the three arrangements. It is demonstrated that the system is potentially capable of reproducibly emulating the physical deformation of an organ, and therefore can be used to evaluate absorbed doses to deformable targets and organs at risk in three dimensions and to validate deformation algorithms applied to dose distributions.

  11. Deformation of Wrinkled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  12. [Neurogenic foot deformities].

    PubMed

    Senst, S

    2010-01-01

    There is a multitude of neurological diseases which may lead to neuro-orthopaedic problems and subsequently to neurogenic foot deformities. For this reason the diagnostician will be consistently surprised that there is a great multitude of different foot abnormalities and that not only the typical spastic talipes equines dominates. Of particular significance here is that these deformities almost always develop progressively, whereas most diseases persist per se, cerebral palsy being a typical case in point. However, in MMC (myelomeningocele) patients, there is also the danger of a worsening of the basic problem in the case of tethered cord syndrome. Unlike congenital talipes equinovarus, neuro-orthopaedic talipes equinovarus often shows over- or undercorrection postoperatively due to a shift in muscle imbalance. It is important, therefore, that the basis of conservative therapy include regular physiotherapy and orthoses during the day and, if necessary, at night. Botulinum toxin has been established as an additional measure for spasticity; however, this cannot always prevent surgical intervention, but is able to delay this to a better point in the development of the child/patient. The present article describes the diversity of neurological deformities and presents conservative as well as surgical therapeutic approaches.

  13. Pneumatic tyres interacting with deformable terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekakos, C. A.; Papazafeiropoulos, G.; O'Boy, D. J.; Prins, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a numerical model of a deformable tyre interacting with a deformable road has been developed with the use of the finite element code ABAQUS (v. 6.13). Two tyre models with different widths, not necessarily identical to any real industry tyres, have been created purely for research use. The behaviour of these tyres under various vertical loads and different inflation pressures is studied, initially in contact with a rigid surface and then with a deformable terrain. After ensuring that the tyre model gives realistic results in terms of the interaction with a rigid surface, the rolling process of the tyre on a deformable road was studied. The effects of friction coefficient, inflation pressure, rebar orientation and vertical load on the overall performance are reported. Regarding the modelling procedure, a sequence of models were analysed, using the coupling implicit - explicit method. The numerical results reveal that not only there is significant dependence of the final tyre response on the various initial driving parameters, but also special conditions emerge, where the desired response of the tyre results from specific optimum combination of these parameters.

  14. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  15. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  16. Seismic Properties of Opalinus Clay During Triaxial Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; Braun, G.

    Argillaceous formations are being considered as potential host rocks for repositories of radioactive waste. For analysing hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechani- cal properties an underground rock laboratory has been established in the reconnais- sance gallery of the Mont Terri situated in the Opalinus Clay formation. This host rock consists mainly of 40-70% clay minerals, 10-30% quartz and 5-20% calcite with a porosity of 12-18 vol.%. We used cubic Opalinus Clay samples, oriented normal, parallel and 45 to bedding to perform deformation experiments in a multi anvil appa- ratus with simultaneous seismic velocity measurements of Vp, Vs and shear splitting in the three orthogonal directions under various loading conditions. The results show marked inherent velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting (up to more than 30%) related to the quasi-hexagonal fabric as revealed by X-ray texture measurements. The observed effects of foliation related anisotropy and, in addition, stress induced crack opening and crack closure, are important for interpreting the seismic response of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around tunnels with varying shape and orientation.

  17. Characterization of red blood cell deformability change during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Jun; Cui, Tony; Shehata, Nadine; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-02-07

    Stored red blood cells (RBCs) show progressive deformability changes during blood banking/storage. Their deformability changes over an 8 weeks' storage period were measured using a microfluidic device. Hydrodynamic focusing controls the orientation and position of individual RBCs within the microchannel. High-speed imaging (5000 frames s(-1)) captures the dynamic deformation behavior of the cells, and together with automated image analysis, enables the characterization of over 1000 RBCs within 3 minutes. Multiple parameters including deformation index (DI), time constant (shape recovery rate), and RBC circularity were quantified. Compared to previous studies on stored RBC deformability, our results include a significantly higher number of cells (>1000 cells per sample vs. a few to tens of cells per sample) and, for the first time, reveal deformation changes of stored RBCs when traveling through human-capillary-like microchannels. Contrary to existing knowledge, our results demonstrate that the deformation index of RBCs under folding does not change significantly over blood storage. However, significant differences exist in time constants and circularity distribution widths, which can be used to quantify stored RBC quality or age.

  18. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  19. Microscopic analysis of pear-shaped nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sd f interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  20. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  1. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  2. Micromachined deformable mirrors for dynamic wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas; Bierden, Paul; Perreault, Julie

    2004-10-01

    The design, manufacture, and testing of optical quality surface micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) is described. With such mirrors, the shape of the reflective surface can be modified dynami-cally to compensate for optical aberrations and thereby improve image resolution in telescopes or microscopes. Over several years, we have developed microelectromechanical system (MEMS) processing technologies that allow production of optical quality of surface micromachined mirrors. These process steps have been integrated with a commercial foundry process to produce deformable mirrors of unprecedented quality. The devices employ 140 electrostatic actuators. Measurements of their performance detailed in this paper include 2µm of useful stroke, 3nm position repeatability, >90% reflectivity, and flatness better than 20nm RMS. A chemo-mechanical polishing process has been used to improve surface quality of the mirrors, and a gold coating process has been developed to improve the reflectivity without introducing a significant amount of stress in the mirror mem-brane. An ion bombardment technique has been developed to flatten mirrors. These silicon based deformable mirrors have the potential to modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wave-front, and have applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. Design considerations and performance evaluation of recently fabricated DMs are presented.

  3. Determination of stable points in deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopivec, F.; Savsek-Safic, S.

    2003-04-01

    Determination of displacements of natural and man-made objects is one of the more demanding tasks of the surveying profession. The underlying problem is in the identification of stability and potential hazards of man-made objects in the time of building and later on, as well as earth movements brought about by natural forces or unsupervised land consumption. Due to a constant emergence of displacements, the identification of size, velocity and periodicity of displacements plays an important role especially in civil engineering, mining and related geosciences. The preliminary condition for the deformation analysis is to measure and process the data of respective epochs carefully in the sense of estimating the quality of a given network. In observations, a special emphasis should be given to detecting and eliminating the gross errors. The characteristic point displacements are identified on the basis of at least two epochs and solely on identical network points. This paper aims at presenting the implementation of the Hannover, Asanin and Mihailovic deformation analysis approaches. For the purpose of testing the approaches a trigonometric network in the shape of a sexangle with a centre point was used. The observations and displacements were simulated, accordingly, for pattern generation of normally distributed random variables the Box and Mueller polar generation method was used. On the basis of geodetic observations and with the use of statistical methods the displacements of a given object are determined. Additionally, a comparison regarding the efficiency of stable point identification according to the deformation analysis approaches has been made.

  4. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Cao, Yuchen; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. These results are to be added to the website Massexplorer (http://massexplorer.frib.msu.edu/) which contains results from earlier mass table calculations and information on single quasiparticle energies.

  5. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  6. Shape Coexistence In Light Krypton Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, E.; Goergen, A.; Bouchez, E.; Chatillon, A.; Korten, W.; Le Coz, Y.; Theisen, Ch.; Huerstel, A.; Lucas, R.; Wilson, J.N.; Becker, F.; Gerl, J.; Blank, B.; Hannachi, F.

    2005-04-05

    Shape coexistence in the light krypton isotopes was studied in a series of experiments at GANIL using various experimental techniques. A new low-lying 0+ state, a so-called shape isomer, was found in delayed conversion-electron spectroscopy after fragmentation reactions. The systematics of such low-lying 0+ states suggests that the ground states of the isotopes 78Kr and 76Kr have prolate deformation, while states with prolate and oblate shape are practically degenerate and strongly mixed in 74Kr, and that the oblate configuration becomes the ground state in 72Kr. This scenario was tested in experiments performing low-energy Coulomb excitation of radioactive 76Kr and 74Kr beams from the SPIRAL facility. Both transitional and diagonal electromagnetic matrix elements were extracted from the observed {gamma}-ray yields. The results find the prolate shape for the ground-state bands in 76Kr and 74Kr and an oblate deformation for the excited 2{sub 2}{sup +} state in 74Kr, confirming the proposed scenario of shape coexistence.

  7. Smoothly deformed light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Stig

    1993-01-01

    A single mode cavity is deformed smoothly to change its electromagnetic eigenfrequency. The system is modeled as a simple harmonic oscillator with a varying period. The Wigner function of the problem is obtained exactly by starting with a squeezed initial state. The result is evaluated for a linear change of the cavity length. The approach to the adiabatic limit is investigated. The maximum squeezing is found to occur for smooth change lasting only a fraction of the oscillational period. However, only a factor of two improvement over the adiabatic result proves to be possible. The sudden limit cannot be investigated meaningfully within the model.

  8. Dynamics of Brownian motors in deformable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulaché, Rosalie Laure; Kepnang Pebeu, Fabrice Maxime; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2016-10-01

    The directed transport in a one-dimensional overdamped, Brownian motor subjected to a travelling wave potential with variable shape and exposed to an external bias is studied numerically. We focus our attention on the class of Remoissenet-Peyrard parametrized on-site potentials with slight modification, whose shape can be varied as a function of a parameter s, recovering the sine-Gordon shape as the special case. We demonstrate that in the presence of the travelling wave potential the observed dynamical properties of the Brownian motor which crucially depends on the travelling wave speed, the intensity of the noise and the external load is significantly influenced also by the geometry of the system. In particular, we notice that systems with sharp wells and broad barriers favour the transport under the influence of an applied load. The efficiency of transport of Brownian motors in deformable systems remains equal to 1 (in the absence of an applied load) up to a critical value of the travelling wave speed greater than that of the pure sine-Gordon shape.

  9. Interactive Streamline Exploration and Manipulation Using Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-12

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing three-dimensional flow fields with streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines at once makes it difficult to locate interesting regions, but displaying too few streamlines risks missing important features. A more ideal streamline exploration model is to allow the viewer to freely move across the field that has been populated with interesting streamlines and pull away the streamlines that cause occlusion so that the viewer can inspect the hidden ones in detail. In this paper, we present a streamline deformation algorithm that supports such user-driven interaction with three-dimensional flow fields. We define a view-dependent focus+context technique that moves the streamlines occluding the focus area using a novel displacement model. To preserve the context surrounding the user-chosen focus area, we propose two shape models to define the transition zone for the surrounding streamlines, and the displacement of the contextual streamlines is solved interactively with a goal of preserving their shapes as much as possible. Based on our deformation model, we design an interactive streamline exploration tool using a lens metaphor. Our system runs interactively so that users can move their focus and examine the flow field freely.

  10. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  11. Dome corrective osteotomy for cubitus varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Tien, Y C; Chih, H W; Lin, G T; Lin, S Y

    2000-11-01

    Between 1994 and 1998, 15 patients had corrective dome-shaped osteotomy of the humerus for posttraumatic cubitus varus deformity. Thirteen patients had surgery before puberty and two patients had surgery after puberty. In the prepuberty group, all the osteotomies were done by a posterior approach with triceps muscle splitting, and cross pins were used to fix the osteotomy. In the postpuberty group, the osteotomies were done by a posterior approach with olecranon osteotomy, and reconstructive plates were used for fixation. The average followup was 2 years and 4 months. Preoperative carrying angle ranged from 19 degrees to 31 degrees varus (average, 26.2 degrees) and postoperative carrying angle ranged from 7 degrees to 15 degrees valgus (average, 10.7 degrees). No loss of correction was observed and all osteotomies united. The preoperative and postoperative differences of the lateral condylar prominence index ranged from -67% to +6% (average, -30.1%). After reviewing these cases, a dome-shaped osteotomy was found to have the following advantages for correction of cubitus varus deformity: the osteotomy site is more stable than a lateral closing wedge osteotomy for maintaining the correction obtained; the domed osteotomy avoids having the lateral condyle becoming prominent; and the posterior scar is more cosmetically acceptable than the lateral scar in the lateral closing wedge osteotomy.

  12. A Survey of Shape Parameterization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of shape parameterization techniques for multidisciplinary optimization and highlights some emerging ideas. The survey focuses on the suitability of available techniques for complex configurations, with suitability criteria based on the efficiency, effectiveness, ease of implementation, and availability of analytical sensitivities for geometry and grids. The paper also contains a section on field grid regeneration, grid deformation, and sensitivity analysis techniques.

  13. Global feedforward and glocal feedback control of large deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    With an increasing demand for high spatial resolution and fast temporal response of AO components for ELTs, the need for actively controlled, electronically damped deformable mirrors is evident. With typically more than 1000 actuators and collocated sensors, the evolving multi-input multi-output control task for shaping the deformable mirror requires sophisticated control concepts. Although global position control of the mirror would be the most promising solution, the computational complexity for high order spatial control of the deformable element typically exceeds available computing power. Due to this reason, existing deformable membrane mirrors for large telescopes incorporate local feedback instead of global feedback control and neglect some of the global dynamics of the deformable mirror. As a side effect, coupling of the separately controlled actuators through the deformable membrane can lead to instability of the individually stable loops and draws the need for carefully designing the control parameters of the local feedback loops. In this presentation, the computational demands for global position control of deformable mirrors are revisited and a less demanding model-based modal control concept for large deformable membrane mirrors with distributed force actuators and collocated position sensors is presented. Both global feedforward and glocal feedback control is employed in a two-degree-of-freedom control structure allowing for separately designing tracking performance and disturbance rejection. In order to implement state feedback control, non-measureable state information is reconstructed by using model-based distributed state observers. By taking into account the circular symmetry of the deformable mirror geometry, the computational complexity of the algorithms is discussed and model reduction techniques with quasi-static state approximation are presented. As an example, the geometric layout of required sensor / actuator wiring and computational

  14. Deformation-induced magma degassing (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, L.; Pommier, A.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J. M.; Burgisser, A.

    2009-12-01

    The style and rate of magma degassing during its rise in volcanic conduits controls the eruptive behavior of volcanoes. For example, the transition from extremely explosive to an effusive eruption of lava, as observed recently at Chaitén volcano, Chile, may be the consequence of efficient degassing of highly viscous magmas through a permeable bubble network. Magma experiences extensive shear deformation along conduit walls during its rise to the surface, which could enhance gas bubble coalescence and favor degassing of magma at depth. We performed a series of simple shear deformation experiments using an internally heated Paterson-type apparatus, on bubbly magmas at 100 MPa confining pressure and temperatures between 823 and 873K. Crystal free silicate-melt of tephri-phonolitic composition containing about 15 vol.% H2O-pressurized bubbles was used for the experiments. The experimental products were analyzed both in two and three-dimensions using an optical microscope and a X-ray nanotomographer respectively. The water content of the starting material and the deformed samples was measured by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analyses of the samples after deformation show that simple shear enhances bubble coalescence and degassing, especially at high strain (gamma~10, about 2.5 rotations). The water content of the deformed glasses is equal to the starting material at relatively low gamma (~2) while it decreases dramatically at high strain, to a value (~0.1 wt.%) much lower than the H2O-saturation limit at 100 MPa (~4.2 wt.%). An additional static experiment was performed for the same duration as the high strain experiment to check if the samples were degassing with time. The FTIR analyses confirmed that the bulk water content of the sample remains constant in the absence of shear and over the timescale of the high strain experiments. The observation that the residual water content is lower than 100 MPa-saturation value, indicates that the degassing process is not

  15. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  16. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  17. Deformability analysis of sickle blood using ektacytometry.

    PubMed

    Rabai, Miklos; Detterich, Jon A; Wenby, Rosalinda B; Hernandez, Tatiana M; Toth, Kalman; Meiselman, Herbert J; Wood, John C

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by decreased erythrocyte deformability, microvessel occlusion and severe painful infarctions of different organs. Ektacytometry of SCD red blood cells (RBC) is made difficult by the presence of rigid, poorly-deformable irreversibly sickled cells (ISC) that do not align with the fluid shear field and distort the elliptical diffraction pattern seen with normal RBC. In operation, the computer software fits an outline to the diffraction pattern, then reports an elongation index (EI) at each shear stress based on the length and width of the fitted ellipse: EI=(length-width)/(length+width). Using a commercial ektacytometer (LORCA, Mechatronics Instruments, The Netherlands) we have approached the problem of ellipse fitting in two ways: (1) altering the height of the diffraction image on a computer monitor using an aperture within the camera lens; (2) altering the light intensity level (gray level) used by the software to fit the image to an elliptical shape. Neither of these methods affected deformability results (elongation index-shear stress relations) for normal RBC but did markedly affect results for SCD erythrocytes: (1) decreasing image height by 15% and 30% increased EI at moderate to high stresses; (2) progressively increasing the light level increased EI over a wide range of stresses. Fitting data obtained at different image heights using the Lineweaver-Burke routine yielded percentage ISC results in good agreement with microscopic cell counting. We suggest that these two relatively simple approaches allow minimizing artifacts due to the presence of rigid discs or ISC and also suggest the need for additional studies to evaluate the physiological relevance of deformability data obtained via these methods.

  18. Algorithmic deformation of matrix factorisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carqueville, Nils; Dowdy, Laura; Recknagel, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Branes and defects in topological Landau-Ginzburg models are described by matrix factorisations. We revisit the problem of deforming them and discuss various deformation methods as well as their relations. We have implemented these algorithms and apply them to several examples. Apart from explicit results in concrete cases, this leads to a novel way to generate new matrix factorisations via nilpotent substitutions, and to criteria whether boundary obstructions can be lifted by bulk deformations.

  19. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  20. Search for octupole deformation in neutron rich Xe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bentaleb, M.; Schulz, N.; Lubkiewicz, E.

    1994-07-01

    A search for octupole deformation in neutron rich Xe isotopes has been conducted through gamma-ray spectroscopy of primary fragments produced in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm. The spectrometer consisted of the Eurogam array and a set of 5 LEPS detectors. Level schemes were constructed for Xe isotopes with masses ranging from 138 to 144. Except for {sup 139}Xe, none of them exhibit an alternating parity quasimolecular band, {alpha} feature usually encountered in octupole deformed nuclei. Substantial evidence for reflection asymmetric shape in the intrinsic system of the nucleus exists for the light actinide nuclei.

  1. A Deformable Generic 3D Model of Haptoral Anchor of Monogenean

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation. PMID:24204903

  2. A deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of Monogenean.

    PubMed

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation.

  3. A Theory of Shape-Shifting Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Pierre; Goldstein, Raymond; Smoukov, Stoyan; Denkov, Nikolai

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of cooled oil emulsion droplets uncovered a remarkable array of shape transformations: the initially spherical droplets flatten into polygonal shapes, first hexagons, then triangles or quadrilaterals that ultimately grow thin protrusions from their corners. These transformations are driven by a partial phase transition of the bulk liquid phase. In this talk, we explore theoretically the simplest geometric competition between this phase transition and surface tension in planar polygons. We recover the experimental sequence of shapes and predict shape statistics in qualitative agreement with experiments. Extending the model to capture some of the three-dimensional structure of the droplets, we analyse the topological transition of droplet puncture observed in experiments.

  4. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Buck, Taraz E.; Sullivan, Devin P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  5. Automatic shape model building based on principal geodesic analysis bootstrapping.

    PubMed

    Dam, Erik B; Fletcher, P Thomas; Pizer, Stephen M

    2008-04-01

    We present a novel method for automatic shape model building from a collection of training shapes. The result is a shape model consisting of the mean model and the major modes of variation with a dense correspondence map between individual shapes. The framework consists of iterations where a medial shape representation is deformed into the training shapes followed by computation of the shape mean and modes of shape variation. In the first iteration, a generic shape model is used as starting point - in the following iterations in the bootstrap method, the resulting mean and modes from the previous iteration are used. Thereby, we gradually capture the shape variation in the training collection better and better. Convergence of the method is explicitly enforced. The method is evaluated on collections of artificial training shapes where the expected shape mean and modes of variation are known by design. Furthermore, collections of real prostates and cartilage sheets are used in the evaluation. The evaluation shows that the method is able to capture the training shapes close to the attainable accuracy already in the first iteration. Furthermore, the correspondence properties measured by generality, specificity, and compactness are improved during the shape model building iterations.

  6. Canal Shaping with One Shape File and Twisted Files: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vedati Santosh; Aravind, Kumbakonam; Kumar, Harish TVS; Vishal M, Bharath; Vizaikumar, Vasudha Nelluri; Das, Rupali; Vamsilatha, K

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of two different rotary Nickel –Titanium (Ni-Ti) files, One shape file and Twisted files in a simulated artificial canals. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 endodontic training blocks were used in this study and divided in two groups consisting of 20 each ( n = 20) and the shaping ability was accessed based on the left over ink stain in the artificial canal. Results: Image proplus analysis software and stereomicroscope were used for analysing the shaping ability of the files and statistical analysis was done by SPSS software. Twisted files showed better shaping ability compared to one shape file both experimentally and statistically. Conclusion: It can be concluded that twisted files shaped the canals better then one shape file. PMID:25654059

  7. Shape optimization of peristaltic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shawn W.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2010-02-01

    Transport is a fundamental aspect of biology and peristaltic pumping is a fundamental mechanism to accomplish this; it is also important to many industrial processes. We present a variational method for optimizing the wave shape of a peristaltic pump. Specifically, we optimize the wave profile of a two dimensional channel containing a Navier-Stokes fluid with no assumption on the wave profile other than it is a traveling wave (e.g. we do not assume it is the graph of a function). Hence, this is an infinite-dimensional optimization problem. The optimization criteria consists of minimizing the input fluid power (due to the peristaltic wave) subject to constraints on the average flux of fluid and area of the channel. Sensitivities of the cost and constraints are computed variationally via shape differential calculus and we use a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method to find a solution of the first order KKT conditions. We also use a merit-function based line search in order to balance between decreasing the cost and keeping the constraints satisfied when updating the channel shape. Our numerical implementation uses a finite element method for computing a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, adjoint equations, as well as for the SQP method when computing perturbations of the channel shape. The walls of the channel are deformed by an explicit front-tracking approach. In computing functional sensitivities with respect to shape, we use L2-type projections for computing boundary stresses and for geometric quantities such as the tangent field on the channel walls and the curvature; we show error estimates for the boundary stress and tangent field approximations. As a result, we find optimized shapes that are not obvious and have not been previously reported in the peristaltic pumping literature. Specifically, we see highly asymmetric wave shapes that are far from being sine waves. Many examples are shown for a range of fluxes and Reynolds numbers up to Re=500

  8. From Shape to Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Hillel A.

    In order to make letter shape recognition an integral part of perception training, the use of the line in its two basic shapes is proposed. Letter shapes may seem exceedingly complex linear shapes to young minds. Thus instead of instruction in configuration, instruction involving transformational activities to manipulate and create the…

  9. Elastic deformations in hexagonal phases studied by small-angle X-ray diffraction and simulations.

    PubMed

    Perutková, Šárka; Daniel, Matej; Rappolt, Michael; Pabst, Georg; Dolinar, Gregor; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-02-28

    In this study we present experimental and theoretical results which concern the deviations from circularity of the pivotal plane in the inverse hexagonal phases (H(II)) of phospholipid self-assemblies. Due to packing constraints, the cross-section of the polar/apolar interface deviates from a circle, which we studied in minute detail by analysing small-angle X-ray diffraction data of dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (SOPE), respectively. On this structural basis, Monte Carlo (MC) simulated annealing variations of the free energy were carried out, both on the formation of the H(II)-phase and on the particular shape of the cross-section in the H(II)-phase. The equilibrium of the H(II)-phase pivotal plane contour and the corresponding values of the mean intrinsic curvature, H(m), and the hydrocarbon chain stiffness, τ, were determined from MC calculations. The results of these calculations were tested by solving the corresponding system of non-linear differential equations derived using variational calculus. Here our main aim is to predict the range of possible values of H(m) and τ. Comparing the measured structural data with predictions from MC calculations including lipid anisotropy, and accounting for the elastic deformations of the pivotal plane allowed us to determine a relationship between the bending deformation and stretching of hydrocarbon chains.

  10. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  11. Deformed chiral nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, C. E.; Shepard, J. R.

    1991-04-01

    We compute properties of the nucleon in a hybrid chiral model based on the linear σ-model with quark degrees of freedom treated explicity. In contrast to previous calculations, we do not use the hedgehog ansatz. Instead we solve self-consistently for a state with well defined spin and isospin projections. We allow this state to be deformed and find that, although d- and g-state admixtures in the predominantly s-state single quark wave functions are not large, they have profound effects on many nucleon properties including magnetic moments and gA. Our best fit parameters provide excellent agreement with experiment but are much different from those determined in hedgehog calculations.

  12. [Rheumatic forefoot deformities].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, R

    2014-11-01

    The frequency and extent of rheumatic forefoot deformities have been greatly reduced since the introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). The accompanying reduction in arthritic destruction of joints opens up new treatment options whereby priority is given to joint preservation. This is true for the first middle foot ray as well as for the small toe rays. Whereas resection arthroplasty of the metatarsophalangeal joints II-V was previously considered the gold standard treatment, joint-preserving operative procedures (e.g. metatarsal osteotomy and periarticular soft tissue interventions) are now being increasingly more propagated. Resection arthroplasty of the first midfoot ray has major biomechanical disadvantages so that it is not surprising that reconstructive procedures are given priority. In patients with severe arthritic destruction of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, arthrodesis has substantial biomechanical advantages compared to resection arthroplasty. Nevertheless, it has not yet been confirmed that fusion leads to superior clinical results.

  13. Influence of Holding Time on Shape Recovery in a Polyurethane Shape-Memory Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, David; Ferrando, Francesc; De la Flor, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    Shape-memory polymers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. A shape-memory polymer can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape and subsequently made to recover its original shape when a suitable stimulus is applied. This is accomplished by means of a thermomechanical cycle called programming. Programming can be performed in a stress- or strain-controlled mode. The thermomechanical conditions of the programming affect shape-memory properties differently in each programming mode. One of the parameters which significantly affects shape-memory properties in a stress-controlled procedure is stress-holding time ( t H) at high temperature. This paper studies how stress-holding time affects the most significant shape-memory properties under successive thermomechanical cycles. The experiments were conducted using two different programming temperatures in the vicinity of the T g. The shape-recovery ratio decreased dramatically with cycling even when the holding time was just a few seconds, however, the impact of the stress-holding time depends on the temperature at which it has been applied. Shape-fixity ratio and switching temperature were also studied, but stress-holding time and successive cycles do not seem to affect either of these factors.

  14. Global and Local Stress Analyses of McDonnell Douglas Stitched/RFI Composite Wing Stub Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains results of structural analyses performed in support of the NASA structural testing of an all-composite stitched/RFI (resin film infusion) wing stub box. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Company designed and fabricated the wing stub box. The analyses used a global/local approach. The global model contains the entire test article. It includes the all-composite stub box, a metallic load-transition box and a metallic wing-tip extension box. The two metallic boxes are connected to the inboard and outboard ends of the composite wing stub box, respectively. The load-transition box was attached to a steel and concrete vertical reaction structure and a load was applied at the tip of the extension box to bend the wing stub box upward. The local model contains an upper cover region surrounding three stringer runouts. In that region, a large nonlinear deformation was identified by the global analyses. A more detailed mesh was used for the local model to obtain more accurate analysis results near stringer runouts. Numerous analysis results such as deformed shapes, displacements at selected locations, and strains at critical locations are included in this report.

  15. Reflection asymmetric shapes in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Emling, H.; Holzmann, R.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Moore, E.F.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Mowbary, A.S.; Hotchkiss, M.A.; Phillips, W.R.; Drigert, M.W.; Ye, D.; Benet, P.; Manchester Univ. . Dept. of Physics; EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID; Notre Dame Univ., IN; Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN )

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data show that there is no even-even nucleus with a reflection asymmetric shape in its ground state. Maximum octupole- octupole correlations occur in nuclei in the mass 224 (N{approximately}134, Z{approximately}88) region. Parity doublets, which are the characteristic signature of octupole deformation, have been observed in several odd mass Ra, Ac and Pa nuclei. Intertwined negative and positive parity levels have been observed in several even-even Ra and Th nuclei above spin {approximately}8{Dirac h}. In both cases, the opposite parity states are connected by fast El transitions. In some medium-mass nuclei intertwined negative and positive parity levels have also been observed above spin {approximately}7{Dirac h}. The nuclei which exhibit octupole deformation in this mass region are {sup 144}Ba, {sup 146}Ba and {sub 146}Ce; {sup 142}Ba, {sup 148}Ce, {sup 150}Ce and {sup 142}Xe do not show these characteristics. No case of parity doublet has been observed in the mass 144 region. 32 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Extracting Cell Stiffness from Real-Time Deformability Cytometry: Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mietke, Alexander; Otto, Oliver; Girardo, Salvatore; Rosendahl, Philipp; Taubenberger, Anna; Golfier, Stefan; Ulbricht, Elke; Aland, Sebastian; Guck, Jochen; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth

    2015-11-17

    Cell stiffness is a sensitive indicator of physiological and pathological changes in cells, with many potential applications in biology and medicine. A new method, real-time deformability cytometry, probes cell stiffness at high throughput by exposing cells to a shear flow in a microfluidic channel, allowing for mechanical phenotyping based on single-cell deformability. However, observed deformations of cells in the channel not only are determined by cell stiffness, but also depend on cell size relative to channel size. Here, we disentangle mutual contributions of cell size and cell stiffness to cell deformation by a theoretical analysis in terms of hydrodynamics and linear elasticity theory. Performing real-time deformability cytometry experiments on both model spheres of known elasticity and biological cells, we demonstrate that our analytical model not only predicts deformed shapes inside the channel but also allows for quantification of cell mechanical parameters. Thereby, fast and quantitative mechanical sampling of large cell populations becomes feasible.

  17. Extracting Cell Stiffness from Real-Time Deformability Cytometry: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mietke, Alexander; Otto, Oliver; Girardo, Salvatore; Rosendahl, Philipp; Taubenberger, Anna; Golfier, Stefan; Ulbricht, Elke; Aland, Sebastian; Guck, Jochen; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Cell stiffness is a sensitive indicator of physiological and pathological changes in cells, with many potential applications in biology and medicine. A new method, real-time deformability cytometry, probes cell stiffness at high throughput by exposing cells to a shear flow in a microfluidic channel, allowing for mechanical phenotyping based on single-cell deformability. However, observed deformations of cells in the channel not only are determined by cell stiffness, but also depend on cell size relative to channel size. Here, we disentangle mutual contributions of cell size and cell stiffness to cell deformation by a theoretical analysis in terms of hydrodynamics and linear elasticity theory. Performing real-time deformability cytometry experiments on both model spheres of known elasticity and biological cells, we demonstrate that our analytical model not only predicts deformed shapes inside the channel but also allows for quantification of cell mechanical parameters. Thereby, fast and quantitative mechanical sampling of large cell populations becomes feasible. PMID:26588562

  18. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  19. Styrene-based shape memory foam: fabrication and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Zhou, Tianyang; Qin, Chao; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory polymer foam is a promising kind of structure in the biomedical and aerospace field. Shape memory styrene foam with uniform and controlled open-cell structure was successfully fabricated using a salt particulate leaching method. Shape recovery capability exists for foam programming in both high-temperature compression and low-temperature compression (deformation processes. Such a property could expand its potential application in the self-healing field. The mechanical property at different temperatures was thoroughly studied. Shape recovery properties such as shape fixing property and shape recovery ratio were also characterized. In order to provide guidance for the future fabrication of shape memory foam, the theories of Gibson and Ashby as well as differential micromechanics theory were applied to predict Young’s modulus and the mechanical behavior of SMP styrene foams during the compression process.

  20. Evaluation of CP shape correction for e-beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Masahiro; Bunya, Keita; Isobe, Hideaki; Komami, Hideaki; Abe, Kenji; Kurokawa, Masaki; Yamada, Akio; Sakamoto, Kiichi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Kuwano, Kazusumi; Tateishi, Masahiro; Chau, Larry

    2012-11-01

    Character projection (CP) exposure has some advantages compared with variable shaped beam (VSB) system; (1) shot count reduction by printing complex patterns in one e-beam shot, (2) high pattern fidelity by using CP stencil. In this paper we address another advantage of CP exposure, namely the shape correction of CP stencil for cancelling the pattern deformation on the substrate. The deformation of CP printings is decomposed into some elements. They are CP stencil manufacturing error, proximity effect, beam blur of the e-beam writer and resist blur. The element caused by beam blur of e-beam writer can be predicted by measuring the total beam blur obtained from CD-dose curves. The pattern deformation was corrected by applying the shape correction software system of D2S. The corrected CP stencil of 22nm-node standard cell was manufactured and standard cell patterns were exposed. We confirmed that our shape correction method is the appropriate solution for correcting deformation issue of CP openings. The beam blur required for the 1X nm dimensions was predicted from the exposure results of standard cell patterns with applying shape correction and CD-dose curves. We simulated the optical system to realize the required beam blur. As a result, the next electron optics has the resolving capability of 1X nm dimension.

  1. The influence of deformation, annealing and recrystallisation on oxide nanofeatures in oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl; Tatlock, Gordon J.

    2017-04-01

    This work demonstrates that Y-Ti oxide nanofeatures, observed in as-extruded oxide dispersion strengthened steel, are structurally modified by cold forging. A 950 °C heat treatment promoted restructuring of the deformed particles and partial recrystallisation of the cold forged alloy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that cuboid shaped nanofeatures were deformed during forging, which resulted in high number densities of lens shaped yttrium-titanium oxide particles. Annealing the forged alloy promoted partial recrystallisation of the ferritic matrix. Particle morphology reverted from lens shaped, as witnessed in the deformed material, to cuboid shaped oxide nanofeatures, identical to those observed in as-extruded material. Precipitation distributions evaluated in both recrystallised and recovering grains were indistinguishable from those first measured in the as-extruded alloy. TEM images revealed a widespread orientation relationship between the oxide precipitates and the recrystallised grains; registration with the ferrite lattice was omnipresent in both recovering and recrystallised grains.

  2. Controls on Dune Deformation Patterns in White Sands, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. B.; Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Eolian dune fields exhibit a variety of pattern transitions, including: the ab initio appearance of dunes from no dunes; transverse to barchan and unvegetated barchan to vegetated parabolic. Recent model predictions offer some insight into the mechanisms underlying some of these transitions. However, there are few direct observations, and tests providing empirical verification are sparse. The White Sands dune field exhibits all three of the aforementioned transitions in sequence, from the upwind to downwind margin, and has the potential to be a testing ground for these predictions. Repeat LiDAR data at White Sands provide an excellent opportunity to study not only dune structure, but also dune dynamics, which can provide insight into how dunes destabilize from one dune morphology into another. We employ a recently developed method for decomposing dune migration into two components: "translation" of a dune, and changes in dune shape referred to as "deformation". We find that the fastest moving dunes (i.e. the dunes translating most quickly) have the largest amount of deformation. Patterns of deformation also vary depending on dune type: transverse dunes experience coherent deformation, while parabolic dunes exhibit highly localized and apparently random deformation. Only a fraction of the deformation can be explained by the migration rate. A significant amount of deformation appears to be attributable to dune-dune interactions, which destabilize dune patterns in locations where dune density is high. At the interface between the transverse to barchan dune patterns, we describe how transverse dunes break up into barchans and compare it to published model results. Regarding the barchan to parabolic transition, we find that the onset of vegetation drives a gradual slowdown in migration rates, while the magnitude of deformation drops and becomes localized to dune crests as the arms are stabilized by plants.

  3. Folder: a MATLAB-based tool for modelling deformation in layered media subject to layer parallel shortening or extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    We present Folder, a numerical tool to simulate and analyse the structure development in mechanically layered media during the layer parallel shortening or extension. Folder includes a graphical user interface that allows for easy designing of complex geometrical models, defining material parameters (including linear and non-linear rheology), and specifying type and amount of deformation. It also includes a range of features that facilitate the visualization and examination of various relevant quantities e.g. velocities, stress, rate of deformation, pressure, and finite strain. Folder contains a separate application, which illustrates analytical solutions of growth rate spectra for layer parallel shortening and extension of a single viscous layer. In the study, we also demonstrate a Folder application, where the role of confinement on the growth rate spectrum and the fold shape evolution during the deformation of a single layer subject to the layer parallel shortening is presented. In the case of the linear viscous materials used for the layer and matrix, the close wall proximity leads to a decrease of the growth rate values. The decrease is more pronounced for the larger wavelengths than for the smaller wavelengths. The growth rate reduction is greater when the walls are set closer to the layer. The presence of the close confinement can also affect the wavelength selection process and significantly shift the position of the dominant wavelength. The influence of the wall proximity on the growth rate spectrum for the case of non-linear viscous materials used for the layer and/or matrix is very different as compared to the linear viscous case. We observe a multiple maxima in the growth rate spectrum. The number of the growth rate maxima, their value and the position strongly depend on the closeness of the confinement. The maximum growth rate value for a selected range of layer-wall distances is much larger than in the case when the confinement effect is not taken

  4. A statistical model-based technique for accounting for prostate gland deformation in endorectal coil-based MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Amir M; Sharifi, Reza; Agarwal, Harsh K; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Kruecker, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy procedures, combining high-resolution endorectal coil (ERC)-MRI with Computed Tomography (CT) images has shown to improve the diagnostic specificity for malignant tumors. Despite such advantage, there exists a major complication in fusion of the two imaging modalities due to the deformation of the prostate shape in ERC-MRI. Conventionally, nonlinear deformable registration techniques have been utilized to account for such deformation. In this work, we present a model-based technique for accounting for the deformation of the prostate gland in ERC-MR imaging, in which a unique deformation vector is estimated for every point within the prostate gland. Modes of deformation for every point in the prostate are statistically identified using a set of MR-based training set (with and without ERC-MRI). Deformation of the prostate from a deformed (ERC-MRI) to a non-deformed state in a different modality (CT) is then realized by first calculating partial deformation information for a limited number of points (such as surface points or anatomical landmarks) and then utilizing the calculated deformation from a subset of the points to determine the coefficient values for the modes of deformations provided by the statistical deformation model. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation, our results demonstrated a mean estimation error of 1mm for a MR-to-MR registration.

  5. Thin-skinned deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Joannah; Grotzinger, John; Okubo, Chris; Milliken, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Deformation of sedimentary rocks is widespread within Valles Marineris, characterized by both plastic and brittle deformation identified in Candor, Melas, and Ius Chasmata. We identified four deformation styles using HiRISE and CTX images: kilometer-scale convolute folds, detached slabs, folded strata, and pull-apart structures. Convolute folds are detached rounded slabs of material with alternating dark- and light-toned strata and a fold wavelength of about 1 km. The detached slabs are isolated rounded blocks of material, but they exhibit only highly localized evidence of stratification. Folded strata are composed of continuously folded layers that are not detached. Pull-apart structures are composed of stratified rock that has broken off into small irregularly shaped pieces showing evidence of brittle deformation. Some areas exhibit multiple styles of deformation and grade from one type of deformation into another. The deformed rocks are observed over thousands of kilometers, are limited to discrete stratigraphic intervals, and occur over a wide range in elevations. All deformation styles appear to be of likely thin-skinned origin. CRISM reflectance spectra show that some of the deformed sediments contain a component of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Several mechanisms could be responsible for the deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, such as subaerial or subaqueous gravitational slumping or sliding and soft sediment deformation, where the latter could include impact-induced or seismically induced liquefaction. These mechanisms are evaluated based on their expected pattern, scale, and areal extent of deformation. Deformation produced from slow subaerial or subaqueous landsliding and liquefaction is consistent with the deformation observed in Valles Marineris.

  6. Image segmentation based on kernel PCA and shape prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoping; Boukerroui, Djamal; Cocquerez, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    The introduction of shape priori in the segmentation model ameliorates effectively the poor segmentation result due to the using of the image information alone to segment the image including noise, occlusion, or missing parts. But the presentation of shape via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) brings on the limitation of the similarity between the objet and the prior shape. In this paper, we proposed using Kernel PCA (KPCA) to capture the shape information - the variability. KPCA can present better shape prior knowledge. The model based on KPCA allows segmenting the object with nonlinear transformation or a quite difference with the priori shape. Moreover, since the shape model is incorporated into the deformable model, our segmentation model includes the image term and the shape term to balance the influence of the global image information and the shape prior knowledge in proceed of segmentation. Our model and the model based on PCA both are applied to synthetic images and CT medical images. The comparative results show that KPCA can more accurately identify the object with large deformation or from the noised seriously background.

  7. Control of cell nucleus shapes via micropillar patterns.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhen; Yan, Ce; Peng, Rong; Zhao, Yingchun; He, Yao; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-02-01

    We herein report a material technique to control the shapes of cell nuclei by the design of the microtopography of substrates to which the cells adhere. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) micropillars or micropits of a series of height or depth were fabricated, and some surprising self deformation of the nuclei of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was found in the case of micropillars with a sufficient height. Despite severe nucleus deformation, BMSCs kept the ability of proliferation and differentiation. We further demonstrated that the shapes of cell nuclei could be regulated by the appropriate micropillar patterns. Besides circular and elliptoid shapes, some unusual nucleus shapes of BMSCs have been achieved, such as square, cross, dumbbell, and asymmetric sphere-protrusion.

  8. Understanding Gas-Induced Structural Deformation of ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Ania, Conchi O; García-Pérez, E; Haro, M; Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J J; Valdés-Solís, T; Parra, J B; Calero, S

    2012-05-03

    ZIF-8 is a zeolitic imidazolate framework with very good thermal and chemical stability that opens up many applications that are not feasible by other metal-organic frameowrks (MOFs) and zeolites. Several works report the adsorption properties of ZIF-8 for strategic gases. However, despite the vast experimental corpus of data reported, there seems yet to be a dearth in the understanding of the gas adsorption properties. In this work we provide insights at a molecular level on the mechanisms governing the ZIF-8 structural deformation during molecular adsorption. We demonstrate that the ZIF-8 structural deformation during the adsorption of different molecules at cryogenic temperature goes beyond the gas-induced rotation of the imidazolate linkers. We combine experimental and simulation studies to demonstrate that this deformation is governed by the polarizability and molecular size and shape of the gases, and that the stepped adsorption behavior is defined by the packing arrangement of the guest inside the host.

  9. Strain-Induced Deformation in Magnesia-Alumina Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Soo; Lombardo, Stephen J; Winholtz, Robert A

    2008-06-18

    Ceramic beams are induced in situ to form complex shapes at elevated temperature without the application of an external stress. This process has been demonstrated for thin alumina substrates coated with a layer of magnesia. The internal strain causing the substrates to deform at elevated temperature arises as a consequence of strain mismatch accompanying the penetration of the coating into the substrate. The magnitude of the deformation depends on the amount of coating applied, on the thickness of the substrate, on the density of the substrate, and on the temperature. During exposure of the beams to elevated temperature, the magnesia coating reacts with the alumina substrate to form the spinel phase; the resulting volume change accompanying the phase transformation is likely the predominant driving force for deformation.

  10. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  11. Possible excited deformed rotational bands in {sup 82}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.

    2011-08-15

    Excited states of neutron-rich nucleus {sup 82}Ge were studied from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Eleven new transitions and seven new levels in {sup 82}Ge were identified by using X(Dy)-{gamma}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma}-{gamma} triple coincidences. Possible excited deformed rotational bands are observed, for the first time, in this nuclear region. Coexistence of the spherical ground and deformed excited shapes is proposed in {sup 82}Ge. These deformed rotational bands can be formed by two-particle, two-hole excitations with the 0{sup +} pairing energy states of the {nu}9/2[404]{sup -2} x 1/2[431]{sup 2} configuration across the N=50 closed shell.

  12. Understanding eye deformation in non-contact tonometry.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Roland; Kurita, Yuichi; Iida, Yoshichika; Kaneko, Makoto; Mishima, Hiromu K; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Sugimoto, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Non-contact tonometers are widely used to measure the internal eye pressure, i.e. the IntraOcular Pressure (IOP), which is an important parameter for the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma. During the measurement, the eye is deformed by a short air pulse. Commonly the pressure dependent deformation is estimated from the time when the eye becomes flat, which is derived from the monitored reflection of an incident infrared light. We used a high speed camera to capture the complete motion of the eye directly and obtain more data during the pressure measurement. Assuming a simple eye model with non-linear material properties of the cornea, we extend our previous analysis of the motion of the eye, and obtain a similar principle shape of the eye deformation as observed in the experiments.

  13. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Rock Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirth, James G.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-09-21

    The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the

  14. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation.

  15. Structural shape optimization in multidisciplinary system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    Structural shape optimization couples with other discipline optimization in the design of complex engineering systems. For instance, the wing structural weight and elastic deformations couple to aerodynamic loads and aircraft performance through drag. This coupling makes structural shape optimization a subtask in the overall vehicle synthesis. Decomposition methods for optimization and sensitivity analysis allow the specialized disciplinary methods to be used while the disciplines are temporarily decoupled, after which the interdisciplinary couplings are restored at the system level. Application of decomposition methods to structures-aerodynamics coupling in aircraft is outlined and illustrated with a numerical example of a transport aircraft. It is concluded that these methods may integrate structural and aerodynamic shape optimizations with the unified objective of the maximum aircraft performance.

  16. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  17. Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2008-03-31

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light. (laser biology)

  18. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  19. A skeleton family generator via physics-based deformable models.

    PubMed

    Krinidis, Stelios; Chatzis, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for object skeleton family extraction. The introduced technique utilizes a 2-D physics-based deformable model that parameterizes the objects shape. Deformation equations are solved exploiting modal analysis, and proportional to model physical characteristics, a different skeleton is produced every time, generating, in this way, a family of skeletons. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons match to hand-labeled skeletons provided by human subjects, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, cuts and tears, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, the proposed approach produces no spurious branches without the need of any known skeleton pruning method.

  20. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-31

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  1. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-09-18

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  2. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2010-06-23

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  3. Microscopic and Macroscopic Dynamic Interface Shapes and the Interpretation of Dynamic Contact Angles.

    PubMed

    Ramé; Garoff

    1996-01-15

    We have studied shapes of dynamic fluid interfaces at distances deformation is important, an analysis valid to O(1) in Ca describes the shape of the fluid interface. Static capillarity should describe the interface shape far from the contact line. We have quantitatively determined the extent of the regions described by the analysis with viscous deformation and by a static shape as a function of Ca. We observe a third portion of the interface between the two regions cited above, which is not described by either the analysis with viscous deformation or a static shape. In this third region the interface shape is controlled by viscous and gravitational forces of comparable magnitude. We detect significant viscous deformation even far from the contact line at Ca approximately > 0.01. Our measured dynamic contact angle parameter extracted by fitting the analysis with viscous deformation to the shape near the moving contact line coincides with the contact angle of the static-like shape far from the contact line. We measure and explain the discrepancy between this dynamic contact angle parameter and the apparent contact angles based on meniscus or apex heights. Our observations of viscous effects at large distances from the contact line have implications for dynamic contact angle measurements in capillary tubes.

  4. The average shape of the closed trefoil knot fluctuating on a floppy rope.

    PubMed

    Modlinski, Marcin; Przybyl, Sylwester; Pieranski, Piotr

    2013-05-01

    The average shape of the trefoil knot tied on a floppy, hard rope subject to thermal fluctuations has been determined. The fluctuations of the shape of knots were performed by random bending. As a result of the changing shape procedure large sets of deformed conformations of the initial knot were obtained. Afterwards, these sets were subject to the shape-fitting procedure. It has been found that the conformation is different from the ideal conformation of the knot.

  5. Deformation of Platonic foam cells: effect on growth rate.

    PubMed

    Evans, Myfanwy E; Zirkelbach, Johannes; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Kraynik, Andrew M; Mecke, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    The diffusive growth rate of a polyhedral cell in dry three-dimensional foams depends on details of shape beyond cell topology, in contrast to the situation in two dimensions, where, by von Neumann's law, the growth rate depends only on the number of cell edges. We analyze the dependence of the instantaneous growth rate on the shape of single foam cells surrounded by uniform pressure; this is accomplished by supporting the cell with films connected to a wire frame and inducing cell distortions by deforming the wire frame. We consider three foam cells with a very simple topology; these are the Platonic foam cells, which satisfy Plateau's laws and are based on the trivalent Platonic solids (tetrahedron, cube, and dodecahedron). The Surface Evolver is used to model cell deformations induced through extension, compression, shear, and torsion of the wire frames. The growth rate depends on the deformation mode and frame size and can increase or decrease with increasing cell distortion. The cells have negative growth rates, in general, but dodecahedral cells subjected to torsion in small wire frames can have positive growth rates. The deformation of cubic cells is demonstrated experimentally.

  6. Deformation of Platonic foam cells: Effect on growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Myfanwy E.; Zirkelbach, Johannes; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Kraynik, Andrew M.; Mecke, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    The diffusive growth rate of a polyhedral cell in dry three-dimensional foams depends on details of shape beyond cell topology, in contrast to the situation in two dimensions, where, by von Neumann's law, the growth rate depends only on the number of cell edges. We analyze the dependence of the instantaneous growth rate on the shape of single foam cells surrounded by uniform pressure; this is accomplished by supporting the cell with films connected to a wire frame and inducing cell distortions by deforming the wire frame. We consider three foam cells with a very simple topology; these are the Platonic foam cells, which satisfy Plateau's laws and are based on the trivalent Platonic solids (tetrahedron, cube, and dodecahedron). The Surface Evolver is used to model cell deformations induced through extension, compression, shear, and torsion of the wire frames. The growth rate depends on the deformation mode and frame size and can increase or decrease with increasing cell distortion. The cells have negative growth rates, in general, but dodecahedral cells subjected to torsion in small wire frames can have positive growth rates. The deformation of cubic cells is demonstrated experimentally.

  7. Simultaneous concentration and purification through gradient deformation chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velayudhan, A.; Hendrickson, R. L.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Mobile-phase additives, commonly used to modulate absorbate retention in gradient elution chromatography, are usually assumed to be either linearly retained or unretained. Previous theoretical work from our laboratory has shown that these modulators, such as salts in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography and organic modifiers in reversed-phase chromatography, can absorb nonlinearly, giving rise to gradient deformation. Consequently, adsorbate peaks that elute in the vicinity of the head of the deformed gradient may exhibit unusual shapes, form shoulders, and/or be concentrated. These effects for a reversed-phase sorbent with aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) as the modulator are verified experimentally. Gradient deformation is demonstrated experimentally and agrees with simulations based on ACN isotherm parameters that are independently determined from batch equilibrium studies using the layer model. Unusual absorbate peak shapes were found experimentally for single-component injections of phenylalanine, similar to those calculated by the simulations. A binary mixture of tryptophan and phenylalanine is used to demonstrate simultaneous concentration and separation, again in agreement with simulations. The possibility of gradient deformation in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography is discussed.

  8. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  9. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect

  10. Reduction of deformability of erythrocytes of ischemic rats under the action of semax: examination by the method of laser diffractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugovtsov, A. E.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Fadukova, O. E.; Koshelev, V. B.

    2006-08-01

    Reduced ability of erythrocytes of ischemic rats to change their shape in shear flow and semax effect on the deformability of erythrocytes are studied with laser diffractometry technique. It is shown that both in vivo and in vitro applied semax positively influences the impaired deformability properties of erythrocytes of ischemic rats.

  11. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  12. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  13. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  14. A numerical simulation of flows around a deformable gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Minoru; Ishii, Ryuji; Morioka, Shigeki

    1991-12-01

    A numerical simulation of flows around a (deformable) gas bubble rising through an incompressible viscous fluid was carried out on a supercomputer Fujitsu VP2600 at Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. The solution algorithm is a modified Marker And Cell (MAC) method. For the grid generation, an orthogonal mapping proposed by Ryskin and Leal was applied. it is assumed that the shape of the bubble and the flow field are axisymmetric.

  15. Optical Diagnostic Imaging Of Surface Topography And Body Deformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windischbauer, Gerhard

    1989-04-01

    Modern diagnostic imaging techniques are providing three-dimensional images by the combination of analog sensing devices, powerful digital processors and graphic displays. Computer based optical imaging systems are used for detection and tracking of body deformities in Orthopaedics. To establish a morphometric data-base means for comparing and averaging similar shapes have to be prepared. Assuming fast technological advancements use at present and prospective applications are given.

  16. Remanent magnetism and ductile deformation in an experimentally deformed magnetite-bearing limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.

    1991-07-01

    A limestone with pseudo-single-domain (PSD) pure magnetite is given an isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM). Samples are deformed triaxially at 200 MPa (2 kbar) confining pressure at room temperature and at a strain-rate of 10 -5 s -1. The limestone deforms in a ductile manner by twinning to produce sufficiently homogeneously strained specimens up to about 20% shortening. The uniform, saturation IRM rotates away from the shortening axis, approximately by an amount expected for the homogeneous strain of a non-material line marker. Hydrostatic compaction alone shows that this is time-dependent and compatible with progressive damage of the ferrimagnetic grains. Strain produces an increase in coercivity of the magnetite, an increase in its saturation remanence, and an increase in its anisotropy of magnetization (with respect to IRM). These observations are compatible with reduction in effective grain size and change of shape of magnetite. Experimental deformation reduces the intensity of magnetisation, chiefly by the removal of low-coercivity components of remanence when there is a pure IRM vector.

  17. A simulation study of planar swaging deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-Gen; Jen, Gwang-Shen; Su, Gwang-Huei

    1992-08-01

    Planar swaging deformation was studied with a photoplastic method. The domestic polycarbonate was used as a simulation material. The full-field strain distribution for planar swaging deformation was obtained. The average error of the calculated strain was less than 7 percent. The deformation area and the effect of friction on deformation area were studied with the characteristics of photoplasticity. This paper points out the special features of planar swaging deformation and the effect of lubrication on deformation flow.

  18. Femoral deformity planning: intentional placement of the apex of deformity.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Camara, James M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, correction of femoral deformity has been performed with osteotomies through the center of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the CORA location is not always practical. If the osteotomy is created at a site adjacent to the CORA, an additional translation must be performed to accurately correct the deformity. However, at times, the ideal osteotomy site may require an unfeasible amount of translation. Multiple osteotomies may also be problematic, and when overcorrection of the mechanical axis is planned, the CORA method is not practical.This article describes a novel method by which the surgeon may choose the location of the osteotomy regardless of the location of the CORA and may consolidate a multiapical deformity into a single corrective osteotomy. Furthermore, intentional mechanical axis overcorrection may be performed to unload knee joint arthritis. Simple, complex, and multiapical deformities may now be corrected via a single familiar surgical procedure, such as a distal femoral osteotomy, and the need for translation is eliminated.

  19. An EBSD study of texture development and hybrid deformation mechanisms in fine grained calcite aggregates deformed in direct shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, X.; Trullenque, G.; Drury, M. R.; de Bresser, J.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding of texture development and its relation to grain size sensitive (GSS) deformation mechanism is of great importance since the rheological behavior of rocks varies substantially depending on which deformation mechanisms are controlling. Recent studies on naturally and experimentally deformed calcite and olivine aggregates have demonstrated that even fine grained materials that are expected to deform by grain size sensitive (GSS) mechanisms, develop a weak but distinct LPO (texture) at high strain. To investigate this behavior we conducted new deformation experiments on Solnhofen limestone in direct shear. This study is part of a wider investigation on large strain deformation in different deformation modes from G. Trullenque, in collaboration with D.L. Kohlstedt (Minneapolis, USA), R. Heilbronner and H. Stuenitz (Basel, Switzerland) and the Utrecht group. The samples have been deformed to high strain both in the conditions of the transition between the GSS and GSI creep regime and in the GSS creep regime. We used Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the texture strength of the samples, the distribution of misorientation axes and the grain size distributions. The results show an oblique shape preferred orientation at 35° to 40° to the shear plane and a moderate LPO. The c-axis preferred orientation shows a girdle with one main maximum at a high angle to the shear plane, displaced towards the shortening direction of the imposed shear. The a-axes present a weak girdle perpendicular to the c-axis. Grain growth occurred during high deformation. The misorientation angle distribution has a main peak at low angle. This is due to the progressive subgrain formation and rotation which occurred mainly in the larger grains. Subgrain rotation with misorientations up to 10° occured but most boundaries are low angle (< 5°). This shows the formation of new high angle boundaries and grain size reduction. The formation of subgrains and subgrain

  20. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual cluttering for visualizing 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely.

  1. Nonlinear optimization simplified by hypersurface deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stillinger, F.H.; Weber, T.A.

    1988-09-01

    A general strategy is advanced for simplifying nonlinear optimization problems, the ant-lion method. This approach exploits shape modifications of the cost-function hypersurface which distend basins surrounding low-lying minima (including global minima). By intertwining hypersurface deformations with steepest-descent displacements, the search is concentrated on a small relevant subset of all minima. Specific calculations demonstrating the value of this method are reported for the partitioning of two classes of irregular but nonrandom graphs, the prime-factor graphs and the pi graphs. We also indicate how this approach can be applied to the traveling salesman problem and to design layout optimization, and that it may be useful in combination with simulated annealing strategies.

  2. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  3. Measurement of surface deformation of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Stokes, I; Greenapple, D M

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the surface shape and deformations of soft tissue in three dimensions. The method uses close range stereophotogrammetry to record the three-dimensional locations of miniature optical targets applied to the tissue surface. This has been applied to study of human lumbar intervertebral disc. Measurements of the strain along surface annular fibers have been made under varying loads. In this case the maximum expected errors are about 0.15 mm, which corresponds to a strain of less than 1%. Preliminary findings have differed from predictions made in published mathematical models for the disc in that they show very little strain of the annulus in compression loading, but confirm axial torsional loading as liable to produce mechanical disruption of the disc annulus.

  4. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual clutter in 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely. PMID:26600061

  5. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  6. Control of micromachined deformable mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, M. L.; Bartman, R.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Kaiser, W.; Wang, P. K. C.

    1993-01-01

    A micromachined deformable mirror with pixelated electrostatic actuators is proposed. The paper begins with a physical description of the proposed mirror. Then a mathematical model in the form of a nonlinear partial differential equation describing the mirror surface deformations is derived. This model is used to derive the required voltages for the actuators to achieve a specified static deformation of the mirror surface. This is followed by the derivation of a static nonlinear feedback controller for achieving noninteracting actuation. Then the structure for a complete control system for wavefront correction is proposed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the physical implementation of the proposed control system.

  7. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  8. Plastically deformed region around indentations on Si angle crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.

    1994-12-01

    Expansion of a hemispherical shell by inner pressure has been widely applied for the model of the deformation by an indentation on a flat surface; however, the deformed region is not necessarily spherically symmetric, especially in anisotropic materials such as single crystals. Therefore, whether the spherical model is applicable in an indentation process for objective materials must always be kept in mind. Indentations have been made on the (111) surface of silicon crystal at various temperatures. The three-dimensional shape of the plastically deformed region was experimentally measured by means of an etching technique and its difference from the hemisphere was observed. It was never spherical but much more complicated, similar to a bottle gourd. The slip mechanism, which resulted in the observed shape of the plastic region, is discussed further. The plastic region was analytically obtained also on the assumption that the stress distribution was spherically symmetrical. The result is approximately in accordance with the observed shape. It is therefore concluded that the stress distribution is nearly spherical although the plastic region is far from it. The yield strength of silicon crystals and their temperature dependence were obtained based on the spherical model.

  9. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  10. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave= 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions. Supported in part by the NSF and the OWU SSRP.

  11. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions.

  12. Lightweight deformable mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith

    This thesis presents a concept for ultra-lightweight deformable mirrors based on a thin substrate of optical surface quality coated with continuous active piezopolymer layers that provide modes of actuation and shape correction. This concept eliminates any kind of stiff backing structure for the mirror surface and exploits micro-fabrication technologies to provide a tight integration of the active materials into the mirror structure, to avoid actuator print-through effects. Proof-of-concept, 10-cm-diameter mirrors with a low areal density of about 0.5 kg/m2 have been designed, built and tested to measure their shape-correction performance and verify the models used for design. The low cost manufacturing scheme uses replication techniques, and strives for minimizing residual stresses that deviate the optical figure from the master mandrel. It does not require precision tolerancing, is lightweight, and is therefore potentially scalable to larger diameters for use in large, modular space telescopes. Other potential applications for such a laminate could include ground-based mirrors for solar energy collection, adaptive optics for atmospheric turbulence, laser communications, and other shape control applications. The immediate application for these mirrors is for the Autonomous Assembly and Reconfiguration of a Space Telescope (AAReST) mission, which is a university mission under development by Caltech, the University of Surrey, and JPL. The design concept, fabrication methodology, material behaviors and measurements, mirror modeling, mounting and control electronics design, shape control experiments, predictive performance analysis, and remaining challenges are presented herein. The experiments have validated numerical models of the mirror, and the mirror models have been used within a model of the telescope in order to predict the optical performance. A demonstration of this mirror concept, along with other new telescope technologies, is planned to take place during

  13. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation. Additionally, we study capsules pushed or pulled by a point force, where we always find capsule shapes to transform smoothly without bifurcations.

  14. Finite elastic-plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakuma, T.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1984-01-01

    Applying Hill's self-consistent method to finite elastic-plastic deformations, the overall moduli of polycrystalline solids are estimated. The model predicts a Bauschinger effect, hardening, and formation of vertex or corner on the yield surface for both microscopically non-hardening and hardening crystals. The changes in the instantaneous moduli with deformation are examined, and their asymptotic behavior, especially in relation to possible localization of deformations, is discussed. An interesting conclusion is that small second-order quantities, such as shape changes of grains and residual stresses (measured relative to the crystal elastic moduli), have a first-order effect on the overall response, as they lead to a loss of the overall stability by localized deformation. The predicted incipience of localization for a uniaxial deformation in two dimensions depends on the initial yield strain, but the orientation of localization is slightly less than 45 deg with respect to the tensile direction, although the numerical instability makes it very difficult to estimate this direction accurately.

  15. Plastic deformation of triblock elastomers by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amanda; Rottler, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical properties of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) can be greatly enhanced by exploiting the complex morphology of triblock copolymers. A common strategy consists of confining chain ends into hard glassy regions that effectively crosslink a soft rubbery phase. We present molecular dynamics simulations that provide insight into key microscopic behaviour of the copolymer chains during deformation. First, a coarse-grained polymer model with an ABA type configuration and soft interactions is employed to achieve equilibrated spherical morphologies. Our model TPEs contain at least 30 spheres in order to ensure configurational averaging. Elastoplastic deformation with uniaxial extension or volume conserving shear is then studied after hard excluded volume interactions have been reintroduced. We consider trends of stress-strain curves for different chain lengths, and compare to equivalent homopolymeric systems. During deformation we simultaneously track the evolution of the number and shape of the minority spheres, the proportion of chains bridging from one sphere to another, as well as local plastic deformation. The simulations reveal strong differences between deformation modes, the evolution of sphere morphology and chain anisotropy.

  16. Development of an atmospheric turbulence simulator for deformable mirror evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Shin, Sunmi; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Yang, Ho-Soon; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Currently we are developing a 10 cm silicon carbide (SiC) deformable mirror with 37 actuators operating at 500 Hz. The deformable mirror will be applied in a 1.5 m telescope. An adaptive optics system capability for the deformable mirror was simulated and performance was predicted based on the Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence model. However, in order to confirm the predictions, a closed-loop adaptive optics system was constructed with the insertion of an atmospheric turbulence simulator consisting of two point sources, a Boston deformable mirror, and double random phase plates. In order to simulate a binary star, the two point sources are mounted on 3-axis micron meter stages and are optically merged into a single beam path by a beam splitter cube. The light intensity of each source is adjustable to a corresponding stellar magnitude, while the angular separation can be precisely adjusted by moving the 3-axis stages. The atmospheric disturbance is generated by shaping the Boston deformable mirror and also by rotating the double phase plates. The Fried parameter of the generated the atmospheric disturbance corresponds to an area from 7 to 15 cm at 500 nm at the telescope pupil plane, which represents typical seeing conditions at the Bohyun observatory, South Korea.

  17. The planar shape of drumlins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, Matteo; Clark, Chris D.; Hughes, Anna L. C.; Dunlop, Paul; Stokes, Chris R.

    2010-12-01

    The asymmetry of the planar shape of drumlins is an established paradigm in the literature and characterizes drumlins as resembling tear drops with a blunt (bullet-shaped) stoss end and a tapering (pointed) lee end. It is widely cited and never been seriously questioned. In this paper, the planar shape of 44,500 drumlins mapped in various regional settings from drumlin fields in North America and Northern Europe were objectively analysed by means of Geographic Information System tools. Two parameters were considered. The first (denoted here as Aspl) focuses on the relative position of the point of intersection between the axes of the maximum length and the maximum width. It is defined as the distance between the upstream (i.e. beginning of the drumlin) and the intersection point (measured along the longitudinal axis) divided by the entire length of the long axis. Results indicate that the intersection point of the majority of drumlins (64%) is very close to the longitudinal midpoint (0.33 < Aspl < 0.66). The second parameter ( Aspl _A) is defined as the ratio between the area of the upstream half of the drumlin to that of the entire drumlin. Results show that for most drumlins (81%), the upper half area is almost as large as the down-half (0.45 < Aspl _A < 0.55). Taken together, these results concordantly indicate that drumlin planar shape has a strong tendency to be longitudinally symmetric and that the long-established paradigm of their plan form is false.

  18. Deformations of anti-de Sitter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stephane

    2006-11-01

    This PhD thesis mainly deals with deformations of locally anti-de Sitter black holes, focusing in particular on BTZ black holes. We first study the generic rotating and (extended) non-rotating BTZ black holes within a pseudo-Riemannian symmetric spaces framework, emphasize on the role played by solvable subgroups of SL(2,R) in the black hole structure and derive their global geometry in a group-theoretical way. We analyse how these observations are transposed in the case of higher-dimensional locally AdS black holes. We then show that there exists, in SL(2,R), a family of twisted conjugacy classes which give rise to winding symmetric WZW D1-branes in a BTZ black hole background. The term "deformation" is then considered in two distinct ways. On the one hand, we deform the algebra of functions on the branes in the sense of (strict) deformation quantization, giving rise to a "noncommutative black hole". In the same context, we investigate the question of invariant deformations of the hyperbolic plane and present explicit formulae. On the other hand, we explore the moduli space of the (orbifolded) SL(2,R) WZW model by studying its marginal deformations, yielding namely a new class of exact black string solutions in string theory. These deformations also allow us to relate the D1-branes in BTZ black holes to D0-branes in the 2D black hole. A fair proportion of this thesis consists of (hopefully) pedagogical short introductions to various subjects: deformation quantization, string theory, WZW models, symmetric spaces, symplectic and Poisson geometry.

  19. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future.

  20. Shape-variable seals for pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Tempel, A.; Hühne, C.

    2015-09-01

    Sealing concepts that allow a large change of cross-sectional area are investigated. Shape variable seals are indispensable for biologically inspired pressure actuated cellular structures (PACS), which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and adaptive structures for diverse applications. The extensibility, stiffness and load capacity requirements exceed the characteristics of state of the art solutions. This work focuses on the design of seals suitable for extensional deformations of more than 25%. In a first step, a number of concepts are generated. Then the most suitable concept is chosen, based on numerical characterization and experimental examination. The deformation supportive end cap (DSEC) yields satisfying results as it displays a stress optimized shape under maximum load, an energetically inexpensive bending-based deformation mechanism and utilizes the applied forces to support distortion. In the first real-life implementation of a double row PACS demonstrator, which contains the DSEC, the proof of concept is demonstrated.

  1. Shape dependence of entanglement entropy in conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Thomas; Leigh, Robert G.; Parrikar, Onkar

    2016-04-01

    We study universal features in the shape dependence of entanglement entropy in the vacuum state of a conformal field theory (CFT) on R^{1,d-1} . We consider the entanglement entropy across a deformed planar or spherical entangling surface in terms of a perturbative expansion in the infinitesimal shape deformation. In particular, we focus on the second order term in this expansion, known as the entanglement density. This quantity is known to be non-positive by the strong-subadditivity property. We show from a purely field theory calculation that the non-local part of the entanglement density in any CFT is universal, and proportional to the coefficient C T appearing in the two-point function of stress tensors in that CFT. As applications of our result, we prove the conjectured universality of the corner term coefficient σ /C_T=π^2/24 in d = 3 CFTs, and the holographic Mezei formula for entanglement entropy across deformed spheres.

  2. Microfluidic micropipette aspiration for measuring the deformability of single cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Quan; Park, Sunyoung; Ma, Hongshen

    2012-08-07

    We present a microfluidic technique for measuring the deformability of single cells using the pressure required to deform such cells through micrometre-scale tapered constrictions. Our technique is equivalent to whole-cell micropipette aspiration, but involves considerably simpler operation, less specialized equipment, and less technical skill. Single cells are infused into a microfluidic channel, and then deformed through a series of funnel-shaped constrictions. The constriction openings are sized to create a temporary seal with each cell as it passes through the constriction, replicating the interaction with the orifice of a micropipette. Precisely controlled deformation pressures are generated using an external source and then attenuated 100 : 1 using an on-chip microfluidic circuit. Our apparatus is capable of generating precisely controlled pressures as small as 0.3 Pa in a closed microchannel network, which is impervious to evaporative losses that normally limit the precision of such equipment. Intrinsic cell deformability, expressed as cortical tension, is determined from the threshold deformation pressure using the liquid-drop model. We measured the deformability of several types of nucleated cells and determined the optimal range of constriction openings. The cortical tension of passive human neutrophils was measured to be 37.0 ± 4.8 pN μm(-1), which is consistent with previous micropipette aspiration studies. The cortical tensions of human lymphocytes, RT4 human bladder cancer cells, and L1210 mouse lymphoma cells were measured to be 74.7 ± 9.8, 185.4 ± 25.3, and 235.4 ± 31.0 pN μm(-1) respectively. The precision and usability of our technique demonstrates its potential as a biomechanical assay for wide-spread use in biological and clinical laboratories.

  3. Soft materials with recoverable shape factors from extreme distortion states

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, Jonathan; Sulaiman, Santy; Arkles, Barry; Lewicki, James P.

    2016-01-20

    We present elastomeric polysiloxane nanocomposites with elongations of >5000% (more than 3× greater than any previously reported material) with excellent shape recovery. Highly deformable materials are desirable for the fabrication of stretchable implants and microfluidic devices. No crosslinking or domain formation is observed by a variety of analytical techniques, suggesting that their elastomeric behavior is caused by polymer chain entanglements.

  4. Uncovering deformation processes from surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramondo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    geophysical data, such as teleseismic waveforms, strong motion records and GPS, have also been used by geophysicists for improved rupture models. Many models use equations for a uniform elastic half space stemming from the Okada formulation, but improved data constraints and the use of increasingly sophisticated modeling and inverse methods allowed for the exploration of models with variation of elastic properties in layers or more complex representation of fault and lithosphere structure and rheology. In volcanic studies the role of GPS and InSAR lies in the measurement of pre-eruptive inflation, co-eruptive deflation and the post-eruptive response. The spatio-temporal evolution of volcanic processes, the "breathing" of a volcano, can be monitored with temporal series of InSAR interferograms using multitemporal InSAR techniques. The measured deformation can be used as constraints for the formulation of the inverse problem, to retrieve information concerning the depth, size, shape of the magma chamber (and pressure change) and magma supply dynamics. Deformation modeling commonly relies on simple point sources, dikes and sills; or more complex volume-change sources to produce the different surface deformation patterns caused by magma intrusion.

  5. Discontinuous deformation analysis of particulate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Patricia Ann

    Many geotechnical engineering problems involve the localization of deformations along distinct shear planes, such as the response of a layer of soil to displacement along an underlying bedrock fault. Understanding the process of deformation localization and the propagation of shear zones to the surface would aid in the siting of structures near faults, and in developing mitigation techniques. Discrete numerical methods are especially suited to this type of problem, because the discontinuous nature of soil and the kinematics of soil deformation are modeled directly. This research involves the development and validation of Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA), a type of discrete numerical method, as a tool capable of modeling realistic soil behavior, thus providing the foundation for its application to complex soil mechanics problems, such as earthquake fault rupture propagation. First, a review of the two primary types of discrete numerical modeling, the Distinct Element Method (DEM) and DDA is presented along with a discussion of the key aspects of modeling particulate materials with these methods. Next, several extensions to the numerical program Discontinuous Deformation Analysis for Disks (DDAD), implemented during the process of developing DDAD as a tool for modeling particulate materials, were implemented. A flexible, stress-controlled boundary was incorporated, allows simulation of geotechnical biaxial shear tests that are commonly performed on specimens of granular soils. Using this boundary, the stress-strain and volumetric responses of simulated assemblies of particles were investigated. A new type of particle, the disk cluster, was developed and implemented. A disk cluster is a group of circular disks permanently attached to form a single particle. Disk clusters more accurately represent the nonspherical shape of particulate materials, minimize the problem of excessive rotation that occurs with perfectly circular elements, and retain the simplicity of

  6. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  7. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. Deformity of Ears and Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. C.

    1965-01-01

    Ten children with gross deformity of the external ear were observed. In six the facial bones were underdeveloped on the same side as the deformed ear. In all six there was a congenital abnormality of the kidney or upper urinary tract, usually on the same side as the deformed ear. In addition there were usually other associated congenital defects in each case. In the remaining four children the facial bones appeared normal, and pyelography showed no abnormality of the urinary tract. In these four children there were no other associated defects. These observations emphasize the importance of investigating the urinary tract in children with gross deformity of the external ear, especially where there is an associated underdevelopment of the facial bones. PMID:14317453

  9. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    DOE PAGES

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; ...

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticitymore » theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.« less

  10. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  11. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  12. Fractal analysis of deformation-induced dislocation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiser, M. ); Bay, K. . Inst. fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik); Haehner, P. . Joint Research Centre TU Braunschweig . Inst. fuer Metallphysik und Nukleare Festkoerperphysik)

    1999-06-22

    The paper reports extensive analyses of the fractal geometry of cellular dislocation structures observed in Cu deformed in multiple-slip orientation. Several methods presented for the determination of fractal dimensions are shown to give consistent results. Criteria are formulated which allow the distinguishing of fractal from non-fractal patterns, and implications of fractal dislocation patterning for quantitative metallography are discussed in detail. For an interpretation of the findings a theoretical model is outlined according to which dislocation cell formation is associated to a noise-induced structural transition far from equilibrium. This allows relating the observed fractal dimensions to the stochastic properties of deformation by collective dislocation glide.

  13. Numerical analysis of Al coating using different particle shape in LPCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, S. N. A.; Manap, A.; Afandi, N. F.

    2016-03-01

    Cold spray (CS) is a unique spraying process where the spray materials are not melted in a spray gun. Instead, the particles are kinetically deposited on the substrate at low temperature using compressed gas. This study investigates the deposition behaviour of different particle shape of Al coating using low pressure cold sprayed (LPCS) through smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, which are achieved by modelling the multiple particle impacts on Al substrate. The impact of Al particle on the Al substrate is analysed by evaluating the shape of deformation, porosity between particle, and effect of stress on the substrate. The results show that the irregular particle shapes (horizontal and vertical ellipse) tend to detach the bonded particle from the substrate and thus increase the potential risk of high tensile stress. That is really harmful to the coating quality, which never happens for spherical particle. Deposition using irregular particle exhibits tensile stress at the depth coating, whereas spherical particle exhibits compressive stress. Compressive stress is generally ensure a longer component life due to their positive effect on the fatigue life and wear resistance application.

  14. Asymmetric shape transitions of epitaxial quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chaozhen; Spencer, Brian J.

    2016-06-01

    We construct a two-dimensional continuum model to describe the energetics of shape transitions in fully faceted epitaxial quantum dots (strained islands) via minimization of elastic energy and surface energy at fixed volume. The elastic energy of the island is based on a third-order approximation, enabling us to consider shape transitions between pyramids, domes, multifaceted domes and asymmetric intermediate states. The energetics of the shape transitions are determined by numerically calculating the facet lengths that minimize the energy of a given island type of prescribed island volume. By comparing the energy of different island types with the same volume and analysing the energy surface as a function of the island shape parameters, we determine the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the lowest barrier transition pathway for the island shape as a function of increasing volume. The main result is that the shape transition from pyramid to dome to multif