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Sample records for deforming patient model

  1. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  2. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  3. A patient-specific, finite element model for noncommunicating hydrocephalus capable of large deformation.

    PubMed

    Lefever, Joel A; Jaime García, José; Smith, Joshua H

    2013-05-31

    A biphasic model for noncommunicating hydrocephalus in patient-specific geometry is proposed. The model can take into account the nonlinear behavior of brain tissue under large deformation, the nonlinear variation of hydraulic conductivity with deformation, and contact with a rigid, impermeable skull using a recently developed algorithm. The model was capable of achieving over a 700 percent ventricular enlargement, which is much greater than in previous studies, primarily due to the use of an anatomically realistic skull recreated from magnetic resonance imaging rather than an artificial skull created by offsetting the outer surface of the cerebrum. The choice of softening or stiffening behavior of brain tissue, both having been demonstrated in previous experimental studies, was found to have a significant effect on the volume and shape of the deformed ventricle, and the consideration of the variation of the hydraulic conductivity with deformation had a modest effect on the deformed ventricle. The model predicts that noncommunicating hydrocephalus occurs for ventricular fluid pressure on the order of 1300 Pa.

  4. Simulations of blood flow in patient-specific aortic dissections with a deformable wall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeumler, Kathrin; Vedula, Vijay; Sailer Karmann, Anna; Marsden, Alison; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition in which blood penetrates into the vessel wall, creating a second flow channel, often requiring emergency surgical repair. Up to 50% of patients who survive the acute event face late complications like aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. Prediction of late complications, however, remains challenging. We therefore aim to perform accurate and reliable patient-specific simulations of blood flow in aortic dissections, validated by 4D-Flow MRI. Among other factors, this is a computational challenge due to the compliance of the vessel walls and the large degree of membrane deformation between the two flow channels. We construct an anatomic patient-specific model from CT data including both flow channels and the membrane between them. We then run fluid structure interaction simulations using an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation within a multiscale variational framework, employing stabilized finite element methods. We compare hemodynamics between a rigid and a deformable wall model and examine membrane dynamics and pressure differences between the two flow channels. The study focuses on the computational and modeling challenges emphasizing the importance of employing a deformable wall model for aortic dissections.

  5. Tuning of patient-specific deformable models using an adaptive evolutionary optimization strategy.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric; Lutton, Evelyne

    2012-10-01

    We present and analyze the behavior of an evolutionary algorithm designed to estimate the parameters of a complex organ behavior model. The model is adaptable to account for patient's specificities. The aim is to finely tune the model to be accurately adapted to various real patient datasets. It can then be embedded, for example, in high fidelity simulations of the human physiology. We present here an application focused on respiration modeling. The algorithm is automatic and adaptive. A compound fitness function has been designed to take into account for various quantities that have to be minimized. The algorithm efficiency is experimentally analyzed on several real test cases: 1) three patient datasets have been acquired with the "breath hold" protocol, and 2) two datasets corresponds to 4-D CT scans. Its performance is compared with two traditional methods (downhill simplex and conjugate gradient descent): a random search and a basic real-valued genetic algorithm. The results show that our evolutionary scheme provides more significantly stable and accurate results.

  6. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  7. Deformed Richardson-Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, P.; Stolin, A.; Johannesson, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Richardson-Gaudin model describes strong pairing correlations of fermions confined to a finite chain. The integrability of the Hamiltonian allows the algebraic construction of its eigenstates. In this work we show that the quantum group theory provides a possibility to deform the Hamiltonian preserving integrability. More precisely, we use the so-called Jordanian r-matrix to deform the Hamiltonian of the Richardson-Gaudin model. In order to preserve its integrability, we need to insert a special nilpotent term into the auxiliary L-operator which generates integrals of motion of the system. Moreover, the quantum inverse scattering method enables us to construct the exact eigenstates of the deformed Hamiltonian. These states have a highly complex entanglement structure which require further investigation.

  8. Integrable Deformations of T -Dual σ Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Wulff, Linus

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to deform (generically non-Abelian) T duals of two-dimensional σ models, which preserves classical integrability. The deformed models are identified by a linear operator ω on the dualized subalgebra, which satisfies the 2-cocycle condition. We prove that the so-called homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations are equivalent, via a field redefinition, to our deformed models when ω is invertible. We explain the details for deformations of T duals of principal chiral models, and present the corresponding generalization to the case of supercoset models.

  9. Deformable human body model development

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  10. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Moessinger, A C

    1983-12-01

    Rat fetuses were paralyzed by daily transuterine injections of curare from day 18 of gestation until term (day 21). The following anomalies were noted at the time of delivery: multiple joint contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, micrognathia, fetal growth retardation, short umbilical cords, and polyhydramnios. Neither sham-operated nor untouched littermate control fetuses had any of these anomalies. The group of anomalies (or deformation sequence) obtained with this animal model is presumed to result from the paralytic effect of curare. This phenotype bears a striking resemblance to the syndrome of ankyloses, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia (also known as Pena and Shokeir I), presumably inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It is suggested that this phenotype is not specific but, rather, represents a deformation sequence which results from fetal immobilization or akinesia. Diagnostic evaluation of patients with this group of anomalies should include the identification of the underlying pathologic process (etiology of the akinesia) to allow for proper classification and genetic counseling.

  11. Reconstruction of 3D lung models from 2D planning data sets for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using combined deformable image registration and navigator channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L.; Hodgson, David C.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Late complications (cardiac toxicities, secondary lung, and breast cancer) remain a significant concern in the radiation treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). To address this issue, predictive dose-risk models could potentially be used to estimate radiotherapy-related late toxicities. This study investigates the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NCs) to reconstruct 3D lung models from 2D radiographic planning images, in order to retrospectively calculate the treatment dose exposure to HL patients treated with 2D planning, which are now experiencing late effects. Methods: Three-dimensional planning CT images of 52 current HL patients were acquired. 12 image sets were used to construct a male and a female population lung model. 23 ''Reference'' images were used to generate lung deformation adaptation templates, constructed by deforming the population model into each patient-specific lung geometry using a biomechanical-based DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. 17 ''Test'' patients were used to test the accuracy of the reconstruction technique by adapting existing templates using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs. The adaptation process included three steps. First, a Reference patient was matched to a Test patient by thorax measurements. Second, four NCs (small regions of interest) were placed on the lung boundary to calculate 1D differences in lung edges. Third, the Reference lung model was adapted to the Test patient's lung using the 1D edge differences. The Reference-adapted Test model was then compared to the 3D lung contours of the actual Test patient by computing their percentage volume overlap (POL) and Dice coefficient. Results: The average percentage overlapping volumes and Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the adapted and actual Test models were found to be 89.2{+-}3.9% (Right lung=88.8%; Left lung=89.6%) and 89.3{+-}2.7% (Right=88.5%; Left=90.2%), respectively. Paired T-tests demonstrated that the

  12. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  13. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  14. Decoherence of spin-deformed bosonic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Sh.; Mahdifar, A.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2013-07-15

    The decoherence rate and some parameters affecting it are investigated for the generalized spin-boson model. We consider the spin-bosonic model when the bosonic environment is modeled by the deformed harmonic oscillators. We show that the state of the environment approaches a non-linear coherent state. Then, we obtain the decoherence rate of a two-level system which is in contact with a deformed bosonic environment which is either in thermal equilibrium or in the ground state. By using some recent realization of f-deformed oscillators, we show that some physical parameters strongly affect the decoherence rate of a two-level system. -- Highlights: •Decoherence of the generalized spin-boson model is considered. •In this model the environment consists of f-oscillators. •Via the interaction, the state of the environment approaches non-linear coherent states. •Effective parameters on decoherence are considered.

  15. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  16. Mathematical modeling of deformation during hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, D.; Stachowiak, R.G.; Samarasekera, I.V.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The deformation that occurs in the roll bite during the hot rolling of steel, particularly the strain-rate and strain distribution, has been mathematically modeled using finite-element analysis. In this paper three different finite-element models are compared with one another and with industrial measurements. The first model is an Eulerian analysis based on the flow formulation method, while the second utilizes an Updated Lagrangian approach. The third model is based on a commercially available program DEFORM which also utilizes a Lagrangian reference frame. Model predictions of strain and strain-rate distribution, particularly near the surface of the slab, are strongly influenced by the treatment of friction at the boundary and the magnitude of the friction coefficient or shear factor. Roll forces predicted by the model have been compared with industrial rolling loads from a seven-stand hot-strip mill.

  17. Measurement of ship deformation based on ARX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Hu, Feng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Ship deformation is the main error source of partial reference. Such deformation can be estimated by laser gyro units and Kalman filter technology. For Kalman filter, deformation was divide into two parts, dynamic deformation, and static deformation. Traditionally, dynamic deformation is treated as AR2 model .In this paper, dynamic deformation is taken as a kind of ARX model. Based on actual data measured by Yuanwang-3 Space Survey Ship, simulation experiments are studied. Results show that the novel model can improve the measurement precision.

  18. Unified Model Deformation and Flow Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Bell, James H.; Morgan, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    The number of optical techniques that may potentially be used during a given wind tunnel test is continually growing. These include parameter sensitive paints that are sensitive to temperature or pressure, several different types of off-body and on-body flow visualization techniques, optical angle-of-attack (AoA), optical measurement of model deformation, optical techniques for determining density or velocity, and spectroscopic techniques for determining various flow field parameters. Often in the past the various optical techniques were developed independently of each other, with little or no consideration for other techniques that might also be used during a given test. Recently two optical techniques have been increasingly requested for production measurements in NASA wind tunnels. These are the video photogrammetric (or videogrammetric) technique for measuring model deformation known as the video model deformation (VMD) technique, and the parameter sensitive paints for making global pressure and temperature measurements. Considerations for, and initial attempts at, simultaneous measurements with the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and the videogrammetric techniques have been implemented. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) has been found to be useful for boundary-layer transition detection since turbulent boundary layers convect heat at higher rates than laminar boundary layers of comparable thickness. Transition is marked by a characteristic surface temperature change wherever there is a difference between model and flow temperatures. Recently, additional capabilities have been implemented in the target-tracking videogrammetric measurement system. These capabilities have permitted practical simultaneous measurements using parameter sensitive paint and video model deformation measurements that led to the first successful unified test with TSP for transition detection in a large production wind tunnel.

  19. A Digital Video Model Deformation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Childers, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    The use of slid-state array cameras and a PC controlled image acquisition system to measure model deformation in a wind tunnel is discussed. This digital system is an improvement to an earlier video model deformation system used at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) which employed high-resolution tube cameras and required the manual measurement of targets on video hardcopy images. The new system eliminates both the vibration-induced distortion associated with tube cameras and the manual readup of video images necessary in the earlier version. Camera calibration and data reduction procedures necessary to convert pixel image plane data from two cameras into wing deflections are presented. Laboratory tests to establish the uncertainty of the new system with the geometry to be used at the NTF are described.

  20. A digital video model deformation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Childers, B. A.

    The use of solid-state array cameras and a PC-controlled image acquisition system to measure model deformation in a wind tunnel is discussed. This digital system improves an earlier video model deformation system that used high-resolution tube cameras and required the manual measurement of targets on video hardcopy images. The new system eliminates both the vibration-induced distortion associated with tube cameras and the manual readup of video images necessary in the earlier version. Camera calibration and data reduction procedures necessary to convert pixel image plane data from two cameras into wing deflections are presented. Laboratory tests to establish the uncertainty of the system with the geometry to be used are described.

  1. Acoustoelasticity model of inhomogeneously deformed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchishin, O. Z.; Chekurin, V. F.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a mathematical model of dynamics of small elastic perturbations in an inhomogeneously deformed rigid body, where for the determining parameters of a local state we take the tensor characteristics of a given actual (strained) configuration (the Cauchy stress tensor and the Hencky or Almansi or Figner strain measure). An iteration algorithm is developed to solve the Cauchy problem stated in the framework of this model for a system of hyperbolic equations with variable coefficients that describes the propagation of elastic pulses in an inhomogeneous deformed continuum. In the case of two-dimensional stress fields, we obtain acoustoelasticity integral relations between the probing pulse parameters and the initial strain (stress) distribution in the direction of pulse propagation in the strained body. We also consider an example of application of the obtained integral relations in the inverse acoustic tomography problem for residual strains in a strip.

  2. Modeling plasticity by non-continuous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shmuel, Yaron; Altus, Eli

    2016-10-01

    Plasticity and failure theories are still subjects of intense research. Engineering constitutive models on the macroscale which are based on micro characteristics are very much in need. This study is motivated by the observation that continuum assumptions in plasticity in which neighbour material elements are inseparable at all-time are physically impossible, since local detachments, slips and neighbour switching must operate, i.e. non-continuous deformation. Material microstructure is modelled herein by a set of point elements (particles) interacting with their neighbours. Each particle can detach from and/or attach with its neighbours during deformation. Simulations on two- dimensional configurations subjected to uniaxial compression cycle are conducted. Stochastic heterogeneity is controlled by a single "disorder" parameter. It was found that (a) macro response resembles typical elasto-plastic behaviour; (b) plastic energy is proportional to the number of detachments; (c) residual plastic strain is proportional to the number of attachments, and (d) volume is preserved, which is consistent with macro plastic deformation. Rigid body displacements of local groups of elements are also observed. Higher disorder decreases the macro elastic moduli and increases plastic energy. Evolution of anisotropic effects is obtained with no additional parameters.

  3. Explicit Seesaw Model and Deformed Fermion Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolikowski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    In the simple model of neutrino texture presented in this paper, the Majorana lefthanded mass matrix is zero, the Majorana righthanded mass matrix --- diagonal and degenerate, and the Dirac mass matrix has a hierarchical structure, deformed unitarily by nearly bimaximal mixing. In the case, when the Majorana righthanded term dominates over the Dirac term, the familiar seesaw mechanism leads effectively to the nearly bimaximal oscillations of active neutrinos, consistent with solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. If the Dirac term, before its unitary deformation, is similar in shape to the known charged-lepton mass matrix, then parameters for solar ν e's and atmospheric ν μ 's become related to each other, predicting from the SuperKamiokande value of Δ m322 a tiny Δ m212 typical for MSW LOW solar solution rather than for MSW Large Mixing Angle solution. The predicted mass spectrum is then hierarchical. In Appendix a suggestive form of nearly bimaximal effective mass matrix is derived.

  4. Tracking of object deformations in color and depth video: deformation models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordt, Andreas; Reinhold, Stefan; Koch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The research on deformation tracking based on color image data has continuously gained a wide interest in the last 15 years. In addition, using depth sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect, allows to mitigate the ambiguity problems that arise when trying to solve the deformation tracking tasks on color images only, by adding depth information. However, the fusion of color and depth data is not straight forward, and the deformation tracking task is still ill-posed due to the lack of a general deformation model. The problem is usually circumvented by providing special deformation functions for the task at hand, e.g., skeleton-based for reconstructing people or triangle-based for tracking planar surfaces. In this article we summarize the Analysis by Synthesis (AbS) approach for deformation tracking in depth and color video and show some successful applications of specialized deformation functions. To overcome the issues with NURBS based deformation tracking we propose a new geodesic RBF-based deformation model, which can adapt to any surface topology and shape, while keeping the number of deformation parameters low. Example deformations for objects of different topologies are given, showing the versatility and efficiency of the proposed model.

  5. Modelling highly deformable metal extrusion using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Mahesh; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-05-01

    Computational modelling is often used to reduce trial extrusions through accurate defect prediction. Traditionally, metal extrusion is modelled using mesh based finite element methods. However, large plastic deformations can lead to heavy re-meshing and numerical diffusion. Here we use the mesh-less smoothed particle hydrodynamics method since it allows simulation of large deformations without re-meshing and the tracking of history dependent properties such as plastic strain making it suitable for defect prediction. The variation in plastic strain and deformation for aluminium alloy in a cylindrical 3D geometry with extrusion ratio and die angle is evaluated. The extrusion process is found to have three distinct phases consisting of an initial sharp rise in extrusion force, a steady phase requiring constant force and terminating in a sharp decline in force as metal is completely extruded. Deformation and plastic strain increased significantly with extrusion ratio but only moderately with die angle. Extrusion force increased by 150 % as the extrusion ratio increased from 2:1 to 4:1 but had only a marginal change with die angle. A low strain zone in the centre of the extruded product was found to be a function of extrusion ratio but was persistent and did not vary with die angle. Simulation of a complex 3D building industry component showed large variations in plastic strain along the length of the product at two scales. These were due to change in metal behaviour as extrusion progressed from phase 1 to phase 2. A stagnation zone at the back of the die was predicted that could lead to the "funnel" or "pipe" defect.

  6. Deformations of Geometric Structures in Topological Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with it application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are described by a Hochschild cohomology of the DG-algebra A = (A,Q), Q = ∂¯+∂deform, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)nQ+dHoch. Here ∂¯ is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while ∂deform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln.

  7. Modeling plastic deformation effect on magnetization in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Xu, Minqiang; Leng, Jiancheng; Xu, Mingxiu

    2012-03-01

    Based on the Sablik-Landgraf model, an integrated model has been developed which provides a description of the effect of plastic deformation on magnetization. The modeling approach is to incorporate the effect of plastic deformation on the effective field and that on the model parameters. The effective field incorporates the contributions of residual stress, stress demagnetization term, and the plastic deformation. We also consider the effect of plastic deformation on the model parameters: pinning coefficient, the scaling constant and the interdomain coupling coefficient. The computed magnetization exhibits sharp change in the preliminary stage of plastic deformation, and then decreases slowly with the increase of plastic strain, in agreement with experimental results.

  8. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM.

    PubMed

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2014-11-26

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  9. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  10. Implicit modeling of folds and overprinting deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Ailleres, Laurent; Grose, Lachlan; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark; Armit, Robin

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional structural modeling is gaining importance for a broad range of quantitative geoscientific applications. However, existing approaches are still limited by the type of structural data they are able to use and by their lack of structural meaning. Most techniques heavily rely on spatial data for modeling folded layers, but are unable to completely use cleavage and lineation information for constraining the shape of modeled folds. This lack of structural control is generally compensated by expert knowledge introduced in the form of additional interpretive data such as cross-sections and maps. With this approach, folds are explicitly designed by the user instead of being derived from data. This makes the resulting structures subjective and deterministic. This paper introduces a numerical framework for modeling folds and associated foliations from typical field data. In this framework, a parametric description of fold geometry is incorporated into the interpolation algorithm. This way the folded geometry is implicitly derived from observed data, while being controlled through structural parameters such as fold wavelength, amplitude and tightness. A fold coordinate system is used to support the numerical description of fold geometry and to modify the behavior of classical structural interpolators. This fold frame is constructed from fold-related structural elements such as axial foliations, intersection lineations, and vergence. Poly-deformed terranes are progressively modeled by successively modeling each folding event going backward through time. The proposed framework introduces a new modeling paradigm, which enables the building of three-dimensional geological models of complex poly-deformed terranes. It follows a process based on the structural geologist approach and is able to produce geomodels that honor both structural data and geological knowledge.

  11. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process.

  12. Modelling of orbital deformation using finite-element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Lindqvist, Christian; Kontio, Risto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite-element model (FEM) of the human orbit, containing the globe, to predict orbital deformation in subjects following a blunt injury. This study investigated the hypothesis that such deformation could be modelled using finite-element techniques. One patient who had CT-scan examination to the maxillofacial skeleton including the orbits, as part of her treatment, was selected for this study. A FEM of one of the orbits containing the globe was constructed, based on CT-scan images. Simulations were performed with a computer using the finite-element software NISA (EMRC, Troy, USA). The orbit was subjected to a blunt injury of a 0.5 kg missile with 30 m s−1 velocity. The FEM was then used to predict principal and shear stresses or strains at each node position. Two types of orbital deformation were predicted during different impact simulations: (i) horizontal distortion and (ii) rotational distortion. Stress values ranged from 213.4 to 363.3 MPa for the maximum principal stress, from −327.8 to −653.1 MPa for the minimum principal stress, and from 212.3 to 444.3 MPa for the maximum shear stress. This is the first finite-element study, which demonstrates different and concurrent patterns of orbital deformation in a subject following a blunt injury. Finite element modelling is a powerful and invaluable tool to study the multifaceted phenomenon of orbital deformation. PMID:16849235

  13. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  14. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  15. Calcaneus deformity in the ambulant patient with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R K; Hoffman, E B

    1991-11-01

    We reviewed our experience of tibialis anterior transfer and anterior release for calcaneus deformity in 46 feet of 26 ambulant patients with myelomeningocele. At an average follow-up of 8.4 years (2 to 17.6) there were 89% who had satisfactory results; 64% of the patients having tibialis anterior transfers were able to stand on their toes. Hip abductor power was a good predictor of a functional transfer. Pre-operative trophic ulceration of the heel increased from 3.2% to 33% if surgery was delayed. Secondary deformities, two-thirds of them into valgus, developed in 76% of feet.

  16. Approach to analyze a deformable moving target by using the shape deformation model and morphological operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiguo; Asai, Take; Akatsuka, Takao

    1995-10-01

    The measurement of the characteristic parameters for a moving object with deformation is often an important problem. Here, an approach to analyze the shape change of a ball, when it is kicked in soccer, is proposed by using a simple shape deformation model to evaluate the shape change from the image sequence. Moreover, to determine the parameters of the model which apply to actual ball deformation, the detection of ball is necessary, and the pattern spectrum based on morphological operators is considered. Here, we assume that the deformation surface of the ball is a circular arc, when it is kicked by foot, and the arc is always convex when it is observed from the kicking side. To obtain the parameters of the arc, the preprocessing of the ball image such as local binarization, the region filling and noisy smoothing with morphological operators, is performed from actual image sequence. In order to detect the ball, the pattern spectrum with morphological operators is measured, and then circumscribed circle of the ball is extracted. So, the center and radius of the ball from circumscribed circle and the arc of the deformation surface of the model are obtained. Finally, the characteristic parameters of a moving ball such as the deformation are measured by using the shape deformation model. To demonstrate the effect of this method, we show an application to extract the deformation of the ball in football for the actual sports skill training.

  17. Cervical Disc Deformation During Flexion–Extension in Asymptomatic Controls and Single-Level Arthrodesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William; Donaldson, William; Lee, Joon; Kang, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cervical disc deformation in asymptomatic subjects and single-level arthrodesis patients during in vivo functional motion. A validated model-based tracking technique determined vertebral motion from biplane radiographs collected during dynamic flexion–extension. Level-dependent differences in disc compression–distraction and shear deformation were identified within the anterior and posterior annulus (PA) and the nucleus of 20 asymptomatic subjects and 15 arthrodesis patients using a mixed-model statistical analysis. In asymptomatic subjects, disc compression and shear deformation per degree of flexion–extension progressively decreased from C23 to C67. The anterior and PA experienced compression–distraction deformation of up to 20%, while the nucleus region was compressed between 0% (C67) and 12% (C23). Peak shear deformation ranged from 16% (at C67) to 33% (at C45). In the C5–C6 arthrodesis group, C45 discs were significantly less compressed than in the control group in all disc regions (all p ≤ 0.026). In the C6–C7 arthrodesis group, C56 discs were significantly less compressed than the control group in the nucleus (p = 0.023) and PA (p = 0.014), but not the anterior annulus (AA; p = 0.137). These results indicate in vivo disc deformation is level-dependent, and single-level anterior arthrodesis alters the compression–distraction deformation in the disc immediately superior to the arthrodesis. PMID:23861160

  18. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement System User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide the user of the NASA VMD system, running the MDef software, Version 1.10, all information required to operate the system. The NASA Videogrammetric Model Deformation system consists of an automated videogrammetric technique used to measure the change in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load in a wind tunnel. The basic instrumentation consists of a single CCD video camera and a frame grabber interfaced to a computer. The technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two-dimensional coordinates of wing targets with fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the span-wise location. The major consideration in the development of the measurement system was that productivity must not be appreciably reduced.

  19. On the sigma-model of deformed special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardoso, Gabriel; Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2013-07-01

    We discuss the deformed sigma-model that arises when considering four-dimensional N=2 abelian vector multiplets in the presence of an arbitrary chiral background field. In addition, we allow for a class of deformations of special geometry by non-holomorphic terms. We analyze the geometry of the sigma-model in terms of intrinsic torsion classes. We show that, generically, the deformed geometry is non-Kähler. We illustrate our findings with an example. We also express the deformed sigma-model in terms of the Hesse potential that underlies the real formulation of special geometry.

  20. Deformation methods in modelling of the inner magnetospheric electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P. K.

    2007-12-01

    Various deformation methods have been widely used in animation image processing. In common terms, they are mathematical presentations of deformations of an image drawn on an elastic material under stretching or compression of the material. Such a method has also been used in modelling of the magnetospheric magnetic fields, and recently been generalized to include also the electric fields. In this presentations, the theory of the deformation method and an application in a form of a new global magnetospheric electromagnetic field model are previewed. The main focus of the presentation is on the inner magnetospheric current systems and associated electromagnetic fields during quiet and disturbed periods. Finally, a short look at the modern deformation methods in image processing is taken. These methods include the Free Form Deformations and Moving Least Squares Deformations, and their future applications in magnetospheric field modelling are discussed.

  1. Probabilistic multiobject deformable model for MR/SPECT brain image registration and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikou, Christophoros; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    1999-05-01

    A probabilistic deformable model for the representation of brain structures is described. The statistically learned deformable model represents the relative location of head (skull and scalp) and brain surfaces in MR/SPECT images pairs and accommodates the significant variability of these anatomical structures across different individuals. To provide a training set, a representative collection of 3D MRI volumes of different patients have first been registered to a reference image. The head and brain surfaces of each volume are parameterized by the amplitudes of the vibration modes of a deformable spherical mesh. For a given MR image in the training set, a vector containing the largest vibration modes describing the head and the brain is created. This random vector is statistically constrained by retaining the most significant variations modes of its Karhunen-Loeve expansion on the training population. By these means, both head and brain surfaces are deformed according to the anatomical variability observed in the training set. Two applications of the probabilistic deformable model are presented: the deformable model-based registration of 3D multimodal (MR/SPECT) brain images and the segmentation of the brain from MRI using the probabilistic constraints embedded in the deformable model. The multi-object deformable model may be considered as a first step towards the development of a general purpose probabilistic anatomical atlas of the brain.

  2. dMODELS: A software package for modeling volcanic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.

    2013-12-01

    dMODELS is software package including the most common source models used to interpret deformation measurements near active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on estimating the parameters of analytical models of deformation by inverting data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include: (a) pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space; and (b) pressurized spherical magma chamber with correction for the effect of topography (i.e., Williams and Wadge, 1998). All the expressions have been extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. The software has been developed using Matlab but compiled versions that can be run using the free Matlab Compiler Runtime (MCR) are available for Linux, and Windows 7 (32bit and 64bit). The MATLAB scripts and compiled files are open source and intended for teaching and research. The software can be downloaded from the USGS web site pubs.usgs.gov/tm/13/b1/. Please e-mail the author at mbattaglia@usgs.gov if you would like to be included in the dMODELS mail list to get information about the release of software updates.

  3. Meshless Modeling of Deformable Shapes and their Motion

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Bart; Ovsjanikov, Maks; Wand, Michael; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for interactive shape deformation modeling and key frame interpolation based on a meshless finite element formulation. Starting from a coarse nodal sampling of an object’s volume, we formulate rigidity and volume preservation constraints that are enforced to yield realistic shape deformations at interactive frame rates. Additionally, by specifying key frame poses of the deforming shape and optimizing the nodal displacements while targeting smooth interpolated motion, our algorithm extends to a motion planning framework for deformable objects. This allows reconstructing smooth and plausible deformable shape trajectories in the presence of possibly moving obstacles. The presented results illustrate that our framework can handle complex shapes at interactive rates and hence is a valuable tool for animators to realistically and efficiently model and interpolate deforming 3D shapes. PMID:24839614

  4. Jordanian deformation of the open sℓ(2) Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, N. Cirilo; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin model with integrable boundaries. Starting from the Jordanian deformation of the SL( 2)-invariant Yang R-matrix and generic solutions of the associated reflection equation and the dual reflection equation, we obtain the corresponding inhomogeneous spin- 1/2 XXX chain. The semiclassical expansion of the transfer matrix yields the deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  5. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  6. HSR Model Deformation Measurements from Subsonic to Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Erickson, G. E.; Goodman, W. L.; Fleming, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the video model deformation technique (VMD) used at five NASA facilities and the projection moire interferometry (PMI) technique used at two NASA facilities. Comparisons between the two techniques for model deformation measurements are provided. Facilities at NASA-Ames and NASA-Langley where deformation measurements have been made are presented. Examples of HSR model deformation measurements from the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel, Langley 16-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, and the Ames 12-foot Pressure Tunnel are presented. A study to improve and develop new targeting schemes at the National Transonic Facility is also described. The consideration of milled targets for future HSR models is recommended when deformation measurements are expected to be required. Finally, future development work for VMD and PMI is addressed.

  7. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-03-15

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  8. Preliminary deformation model for National Seismic Hazard map of Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Sarsito, Dina; Prijatna, Kosasih; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Susilo,; Efendi, Joni

    2015-04-24

    Preliminary deformation model for the Indonesia’s National Seismic Hazard (NSH) map is constructed as the block rotation and strain accumulation function at the elastic half-space. Deformation due to rigid body motion is estimated by rotating six tectonic blocks in Indonesia. The interseismic deformation due to subduction is estimated by assuming coupling on subduction interface while deformation at active fault is calculated by assuming each of the fault‘s segment slips beneath a locking depth or in combination with creeping in a shallower part. This research shows that rigid body motion dominates the deformation pattern with magnitude more than 15 mm/year, except in the narrow area near subduction zones and active faults where significant deformation reach to 25 mm/year.

  9. Effect of material property heterogeneity on biomechanical modeling of prostate under deformation.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M; Jewett, Michael A S; van der Kwast, Theo; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K

    2015-01-07

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations. First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using a clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging, and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of the heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to the homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. Such differences in the deformation of the prostate could be potentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were

  10. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. A study of structural foot deformity in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Gwon Uk; Kweon, Mi Gyoug; Park, Seol; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural deformity of the foot joint on the affected side in hemiplegic patients to examine factors that affect this kind of structural deformity. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients and 32 normal adults participated. The foot posture index (FPI) was used to examine the shape of the foot, the modified Ashworth scale test was used to examine the degree of ankle joint rigidity, the navicular drop test was used to investigate the degree of navicular change, and the resting calcaneal stance position test was used to identify location change of the heel bone. [Results] The FPIs of the paretic side of the hemiplegic patients, the non-paretic side of the hemiplegic patients, and normal participants were −0.25 ± 2.1, 1.74 ± 2.3, and 2.12 ± 3.4 respectively. [Conclusion] Our findings indicated that in stroke-related hemiplegic patients, the more severe the spasticity, the more supinated the foot. Further, the smaller the degree of change in the navicular height of hemiplegic patients is, the more supinated the paretic side foot is. Additionally, a greater change in the location of the calcaneus was associated with greater supination of the overall foot. PMID:25642071

  12. Brst-Invariant Deformations of Geometric Structures in Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    The closed string correlators can be constructed from the open ones using topological string theories as a model. The space of physical closed string states is isomorphic to the Hochschild cohomology of (A,Q) (operator Q of ghost number one), - this statement has been verified by means of computation of the Hochschild cohomology of the category of D-branes. We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with its application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are describing by a Hochschild cohomology theory of the DG-algebra, {A} = (A, Q), Q = bar ∂ + {∂ {deform}}, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)nQ+dHoch. Here bar ∂ is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while ∂deform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln. We assume that if in the theory exists a single D-brane then all the information associated with deformations is encoded in an associative algebra A equipped with a differential Q = bar ∂ + {∂ {deform}}. In addition equivalence classes of deformations of these data are described by a Hochschild cohomology of (A,Q), an important geometric invariant of the (anti)holomorphic structure on X. We also discuss the identification of the harmonic structure (HT•(X) HΩ•(X)) of affine space X and the group {Ext}Xn ({ {O}_Δ }, { {O}Δ }) (the HKR isomorphism), and bulk-boundary deformation pairing.

  13. a Visualization Model of Flower Based on Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xuedong

    We present a simple and effective modeling method for flowers. It starts with an initial geometric shape, such as ellipsoid, cylinder, or plane surface et al., and then simulates flower components (such as pedicel, receptacle, pistils, stamens, petals and sepals) by addition deformation to the basic geometric shape. The detailed geometry of flower component is defined by basic equation for the basic shape along with a deformation function. A variety of flower can be produced by varying the deformation parameters. A number of examples are given in the paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  14. A multi-organ biomechanical model to analyze prostate deformation due to large deformation of the rectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Ménard, Cynthia; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal receiver coil (ERC) provides superior visualization of the prostate gland and its surrounding anatomy at the expense of large anatomical deformation. The ability to correct for this deformation is critical to integrate the MR images into the CT-based treatment planning for radiotherapy. The ability to quantify and understand the physiological motion due to large changes in rectal filling can also improve the precision of image-guided procedures. The purpose of this study was to understand the biomechanical relationship between the prostate, rectum, and bladder using a finite element-based multi-organ deformable image registration method, 'Morfeus' developed at our institution. Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Gold seed markers were implanted in the prostate and MR scans performed with the ERC in place and its surrounding balloon inflated to varying volumes (0-100cc). The prostate, bladder, and rectum were then delineated, converted into finite element models, and assigned appropriate material properties. Morfeus was used to assign surface interfaces between the adjacent organs and deform the bladder and rectum from one position to another, obtaining the position of the prostate through finite element analysis. This approach achieves sub-voxel accuracy of image co-registration in the context of a large ERC deformation, while providing a biomechanical understanding of the multi-organ physiological relationship between the prostate, bladder, and rectum. The development of a deformable registration strategy is essential to integrate the superior information offered in MR images into the treatment planning process.

  15. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  16. Inelastic deformation and phenomenological modeling of aluminum including transient effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A review was made of several phenomenological theories which have recently been proposed to describe the inelastic deformation of crystalline solids. Hart's deformation theory has many advantages, but there are disagreements with experimental deformation at stress levels below yield. A new inelastic deformation theory was proposed, introducing the concept of microplasticity. The new model consists of five deformation elements: a friction element representing a deformation element controlled by dislocation glide, a nonrecoverable plastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the strong dislocation barriers, a microplastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the weak barriers, a short range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable anelastic strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the weak barriers, and a long range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the strong barriers. Load relaxation and tensile testing in the plastic range were used to determine the material parameters for the plastic friction elements. The short range and long range anelastic moduli and the material parameters for the kinetics of microplasticity were determined by the measurement of anelastic loops and by performing load relaxation tests in the microplastic region. Experimental results were compared with a computer simulation of the transient deformation behavior of commercial purity aluminum. An attempt was made to correlate the material parameters and the microstructure from TEM. Stability of material parameters during inelastic deformation was discussed and effect of metallurgical variables was examined experimentally. 71 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Brst-Invariant Deformations of Geometric Structures in Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    The closed string correlators can be constructed from the open ones using topological string theories as a model. The space of physical closed string states is isomorphic to the Hochschild cohomology of (A, Q) (operator Q of ghost number one), - this statement has been verified by means of computation of the Hochschild cohomology of the category of D-branes. We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with its application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are describing by a Hochschild cohomology theory of the DG-algebra {A} = (A, Q), Q = /line{\\part} + \\part { deform}, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)n Q + dHoch. Here /line{\\part} is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while \\partdeform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln. We assume that if in the theory exists a single D-brane then all the information associated with deformations is encoded in an associative algebra A equipped with a differential Q = /line{\\part}+\\part { deform}. In addition equivalence classes of deformations of these data are described by a Hochschild cohomology of (A, Q), an important geometric invariant of the (anti)holomorphic structure on X. We also discuss the identification of the harmonic structure (HT•(X); HΩ•(X)) of affine space X and the group ExtXn({O}\\triangle , {O}\\triangle ) (the HKR isomorphism), and bulk-boundary deformation pairing.

  18. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  19. Integrability of the η-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Heinze, Martin; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the η-deformed \\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5} background. For this integrable model we construct a 4× 4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the η-deformed Neumann and {{≤ft(\\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5}\\right)}η} geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  20. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  1. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  2. Symmetry Based No Core Shell Model in a Deformed Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekejian, David; Draayer, Jerry; Launey, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    To address current limitations of shell-model descriptions of large spatial deformation and cluster structures, we adopt a no-core shell model with a deformed harmonic oscillator basis and implement an angular momentum projection in a symmetry-adapted scheme. This approach allows us to reach larger model spaces as a result of computational memory savings for calculations of highly deformed states, such as the Hoyle state in C-12. The method is first tested with schematic interactions, but the ultimate goal is to carry forward calculations with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in future work. Supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI-1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and benefitted from computing resources provided by Blue Waters and LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  3. Tidal deformation of planets: experience in experimental modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobryakov, A. P.; Revuzhenko, A. F.; Shemyakin, E. I.

    1992-06-01

    Two types of apparatus are described for laboratory modeling of tidal deformation. Plane deformation occurs in the first, and the model of the body has the shape of an elliptical cylinder; in the second three-dimensional deformation occurs, and the model is spheroidal in shape. In both cases displacements simulating motion of the tidal wave are assigned on the boundary. A global mechanism of directed mass transfer has been discovered. It is connected with transformation of vertical displacements to horizontal ones. The internal particles describe almost closed trajectories in one complete rotation of the tidal wave, but do not return to their original position. Residual displacements accumulate with increasing number of cycles and lead to differential rotation of internal masses. Questions surrounding experimental measurement of energy dissipation and the role of an internal rigid core are investigated. The effect of directed transfer on the physical fields of planets is discussed.

  4. Masticatory function and temporomandibular disorders in patients with dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of individuals in the Swedish population will at some stage during life have treatment with orthodontic appliances. In more severe cases, when orthodontic treatment is not considered sufficient enough to correct the malocclusion, the orthodontic treatment is combined with orthognathic surgery. For these cases, a satisfying jaw relation is achieved by surgically moving the maxilla and/or the mandible into a pre-planned position. Patients due to be treated with orthognathic surgery often suffer from an impaired masticatory function, symptoms from the masticatory muscles or temporomandibular joints (temporomandibular disorders), headaches as well as dissatisfaction with their facial aesthetics. Since orthognathic treatment is expensive, in many cases arduous to the patient and not without complications, it is important to assess the treatment outcome and if this is satisfying for the patients. Previous studies that have examined the outcome after orthognathic treatment have had diverging study designs and have come to different conclusions with regard to both temporomandibular disorders and masticatory function. The overall aim of this thesis was to assess and compare the frequencies of temporomandibular disorders and the masticatory function in patients with dentofacial deformities before and after orthognathic treatment. THE THESIS IS BASED ON THE FOLLOWING STUDIES: Paper I is a systematic literature review aiming to, in an evidence-based approach, answer the question whether orthognathic treatment affects the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. The review encompasses the period from January 1966 to April 2006 and was further extended to May 2013 in the frame story of this thesis. CONCLUSIONS IN PAPER I AND THE COMPLEMENTARY SURVEY: There is insufficient scientific evidence for a decrease of sub diagnoses of temporomandibular disorders after orthognathic treatment. There is limited scientific evidence for a reduction of

  5. Deformation of facial model for complete denture prosthesis using ARAP group method and elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Sun, Yuchun; Jiang, Xiaotong; Li, Weiwei

    2017-02-07

    With the development of 3D printing and computer graphics technology, mouth rehabilitation has increasingly adopted digital methods. This research proposes a new method to transform the appearance of facial model after complete denture prosthesis. A feature template with few feature points is first constructed according to the facial muscle anatomy and facial deformation after complete denture prosthesis. Next, the traditional as-rigid-as-possible (ARAP) method is optimised by clustering based on facial muscles. The optimised ARAP method is then used for real-time and interactive simulations. Finally, by classifying the degrees of elasticity in the model with additional weights, the simulation can be customised to the skin of individual patients. Different degrees of elastic deformation and post-operative models are superimposed for match analysis. Compared with our previous study, the error is reduced by 24.05%. Results show that our method can deform facial models accurately and efficiently.

  6. Role of anelastic rheology in volcanic deformation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, E.; Giunchi, C.; Bonafede, M.

    2003-04-01

    Analogical models of ground deformation in volcanic areas often show better agreement with observations than mathematical models assuming a perfectly elastic behaviour of the medium. In particular, extensive sand-box experiments show that, following an inflation episode at depth, strain localization takes place above the source, along fault-like structures, which play a fundamental role in governing the cumulative long term deformation of the medium. Owing to the low lithostatic pressure, to the widespread presence of fluids and to the low cohesion of volcanic material, shallow layers in a volcanic region are better described in terms of the modified Mohr-Coulomb constitutive relation. Deep layers, on the other side, are better described in terms of viscoelastic constitutive relations, owing to the high temperatures close to magma reservoirs. Taking into account the inelastic properties of the medium, it is possible to lower considerably the overpressure estimates inferred from elastic models and to reconcile inferred overpressure values with petrologic constraints. In this study, we develop finite element models of ground deformation in volcanic areas, employing elastic and inelastic constitutive laws. The aim of the analysis is to elucidate how a heterogeneous structure of the medium (variations in rheologic parameters and pore pressure) affect the stress and strain distribution. The huge ground deformation (more than 1.5 m) observed at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) during 1982-84 is modelled in terms of an inelastic behaviour of the medium. The caldera is characterized by different mechanical (elastic and inelastic) properties with respect to the host rocks, due to the different formation and evolution. Axi-symmetric finite element models are developed, involving an overpressure source located at depth greater than the deepest limit of hypocenter distribution. Models take into account gravity and the initial isotropic (lithostatic) stress state is perturbed by

  7. Symmetries and deformations in the spherical shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Pittel, S.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss symmetries of the spherical shell model that make contact with the geometric collective model of Bohr and Mottelson. The most celebrated symmetry of this kind is SU(3), which is the basis of Elliott’s model of rotation. It corresponds to a deformed mean field induced by a quadrupole interaction in a single major oscillator shell N and can be generalized to include several major shells. As such, Elliott’s SU(3) model establishes the link between the spherical shell model and the (quadrupole component of the) geometric collective model. We introduce the analogue symmetry induced by an octupole interaction in two major oscillator shells N-1 and N, leading to an octupole-deformed solution of the spherical shell model. We show that in the limit of large oscillator shells, N\\to ∞ , the algebraic octupole interaction tends to that of the geometric collective model.

  8. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2016-11-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and non-linear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  9. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and nonlinear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  10. Data driven modeling of plastic deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Versino, Daniele; Tonda, Alberto; Bronkhorst, Curt A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the application of machine learning techniques for the development of constitutive material models is being investigated. A flow stress model, for strain rates ranging from 10–4 to 1012 (quasi-static to highly dynamic), and temperatures ranging from room temperature to over 1000 K, is obtained by beginning directly with experimental stress-strain data for Copper. An incrementally objective and fully implicit time integration scheme is employed to integrate the hypo-elastic constitutive model, which is then implemented into a finite element code for evaluation. Accuracy and performance of the flow stress models derived from symbolic regression are assessed by comparisonmore » to Taylor anvil impact data. The results obtained with the free-form constitutive material model are compared to well-established strength models such as the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) model and the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model. Here, preliminary results show candidate free-form models comparing well with data in regions of stress-strain space with sufficient experimental data, pointing to a potential means for both rapid prototyping in future model development, as well as the use of machine learning in capturing more data as a guide for more advanced model development.« less

  11. Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, N. N.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) intended for describing the processes of deformation of structures produced by using CCC under high-temperature loading are considered. A phenomenological theory of CCC inelastic deformation is proposed, where such materials are considered as homogeneous ones with effective characteristics and where their high anisotropy of mechanical characteristics and different ways of resistance to extension and compression are taken into account. Micromechanical models are proposed for spatially reinforced CCC, where the difference between mechanical characteristics of components and the reinforcement scheme are taken into account. Themodel parameters are determined from the results of experiments of composite macrospecimens in the directions typical of the material. A version of endochronictype theory with several internal times "launched" for each composite component and related to some damage accumulation mechanisms is proposed for describing the inelastic deformation. Some practical examples are considered.

  12. Modeling Large-Strain, High-Rate Deformation in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Kay, G J; LeBlanc, M M

    2001-07-20

    The large strain deformation response of 6061-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V has been evaluated over a range in strain rates from 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} to over 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. The results have been used to critically evaluate the strength and damage components of the Johnson-Cook (JC) material model. A new model that addresses the shortcomings of the JC model was then developed and evaluated. The model is derived from the rate equations that represent deformation mechanisms active during moderate and high rate loading. Another model that accounts for the influence of void formation on yield and flow behavior of a ductile metal (the Gurson model) was also evaluated. The characteristics and predictive capabilities of these models are reviewed.

  13. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  14. Storm Tracks and Barotropic Deformation in Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert X.; Dole, Randall M.

    2000-08-01

    The relationship between the time-mean planetary-scale deformation field and the structure of midlatitude storm tracks is studied in wintertime simulations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Earth Observing System model. Model biases are determined by contrasting model simulations (forced by observed SSTs) with parallel analyses of NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. Barotropic diagnostics are employed to identify potential dynamical linkages between regional biases in the midlatitude storm tracks and the horizontal deformation field. Initial observational analyses confirm that synoptic eddies are optimally configured to transfer kinetic energy to the mean flow in the jet exit regions, where strong stretching deformation exists. In these regions, the major axes of the synoptic eddies are aligned along the dilatation axes of the mean flow. Consequently, mean flow advection stretches synoptic eddies along their major axes, thereby increasing their anisotropy and weakening their kinetic energy.A strong link is identified between model biases in the horizontal structure of the midlatitude storm tracks and the representation of upper-tropospheric barotropic deformation. In particular, model-simulated storm tracks extend too far downstream in regions where the zonal stretching deformation (associated with horizontal diffluence in jet exit regions) is either too weak in magnitude or displaced westward in comparison with observations. These biases are associated with anomalously weak or westward-displaced patterns of negative barotropic energy conversions, which normally act as a sink of synoptic eddy activity in the jet exit. The anomalous energy conversion patterns are primarily due to model biases in the winter-mean flow rather than the simulated horizontal eddy structures, which closely resemble observations.The results indicate that the horizontal structure of

  15. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  16. Evaluation of deformable image registration and a motion model in CT images with limited features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Kincaid, R.; Goodman, K. A.; Mageras, G. S.

    2012-05-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is increasingly used in radiotherapy applications and provides the basis for a previously described model of patient-specific respiratory motion. We examine the accuracy of a DIR algorithm and a motion model with respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) images of software phantom with known displacement fields, physical deformable abdominal phantom with implanted fiducials in the liver and small liver structures in patient images. The motion model is derived from a principal component analysis that relates volumetric deformations with the motion of the diaphragm or fiducials in the RCCT. Patient data analysis compares DIR with rigid registration as ground truth: the mean ± standard deviation 3D discrepancy of liver structure centroid positions is 2.0 ± 2.2 mm. DIR discrepancy in the software phantom is 3.8 ± 2.0 mm in lung and 3.7 ± 1.8 mm in abdomen; discrepancies near the chest wall are larger than indicated by image feature matching. Marker's 3D discrepancy in the physical phantom is 3.6 ± 2.8 mm. The results indicate that visible features in the images are important for guiding the DIR algorithm. Motion model accuracy is comparable to DIR, indicating that two principal components are sufficient to describe DIR-derived deformation in these datasets.

  17. Modeling Finite Deformations in Trigonal Ceramic Crystals with Lattice Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-08

    International Journal of Plasticity 26 (2010) 1357–1386 1385Farber, Y.A., Yoon, S.Y., Lagerlof, K.P.D., Heuer, A.H., 1993. Microplasticity during high... microplasticity -induced deformation in uniaxially strained ceramics by 3-D Voronoi polycrystal modeling. Int. J. Plast. 21, 801–834. Zhang, C., Kalia, R.K

  18. Biomedical image segmentation using geometric deformable models and metaheuristics.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Pablo; Valsecchi, Andrea; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Cagnoni, Stefano; Damas, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a hybrid level set approach for medical image segmentation. This new geometric deformable model combines region- and edge-based information with the prior shape knowledge introduced using deformable registration. Our proposal consists of two phases: training and test. The former implies the learning of the level set parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm, while the latter is the proper segmentation, where another metaheuristic, in this case Scatter Search, derives the shape prior. In an experimental comparison, this approach has shown a better performance than a number of state-of-the-art methods when segmenting anatomical structures from different biomedical image modalities.

  19. Gauged spinning models with deformed supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoruk, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny

    2016-11-01

    New models of the SU(2|1) supersymmetric mechanics based on gauging the systems with dynamical ( 1, 4, 3) and semi-dynamical ( 4, 4, 0) supermultiplets are presented. We propose a new version of SU(2|1) harmonic superspace approach which makes it possible to construct the Wess-Zumino term for interacting ( 4, 4, 0) multiplets. A new {N}=4 extension of d = 1 Calogero-Moser multiparticle system is obtained by gauging the U( n) isometry of matrix SU(2|1) harmonic superfield model.

  20. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  1. A New Model for Episodic Caldera Deformation at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, P. F.; Gervais, S. M.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Wicks, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly 90 years, geodetic measurements at Yellowstone have shown recurring episodes of uplift and subsidence confined mostly to the caldera but also extending into the Norris Geyser Basin. The most recent such episode began in late 2004 with the onset of caldera-wide uplift that continued for about 5 years before switching to subsidence in late 2009. The physical mechanism driving the deformation is unknown, though several researchers have proposed kinematic models that can reproduce the observed data. The "Lake" earthquake swarm, which occurred in the northern part of Yellowstone Lake from December 2008 through January 2009, provides a new constraint on caldera deformation models. The timing of the swarm correlates with an abrupt change in local deformation, which preceded the gradual transition from uplift to subsidence in late 2009. Thus, caldera deformation, at least in the vicinity of Yellowstone Lake, consists of two (or more) distinct parts, implying the existence of two (or more) distinct deformation sources. This fresh information leads us to propose a new kinematic model for deformation at Yellowstone, which we develop from the last 15 years of continuous GPS and InSAR data. Our new model consists of three deformation sources: (1) a cauldron block source that is subject to a constant displacement at its base while its surrounding ring fault remains locked; (2) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity near the Norris Geyser Basin, which is known to deform separately from the caldera; and (3) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity at the Sour Creek Dome, which we infer from the abrupt change in deformation rate after the Lake Swarm. We use the GPS and InSAR data from the period of strongest signal, summer 2005 through summer 2007, to optimize the geometry of the three sources: the locations and depths of the spherical cavity, and the perimeter of the cauldron block. We then, while holding their geometry fixed, estimate the

  2. Meso-Scale Modeling of Polycrystal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hojun

    Computational material modeling of material is essential to accelerate material/process design and reduce costs in wide variety of applications. In particular, multi-scale models are gaining momentum in many fields as computers become faster, and finer structures become accessible experimentally. An effective (i.e. sufficiently accurate and fast to have practical impact) multi-scale model of dislocation-based metal plasticity may have many important applications such as metal forming. A two-scale method to predict quantitatively the Hall-Petch effect, as well as dislocation densities and lattice curvatures throughout a polycrystal, has been developed and implemented. Based on a finite element formulation, the first scale is called a Grain-Scale Simulation (GSS) that is standard except for using novel single-crystal constitutive equations that were proposed and tested as part of this work (and which are informed from the second model scale). The GSS allows the determination of local stresses, strains, and slip magnitudes while enforcing compatibility and equilibrium throughout a polycrystal in a finite element sense. The second scale is called here a Meso-Scale Simulation (MSS) which is novel in concept and application. It redistributes the mobile part of the dislocation density within grains consistent with the plastic strain distribution, and enforces slip transmission criteria at grain boundaries that depend on local grain and boundary properties. Stepwise simulation at the two scales proceeds sequentially in order to predict the spatial distribution of dislocation density and the flow stress for each slip system within each grain, and each simulation point. The MSS was formulated with the minimum number of undermined or arbitrary parameters, three. Two of these are related to the shape of the strain hardening curve and the other represents the initial yield. These parameters do not invoke additional length scales. The new model made possible the following

  3. The impact of deformation of an aneurysm model under pulsatile flow on hemodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Takao, H; Ichikawa, C; Kamiya, K; Murayama, Y; Motosuke, M

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic analysis of cerebral aneurysms has been widely carried out to clarify the mechanisms of their growth and rupture. In several cases, patient-specific aneurysm models made of transparent polymers have been used. Even though periodic changes in aneurysms due to the pulsation of blood flow could be important, the deformation of the model geometry and its effect on hemodynamic evaluation has not been fully investigated. In addition, the fabrication accuracy of aneurysm models has not been evaluated even though it may affect the hemodynamic parameters to be analyzed. In this study, the fabrication accuracy of a silicone aneurysm model was investigated. Additionally, the deformation of the model under pulsatile flow as well as its correlation with flow behavior was evaluated. Consequently, a fabrication method for an aneurysm model with high accuracy was established and the importance of the wall thickness of the model was also specified.

  4. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  5. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2016-06-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and the addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of two, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  6. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  7. Dynamic deformable models for 3D MRI heart segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Leonid; Bao, Zhaosheng; Gusikov, Igor; Wood, John; Breen, David E.

    2002-05-01

    Automated or semiautomated segmentation of medical images decreases interstudy variation, observer bias, and postprocessing time as well as providing clincally-relevant quantitative data. In this paper we present a new dynamic deformable modeling approach to 3D segmentation. It utilizes recently developed dynamic remeshing techniques and curvature estimation methods to produce high-quality meshes. The approach has been implemented in an interactive environment that allows a user to specify an initial model and identify key features in the data. These features act as hard constraints that the model must not pass through as it deforms. We have employed the method to perform semi-automatic segmentation of heart structures from cine MRI data.

  8. Phenomenological model for transient deformation based on state variables

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M S; Cho, C W; Alexopoulos, P; Mughrabi, H; Li, C Y

    1980-01-01

    The state variable theory of Hart, while providing a unified description of plasticity-dominated deformation, exhibits deficiencies when it is applied to transient deformation phenomena at stresses below yield. It appears that the description of stored anelastic strain is oversimplified. Consideration of a simple physical picture based on continuum dislocation pileups suggests that the neglect of weak barriers to dislocation motion is the source of these inadequacies. An appropriately modified description incorporating such barriers then allows the construction of a macroscopic model including transient effects. Although the flow relations for the microplastic element required in the new theory are not known, tentative assignments may be made for such functions. The model then exhibits qualitatively correct behavior when tensile, loading-unloading, reverse loading, and load relaxation tests are simulated. Experimental procedures are described for determining the unknown parameters and functions in the new model.

  9. Compound dislocation models (CDMs) for volcano deformation analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul R.; Prats-Iraola, Pau

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic crises are often preceded and accompanied by volcano deformation caused by magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Fast and efficient model identification and parameter estimation techniques for various sources of deformation are crucial for process understanding, volcano hazard assessment and early warning purposes. As a simple model that can be a basis for rapid inversion techniques, we present a compound dislocation model (CDM) that is composed of three mutually orthogonal rectangular dislocations (RDs). We present new RD solutions, which are free of artefact singularities and that also possess full rotational degrees of freedom. The CDM can represent both planar intrusions in the near field and volumetric sources of inflation and deflation in the far field. Therefore, this source model can be applied to shallow dikes and sills, as well as to deep planar and equidimensional sources of any geometry, including oblate, prolate and other triaxial ellipsoidal shapes. In either case the sources may possess any arbitrary orientation in space. After systematically evaluating the CDM, we apply it to the co-eruptive displacements of the 2015 Calbuco eruption observed by the Sentinel-1A satellite in both ascending and descending orbits. The results show that the deformation source is a deflating vertical lens-shaped source at an approximate depth of 8 km centred beneath Calbuco volcano. The parameters of the optimal source model clearly show that it is significantly different from an isotropic point source or a single dislocation model. The Calbuco example reflects the convenience of using the CDM for a rapid interpretation of deformation data.

  10. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the

  11. A large deformation viscoelastic model for double-network hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunwei; Lin, Shaoting; Zhao, Xuanhe; Anand, Lallit

    2017-03-01

    We present a large deformation viscoelasticity model for recently synthesized double network hydrogels which consist of a covalently-crosslinked polyacrylamide network with long chains, and an ionically-crosslinked alginate network with short chains. Such double-network gels are highly stretchable and at the same time tough, because when stretched the crosslinks in the ionically-crosslinked alginate network rupture which results in distributed internal microdamage which dissipates a substantial amount of energy, while the configurational entropy of the covalently-crosslinked polyacrylamide network allows the gel to return to its original configuration after deformation. In addition to the large hysteresis during loading and unloading, these double network hydrogels also exhibit a substantial rate-sensitive response during loading, but exhibit almost no rate-sensitivity during unloading. These features of large hysteresis and asymmetric rate-sensitivity are quite different from the response of conventional hydrogels. We limit our attention to modeling the complex viscoelastic response of such hydrogels under isothermal conditions. Our model is restricted in the sense that we have limited our attention to conditions under which one might neglect any diffusion of the water in the hydrogel - as might occur when the gel has a uniform initial value of the concentration of water, and the mobility of the water molecules in the gel is low relative to the time scale of the mechanical deformation. We also do not attempt to model the final fracture of such double-network hydrogels.

  12. Dislocation models of interseismic deformation in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; McCrory, P.; Svarc, J.; Murray, J.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS-derived crustal velocity field of the western United States is used to construct dislocation models in a viscoelastic medium of interseismic crustal deformation. The interseismic velocity field is constrained by 1052 GPS velocity vectors spanning the ???2500-km-long plate boundary zone adjacent to the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone and extending ???1000 km into the plate interior. The GPS data set is compiled from U.S. Geological Survey campaign data, Plate Boundary Observatory data, and the Western U.S. Cordillera velocity field of Bennett et al. (1999). In the context of viscoelastic cycle models of postearthquake deformation, the interseismic velocity field is modeled with a combination of earthquake sources on ???100 known faults plus broadly distributed sources. Models that best explain the observed interseismic velocity field include the contributions of viscoelastic relaxation from faulting near the major plate margins, viscoelastic relaxation from distributed faulting in the plate interior, as well as lateral variations in depth-averaged rigidity in the elastic lithosphere. Resulting rigidity variations are consistent with reduced effective elastic plate thickness in a zone a few tens of kilometers wide surrounding the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Primary deformation characteristics are captured along the entire SAF system, Eastern California Shear Zone, Walker Lane, the Mendocino triple junction, the Cascadia margin, and the plate interior up to ???1000 km from the major plate boundaries.

  13. Severe Skew Foot Deformity in a Patient With Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2011-01-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with the full phenotypic features of Freeman Sheldon syndrome (FSS). Severe skew foot deformity has been recognized as additional skeletal abnormality. Parents were first degree cousins, raising the possibility of autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of severe skew foot deformity in a patient with (FSS). Keywords Freeman-Sheldon syndrome; Skew foot deformity; Metatarsus adductus PMID:22383916

  14. A skeleton family generator via physics-based deformable models.

    PubMed

    Krinidis, Stelios; Chatzis, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for object skeleton family extraction. The introduced technique utilizes a 2-D physics-based deformable model that parameterizes the objects shape. Deformation equations are solved exploiting modal analysis, and proportional to model physical characteristics, a different skeleton is produced every time, generating, in this way, a family of skeletons. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons match to hand-labeled skeletons provided by human subjects, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, cuts and tears, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, the proposed approach produces no spurious branches without the need of any known skeleton pruning method.

  15. Modeling and analysis methodology for aeroelastically tailored chordwise deformable wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Chang, Stephen; Zischka, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Structural concepts have been created which produce chordwise camber deformation that results in enhanced lift. A wing box can be tailored to utilize each of these with composites. In attempting to optimize the aerodynamic benefits, we have found there are two optimal designs that are of interest. There is a weight optimum which corresponds to the maximum lift per unit structural weight. There is also a lift optimum that corresponds to maximum absolute lift. New structural models, the basic deformation mechanisms that are utilized and typical analytical results are presented. It appears that lift enhancements of sufficient magnitude can be produced to render this type of wing tailoring of practical interest. Experiments and finite element correlations are performed which confirm the validity of the theoretical models utilized.

  16. A Multiple Object Geometric Deformable Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, John A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Deformable models are widely used for image segmentation, most commonly to find single objects within an image. Although several methods have been proposed to segment multiple objects using deformable models, substantial limitations in their utility remain. This paper presents a multiple object segmentation method using a novel and efficient object representation for both two and three dimensions. The new framework guarantees object relationships and topology, prevents overlaps and gaps, enables boundary-specific speeds, and has a computationally efficient evolution scheme that is largely independent of the number of objects. Maintaining object relationships and straightforward use of object-specific and boundary-specific smoothing and advection forces enables the segmentation of objects with multiple compartments, a critical capability in the parcellation of organs in medical imaging. Comparing the new framework with previous approaches shows its superior performance and scalability. PMID:23316110

  17. On the unimportance of constitutive models in computing brain deformation for image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Adam; Hawkins, Trent; Miller, Karol

    2009-02-01

    Imaging modalities that can be used intra-operatively do not provide sufficient details to confidently locate the abnormalities and critical healthy areas that have been identified from high-resolution pre-operative scans. However, as we have shown in our previous work, high quality pre-operative images can be warped to the intra-operative position of the brain. This can be achieved by computing deformations within the brain using a biomechanical model. In this paper, using a previously developed patient-specific model of brain undergoing craniotomy-induced shift, we conduct a parametric analysis to investigate in detail the influences of constitutive models of the brain tissue. We conclude that the choice of the brain tissue constitutive model, when used with an appropriate finite deformation solution, does not affect the accuracy of computed displacements, and therefore a simple linear elastic model for the brain tissue is sufficient.

  18. Model Deformation Measurements at a Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. Data reduction procedures and the results of tunnel tests at the NTF are presented.

  19. Model Deformation Measurements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1998-01-01

    Only recently have large amounts of model deformation data been acquired in NASA wind tunnels. This acquisition of model deformation data was made possible by the development of an automated video photogrammetric system to measure the changes in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load. The measurement technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. A major consideration in the development of the measurement system was that use of the technique must not appreciably reduce wind tunnel productivity. The measurement technique has been used successfully for a number of tests at four large production wind tunnels at NASA and a dedicated system is nearing completion for a fifth facility. These facilities are the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley, and the 12-FT Pressure Tunnel at NASA Ames. A dedicated system for the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel is scheduled to be used for the first time for a test in September. The advantages, limitations, and strategy of the technique as currently used in NASA wind tunnels are presented. Model deformation data are presented which illustrate the value of these measurements. Plans for further enhancements to the technique are presented.

  20. Heavy quark potential from deformed AdS5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed AdS5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.

  1. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  2. Heterogeneous Deformable Modeling of Bio-Tissues and Haptic Force Rendering for Bio-Object Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiyong; Lee, Yuan-Shin; Narayan, Roger J.

    This paper presents a novel technique for modeling soft biological tissues as well as the development of an innovative interface for bio-manufacturing and medical applications. Heterogeneous deformable models may be used to represent the actual internal structures of deformable biological objects, which possess multiple components and nonuniform material properties. Both heterogeneous deformable object modeling and accurate haptic rendering can greatly enhance the realism and fidelity of virtual reality environments. In this paper, a tri-ray node snapping algorithm is proposed to generate a volumetric heterogeneous deformable model from a set of object interface surfaces between different materials. A constrained local static integration method is presented for simulating deformation and accurate force feedback based on the material properties of a heterogeneous structure. Biological soft tissue modeling is used as an example to demonstrate the proposed techniques. By integrating the heterogeneous deformable model into a virtual environment, users can both observe different materials inside a deformable object as well as interact with it by touching the deformable object using a haptic device. The presented techniques can be used for surgical simulation, bio-product design, bio-manufacturing, and medical applications.

  3. Modelling of deformation and recrystallisation microstructures in rocks and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Evans, Lynn A.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Jessell, Mark W.; Lebensohn, Ricardo; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Peternell, Mark; Piazolo, Sandra; Weikusat, Ilka; Wilson, Chris J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Microstructures both record the deformation history of a rock and strongly control its mechanical properties. As microstructures in natural rocks only show the final "post-mortem" state, geologists have attempted to simulate the development of microstructures with experiments and later numerical models. Especially in-situ experiments have given enormous insight, as time-lapse movies could reveal the full history of a microstructure. Numerical modelling is an alternative approach to simulate and follow the change in microstructure with time, unconstrained by experimental limitations. Numerical models have been applied to a range of microstructural processes, such as grain growth, dynamic recrystallisation, porphyroblast rotation, vein growth, formation of mylonitic fabrics, etc. The numerical platform "Elle" (www.elle.ws) in particular has brought progress in the simulation of microstructural development as it is specifically designed to include the competition between simultaneously operating processes. Three developments significantly improve our capability to simulate microstructural evolution: (1) model input from the mapping of crystallographic orientation with EBSD or the automatic fabric analyser, (2) measurement of grain size and crystallographic preferred orientation evolution using neutron diffraction experiments and (3) the implementation of the full-field Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) solver for modelling anisotropic crystal-plastic deformation. The latter enables the detailed modelling of stress and strain as a function of local crystallographic orientation, which has a strong effect on strain localisation such as, for example, the formation of shear bands. These models can now be compared with the temporal evolution of crystallographic orientation distributions in in-situ experiments. In the last decade, the possibility to combine experiments with numerical simulations has allowed not only verification and refinement of the numerical simulation

  4. Visualization of cardiac dynamics using physics-based deformable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Modeling of moving anatomic structures is complicated by the complexity of motion intrinsic and extrinsic to the structures. However when motion is cyclical, such as in heart, effective dynamic modeling can be approached using modern fast imaging techniques, which provide 3D structural data. Data may be acquired as a sequence of 3D volume images throughout the cardiac cycle. To model the intricate non- linear motion of the heart, we created a physics-based surface model which can realistically deform between successive time points in the cardiac cycle, yielding a dynamic 4D model of cardiac motion. Sequences of fifteen 3D volume images of intact canine beating hearts were acquired during compete cardiac cycles using the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor and the Electron Beam CT. The chambers of the heart were segmented at successive time points, typically at 1/15-second intervals. The left ventricle of the first item point was reconstructed as an initial triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable model, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, was applied to the initial mesh and allowed the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resultant 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto the anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D mode, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. For acquisition systems that may provide only limited 4D data, the model can provide interpolated anatomic shape between time points. This physics-based deformable model accurately represents dynamic cardiac structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provides the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allowing

  5. Surrogate modeling of deformable joint contact using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models.

  6. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  7. Frame junction vibration transmission with a modified frame deformation model.

    PubMed

    Moore, J A

    1990-12-01

    A previous paper dealt with vibration transmission through junctions of connected frame members where the allowed frame deformations included bending, torsion, and longitudinal motions [J.A. Moore, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2766-2776 (1990)]. In helicopter and aircraft structures the skin panels can constitute a high impedance connection along the length of the frames that effectively prohibits in-plane motion at the elevation of the skin panels. This has the effect of coupling in-plane bending and torsional motions within the frame. This paper discusses the transmission behavior through frame junctions that accounts for the in-plane constraint in idealized form by assuming that the attached skin panels completely prohibit inplane motion in the frames. Also, transverse shear deformation is accounted for in describing the relatively deep web frame constructions common in aircraft structures. Longitudinal motion in the frames is not included in the model. Transmission coefficient predictions again show the importance of out-of-plane bending deformation to the transmission of vibratory energy in an aircraft structure. Comparisons are shown with measured vibration transmission data along the framing in the overhead of a helicopter airframe, with good agreement. The frame junction description has been implemented within a general purpose statistical energy analysis (SEA) computer code in modeling the entire airframe structure including skin panels.

  8. Oscillatory athermal quasistatic deformation of a model glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-08-01

    We report computer simulations of oscillatory athermal quasistatic shear deformation of dense amorphous samples of a three-dimensional model glass former. A dynamical transition is observed as the amplitude of the deformation is varied: For large values of the amplitude the system exhibits diffusive behavior and loss of memory of the initial conditions, whereas localization is observed for small amplitudes. Our results suggest that the same kind of transition found in driven colloidal systems is present in the case of amorphous solids (e.g., metallic glasses). The onset of the transition is shown to be related to the onset of energy dissipation. Shear banding is observed for large system sizes, without, however, affecting qualitative aspects of the transition.

  9. Improved techniques for thermomechanical testing in support of deformation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Ellis, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of generating precise thermomechanical deformation data to support constitutive model development was investigated. Here, the requirement is for experimental data that is free from anomalies caused by less than ideal equipment and procedures. A series of exploratory tests conducted on Hastelloy X showed that generally accepted techniques for strain controlled tests were lacking in at least three areas. Specifically, problems were encountered with specimen stability, thermal strain compensation, and temperature/mechanical strain phasing. The source of these difficulties was identified and improved thermomechanical testing techniques to correct them were developed. These goals were achieved by developing improved procedures for measuring and controlling thermal gradients and by designing a specimen specifically for thermomechanical testing. In addition, innovative control strategies were developed to correctly proportion and phase the thermal and mechanical components of strain. Subsequently, the improved techniques were used to generate deformation data for Hastelloy X over the temperature range, 200 to 1000 C.

  10. Finite element modeling of the deformation of magnetoelastic film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew I.; White, Daniel A.; Steigmann, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles, a magnetoelastic polymer, has been developed. This engineered material is formed into a thin film using spin casting. An applied magnetic field will deform the film. The magnetic deformation of this film has many possible applications, particularly in microfluidic pumps and pressure regulators. In this paper a finite element method suitable for the transient simulation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional magnetoelastic polymers subjected to time-varying magnetic fields is developed. The approach is similar to that employed in finite elment magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the key difference is a more complex hyperelastic material model. In order to confirm the validity of the approach, finite element solutions for an axially symmetric thin film are compared to an analytical solution based on the membrane (infinitely thin) approximation. For this particular problem the two approaches give qualitatively similar results and converge as the film thickness approaches zero.

  11. Elastic properties of compressed cryocrystals in a deformed atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2013-06-01

    A model with deformed atom shells was built to investigate the elastic properties of rare-gas Ne and Kr crystals under high pressure. It is shown that the observed deviation from the Cauchy relation δ cannot be adequately reproduced when taking into account only the many-body interaction. The individual pressure dependence of δ is the result of competition of the many-body interaction and the quadrupole interaction associated with the quadrupole-type deformation of electron shells of the atoms during the displacement of the nuclei. Each kind of interaction makes a strongly pressure dependent contribution to δ. In the case of Ne and Kr, contributions of these interactions are compensated to a good precision, providing δ being almost constant against pressure.

  12. Cochlear implant in a patient with mondini's deformity of the cochlea: pilot patient in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Sadaf; Junaid, Montasir; Sobani, Zainul Abedeen; Nadeem, Naila; Awans, Mohammad Sohail

    2013-07-01

    Autosomal-recessive genes account for about 80% of the patients of non-syndromic deafness, and a major portion of those lead to cochlear pathology. Given the strong cultural practice of consanguineous marriages and the lack of awareness regarding screening modalities, a high prevalence of hereditary pre-lingual deafness is seen in Pakistan. Considering the situation, cochlear implant surgery was introduced by Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, Pakistan, in 2003. Recently we decided to expand the profile and services available and conducted the first ever cochlear implant on an anatomically-challenged cochlea. The case report relates to the experience of our pilot patient who was suffering from Mondini's deformity.

  13. Quasiequilibrium models for triaxially deformed rotating compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xing; Markakis, Charalampos; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Uryu, Koji

    2008-12-15

    Quasiequilibrium models of rapidly rotating triaxially deformed stars are computed in general relativistic gravity, assuming a conformally flat spatial geometry (Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation) and a polytropic equation of state. Highly deformed solutions are calculated on the initial slice covered by spherical coordinate grids, centered at the source, in all angular directions up to a large truncation radius. Constant rest mass sequences are calculated from nearly axisymmetric to maximally deformed triaxial configurations. Selected parameters are to model (proto-) neutron stars; the compactness is M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.14, and 0.2 for polytropic index n=0.3 and M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.12, and 0.14 for n=0.5, where M/R refers to that of a nonrotating spherical star having the same rest mass. We confirmed that the triaxial solutions exist for these parameters as in the case of Newtonian polytropes. However, it is also found that the triaxial sequences become shorter for higher compactness, and those disappear at a certain large compactness for the n=0.5 case. In the scenario of the contraction of proto-neutron stars being subject to strong viscosity and rapid cooling, it is plausible that, once the viscosity driven secular instability sets in during the contraction, the proto-neutron stars are always maximally deformed triaxial configurations, as long as the compactness and the equation of state parameters allow such triaxial sequences. Detection of gravitational waves from such sources may be used as another probe for the nuclear equation of state.

  14. A nonaffine network model for elastomers undergoing finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we construct a new physics-based model of rubber elasticity to capture the strain softening, strain hardening, and deformation-state dependent response of rubber materials undergoing finite deformations. This model is unique in its ability to capture large-stretch mechanical behavior with parameters that are connected to the polymer chemistry and can also be easily identified with the important characteristics of the macroscopic stress-stretch response. The microscopic picture consists of two components: a crosslinked network of Langevin chains and an entangled network with chains confined to a nonaffine tube. These represent, respectively, changes in entropy due to thermally averaged chain conformations and changes in entropy due to the magnitude of these conformational fluctuations. A simple analytical form for the strain energy density is obtained using Rubinstein and Panyukov's single-chain description of network behavior. The model only depends on three parameters that together define the initial modulus, extent of strain softening, and the onset of strain hardening. Fits to large stretch data for natural rubber, silicone rubber, VHB 4905 (polyacrylate rubber), and b186 rubber (a carbon black-filled rubber) are presented, and a comparison is made with other similar constitutive models of large-stretch rubber elasticity. We demonstrate that the proposed model provides a complete description of elastomers undergoing large deformations for different applied loading configurations. Moreover, since the strain energy is obtained using a clear set of physical assumptions, this model may be tested and used to interpret the results of computer simulation and experiments on polymers of known microscopic structure.

  15. Multiplanar Deformities Correction Using Taylor Spatial Frame in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Lior; Keren, Yaniv; Eidelman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) is a modern circular external fixator that, using a virtual hinge, is able to correct six axis deformities simultaneously. Despite the growing popularity of this method, few reports exist about its use in children and adolescents. To evaluate the effectiveness of TSF in correcting multiplanar deformities in patients with open physis, we reviewed the results of treatment in children who had at least two planes deformities of lower limbs. Methods: Over a period of 8 years, we treated 51 patients, 40 boys, 11 girls, with a mean age of 12.4 years (range, 2-16 years). All patients had open physis at the time of the TSF application. All patients had at least two deformities (angular and/or rotational). Fifty-five osteotomies (11 femoral, 44 tibial) were performed. Patients were divided into four groups: 13 with post-traumatic malunions, 18 with tibia vara, six with rickets, and 14 with miscellaneous deformities. Correction goal was determined as correction of deformities to population-average parameters of the lower limbs in frontal and sagittal views and normal mechanical axis deviation. Results: Correction goal was achieved in all except one patient; four patients had recurrence of deformities post-operatively and were re-operated. Most common complications were pin tract infection (20 patients), delayed union (2), regenerate translation (1), post-removal femoral fractures (2), knee subluxation (1), nonunion (1), and one patient developed chronic osteomyelitis secondary to deep pin tract infection. Conclusion: TSF allowed accurate correction of complex limb deformities in children and adolescents with relatively few serious complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV. Case series. PMID:27347235

  16. [DEFORMITY OF LEFT VENTRICLE WALLS IN PATIENTS WITH AORTAL VALVE STENOSIS].

    PubMed

    Trembovetskaya, E M

    2015-04-01

    Parameters of longitudinal deformity of left ventricle walls in patients, suffering aortal valve stenosis (AVS), were analyzed. While the process of heart contraction in norm and in AVS occurs, longitudinal deformity is expressed maximally in its apical divisions. AVS deformity of apical divisions of left ventricle, as well as middle divisions of interventricular septum and lower wall, practically did not differ from such in norm, and deformity of basal divisions of all walls and middle divisions of posterior, lateral and anterior walls of left ventricle was trustworthy less than a norm. Thus, a reduction of the deformity indices in basal divisions of left ventricle and middle segments of its posterior, lateral and anterior walls in patients, suffering AVS with preserved output fraction, precedes the disorders of its hemodynamics and constitutes a predictor for the cardiac output reduction.

  17. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  18. A GPU based high-resolution multilevel biomechanical head and neck model for validating deformable image registration

    SciTech Connect

    Neylon, J. Qi, X.; Sheng, K.; Low, D. A.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Staton, R.; Pukala, J.; Manon, R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Validating the usage of deformable image registration (DIR) for daily patient positioning is critical for adaptive radiotherapy (RT) applications pertaining to head and neck (HN) radiotherapy. The authors present a methodology for generating biomechanically realistic ground-truth data for validating DIR algorithms for HN anatomy by (a) developing a high-resolution deformable biomechanical HN model from a planning CT, (b) simulating deformations for a range of interfraction posture changes and physiological regression, and (c) generating subsequent CT images representing the deformed anatomy. Methods: The biomechanical model was developed using HN kVCT datasets and the corresponding structure contours. The voxels inside a given 3D contour boundary were clustered using a graphics processing unit (GPU) based algorithm that accounted for inconsistencies and gaps in the boundary to form a volumetric structure. While the bony anatomy was modeled as rigid body, the muscle and soft tissue structures were modeled as mass–spring-damper models with elastic material properties that corresponded to the underlying contoured anatomies. Within a given muscle structure, the voxels were classified using a uniform grid and a normalized mass was assigned to each voxel based on its Hounsfield number. The soft tissue deformation for a given skeletal actuation was performed using an implicit Euler integration with each iteration split into two substeps: one for the muscle structures and the other for the remaining soft tissues. Posture changes were simulated by articulating the skeletal structure and enabling the soft structures to deform accordingly. Physiological changes representing tumor regression were simulated by reducing the target volume and enabling the surrounding soft structures to deform accordingly. Finally, the authors also discuss a new approach to generate kVCT images representing the deformed anatomy that accounts for gaps and antialiasing artifacts that may

  19. Multiscale Combination of Physically-Based Registration and Deformation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.; Goldgof, D.B.; Sarkar, S.

    1999-11-08

    In this paper the authors present a novel multiscale approach to recovery of nonrigid motion from sequences of registered intensity and range images. The main idea of the approach is that a finite element (FEM) model can naturally handle both registration and deformation modeling using a single model-driving strategy. The method includes a multiscale iterative algorithm based on analysis of the undirected Hausdorff distance to recover correspondences. The method is evaluated with respect to speed, accuracy, and noise sensitivity. Advantages of the proposed approach are demonstrated using man-made elastic materials and human skin motion. Experiments with regular grid features are used for performance comparison with a conventional approach (separate snakes and FEM models). It is shown that the new method does not require a grid and can adapt the model to available object features.

  20. Improved Rubin-Bodner model for the prediction of soft tissue deformations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangming; Xia, James J; Liebschner, Michael; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Kim, Daeseung; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-11-01

    In craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgery, a reliable way of simulating the soft tissue deformation resulted from skeletal reconstruction is vitally important for preventing the risks of facial distortion postoperatively. However, it is difficult to simulate the soft tissue behaviors affected by different types of CMF surgery. This study presents an integrated bio-mechanical and statistical learning model to improve accuracy and reliability of predictions on soft facial tissue behavior. The Rubin-Bodner (RB) model is initially used to describe the biomechanical behavior of the soft facial tissue. Subsequently, a finite element model (FEM) computers the stress of each node in soft facial tissue mesh data resulted from bone displacement. Next, the Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) method is implemented to obtain the relationship between the facial soft tissue deformation and the stress distribution corresponding to different CMF surgical types and to improve evaluation of elastic parameters included in the RB model. Therefore, the soft facial tissue deformation can be predicted by biomechanical properties and statistical model. Leave-one-out cross-validation is used on eleven patients. As a result, the average prediction error of our model (0.7035mm) is lower than those resulting from other approaches. It also demonstrates that the more accurate bio-mechanical information the model has, the better prediction performance it could achieve.

  1. Statistical modeling of interfractional tissue deformation and its application in radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vile, Douglas J.

    In radiation therapy, interfraction organ motion introduces a level of geometric uncertainty into the planning process. Plans, which are typically based upon a single instance of anatomy, must be robust against daily anatomical variations. For this problem, a model of the magnitude, direction, and likelihood of deformation is useful. In this thesis, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to statistically model the 3D organ motion for 19 prostate cancer patients, each with 8-13 fractional computed tomography (CT) images. Deformable image registration and the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) are used to quantify the interfraction systematic and random motion. By applying the PCA technique to the random DVFs, principal modes of random tissue deformation were determined for each patient, and a method for sampling synthetic random DVFs was developed. The PCA model was then extended to describe the principal modes of systematic and random organ motion for the population of patients. A leave-one-out study tested both the systematic and random motion model's ability to represent PCA training set DVFs. The random and systematic DVF PCA models allowed the reconstruction of these data with absolute mean errors between 0.5-0.9 mm and 1-2 mm, respectively. To the best of the author's knowledge, this study is the first successful effort to build a fully 3D statistical PCA model of systematic tissue deformation in a population of patients. By sampling synthetic systematic and random errors, organ occupancy maps were created for bony and prostate-centroid patient setup processes. By thresholding these maps, PCA-based planning target volume (PTV) was created and tested against conventional margin recipes (van Herk for bony alignment and 5 mm fixed [3 mm posterior] margin for centroid alignment) in a virtual clinical trial for low-risk prostate cancer. Deformably accumulated delivered dose served as a surrogate for clinical outcome. For the bony landmark setup

  2. Neural Network method for Inverse Modeling of Material Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.D., Jr.; Ivezic, N.D.; Zacharia, T.

    1999-07-10

    A method is described for inverse modeling of material deformation in applications of importance to the sheet metal forming industry. The method was developed in order to assess the feasibility of utilizing empirical data in the early stages of the design process as an alternative to conventional prototyping methods. Because properly prepared and employed artificial neural networks (ANN) were known to be capable of codifying and generalizing large bodies of empirical data, they were the natural choice for the application. The product of the work described here is a desktop ANN system that can produce in one pass an accurate die design for a user-specified part shape.

  3. Comparison of Three Optical Methods for Measuring Model Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.; Hoppe, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the current state-of-the-art of the following three optical techniques under study by NASA for measuring model deformation in wind tunnels: (1) video photogrammetry, (2) projection moire interferometry, and (3) the commercially available Optotrak system. An objective comparison of these three techniques should enable the selection of the best technique for a particular test undertaken at various NASA facilities. As might be expected, no one technique is best for all applications. The techniques are also not necessarily mutually exclusive and in some cases can be complementary to one another.

  4. Finite Element Model and Validation of Nasal Tip Deformation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Badran, Alan; Ho, David; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-03-01

    Nasal tip mechanical stability is important for functional and cosmetic nasal airway surgery. Palpation of the nasal tip provides information on tip strength to the surgeon, though it is a purely subjective assessment. Providing a means to simulate nasal tip deformation with a validated model can offer a more objective approach in understanding the mechanics and nuances of the nasal tip support and eventual nasal mechanics as a whole. Herein we present validation of a finite element (FE) model of the nose using physical measurements recorded using an ABS plastic-silicone nasal phantom. Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to capture the geometry of the phantom at rest and while under steady state load. The silicone used to make the phantom was mechanically tested and characterized using a linear elastic constitutive model. Surface point clouds of the silicone and FE model were compared for both the loaded and unloaded state. The average Hausdorff distance between actual measurements and FE simulations across the nose were 0.39 ± 1.04 mm and deviated up to 2 mm at the outermost boundaries of the model. FE simulation and measurements were in near complete agreement in the immediate vicinity of the nasal tip with millimeter accuracy. We have demonstrated validation of a two-component nasal FE model, which could be used to model more complex modes of deformation where direct measurement may be challenging. This is the first step in developing a nasal model to simulate nasal mechanics and ultimately the interaction between geometry and airflow.

  5. Problems, acceptance and social inequality: a study of the deformed leprosy patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Kopparty, S N

    1995-09-01

    Though the impact of social inequality on health conditions is widely known, its impact on the chronic and stigmatized disease, leprosy, has received little attention. Deformity sometimes leads to disabilities and to handicaps causing problems to the patient and his family. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the impact of social inequality, prevalent in the form of the caste system in India on the deformed leprosy patients and on their families. This impact was examined in terms of the problems faced by the patients. A sample of 150 deformed patients and their families, drawn from two districts in Tamil Nadu, was selected for the study. About 57% of the deformed patients experienced their deformity as a handicap which caused social and economic problems while the rest did not. Of the three caste groups, the Lower Caste group experienced more severe economic problems while the Upper Caste group faced more social problems. The extent of acceptance of deformed patients in their family varied significantly among those facing and not facing problems due to their deformity. The deformed patients without any handicap were accepted in a large majority of their families (82%) regardless of their caste status. In contrast the deformed but handicapped patients were accepted differentially among the three caste groups with the Upper group accepting them in most of their families (80%) while in the Lower group much less number of families (54%) did. All the families of the deformed but not handicapped patients desired to keep their patients till their death irrespective of their caste status. On the contrary, while all the families in the Upper Caste group expressed their willingness to keep their handicapped patients in the family till their death, 10% in the Middle and 22% in the Lower Caste groups did not want to do so. This suggests the gradual marginalization, rejection and dehabilitation of the affected. Thus, one's caste status can be a broad indicator

  6. 3D Morphology Prediction of Progressive Spinal Deformities from Probabilistic Modeling of Discriminant Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Kadoury, Samuel; Mandel, William; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Nault, Marie-Lyne; Parent, Stefan

    2017-01-23

    We introduce a novel approach for predicting the progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis from 3D spine models reconstructed from biplanar X-ray images. Recent progress in machine learning have allowed to improve classification and prognosis rates, but lack a probabilistic framework to measure uncertainty in the data. We propose a discriminative probabilistic manifold embedding where locally linear mappings transform data points from high-dimensional space to corresponding lowdimensional coordinates. A discriminant adjacency matrix is constructed to maximize the separation between progressive and non-progressive groups of patients diagnosed with scoliosis, while minimizing the distance in latent variables belonging to the same class. To predict the evolution of deformation, a baseline reconstruction is projected onto the manifold, from which a spatiotemporal regression model is built from parallel transport curves inferred from neighboring exemplars. Rate of progression is modulated from the spine flexibility and curve magnitude of the 3D spine deformation. The method was tested on 745 reconstructions from 133 subjects using longitudinal 3D reconstructions of the spine, with results demonstrating the discriminatory framework can identify between progressive and non-progressive of scoliotic patients with a classification rate of 81% and prediction differences of 2.1o in main curve angulation, outperforming other manifold learning methods. Our method achieved a higher prediction accuracy and improved the modeling of spatiotemporal morphological changes in highly deformed spines compared to other learning methods.

  7. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  8. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  9. Multimodality Tumor Delineation and Predictive Modelling via Fuzzy-Fusion Deformable Models and Biological Potential Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Richard Marc

    The radiation therapy treatment planning (RTTP) process may be subdivided into three planning stages: gross tumor delineation, clinical target delineation, and modality dependent target definition. The research presented will focus on the first two planning tasks. A gross tumor target delineation methodology is proposed which focuses on the integration of MRI, CT, and PET imaging data towards the generation of a mathematically optimal tumor boundary. The solution to this problem is formulated within a framework integrating concepts from the fields of deformable modelling, region growing, fuzzy logic, and data fusion. The resulting fuzzy fusion algorithm can integrate both edge and region information from multiple medical modalities to delineate optimal regions of pathological tissue content. The subclinical boundaries of an infiltrating neoplasm cannot be determined explicitly via traditional imaging methods and are often defined to extend a fixed distance from the gross tumor boundary. In order to improve the clinical target definition process an estimation technique is proposed via which tumor growth may be modelled and subclinical growth predicted. An in vivo, macroscopic primary brain tumor growth model is presented, which may be fit to each patient undergoing treatment, allowing for the prediction of future growth and consequently the ability to estimate subclinical local invasion. Additionally, the patient specific in vivo tumor model will be of significant utility in multiple diagnostic clinical applications.

  10. Modelling Polymer Deformation and Welding Behaviour during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    2016-11-01

    3D printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The most common method, fused deposition modelling, involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion of the material to fabricate a three-dimensional object. The key to the ensuring strength at the weld between these layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, as the printed layer cools towards the glass transition temperature, the time available for diffusion is limited. In addition, the extrusion process significantly deforms the polymer micro-structure prior to welding and consequently affects how the polymers "re-entangle" across the weld. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal printing process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and amorphous polymer rheology have on the ultimate weld structure. In particular, we incorporate both the stretch and orientation of the polymer using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine how the melt flows through the nozzle and is deposited onto the build plate. We then address how this deformation relaxes and contributes to the thickness and structure of the weld. National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Georgetown University.

  11. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods.

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Blount Disease or Blount-Like Deformity.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Nypaver, Chrissy M; Schiff, Adam P; Hopkinson, William J; Rees, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Blount disease is associated with complex deformity of the proximal tibia, and some patients will develop knee osteoarthritis. Five patients (eight knees) with Blount disease or Blount-like deformity underwent total knee arthroplasty. Mean proximal tibial metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was 20.75°. Each patient had substantial posteromedial tibial bony defects and six knees required extensive medial releases. Two knees required increased constraint at index procedure. One patient has undergone bilateral revision surgery with rotating hinge prostheses. Mean WOMAC scores were 13.5 and Knee Society scores were 212.5 at average 75.2 month follow-up. Despite technical challenges, patients with these deformities can have successful outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons should be prepared to address posteromedial tibial bony defects and consider constrained arthroplasty at the index procedure.

  13. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  14. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study.

  15. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  16. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Effler, Janet C; Kutscher, Brett L; Sullivan, Sarah E; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis. PMID:18652669

  18. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ertuerk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-17

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  19. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertürk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  20. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  1. Unified constitutive model for single crystal deformation behavior with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Jordan, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal materials are being used in gas turbine airfoils and are candidates for other hot section components because of their increased temperature capabilities and resistance to thermal fatigue. Development of a constitutive model which assesses the inelastic behavior of these materials has been studied in 2 NASA programs: Life Prediction and Constitutive Models for Engine Hot Section Anisotropic Materials and Biaxial Constitutive Equation Development for Single Crystals. The model has been fit to a large body of constitutive data for single crystal PWA 1480 material. The model uses a unified approach for computing total inelastic strains (creep plus plasticity) on crystallographic slip systems reproducing observed directional and strain rate effects as a natural consequence of the summed slip system quantities. The model includes several of the effects that have been reported to influence deformation in single crystal materials, such as shear stress, latent hardening, and cross slip. The model is operational in a commercial Finite Element code and is being installed in a Boundary Element Method code.

  2. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  3. The impact of patient self assessment of deformity on HRQL in adults with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Tones, Megan J; Moss, Nathan D

    2007-01-01

    Background Body image and HRQL are significant issues for patients with scoliosis due to cosmetic deformity, physical and psychological symptoms, and treatment factors. A selective review of scoliosis literature revealed that self report measures of body image and HRQL share unreliable correlations with radiographic measures and clinician recommendations for surgery. However, current body image and HRQL measures do not indicate which aspects of scoliosis deformity are the most distressing for patients. The WRVAS is an instrument designed to evaluate patient self assessment of deformity, and may show some promise in identifying aspects of deformity most troubling to patients. Previous research on adolescents with scoliosis supports the use of the WRVAS as a clinical tool, as the instrument shares strong correlations with radiographic measures and quality of life instruments. There has been limited use of this instrument on adult populations. Methods The WRVAS and the SF-36v2, a HRQL measure, were administered to 71 adults with scoliosis, along with a form to report age and gender. Preliminary validation analyses were performed on the WRVAS (floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and collinearity, correlations with the SF-36v2, and multiple regression with the WRVAS total score as the predictor, and SF-36v2 scores as outcomes). Results The psychometric properties of the WRVAS were acceptable. Older participants perceived their deformities as more severe than younger participants. More severe deformities were associated with lower scores on the Physical Component Summary Score of the SF-36v2. Total WRVAS score also predicted Physical Component Summary scores. Conclusion The results of the current study indicate that the WRVAS is a reliable tool to use with adult patients, and that patient self assessment of deformity shared a relationship with physical rather than psychological aspects of HRQL. The current and previous studies concur that revision of the

  4. Statistical Modeling of CTV Motion and Deformation for IMRT of Early-Stage Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Luiza; Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J.P. Maarten; Budiarto, Eka; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; Asselen, Bram van; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. Results: The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. Conclusions: The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model

  5. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-08-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  6. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  7. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  8. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  9. Brain-skull boundary conditions in a computational deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Liu, Fenghong; Roberts, David; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Brain shift poses a significant challenge to accurate image-guided neurosurgery. To this end, finite element (FE) brain models have been developed to estimate brain motion during these procedures. The significance of the brain-skull boundary conditions (BCs) for accurate predictions in these models has been explored in dynamic impact and inertial rotation injury computational simulations where the results have shown that the brain mechanical response is sensitive to the type of BCs applied. We extend the study of brain-skull BCs to quasi-static brain motion simulations which prevail in neurosurgery. Specifically, a frictionless brain-skull BC using a contact penalty method master-slave paradigm is incorporated into our existing deformation forward model (forced displacement method). The initial brain-skull gap (CSF thickness) is assumed to be 2mm for demonstration purposes. The brain surface nodes are assigned as either fixed (at bottom along the gravity direction), free (at brainstem), with prescribed displacement (at craniotomy) or as slave nodes potentially in contact with the skull (all the remaining). Each slave node is assigned a penalty parameter (β=5) such that when the node penetrates the rigid body skull inner-surface (master surface), a contact force is introduced proportionally to the penetration. Effectively, brain surface nodes are allowed to move towards or away from the cranium wall, but are ultimately restricted from penetrating the skull. We show that this scheme improves the model's ability to represent the brain-skull interface.

  10. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models

    PubMed Central

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J.; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  11. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  12. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  13. Model Deformation Measurement Technique NASA Langley HSR Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Goad, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    Model deformation measurement techniques have been investigated and developed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The current technique is based upon a single video camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. Variations of this technique have been used to measure wing twist and bending at a few selected spanwise locations near the wing tip on HSR models at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Automated measurements have been made at both the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and at Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel during the past year. Automated measurements were made for the first time at the NTF during the recently completed HSR Reference H Test 78 in early 1996. A major problem in automation for the NTF has been the need for high contrast targets which do not exceed the stringent surface finish requirements. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Wing twist examples from the HSR Reference H model are presented to illustrate the run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode at the NTF. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode at the NTF are also presented.

  14. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Modeling Interseismic and Transient Deformation in Southcentral Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, A. M.; Ali, T.

    2009-12-01

    The convergent margin of Southern Alaska marks the active tectonic boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Here we numerically model the response of the Alaskan lithosphere to interseismic, coseismic and postseismic loading in order to interpret the contemporary velocity field from GPS observations. Results suggest that, to first order, the surface velocities can be explained by the combination of interseismic deformation associated with a locked megathrust and postseismic viscous relaxation following large earthquakes, particularly the 1964 M9.2 Great Alaska earthquake. The best fitting model requires a weak mantle wedge sandwiched between a strong crust and the subducting slab. Most of the trenchward directed velocities observed in the GPS data, near the Kenai Peninsula and Kodiak Island as well in interior Alaska north of the Denali Fault, are a viscous relaxation response to the 1964 earthquake. In a few decades we should begin to see these velocities decay and subsequently point northwestwards. Postseismic viscous relaxation associated with large strike slip earthquakes since 1949 on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather faults only provide a small contribution (~5mm/yr) to the present day GPS velocity field in that region. Our models demonstrate how subduction of the Pacific plate tends to load all the major faults at the margin including the central and eastern segments of the Denali fault and show how the 1964 earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation combined to increase Coulomb stress at the fault segment that ruptured during the 2002 M7.9 Denali earthquake.

  16. A model of pulsatile flow in a uniform deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Borovetz, H S; Anderson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of blood flow in natural and artificial conduits usually require large computers for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Often, physical insight into the fluid dynamics is lost when the solution is purely numerical. An alternative to solving the most general form of the Navier-Stokes equations is described here, wherein a functional form of the solution is assumed in order to simplify the required computations. The assumed forms for the axial pressure gradient and velocity profile are chosen such that conservation of mass is satisfied for fully established pulsatile flow in a straight, deformable vessel. The resulting equations are cast in finite-difference form and solved explicitly. Results for the limiting cases of rigid wall and zero applied pressure are found to be in good agreement with analytical solutions. Comparison with the experimental results of Klanchar et al. [Circ. Res. 66, 1624-1635 (1990]) also shows good agreement. Application of the model to realistic physiological parameter values provides insight as to the influence of the pulsatile nature of the flow field on wall shear development in the presence of a moving wall boundary. Specifically, the model illustrates the dependence of flow rate and shear rate on the amplitude of the vessel wall motion and the phase difference between the applied pressure difference and the oscillations of the vessel radius. The present model can serve as a useful tool for experimentalists interested in quantifying the magnitude and character of velocity profiles and shearing forces in natural and artificial biologic conduits.

  17. Patients seeking symmetrical recontouring for "perceived" deformities in the width of the face and skull.

    PubMed

    Edgerton, M T; Langman, M W; Pruzinsky, T

    1990-01-01

    This article describes plastic surgery patients who sought symmetrical recontouring of the width of the face and skull. The basic demographic and personality characteristics of these facial width deformity (FWD) patients and the surgical procedures performed on them are discussed. Details of the surgical and psychological management of three representative cases are given. Speculative conclusions regarding the general characteristics of the FWD population are offered. Suggestions are proposed for a combined surgical-medical psychotherapeutic collaboration in managing these patients.

  18. Accurate 3D Modeling of Breast Deformation for Temporal Mammogram Registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this research project, we have developed mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast compression during...proposed to simulate and analyze breast deformation that can significantly improve the accuracy of matching in temporal mammograms and thus, the...performance of diagnosis and treatment. In this research project, we have developed a mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast

  19. Model Attitude and Deformation Measurements at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently participating in an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) sponsored Model Attitude and Deformation Working Group. This working group is chartered to develop a best practices document dealing with the measurement of two primary areas of wind tunnel measurements, 1) model attitude including alpha, beta and roll angle, and 2) model deformation. Model attitude is a principle variable in making aerodynamic and force measurements in a wind tunnel. Model deformation affects measured forces, moments and other measured aerodynamic parameters. The working group comprises of membership from industry, academia, and the Department of Defense (DoD). Each member of the working group gave a presentation on the methods and techniques that they are using to make model attitude and deformation measurements. This presentation covers the NASA Glenn Research Center s approach in making model attitude and deformation measurements.

  20. Pulmonary function in patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy: a comparison of patients with and without spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Ondrej; Chlumsky, Jan; Mazanec, Radim; Kolar, Pavel; Andel, Ross; Kobesova, Alena

    2012-12-01

    We assessed pulmonary function in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Fourteen neuropathy patients without spinal deformity (group 1), 14 with spinal deformity (group 2), and 16 individuals with idiopathic spinal deformity (group 3) matched to group 2 for age, height and Cobb angle, were included. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy severity was measured with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Score. All participants exhibited mild decrease in maximal inspiratory pressure at the mouth. One-way analysis of variance yielded significant main effects for lung volumes - slow vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1s, and total lung capacity (p's<.01), attributable to greater volumes in group 1 compared to groups with spinal deformity - and transfer factor for carbon monoxide (p=.013), reflecting differences between groups 1 vs. 2. Slow vital capacity and total lung capacity correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure at the mouth in group 2, whereas slow vital capacity correlated with muscle work in group 3 (p's<.05). Decreased lung volume may be due to impaired respiratory muscle strength in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with spinal deformity and due to spinal deformity in idiopathic patients.

  1. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring during surgery of spinal deformities in 217 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 217 patients who received MIOM during corrective surgery of spinal deformities between March 2000 and December 2005. Aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during corrective spine surgery. MIOM is becoming an increasingly used method of monitoring function during corrective spine surgery. The combination of monitoring of ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficits during the operation. Intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials combined with continuous EMG and motor evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 217 consecutive patients with spinal deformities of different aetiologies were monitored by means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. Out of which 201 patients presented true negative findings while one patient presented false negative and three patients presented false positive findings. Twelve patients presented true positive findings where neurological deficit after the operation was predicted. All neurological deficits in those 12 patients recovered completely. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during surgery of spinal deformities has been calculated of 92.3% and the specificity 98.5%. Based upon the results of this study MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord and nerve root function during corrective surgery of spinal deformities and consequently improves postoperative results. The Wake-up test for surgical procedure of spinal deformities became obsolete in our institution. PMID:17632737

  2. Nasal septal deformities in chronic rhinosinusitis patients: clinical and radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Poje, G; Zinreich, J S; Skitarelić, N; Đurić Vuković, K; Passàli, G C; Passàli, D; Mladina, R

    2014-04-01

    Septal deformities are very frequent in patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The question is whether or not some types of septal deformities are involved more frequently in this process or not. The authors observed the incidence of particular types of septal deformities in a group of CRS patients using Mladina classification. The same has been done with a control group that consisted of healthy volunteers. In the literature, type 7 has been found very frequently, i.e. in nearly 30% of all CRS cases. Herein, type 7 was mostly composed of types 3 and 5. Type 3 can be accurately recognised on axial MSCT scans, while type 5 can be accurately recognised on coronal views. Concomitant septal surgery at the time of endoscopic sinus surgery is recommended.

  3. Learning intervention-induced deformations for non-rigid MR-CT registration and electrode localization in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Onofrey, John A.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning a statistical model of non-rigid deformations induced by interventional procedures. We make use of this learned model to perform constrained non-rigid registration of pre-procedural and post-procedural imaging. We demonstrate results applying this framework to non-rigidly register post-surgical computed tomography (CT) brain images to pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of epilepsy patients who had intra-cranial electroencephalography electrodes surgically implanted. Deformations caused by this surgical procedure, imaging artifacts caused by the electrodes, and the use of multi-modal imaging data make non-rigid registration challenging. Our results show that the use of our proposed framework to constrain the non-rigid registration process results in significantly improved and more robust registration performance compared to using standard rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26900569

  4. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  5. Joint segmentation and deformable registration of brain scans guided by a tumor growth model.

    PubMed

    Gooya, Ali; Pohl, Kilian M; Bilello, Michel; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for joint segmentation and deformable registration of brain scans of glioma patients to a normal atlas. The proposed method is based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm that incorporates a glioma growth model for atlas seeding, a process which modifies the normal atlas into one with a tumor and edema. The modified atlas is registered into the patient space and utilized for the posterior probability estimation of various tissue labels. EM iteratively refines the estimates of the registration parameters, the posterior probabilities of tissue labels and the tumor growth model parameters. We have applied this approach to 10 glioma scans acquired with four Magnetic Resonance (MR) modalities (T1, T1-CE, T2 and FLAIR) and validated the result by comparing them to manual segmentations by clinical experts. The resulting segmentations look promising and quantitatively match well with the expert provided ground truth.

  6. 3-D deformable image registration: a topology preservation scheme based on hierarchical deformation models and interval analysis optimization.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Vincent; Heinrich, Christian; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2005-05-01

    This paper deals with topology preservation in three-dimensional (3-D) deformable image registration. This work is a nontrivial extension of, which addresses the case of two-dimensional (2-D) topology preserving mappings. In both cases, the deformation map is modeled as a hierarchical displacement field, decomposed on a multiresolution B-spline basis. Topology preservation is enforced by controlling the Jacobian of the transformation. Finding the optimal displacement parameters amounts to solving a constrained optimization problem: The residual energy between the target image and the deformed source image is minimized under constraints on the Jacobian. Unlike the 2-D case, in which simple linear constraints are derived, the 3-D B-spline-based deformable mapping yields a difficult (until now, unsolved) optimization problem. In this paper, we tackle the problem by resorting to interval analysis optimization techniques. Care is taken to keep the computational burden as low as possible. Results on multipatient 3-D MRI registration illustrate the ability of the method to preserve topology on the continuous image domain.

  7. Modeling of deformation behavior and texture evolution in magnesium alloy using the intermediate $\\phi$-model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; M'Guil, S. M.; Wen, Wei; Lavender, Curt A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-06

    The viscoplastic intermediate phi-model was applied in this work to predict the deformation behavior and texture evolution in a magnesium alloy, an HCP material. We simulated the deformation behavior with different intergranular interaction strengths and compared the predicted results with available experimental results. In this approach, elasticity is neglected and the plastic deformation mechanisms are assumed as a combination of crystallographic slip and twinning systems. Tests are performed for rolling (plane strain compression) of random textured Mg polycrystal as well as for tensile and compressive tests on rolled Mg sheets. Simulated texture evolutions agree well with experimental data. Activities of twinning and slip, predicted by the intermediate $\\phi$-model, reveal the strong anisotropic behavior during tension and compression of rolled sheets.

  8. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  9. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  10. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  11. Erythrocyte oxidative stress is associated with cell deformability in patients with retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Becatti, M; Marcucci, R; Gori, A M; Mannini, L; Grifoni, E; Alessandrello Liotta, A; Sodi, A; Tartaro, R; Taddei, N; Rizzo, S; Prisco, D; Abbate, R; Fiorillo, C

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Retinal vein occlusion (RVO), characterized by blood hyperviscosity, has an unclear pathogenesis. We aimed to find out if hemorheological profile is altered by oxidative stress in RVO patients. Red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress is associated to whole blood viscosity and RBC deformability. Reactive oxygen species alter RBC membrane rigidity, playing a key role in RVO pathogenesis.

  12. Evaluation of model-based deformation correction in image-guided liver surgery via tracked intraoperative ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Logan W.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Weis, Jared A.; Simpson, Amber L.; Adams, Lauryn B.; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Soft-tissue deformation represents a significant error source in current surgical navigation systems used for open hepatic procedures. While numerous algorithms have been proposed to rectify the tissue deformation that is encountered during open liver surgery, clinical validation of the proposed methods has been limited to surface-based metrics, and subsurface validation has largely been performed via phantom experiments. The proposed method involves the analysis of two deformation-correction algorithms for open hepatic image-guided surgery systems via subsurface targets digitized with tracked intraoperative ultrasound (iUS). Intraoperative surface digitizations were acquired via a laser range scanner and an optically tracked stylus for the purposes of computing the physical-to-image space registration and for use in retrospective deformation-correction algorithms. Upon completion of surface digitization, the organ was interrogated with a tracked iUS transducer where the iUS images and corresponding tracked locations were recorded. Mean closest-point distances between the feature contours delineated in the iUS images and corresponding three-dimensional anatomical model generated from preoperative tomograms were computed to quantify the extent to which the deformation-correction algorithms improved registration accuracy. The results for six patients, including eight anatomical targets, indicate that deformation correction can facilitate reduction in target error of ∼52%. PMID:27081664

  13. An Approach for Measuring and Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Metallic Plates during High Velocity Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Brendan J.; Trabia, Mohamed B.; Roy, Shawoon K.; Somasundarum, Deepak; Jennings, Richard; Matthes, Melissa; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Daykin, Edward P.; Pena, Michael T.; Machorro, Eric A.

    2014-05-29

    During high velocity impact experiments, projectile impact creates extreme pressure waves that results in a significant localized deformation within a short period of time. Experiments under these conditions require sophisticated data acquisition technique to better understand the materials deformation mechanisms. Since these experiments are expensive, it is also beneficial to develop accurate computational models that can predict this kind of deformation in high velocity impact events.

  14. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2011-11-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  15. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2012-04-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  16. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  17. Deformable prostate registration from MR and TRUS images using surface error driven FEM models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquee, Farheen; Goksel, Orcun; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James; Spadinger, Ingrid; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-02-01

    The fusion of TransRectal Ultrasound (TRUS) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the prostate can aid diagnosis and treatment planning for prostate cancer. Surface segmentations of the prostate are available in both modalities. Our goal is to develop a 3D deformable registration method based on these segmentations and a biomechanical model. The segmented source volume is meshed and a linear finite element model is created for it. This volume is deformed to the target image volume by applying surface forces computed by assuming a negative relative pressure between the non-overlapping regions of the volumes and the overlapping ones. This pressure drives the model to increase the volume overlap until the surfaces are aligned. We tested our algorithm on prostate surfaces extracted from post-operative MR and TRUS images for 14 patients, using a model with elasticity parameters in the range reported in the literature for the prostate. We used three evaluation metrics for validating our technique: the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) (ideally equal to 1.0), which is a measure of volume alignment, the volume change in source surface during registration, which is a measure of volume preservation, and the distance between the urethras to assess the anatomical correctness of the method. We obtained a DSC of 0.96+/-0.02 and a mean distance between the urethras of 1.5+/-1.4 mm. The change in the volume of the source surface was 1.5+/-1.4%. Our results show that this method is a promising tool for physicallybased deformable surface registration.

  18. Treatment of Combined Spinal Deformity in Patient with Ollier Disease and Abnormal Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ryabykh, S. О.; Gubin, A. V.; Prudnikova, О. G.; Kobyzev, А. Е.

    2012-01-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  19. Modelling of the cellular automata space deformation within the RCAFE framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Mateusz; Madej, Łukasz

    2016-10-01

    Development of the innovative approach to micro scale cellular automata (CA) space deformation during dynamic recrystallization process (DRX) is the main goal of the present paper. Major assumptions of the developed CA DRX model as well as novel space deformation algorithm, which is based on the random cellular automata concept and FE method, are described. Algorithms and methods to transfer input/output data between FE and CA are presented in detail. Visualization tool to analyze progress of deformation in the irregular CA space is also highlighted. Finally, initial results in the form of deformed and recrystallized microstructures are presented and discussed.

  20. Analysis of the relative deformation of lung lobes before and after surgery in patients with NSCLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedschlag, Ch; van Loon, J.; van Baardwijk, A.; Rossi, M. M. G.; van Pel, R.; Blaauwgeers, J. L. G.; van Suylen, R. J.; Boersma, L.; Stroom, J.; Gilhuijs, K. G. A.

    2009-09-01

    An accurate assessment of the extent of the tumor is critical for successful local treatment of lung cancer by surgery and/or radiotherapy. Guidelines to establish the extent of treatment margins may be derived from correlation studies between pre-treatment imaging and histopathology. Deformations occur, however, between in-vivo CT imaging and ex-vivo pathology due to the softness of lung tissue and pathology processing. The first aim of this study was to quantify these deformations in tissue around non-small cell lung cancer. The second aim was to explore factors associated with the magnitude of the deformations. The study was performed in 25 patients who underwent lobectomy after preoperative CT. Non-rigid registration was employed to evaluate tissue deformations around the gross tumor volume (GTV), taking into account potential differences in elasticity between tumor and healthy lung tissue. Tissue was found to be compacted by approximately 60% depending on circularity of the tumor and orientation of the specimen on the pathology table during processing. The deformations give rise to potential underestimation of the treatment margins in pathology studies that do not take this aspect into account.

  1. Influence of 3 months endurance training on red cell deformability in non insulin dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, B; Opitz, D; Bloch, W; Brixius, K

    2013-08-01

    The main purpose of the study was to examine if 3 months of bicycle endurance training alters the red cell deformability in non insulin dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus men.The red cell deformability was measured with the Laser assisted optical rotational cell analyzer. The maximal elongation index and the semimaximal shear stress were measured with the Lineweaver Burke model.At the beginning and the end of the intervention the patients passed a bicycle ergometry test. As a reference group, 13 males without diabetes passed the same testing procedure. Blood samplings were taken before testing, immediately after physical exhaustion and after a 30 min recovery phase.After the training period diabetic patients could significantly reduce BMI, fasting glucose and HbA1c. The reference group had significantly higher elongation indices than the diabetes patients independent from training status. After the training period the basal values of the maximal elongation index did not change significantly. However, maximal elongation indices were significantly reduced after physical examination and in resting time.The semimaximal shear stress of diabetes patients did not alter during the training period. In comparison to the reference group semimaximal shear stress was significantly reduced at all measurement times.This pilot study proves that the maximal elongation index is significantly decreased in diabetes mellitus patients. After 3 months endurance training the red cells become more rigid while the semimaximal shear stress remains constant. Further interventions are required to analyze the exact cause of the presented findings.

  2. Improved Porosity and Permeability Models with Coal Matrix Block Deformation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinbo; Li, Zenghua; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Lanjun; Qi, Qiangqiang; Si, Leilei; Li, Jinhu

    2016-09-01

    Coal permeability is an important parameter in coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and greenhouse gas storage. A reasonable theoretical permeability model is helpful for analysing the influential factors of gas flowing in a coalbed. As an unconventional reservoir, the unique feature of a coal structure deformation determines the state of gas seepage. The matrix block and fracture change at the same time due to changes in the effective stress and adsorption; the porosity and permeability also change. Thus, the matrix block deformation must be ignored in the theoretical model. Based on the cubic model, we analysed the characteristics of matrix block deformation and fracture deformation. The new models were developed with the change in matrix block width a. We compared the new models with other models, such as the Palmer-Manson (P-M) model and the Shi-Durucan (S-D) model, and used a constant confining stress. By matching the experimental data, our model matches quite well and accurately predicts the evolution of permeability. The sorption-induced strain coefficient f differs between the strongly adsorbing gases and weakly adsorbing gases because the matrix block deformation is more sensitive for the weakly adsorbing gases and the coefficient f is larger. The cubic relationship between porosity and permeability overlooks the importance of the matrix block deformation. In our model, the matrix block deformation suppresses the permeability ratio growth. With a constant confining stress, the weight of the matrix block deformation for the strongly adsorbing gases is larger than that for weakly adsorbing gases. The weight values increase as the pore pressure increases. It can be concluded that the matrix block deformation is an important phenomenon for researching coal permeability and can be crucial for the prediction of CBM production due to the change in permeability.

  3. Automatic brain segmentation and validation: image-based versus atlas-based deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutanos, Georges B.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    1997-04-01

    Due to the complexity of the brain surface, there is at present no segmentation method that proves to work automatically and consistently on any 3-D magnetic resonance (MR) images of the head. There is a definite lack of validation studies related to automatic brain extraction. In this work we present an image-base automatic method for brain segmentation and use its results as an input to a deformable model method which we call image-based deformable model. Combining image-based methods with a deformable model can lead to a robust segmentation method without requiring registration of the image volumes into a standardized space, the automation of which remains challenging for pathological cases. We validate our segmentation results on 3-D MP-RAGE (magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo) volumes for the image model prior- and post-deformation and compare it to an atlas model prior- and post-deformation. Our validation is based on volume measurement comparison to manually segmented data. Our analysis shows that the improvement afforded by the deformable model methods are statistically significant, however there are no significant differences between the image-based and atlas-based deformable model methods.

  4. An adaptive patient specific deformable registration for breast images of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cheng; Tang, Fuk-Hay

    2014-03-01

    A patient specific registration model based on finite element method was investigated in this study. Image registration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) has been studied a lot. Surface-based registration is extensively applied in medical imaging. We develop and evaluate a registration method combine surface-based registration with biomechanical modeling. .Four sample cases of patients with PET and MRI breast scans performed within 30 days were collected from hospital. K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment images into two parts, which is fat tissue and neoplasm [2]. Instead of placing extrinsic landmarks on patients' body which may be invasive, we proposed a new boundary condition to simulate breast deformation during two screening. Then a three dimensional model with meshes was built. Material properties were assigned to this model according to previous studies. The whole registration was based on a biomechanical finite element model, which could simulate deformation of breast under pressure.

  5. A Deformable Generic 3D Model of Haptoral Anchor of Monogenean

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation. PMID:24204903

  6. A deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of Monogenean.

    PubMed

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation.

  7. Construction of a deformable spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain: evaluation of similarity metrics and deformation models.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Clancy, Sean; Clouchoux, Cedric; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2014-01-01

    The development and identification of best methods in fetal brain MRI analysis is crucial as we expect an outburst of studies on groupwise and longitudinal analysis of early brain development in the upcoming years. To address this critical need, in this paper, we have developed a mathematical framework for the construction of an unbiased deformable spatiotemporal atlas of the fetal brain MRI and compared it to alternative configurations in terms of similarity metrics and deformation models. Our contributions are twofold: first we suggest a novel approach to fetal brain spatiotemporal atlas construction that shows high capability in capturing anatomic variation between subjects; and second, within our atlas construction framework we evaluate and compare a set of plausible configurations for inter-subject fetal brain MRI registration and identify the most accurate approach that can potentially lead to most accurate results in population atlas construction, atlas-based segmentation, and group analysis. Our evaluation results indicate that symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration with cross correlation similarity metric outperforms other configurations in this application and results in sharp unbiased atlases that can be used in fetal brain MRI analysis.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  9. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  10. Twisted supersymmetry in a deformed Wess-Zumino model in (2 + 1) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palechor, C.; Ferrari, A. F.; Quinto, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Non-anticommutative deformations have been studied in the context of super-symmetry (SUSY) in three and four space-time dimensions, and the general picture is that highly nontrivial to deform supersymmetry in a way that still preserves some of its important properties, both at the formal algebraic level (e.g., preserving the associativity of the deformed theory) as well as at the physical level (e.g., maintaining renormalizability). The Hopf algebra formalism allows the definition of algebraically consistent deformations of SUSY, but this algebraic consistency does not guarantee that physical models build upon these structures will be consistent from the physical point of view. We will investigate a deformation induced by a Drinfel'd twist of the N = 1 SUSY algebra in three space-time dimensions. The use of the Hopf algebra formalism allows the construction of deformed N = 1 SUSY algebras that should still preserve a deformed version of supersymmetry. We will construct the simplest deformed version of the Wess-Zumino model in this context, but we will show that despite the consistent algebraic structure, the model in question is not invariant under SUSY transformation and is not renormalizable. We will comment on the relation of these results with previous ones discussed in the literature regarding similar four-dimensional constructions.

  11. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  12. [Research progress on real-time deformable models of soft tissues for surgery simulation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Biological tissues generally exhibit nonlinearity, anisotropy, quasi-incompressibility and viscoelasticity about material properties. Simulating the behaviour of elastic objects in real time is one of the current objectives of virtual surgery simulation which is still a challenge for researchers to accurately depict the behaviour of human tissues. In this paper, we present a classification of the different deformable models that have been developed. We present the advantages and disadvantages of each one. Finally, we make a comparison of deformable models and perform an evaluation of the state of the art and the future of deformable models.

  13. Modeling of sharp change in magnetic hysteresis behavior of electrical steel at small plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Rios, S.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Yonamine, T.; Campos, M.F. de

    2005-05-15

    In 2.2% Si electrical steel, the magnetic hysteresis behavior is sharply sheared by a rather small plastic deformation (0.5%). A modification to the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model makes it possible to model magnetic effects of plastic deformation. In this paper, with this model, it is shown how a narrow hysteresis with an almost steplike hysteresis curve for an undeformed specimen is sharply sheared by plastic deformation. Computed coercivity and hysteresis loss show a sharp step to higher values at small strain due to an n=1/2 power law dependence on residual strain. The step is seen experimentally.

  14. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (d{sub E}) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of d{sub E}, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SD{sub dose}) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average d{sub E} across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of d{sub E} (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SD{sub dose} (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An

  15. Thermal debinding modeling of mass transport and deformation in powder-injection molding compact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengjie, Ying; Lam, Y. C.; Yu, S. C. M.; Tam, K. C.

    2002-06-01

    A two-dimensional model of mass transport and deformation in thermal debinding for the powder-injection molding (PIM) compact, based on mass and heat transfer in deformable porous media and elasticity theory, is proposed. The primary mechanisms of mass transport, i.e., liquid flow, gas flow, vapor diffusion, and convection, as well as heat transfer, polymer pyrolysis, powder-particle packing, compact deformation, and their interactions are simultaneously included in the model. A computer code, in which integrated control-volume finite-difference and finite-element methods are employed, is developed to simulate the process. The simulated results revealed that the nonuniform distribution of polymer residue, which results from the nonuniform flow of the polymer, causes the nonuniform deformation in the compact. Severe nonuniform deformation in the compact might lead to cracking, distortion, and failure of the compact during the polymer-removal process.

  16. Deformable Surface Model for the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with an Endovascular Sealing System.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; El-Batti, Salma; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Mousseaux, Elie; Armentano, Ricardo L; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Craiem, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is responsible for 1-3% of all deaths among the elderly population in developed countries. A novel endograft proposes an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system that isolates the aneurysm wall from blood flow using a polymer-filled endobag that surrounds two balloon-expandable stents. The volume of injected polymer is determined by monitoring the endobag pressure but the final AAA expansion remains unknown. We conceived and developed a fully deformable surface model for the comparison of pre-operative sac lumen size and final endobag size (measured using a follow-up scan) with the volume of injected polymer. Computed tomography images were acquired for eight patients. Aneurysms were manually and automatically segmented twice by the same observer. The injected polymer volume resulted 9% higher than the aneurysm pre-operative lumen size (p < 0.05), and 11% lower than the final follow-up endobag volume (p < 0.01). The automated method required minimal user interaction; it was fast and used a single set of parameters for all subjects. Intra-observer and manual vs. automated variability of measured volumes were 0.35 ± 2.11 and 0.07 ± 3.04 mL, respectively. Deformable surface models were used to quantify AAA size and showed that EVAS system devices tended to expand the sac lumen size.

  17. Skuller: A volumetric shape registration algorithm for modeling skull deformities.

    PubMed

    Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Kavan, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    We present an algorithm for volumetric registration of 3D solid shapes. In comparison to previous work on image based registration, our technique achieves higher efficiency by leveraging a template tetrahedral mesh. In contrast to point- and surface-based registration techniques, our method better captures volumetric nature of the data, such as bone thickness. We apply our algorithm to study pathological skull deformities caused by a particular condition, i.e., craniosynostosis. The input to our system is a pair of volumetric 3D shapes: a tetrahedral mesh and a voxelized object represented by a set of voxel cells segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans. Our general framework first performs a global registration and then launches a novel elastic registration process that uses as much volumetric information as possible while deforming the generic template tetrahedral mesh of a healthy human skull towards the underlying geometry of the voxel cells. Both data are high-resolution and differ by large non-rigid deformations. Our fully-automatic solution is fast and accurate, as compared with the state of the arts from the reconstruction and medical image registration fields. We use the resulting registration to match the ground-truth surfaces extracted from the medical data as well as to quantify the severity of the anatomical deformity.

  18. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-02-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  19. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  20. Orthognathic correction of a craniofacial deformity in a patient with a mutilated dentition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stamboulieh, Jason N; Neagle, Jack M; Throndson, Roger

    2010-06-01

    Orthognathic surgery is routinely performed for patients with dentofacial deformity and has been conducted for more than 100 years (1). Orthognathic Surgery is a functional and esthetic surgery that affects patients self perception. Patients have noted an improvement in their facial appearance after orthognathic surgery that was associated with improvement in psychosocial adjustments (2). When the decision to move both the maxilla and the mandible is made, there are numerous variables to be considered. Among these variables are the stability of double jaw surgery, improving the masticatory function of the patient and lastly, the esthetic result. Past studies have also looked at patient concerns including temporomandibular joint symptoms, speech difficulties and problems with mastication. In one study by Rivera and colleagues who studied 143 patients pre-operatively found 71 pecent with esthetic concerns (3), 47 percent had functional concerns and 28 percent had temporomandibular joint concerns. Traditional treatment planning for two-jaw surgery uses the condyle as the point of rotation with the mandibular occlusal plane being used as a template for setting the maxillary teeth (4). This approach, which allows clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of the mandible gives stable skeletal results. Recent studies appear to indicate that long term stability is achieved mainly when rigid fixation is employed. Orthognathic surgery is only one part of the process to correct a dentofacial deformity. The process starts with the initial diagnosis, followed by a treatment plan and then patient consent. Treatment generally begins with a dental assessment to correct decay, followed by orthodontic decompensation in preparation for surgical intervention. Orthognathic surgery is followed by postoperative orthodontia to maximize the occlusal relationship. This process underscores the skill and detailed communication between orthodontist and oral surgeon, and emphasizes the crucial

  1. Experimental Deformation of Dehydrating Antigorite: Challenging Models of Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Chernak, Linda

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes in subduction zones are caused by the dehydration of hydrous phases, we conducted temperature-ramping experiments on antigorite serpentinite. Cold-pressed powdered samples of antigorite were deformed to a high differential stress at 400°C and 1.0 GPa, within the antigorite stability field, where we have shown that deformation localizes. Temperature was then increased at different rates, 1800°C/hr and 180°C/hr, to cross the reaction boundary while the sample continued to deform; samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-5 s-1 and 10-6 s-1. Two additional experiments were conducted in a similar manner at 300°C, 1.5 GPa and 10-5 s-1 but samples remained 'statically' at high stress during the temperature increase. Our results show that although the decrease in stress during temperature ramping is large, stress relaxes stably, even after dehydration. We find that the slopes of the unloading curves are approximately the same for constant values of the ratio (strain rate/ramp rate) and that the unloading slope is greater for higher values of this ratio. In addition, we find that the unloading curves with the greatest slopes are similar to the apparatus compliance, suggesting that we are generating 'slow earthquakes' in our experiments over the course 5 to 10s of minutes. A strain rate stepping experiment indicates that antigorite has velocity strengthening behavior at 700°C and 1.5 GPa suggesting that as soon as an instability develops in the antigorite, the material strengthens sufficiently to not go unstable. Our results thus suggest that antigorite dehydration does not result in 'dehydration embrittlement' but that it may promote slow earthquakes. We have also conducted a preliminary experiment to study the role of effective pressure on deformation behavior after dehydration. A cold-pressed powdered sample of antigorite with a small core of coarse-grained olivine at one end was deformed at 700

  2. Surgical correction of ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy sequelae.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Parekh, Harshil; Venkatramani, Hari; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy is an important cosmetic concern among the patients and their relatives; especially in the patients who have recovered the basic limb functions. Though there is ample literature available regarding the management of the shoulder deformity there is paucity of literature regarding management of wrist ulnar deviation deformity. We report our experience with correction of this deformity in five cases with isolated ulnar deviation deformity without forearm rotational deformity or weakness of the wrist muscles. All the patients underwent extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) to extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) tendon transfer. At a minimum of 18 months follow-up all the patients and their families were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the limb. Correction of the deformity improves the appearance of the limb, improves self-confidence of the child, and allows them to integrate well into the society. Interestingly, the patients expressed improvement in their grip strength and overall hand function after this surgery. The notable functions which improved were easy reach of the hand-to-mouth for feeding and easy handling of the things requiring bimanual activities. Although the main aim of this operation was to correct the appearance of the hand it was found to be also functionally useful by the patients and hence we are encouraged to report it for wider use. The results were maintained during the follow-up period of as long as 47 months.

  3. Development of a preoperative predictive model for major complications following adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Bess, Shay; Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Mundis, Gregory M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Ailon, Tamir; Burton, Douglas C; Klineberg, Eric; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-03-24

    OBJECTIVE The operative management of patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) has a high complication rate and it remains unknown whether baseline patient characteristics and surgical variables can predict early complications (intraoperative and perioperative [within 6 weeks]). The development of an accurate preoperative predictive model can aid in patient counseling, shared decision making, and improved surgical planning. The purpose of this study was to develop a model based on baseline demographic, radiographic, and surgical factors that can predict if patients will sustain an intraoperative or perioperative major complication. METHODS This study was a retrospective analysis of a prospective, multicenter ASD database. The inclusion criteria were age ≥ 18 years and the presence of ASD. In total, 45 variables were used in the initial training of the model including demographic data, comorbidities, modifiable surgical variables, baseline health-related quality of life, and coronal and sagittal radiographic parameters. Patients were grouped as either having at least 1 major intraoperative or perioperative complication (COMP group) or not (NOCOMP group). An ensemble of decision trees was constructed utilizing the C5.0 algorithm with 5 different bootstrapped models. Internal validation was accomplished via a 70/30 data split for training and testing each model, respectively. Overall accuracy, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and predictor importance were calculated. RESULTS Five hundred fifty-seven patients were included: 409 (73.4%) in the NOCOMP group, and 148 (26.6%) in the COMP group. The overall model accuracy was 87.6% correct with an AUROC curve of 0.89 indicating a very good model fit. Twenty variables were determined to be the top predictors (importance ≥ 0.90 as determined by the model) and included (in decreasing importance): age, leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, number of decompression levels, number of

  4. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  5. A discrete curvature-based deformable surface model with application to segmentation of volumetric images.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Amir; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new curvature-based three-dimensional (3-D) deformable surface model. The model deforms under defined force terms. Internal forces are calculated from local model curvature, using a robust method by a least-squares error (LSE) approximation to the Dupin indicatrix. External forces are calculated by applying a step expansion and restoration filter (SEF) to the image data. A solution for one of the most common problems associated with deformable models, self-cutting, has been proposed in this work. We use a principal axis analysis and reslicing of the deformable model, followed by triangulation of the slices, to remedy self-cutting. We use vertex resampling, multiresolution deformation, and refinement of the mesh grid to improve the quality of the model deformation, which leads to better results. Examples of the model application to different cases (simulation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and ultrasound images) are presented, showing diversity and flexibility of the model.

  6. Construction of a biomechanical head and neck motion model as a guide to evaluation of deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Teske, Hendrik; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Meis, Jan; Bendl, Rolf; Stoiber, Eva; Giske, Kristina

    2017-03-28

    The use of deformable image registration methods in the context of adaptive radiotherapy leads to uncertainties in the simulation of the administered dose distributions during the treatment course. Evaluation of these methods is a prerequisite to decide if a plan adaptation will improve the individual treatment. Current approaches using manual references limit the validity of evaluation, especially for low contrast regions. In particular for the head and neck region, the highly flexible anatomy and the low soft tissue contrast in control images pose a challenge to image registration and its evaluation. Biomechanical models promise to overcome this issue by providing anthropomorphic motion modelling of the patient. We introduce a novel biomechanical motion model for generation and sampling of different postures of the head and neck anatomy. Motion propagation behaviour of the individual bones is defined by an underlying kinematic model. This model interconnects the bones by joints and thus is capable to provide a wide range of motion. Triggered by the motion of the individual bones, soft tissue deformation is described by an extended heterogeneous tissue model based on the chainmail approach. This extension, for the first time, allows the propagation of decaying rotations within soft tissue without the necessity of explicit tissue segmentation. Overall motion simulation and sampling of deformed CT scans including a basic noise model is achieved within 30 seconds. The proposed biomechanical motion model for the head and neck site generates displacement vector fields on a voxel basis, approximating arbitrary anthropomorphic postures of the patient. It was developed with the intention to provide input data for the evaluation of deformable image registration.

  7. The utility of a multimaterial 3D printed model for surgical planning of complex deformity of the skull base and craniovertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Donato; Tanweer, Omar; Berman, Phillip; Harter, David H

    2016-11-01

    Utilizing advanced 3D printing techniques, a multimaterial model was created for the surgical planning of a complex deformity of the skull base and craniovertebral junction. The model contained bone anatomy as well as vasculature and the previously placed occipital cervical instrumentation. Careful evaluation allowed for a unique preoperative perspective of the craniovertebral deformity and instrumentation options. This patient-specific model was invaluable in choosing the most effective approach and correction strategy, which was not readily apparent from standard 2D imaging. Advanced 3D multimaterial printing provides a cost-effective method of presurgical planning, which can also be used for both patient and resident education.

  8. Are cam and pincer deformities as common as dysplasia in Japanese patients with hip pain?

    PubMed

    Mori, R; Yasunaga, Y; Yamasaki, T; Nakashiro, J; Fujii, J; Terayama, H; Ohshima, S; Ochi, M

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip secondary to acetabular dysplasia is very common, and there are few data concerning the pathogeneses and incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). We have attempted to clarify the radiological prevalence of painful FAI in a cohort of Japanese patients and to investigate the radiological findings. We identified 176 symptomatic patients (202 hips) with Tönnis grade 0 or 1 osteoarthritis, whom we prospectively studied between August 2011 and July 2012. There were 61 men (65 hips) and 115 women (137 hips) with a mean age of 51.8 years (11 to 83). Radiological analyses included the α-angle, centre-edge angle, cross-over sign, pistol grip deformity and femoral head neck ratio. Of the 202 hips, 79 (39.1%) had acetabular dysplasia, while 80 hips (39.6%) had no known aetiology. We found evidence of FAI in 60 hips (29.7%). Radiological FAI findings associated with cam deformity were the most common. There was a significant relationship between the pistol grip deformity and both the α-angle (p < 0.001) and femoral head-neck ratio (p = 0.024). Radiological evidence of symptomatic FAI was not uncommon in these Japanese patients.

  9. Hallux valgus inheritance: pedigree research in 350 patients with bunion deformity.

    PubMed

    Piqué-Vidal, Carlos; Solé, María T; Antich, Jaume

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to construct 3-generation pedigree charts from 350 patients with hallux valgus. During a 1-year period, all consecutive patients (n = 1174) with a painful bunion deformity evaluated roentgenographically were asked to complete a detailed 3-generation family history questionnaire. We studied 350 probands (22 men, 328 women; male/female ratio, 1:14.9; mean age, 47.8 years). Juvenile hallux valgus was diagnosed in 15 patients. Three or more affected members were observed in pedigrees from 244 probands, 2 affected members in 71, and 1 affected member in 35 (proband) (affected subjects per pedigree ranged from 1 to 16). Ninety percent of probands had at least 1 family member affected. The hallux valgus penetrance according to pedigrees from all probands was 56%. The female sex predominated with regard to the gender of parents with hallux valgus, affected branch of the family, and gender of relatives with bunion deformity. Severity of hallux valgus was not significantly influenced by gender, the affected branch of the family, or gender of the affected relatives. Family history of bunion deformity was present in 90% of probands, with vertical transmission affecting some family members across 3 generations, which is compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance.

  10. Erythrocyte: A systems model of the control of aggregation and deformability.

    PubMed

    Bazanovas, Antonina N; Evstifeev, Aleksandr I; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F; Sadreev, Ildar I; Skorinkin, Andrey I; Kotov, Nikolay V

    2015-05-01

    Human erythrocytes are highly specialized enucleate cells that are involved in providing efficient gas transport. Erythrocytes have been extensively studied both experimentally and by mathematical modeling in recent years. However, understanding of how aggregation and deformability are regulated is limited. These properties of the erythrocyte are essential for the physiological functioning of the cell. In this work, we propose a novel mathematical model of the molecular system that controls the aggregation and deformability of the erythrocyte. This model is based on the experimental results of previously published studies. Our model suggests fundamentally new mechanisms that regulate aggregation and deformability in a latch-like manner. The results of this work could be used as a general explanation of how the erythrocytes regulate their aggregation and deformability, and are essential in understanding erythrocyte disorders and aging.

  11. Using GPS loading deformation to distinguish different hydrological measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's lithosphere is deformed elastically by seasonal and inter-annual surface mass variations. The Global Positioning System (GPS) accurately measures 3D crustal deformation caused by surface hydrological mass movements. In this study, we calculate the loading deformation using different hydrological models and in-situ hydrological measurements, and compare those modeled results with actual deformation measurements of the dense GPS network in United States and Europe. Therefore, GPS can be used as an independent tool to evaluate the differences between hydrological measurements and models. We are particularly interested in comparing the snow volume differences between in-situ snow measurement (such as SNOTEL) and the snow components of simulated models (such as GLDAS or NLDAS). We, therefore, demonstrate that GPS as a geodetic observation can provide valuable information for hydrological studies.

  12. Deformation Prediction and Geometrical Modeling of Head and Neck Cancer Tumor: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Maryam

    Radiation therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer tumors for several years and many cancer patients receive radiotherapy. It may be used as primary therapy or with a combination of surgery or other kinds of therapy such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or some mixture of the three. The treatment objective is to destroy cancer cells or shrink the tumor by planning an adequate radiation dose to the desired target without damaging the normal tissues. By using the pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT) images, most of the radiotherapy planning systems design the target and assume that the size of the tumor will not change throughout the treatment course, which takes 5 to 7 weeks. Based on this assumption, the total amount of radiation is planned and fractionated for the daily dose required to be delivered to the patient's body. However, this assumption is flawed because the patients receiving radiotherapy have marked changes in tumor geometry during the treatment period. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the changes of the tumor shape and size over time during the course of radiotherapy in order to prevent significant effects of inaccuracy in the planning. In this research, a methodology is proposed in order to monitor and predict daily (fraction day) tumor volume and surface changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire treatment period. In the proposed method, geometrical modeling and data mining techniques will be used rather than repetitive CT scans data to predict the tumor deformation for radiation planning. Clinical patient data were obtained from the University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). In the first step, by using CT scan data, the tumor's progressive geometric changes during the treatment period are quantified. The next step relates to using regression analysis in order to develop predictive models for tumor geometry based on the geometric analysis results and the patients' selected attributes (age, weight

  13. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y; Liang, J; Yan, D

    2006-02-01

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  14. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  15. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  16. Demonstration of finite element simulations in MOOSE using crystallographic models of irradiation hardening and plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Anirban; Wen, Wei; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Tome, Carlos

    2016-05-31

    This report describes the implementation of a crystal plasticity framework (VPSC) for irradiation hardening and plastic deformation in the finite element code, MOOSE. Constitutive models for irradiation hardening and the crystal plasticity framework are described in a previous report [1]. Here we describe these models briefly and then describe an algorithm for interfacing VPSC with finite elements. Example applications of tensile deformation of a dog bone specimen and a 3D pre-irradiated bar specimen performed using MOOSE are demonstrated.

  17. A Model for Estimating Nonlinear Deformation and Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4232 A MODEL FOR ESTIMATING NONLINEAR DEFORMATION AND DAMAGE IN CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES (PREPRINT) Unni Santhosh and...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Unni Santhosh and Jalees Ahmad 5d. PROJECT...Composite Materials, 2010 A Model for Estimating Nonlinear Deformation and Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Unni Santhosh and Jalees Ahmad Research

  18. Computer Modelling of Cyclic Deformation of High-Temperature Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    precision. In this case the aim will be at least to eliminate functional empiricism. Restriction of empiricism to the choice of parameters to be input...deformation of dispersion-hardened materials. In the general case this will be done by a literature search. For specific materials, the micromechanisms...cross-slip and/or climb without the generation of appreciable back-stress. Task 112. Anisotropic dispersoids This task covers the case of dispersoids

  19. Numerical modeling of a large deformation thermoforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Schrank, M.G.

    1988-04-01

    A numerical solution, using finite element methods, is presented for the simulation of a blow-molding process used to form a thermoplastic polymer (polyethylene terephthalate). The constitutive relationship employed in the analysis is a modification of the creep power law, allowing both strain hardening and strain rate hardening of the material. Analytical results compare well with experimental data for both rate of deformation during the forming process and strain distribution in the final formed configuration. 15 figs.

  20. Analysis of masseter deformation patterns during a maximum exertion clenching in patients with unilateral chewing

    PubMed Central

    BUSATO, A.; BALCONI, G.; VISMARA, V.; BERTELÈ, L.; GARO, G.; DE GREGORIO, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of the following study is to examine both masseter muscles (left/right) in a group of patients suffering from unilateral chewing during a maximum exertion isometric contraction using the deformation pattern analysis of ultrasound videos and compare them with the results obtained by studying patients with alternate bilateral chewing patterns. Materials and methods This study has been conducted by use of an ultrasound machine and a linear probe which allowed us to record a video (DCM) comprised of 45 frames per second (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm). The probe was fixed to a brace and the patients were asked to clench their teeth as hard as possible, obtain the muscle’s maximum exertion, for 5 seconds three times, with 30 seconds intervals in between. Both right and left masseter muscles were analyzed. We applied to the ultrasound video a dedicated software (Mudy 1.7.7.2 AMID Sulmona Italy) for the analysis of muscle deformation patterns. The total number of patients for this study is 150. Out of this number, 50 belong to Group A, mono lateral chewing on the left side arch, and 50 to Group B, mono lateral chewing on the right side arch. The remains patients belong to Group C, bilateral alternate chewing. The deformation pattern analysis of the skeletal muscles on ultrasound videos allows us to highlight with ease the clear difference in the clenching capabilities and strain management between the dominant masseter and the subordinate masseter in a unilaterally chewing patient. Results In the sample investigated both in Group A and Group B the unilateral chewing is associated with a series of parameters (number, shape, volume, position and orientation of the teeth) and is also associated with the extension of the cutting surface really available. PMID:28280533

  1. Corrections of diverse forms of lower limb deformities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Melchenko, Eugeniy; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Csepan, Robert; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracolumbar kyphosis has been considered as the first presenting deformity and is often a key diagnostic clue noted in children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV (Morquio's syndrome). However, we observed that the progressive irregularities of the epiphyses of the long bones were the most prominent skeletal pathology, causing effectively the development of diverse forms of lower limbs deformities with extreme variation in age of onset. Materials and Methods: Ten patients (seven children and three adults) with an average age of 15 years have been enrolled in this study. Age of diagnosis of MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and a MISLEADING rate of severity. Hip dislocations, genu valgum, protrusio acetabuli and osteoarthritis were the most common lower limbs deformities in these patients. Clinical and radiographic phenotypes were the baseline tools of documentation. Urinary screening and genotypic characterizations have been applied accordingly. Results: Combined pelvic and femoral procedures for hip dislocation, epiphysiodeses and supracondylar osteotomy for genu valgum and hip arthroplasty for protrusio acetabuli have been performed. All patients manifested insufficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase, an enzyme that degrades keratin sulphate and chondroitin-6 sulphate. Conclusion: The extensive clinical heterogeneity contributed significantly in the delay in establishing the diagnosis particularly in adult patients with MPS IV. The epiphyseal irregularities of the long bones and the progressive flattening pathology of MPS IV A were the reason to falsely diagnose some patients as spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenital and/or tarda. Proximal femoral osteotomy, realignment osteotomy and total hip arthroplasty have been performed for coxa vara, genu valgum and protrusio acetabuli, respectively, in children and adult group of patients. The importance of early diagnosis on MPS IV A is to receive enzyme replacement therapy

  2. Medical image-guided surgery planning for breast reconstruction using deformable modeling and surface flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pengfei; Gu, Lixu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jingsi; Xu, Hua; Dong, Jiasheng; Chen, Weitao; Pei, Wei; Song, Jiasi; Li, Bowen; Xu, Jianrong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a virtual breast plastic surgery planning method is proposed, which reconstructs the breast after excision for certain diseases such as cancer. In order to achieve a rational result, we calculate shape, area, volume and depth of the skin and muscle for the reconstruction, based on the other healthy breast. The steps are as follows: 1) input breast's MRI data of patient; 2) get the healthy breast using balloon segmentation algorithm and get triangle mesh on breast surface; 3) flatten the triangulated skin of breast using deformable model to attain the shape and volume of the flap for breast reconstruction. Other methods such as mesh smoothing and cutting of triangulated surface are also introduced. The doctors validation and evaluation process are also provided to ensure the robust and stable result of virtual surgery planning.

  3. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation.

  4. S-matrices and quantum group symmetry of k-deformed sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Miramontes, J. Luis; Schmidtt, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, two kinds of integrable deformations of the string world sheet theory in the gauge/gravity correspondence have been constructed (Delduc et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 051601; Hollowood et al 2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 495402). One class of these, the k deformations associated to the more general q deformations but with q={{{e}}}{{i}π /k} a root of unity, has been shown to be related to a particular discrete deformation of the principal chiral models and (semi-)symmetric space sigma models involving a gauged WZW model. We conjecture a form for the exact S-matrices of the bosonic integrable field theories of this type. The S-matrices imply that the theories have a hidden infinite dimensional affine quantum group symmetry. We provide some evidence, via quantum inverse scattering techniques, that the theories do indeed possess the finite-dimensional part of this quantum group symmetry.

  5. Extension of continental lithosphere - A model for two scales of basin and range deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Fletcher, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a model for deformation in an extending continental lithosphere that is stratified in density and strength is described. The lithosphere model demonstrates that the necking instabilities at two wavelengths originate due to a strong upper crust, a mantle layer, and a weak lower crust. It is observed that the dominant wavelengths of necking are controlled by layer thickness and the strength of the layers control the amplitude of the instabilities. The model is applied to the Basin and Range Province of the western U.S. where deformations in ranges and tile domains are detected. The relation between the Bouguer gravity anomaly and the deformations is studied. The data reveal that the horizontal scale of short wavelength necking correlates with the spacings of individual basins and ranges, and the longer wavelength corresponds to the width of tilt domains. The control of the Basin and Range deformation by two scales of extensional instability is proposed.

  6. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined.

  7. Combination joint-preserving surgery for forefoot deformity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Niki, H; Hirano, T; Okada, H; Beppu, M

    2010-03-01

    Proximal osteotomies for forefoot deformity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have hitherto not been described. We evaluated combination joint-preserving surgery involving three different proximal osteotomies for such deformities. A total of 30 patients (39 feet) with a mean age of 55.6 years (45 to 67) underwent combined first tarsometatarsal fusion and distal realignment, shortening oblique osteotomies of the bases of the second to fourth metatarsals and a fifth-ray osteotomy. The mean follow-up was 36 months (24 to 68). The mean foot function index scores for pain, disability and activity subscales were 18, 23, and 16 respectively. The mean Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot score improved significantly from 52.2 (41 to 68) to 89.6 (78 to 97). Post-operatively, 14 patients had forefoot stiffness, but had no disability. Most patients reported highly satisfactory walking ability. Residual deformity and callosities were absent. The mean hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles decreased from 47.0 degrees (20 degrees to 67 degrees) to 9.0 degrees (2 degrees to 23 degrees) and from 14.1 degrees (9 degrees to 20 degrees) to 4.6 degrees (1 degree to 10 degrees), respectively. Four patients had further surgery including removal of hardware in three and a fifth-ray osteotomy in one. With good peri-operative medical management of rheumatoid arthritis, surgical repositioning of the metatarsophalangeal joint by metatarsal shortening and consequent relaxing of surrounding soft tissues can be successful. In early to intermediate stages of the disease, it can be performed in preference to joint-sacrificing procedures.

  8. Modelling heat and mass transfer in bread baking with mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, V.; Salagnac, P.; Glouannec, P.; Ploteau, J.-P.; Jury, V.; Boillereaux, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-hydric behaviour of bread during baking is studied. A numerical model has been developed with Comsol Multiphysics© software. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfers in the bread and the phenomenon of swelling. This model predicts the evolution of temperature, moisture, gas pressure and deformation in French "baguette" during baking. Local deformation is included in equations using solid phase conservation and, global deformation is calculated using a viscous mechanic model. Boundary conditions are specified with the sole temperature model and vapour pressure estimation of the oven during baking. The model results are compared with experimental data for a classic baking. Then, the model is analysed according to physical properties of bread and solicitations for a better understanding of the interactions between different mechanisms within the porous matrix.

  9. Tissue deformation and shape models in image-guided interventions: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D J; Barratt, D; Blackall, J M; Chan, C; Edwards, P J; Rhode, K; Penney, G P; McClelland, J; Hill, D L G

    2005-04-01

    This paper promotes the concept of active models in image-guided interventions. We outline the limitations of the rigid body assumption in image-guided interventions and describe how intraoperative imaging provides a rich source of information on spatial location of anatomical structures and therapy devices, allowing a preoperative plan to be updated during an intervention. Soft tissue deformation and variation from an atlas to a particular individual can both be determined using non-rigid registration. Established methods using free-form deformations have a very large number of degrees of freedom. Three examples of deformable models--motion models, biomechanical models and statistical shape models--are used to illustrate how prior information can be used to restrict the number of degrees of freedom of the registration algorithm and thus provide active models for image-guided interventions. We provide preliminary results from applications for each type of model.

  10. Modeling of porous scaffold deformation induced by medium perfusion.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we tested the possibility of calculating permeability of porous scaffolds utilized in soft tissue engineering using pore size and shape. We validated the results using experimental measured pressure drop and simulations with the inclusion of structural deformation. We prepared Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Chitosan-Gelatin (CG) scaffolds by salt leaching and freeze drying technique, respectively. Micrographs were assessed for pore characteristics and mechanical properties. Porosity for both scaffolds was nearly same but the permeability varied 10-fold. Elastic moduli were 600 and 9 kPa for PCL and CG scaffolds, respectively, while Poisson's ratio was 0.3 for PCL scaffolds and ∼1.0 for CG scaffolds. A flow-through bioreactor accommodating a 10 cm diameter and 0.2 cm thick scaffold was used to determine the pressure-drop at various flow rates. Additionally, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a dynamic mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop matched the simulation results of PCL scaffolds. Simulations were extended to a broad range of permeabilities (10(-10) m(2) to 10(-14) m(2) ), elastic moduli (10-100,000 kPa) and Poisson's ratio (0.1-0.49). The results showed significant deviation in pressure drop due to scaffold deformation compared to rigid scaffold at permeabilities near healthy tissues. Also, considering the scaffold as a nonrigid structure altered the shear stress profile. In summary, scaffold permeability can be calculated using scaffold pore characteristics and deformation could be predicted using CFD simulation. These relationships could potentially be used in monitoring tissue regeneration noninvasively via pressure drop.

  11. A Mechanism-based Model for Deformation Twinning in Polycrystalline FCC Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Hu, Xiaohua; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation twinning, a common and important plastic deformation mechanism, is the key contributor to the excellent combination of strength and ductility in twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel. In the open literature, a significant amount of research has been reported on the microstructural characteristics of deformation twinning and its influence on the overall deformation behavior of TWIP steel. In this study, we examine the feasibility of a mechanism-based crystal plasticity model in simulating the microstructural level deformation characteristics of TWIP steel. To this end, a model considering both double-slip and double-twin is developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and local microstructural features related to the formation and growth of micro-twins in low stacking fault energy (SFE) TWIP steel. The twin systems are described as pseudo-slips that can be activated when their resolved shear stress reaches the corresponding critical value. A hardening law that accounts for the interaction among the slip and twin systems is also developed. Numerical simulations for dDifferent mesh sizes and single crystal patch tests under different loading modes are carried out to verify the modeling procedure. Our simulation results reveal that, despite its simple nature, the double-slip/double-twin model can capture the key deformation features of TWIP steel, including twin volume fraction evolution, continuous strain hardening, and the final fracture in the form of strain localization.

  12. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Robert; Tomé, Carlos; Liu, Wenfeng; Alankar, Alankar; Subramanian, Gopinath; Stanek, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. CASL has endeavored to improve upon this approach by incorporating a microstructurally-based, atomistically-informed, zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability into the BISON-CASL engineering scale fuel performance code. Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tome´ [2], has been coupled with BISON-CASL to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of the cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON-CASL and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  13. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  14. Differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-08-01

    The differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering, attention to which has been called recently by Beene, Horen, and Satchler [Phys. Rev. C 48, 3128 (1993)], were pointed out already some time ago by contrasting the rules of equal deformation lengths and equal normalized multipole moments for the optical potential and the underlying nucleon distribution of the excited nucleus.

  15. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde load on erythrocyte deformability in healthy subjects and patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Koichi; Tsuruya, Kota; Anzai, Kazuya; Arase, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Shunji; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Mine, Tetsuya; Matsuzaki, Shohei

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol intake leads to the distribution of alcohol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde throughout the blood and organs. Hepatic cirrhosis is associated with abnormal red blood cell morphology and function, particularly impaired red blood cell deformability. To investigate the effect of drinking on red blood cells in patients with hepatic cirrhosis, erythrocyte deformability was evaluated in response to alcohol and acetaldehyde tolerance. Erythrocyte deformability in 10 healthy and 15 cirrhotic subjects was examined by filterability of the red blood cells. Erythrocyte deformability decreased markedly in the cirrhosis group compared with the healthy group (p < 0.05). No significant change in erythrocyte deformability was observed in healthy or cirrhotic subjects due to ethanol 100 mM tolerance. Acetaldehyde tolerance elicited a significant decrease in erythrocyte deformability at 2 mM in the cirrhosis group (p < 0.05). Alcohol consumption in cirrhotic patients was suggested to worsen erythrocyte deformability and red blood cell function. Decreased erythrocyte deformability worsens microcirculation in the liver, resulting in more severe hepatic dysfunction.

  16. Kinematic evolution of thrusts wedge and erratic line length balancing: insights from deformed sandbox models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Irfan; Dubey, A. K.; Toscani, Giovanni; Bonini, Lorenzo; Seno, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Kinematic evolution of fold-thrust structures has been investigated by analogue models that include syntectonic sedimentation. Different decollement dips and basement thicknesses produced different wedge geometries and propagating characteristics. A model with one decollement level was characterized by a closely spaced thrust system during early stages of shortening as compared to the late stages. The frequency of fault nucleation was rapid during the early stages of deformation. Conversely, the frequency of fault nucleation was low and thrust spacing was significantly wider in a model with two decollement levels. Individual faults became locked at steep dips and deformation stepped forward as a new fault nucleated in-sequence in front of the older locked structure. Once the thrust system was established up to 27 % overall shortening, an overlying bed was introduced to simulate syntectonic deformation. Model sand wedge did not grow self similarly but rather its length and height increased episodically with deformation. Restoration of deformed models show that layer parallel shortening accommodated for approximately half of the total model shortening across the multilayers. Calculated error in apparent layer shortening from the restored layers revealed a direct relation with depth of the layers in the models. The experimental results are comparable to a natural example from the Northern Apennines fold-and-thrust belts.

  17. Material Properties from Air Puff Corneal Deformation by Numerical Simulations on Model Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; de la Hoz, Andrés; Marcos, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate a new method for reconstructing corneal biomechanical properties from air puff corneal deformation images using hydrogel polymer model corneas and porcine corneas. Methods Air puff deformation imaging was performed on model eyes with artificial corneas made out of three different hydrogel materials with three different thicknesses and on porcine eyes, at constant intraocular pressure of 15 mmHg. The cornea air puff deformation was modeled using finite elements, and hyperelastic material parameters were determined through inverse modeling, minimizing the difference between the simulated and the measured central deformation amplitude and central-peripheral deformation ratio parameters. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on the model cornea materials as well as on corneal strips, and the results were compared to stress-strain simulations assuming the reconstructed material parameters. Results The measured and simulated spatial and temporal profiles of the air puff deformation tests were in good agreement (< 7% average discrepancy). The simulated stress-strain curves of the studied hydrogel corneal materials fitted well the experimental stress-strain curves from uniaxial extensiometry, particularly in the 0–0.4 range. Equivalent Young´s moduli of the reconstructed material properties from air-puff were 0.31, 0.58 and 0.48 MPa for the three polymer materials respectively which differed < 1% from those obtained from extensiometry. The simulations of the same material but different thickness resulted in similar reconstructed material properties. The air-puff reconstructed average equivalent Young´s modulus of the porcine corneas was 1.3 MPa, within 18% of that obtained from extensiometry. Conclusions Air puff corneal deformation imaging with inverse finite element modeling can retrieve material properties of model hydrogel polymer corneas and real corneas, which are in good correspondence with those obtained from uniaxial extensiometry

  18. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  19. FISH analysis of a subtle familial Xp deletion in a female patient with Madelung deformity

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.Y.; Gibson, L.H.; Pober, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    A subtle deletion of Xp [del(X)(p22.32)]was identified by high-resolution chromosome analysis in a twelve-year-old female with short stature (<2 percentile) and Madelung deformity suggestive of Turner syndrome. The proband`s mother, who has short stature (<2 percentile) and demyelinating disorder, also showed this deletion. The maternal grandmother is of normal height and carries two normal X chromosomes. Both the patient and her mother have no other physical abnormalities and are of normal intelligence. To confirm and delineate this Xp deletion, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on metaphases from the patient and her mother using probes of DXYS20 (a pseudoautosomal locus), DXS232A, and a newly isolated Xp YAC clone, YHX2, whose relative map position is unknown. Hybridization signals of DXS232A were detected on both X chromosomes, and DXYS20 and YHX2 were missing from one of the X`s of both the patient and her mother. YHX2 was thus placed distal to DXS232A (tel-DXYS20-YHX2-S232A-cen). This familial deletion with a breakpoint distal to DXS232A, which is located at -900 Kb telomeric to STS locus, appears to be the smallest Xp deletion reported thus far. Short stature is consistently associated with females carrying Xp deletions. Madelung deformity has been found in some patients with Turner syndrome or Dyschondrosteosis but it has not been reported in patients with Xp deletion. Our results suggest that the phenotype of our patient is associated with her chromosome abnormality. Due to the subtlety of the deletion identified in our patient and her mother, females presenting with short stature warrant careful clinical and cytogenetic evaluation.

  20. 3D geometrical modelling of post-foliation deformations in metamorphic terrains (Syros, Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    Superposed to ductile syn-metamorphic deformations, post-foliation deformations affect metamorphic units during their exhumation. Understanding the role of such deformations in the structuration of metamorphic units is key for understanding the tectonic evolution of convergence zones. We characterize post-foliations deformations using 3D modelling which is a first-order tool to describe complex geological structures, but a challenging task where based only on surface data. We propose a modelling procedure that combines fast draft models (interpolation of orientation data), with more complex ones where the structural context is better understood (implicit modelling), allowing us to build a 3D geometrical model of Syros Island blueschists (Cyclades), based on field data. With our approach, the 3D model is able to capture the complex present-day geometry of the island, mainly controlled by the superposition of three types of post-metamorphic deformations affecting the original metamorphic pile: i) a top-to-South ramp-flat extensional system that dominates the overall island structure, ii) large-scale folding of the metamorphic units associated with ramp-flat extensional system, and iii) steeply-dipping normal faults trending dominantly NNW-SSE and EW. The 3D surfaces produced by this method match outcrop data, are geologically consistent, and provide reasonable estimates of geological structures in poorly constrained areas.

  1. Surrogate-driven deformable motion model for organ motion tracking in particle radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassi, Aurora; Seregni, Matteo; Riboldi, Marco; Cerveri, Pietro; Sarrut, David; Battista Ivaldi, Giovanni; Tabarelli de Fatis, Paola; Liotta, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is the development and experimental testing of a tumor tracking method for particle radiation therapy, providing the daily respiratory dynamics of the patient’s thoraco-abdominal anatomy as a function of an external surface surrogate combined with an a priori motion model. The proposed tracking approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, estimated from the four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomography (CT) through deformable image registration. The model is adapted to the interfraction baseline variations in the patient’s anatomical configuration. The driving amplitude and phase parameters are obtained intrafractionally from a respiratory surrogate signal derived from the external surface displacement. The developed technique was assessed on a dataset of seven lung cancer patients, who underwent two repeated 4D CT scans. The first 4D CT was used to build the respiratory motion model, which was tested on the second scan. The geometric accuracy in localizing lung lesions, mediated over all breathing phases, ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 mm across all patients. Errors in tracking the surrounding organs at risk, such as lungs, trachea and esophagus, were lower than 1.3 mm on average. The median absolute variation in water equivalent path length (WEL) within the target volume did not exceed 1.9 mm-WEL for simulated particle beams. A significant improvement was achieved compared with error compensation based on standard rigid alignment. The present work can be regarded as a feasibility study for the potential extension of tumor tracking techniques in particle treatments. Differently from current tracking methods applied in conventional radiotherapy, the proposed approach allows for the dynamic localization of all anatomical structures scanned in the planning CT, thus providing complete information on density and WEL variations required for particle beam range adaptation.

  2. A statistical model-based technique for accounting for prostate gland deformation in endorectal coil-based MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Amir M; Sharifi, Reza; Agarwal, Harsh K; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Kruecker, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy procedures, combining high-resolution endorectal coil (ERC)-MRI with Computed Tomography (CT) images has shown to improve the diagnostic specificity for malignant tumors. Despite such advantage, there exists a major complication in fusion of the two imaging modalities due to the deformation of the prostate shape in ERC-MRI. Conventionally, nonlinear deformable registration techniques have been utilized to account for such deformation. In this work, we present a model-based technique for accounting for the deformation of the prostate gland in ERC-MR imaging, in which a unique deformation vector is estimated for every point within the prostate gland. Modes of deformation for every point in the prostate are statistically identified using a set of MR-based training set (with and without ERC-MRI). Deformation of the prostate from a deformed (ERC-MRI) to a non-deformed state in a different modality (CT) is then realized by first calculating partial deformation information for a limited number of points (such as surface points or anatomical landmarks) and then utilizing the calculated deformation from a subset of the points to determine the coefficient values for the modes of deformations provided by the statistical deformation model. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation, our results demonstrated a mean estimation error of 1mm for a MR-to-MR registration.

  3. Prediction of water loss and viscoelastic deformation of apple tissue using a multiscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregawi, Wondwosen A.; Abera, Metadel K.; Fanta, Solomon W.; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-11-01

    A two-dimensional multiscale water transport and mechanical model was developed to predict the water loss and deformation of apple tissue (Malus × domestica Borkh. cv. ‘Jonagold’) during dehydration. At the macroscopic level, a continuum approach was used to construct a coupled water transport and mechanical model. Water transport in the tissue was simulated using a phenomenological approach using Fick’s second law of diffusion. Mechanical deformation due to shrinkage was based on a structural mechanics model consisting of two parts: Yeoh strain energy functions to account for non-linearity and Maxwell’s rheological model of visco-elasticity. Apparent parameters of the macroscale model were computed from a microscale model. The latter accounted for water exchange between different microscopic structures of the tissue (intercellular space, the cell wall network and cytoplasm) using transport laws with the water potential as the driving force for water exchange between different compartments of tissue. The microscale deformation mechanics were computed using a model where the cells were represented as a closed thin walled structure. The predicted apparent water transport properties of apple cortex tissue from the microscale model showed good agreement with the experimentally measured values. Deviations between calculated and measured mechanical properties of apple tissue were observed at strains larger than 3%, and were attributed to differences in water transport behavior between the experimental compression tests and the simulated dehydration-deformation behavior. Tissue dehydration and deformation in the high relative humidity range ( > 97% RH) could, however, be accurately predicted by the multiscale model. The multiscale model helped to understand the dynamics of the dehydration process and the importance of the different microstructural compartments (intercellular space, cell wall, membrane and cytoplasm) for water transport and mechanical

  4. Evaluation of deformation accuracy of a virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on clinical trials for patient-specific laparoscopic surgery simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Qu, Jia Di; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-02-01

    This paper evaluates deformation accuracy of a virtual pneumoperitoneum method by utilizing measurement data of real deformations of patient bodies. Laparoscopic surgery is an option of surgical operations that is less invasive technique as compared with traditional surgical operations. In laparoscopic surgery, the pneumoperitoneum process is performed to create a viewing and working space. Although a virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on 3D CT image deformation has been proposed for patient-specific laparoscopy simulators, quantitative evaluation based on measurements obtained in real surgery has not been performed. In this paper, we evaluate deformation accuracy of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on real deformation data of the abdominal wall measured in operating rooms (ORs.) The evaluation results are used to find optimal deformation parameters of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method. We measure landmark positions on the abdominal wall on a 3D CT image taken before performing a pneumoperitoneum process. The landmark positions are defined based on anatomical structure of a patient body. We also measure the landmark positions on a 3D CT image deformed by the virtual pneumoperitoneum method. To measure real deformations of the abdominal wall, we measure the landmark positions on the abdominal wall of a patient before and after the pneumoperitoneum process in the OR. We transform the landmark positions measured in the OR from the tracker coordinate system to the CT coordinate system. A positional error of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method is calculated based on positional differences between the landmark positions on the 3D CT image and the transformed landmark positions. Experimental results based on eight cases of surgeries showed that the minimal positional error was 13.8 mm. The positional error can be decreased from the previous method by calculating optimal deformation parameters of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method from the experimental

  5. Quantitative analogue modelling of the surface deformation associated with cone-sheet and dyke emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldstrand, Frank; Bjugger, Fanny; Galland, Olivier; Burchardt, Steffi; Hallot, Erwan

    2014-05-01

    Inclined cone-sheets and sub-vertical dykes constitute the two principal types of magmatic sheet intrusions produced by volcanic systems. In active volcanic systems, the emplacement of sheet intrusions causes measurable surface deformation, which is analyzed through geodetic models. Geodetic model output is classically the shape of underlying intrusions causing the surface deformation, however, the results of these models are not testable as the subsurface intrusion is not accessible. Such test would only be doable with a physical system in which both (1) the surface deformation pattern and (2) the 3D shape of the underlying intrusion are known. In addition, established geodetic models only consider static magma intrusions, and do not account for emplacement and propagation processes. This would require combined good time- and space-resolution, which is not achievable with classical geodetic monitoring systems. We present a series of analogue models that may be a way of accurately linking surface deformation to the underlying intrusions and associated emplacement processes. We systematically varied depth of intrusion, the cohesive properties of the silica powder representing the country rock and the velocity of injected magma. The pressure of the intruding vegetable oil was measured through time, and the model surface topography was monitored. The low viscosity magma was simulated by molten vegetable oil, which solidified after intrusion; the solidified intrusion was then excavated and its shape was measured. By linking the development of the surface uplift in height, area, and volume with the pressure data from the onset of intrusion until the time of eruption, we identify characteristic laws of surface deformation. First results indicate that the pattern of uplift over time varies, depending on whether deformation is caused by a dyke- or a cone-sheet-shaped intrusion. The results from all experiments may enable us to distinguish the two intrusion types using

  6. Non-proportional/Non-monotonous Deformation Modeling of an Ultra High Strength Automotive Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rahul K.; Ogihara, Yuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    In this work, as non-proportional/non-monotonous deformation experiments, two-stage and tension-compression-tension uniaxial tests were performed, respectively, for a cold rolled ultra high strength dual phase steel sheet: DP780. Deformation behaviors under such deformation paths were found different than those of the ultra low carbon single phase steels observed by Verma et al. (Int. J. Plast. 2011, 82-101). To model the newly observed deformation behaviors, the combined type constitutive law previously proposed by Verma et al. (Int. J. Plast. 2011, 82-101) was successfully applied here. Permanent softening observed during reverse loading was properly characterized into the isotropic and kinematic hardening parts of the hardening law using tension-compression-tension test data. The cross effect observed in two-stage tests was also effectively incorporated into the constitutive law.

  7. Model-based 3D/2D deformable registration of MR images.

    PubMed

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Capson, David W

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed for automatic registration of 3D preoperative magnetic resonance images of deformable tissue to a sequence of its 2D intraoperative images. The algorithm employs a dynamic continuum mechanics model of the deformation and similarity (distance) measures such as correlation ratio, mutual information or sum of squared differences for registration. The registration is solely based on information present in the 3D preoperative and 2D intraoperative images and does not require fiducial markers, feature extraction or image segmentation. Results of experiments with a biopsy training breast phantom show that the proposed method can perform well in the presence of large deformations. This is particularly useful for clinical applications such as MR-based breast biopsy where large tissue deformations occur.

  8. Combined GPS and InSAR Models of Postseismic Deformation from the Northridge Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Parker, J. W.; Peltzer, G.

    Models of combined Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data collected in the region of the Northridge earthquake indicate that significant afterslip on the main fault occurred following the earthquake. Additional shallow deformation occurred to the west of the main rupture plane. Both data sets are consistent with logarithmic time-dependent behavior following the earthquake indicative of afterslip rather than postseismic relaxation. Aftershocks account for only about 10% of the postseismic motion. The two data sets are complimentary in determining the postseismic processes. Fault afterslip and shallow deformation dominate the deformation field in the two years following the earthquake. Lower crustal deformation may play an important role later in the earthquake cycle.

  9. Nonrigid Medical Image Registration by Finite-Element Deformable Sheet-Curve Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Freedman, Matthew T.; Adali, Tulay; Shields, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Image-based change quantitation has been recognized as a promising tool for accurate assessment of tumor's early response to chemoprevention in cancer research. For example, various changes on breast density and vascularity in glandular tissue are the indicators of early response to treatment. Accurate extraction of glandular tissue from pre- and postcontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images requires a nonrigid registration of sequential MR images embedded with local deformations. This paper reports a newly developed registration method that aligns MR breast images using finite-element deformable sheet-curve models. Specifically, deformable curves are constructed to match the boundaries dynamically, while a deformable sheet of thin-plate splines is designed to model complex local deformations. The experimental results on both digital phantoms and real MR breast images using the new method have been compared to point-based thin-plate-spline (TPS) approach, and have demonstrated a significant and robust improvement in both boundary alignment and local deformation recovery. PMID:23165046

  10. Virtual Deformation Control of the X-56A Model with Simulated Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Chin, Alexander W.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    A robust control law design methodology is presented to stabilize the X-56A model and command its wing shape. The X-56A was purposely designed to experience flutter modes in its flight envelope. The methodology introduces three phases: the controller design phase, the modal filter design phase, and the reference signal design phase. A mu-optimal controller is designed and made robust to speed and parameter variations. A conversion technique is presented for generating sensor strain modes from sensor deformation mode shapes. The sensor modes are utilized for modal filtering and simulating fiber optic sensors for feedback to the controller. To generate appropriate virtual deformation reference signals, rigid-body corrections are introduced to the deformation mode shapes. After successful completion of the phases, virtual deformation control is demonstrated. The wing is deformed and it is shown that angle-ofattack changes occur which could potentially be used to an advantage. The X-56A program must demonstrate active flutter suppression. It is shown that the virtual deformation controller can achieve active flutter suppression on the X-56A simulation model.

  11. Virtual Deformation Control of the X-56A Model with Simulated Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Chin, Alexander Wong

    2013-01-01

    A robust control law design methodology is presented to stabilize the X-56A model and command its wing shape. The X-56A was purposely designed to experience flutter modes in its flight envelope. The methodology introduces three phases: the controller design phase, the modal filter design phase, and the reference signal design phase. A mu-optimal controller is designed and made robust to speed and parameter variations. A conversion technique is presented for generating sensor strain modes from sensor deformation mode shapes. The sensor modes are utilized for modal filtering and simulating fiber optic sensors for feedback to the controller. To generate appropriate virtual deformation reference signals, rigid-body corrections are introduced to the deformation mode shapes. After successful completion of the phases, virtual deformation control is demonstrated. The wing is deformed and it is shown that angle-of-attack changes occur which could potentially be used to an advantage. The X-56A program must demonstrate active flutter suppression. It is shown that the virtual deformation controller can achieve active flutter suppression on the X-56A simulation model.

  12. Modelling multi-scale deformation of amorphous glassy polymers with experimentally motivated evolution of the microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engqvist, Jonas; Wallin, Mathias; Ristinmaa, Matti; Hall, Stephen A.; Plivelic, Tomás S.

    2016-11-01

    Novel experimental data, obtained recently using advanced multi-scale experiments, have been used to develop a micro-mechanically motivated constitutive model for amorphous glassy polymers. Taking advantage of the experiments, the model makes use of a microstructural deformation gradient to incorporate the experimentally obtained deformation of the microstructure, as well as its evolving orientation. By comparing results from the model to experimental data, it is shown that the proposed approach is able to accurately predict glassy polymer deformation over a wide range of length-scales, from the macroscopic response (mm range) down to the deformation of the microstructure (nm range). The proposed model is evaluated by comparing the numerical response to experimental results on multiple scales from an inhomogeneous cold drawing experiment of glassy polycarbonate. Besides the macroscopic force-displacement response, a qualitative comparison of the deformation field at the surface of the specimen is performed. Furthermore, the predicted evolution of the fabric orientation is compared to experimental results obtained from X-ray scattering experiments. The model shows very good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of length scales.

  13. Numerical Models of Post-Seismic Deformation Following the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasscoe, M. T.; Donnellan, A.; Lyzenga, G. A.; Norton, C. D.; Parker, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    The M 7.8 1906 Great San Francisco earthquake ruptured 470 km, or about a third of the San Andreas fault, producing offsets of up to 8.5 m. We are studying the long-term effects in the strain field generated by this earthquake and comparing model results using the 3D GeoFEST code combined with the DISLOC elastic dislocation code with observed data. We are comparing model results with current GPS data in order to quantify the contribution of post seismic deformation from large earthquakes to the current velocity field. Viscoelastic models indicate 2-6 mm/yr of post-seismic deformation resulting from postseismic relaxation following the 1906 event. Our model results best fit the GPS data from Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) network using a 40 yr relaxation time and an 18-30 km locking depth for the San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras faults.

  14. Localised vs distributed deformation: 3D modelling of the Dead Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, M. H.; King, G. C.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere behaves as strain softening elasto-plastic materials. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in process zones where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. We propose an alternative modelling method based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that this model explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that 65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining 35% must remain distributed. Observations suggest that distributed deformation occurs at stress levels that can be ten times greater than that associated with

  15. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  16. A theoretical model to predict tensile deformation behavior of balloon catheter.

    PubMed

    Todo, Mitsugu; Yoshiya, Keiji; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    In this technical note, a simple theoretical model was proposed to express the tensile deformation and fracture of balloon catheter tested by the ISO standard using piece-wise linear force-displacement relations. The model was then validated by comparing with the tensile force-displacement behaviors of two types of typical balloon catheters clinically used worldwide. It was shown that the proposed model can effectively be used to express the tensile deformation behavior and easily be handled by physicians who are not familiar with mechanics of materials.

  17. Modeling a MEMS deformable mirror using non-parametric estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Dani; Juez, Francisco Javier de Cos; Myers, Richard; Guesalaga, Andrés; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez

    2010-09-27

    Using non-parametric estimation techniques, we have modeled an area of 126 actuators of a micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirror with 1024 actuators. These techniques produce models applicable to open-loop adaptive optics, where the turbulent wavefront is measured before it hits the deformable mirror. The model's input is the wavefront correction to apply to the mirror and its output is the set of voltages to shape the mirror. Our experiments have achieved positioning errors of 3.1% rms of the peak-to-peak wavefront excursion.

  18. Memory effects in schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    We consider two schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, motivated by the observations, in computer simulations of a model glass, of a nonequilibrium transition from a localized to a diffusive regime as the shear amplitude is increased, and of persistent memory effects in the localized regime. The first of these schematic models is the NK model, a spin model with disordered multi-spin interactions previously studied as a model for sheared amorphous solids. The second model, a transition matrix model, is an abstract formulation of the manner in which occupancy of local energy minima evolves under oscillatory deformation cycles. In both of these models, we find a behavior similar to that of an atomic model glass studied earlier. We discuss possible further extensions of the approaches outlined.

  19. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: Modelling the Dead Sea region in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey C. P.; Klinger, Yann; Agnon, Amotz

    2011-08-01

    The Earth's lithosphere behaves as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field scale observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in 'process zones' where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods (finite difference, finite or discrete elements) use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. In this paper, we propose an alternative modelling method that is based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that this model explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that ~ 65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining ~ 35% has to remain distributed. Observations suggest that

  20. Why is the tube model inapplicable for entangled polymer dynamics at large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Wang, Yangyang

    2011-03-01

    Accumulating experimental revelation of the phenomenology governing dynamics of entangled linear polymers at large deformations has caused us to question the legitimacy of the tube model as an acceptable theoretical description of nonlinear polymer rheology. Upon an explicit investigation of its premise, we have come to realize that the tube model did not overcome the difficulty confronted by other theories and did not contain the basic physics required to explain why and how the entanglement network must break down during large deformations. It considered an unrealistic situation where a load-bearing chain relaxed fast in an affinely deformed tube so that only the chain segment orientation produced the shear stress for applied rates lower than the Rouse rate. A non-monotonic relation between the resulting shear stress and imposed strain for startup shear and step deformations arose from excessive chain orientation not collapse of the entanglement network. In the tube model, the nature of the overshoot is not yielding (transition from elastic deformation to flow), but an elastic instability. Accumulating experimental observations contradict this picture. This presentation will elucidate how the emerging physical picture differs from that of the unrealistic tube model.

  1. Elastic plastic self-consistent (EPSC) modeling of plastic deformation in fayalite olivine

    DOE PAGES

    Burnley, Pamela C

    2015-07-01

    Elastic plastic self-consistent (EPSC) simulations are used to model synchrotron X-ray diffraction observations from deformation experiments on fayalite olivine using the deformation DIA apparatus. Consistent with results from other in situ diffraction studies of monomineralic polycrystals, the results show substantial variations in stress levels among grain populations. Rather than averaging the lattice reflection stresses or choosing a single reflection to determine the macroscopic stress supported by the specimen, an EPSC simulation is used to forward model diffraction data and determine a macroscopic stress that is consistent with lattice strains of all measured diffraction lines. The EPSC simulation presented here includesmore » kink band formation among the plastic deformation mechanisms in the simulation. The inclusion of kink band formation is critical to the success of the models. This study demonstrates the importance of kink band formation as an accommodation mechanism during plastic deformation of olivine as well as the utility of using EPSC models to interpret diffraction from in situ deformation experiments.« less

  2. Elastic plastic self-consistent (EPSC) modeling of plastic deformation in fayalite olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Burnley, Pamela C

    2015-07-01

    Elastic plastic self-consistent (EPSC) simulations are used to model synchrotron X-ray diffraction observations from deformation experiments on fayalite olivine using the deformation DIA apparatus. Consistent with results from other in situ diffraction studies of monomineralic polycrystals, the results show substantial variations in stress levels among grain populations. Rather than averaging the lattice reflection stresses or choosing a single reflection to determine the macroscopic stress supported by the specimen, an EPSC simulation is used to forward model diffraction data and determine a macroscopic stress that is consistent with lattice strains of all measured diffraction lines. The EPSC simulation presented here includes kink band formation among the plastic deformation mechanisms in the simulation. The inclusion of kink band formation is critical to the success of the models. This study demonstrates the importance of kink band formation as an accommodation mechanism during plastic deformation of olivine as well as the utility of using EPSC models to interpret diffraction from in situ deformation experiments.

  3. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  4. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad; Abu Shaphe, Md.; Anwar, Dilshad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb's angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration's tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE). Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS. PMID:26583083

  5. Finite element modeling of passive material influence on the deformation and force output of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, John A; Chi, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Judy P; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Edgerton, Victor R; Sinha, Shantanu

    2012-05-01

    The pattern of deformation of different structural components of a muscle-tendon complex when it is activated provides important information about the internal mechanics of the muscle. Recent experimental observations of deformations in contracting muscle have presented inconsistencies with current widely held assumption about muscle behavior. These include negative strain in aponeuroses, non-uniform strain changes in sarcomeres, even of individual muscle fibers and evidence that muscle fiber cross sectional deformations are asymmetrical suggesting a need to readjust current models of contracting muscle. We report here our use of finite element modeling techniques to simulate a simple muscle-tendon complex and investigate the influence of passive intramuscular material properties upon the deformation patterns under isometric and shortening conditions. While phenomenological force-displacement relationships described the muscle fiber properties, the material properties of the passive matrix were varied to simulate a hydrostatic model, compliant and stiff isotropically hyperelastic models and an anisotropic elastic model. The numerical results demonstrate that passive elastic material properties significantly influence the magnitude, heterogeneity and distribution pattern of many measures of deformation in a contracting muscle. Measures included aponeurosis strain, aponeurosis separation, muscle fiber strain and fiber cross-sectional deformation. The force output of our simulations was strongly influenced by passive material properties, changing by as much as ~80% under some conditions. The maximum output was accomplished by introducing anisotropy along axes which were not strained significantly during a muscle length change, suggesting that correct costamere orientation may be a critical factor in the optimal muscle function. Such a model not only fits known physiological data, but also maintains the relatively constant aponeurosis separation observed during in vivo

  6. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Software Package: Reference Manual for MDef.exe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cate, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    The program MDef.exe was created to take images in wind tunnels of models under test, identify targets, compute the targets centroids, compute the target's real-world X-Y-Z coordinates and the model's deformation (vertical displacement and wing twist).

  7. Aeroelastic Deformation Measurements of Flap, Gap, and Overhang on a Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Ghee, Terence A.; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2000-01-01

    Single-camera, single-view videogrammetry has been used to determine static aeroelastic deformation of a slotted flap configuration on a semispan model at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Deformation was determined by comparing wind-off to wind-on spatial data from targets placed on the main element, shroud, and flap of the model. Digitized video images from a camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. The videogrammetric technique has been established at NASA facilities as the technique of choice when high-volume static aeroelastic data with minimum impact on data taking is required. The primary measurement at the NTF with this technique in the past has been the measurement of static aeroelastic wing twist on full span models. The first results using the videogrammetric technique for the measurement of component deformation during semispan testing at the NTF are presented.

  8. Facial anthropometrics versus cephalometry as predictors for surgical treatment in patients with Class III dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, A E; Stella, J P; Epker, B N

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine statistically the relative importance of facial anthropometrics and cephalometry in diagnosing the specific jaw deformity in patients with Class III relationships, ie, the contribution that maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism made to the Class III deformity. Frontal and right profile photographic views and pretreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of 20 randomly selected Class III patients were analyzed. Correlation and multiple-regression analyses were utilized to determine the relative importance of clinical diagnosis and cephalometric diagnosis in determining the actual surgery performed. In addition, these analyses determined the relative importance of the various facial anthropometrics and cephalometric parameters critical to making the specific diagnosis of maxillary deficiency and/ or mandibular prognathism. It was concluded that a jaw-specific diagnosis of the Class III population studied was best made with facial anthropometrics rather than cephalometry, and the most important predictive facial features on which to based this diagnosis were paranasal configuration and chin projection. Although the overall cephalometric diagnosis had no statistically significant correlation to the actual surgery preformed, two individual cephalometric parameters, maxillary first molar to pterygoid vertical and mandibular plane angle, were found to statistically correlate to the actual surgery performed. These cephalometric parameters should be scrutinized along with the facial anthropometric data when the jaw-specific surgery is selected.

  9. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: Modelling the Dead Sea region in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, M.; King, G. C. P.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth's lithosphere behaves as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field scale observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in 'process zones' where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods (finite difference, finite or discrete elements) use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. In this paper, we propose an alternative modelling method that is based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that thismodel explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that ~65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining ~35% has to remain distributed. Observations suggest that distributed

  10. Dosimetric treatment course simulation based on a statistical model of deformable organ motion.

    PubMed

    Söhn, M; Sobotta, B; Alber, M

    2012-06-21

    We present a method of modeling dosimetric consequences of organ deformation and correlated motion of adjacent organ structures in radiotherapy. Based on a few organ geometry samples and the respective deformation fields as determined by deformable registration, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to create a low-dimensional parametric statistical organ deformation model (Söhn et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 5893-908). PCA determines the most important geometric variability in terms of eigenmodes, which represent 3D vector fields of correlated organ deformations around the mean geometry. Weighted sums of a few dominating eigenmodes can be used to simulate synthetic geometries, which are statistically meaningful inter- and extrapolations of the input geometries, and predict their probability of occurrence. We present the use of PCA as a versatile treatment simulation tool, which allows comprehensive dosimetric assessment of the detrimental effects that deformable geometric uncertainties can have on a planned dose distribution. For this, a set of random synthetic geometries is generated by a PCA model for each simulated treatment course, and the dose of a given treatment plan is accumulated in the moving tissue elements via dose warping. This enables the calculation of average voxel doses, local dose variability, dose-volume histogram uncertainties, marginal as well as joint probability distributions of organ equivalent uniform doses and thus of TCP and NTCP, and other dosimetric and biologic endpoints. The method is applied to the example of deformable motion of prostate/bladder/rectum in prostate IMRT. Applications include dosimetric assessment of the adequacy of margin recipes, adaptation schemes, etc, as well as prospective 'virtual' evaluation of the possible benefits of new radiotherapy schemes.

  11. [Deformity of the cardiac structures in patients with mitral valve prolapse: the relationship with flat chest].

    PubMed

    Sunami, Y; Shimura, A; Miyazawa, Y; Nishimoto, Y; Masuda, Y; Inagaki, Y

    1988-01-01

    In view of the close relationship of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and chest deformity, seven patients of MVP associated with flat chest were echocardiographically evaluated, and the results were compared with those of 43 normal control subjects, 29 cases with flat chest, and patients with MVP either of the anterior (25 cases) or posterior (21 cases) leaflet. MVP associated with flat chest was observed in the anterior leaflet in all cases. MVP was related to the dislocation of the two mitral leaflets caused by the displaced posterior mitral ring observed by two-dimensional echocardiography. The transition type was observed among the cases with or without dislocation of the mitral ring in cases with flat chest.

  12. A Full-Body Layered Deformable Model for Automatic Model-Based Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiping; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a full-body layered deformable model (LDM) inspired by manually labeled silhouettes for automatic model-based gait recognition from part-level gait dynamics in monocular video sequences. The LDM is defined for the fronto-parallel gait with 22 parameters describing the human body part shapes (widths and lengths) and dynamics (positions and orientations). There are four layers in the LDM and the limbs are deformable. Algorithms for LDM-based human body pose recovery are then developed to estimate the LDM parameters from both manually labeled and automatically extracted silhouettes, where the automatic silhouette extraction is through a coarse-to-fine localization and extraction procedure. The estimated LDM parameters are used for model-based gait recognition by employing the dynamic time warping for matching and adopting the combination scheme in AdaBoost.M2. While the existing model-based gait recognition approaches focus primarily on the lower limbs, the estimated LDM parameters enable us to study full-body model-based gait recognition by utilizing the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head as well. In the experiments, the LDM-based gait recognition is tested on gait sequences with differences in shoe-type, surface, carrying condition and time. The results demonstrate that the recognition performance benefits from not only the lower limb dynamics, but also the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head. In addition, the LDM can serve as an analysis tool for studying factors affecting the gait under various conditions.

  13. On the choice of boundary conditions in continuum models of continental deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowinski, Shimon; O'Connell, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of continental deformation have treated the lithosphere as a viscous medium and investigated the time evolution of the deformation caused by tectonic and buoyancy forces. This paper examines the differences between (1) continuum models that keep velocity boundary conditions constant with time and (2) models that keep stress boundary conditions constant with time. These differences are demonstrated by using a simple example of a continental lithosphere that is subjected to horizontal compression. The results show that in (2) the indentation velocity decreases with time, while in (1) the indentation velocity remains constant with time.

  14. Viscoelastic-cycle model of interseismic deformation in the northwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; McCrory, Patricia; Wilson, Doug; Svarc, Jerry; Puskas, Christine; Smith, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We apply a viscoelastic cycle model to a compilation of GPS velocity fields in order to address the kinematics of deformation in the northwestern United States. A viscoelastic cycle model accounts for time-dependent deformation following large crustal earthquakes and is an alternative to block models for explaining the interseismic crustal velocity field. Building on the approach taken in Pollitz et al., we construct a deformation model for the entire western United States-based on combined fault slip and distributed deformation-and focus on the implications for the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), Cascadia megathrust, and western Washington. We find significant partitioning between strike-slip and dip-slip motion near the MTJ as the tectonic environment shifts from northwest-directed shear along the San Andreas fault system to east-west convergence along the Juan de Fuca Plate. By better accounting for the budget of aseismic and seismic slip along the Cascadia subduction interface in conjunction with an assumed rheology, we revise a previous model of slip for the M~ 9 1700 Cascadia earthquake. In western Washington, we infer slip rates on a number of strike-slip and dip-slip faults that accommodate northward convergence of the Oregon Coast block and northwestward convergence of the Juan de Fuca Plate. Lateral variations in first order mechanical properties (e.g. mantle viscosity, vertically averaged rigidity) explain, to a large extent, crustal strain that cannot be rationalized with cyclic deformation on a laterally homogeneous viscoelastic structure. Our analysis also shows that present crustal deformation measurements, particularly with the addition of the Plate Boundary Observatory, can constrain such lateral variations.

  15. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Robert; Tomé, Carlos; Liu, Wenfeng; Alankar, Alankar; Subramanian, Gopinath; Stanek, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical constitutive models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. To improve upon this approach, a microstructurally-based zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability is being developed within the United States Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tomé [1], has been coupled with the BISON engineering scale fuel performance code to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic nature (defect and dislocation movement) and orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. A future goal is for VPSC to obtain information on reaction rate kinetics from atomistic calculations to inform the defect and dislocation behavior models described in VPSC. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  16. A multilayer model of time dependent deformation following an earthquake on a strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer model of the Earth to calculate finite element of time dependent deformation and stress following an earthquake on a strike slip fault is discussed. The model involves shear properties of an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard viscoelastic linear solid lower lithosphere, a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere and an elastic mesosphere. Systematic variations of fault and layer depths and comparisons with simpler elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic asthenosphere calculations are analyzed. Both the creep of the lower lithosphere and astenosphere contribute to the postseismic deformation. The magnitude of the deformation is enhanced by a short distance between the bottom of the fault (slip zone) and the top of the creep region but is less sensitive to the thickness of the creeping layer. Postseismic restressing is increased as the lower lithosphere becomes more viscoelastic, but the tendency for the width of the restressed zone to growth with time is retarded.

  17. A dislocation density based constitutive model for cyclic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Estrin, Y.; Braasch, H.; Brechet, Y.

    1996-10-01

    A new constitutive model describing material response to cyclic loading is presented. The model includes dislocation densities as internal variables characterizing the microstructural state of the material. In the formulation of the constitutive equations, the dislocation density evolution resulting from interactions between dislocations in channel-like dislocation patterns is considered. The capabilities of the model are demonstrated for INCONEL 738 LC and Alloy 800H.

  18. Numerical model for the shear rheology of two-dimensional wet foams with deformable bubbles.

    PubMed

    Kähärä, T; Tallinen, T; Timonen, J

    2014-09-01

    Shearing of two-dimensional wet foam is simulated using an introduced numerical model, and results are compared to those of experiments. This model features realistically deformable bubbles, which distinguishes it from previously used models for wet foam. The internal bubble dynamics and their contact interactions are also separated in the model, making it possible to investigate the effects of the related microscale properties of the model on the macroscale phenomena. Validity of model assumptions was proved here by agreement between the simulated and measured Herschel-Bulkley rheology, and shear-induced relaxation times. This model also suggests a relationship between the shear stress and normal stress as well as between the average degree of bubble deformation and applied shear stress. It can also be used to analyze suspensions of bubbles and solid particles, an extension not considered in this work.

  19. Numerical model for the deformation of nucleated cells by optical stretchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sraj, Ihab; Francois, Joshua; Marr, David W. M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we seek to numerically study the deformation of nucleated cells by single diode-laser bar optical stretchers. We employ a recently developed computational model, the dynamic ray-tracing method, to determine the force distribution induced by optical stretchers on a cell encapsulating a nucleus of different optical properties. These optical forces are shape dependent and can deform real non-rigid objects; thus resulting in dynamically changing distributions with cell and nucleus deformation. A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is a common biological cell that is of interest to the biomedical community because of its use in recombinant protein therapeutics and is an example of a nucleated cell. To this end, we model CHO cells as two concentric three-dimensional elastic capsules immersed in a fluid where the hydrodynamic forces are calculated using the immersed boundary method. We vary the inner capsule size to simulate different nucleus sizes. Our results show that the presence of a nucleus has a major effect on the force distribution on the cell surface and consequently on its net deformation. Scattering and gradient forces are reported for different nucleus sizes and the effect of nucleus size on the cell deformation is discussed quantitatively.

  20. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  1. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome. PMID:26981211

  2. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-02-26

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome.

  3. Droplet Deformation Prediction with the Droplet Deormation and Break Up Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  4. Experimental deformation of two-component IRM in magnetite-bearing limestone: a model for the behaviour of NRM during natural deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental, room temperature, triaxial deformation at 200 MPa (2 kbar) and at a controlled strain rate of 10 -5 s -1 is performed on three limestones with magnetic behaviour dominated by single-domain magnetite. Permanent deformation is achieved mainly by twinning of calcite. Isothermal remanent magnetisation (IRM) in the samples is reduced in magnitude, especially when parallel to compressive stress. The decrease in magnitude correlates slightly better with peak stress than with strain, in accord with previous work in uniaxial tests, indicating the role of stress in deformational 'demagnetisation'. Remanences have their vector plots condensed after deformation, particularly in the range 0-30 mT. A two-component IRM is used as a simple model of a multi-component natural remanent magnetisation (NRM). The resultant vector is deflected by the action of stress towards whichever components are least reduced by deformation; in the case of magnetite-bearing rocks this appears to be the most coercive components. In the case of a natural deformation, it is predicted that the effects of stress at any stage should be to remove progressively any low-coercivity components added to an NRM by remagnetisation during tectonism, especially those parallel to compressive stress.

  5. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  6. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  7. Spherical shell model description of deformation and superdeformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Zuker, A.

    2003-04-01

    Large-scale shell model calculations give at present a very accurate and comprehensive description of light and medium-light nuclei, specially when 0hbar ω spaces are adequate. The full pf-shell calculations have made it possible to describe many collective features in an spherical shell model context. Calculations including two major oscillator shells have proven able to describe also superdeformed bands.

  8. Talectomy in patients with recurrent deformity in club foot. A long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Legaspi, J; Li, Y H; Chow, W; Leong, J C

    2001-04-01

    We reviewed 24 feet in 15 patients who had undergone talectomy for recurrent equinovarus deformity; 21 were associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, two with myelomeningocele and one with idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus. The mean follow-up was 20 years. Good results were achieved in eight feet (33%) in which further surgery was not needed and walking was painless; a fair result was obtained in ten feet (42%) in which further surgery for recurrence of a hindfoot deformity had been necessary but walking was painless; the remaining six feet (25%) were poor, with pain on walking. All patients wore normal shoes and could walk independently, except one who was wheelchair-bound because of other joint problems. Recurrent deformity, the development of tibiocalcaneal arthritis and spontaneous fusion of the tibia to the calcaneum were all seen in these patients.

  9. Regional Longitudinal Myocardial Deformation Provides Incremental Prognostic Information in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Pedersen, Sune H.; Galatius, Søren; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Bech, Jan; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Background Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) has recently been demonstrated to be a superior prognosticator to conventional echocardiographic measures in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of regional longitudinal myocardial deformation in comparison to GLS, conventional echocardiography and clinical information. Method In total 391 patients were admitted with ST-Segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequently examined by echocardiography. All patients were examined by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and two-dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSE). Results During a median-follow-up of 5.3 (IQR 2.5–6.1) years the primary endpoint (death, heart failure or a new MI) was reached by 145 (38.9%) patients. After adjustment for significant confounders (including conventional echocardiographic parameters) and culprit lesion, reduced longitudinal performance in the anterior septal and inferior myocardial regions (but not GLS) remained independent predictors of the combined outcome. Furthermore, inferior myocardial longitudinal deformation provided incremental prognostic information to clinical and conventional echocardiographic information (Harrell's c-statistics: 0.63 vs. 0.67, p = 0.032). In addition, impaired longitudinal deformation outside the culprit lesion perfusion region was significantly associated with an adverse outcome (p<0.05 for all deformation parameters). Conclusion Regional longitudinal myocardial deformation measures, regardless if determined by TDI or 2DSE, are superior prognosticators to GLS. In addition, impaired longitudinal deformation in the inferior myocardial segment provides prognostic information over and above clinical and conventional echocardiographic risk factors. Furthermore, impaired longitudinal deformation outside the culprit lesion perfusion region seems to be a paramount marker of adverse

  10. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  11. Low Latency Sensor Web Integration of Seismic Tomography, InSAR, and Deformation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Masterlark, T.; Lees, J. M.; Lundgren, P.; Song, W.

    2011-12-01

    In the volcanic environment, seismometers are sensitive to high-frequency, brittle failure earthquakes (tectonic-shear and dike intrusion events) and volcanic tremor. Real-time seismic analysis provides epicenter location, fault parameters, and, given enough data, the geometry of magmatic intrusion with short latency. Due to the limits of the seismic frequency response, however, seismic data analysis can only infer magma movement and volume change through their manifestation on changes in the elastic properties of the volcano obtained from tomography, and when possible from tracking earthquake hypocenters. Geodetic measurements (GPS, leveling, InSAR) on the other hand, measure volume changes and surface strain more directly by tracking surface deformation. Geodetic observations, however, lack the sensitivity to distinguish between various sources of surface deformation. In particular, the separation of deformation due to magma migration from all other extraneous sources is a key limitation of geodetic data inversion. We will present a framework in which high-resolution, real-time seismic tomography, calculated by a distributed network of seismic sensor nodes, can be coupled with low-latency InSAR acquisition and processing to constrain three-dimensional(3D) finite element model (FEM) solutions for the volcano deformation sources. The FEM simulates pressurized magma chambers (a deformation source) embedded in domains having a distribution of material properties, determined from seismic tomography models, and the irregular relief of a volcano, according to available digital elevation models (DEMs). The mass and volume estimates thus calculated, are then re-incorporated into the next iteration of the seismic tomography. This is done by first delineating subsurface regions where magma injection is required by the deformation models. Model parameters within these 3D structures are constrained by restricting the range of velocity (or Q) those voxels (model elemets) can

  12. A Lattice Boltzmann Fictitious Domain Method for Modeling Red Blood Cell Deformation and Multiple-Cell Hydrodynamic Interactions in Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xing; Lin, Guang; Zou, Jianfeng; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

    2013-07-20

    To model red blood cell (RBC) deformation in flow, the recently developed LBM-DLM/FD method ([Shi and Lim, 2007)29], derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain methodthe fictitious domain method, is extended to employ the mesoscopic network model for simulations of red blood cell deformation. The flow is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method with an external force, while the network model is used for modeling red blood cell deformation and the fluid-RBC interaction is enforced by the Lagrange multiplier. To validate parameters of the RBC network model, sThe stretching numerical tests on both coarse and fine meshes are performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data to validate the parameters of the RBC network model. In addition, RBC deformation in pipe flow and in shear flow is simulated, revealing the capacity of the current method for modeling RBC deformation in various flows.

  13. SDEM modelling of deformation associated with a listric fault system and associated fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Marie L.; Clausen, Ole R.; Egholm, David L.; Andresen, Katrine J.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical modelling of geological structures using FEM, DEM and SDEM methods as well as analogue modelling are widely used in order to achieve a better understanding of the kinematics and dynamics during deformation. The methods are furthermore the ultimate source for mapping (observing) the true geometry of geological structures as well as subsurface fluid flow phenomena in 3D seismic data developed for hydrocarbon exploration. Here we use 3D seismic data and SDEM modelling to suggest a dynamic-kinematic evolution of the deformation in the hangingwall of a listric fault overlying an active salt roller. We use the results to obtain a better understanding of the fluid flow in a complex deformed hangingwall. The case study is focused at the D-1 fault trend in the western part of the Norwegian Danish Basin, at the northern slope of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High. The D-1 main fault detaches along the northern flank of a Zechstein salt roller which was active during the Cenozoic. The seismic analysis shows a system of secondary normal antithetic and synthetic faults dipping approximately 50-60dg within the hangingwall. Shallow gas is trapped in the hangingwall and the secondary faults often confine the accumulations i.e. indicating that the secondary faults are sealing. The modelling confirms that the geometry of the secondary faults is highly controlled by the rheology of different layers in the hangingwall but also on the intensity of the salt movement. The modelling also suggests the presence of vertical deformation zones; structures which are not directly observed on the seismic data. The vertical deformation zones are related to the differential vertical movement of the strata due to salt migration. A neural network trained chimney probability cube shows high probabilities for the presence of minor vertical gas chimneys below the gas accumulations suggesting that vertical fluid migration in the hangingwall occurred in areas with significant vertical salt movements. The

  14. Guidelines for patient-specific jawline definition with titanium implants in esthetic, deformity, and malformation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mommaerts, Maurice Yves

    2016-01-01

    Context: Asymmetry and unfavorable esthetics of the jawline have become possible to correct in three dimensions using computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing. Aims: The aim of this study was to provide esthetic, technical, and operative guidelines for mandibular angle and border augmentation using patient-specific titanium implants made by selective laser melting. Settings and Design: University hospital - prospective registry. Subjects and Methods: Twelve patients and 17 implantation sites were documented and prospectively registered. Malformational, deformational, and purely esthetic indications were encountered. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive. Results: Patient satisfaction was high, probably because the patients had input into the planned dimensions and shape. A serious infection with implant removal occurred in one patient who had six previous surgeries at the same sites. Technical and surgical guidelines were developed including splitting implants into two segments when the mental nerve was at risk, using a three-dimensional (3D) puzzle connection, providing at least two screw holes per segment, using scaffolds at the bony contact side, using a “satin” finish at the periosteal side, referring to anatomical structures where possible, making provisions for transbuccal and transoral fixation, using a high vestibular incision, and using a double-layer closure. Esthetic guidelines are discussed but could not be upgraded. Conclusions: Mirroring techniques and 3D print accuracy up to 0.1 mm allow precise planning of jaw angle implants. Patients are pleased when given preoperative renderings for their consideration. Infections can be managed using technical and operative recommendations and careful patient selection. PMID:28299273

  15. Cell resolved, multiparticle model of plastic tissue deformations and morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirok, Andras; Isai, Dona Greta

    2015-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional mechanical model of embryonic tissue dynamics. Mechanically coupled adherent cells are represented as particles interconnected with elastic beams which can exert non-central forces and torques. Tissue plasticity is modeled by a stochastic process consisting of a connectivity change (addition or removal of a single link) followed by a complete relaxation to mechanical equilibrium. In particular, we assume that (i) two non-connected, but adjacent particles can form a new link; and (ii) the lifetime of links is reduced by tensile forces. We demonstrate that the proposed model yields a realistic macroscopic elasto-plastic behavior and we establish how microscopic model parameters determine material properties at the macroscopic scale. Based on these results, microscopic parameter values can be inferred from tissue thickness, macroscopic elastic modulus and the magnitude and dynamics of intercellular adhesion forces. In addition to their mechanical role, model particles can also act as simulation agents and actively modulate their connectivity according to specific rules. As an example, anisotropic link insertion and removal probabilities can give rise to local cell intercalation and large scale convergent extension movements. The proposed stochastic simulation of cell activities yields fluctuating tissue movements which exhibit the same autocorrelation properties as empirical data from avian embryos.

  16. Determination of the Maximal Corrective Ability and Optimal Placement of the Ortho-SUV Frame for Femoral Deformity with respect to the Soft Tissue Envelope, a Biomechanical Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Skomoroshko, Petr V.; Vilensky, Victor A.; Hammouda, Ahmed I.; Fletcher, Matt D. A.; Solomin, Leonid N.

    2014-01-01

    Circular fixation according to the Ilizarov method is a well-recognised modality of treatment for trauma and deformity. One shortcoming of the traditional fixator is its limited ability to correct more than one plane of deformity simultaneously, leading to lengthy frame-time indices. Hexapod circular fixation utilising computer guidance is commonplace for complex multidimensional deformity but difficulties often arise with correction of femoral deformity due to bulkiness of the frame construct, particularly in proximal deformity and in patients of increased size. The Ortho-SUV frame is an innovative hexapod which permits unique customisation to individual patient anatomy to maximise tolerance and optimal range of deformity correction. We hypothesised that the optimal configuration and maximal degree of correction achievable by the Ortho-SUV frame can be biomechanically modelled and applied clinically. A study was constructed using Ortho-SUV and femoral limb models to measure deformity correction via differing frame constructs and determine optimal frame configuration to achieve correction in proximal, middle, and distal third deformities with respect to the soft tissue envelope. The ideal frame configuration is determined for correction of deformity in all locations of the femur with the maximal parameters of correction calculated whilst avoiding and mitigating soft tissue irritation from bulky frame construction. PMID:25610658

  17. Extended sigma-model in nontrivially deformed field-antifield formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose an action for the extended sigma-models in the most general setting of the kinetic term allowed in the nontrivially deformed field-antifield formalism. We show that the classical motion equations do naturally take their desired canonical form.

  18. Finite Deformation by Elasticity, Slip, and Twinning: Atomistic Considerations, Continuum Modeling, and Application to Ceramic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    finite shear strains associated with slip and deformation twinning and improper lattice rotations across twin boundaries . Nonlinear anisotropic...of (2) results from gradients in twin fractions, e.g. interface dislocations at tapered twin boundaries . Disclination models of twins (Clayton et

  19. Modeling the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline alloy with hierarchical microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxi; Zhou, Jianqiu; Zhao, Yonghao

    2016-02-01

    A mechanism-based plasticity model based on dislocation theory is developed to describe the mechanical behavior of the hierarchical nanocrystalline alloys. The stress-strain relationship is derived by invoking the impeding effect of the intra-granular solute clusters and the inter-granular nanostructures on the dislocation movements along the sliding path. We found that the interaction between dislocations and the hierarchical microstructures contributes to the strain hardening property and greatly influence the ductility of nanocrystalline metals. The analysis indicates that the proposed model can successfully describe the enhanced strength of the nanocrystalline hierarchical alloy. Moreover, the strain hardening rate is sensitive to the volume fraction of the hierarchical microstructures. The present model provides a new perspective to design the microstructures for optimizing the mechanical properties in nanostructural metals.

  20. Elastic properties of compressed rare-gas crystals in a model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastic properties of compressed Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe rare-gas crystals were studied in a model of deformable and polarizable atoms. The second-order Fuchs elasticity moduli, their pressure derivatives, and the Zener elastic anisotropy ratio were calculated with allowance for three-body interaction and quadrupole deformation in electron shells within a wide pressure range. Comparison with the experiment and results of other authors was performed. In xenon at a compression of 0.6, the shear modulus B 44 was observed to become zero, thus corresponding to the FCC-HCP transition at 75 GPa.

  1. Image-based biomechanical modeling of aortic wall stress and vessel deformation: response to pulsatile arterial pressure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Bauer, Miriam; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Richter, Götz-M.

    2008-03-01

    Image-based modeling of cardiovascular biomechanics may be very helpful for patients with aortic aneurysms to predict the risk of rupture and evaluate the necessity of a surgical intervention. In order to generate a reliable support it is necessary to develop exact patient-specific models that simulate biomechanical parameters and provide individual structural analysis of the state of fatigue and characterize this to the potential of rupture of the aortic wall. The patient-specific geometry used here originates from a CT scan of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the wall stress distribution and the vessel deformation. The wall transient boundary conditions are based on real time-dependent pressure simulations obtained from a previous computational fluid dynamics study. The physiological wall material properties consider a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive model, based on realistic ex-vivo analysis of the aneurismal arterial tissue. The results showed complex deformation and stress distribution on the AAA wall. The maximum stresses occurred at the systole and are found around the aneurismal bulge in regions close to inflection points. Biomechanical modeling based on medical images and coupled with patient-specific hemodynamics allows analysing and quantifying the effects of dilatation of the arterial wall due to the pulsatile aortic pressure. It provides a physical and realistic insight into the wall mechanics and enables predictive simulations of AAA growth and assessment of rupture. Further development integrating endovascular models would help evaluating non-invasively individual treatment strategies for optimal placement and improved device design.

  2. Three-dimensional models of deformation near strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Katzman, Rafael; Lin, J.

    1996-01-01

    We use three-dimensional elastic models to help guide the kinematic interpretation of crustal deformation associated with strike-slip faults. Deformation of the brittle upper crust in the vicinity of strike-slip fault systems is modeled with the assumption that upper crustal deformation is driven by the relative plate motion in the upper mantle. The driving motion is represented by displacement that is specified on the bottom of a 15-km-thick elastic upper crust everywhere except in a zone of finite width in the vicinity of the faults, which we term the "shear zone." Stress-free basal boundary conditions are specified within the shear zone. The basal driving displacement is either pure strike slip or strike slip with a small oblique component, and the geometry of the fault system includes a single fault, several parallel faults, and overlapping en echelon faults. We examine the variations in deformation due to changes in the width of the shear zone and due to changes in the shear strength of the faults. In models with weak faults the width of the shear zone has a considerable effect on the surficial extent and amplitude of the vertical and horizontal deformation and on the amount of rotation around horizontal and vertical axes. Strong fault models have more localized deformation at the tip of the faults, and the deformation is partly distributed outside the fault zone. The dimensions of large basins along strike-slip faults, such as the Rukwa and Dead Sea basins, and the absence of uplift around pull-apart basins fit models with weak faults better than models with strong faults. Our models also suggest that the length-to-width ratio of pull-apart basins depends on the width of the shear zone and the shear strength of the faults and is not constant as previously suggested. We show that pure strike-slip motion can produce tectonic features, such as elongate half grabens along a single fault, rotated blocks at the ends of parallel faults, or extension perpendicular to

  3. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  4. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-07

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  5. Wave propagation in protein microtubules modeled as orthotropic elastic shells including transverse shear deformations.

    PubMed

    Daneshmand, Farhang; Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Amabili, Marco

    2011-07-07

    Wave propagation along the microtubules is one of the issues of major concern in various microtubule cellular functions. In this study, the general wave propagation behavior in protein microtubules is investigated based on a first-order shear deformation shell theory for orthotropic materials, with particular emphasis on the role of strongly anisotropic elastic properties of microtubules. According to experimental observation, the first-order shear deformation theory is used for the modeling of microtubule walls. A general displacement representation is introduced and a type of coupled polynomial eigenvalue problem is developed. Numerical examples describe the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia on wave velocities in orthotropic microtubules. Finally, the influences of the microtubule shear modulus, axial external force, effective thickness and material temperature dependency on wave velocities along the microtubule protofilaments, helical pathway and radial directions are elucidated. Most results presented in the present investigation have been absent from the literature for the wave propagation in microtubules.

  6. Elastic properties of compressed crystalline Ne in the model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, V. V.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2013-02-01

    An ab initio version of the model with deformable atoms has been constructed to investigate the elastic properties of compressed crystalline neon. Approximations for the calculating parameters of quadrupole deformation of atomic electron shells have been discussed. It has been shown that the pressure dependence of the deviation from the Cauchy relation δ is the result of two competitive interactions, namely, the many-body and electron-phonon interactions, which manifests itself in the deformation of atomic electron shells during the shift of nuclei. In the case of Ne, contributions of these interactions are compensated to a large degree, which provides a weakly pressure-dependent positive value for δ. The agreement of calculated elastic moduli and deviations from the Cauchy relation for Ne with the experiment is good.

  7. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable

  8. A Deformed Shape Monitoring Model for Building Structures Based on a 2D Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible. PMID:23698269

  9. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  10. Modeling lithospheric rheology from modern measurements of Bonneville shoreline deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Eric P.

    Here I develop a cross-correlation approach to estimating heights of shoreline features, and apply the new method to paleo-shorelines of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville. I calculaTe 1st-derivative (slope) and 2nd-derivative (curvature) profiles from Digital Elevation Model (DEM) or Global Positioning SysTem Real-Time Kinematic (GPS-RTK) measurements of elevation. I then cross-correla Te pairs of profiles that have been shifT ed by various "lags," or shifts in elevation. The correlation coefficient (a normalized dot-product measure of similarity) is calcula Ted as a function of lag within small (~40 m) windows cenTered at various elevations. The elevation and lag with the greaTest correlation coefficient indicaTes the shoreline elevation at the reference profile and the change in shoreline height for the profile pair. I evalua Te several different algorithms for deriving slope and curvature by examining closure of elevation lags across profile triples. I then model isostatic response to Lake Bonneville loading and unloading. I first model lakeshore uplift response to lake load removal assuming an elastic layer over an inviscid half-space. I obtain a best-fit comparison of predic Ted to observed shoreline heights for the Bonneville level with an elastic layer thickness, Te, of 25±2 km (at 95% confidence) when using only previously published shoreline elevation estimaTes. The best-fit for the Bonneville level when using these estimaTes plus 44 new estima Tes suggests a Te of 26±2 km. The best-fit model for the Provo level suggests Te of 17±3 km. For the Gilbert level, the response is insensitive to the assumed Te. I next model isostatic response to Bonneville loading and unloading

  11. Image-based Modeling of PSF Deformation with Application to Limited Angle PET Data.

    PubMed

    Matej, Samuel; Li, Yusheng; Panetta, Joseph; Karp, Joel S; Surti, Suleman

    2016-10-01

    The point-spread-functions (PSFs) of reconstructed images can be deformed due to detector effects such as resolution blurring and parallax error, data acquisition geometry such as insufficient sampling or limited angular coverage in dual-panel PET systems, or reconstruction imperfections/simplifications. PSF deformation decreases quantitative accuracy and its spatial variation lowers consistency of lesion uptake measurement across the imaging field-of-view (FOV). This can be a significant problem with dual panel PET systems even when using TOF data and image reconstruction models of the detector and data acquisition process. To correct for the spatially variant reconstructed PSF distortions we propose to use an image-based resolution model (IRM) that includes such image PSF deformation effects. Originally the IRM was mostly used for approximating data resolution effects of standard PET systems with full angular coverage in a computationally efficient way, but recently it was also used to mitigate effects of simplified geometric projectors. Our work goes beyond this by including into the IRM reconstruction imperfections caused by combination of the limited angle, parallax errors, and any other (residual) deformation effects and testing it for challenging dual panel data with strongly asymmetric and variable PSF deformations. We applied and tested these concepts using simulated data based on our design for a dedicated breast imaging geometry (B-PET) consisting of dual-panel, time-of-flight (TOF) detectors. We compared two image-based resolution models; i) a simple spatially invariant approximation to PSF deformation, which captures only the general PSF shape through an elongated 3D Gaussian function, and ii) a spatially variant model using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to more accurately capture the asymmetric PSF shape in images reconstructed from data acquired with the B-PET scanner geometry. Results demonstrate that while both IRMs decrease the overall uptake

  12. [Lower extremity deformities as an obstacle in rehabilitation of meningomyelocele patients--pathogenesis and principles of treatment].

    PubMed

    Szulc, A; Głowacki, M

    1998-01-01

    The fate of 89 patients with meningomyelocele operated at the Institute of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation in Poznań between 1970 and 1989 due to paretic deformities of lower extremities has been traced by the authors. Deformities prevented nursing, standing or ambulating; their type and results of treatment have been related to the level of neurosegmental lesion. Modified Sharrard's classification served to group the patients. The level of lesion established during lower extremities muscles testing has been verified after neurological examination supplemented with electrophysiological tests: sensory response within L3-S2 dermatomes, afferent conduction velocity of the peroneal nerve and selected muscles of lower extremity electromyogram. Deformities due to inadequate nursing (hip and knee contractures and equinus foot) were the main obstacle in the rehabilitation in patients with spinal Th12-L2 lesion. In patients with L3-L5 lesion hip contractures were accompanied by dislocation or subluxation of the hip due to muscular imbalance. Knee contracture was less frequent in this group and foot deformities were diverse. Surgical correction of paretic deformity of the hip was the last stage of management designed to promote rehabilitation, following previous foot and knee surgery. In patients with Th12-L2 lesion recurrence of contractures made standing and walking impossible. In patients with L3-L5 neurosegmental lesion surgery for paretic dislocation or subluxation of the hip inclusive of open reduction, varus-derotation osteotomy of the proximal femur, transiliac osteotomy and iliopsoas transfer to the greater trochanter according to Mustard resulted in stable hip. Seventy percent of patients with L3-L4 lesion and all patients with L5 lesion profited from hip surgery with reduced orthotic use and effective gait.

  13. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  14. Aeroelastic Deformation Measurements of Flap, Gap, and Overhang on a Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu; Garg, Sanjay; Ghee, Terence A.; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2001-01-01

    Single-camera, single-view videogrammetry has been used for the first time to determine static aeroelastic deformation of a slotted flap configuration on a semispan model at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Deformation was determined by comparing wind-off to wind-on spatial data from targets placed on the main element, shroud, and flap of the model. Digitized video images from a camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. The videogrammetric technique used for the measurements presented here has been established at NASA facilities as the technique of choice when high-volume static aeroelastic data with minimum impact on data taking is required. However, the primary measurement at the NTF with this technique in the past has been the measurement of the static aeroelastic wing twist of the main wing element on full span models rather than for the measurement of component deformation. Considerations for using the videogrammetric technique for semispan component deformation measurements as well as representative results are presented.

  15. Collision detection and modeling of rigid and deformable objects in laparoscopic simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dy, Mary-Clare; Tagawa, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiromi T.; Komori, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    Laparoscopic simulators are viable alternatives for surgical training and rehearsal. Haptic devices can also be incorporated with virtual reality simulators to provide additional cues to the users. However, to provide realistic feedback, the haptic device must be updated by 1kHz. On the other hand, realistic visual cues, that is, the collision detection and deformation between interacting objects must be rendered at least 30 fps. Our current laparoscopic simulator detects the collision between a point on the tool tip, and on the organ surfaces, in which haptic devices are attached on actual tool tips for realistic tool manipulation. The triangular-mesh organ model is rendered using a mass spring deformation model, or finite element method-based models. In this paper, we investigated multi-point-based collision detection on the rigid tool rods. Based on the preliminary results, we propose a method to improve the collision detection scheme, and speed up the organ deformation reaction. We discuss our proposal for an efficient method to compute simultaneous multiple collision between rigid (laparoscopic tools) and deformable (organs) objects, and perform the subsequent collision response, with haptic feedback, in real-time.

  16. Tectonic and hydrological controls on multiscale deformations in the Levant: numerical modeling and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belferman, Mariana; Katsman, Regina; Agnon, Amotz; Ben Avraham, Zvi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of the dynamics of water bodies in triggering deformations in the upper crust and subsequently leading to earthquakes has been attracting considerable attention. We suggest that dynamic changes in the levels of the water bodies occupying tectonic depressions along the Dead Sea Transform (DST) cause significant variations in the shallow crustal stress field and affect local fault systems in a way that eventually leads to earthquakes. This mechanism and its spatial and temporal scales differ from those in tectonically-driven deformations. In this study we present a new thermo-mechanical model, constructed using the finite element method, and extended by including a fluid flow component in the upper crust. The latter is modeled on a basis of two-way poroelastic coupling with the momentum equation. This coupling is essential for capturing fluid flow evolution induced by dynamic water loading in the DST depressions and to resolve porosity changes. All the components of the model, namely elasticity, creep, plasticity, heat transfer, and fluid flow, have been extensively verified and presented in the study. The two-way coupling between localized plastic volumetric deformations and enhanced fluid flow is addressed, as well as the role of variability of the rheological and the hydrological parameters in inducing deformations in specific faulting environments. Correlations with historical and contemporary earthquakes in the region are discussed.

  17. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, X H; Qiao, J W; Jiao, Z M; Wang, Z H; Yang, H J; Xu, B S

    2015-09-10

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  18. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer

  19. Cubical Mass-Spring Model design based on a tensile deformation test and nonlinear material model.

    PubMed

    San-Vicente, Gaizka; Aguinaga, Iker; Tomás Celigüeta, Juan

    2012-02-01

    Mass-Spring Models (MSMs) are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of deformable bodies such as soft tissues in medical applications. Although they are fast to compute, they lack accuracy and their design remains still a great challenge. The major difficulties in building realistic MSMs lie on the spring stiffness estimation and the topology identification. In this work, the mechanical behavior of MSMs under tensile loads is analyzed before studying the spring stiffness estimation. In particular, the performed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the behavior of cubical MSMs shows that they have a nonlinear response similar to hyperelastic material models. According to this behavior, a new method for spring stiffness estimation valid for linear and nonlinear material models is proposed. This method adjusts the stress-strain and compressibility curves to a given reference behavior. The accuracy of the MSMs designed with this method is tested taking as reference some soft-tissue simulations based on nonlinear Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results show that MSMs can be designed to realistically model the behavior of hyperelastic materials such as soft tissues and can become an interesting alternative to other approaches such as nonlinear FEM.

  20. Analysis of the induced seismicity of the Lacq gas field (Southwestern France) and model of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardainne, T.; Dubos-Sallée, N.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaillot, P.; Perroud, H.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to propose a model of deformation pattern for the Lacq gas field (southwest of France), considering the temporal and spatial evolution of the observed induced seismicity. This model of deformation has been determined from an updating of the earthquake locations and considering theoretical and analogue models usually accepted for hydrocarbon field deformation. The Lacq seismicity is clearly not linked to the natural seismicity of the Pyrenean range recorded 30km farther to the south since the first event was felt in 1969, after the beginning of the hydrocarbon recovery. From 1974 to 1997, more than 2000 local events (ML < 4.2) have been recorded by two permanent local seismic networks. Unlike previously published results focusing on limited time lapse studies, our analysis relies on the data from 1974 to 1997. Greater accuracy of the absolute locations have been obtained using a well adapted algorithm of 3-D location, after improvement of the 3-D P-wave velocity model and determination of specific station corrections for different clusters of events. This updated catalogue of seismicity has been interpreted taking into account the structural context of the gas field. The Lacq gas field is an anticlinal reservoir where 3-D seismic and borehole data reveal a pattern of high density of fracturing, mainly oriented WNW-ESE. Seismicity map and vertical cross-sections show that majority of the seismic events (70 per cent) occurred above the gas reservoir. Correlation is also observed between the orientation of the pre-existent faults and the location of the seismic activity. Strong and organized seismicity occurred where fault orientation is consistent with the poroelastic stress perturbation due to the gas recovery. On the contrary, the seismicity is quiescient where isobaths of the reservoir roof are closed to be perpendicular to the faults. These quiescient areas as well as the central seismic part are characterized by a surface subsidence

  1. A continuum model of continental deformation above subduction zones - Application to the Andes and the Aegean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowinski, Shimon; O'Connell, Richard J.; England, Philip

    1989-01-01

    A continuum model of continental deformation above subduction zones was developed that combines the viscous sheet and the corner flow models; the continental lithosphere is described by a two-dimensional sheet model that considers basal drag resulting from the viscous asthenosphere flow underneath, and a corner flow model with a deforming overlying plate and a rigid subducting plate is used to calculate the shear traction that acts on the base of the lithosphere above a subduction zone. The continuum model is applied to the Andes and the Aegean deformations, which represent, respectively, compressional and extensional tectonic environments above subduction zones. The models predict that, in a compressional environment, a broad region of uplifted topography will tend to develop above a more steeply dippping slab, rather than above a shallower slab, in agreement with observations in the various segments of the central Andes. For an extensional environment, the model predicts that a zone of compression can develop near the trench, and that extensional strain rate can increase with distance from the trench, as is observed in the Aegean.

  2. Modelling the large strain solid phase deformation behaviour of polymer nanoclay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, P. E.; Spares, R.; Sweeney, J.; Coates, P. D.

    2008-12-01

    This work concerns the solid phase deformation processing of polypropylene/nanoclay composites, for which the materials are stretched to large tensile deformations at elevated temperatures. Under these conditions the polymer matrix is nonlinearly dependent on time and strain rate. A constitutive model that is a combination of an Eyring process and physically-based molecular chain models has been shown to give a good representation of the polymer behavior, which includes strain-rate dependent yielding and stress relaxation. In order to model the nanocomposite, platelike regions that are relatively stiff are introduced into a continuum of model polymer material. This is done using a Monte Carlo approach that sequentially places non-overlapping platelets in the matrix. The process for introducing the platelets has the potential to produce platelet orientation distributions that conform with prescribed statistics, such as may be deduced from observations on real nanocomposite.

  3. A mechano-electrochemical model of radial deformation of the capillary glycocalyx.

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Edward R; Stace, Thomas M

    2002-01-01

    A mechano-electrochemical theory of the surface glycocalyx on capillary endothelial cells is presented that models the structure as a mixture of electrostatically charged macromolecules hydrated in an electrolytic fluid. Disturbances arising from mechanical deformation are introduced as perturbations away from a nearly electroneutral equilibrium environment. Under mechanical compression of the layer, such as might occur on the passing of stiff leukocytes through capillaries, the model predicts that gradients in the electrochemical potential of the compressed layer cause a redistribution of mobile ions within the glycocalyx and a rehydration and restoration of the layer to its equilibrium dimensions. Because of the large deformations of the glycocalyx arising from passing leukocytes, nonlinear kinematics associated with finite deformations of the layer are accounted for in the theory. A pseudo-equilibrium approximation is invoked for the transport of the mobile ions that reduces the system of coupled nonlinear integro-differential equations to a single nonlinear partial differential equation that is solved numerically for the compression and recovery of the glycocalyx using a finite difference method on a fixed grid. A linearized model for small strains is also obtained as verification of the finite difference solution. Results of the asymptotic analysis agree well with the nonlinear solution in the limit of small deformations of the layer. Using existing experimental and theoretical estimates of glycocalyx properties, the glycocalyx fixed-charge density is estimated from the analysis to be approximately 1 mEq/l, i.e., we estimate that there exists approximately one fixed charge on the glycocalyx for every 100 ions in blood. Such a charge density would result in a voltage differential between the undeformed glycocalyx and the capillary lumen of approximately 0.1 mV. In addition to providing insight into the mechano-electrochemical dynamics of the layer under

  4. Development of mathematical models and methods for calculation of rail steel deformation resistance of various chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, A. A.; Golovatenko, A. V.; Kadykov, V. N.; Dumova, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    Using the device of the complex “Gleeble System 3800” the physical experimental studies of deformation resistance of chrome rail steel at different thermo-mechanical deformation parameters were carried out. On the basis of mathematical processing of experimental data the statistical model of dependence of the rail steel deformation resistance on the simultaneous influence of deformation degree, rate and temperature, as well as the steel chemical composition, was developed. The nature of influence of deformation parameters and the content of chemical elements in steel on its resistance to plastic deformation is scientifically substantiated. Verification of the adequacy of the proposed model by the comparative analysis of the calculated and actual rolling forces during passes in the universal rail-and-structural steel mill JSC “EVRAZ Consolidated West Siberian Metallurgical Plant” (“EVRAZ ZSMK”) showed the possibility of its use for development and improvement of new modes of rails rolling.

  5. Watermarked cardiac CT image segmentation using deformable models and the Hermite transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Coronel, Sandra L.; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Brieva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Medical image watermarking is an open area for research and is a solution for the protection of copyright and intellectual property. One of the main challenges of this problem is that the marked images should not differ perceptually from the original images allowing a correct diagnosis and authentication. Furthermore, we also aim at obtaining watermarked images with very little numerical distortion so that computer vision tasks such as segmentation of important anatomical structures do not be impaired or affected. We propose a preliminary watermarking application in cardiac CT images based on a perceptive approach that includes a brightness model to generate a perceptive mask and identify the image regions where the watermark detection becomes a difficult task for the human eye. We propose a normalization scheme of the image in order to improve robustness against geometric attacks. We follow a spread spectrum technique to insert an alphanumeric code, such as patient's information, within the watermark. The watermark scheme is based on the Hermite transform as a bio-inspired image representation model. In order to evaluate the numerical integrity of the image data after watermarking, we perform a segmentation task based on deformable models. The segmentation technique is based on a vector-value level sets method such that, given a curve in a specific image, and subject to some constraints, the curve can evolve in order to detect objects. In order to stimulate the curve evolution we introduce simultaneously some image features like the gray level and the steered Hermite coefficients as texture descriptors. Segmentation performance was assessed by means of the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance. We tested different mark sizes and different insertion schemes on images that were later segmented either automatic or manual by physicians.

  6. Effect of Surgical Curve Correction on Exercise Tolerance and Physical Capacities in Patients of Severe Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Ashok K; Borde, Mandar; Singh, Vishwajeet; Singh, Hemant U

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, surgical intervention for patients with a spinal deformity has been considered for cosmetic benefits, but surgical intervention can alter the lung physiology or volumes and in turn leads to increase in physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Therefore, we conducted this to determine whether a surgical correction would restore the lung physiology, physical capacity and exercise tolerance in patients with kyphoscoliosis. Aim To evaluate the usage of six-minute walk test scores and modified Borg scores as tools/measures for exercise tolerance in patients with spinal deformity and to study the effects of surgical correction of spinal deformity on exercise tolerance with above parameters as the measures. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with spinal deformity, who had undergone surgery for deformity correction, were evaluated. All patients were investigated pre-operatively with x-rays of the spine (anteroposterior and lateral views). Clinical tests like breath holding time (after full inspiration) in number of seconds, modified Borg scores, six-minute walk test scores (heart rate, respiratory rate, maximum distance walked); were recorded as measures of exercise tolerance. The patients were followed up on the first, third, sixth and twelfth month post-operatively and tested clinically for breath holding time, modified Borg scores, six-minute walk test scores (heart rate, respiratory rate, maximum distance walked) and x-rays of the spine (anteroposterior and lateral views). Results In our study, breath holding time (p-value = 0.001) and modified Borg scores (p-value = 0.012) showed a significant improvement at 12 months post-operatively. We noted similar findings with heart rate, respiratory rate and maximum distance walked after a six-minute walk test. Improvements were noted in all the parameters, especially in the group of patients with greater than 60 degrees of cobb angle. However, the differences between the two groups (pre

  7. Comparative efficacy of Keishi-bukuryo-gan and pentoxifylline on RBC deformability in patients with "oketsu" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hikiami, H; Goto, H; Sekiya, N; Hattori, N; Sakakibara, I; Shimada, Y; Terasawa, K

    2003-01-01

    Keishi-bukuryo-gan (Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan) (KBG) is one of the prescriptions in Japanese traditional medicine for improving the "oketsu" syndrome, so-called blood stasis syndrome. "Oketsu" syndrome is an important pathological conception in Japanese traditional medicine and often accompanies cerebro-vascular disorders. Previously, we were able to reveal a deterioration of RBC (Red blood cell) deformability and viscoelasticity in patients with "oketsu" syndrome. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether KBG has an effect on RBC deformability in comparison with pentoxifylline (PXF). The subjects were 30 male patients with multiple lacunar infarctions. Eighteen patients (44-79 yrs, mean +/- SD, 66.1 +/- 10.7 yrs) were treated with 12 g of KBG daily for 4 weeks (KBG group). Twelve patients (59-78 yrs, 70.7 +/- 6.4 yrs) were treated with 300 mg of PXF daily for 4 weeks (PXF group). Based on the "oketsu" score, the patients of each group were divided into two subgroups, a non-"oketsu" group ("oketsu" score 20 points or less) and an "oketsu" group ("oketsu" score 21 points or higher). KBG had significant effects on RBC deformability as evaluated by filtration method. KBG also significantly increased intracellular ATP content, as did PXF. Moreover, KBG was more effective for patients with a more severe "oketsu" state. However, PXF was effective only in patients with "oketsu" syndrome, who might have deteriorated RBC deformability. In conclusion, the effect of KBG on RBC deformability was by no means inferior to PXF.

  8. A Deformation Model for Dispersely Failing Elastoplastic Unidirectionally Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagzdins, A.

    2001-09-01

    A calculation model is proposed for unidirectionally reinforced elastoplastic composites capable of gradually accumulating disperse microdamages under loading. The composite is assumed to be a homogeneous transversely isotropic solid. To describe its elastoplastic behavior, an incremental plasticity theory with a nonlinear combined hardening mechanism is invoked. At each point of the solid, its damage is characterized by a centrally symmetric scalar function on a unit sphere. This function is approximated by a fourth-rank tensor, which is used for describing the degradation of the elastic properties of the solid due to the accumulation of disperse microdamages. It is shown how to determine, using the known experimental data, all material constants appearing in the theoretical relations suggested.

  9. Extended Holography: Double-Trace Deformation and Brane-Induced Gravity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.

    2017-03-01

    We put forward a conjecture that for a special class of models - models of the double-trace deformation and brane-induced gravity types - the principle of holographic dualitiy can be extended beyond conformal invariance and anti-de Sitter (AdS) isometry. Such an extension is based on a special relation between functional determinants of the operators acting in the bulk and on the boundary.

  10. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  11. Forward and Reverse Modeling Compressive Deformation in a 3D Geologic Model along the Central San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. A.; Graymer, R. W.; McPhee, D.

    2015-12-01

    During the late Miocene, a small change in the relative motion of the Pacific plate resulted in compressive as well as translational deformation along the central San Andreas Fault (SAF), creating thrust faults and folds throughout this region of California. We constructed a 3D model of an upper crustal volume between Pinnacles National Park and Gold Hill by assembling geologic map data and cross sections, geophysical data, and petroleum well logs in MoveTm, software which has the ability to forward and reverse model movement along faults and folds. For this study, we chose a blind thrust fault west of the SAF near Parkfield to compare deformation produced by MoveTm's forward modeling algorithm with that observed. We chose various synclines east of the SAF to explore the software's ability to unfold (reverse model) units. For the initial round of modeling, strike-slip movement has been omitted as the fault algorithm was designed primarily for extensional or compressional environments. Preliminary forward modeling of originally undeformed strata along the blind thrust produced geometries similar to those in the present-day 3D geologic model. The modeled amount of folding produced in hanging wall strata was less severe, suggesting these units were slightly folded before displacement. Based on these results, the algorithm shows potential in predicting deformation related to blind thrusts. Contraction in the region varies with fold axis location and orientation. MoveTm's unfolding algorithm can allow researchers to measure the amount of contraction a fold represents, and compare that amount across the modeled area as a way of observing regional stress patterns. The unfolding algorithm also allows for passive deformation of strata unconformably underlying the fold; one example reveals a steeper orientation of Cretaceous units prior to late Miocene deformation. Such modeling capabilities can allow for a better understanding of the structural history of the region.

  12. Hot Deformation Behavior of Alloy 800H at Intermediate Temperatures: Constitutive Models and Microstructure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Di, H. S.; Misra, R. D. K.; Zhang, Jiecen

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a Fe-Ni-Cr austenitic Alloy 800H was explored in the intermediate temperature range of 825-975 °C and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1. The study indicates that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at 875-975 °C for strain rates of 0.01-0.1 s-1 and adiabatic heating generated at high strain rates accelerated the DRX process. Based on the experimental data, the Johnson-Cook, modified Johnson-Cook, and Arrhenius-type constitutive models were established to predict the flow stress during hot deformation. A comparative study was made on the accuracy and effectiveness of the above three developed models. The microstructure analysis indicated that all the deformation structures exhibited elongated grains and evidence of some degree of DRX. The multiple DRX at 975 °C and 0.01 s-1 led to an increase in the intensity of {001} <100> "cube" texture component and a significant reduction in the intensity of {011} <211> "brass" component. Additionally, the average values of grain average misorientation and grain orientation spread for deformed microstructure were inversely proportional to the fraction of DRX.

  13. Multicomponent model of deformation and detachment of a biofilm under fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Tierra, Giordano; Pavissich, Juan P; Nerenberg, Robert; Xu, Zhiliang; Alber, Mark S

    2015-05-06

    A novel biofilm model is described which systemically couples bacteria, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and solvent phases in biofilm. This enables the study of contributions of rheology of individual phases to deformation of biofilm in response to fluid flow as well as interactions between different phases. The model, which is based on first and second laws of thermodynamics, is derived using an energetic variational approach and phase-field method. Phase-field coupling is used to model structural changes of a biofilm. A newly developed unconditionally energy-stable numerical splitting scheme is implemented for computing the numerical solution of the model efficiently. Model simulations predict biofilm cohesive failure for the flow velocity between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] m s(-1) which is consistent with experiments. Simulations predict biofilm deformation resulting in the formation of streamers for EPS exhibiting a viscous-dominated mechanical response and the viscosity of EPS being less than [Formula: see text]. Higher EPS viscosity provides biofilm with greater resistance to deformation and to removal by the flow. Moreover, simulations show that higher EPS elasticity yields the formation of streamers with complex geometries that are more prone to detachment. These model predictions are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Multicomponent model of deformation and detachment of a biofilm under fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Tierra, Giordano; Pavissich, Juan P.; Nerenberg, Robert; Xu, Zhiliang; Alber, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel biofilm model is described which systemically couples bacteria, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and solvent phases in biofilm. This enables the study of contributions of rheology of individual phases to deformation of biofilm in response to fluid flow as well as interactions between different phases. The model, which is based on first and second laws of thermodynamics, is derived using an energetic variational approach and phase-field method. Phase-field coupling is used to model structural changes of a biofilm. A newly developed unconditionally energy-stable numerical splitting scheme is implemented for computing the numerical solution of the model efficiently. Model simulations predict biofilm cohesive failure for the flow velocity between and m s−1 which is consistent with experiments. Simulations predict biofilm deformation resulting in the formation of streamers for EPS exhibiting a viscous-dominated mechanical response and the viscosity of EPS being less than . Higher EPS viscosity provides biofilm with greater resistance to deformation and to removal by the flow. Moreover, simulations show that higher EPS elasticity yields the formation of streamers with complex geometries that are more prone to detachment. These model predictions are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. PMID:25808342

  15. A lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows interacting with deformable bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical model to simulate a multiphase flow interacting with deformable solid bodies is proposed. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method and the Shan-Chen model is adopted to handle the multiphase feature. The interaction of the flow with immersed solid bodies is accounted for by using the Immersed Boundary method. Corotational beam finite elements are used to model the deformable bodies and non-linear structure dynamics is predicted through the Time Discontinuous Galerkin method. A numerical campaign is carried out in order to assess the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed modeling by involving different scenarios. In particular, the model is validated by performing the bubble test and by comparing present results with the ones from a numerical commercial software. Moreover, the properties in terms of convergence are discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed methodology is evaluated by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced in the system at the fluid-solid interface. Present findings show that the proposed approach is robust, accurate and suitable of being applied to a lot of practical applications involving the interaction between multiphase flows and deformable solid bodies.

  16. A discrete-element model for viscoelastic deformation and fracture of glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riikilä, T. I.; Tallinen, T.; Åström, J.; Timonen, J.

    2015-10-01

    A discrete-element model was developed to study the behavior of viscoelastic materials that are allowed to fracture. Applicable to many materials, the main objective of this analysis was to develop a model specifically for ice dynamics. A realistic model of glacial ice must include elasticity, brittle fracture and slow viscous deformations. Here the model is described in detail and tested with several benchmark simulations. The model was used to simulate various ice-specific applications with resulting flow rates that were compatible with Glen's law, and produced under fragmentation fragment-size distributions that agreed with the known analytical and experimental results.

  17. Microplate model for the present-day deformation of Tibet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.

    2007-01-01

    Site velocities from 349 Global Positioning System (GPS) stations are used to construct an 11-element quasi-rigid block model of the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings. Rigid rotations of five major blocks are well determined, and average translation velocities of six smaller blocks can be constrained. Where data are well distributed the velocity field can be explained well by rigid block motion and fault slip across block boundaries. Residual misfits average 1.6 mm/yr compared to typical one standard deviation velocity uncertainties of 1.3 mm/yr. Any residual internal straining of the blocks is small and heterogeneous. However, residual substructure might well represent currently unresolved motions of smaller blocks. Although any smaller blocks must move at nearly the same rate as the larger blocks within which they lie, undetected relative motions between them could be significant, particularly where there are gaps in GPS coverage. Predicted relative motions between major blocks agree with the observed sense of slip and along-strike partitioning of motion across major faults. However, predicted slip rates across Tibet's major strike-slip faults are low, only 5-12 mm/yr, a factor of 2-3 smaller than most rates estimated from fault offset features dated by radiometric methods as ???2000 to ???100,000 year old. Previous work has suggested that both GPS data and low fault slip rates are incompatible with rigid block motions of Tibet. The results reported here overcome these objections.

  18. Bayesian estimation of regularization parameters for deformable surface models

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.S.; Lehovich, A.; Hanson, K.M.

    1999-02-20

    In this article the authors build on their past attempts to reconstruct a 3D, time-varying bolus of radiotracer from first-pass data obtained by the dynamic SPECT imager, FASTSPECT, built by the University of Arizona. The object imaged is a CardioWest total artificial heart. The bolus is entirely contained in one ventricle and its associated inlet and outlet tubes. The model for the radiotracer distribution at a given time is a closed surface parameterized by 482 vertices that are connected to make 960 triangles, with nonuniform intensity variations of radiotracer allowed inside the surface on a voxel-to-voxel basis. The total curvature of the surface is minimized through the use of a weighted prior in the Bayesian framework, as is the weighted norm of the gradient of the voxellated grid. MAP estimates for the vertices, interior intensity voxels and background count level are produced. The strength of the priors, or hyperparameters, are determined by maximizing the probability of the data given the hyperparameters, called the evidence. The evidence is calculated by first assuming that the posterior is approximately normal in the values of the vertices and voxels, and then by evaluating the integral of the multi-dimensional normal distribution. This integral (which requires evaluating the determinant of a covariance matrix) is computed by applying a recent algorithm from Bai et. al. that calculates the needed determinant efficiently. They demonstrate that the radiotracer is highly inhomogeneous in early time frames, as suspected in earlier reconstruction attempts that assumed a uniform intensity of radiotracer within the closed surface, and that the optimal choice of hyperparameters is substantially different for different time frames.

  19. Seismicity and coupled deformation modeling at the Coso Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. O.; Hickman, S. H.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-seismicity in geothermal reservoirs, in particular in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), is a beneficial byproduct of injection and production, as it can indicate the generation of high-permeability pathways on either pre-existing or newly generated faults and fractures. The hazard of inducing an earthquake large enough to be felt at the surface, however, is not easily avoided and has led to termination of some EGS projects. To explore the physical processes leading to permeability creation and maintenance in geothermal systems and the physics of induced earthquakes , we investigated the evolution of seismicity and the factors controlling the migration, moment release rate, and timing of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). We report on seismicity in the CGF that has been relocated with high precision double-difference relocation techniques and simultaneous velocity inversions to understand hydrologic reservoir compartmentalization and the nature of subsurface boundaries to fluid flow. We find that two distinct compartments are present within the CGF, which are divided by an aseismic gap showing a relatively low Vp/Vs ratio, likely indicating lower temperatures or lower pore pressures within the gap than in the adjacent reservoir compartments. Well-located events with Mw> 3.5 tend to map onto reactivated fault structures that were revealed when imaged by the relocated micro-seismicity. We relate the temporal and spatial migration of moment release rate to the injection and production histories in the reservoir by employing a thermo-poro-elastic finite element model that takes into account the compartment boundaries defined by the seismicity. We find that pore pressure effects alone are not responsible for the migration of seismicity and that poro-elastic and thermo-elastic stress changes are needed in addition to fluid pressure effects to account for the observed moment release rates.

  20. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  1. Neural network modeling for the prediction of texture evolution of hot deformed aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barat, P.; Withers, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    Commercial aluminum rolling mills operate under very restricted thermomechanical conditions determined from experience and plant trials. In this paper we report results for four-stand tandem mill rolling simulations within and beyond the thermomechanical conditions typical of a rolling mill by plane strain compression (PSC) testing to assess the effect of deformed conditions on the texture of the hot deformed aluminum strip after annealing. A neural network modeling study was then initiated to find a predictive relationship between the observed texture and the thermomechanical parameters of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model suggested that temperature is the prime variable that influences texture. Such models can be used to evaluate optimal strategies for the control of process parameters of a four-stand tandem mill.

  2. A model of river bank deformations under the simultaneous effect of waves from a hydropower plant and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debolskaya, E.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of the river bed deformations in permafrost areas. The deformations are caused by the influence of waves of various origins under an increase of the ambient temperature. The model system consists of an unsteady hydrodynamic module, a thermal module and a bed deformation module. The hydrodynamic module is based on the two-dimensional shallow water equations. The bed deformation module is based on the sediment mass balance conditions. The thermal module is based on the Stefan equation, which defines the "water-ice" boundary movement. We present two applications of the model in which the bed deformation is calculated for the alluvial channels with melting bed under the influences of waves of different duration and intensity. We compared the model predictions with the laboratory data, generally obtaining a good agreement between the two.

  3. A multi-branch finite deformation constitutive model for a shape memory polymer based syntactic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianping; Sun, Huiyu; Fang, Changqing

    2015-02-01

    A multi-branch thermoviscoelastic-themoviscoplastic finite deformation constitutive model incorporated with structural and stress relaxation is developed for a thermally activated shape memory polymer (SMP) based syntactic foam. In this paper, the total mechanical deformation of the foam is divided into the components of the SMP and the elastic glass microballoons by using the mixture rule. The nonlinear Adam-Gibbs model is used to describe the structural relaxation of the SMP as the temperature crosses the glass transition temperature (Tg). Further, a multi-branch model combined with the modified Eying model of viscous flow is used to capture the multitude of relaxation processes of the SMP. The deformation of the glass microballoons could be split into elastic and inelastic components. In addition, the phenomenological evolution rule is implemented in order to further characterize the macroscopic post-yield strain softening behaviors of the syntactic foam. A comparison between the numerical simulation and the thermomechanical experiment shows an acceptable agreement. Moreover, a parametric study is conducted to examine the predictability of the model and to provide guidance for reasonable design of the syntactic foam.

  4. Mathematical modeling of deformation of a porous medium, considering its strengthening due to pore collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovskii, V. M. Sadovskaya, O. V.

    2015-10-28

    Based on the generalized rheological method, the mathematical model describing small deformations of a single-phase porous medium without regard to the effects of a fluid or gas in pores is constructed. The change in resistance of a material to the external mechanical impacts at the moment of pore collapse is taken into account by means of the von Mises–Schleicher strength condition. In order to consider irreversible deformations, alongside with the classical yield conditions by von Mises and Tresca– Saint-Venant, the special condition modeling the plastic loss of stability of a porous skeleton is used. The random nature of the pore size distribution is taken into account. It is shown that the proposed mathematical model satisfies the principles of thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Phenomenological parameters of the model are determined on the basis of the approximate calculation of the problem on quasi-static loading of a cubic periodicity cell with spherical voids. In the framework of the obtained model, the process of propagation of plane longitudinal waves of the compression in a homogenous porous medium, accompanied by the plastic deformation of a skeleton and the collapse of pores, is analyzed.

  5. Cap plasticity models and compactive and dilatant pre-failure deformation

    SciTech Connect

    FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

    2000-02-17

    At low mean stresses, porous geomaterials fail by shear localization, and at higher mean stresses, they undergo strain-hardening behavior. Cap plasticity models attempt to model this behavior using a pressure-dependent shear yield and/or shear limit-state envelope with a hardening or hardening/softening elliptical end cap to define pore collapse. While these traditional models describe compactive yield and ultimate shear failure, difficulties arise when the behavior involves a transition from compactive to dilatant deformation that occurs before the shear failure or limit-state shear stress is reached. In this work, a continuous surface cap plasticity model is used to predict compactive and dilatant pre-failure deformation. During loading the stress point can pass freely through the critical state point separating compactive from dilatant deformation. The predicted volumetric strain goes from compactive to dilatant without the use of a non-associated flow rule. The new model is stable in that Drucker's stability postulates are satisfied. The study has applications to several geosystems of current engineering interest (oil and gas reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, buried targets, and depleted reservoirs for possible use for subsurface sequestration of greenhouse gases).

  6. Performance Analysis of Tandem-L Mission for Modeling Volcanic and Seismic Deformation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Homa; Goel, Kanika; Parizzi, Alessandro; Sudhaus, Henriette; Adam, Nico; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although a great number of publications have focused on the application of InSAR in deformation source modeling as well as the development of different algorithms in this regard, little investigation has been dedicated to the sensitivity analysis of the InSAR in deformation source modeling. Our purpose is to address this issue by analyzing the reliability of InSAR in modeling the deformation sources due to landslides, seismic and volcanic activities, with special focus on the L band SAR measurements. The sensitivity analysis is considered for three commonly used geophysical models in case of subsidence, seismic and volcanic activities; namely, the Gaussian subsidence bowl, Okada and Mogi point source, respectively. In each of the cases, the InSAR sensitivity is analytically formulated and its performance is investigated using simulated SAR data. The investigations are carried out using stochastic error propagation approaches to infer the precision of the models' parameters as well as their mutual covariance. The limiting factors in SAR interferometry are categorized in two groups and investigated separately in sensitivity analysis; with the first dealing with the geometrical limits imposed by the side looking geometry of the SAR measurements and the second focusing on the InSAR stochastic characteristics in the L band.

  7. Multi-object segmentation framework using deformable models for medical imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Namías, Rafael; D'Amato, Juan Pablo; Del Fresno, Mariana; Vénere, Marcelo; Pirró, Nicola; Bellemare, Marc-Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    Segmenting structures of interest in medical images is an important step in different tasks such as visualization, quantitative analysis, simulation, and image-guided surgery, among several other clinical applications. Numerous segmentation methods have been developed in the past three decades for extraction of anatomical or functional structures on medical imaging. Deformable models, which include the active contour models or snakes, are among the most popular methods for image segmentation combining several desirable features such as inherent connectivity and smoothness. Even though different approaches have been proposed and significant work has been dedicated to the improvement of such algorithms, there are still challenging research directions as the simultaneous extraction of multiple objects and the integration of individual techniques. This paper presents a novel open-source framework called deformable model array (DMA) for the segmentation of multiple and complex structures of interest in different imaging modalities. While most active contour algorithms can extract one region at a time, DMA allows integrating several deformable models to deal with multiple segmentation scenarios. Moreover, it is possible to consider any existing explicit deformable model formulation and even to incorporate new active contour methods, allowing to select a suitable combination in different conditions. The framework also introduces a control module that coordinates the cooperative evolution of the snakes and is able to solve interaction issues toward the segmentation goal. Thus, DMA can implement complex object and multi-object segmentations in both 2D and 3D using the contextual information derived from the model interaction. These are important features for several medical image analysis tasks in which different but related objects need to be simultaneously extracted. Experimental results on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging show that the proposed

  8. Computational Study of Uniaxial Deformations in Silica Aerogel Using a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Rangel, Carlos A; Gelb, Lev D

    2015-07-09

    Simulations of a flexible coarse-grained model are used to study silica aerogels. This model, introduced in a previous study (J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 15792), consists of spherical particles which interact through weak nonbonded forces and strong interparticle bonds that may form and break during the simulations. Small-deformation simulations are used to determine the elastic moduli of a wide range of material models, and large-deformation simulations are used to probe structural evolution and plastic deformation. Uniaxial deformation at constant transverse pressure is simulated using two methods: a hybrid Monte Carlo approach combining molecular dynamics for the motion of individual particles and stochastic moves for transverse stress equilibration, and isothermal molecular dynamics simulations at fixed Poisson ratio. Reasonable agreement on elastic moduli is obtained except at very low densities. The model aerogels exhibit Poisson ratios between 0.17 and 0.24, with higher-density gels clustered around 0.20, and Young's moduli that vary with aerogel density according to a power-law dependence with an exponent near 3.0. These results are in agreement with reported experimental values. The models are shown to satisfy the expected homogeneous isotropic linear-elastic relationship between bulk and Young's moduli at higher densities, but there are systematic deviations at the lowest densities. Simulations of large compressive and tensile strains indicate that these materials display a ductile-to-brittle transition as the density is increased, and that the tensile strength varies with density according to a power law, with an exponent in reasonable agreement with experiment. Auxetic behavior is observed at large tensile strains in some models. Finally, at maximum tensile stress very few broken bonds are found in the materials, in accord with the theory that only a small fraction of the material structure is actually load-bearing.

  9. A general approach for modeling the motion of rigid and deformable ellipsoids in ductile flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    A general approach for modeling the motion of rigid or deformable objects in viscous flows is presented. It is shown that the rotation of a 3D object in a viscous fluid, regardless of the mechanical property and shape of the object, is defined by a common and simple differential equation, dQ/dt=-Θ˜Q, where Q is a matrix defined by the orientation of the object and Θ˜ is the angular velocity tensor of the object. The difference between individual cases lies only in the formulation for the angular velocity. Thus the above equation, together with Jeffery's theory for the angular velocity of rigid ellipsoids, describes the motion of rigid ellipsoids in viscous flows. The same equation, together with Eshelby's theory for the angular velocity of deformable ellipsoids, describes the motion of deformable ellipsoids in viscous flows. Both problems are solved here numerically by a general approach that is much simpler conceptually and more economic computationally, compared to previous approaches that consider the problems separately and require numerical solutions to coupled differential equations about Euler angles or spherical (polar coordinate) angles. A Runge-Kutta approximation is constructed for solving the above general differential equation. Singular cases of Eshelby's equations when the object is spheroidal or spherical are handled in this paper in a much simpler way than in previous work. The computational procedure can be readily implemented in any modern mathematics application that handles matrix operations. Four MathCad Worksheets are provided for modeling the motion of a single rigid or deformable ellipsoid immersed in viscous fluids, as well as the evolution of a system of noninteracting rigid or deformable ellipsoids embedded in viscous flows.

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of flow and deformation in idealized mild and moderate arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xi; Yeoh, Guan Heng; Timchenko, Victoria

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional numerical calculations of mild and moderate stenosed blood vessels have been performed. Large eddy simulation through a dynamic subgrid scale Smagorinsky model is applied to model the transitional and turbulent pulsatile flow. For the compliant stenosed model, fluid-structure interaction is realized through a two-way coupling between the fluid flow and the deforming vessel through the change in the external diameter due to the increment of circumferential pressure via a novel moving boundary approach. Model predictions compare very well against measured and numerical data for the centerline velocities, thickness of the flow separation zones and radial wall displacements.

  11. Control of deformable mirrors including a nonlinear modal model for air gap damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present nonlinear pressure dynamics as an extension to a linear distributed parameters model of a deformable mirror. The original, undamped model is recalled and measurement results are shown supporting the need for a damping model which includes the pressure dynamics of the air gap behind the mirror membrane. We will derive the damping coefficients to match our measurement results. Based on the mew model, we will derive a modal feedforward and feedback control law for 88 actuators based on only 3 position sensors and show simulation results to support the algorithm's effectiveness.

  12. Parity Deformed Jaynes-Cummings Model: “Robust Maximally Entangled States”

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, A.; Mojaveri, B.; Shirin, S.; Faseghandis, S. Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The parity-deformations of the quantum harmonic oscillator are used to describe the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model based on the λ-analog of the Heisenberg algebra. The behavior is interestingly that of a coupled system comprising a two-level atom and a cavity field assisted by a continuous external classical field. The dynamical characters of the system is explored under the influence of the external field. In particular, we analytically study the generation of robust and maximally entangled states formed by a two-level atom trapped in a lossy cavity interacting with an external centrifugal field. We investigate the influence of deformation and detuning parameters on the degree of the quantum entanglement and the atomic population inversion. Under the condition of a linear interaction controlled by an external field, the maximally entangled states may emerge periodically along with time evolution. In the dissipation regime, the entanglement of the parity deformed JCM are preserved more with the increase of the deformation parameter, i.e. the stronger external field induces better degree of entanglement. PMID:27917882

  13. Parity Deformed Jaynes-Cummings Model: “Robust Maximally Entangled States”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, A.; Mojaveri, B.; Shirin, S.; Faseghandis, S. Amiri

    2016-12-01

    The parity-deformations of the quantum harmonic oscillator are used to describe the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model based on the λ-analog of the Heisenberg algebra. The behavior is interestingly that of a coupled system comprising a two-level atom and a cavity field assisted by a continuous external classical field. The dynamical characters of the system is explored under the influence of the external field. In particular, we analytically study the generation of robust and maximally entangled states formed by a two-level atom trapped in a lossy cavity interacting with an external centrifugal field. We investigate the influence of deformation and detuning parameters on the degree of the quantum entanglement and the atomic population inversion. Under the condition of a linear interaction controlled by an external field, the maximally entangled states may emerge periodically along with time evolution. In the dissipation regime, the entanglement of the parity deformed JCM are preserved more with the increase of the deformation parameter, i.e. the stronger external field induces better degree of entanglement.

  14. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field.

  15. A model of earthquake triggering probabilities and application to dynamic deformations constrained by ground motion observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Felzer, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have used observations from Felzer and Brodsky (2006) of the variation of linear aftershock densities (i.e., aftershocks per unit length) with the magnitude of and distance from the main shock fault to derive constraints on how the probability of a main shock triggering a single aftershock at a point, P(r, D), varies as a function of distance, r, and main shock rupture dimension, D. We find that P(r, D) becomes independent of D as the triggering fault is approached. When r ??? D P(r, D) scales as Dm where m-2 and decays with distance approximately as r-n with n = 2, with a possible change to r-(n-1) at r > h, where h is the closest distance between the fault and the boundaries of the seismogenic zone. These constraints may be used to test hypotheses about the types of deformations and mechanisms that trigger aftershocks. We illustrate this using dynamic deformations (i.e., radiated seismic waves) and a posited proportionality with P(r, D). Deformation characteristics examined include peak displacements, peak accelerations and velocities (proportional to strain rates and strains, respectively), and two measures that account for cumulative deformations. Our model indicates that either peak strains alone or strain rates averaged over the duration of rupture may be responsible for aftershock triggering.

  16. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  17. The strain path dependence of plastic deformation response of AA5754: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Minh-Son; Hu, Lin; Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2013-12-16

    This work presents modeling of experiments on a balanced biaxial (BB) pre-strained AA5754 alloy, subsequently reloaded uniaxially along the rolling direction and transverse direction. The material exhibits a complex plastic deformation response during the change in strain path due to 1) crystallographic texture, 2) aging (interactions between dislocations and Mg atoms) and 3) recovery (annihilation and re-arrangement of dislocations). With a BB prestrain of about 5 %, the aging process is dominant, and the yield strength for uniaxially deformed samples is observed to be higher than the flow stress during BB straining. The strain hardening rate after changing path is, however, lower than that for pre-straining. Higher degrees of pre-straining make the dynamic recovery more active. The dynamic recovery at higher strain levels compensates for the aging effect, and results in: 1) a reduction of the yield strength, and 2) an increase in the hardening rate of re-strained specimens along other directions. The yield strength of deformed samples is further reduced if these samples are left at room temperature to let static recovery occur. The synergistic influences of texture condition, aging and recovery processes on the material response make the modeling of strain path dependence of mechanical behavior of AA5754 challenging. In this study, the influence of crystallographic texture is taken into account by incorporating the latent hardening into a visco-plastic self-consistent model. Different strengths of dislocation glide interaction models in 24 slip systems are used to represent the latent hardening. Moreover, the aging and recovery effects are also included into the latent hardening model by considering strong interactions between dislocations and dissolved atom Mg and the microstructural evolution. These microstructural considerations provide a powerful capability to successfully describe the strain path dependence of plastic deformation behavior of AA5754.

  18. The aetiology of angular deformities of the lower limb in children in Malawi: a review of 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Brueton, Richard N

    2006-04-01

    The aetiology of 35 Malawian children with angular deformities of the lower limb, including 18 with varus,13 with valgus and four with windswept deformities, was assessed prior to surgical correction by proximal tibial or distal femoral osteotomies. Among the varus limbs, the aetiologies were ligamentous laxity of the knee (7), lesions of the medial tibial metaphysis (3), bowing of the femora and tibiae (3), and there were two girls with the end stage of Blount's disease. Among the valgus patients, eight had extremes of physiological knock knee and five had valgus bowing of the femora or tibiae.

  19. A mechanical model for deformable and mesh pattern wheel of lunar roving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongchao; Wang, Yongfu; Chen, Gang (Sheng); Gao, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    As an indispensable tool for astronauts on lunar surface, the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) is of great significance for manned lunar exploration. An LRV moves on loose and soft lunar soil, so the mechanical property of its wheels directly affects the mobility performance. The wheels used for LRV have deformable and mesh pattern, therefore, the existing mechanical theory of vehicle wheel cannot be used directly for analyzing the property of LRV wheels. In this paper, a new mechanical model for LRV wheel is proposed. At first, a mechanical model for a rigid normal wheel is presented, which involves in multiple conventional parameters such as vertical load, tangential traction force, lateral force, and slip ratio. Secondly, six equivalent coefficients are introduced to amend the rigid normal wheel model to fit for the wheels with deformable and mesh-pattern in LRV application. Thirdly, the values of the six equivalent coefficients are identified by using experimental data obtained in an LRV's single wheel testing. Finally, the identified mechanical model for LRV's wheel with deformable and mesh pattern are further verified and validated by using additional experimental results.

  20. Efficient inversion of three-dimensional finite element models of volcano deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charco, M.; Galán del Sastre, P.

    2014-03-01

    Numerical techniques, as such as finite element method, allow for the inclusion of features, such as topography and/or mechanical heterogeneities, for the interpretation of volcanic deformation. However, models based on these numerical techniques usually are not suitable to be included in non-linear estimations of source parameters based on explorative optimization schemes because they require a calculation of the numerical approach for every evaluation of the misfit function. We present a procedure for finite element (FE) models that can be combined with explorative inversion schemes. The methodology is based on including a body force term representing an infinitesimal source in the model formulation that is responsible for pressure (volume) changes in the medium. This provides significant savings in both the time required for mesh generation and actual computational time of the numerical approach. Furthermore, we develop an inversion algorithm to estimate those parameters that characterize the changes in location and pressure (volume) of deformation sources. Both provide FE inversions in a single step, avoiding remeshing and assembly of the linear system of algebraic equations that define the numerical approach and/or the automatic mesh generation. After providing the theoretical basis for the model, the numerical approach and the algorithm for the inversions, we test the methodology using a synthetic example in a stratovolcano. Our results suggest that the FE inversion methodology can be considered suitable for efficiently save time in quantitative interpretations of volcano deformation.

  1. Modeling Of Microstructure Evolution Of BCC Metals Subjected To Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro; Majta, Janusz; Muszka, Krzysztof; Łach, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of microstructure evolution and properties of ultrafine-grained materials is one of the most significant, current problems in materials science. Several advanced methods of analysis can be applied for this issue: vertex models, phase field models, Monte Carlo Potts, finite element method (FEM) discrete element method (DEM) and finally cellular automata (CA). The main asset of the CA is ability for a close correlation of the microstructure with the mechanical properties in micro- and meso-scale simulation. Joining CA with the DEM undoubtedly improves accuracy of modeling of coupled phenomena during the innovative forming processes in both micro- and macro-scale. Deformation in micro-scale shows anisotropy, which connected with that the polycrystalline material contains grains with different crystallographic orientation, and grain deformation is depended from configuration of directions of main stresses and axis of grain. Then, CA and DEM must be joint solutions of crystal plasticity theory. In the present model, deformation in macro-scale is transferred to meso-sale, where a block contains several, score or hundreds grains, and then is applied in micro-scale to each grain. Creation of low-angle boundaries and their development into high-angle boundaries are simulated by the cellular automata on the base of calculations using finite element method and crystal plasticity theory. The idea proposed in this study and particular solutions are discussed for the case of ultrafine-grained low-carbon steel.

  2. Static deformation modeling and analysis of flexure hinges made of a shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhijiang; Yang, Miao; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Dan

    2016-11-01

    The flexure hinge is a key element in compliant mechanisms to achieve continuous motion; however the motion range of a flexure hinge is severely restricted by the material’s allowable strain. Due to the superelasticity effect, shape memory alloys (SMAs) can undergo much larger strain than other metals; this means that they are excellent candidates for the fabrication of flexure hinges with a large motion range. In this paper, a simple static deformation modeling approach is proposed for a flexure hinge made of a SMA. The superelastic behavior of the SMA is described by Brinson’s constitutive model. The flexure hinge is considered as a non-prismatic cantilever beam associated with geometrical and material nonlinearities. Govern equations of the flexure hinge are derived and solved numerically by applying the nonlinear bending theory of the Euler-Bernoulli beam. Experimental tests show that the proposed modeling approach can predict the deformation of the flexure hinge precisely; the maximum relative error is less than 6.5%. Based on the static deformation model, the motion capacity, the stiffness characteristic and the rotational error of the flexure hinge are also investigated. The results reveal that the flexure hinge made of a SMA has great potential to construct compliant mechanisms with a large motion range.

  3. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  4. Modeling Of Microstructure Evolution Of BCC Metals Subjected To Severe Plastic Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro; Majta, Janusz; Muszka, Krzysztof; Lach, Lukasz

    2011-01-17

    Prediction of microstructure evolution and properties of ultrafine-grained materials is one of the most significant, current problems in materials science. Several advanced methods of analysis can be applied for this issue: vertex models, phase field models, Monte Carlo Potts, finite element method (FEM) discrete element method (DEM) and finally cellular automata (CA). The main asset of the CA is ability for a close correlation of the microstructure with the mechanical properties in micro- and meso-scale simulation. Joining CA with the DEM undoubtedly improves accuracy of modeling of coupled phenomena during the innovative forming processes in both micro- and macro-scale. Deformation in micro-scale shows anisotropy, which connected with that the polycrystalline material contains grains with different crystallographic orientation, and grain deformation is depended from configuration of directions of main stresses and axis of grain. Then, CA and DEM must be joint solutions of crystal plasticity theory. In the present model, deformation in macro-scale is transferred to meso-sale, where a block contains several, score or hundreds grains, and then is applied in micro-scale to each grain. Creation of low-angle boundaries and their development into high-angle boundaries are simulated by the cellular automata on the base of calculations using finite element method and crystal plasticity theory. The idea proposed in this study and particular solutions are discussed for the case of ultrafine-grained low-carbon steel.

  5. Integrated gravity and topography analysis in analog models: Intraplate deformation in Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FernáNdez-Lozano, Javier; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Dombrádi, Endre; MartíN, Alfonso M.; de Vicente, Gerardo; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2012-12-01

    Trends in the topography of the Iberian Peninsula show a pronounced contrast. In the western part of the Iberian microplate the main topographic highs trend E-W to NE-SW and are periodically spaced with wavelengths of 250 km. Conversely, in the northeastern part, the region of the Iberian Chain, topography is more irregular and strike directions vary from NW-SE to E-W and NE-SW. We relate this phenomenon to shortening of a continental lithosphere, which contains two different, well-defined domains of lithospheric strength. Our hypothesis is supported by physical analog models. A new processing method has been developed to assist the interpretation of the model results. It utilizes spectral analysis of gravity and topography data derived from the experiments. Folding of the crust and mantle lithosphere yields periodic gravity fluctuations, while thickening processes lead to localized gravity lows. In this way gravity data can be used to distinguish between the two forms of lithosphere deformation and to correlate areas that underwent the same type of deformation. Gravity modeling has been performed under full in-depth control of the experimental lithosphere structure. As such, gravity signals from the models may be compared to field gravity data for better understanding the underlying deformation mechanism.

  6. A finite element formulation for modeling dynamic wetting on flexible substrates and in deformable porous media.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Cairncross, Richard A.; Madasu, S.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes research advances pursued with award funding issued by the DOE to Drexel University through the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) program. Professor Rich Cairncross was the recipient of this award in 1997. With it he pursued two related research topics under Sandia's guidance that address the outstanding issue of fluid-structural interactions of liquids with deformable solid materials, focusing mainly on the ubiquitous dynamic wetting problem. The project focus in the first four years was aimed at deriving a predictive numerical modeling approach for the motion of the dynamic contact line on a deformable substrate. A formulation of physical model equations was derived in the context of the Galerkin finite element method in an arbitrary Lagrangian/Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference. The formulation was successfully integrated in Sandia's Goma finite element code and tested on several technologically important thin-film coating problems. The model equations, the finite-element implementation, and results from several applications are given in this report. In the last year of the five-year project the same physical concepts were extended towards the problem of capillary imbibition in deformable porous media. A synopsis of this preliminary modeling and experimental effort is also discussed.

  7. A post-seismic deformation model after the 2010 earthquakes in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Laura; Drewes, Hermann; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The Maule 2010 earthquake in Chile generated the largest displacements of geodetic observation stations ever observed in terrestrial reference systems. Coordinate changes came up to 4 meters, and deformations were measurable in distances up to more than 1000 km from the epicentre. The station velocities in the regions adjacent to the epicentre changed dramatically after the seism; while they were oriented eastward with approximately 2 cm/year before the event, they are now directed westward with about 1 cm/year. The 2010 Baja California earthquake in Mexico produced displacements in the decimetre level also followed by anomalous velocity changes. The main problem in geodetic applications is that there is no reliable reference system to be used practically in the region. For geophysical applications we have to redefine the tectonic structure in South America. The area south of 35° S … 40° S was considered as a stable part of the South American plate. Now we see that there are large and extended crustal deformations. The paper presents a new multi-year velocity model computed from the Geocentric Reference System of the Americas (SIRGAS) including only the four years after the seismic events (mid-2010 … mid-2014). These velocities are used to derive a continuous deformation model of the entire Latin American region from Mexico to Tierra de Fuego. The model is compared with the same velocity model for SIRGAS (VEMOS2009) before the earthquakes.

  8. Computational Modeling for Fluid-Porous Structure Interaction with Large Structural Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we utilize numerical models to investigate the importance of poroelasticity in the interaction of blood flow with a porohyperelastic vessel wall, and to establish a connection between the apparent viscoelastic behavior of the structure part and the intramural filtration flow. The main novelty is in the design of a Nitsche's splitting strategy, which separates the fluid from the structure sub-problems for the Fluid-Porous Structure Interaction system undergoing large deformations. The general idea is to use this model to study the influence of different parameters on energy dissipation in a poroelastic medium. We also study a new benchmark test specifically designed to investigate the effect of poroelasticity on large deformations.

  9. Projected shell model for Gamow-Teller transitions in heavy, deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-Jun; Sun, Yang; Gao, Zao-Chun; Kiran Ghorui, Surja

    2016-02-01

    Calculations of Gamow-Teller (GT) transition rates for heavy, deformed nuclei, which are useful input for nuclear astrophysics studies, are usually done with the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We propose a shell-model method by applying the Projected Shell Model (PSM) based on deformed bases. With this method, it is possible to perform a state-by-state calculation for nuclear matrix elements for β-decay and electron-capture in heavy nuclei. Taking β- decay from 168Dy to 168Ho as an example, we show that the known experimental B(GT) from the ground state of the mother nucleus to the low-lying states of the daughter nucleus could be well described. Moreover, strong transitions to high-lying states are predicted to occur, which may considerably enhance the total decay rates once these nuclei are exposed to hot stellar environments.

  10. Feedforward deformation control of a dielectric elastomer actuator based on a nonlinear dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Gupta, Ujjaval; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiang-Yang

    2015-07-01

    In the practical applications of actuators, the control of their deformation or driving force is a key issue. Most of recent studies on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) focus on issues of mechanics, physics, and material science, whereas less importance is given to the control of these soft actuators. In this paper, we underline the importance of a nonlinear dynamic model as the basis for a feedforward deformation control approach of a rubber-based DEA. Experimental evidence shows the effectiveness of the feedforward controller. The present study confirms that a DEA's trajectory can be finely controlled with a solid nonlinear dynamic model despite the presence of material nonlinearities and electromechanical coupling. The effective control of DEAs may pave the way for extensive emerging applications to soft robots.

  11. Single-event multilevel acute total correction of complex equinocavovarus deformity in skeletally mature patients with spastic cerebral palsy hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Bishay, Sherif N G

    2013-01-01

    Complex multiplanar ankle/foot deformity as equinocavovarus is a common problem in patients with spastic cerebral palsy hemiparesis. The data from 30 consecutive patients (30 feet), treated between March 2009 and March 2010, with equinocavovarus and toe clawing secondary to spastic cerebral palsy hemiparesis, aged 16 to 18 years, were analyzed clinically and radiographically. All the patients had received conservative physiotherapy treatment and ankle/foot orthoses before undergoing combined soft tissue and bony surgical procedures performed in a single session to correct the complex toe clawing, cavus, varus, and equinus deformities. Preoperative measurements of certain foot angles were compared with their corresponding postoperative values. A grading system for evaluation of the results using a point scoring system was used to accurately evaluate both the clinical and the radiographic results after an average follow-up period of 2.5 years. Of the 30 patients (30 feet), 18 (60%) had excellent, 9 (30%) good, 3 (10%) fair, and 0 had poor outcomes. Neither vascular problems nor nonunion occurred. Significant improvement was seen postoperatively (p < .0333). Neither staged surgical procedures nor gradual distraction techniques using external fixators are ideal modalities to correct complex ankle/foot equinocavovarus deformity in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. Single-event, multilevel surgery with complete soft tissue and bony correction appears to be the treatment of choice in such cases. It shortens the treatment period and avoids patient dissatisfaction associated with multiple procedures, without major complications.

  12. Modeling complex plastic deformation and fracture of metals under disproportionate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, I. A.; Korotkikh, Yu. G.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2009-09-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe fatigue-damage accumulation in structural materials (metals and their alloys) on multiaxial paths of disproportionate combined heat and power loading. The effect of the shape of the strain path on the fatigue life of metals was studied to obtain qualitative and quantitative estimates of the obtained constitutive relations. It is shown that the proposed constitutive relations adequately describe the main elastoplastic deformation effects and damage accumulation in structural materials for arbitrary strain paths.

  13. Modeling coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical processes including plastic deformation in geological porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, S.; Karra, S.; Pawar, R. J.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2012-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the recent years in developing computational tools for analyzing coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical (THM) processes that occur in geological porous media. This is mainly due to their importance in applications including carbon sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas production from unconventional sources, degradation of Arctic permafrost, and nuclear waste isolation. Large changes in pressures, temperatures and saturation can result due to injection/withdrawal of fluids or emplaced heat sources. These can potentially lead to large changes in the fluid flow and mechanical behavior of the formation, including shear and tensile failure on pre-existing or induced fractures and the associated permeability changes. Due to this, plastic deformation and large changes in material properties such as permeability and porosity can be expected to play an important role in these processes. We describe a general purpose computational code FEHM that has been developed for the purpose of modeling coupled THM processes during multi-phase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code uses a continuum mechanics approach, based on control volume - finite element method. It is designed to address spatial scales on the order of tens of centimeters to tens of kilometers. While large deformations are important in many situations, we have adapted the small strain formulation as useful insight can be obtained in many problems of practical interest with this approach while remaining computationally manageable. Nonlinearities in the equations and the material properties are handled using a full Jacobian Newton-Raphson technique. Stress-strain relationships are assumed to follow linear elastic/plastic behavior. The code incorporates several plasticity models such as von Mises, Drucker-Prager, and also a large suite of models for coupling flow and mechanical deformation via permeability and stresses/deformations

  14. Damping Models for Shear-Deformable Beam with Applications to Spacecraft Wiring Harness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL /RVSV Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave., SE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117...Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVSV/Derek... AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 DAMPING MODELS FOR SHEAR-DEFORMABLE BEAM WITH APPLICATIONS TO SPACECRAFT WIRING HARNESS

  15. a Deformable Template Model with Feature Tracking for Automated Ivus Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Prakash; Hau Chen, Chi

    2010-02-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) can be used to create a 3D vascular profile of arteries for preventative prediction of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Segmentation of individual B-scan frames is a crucial step for creating profiles. Manual segmentation is too labor intensive to be of routine use. Automated segmentation algorithms are not yet accurate enough. We present a method of tracking features across frames of ultrasound data to increase automated segmentation accuracy using a deformable template model.

  16. Unhinging an indenter: A new tectonic model for the internal deformation of Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Thomas K.; Bennett, Richard A.; Gath, Eldon; Franceschi, Pastora

    2010-08-01

    New paleoseismic results from Panama, conducted as part of the seismic hazard assessment for the expansion of the Panama Canal, have led to a reevaluation of the tectonic framework and geologic history of the isthmus of Central America. We propose a soft block indenter model wherein the collision of Central America and South America has resulted in significant internal deformation of the isthmus. Deformation is accommodated by both rapid slip on conjugate strike-slip faults within the isthmus, as well as the generally assumed flexure and northward buckling of Panama. The model is kinematically self-consistent in that there are little or no space problems created with 3 Ma of retrodeformation. Sparse GPS velocity data are consistent to within uncertainties with the new geologically constrained block model, supporting the rapid and extensive internal deformation of Panama. Together, the paleoseismologic and geodetic data suggest that central Panama is an area of high risk due to earthquakes, which is consistent with the historical occurrence of several moderate to large earthquakes in this region. However, this is generally counter to the current perception in central Panama where most people live and where there have been no large, damaging earthquakes for over 100 years.

  17. Nonlocal shear deformable shell model for postbuckling of axially compressed microtubules embedded in an elastic medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shen

    2010-06-01

    Buckling and postbuckling analysis is presented for axially compressed microtubules (MTs) embedded in an elastic matrix of cytoplasm. The microtubule is modeled as a nonlocal shear deformable cylindrical shell which contains small scale effects. The surrounding elastic medium is modeled as a Pasternak foundation. The governing equations are based on higher order shear deformation shell theory with a von Kármán-Donnell-type of kinematic nonlinearity and include the extension-twist and flexural-twist couplings. The thermal effects are also included and the material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent. The small scale parameter e (0) a is estimated by matching the buckling load from their vibrational behavior of MTs with the numerical results obtained from the nonlocal shear deformable shell model. The numerical results show that buckling load and postbuckling behavior of MTs are very sensitive to the small scale parameter e (0) a. The results reveal that the MTs under axial compressive loading condition have an unstable postbuckling path, and the lateral constraint has a significant effect on the postbuckling response of a microtubule when the foundation stiffness is sufficiently large.

  18. Metastatic liver tumour segmentation with a neural network-guided 3D deformable model.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Eugene; Tang, An; Roy, David; Pal, Christopher J; Kadoury, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The segmentation of liver tumours in CT images is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cancer. Furthermore, an accurate assessment of tumour volume aids in the diagnosis and evaluation of treatment response. Currently, segmentation is performed manually by an expert, and because of the time required, a rough estimate of tumour volume is often done instead. We propose a semi-automatic segmentation method that makes use of machine learning within a deformable surface model. Specifically, we propose a deformable model that uses a voxel classifier based on a multilayer perceptron (MLP) to interpret the CT image. The new deformable model considers vertex displacement towards apparent tumour boundaries and regularization that promotes surface smoothness. During operation, a user identifies the target tumour and the mesh then automatically delineates the tumour from the MLP processed image. The method was tested on a dataset of 40 abdominal CT scans with a total of 95 colorectal metastases collected from a variety of scanners with variable spatial resolution. The segmentation results are encouraging with a Dice similarity metric of [Formula: see text] and demonstrates that the proposed method can deal with highly variable data. This work motivates further research into tumour segmentation using machine learning with more data and deeper neural networks.

  19. Understanding how Fault-bounded Blocks Deform in 3D by Inverse Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouen, G.; White, N.

    2004-05-01

    Normal faults play a crucial role in modifying basin stratigraphy. At the exploration scale, the internal deformation of tilted blocks is governed by the three-dimensional geometry of large-scale faults which bound these blocks. At the reservoir scale, the geometry and growth of normal faulting control the deformation of strata and the compartmentalisation of reservoir intervals. Despite their importance, large-scale normal faults are often difficult to image. The purpose of structural validation is two-fold: to determine the 3D shape of normal faults and to investigate the relationship between fault geometry and deformed stratigraphy including the intra-block faults. We have developed methods for tackling structural validation at a variety of scales in two and three dimensions. The cornerstone of our approach is the use of geophysical inverse theory to calculate optimal fault geometries from deformed strata. This approach allows us to focus on key questions: does a solution exist? Are there several possible solutions or just one unique one? In a complex normal fault system, which part of the fault controls the motion responsible for the deformation in the hanging-wall? Traditional forward modelling cannot answer these fundamental issues. We have applied the inversion on seismic data in particularly complex areas in the northern North Sea. The aims of this project are to determine the geometry of the basin-bounding fault, to assess the likelihood of out-of-plane motion as well as understanding the mode of deformation leading to the complexity of the present structure. Closely spaced inverse models show that the basin-bounding fault on the UK side is steeper and more planar than previously thought. This method also helped us to have a better view of what could have been the cause of the organisation and density of the intra-block faulting where it occurs. The North Cormorant study has shown how inverse modelling can yield important, quantitative, insights. Our

  20. Beta Functions in Chirally Deformed Supersymmetric Sigma Models in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 =(2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 =(0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  1. Beta functions in Chirally deformed supersymmetric sigma models in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2016-10-01

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 = (2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 = (0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  2. Red blood cell deformability is reduced in homozygous sickle cell disease patients with leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Andre S; Duncan, Walworth W; Pepple, Dagogo J

    2016-11-25

    Previous reports differ as to whether a decreased elongation index (EI), a proxy for red blood cell (RBC) deformability, is associated with leg ulcers (LU) in people with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD). We sought to determine whether erythrocyte deformability (ED) and haematological indices were associated with the presence of LU in patients with SCD. The study design was cross-sectional. Twenty-seven patients with LU and 23 with no history of ulceration were recruited into the study. A laser assisted rotational red cell analyzer was used in the determination of the EI. Haematological indices were determined using a CELL-DYN Ruby haematology analyzer. Data were normally distributed and presented as means±SD. Two-sample t-test was used to test for associations between haemorheological variables in SCD patients with and without LU. Statistical significance was taken as p < 0.05. The EI was significantly lower in the group with ulcers (0.30±0.07 vs. 0.35±0.07, p = 0.02). Haematological indices were comparable in patients with and without LU. Erythrocyte deformability, but not haematological indices, was associated with LU in patients with SCD.

  3. Deformation of the central Andes (15-27 deg S) derived from a flow model of subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowinski, Shimon; O'Connell, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    A simple viscous flow model of a subduction zone is used to calculate the deformation within continental lithosphere above a subducting slab. This formulation accounts for two forces that dominate the deformation in the overriding lithosphere: tectonic forces and buoyancy forces. Numerical solutions, obtained by using a finite element technique, are compared with observations from the central Andes (15-27 deg S). The model predicts the observed deformation pattern of extension in the forearc, compression in the Western Monocline (corresponding to magmatic activity), extension in the Altiplano, compression in the Eastern Monocline and Subandes, and no deformation in the Brazilian Shield. By comparing the calculated solutions with the large-scale tectonic observations, the forces that govern the deformation in the central Andes are evaluated. The approximately constant subduction velocity in the past 26 million years suggests that the rate of crustal shortening in the Andes has decreased with time due to the thickening of the crust.

  4. Tissue Feature-Based and Segmented Deformable Image Registration for Improved Modeling of Shear Movement of Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yaoqin; Chao Ming; Xing Lei

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To report a tissue feature-based image registration strategy with explicit inclusion of the differential motions of thoracic structures. Methods and Materials: The proposed technique started with auto-identification of a number of corresponding points with distinct tissue features. The tissue feature points were found by using the scale-invariant feature transform method. The control point pairs were then sorted into different 'colors' according to the organs in which they resided and used to model the involved organs individually. A thin-plate spline method was used to register a structure characterized by the control points with a given 'color.' The proposed technique was applied to study a digital phantom case and 3 lung and 3 liver cancer patients. Results: For the phantom case, a comparison with the conventional thin-plate spline method showed that the registration accuracy was markedly improved when the differential motions of the lung and chest wall were taken into account. On average, the registration error and standard deviation of the 15 points against the known ground truth were reduced from 3.0 to 0.5 mm and from 1.5 to 0.2 mm, respectively, when the new method was used. A similar level of improvement was achieved for the clinical cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the segmented deformable approach provides a natural and logical solution to model the discontinuous organ motions and greatly improves the accuracy and robustness of deformable registration.

  5. Correction of the axial and appendicular deformities in a patient with Silver-Russel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ganger, Rudolf; Mindler, Gabriel; Karner, Christoph; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis and limb length discrepancy are the major orthopaedic abnormalities in patients with Silver-Russel syndrome (SRS). In this paper, we describe a series of orthopaedic interventions in an attempt to overcome the progressive pathologic mechanism in a 7-year-old girl who manifested the full phenotypic features of SRS. Materials and Methods: Unilateral hip dislocation, progressive scoliosis and limb length discrepancy have been dealt with through Pemberton osteotomy, spinal fusion and Taylor-Spatial-Frame respectively. Results: In order to correct the axial and the appendicular deformities a sum of seven operations were performed (between the age of 7 years and 13 years). Pemberton osteotomy was performed to treat dislocation of her right hip because of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Spinal fusion (spondylodesis) of segments Th3-L5 was done to correct her scoliosis. And, to overcome the limb length discrepancy of 15-cm we used Taylor-Spatial-Frame with percutaneous distal corticotomy of the femur, and the proximal tibia, as well as the foot, were performed. We were able to minimize the limb length discrepancy to 5 cm. The girl became able to walk with the aid of a below knee orthosis and through lifting the left limb with 5-cm height shoe. Conclusion: Limb lengthening surgery in patients with multiple malformation complex as in SRS is associated with high recurrence risk because of; muscular hypotonia, overtubulation of the long bones, and the poor bone regenerative quality. Our interventions were principally directed towards improving the cosmetic outlook, functions and the biomechanics. PMID:25659548

  6. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  7. Crustal deformation dynamics and stress evolution during seamount subduction: High-resolution 3-D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Sallarès, Valentí; Ranero, César R.; Gerya, Taras

    2016-09-01

    Seamounts or submarine volcanoes frequently collide with the overriding crust along presently active subduction zones locally modifying stress and permanent deformation patterns. Dynamics of this process is not fully understood, and several end-member scenarios of seamount-crust interaction are proposed. Here we use high-resolution 3-D numerical models to investigate evolution of crustal deformation and stress distribution within the upper plate induced by the underthrusting of subducting seamounts. The dynamical effects of the upper plate strength, subduction interface strength, and strain weakening of the crust are investigated. Experiment results demonstrate that characteristic crustal fracturing patterns formed in response to different seamount-crust interaction scenarios. Indenting seamounts strongly deform the overriding plate along a corridor as wide as the underthrusting seamount by constantly shifting subvertical shear zones rooted at the seamount extensions. A reentrant develops during initial seamount collision. A topographic bulge atop the seamount and lateral ridges emerge from further seamount subduction. Obtained stress pattern shows areas of large overpressure above the rearward and large underpressure above the trenchward flank of the seamount. Results of numerical experiments are consistent with seismic reflection images and seismic velocity models of the upper plate in areas of seamount subduction along the Middle America Trench and give important insights into the long-lasting question, whether subducting seamounts and rough seafloor act as barriers or asperities for megathrust earthquakes.

  8. Hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: modeling versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gerya, T.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of evidence indicates that fluid flows exist in the subduction interface, including seismic observation, magnetotelluric imaging, heat flow modeling, etc. Fluid percolation should strongly modify rock deformation affected by fluid-induced weakening within the subduction interface. Hence, we study the fluid-rock interaction along the subduction interface using a visco-plastic hydro-mechanical model, in which rock deformation and fluid percolation are self-consistently coupled. Based on a series of 2D numerical experiments, we found two typical hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: (1) coupled and (2) decoupled. In the case of the coupled regime, the tectonic movement of the subduction interface is divided into blocks; newly generated faults are distributed uniformly , say fault band; fluid activity concentrates inside the faults. In the case of the decoupled regime, the upper layer of the subduction interface stops moving while the lower layer continues moving along with the subduction slab; a primary fault is generated at the centre of the subduction interface, or namely decoupled interface. Available observations suggests that both coupled and decoupled regimes can be observed in the nature at different scales. Systematic parameter study suggests that it is mainly the magnitude of the yield strength of subducted rocks depending on their cohesion and friction coefficient, which control the transition between the coupled and decoupled subduction interface regimes.

  9. Deformed Matrix Models, Supersymmetric Lattice Twists and N=1/4 Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat

    2008-09-24

    A manifestly supersymmetric nonperturbative matrix regularization for a twisted version of N = (8, 8) theory on a curved background (a two-sphere) is constructed. Both continuum and the matrix regularization respect four exact scalar supersymmetries under a twisted version of the supersymmetry algebra. We then discuss a succinct Q = 1 deformed matrix model regularization of N = 4 SYM in d = 4, which is equivalent to a non-commutative A*{sub 4} orbifold lattice formulation. Motivated by recent progress in supersymmetric lattices, we also propose a N = 1/4 supersymmetry preserving deformation of N = 4 SYM theory on R{sup 4}. In this class of N = 1/4 theories, both the regularized and continuum theory respect the same set of (scalar) supersymmetry. By using the equivalence of the deformed matrix models with the lattice formulations, we give a very simple physical argument on why the exact lattice supersymmetry must be a subset of scalar subalgebra. This argument disagrees with the recent claims of the link approach, for which we give a new interpretation.

  10. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline -Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Leyun; Barabash, Rozaliya; Yang, Y; Bieler, Prof T R; Crimp, Prof M A; Eisenlohr, P; Liu, W.; Ice, Gene E

    2011-01-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  11. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Barabash, R. I.; Yang, Y.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.; Eisenlohr, P.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2011-03-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  12. Low-Dimensional Generalized Coordinate Models of Large-Deformation Elastic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odhner, Lael; Dollar, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    In the field of robotics, it is increasingly common to use elastic elements such as rods, beams or sheets to allow motion between the rigid links of a robot, rather than conventional sliding mechanisms such as pin joints. Although these elastic joints are simpler to manufacture, especially at meso- and micro-scales, representational simplicity is sacrificed. It is far easier to compute the Lagrangian of a robot using joint angles as generalized coordinates, rather than by considering the large-deformation continuum behavior of elastic joints. In this talk, we will discuss our work toward finding accurate, low-dimensional discretizations of elastic joint mechanics, suitable for use in generalized coordinate models of robot kinematics and dynamics. We use modally parameterized backbone curves to describe the kinematic configuration of the elastic joints, and compute the energy associated with deformation using rod and shell theory. In the plane, only three smooth deformation modes are sufficient to describe Euler-Bernoulli bending of 90 degrees to within 1 percent. Parametric models for the three-dimensional motion of sheet hinges are more complex, but can be simplified significantly using boundary conditions and constraints imposed by ruled surface assumptions.

  13. An immersed-boundary method for modeling flow of deformable blood cells in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for simulating blood flow at the cellular scale in highly complex geometries, such as microvascular networks. Immersed boundary methods provide the foundation for our approach, as they allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometries, in addition to resolving the large deformation and dynamics of individual blood cell with high fidelity. Different simulation components are seamlessly integrated into the present methodology that can simultaneously model stationary rigid boundaries of arbitrary and complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces of blood cells that are governed by non-linear elasticity. This permits physiologically realistic simulations of blood cells flowing in complex microvascular networks characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels. The methodology is validated against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. We then demonstrate the capabilities of the methodology by simulating deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions flowing in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. The methodology offers the potential of scaling up to large microvascular networks at organ levels. Funded by NSF CBET 1604308.

  14. Buckling and postbuckling of radially loaded microtubules by nonlocal shear deformable shell model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shen

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents an investigation on the buckling and postbuckling of microtubules (MTs) subjected to a uniform external radial pressure in thermal environments. The microtubule is modeled as a nonlocal shear deformable cylindrical shell which contains small scale effects. The governing equations are based on higher order shear deformation shell theory with a von Kármán-Donnell-type of kinematic nonlinearity and include the extension-twist and flexural-twist couplings. The thermal effects are also included and the material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent. A singular perturbation technique is employed to determine the buckling pressure and postbuckling equilibrium paths. The small scale parameter e(0)a is estimated by matching the buckling pressure of MTs measured from the experiments with the numerical results obtained from the nonlocal shear deformable shell model. The numerical results show that buckling pressure and postbuckling behavior of MTs are very sensitive to the small scale parameter e(0)a. The results reveal that the 13_3 microtubule has a stable postbuckling path, whereas the 13_2 microtubule has an unstable postbuckling behavior due to the presence of skew angles.

  15. Final Report (OO-ERD-056) MEDIOS: Modeling Earth Deformation Using Interferometric Observations from Space

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P; Walter, B; Zucca, J; Larsen, S; Goldstein, P; Foxall, W; Ryerson, F

    2002-01-29

    This final report summarizes the accomplishments of the 2-year LDRD-ER project ''MEDIOS: Modeling Earth Deformation using Interferometric Observations from Space'' (00-ERD-056) which began in FY00 and ended in FY01. The structure of this report consists of this summary part plus two separate journal papers, each having their own UCRL number, which document in more detail the major results in two (of three) major categories of this study. The two categories and their corresponding paper titles are (1) Seismic Hazard Mitigation (''Aseismic Creep Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System''), and (2) Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring, or GNEM (''New Signatures of Underground Nuclear Tests Revealed by Satellite Radar Interferometry''). The third category is Energy Exploitation Applications and does not have a separate journal article associated with it but is described briefly. The purpose of this project was to develop a capability within the Geophysics and Global Security Division to process and analyze InSAR data for the purposes of constructing more accurate ground deformation source models relevant to Hazards, Energy, and NAI applications. Once this was accomplished, an inversion tool was to be created that could be applied to many different types (sources) of surface deformation so that accurate source parameters could be determined for a variety of subsurface processes of interest to customers of the GGS Division. This new capability was desired to help attract new project funding for the division.

  16. Simple model for plastic deformation and slip avalanches in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Karin; Antonaglia, James; Qiao, Junwei; Xie, Xie; Liaw, Peter; Uhl, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Ductile bulk metallic glasses are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip-avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress-strain curves. In many such materials, power laws govern the statistics of these avalanches. A basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only one tuning parameter is introduced. The model predicts the observed stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions, related power spectra, and power-law statistics of slip avalanches, including the dependence of the cutoff on experimental parameters with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Material independent (``universal'') predictions for the power-law exponents and scaling functions are extracted using the mean-field theory and renormalization group tools. The results agree with recent experimental observations on deformed bulk metallic glasses. JA and KD gratefully acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1005209 and DMS-1069224, XX, JQ, and PKL gratefully acknowledge NSF grants DMR-0231320, CMMI-0900271, CMMI-1100080, and DMR-0909037.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Exploitation Relics and Faults Influence on Rock Mass Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesołowski, Marek

    2016-12-01

    This article presents numerical modeling results of fault planes and exploitation relics influenced by the size and distribution of rock mass and surface area deformations. Numerical calculations were performed using the finite difference program FLAC. To assess the changes taking place in a rock mass, an anisotropic elasto-plastic ubiquitous joint model was used, into which the Coulomb-Mohr strength (plasticity) condition was implemented. The article takes as an example the actual exploitation of the longwall 225 area in the seam 502wg of the "Pokój" coal mine. Computer simulations have shown that it is possible to determine the influence of fault planes and exploitation relics on the size and distribution of rock mass and its surface deformation. The main factor causing additional deformations of the area surface are the abandoned workings in the seam 502wd. These abandoned workings are the activation factor that caused additional subsidences and also, due to the significant dip, they are a layer on which the rock mass slides down in the direction of the extracted space. These factors are not taken into account by the geometrical and integral theories.

  18. A comparison of boundary element and finite element methods for modeling axisymmetric polymeric drop deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Russell; Toose, Matthijs; Macosko, Christopher W.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2001-12-01

    A modified boundary element method (BEM) and the DEVSS-G finite element method (FEM) are applied to model the deformation of a polymeric drop suspended in another fluid subjected to start-up uniaxial extensional flow. The effects of viscoelasticity, via the Oldroyd-B differential model, are considered for the drop phase using both FEM and BEM and for both the drop and matrix phases using FEM. Where possible, results are compared with the linear deformation theory. Consistent predictions are obtained among the BEM, FEM, and linear theory for purely Newtonian systems and between FEM and linear theory for fully viscoelastic systems. FEM and BEM predictions for viscoelastic drops in a Newtonian matrix agree very well at short times but differ at longer times, with worst agreement occurring as critical flow strength is approached. This suggests that the dominant computational advantages held by the BEM over the FEM for this and similar problems may diminish or even disappear when the issue of accuracy is appropriately considered. Fully viscoelastic problems, which are only feasible using the FEM formulation, shed new insight on the role of viscoelasticity of the matrix fluid in drop deformation. Copyright

  19. A finite deformation viscoelastic-viscoplastic constitutive model for self-healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavari, H.; Naghdabadi, R.; Baghani, M.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, employing the Hencky strain, viscoelastic-viscoplastic response of self-healing materials is investigated. Considering the irreversible thermodynamics and using the effective configuration in the Continuum Damage-Healing Mechanics (CDHM), a phenomenological finite strain viscoelastic-viscoplastic constitutive model is presented. Considering finite viscoelastic and viscoplastic deformations, total deformation gradient is multiplicatively decomposed into viscoelastic and viscoplastic parts. Due to mathematical advantages and physical meaning of Hencky strain, this measure of strain is employed in the constitutive model development. In this regard, defining the damage and healing variables and employing the strain equivalence hypothesis, the strain tensor is determined in the effective configuration. Satisfying the Clausius-Duhem inequality, the evolution equations are introduced for the viscoelastic and viscoplastic strains. The damage and healing variables also evolve according to two different prescribed functions. To employ the proposed model in different loading conditions, the model is discretized in the semi-implicit form. Material parameters of the model are identified employing experimental tests on asphalt mixes available in the literature. Finally, capability of the model is demonstrated comparing the model predictions in the creep-recovery and repeated creep-recovery with the experimental results available in the literature and a good agreement between predicted and test results is revealed.

  20. Modelling the viscoplastic behavior and the heterogeneous intracrystalline deformation of columnar ice polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Montagnat, Maurine; Mansuy, Philippe; Duval, Paul; Philip, A

    2008-01-01

    A full-field formulation based on Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) has been adapted and used to predict the micromechanical fields that develop in columnar Ih ice polycrystals deforming in compression by dislocation creep. The predicted intragranular mechanical fields are in qualitative good agreement with experimental observations, in particular those involving the formation of shear and kink bands. These localization bands are associated with the large internal stresses that develop during creep in such anisotropic material, and their location, intensity, morphology and extension are found to depend strongly on the crystallographic orientation of the grains and on their interaction with neighbor crystals. The predictions of the model are also discussed in relation with the deformation of columnar sea and lake ice, and with the mechanical behavior of granular ice of glaciers and polar ice sheets, as well.

  1. Dynamic thermal modeling of the normal and tumorous breast under elastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H

    2008-01-01

    To quantify the complex relationships between (1) the temperature, and temperature differences, on the surface of the breast as recorded by infrared thermal imaging and (2) the underlying physiological and pathological factors, we have developed a dynamic finite element method for comprehensive modeling of both the thermal and elastic properties of normal and tumorous breast tissues. In the steady state, the gravity-induced deformation is found to cause markedly asymmetric surface temperatures even though all thermal-elastic properties are symmetrical. In the dynamic state, the time course of breast thermal imaging in cold-stress and thermal-recovery procedures is found to be useful in characterizing the origins of the thermal contrast on the breast surface. The tumor-induced thermal contrast has slower temporal behavior than the deformation-induced thermal contrast on the breast surface, which may lead to improvements in breast-tumor diagnosis.

  2. Data Fusion in Wind Tunnel Testing; Combined Pressure Paint and Model Deformation Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    2004-01-01

    As the benefit-to-cost ratio of advanced optical techniques for wind tunnel measurements such as Video Model Deformation (VMD), Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP), and others increases, these techniques are being used more and more often in large-scale production type facilities. Further benefits might be achieved if multiple optical techniques could be deployed in a wind tunnel test simultaneously. The present study discusses the problems and benefits of combining VMD and PSP systems. The desirable attributes of useful optical techniques for wind tunnels, including the ability to accommodate the myriad optical techniques available today, are discussed. The VMD and PSP techniques are briefly reviewed. Commonalties and differences between the two techniques are discussed. Recent wind tunnel experiences and problems when combining PSP and VMD are presented, as are suggestions for future developments in combined PSP and deformation measurements.

  3. Electric dipole moment induced by CP-violating deformations in the noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Jian; Yan, Zhe-Hui; Guan, Rong-Hua; Wei, Xing-Ning

    2017-03-01

    The possibility to detect the noncommutative (NC) spacetime in the electric dipole moments (EDM) experiments is studied in the effective field theory of noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM) with many additional deformations. The EDM given by the previous literatures do not have any observable effect since they are spin-independent. In this work, it is found that three of the deformed terms provide extra sources of CP violation contributed to EDM. We show that these EDMs are sensitive to the spin and thus have potential to be measured in the highly precise experiments. In particular, the EDM induced by NC spacetime may not be parallel to the direction of spin, which demonstrates the intrinsic feature of NC field theory.

  4. Automatic 3D segmentation of spinal cord MRI using propagated deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leener, B.; Cohen-Adad, J.; Kadoury, S.

    2014-03-01

    Spinal cord diseases or injuries can cause dysfunction of the sensory and locomotor systems. Segmentation of the spinal cord provides measures of atrophy and allows group analysis of multi-parametric MRI via inter-subject registration to a template. All these measures were shown to improve diagnostic and surgical intervention. We developed a framework to automatically segment the spinal cord on T2-weighted MR images, based on the propagation of a deformable model. The algorithm is divided into three parts: first, an initialization step detects the spinal cord position and orientation by using the elliptical Hough transform on multiple adjacent axial slices to produce an initial tubular mesh. Second, a low-resolution deformable model is iteratively propagated along the spinal cord. To deal with highly variable contrast levels between the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid, the deformation is coupled with a contrast adaptation at each iteration. Third, a refinement process and a global deformation are applied on the low-resolution mesh to provide an accurate segmentation of the spinal cord. Our method was evaluated against a semi-automatic edge-based snake method implemented in ITK-SNAP (with heavy manual adjustment) by computing the 3D Dice coefficient, mean and maximum distance errors. Accuracy and robustness were assessed from 8 healthy subjects. Each subject had two volumes: one at the cervical and one at the thoracolumbar region. Results show a precision of 0.30 +/- 0.05 mm (mean absolute distance error) in the cervical region and 0.27 +/- 0.06 mm in the thoracolumbar region. The 3D Dice coefficient was of 0.93 for both regions.

  5. InSAR Observations and Finite Element Modeling of Crustal Deformation Around a Surging Glacier, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, K.; Auriac, A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Bjornsson, H.; Pálsson, F.; Pinel, V.; Feigl, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Icelandic ice caps, covering ~11% of the country, are known to be surging glaciers. Such process implies an important local crustal subsidence due to the large ice mass being transported to the ice edge during the surge in a few months only. In 1993-1995, a glacial surge occurred at four neighboring outlet glaciers in the southwestern part of Vatnajökull ice cap, the largest ice cap in Iceland. We estimated that ~16±1 km3 of ice have been moved during this event while the fronts of some of the outlet glaciers advanced by ~1 km.Surface deformation associated with this surge has been surveyed using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) acquisitions from 1992-2002, providing high resolution ground observations of the study area. The data show about 75 mm subsidence at the ice edge of the outlet glaciers following the transport of the large volume of ice during the surge (Fig. 1). The long time span covered by the InSAR images enabled us to remove ~12 mm/yr of uplift occurring in this area due to glacial isostatic adjustment from the retreat of Vatnajökull ice cap since the end of the Little Ice Age in Iceland. We then used finite element modeling to investigate the elastic Earth response to the surge, as well as confirm that no significant viscoelastic deformation occurred as a consequence of the surge. A statistical approach based on Bayes' rule was used to compare the models to the observations and obtain an estimate of the Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v) in Iceland. The best-fitting models are those using a one-kilometer thick top layer with v=0.17 and E between 12.9-15.3 GPa underlain by a layer with v=0.25 and E from 67.3 to 81.9 GPa. Results demonstrate that InSAR data and finite element models can be used successfully to reproduce crustal deformation induced by ice mass variations at Icelandic ice caps.Fig. 1: Interferograms spanning 1993 July 31 to 1995 June 19, showing the surge at Tungnaárjökull (Tu.), Skaftárjökull (Sk.) and S

  6. Internal deformation within an unstable granular slope: insights from physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Koyi, H.; Nilfouroushan, F.; Swantesson, J.; Reshetyuk, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The collapses of granular materials frequently occur in nature in the form of, for example, rock avalanches, debris avalanches and debris flow. In previous studies of collapses of a granular material, most of the focus has been on the effect of initial geometry and mechanical properties of the granular materials, the run-out distance, and the topography of final deposit. In this study, results of analogue models and scanned natural failed slopes are used to outline the mode of failure of an unstable slope. Model results and field observations are used to argue that a granular mass moves downslope in a wavy pattern resulting in its intensive deformation. In the models, we mainly investigated the internal deformation of collapses of granular slopes in terms of their internal structures and the spatial and temporal distribution of the latter. Model results showed that a displaced mass of the granular slope has the following two features: (1) Initial collapse resulted in a series of normal faults, where hanging-wall blocks were slightly deformed, like the slump-shear structures in nature; (2) With further collapse, a set of secondary structures, such as deformed/folded fault surfaces, faulted folds, displaced inclined folds, and overturned folds formed near the slope surface. The occurrence of these structures reflects the failure process of the granular mass in space and time. In addition, our model results show that the nature of basal friction has a significant influence on the geometry and kinematics of these structures at the slope toe. Model results show also that the mass does not glide downslope along only one surface, but includes several gliding surfaces each of which take part of the sliding. These gliding surfaces become steeper deeper in the sliding mass. Some of these features observed in the models are also detected in the field. Scanned failed slope surfaces show a wavy pattern similar to that in the models, reflecting the presence of normal faults at

  7. New exact solutions of the standard pairing model for well-deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Feng; Xie Mingxia; Guan Xin; Dai Lianrong; Draayer, J. P.

    2009-10-15

    A new step-by-step diagonalization procedure for evaluating exact solutions of the nuclear deformed mean-field plus pairing interaction model is proposed via a simple Bethe ansatz in each step from which the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenstates can be obtained progressively. This new approach draws upon an observation that the original one- plus two-body problem in a k-particle Hilbert subspace can be mapped onto a one-body grand hard-core boson picture that can be solved step by step with a simple Bethe ansatz known from earlier work. Based on this new procedure, it is further shown that the extended pairing model for deformed nuclei [Feng Pan, V. G. Gueorguiev, and J. P. Draayer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 112503 (2004)] is similar to the standard pairing model with the first step approximation, in which only the lowest energy eigenstate of the standard pure pairing interaction part is taken into consideration. Our analysis shows that the standard pairing model with the first step approximation displays similar pair structures of the first few exact low-lying states of the model, which, therefore, provides a link between the two models.

  8. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Krempl, E.

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  9. Effect of Shear Deformation and Continuity on Delamination Modelling with Plate Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Riddell, W. T.; Raju, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of several critical assumptions and parameters on the computation of strain energy release rates for delamination and debond configurations modeled with plate elements have been quantified. The method of calculation is based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT), and models that model the upper and lower surface of the delamination or debond with two-dimensional (2D) plate elements rather than three-dimensional (3D) solid elements. The major advantages of the plate element modeling technique are a smaller model size and simpler geometric modeling. Specific issues that are discussed include: constraint of translational degrees of freedom, rotational degrees of freedom or both in the neighborhood of the crack tip; element order and assumed shear deformation; and continuity of material properties and section stiffness in the vicinity of the debond front, Where appropriate, the plate element analyses are compared with corresponding two-dimensional plane strain analyses.

  10. The mechanisms of driving lithospheric deformation in India-Asia collision zone: a perspective from 3-D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of intraplate deformation remains incompletely understood by plate tectonics theory. The India-Asia collision zone is the largest present-day example of continental collision, which makes it an ideal location to study the processes of continental deformation. Existing models of lithospheric deformation are typically quasi two-dimensional and often assume that the lithosphere is a thin viscous sheet, which deforms homogeneously as a result of the collision, or flows above a partially molten lower crust, which explains the exhumation of Himalayan units and lateral spreading of Tibetan plateau. An opposing view is that most deformation localize in shear zones separating less deformed blocks, requiring the lithosphere to have an elasto-plastic rather than a viscous rheology. In order to distinguish which model best fits the observations we develop a 3-D visco-elasto-plastic model, which can model both distributed and highly localized deformation. In our preliminary result, most of the large-scale strike-slips faults including Altyn-Tagh fault, Xianshuihe fault, Red-River fault, Sagaing fault and Jiali fault can be simulated. The topography is consistent with observations that flat plateau in central Tibet and steep, abrupt margins adjacent to Sichuan basin, and gradual topography in southeast Tibet. These models suggest that the localized large-scale strike-slip faults accommodate the continental deformation. These results show the importance of a weak lower crust and topographic effects, as well as the effect of rheology and temperature structure of the lithosphere on the deformation patterns.

  11. Elastic modeling of the Pacaya volcanic complex: a 2009-2015 campaign-GPS deformation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, H. N.; Waite, G. P.; Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Lopez-Hetland, B.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano, in Guatemala, is a basaltic stratovolcano that has been consistently active since 1961. It is known to produce both effusive and explosive eruptions and the erupted material over the last 50+ years has been asymmetrically deposited within an ancestral collapse scarp on the western flanks. This continuous activity and unbalanced edifice presents considerable risk to nearby communities and offers ideal conditions for geodetic applications to monitoring, the study of magmatic systems, and volcano dynamics. Since 2009 periodic campaigns have been conducted to collect GPS data from a six-benchmark network surrounding the volcano. These data span both a 2010, VEI 3 and 2014 VEI 2 explosive eruptions. Initial analysis show total horizontal and vertical displacements up to 40 cm throughout the time series. This research investigates the deformation associated with these eruptive events and inter-eruptive phases in an attempt to improve our understanding of the magma distribution at depth and its influence on the volcanic edifice deformation. Modeling a simplistic point pressure source in a homogeneous half space suggests a fairly shallow deformation source which seems to agree with a hypothesized shallow magma reservoir and vertical, NW-SE trending dike that may influence vent location and edifice stability. Given Pacaya's eruptive and collapse history, continuous monitoring of deformation using GPS and a better understanding of the magmatic plumbing system is essential for improved risk assessment.Pacaya volcano, in Guatemala, is a basaltic stratovolcano that has been consistently active since 1961. It is known to produce both effusive and explosive eruptions and the erupted material over the last 50+ years has been asymmetrically deposited within an ancestral collapse scarp on the western flanks. This continuous activity and unbalanced edifice presents considerable risk to nearby communities and offers ideal conditions for geodetic applications to

  12. Role of passive deformation on propulsion through a lumped torsional flexibility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nipun; Gupta, Amit

    2016-11-01

    Scientists and biologists have been affianced in a deeper examination of insect flight to develop an improved understanding of the role of flexibility on aerodynamic performance. Here, we mimic a flapping wing through a fluid-structure interaction framework based upon a lumped torsional flexibility model. The developed fluid and structural solvers together determine the aerodynamic forces and wing deformation, respectively. An analytical solution to the simplified single-spring structural dynamics equation is established to substantiate simulations. It is revealed that the dynamics of structural deformation is governed by the balance between inertia, stiffness and aerodynamics, where the former two oscillate at the plunging frequency and the latter oscillates at twice the plunging frequency. We demonstrate that an induced phase difference between plunging and passive pitching is responsible for a higher thrust coefficient. This phase difference is also shown to be dependent on aerodynamics to inertia and natural to plunging frequency ratios. For inertia dominated flows, pitching and plunging always remain in phase. As the aerodynamics dominates, a large phase difference is induced which is accountable for a large passive deformation and higher thrust. Authors acknowledge the financial support received from the Aeronautics Research and Development Board (ARDB) under SIGMA Project No. 1705 and thank the IIT Delhi HPC facility for computational resources.

  13. Development of a Two-Phase Model for the Hot Deformation of Highly-Alloyed Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Beaudoin; J. A. Dantzig; I. M. Robertson; B. E. Gore; S. F. Harnish; H. A. Padilla

    2005-10-31

    Conventional processing methods for highly alloyed aluminum consist of ingot casting, followed by hot rolling and thermal treatments. Defects result in lost productivity and wasted energy through the need to remelt and reprocess the material. This research centers on developing a fundamental understanding for deformation of wrought 705X series alloys, a key alloy system used in structural airframe applications. The development of damage at grain boundaries is characterized through a novel test that provides initiation of failure while preserving a controlled deformation response. Data from these mechanical tests are linked to computer simulations of the hot rolling process through a critical measure of damage. Transmission electron microscopy provides fundamental insight into deformation at these high working temperatures, and--in a novel link between microscale and macroscale response--the evolution of microstructure (crystallographic orientation) provides feedback for tuning of friction in the hot rolling process. The key product of this research is a modeling framework for the analysis of industrial hot rolling.

  14. Supersymmetric moose models: An extra dimension from a broken deformed conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, Joshua; Anly Tan, Jong

    2006-09-15

    We find a class of four dimensional deformed conformal field theories which appear extra dimensional when their gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. The theories are supersymmetric moose models which flow to interacting conformal fixed points at low energies, deformed by superpotentials. Using a-maximization we give strong nonperturbative evidence that the hopping terms in the resulting latticized action are relevant deformations of the fixed-point theories. These theories have an intricate structure of RG flows between conformal fixed points. Our results suggest that at the stable fixed points each of the bulk gauge couplings and superpotential hopping terms is turned on, in favor of the extra-dimensional interpretation of the theory. However, we argue that the higher-dimensional gauge coupling is generically small compared to the size of the extra dimension. In the presence of a brane the topology of the extra dimension is determined dynamically and depends on the numbers of colors and bulk and brane flavors, which suggests phenomenological applications. The RG flows between fixed points in these theories provide a class of tests of Cardy's conjectured a-theorem.

  15. Getting drowned in a swirl: Deformable bead-spring model microswimmers in external flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Niklas; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-02-01

    Deformability is a central feature of many types of microswimmers, e.g., for artificially generated self-propelled droplets. Here, we analyze deformable bead-spring microswimmers in an externally imposed solvent flow field as simple theoretical model systems. We focus on their behavior in a circular swirl flow in two spatial dimensions. Linear (straight) two-bead swimmers are found to circle around the swirl with a slight drift to the outside with increasing activity. In contrast to that, we observe for triangular three-bead or squarelike four-bead swimmers a tendency of being drawn into the swirl and finally getting drowned, although a radial inward component is absent in the flow field. During one cycle around the swirl, the self-propulsion direction of an active triangular or squarelike swimmer remains almost constant, while their orbits become deformed exhibiting an "egglike" shape. Over time, the swirl flow induces slight net rotations of these swimmer types, which leads to net rotations of the egg-shaped orbits. Interestingly, in certain cases, the orbital rotation changes sense when the swimmer approaches the flow singularity. Our predictions can be verified in real-space experiments on artificial microswimmers.

  16. Reduced order modeling of aeroelasticity analysis for a wing under static deformation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayama, Masato

    2017-01-01

    The full order analysis of aeroelasticity system, which solves the Euler or Navier Stokes equations in a time domain, is usually expensive in a sense of time consumed. To improve this situation, the Reduced Order Modeling (ROM) method has been developed. If there is a pressure difference between upper and lower surfaces of a wing, the aerodynamic forces loaded on the wing cause static deformations. The ROM, therefore, should have a capability to simulate wing vibrations under the static deformation effect. To include this effect, sequential processing of ROMs for two times is proposed in this study. The 1st step ROM predicts the flutter condition for the rigid wing. The 2nd step ROM predicts the flutter condition for the statically deformed wing under the aerodynamic load caused by the 1st step ROM flutter dynamic pressure. The accuracy of this method is verified by comparing the results with those predicted only by the full order analysis. In this study, the identification of aerodynamic forces is conducted by the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). In the ERA, reduction of singular value matrix influences the accuracy of identification. Two methods are introduced to reduce the singular value matrix, and the flutter conditions acquired by these two methods are compared each other.

  17. Elastic properties of heavy rare-gas crystals under pressure in the model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Pilipenko, E. A.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.

    2013-11-01

    The quantum-mechanical model of deformable and polarizable atoms has been developed for the purpose of investigating the elastic properties of crystals of rare gases Kr and Xe over a wide range of pressures. The inclusion of the deformable electron shells in the analysis is particularly important for the shear moduli of heavy rare-gas crystals. It has been shown that the observed deviation from the Cauchy relation δ( p) for Kr and Xe cannot be adequately reproduced when considering only the many-body interaction. The individual dependence δ( p) for each of the rare-gas crystals is the result of two competitive interactions, namely, the many-body and electron-phonon interactions, which manifests itself in a quadrupole deformation of the electron shells of the atoms due to displacements of the nuclei. The contributions of these interactions in Kr and Xe are compensated with good accuracy, which provides a weakly pressure-dependent value for the parameter δ. The ab initio calculated dependences δ( p) for the entire series Ne-Xe are in good agreement with the experiment.

  18. Modeling and analysis of smart piezoelectric beams using simple higher order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan Elshafei, M.; Alraiess, Fuzy

    2013-03-01

    In the current work, a finite element formulation is developed for modeling and analysis of isotropic as well as orthotropic composite beams with distributed piezoelectric actuators subjected to both mechanical and electrical loads. The proposed model is developed based on a simple higher order shear deformation theory where the displacement field equations in the model account for a parabolic distribution of the shear strain and the nonlinearity of in-plane displacements across the thickness and subsequently the shear correction factor is not involved. The virtual displacement method is used to formulate the equations of motion of the structure system. The model is valid for both segmented and continuous piezoelectric elements, which can be either surface bonded or embedded in the laminated beams. A two-node element with four mechanical degrees of freedom in addition to one electrical degree of freedom for each node is used in the finite element formulation. The electric potential is considered as a function of the thickness and the length of the beam element. A MATLAB code is developed to compute the static deformation and free vibration parameters of the beams with distributed piezoelectric actuators. The obtained results from the proposed model are compared with the available analytical results and the finite element results of other researchers.

  19. A simplified constitutive model for predicting shape memory polymers deformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunxin; Guo, Siu-Siu; He, Yuhao; Liu, Zishun

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can keep a temporary shape after pre-deformation at a higher temperature and subsequent cooling. When they are reheated, their original shapes can be recovered. Such special characteristics of SMPs make them widely used in aerospace structures, biomedical devices, functional textiles and other devices. Increasing usefulness of SMPs motivates us to further understand their thermomechanical properties and deformation behavior, of which the development of appropriate constitutive models for SMPs is imperative. There is much work in literatures that address constitutive models of the thermo-mechanical coupling in SMPs. However, due to their complex forms, it is difficult to apply these constitutive models in the real world. In this paper, a three-element model with simple form is proposed to investigate the thermo-mechanical small strain (within 10%) behavior of polyurethane under uniaxial tension. Two different cases of heated recovery are considered: (1) unconstrained free strain recovery and (2) stress recovery under full constraint at a strain level fixed during low temperature unloading. To validate the model, simulated and predicted results are compared with Tobushi's experimental results and good agreement can be observed.

  20. A droplet deformation and breakup model based on virtual work principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichani, Arash B.; Emami, Mohsen D.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of modeling the deformation and secondary breakup of a droplet is presented. The general formulation is based on the virtual work principle and potential flow assumption. To reach the final model, some approximations are made in the aerodynamic calculations including moderate Reynolds number of gas, Reg ˜ 1000, and high density ratio of liquid to gas phase, ρl/ρg ≫ 1. The dynamics of a drop is considered using two degrees of freedom. Two coupled ordinary differential equations are derived which describe time evolution of drop within both vibrational and bag regimes. The model is capable of keeping track of droplet deformation and distortion up to the onset of the bag rupture. The critical Weber number has been predicted with an error of around 20% as compared to the experimental data. The model performance is enhanced after a minor tuning, which result in the critical Weber number of 12.5. The predicted distortion quantities in lateral and longitudinal directions, as well as the drop profiles, are validated against experiments for bag and vibrational regimes. A good agreement is found between the computed results and experiments. Overall, achievements of the present work indicate a promising potential of the current approach for modeling droplet dynamics.

  1. Elementary model of severe plastic deformation by KoBo process

    SciTech Connect

    Gusak, A.; Storozhuk, N.; Danielewski, M. Korbel, A.; Bochniak, M.

    2014-01-21

    Self-consistent model of generation, interaction, and annihilation of point defects in the gradient of oscillating stresses is presented. This model describes the recently suggested method of severe plastic deformation by combination of pressure and oscillating rotations of the die along the billet axis (KoBo process). Model provides the existence of distinct zone of reduced viscosity with sharply increased concentration of point defects. This zone provides the high extrusion velocity. Presented model confirms that the Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) in KoBo may be treated as non-equilibrium phase transition of abrupt drop of viscosity in rather well defined spatial zone. In this very zone, an intensive lateral rotational movement proceeds together with generation of point defects which in self-organized manner make rotation possible by the decrease of viscosity. The special properties of material under KoBo version of SPD can be described without using the concepts of nonequilibrium grain boundaries, ballistic jumps and amorphization. The model can be extended to include different SPD processes.

  2. Elementary model of severe plastic deformation by KoBo process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusak, A.; Danielewski, M.; Korbel, A.; Bochniak, M.; Storozhuk, N.

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent model of generation, interaction, and annihilation of point defects in the gradient of oscillating stresses is presented. This model describes the recently suggested method of severe plastic deformation by combination of pressure and oscillating rotations of the die along the billet axis (KoBo process). Model provides the existence of distinct zone of reduced viscosity with sharply increased concentration of point defects. This zone provides the high extrusion velocity. Presented model confirms that the Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) in KoBo may be treated as non-equilibrium phase transition of abrupt drop of viscosity in rather well defined spatial zone. In this very zone, an intensive lateral rotational movement proceeds together with generation of point defects which in self-organized manner make rotation possible by the decrease of viscosity. The special properties of material under KoBo version of SPD can be described without using the concepts of nonequilibrium grain boundaries, ballistic jumps and amorphization. The model can be extended to include different SPD processes.

  3. The whole mesh deformation model: a fast image segmentation method suitable for effective parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Pereira, Manuela; Freire, Mário M.; Fernandes, José

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we propose a novel image segmentation method called the whole mesh deformation (WMD) model, which aims at addressing the problems of modern medical imaging. Such problems have raised from the combination of several factors: (1) significant growth of medical image volumes sizes due to increasing capabilities of medical acquisition devices; (2) the will to increase the complexity of image processing algorithms in order to explore new functionality; (3) change in processor development and turn towards multi processing units instead of growing bus speeds and the number of operations per second of a single processing unit. Our solution is based on the concept of deformable models and is characterized by a very effective and precise segmentation capability. The proposed WMD model uses a volumetric mesh instead of a contour or a surface to represent the segmented shapes of interest, which allows exploiting more information in the image and obtaining results in shorter times, independently of image contents. The model also offers a good ability for topology changes and allows effective parallelization of workflow, which makes it a very good choice for large datasets. We present a precise model description, followed by experiments on artificial images and real medical data.

  4. General Multimechanism Reversible-Irreversible Time-Dependent Constitutive Deformation Model Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Since most advanced material systems (for example metallic-, polymer-, and ceramic-based systems) being currently researched and evaluated are for high-temperature airframe and propulsion system applications, the required constitutive models must account for both reversible and irreversible time-dependent deformations. Furthermore, since an integral part of continuum-based computational methodologies (be they microscale- or macroscale-based) is an accurate and computationally efficient constitutive model to describe the deformation behavior of the materials of interest, extensive research efforts have been made over the years on the phenomenological representations of constitutive material behavior in the inelastic analysis of structures. From a more recent and comprehensive perspective, the NASA Glenn Research Center in conjunction with the University of Akron has emphasized concurrently addressing three important and related areas: that is, 1) Mathematical formulation; 2) Algorithmic developments for updating (integrating) the external (e.g., stress) and internal state variables; 3) Parameter estimation for characterizing the model. This concurrent perspective to constitutive modeling has enabled the overcoming of the two major obstacles to fully utilizing these sophisticated time-dependent (hereditary) constitutive models in practical engineering analysis. These obstacles are: 1) Lack of efficient and robust integration algorithms; 2) Difficulties associated with characterizing the large number of required material parameters, particularly when many of these parameters lack obvious or direct physical interpretations.

  5. Unusual plastic deformation and damage features in titanium: Experimental tests and constitutive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana; Flater, Philip; Chandola, Nitin; Alves, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental study on plastic deformation and damage of polycrystalline pure HCP Ti, as well as modeling of the observed behavior. Mechanical characterization data were conducted, which indicate that the material is orthotropic and displays tension-compression asymmetry. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray tomography measurements conducted reveal that damage distribution and evolution in this HCP Ti material is markedly different than in a typical FCC material such as copper. Stewart and Cazacu (2011) anisotropic elastic/plastic damage model is used to describe the behavior. All the parameters involved in this model have a clear physical significance, being related to plastic properties, and are determined from very few simple mechanical tests. It is shown that this model predicts correctly the anisotropy in plastic deformation, and its strong influence on damage distribution and damage accumulation. Specifically, for a smooth axisymmetric specimen subject to uniaxial tension, damage initiates at the center of the specimen, and is diffuse; the level of damage close to failure being very low. On the other hand, for a notched specimen subject to the same loading the model predicts that damage initiates at the outer surface of the specimen, and further grows from the outer surface to the center of the specimen, which corroborates with the in-situ tomography data.

  6. Deformable templates guided discriminative models for robust 3D brain MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Yi; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Tu, Zhuowen

    2013-10-01

    Automatically segmenting anatomical structures from 3D brain MRI images is an important task in neuroimaging. One major challenge is to design and learn effective image models accounting for the large variability in anatomy and data acquisition protocols. A deformable template is a type of generative model that attempts to explicitly match an input image with a template (atlas), and thus, they are robust against global intensity changes. On the other hand, discriminative models combine local image features to capture complex image patterns. In this paper, we propose a robust brain image segmentation algorithm that fuses together deformable templates and informative features. It takes advantage of the adaptation capability of the generative model and the classification power of the discriminative models. The proposed algorithm achieves both robustness and efficiency, and can be used to segment brain MRI images with large anatomical variations. We perform an extensive experimental study on four datasets of T1-weighted brain MRI data from different sources (1,082 MRI scans in total) and observe consistent improvement over the state-of-the-art systems.

  7. Surface Deformation Associated with the 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake Measured from Digital Surface Model Differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitman, N. G.; Briggs, R.; Gold, R. D.; DuRoss, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Post-earthquake, field-based assessments of surface displacement commonly underestimate offsets observed with remote sensing techniques (e.g., InSAR, image cross-correlation) because they fail to capture the total deformation field. Modern earthquakes are readily characterized by comparing pre- and post-event remote sensing data, but historical earthquakes often lack pre-event data. To overcome this challenge, we use historical aerial photographs to derive pre-event digital surface models (DSMs), which we compare to modern, post-event DSMs. Our case study focuses on resolving on- and off-fault deformation along the Lost River fault that accompanied the 1983 M6.9 Borah Peak, Idaho, normal-faulting earthquake. We use 343 aerial images from 1952-1966 and vertical control points selected from National Geodetic Survey benchmarks measured prior to 1983 to construct a pre-event point cloud (average ~ 0.25 pts/m2) and corresponding DSM. The post-event point cloud (average ~ 1 pt/m2) and corresponding DSM are derived from WorldView 1 and 2 scenes processed with NASA's Ames Stereo Pipeline. The point clouds and DSMs are coregistered using vertical control points, an iterative closest point algorithm, and a DSM coregistration algorithm. Preliminary results of differencing the coregistered DSMs reveal a signal spanning the surface rupture that is consistent with tectonic displacement. Ongoing work is focused on quantifying the significance of this signal and error analysis. We expect this technique to yield a more complete understanding of on- and off-fault deformation patterns associated with the Borah Peak earthquake along the Lost River fault and to help improve assessments of surface deformation for other historical ruptures.

  8. Development of Advanced Continuum Models that Incorporate Nanomechanical Deformation into Engineering Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; McDowell, David L.; Mayeur, Jason R.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Gao, Huajian

    2008-09-01

    Materials with characteristic structures at nanoscale sizes exhibit significantly different mechani-cal responses from those predicted by conventional, macroscopic continuum theory. For example,nanocrystalline metals display an inverse Hall-Petch effect whereby the strength of the materialdecreases with decreasing grain size. The origin of this effect is believed to be a change in defor-mation mechanisms from dislocation motion across grains and pileup at grain boundaries at mi-croscopic grain sizes to rotation of grains and deformation within grain boundary interface regionsfor nanostructured materials. These rotational defects are represented by the mathematical conceptof disclinations. The ability to capture these effects within continuum theory, thereby connectingnanoscale materials phenomena and macroscale behavior, has eluded the research community.The goal of our project was to develop a consistent theory to model both the evolution ofdisclinations and their kinetics. Additionally, we sought to develop approaches to extract contin-uum mechanical information from nanoscale structure to verify any developed continuum theorythat includes dislocation and disclination behavior. These approaches yield engineering-scale ex-pressions to quantify elastic and inelastic deformation in all varieties of materials, even those thatpossess highly directional bonding within their molecular structures such as liquid crystals, cova-lent ceramics, polymers and biological materials. This level of accuracy is critical for engineeringdesign and thermo-mechanical analysis is performed in micro- and nanosystems. The researchproposed here innovates on how these nanoscale deformation mechanisms should be incorporatedinto a continuum mechanical formulation, and provides the foundation upon which to develop ameans for predicting the performance of advanced engineering materials.4 AcknowledgmentThe authors acknowledge helpful discussions with Farid F. Abraham, Youping Chen, Terry J

  9. Comparison of optimization strategy and similarity metric in atlas-to-subject registration using statistical deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Grupp, R. B.; Sato, Y.; Taylor, R. H.; Armand, M.

    2015-03-01

    A robust atlas-to-subject registration using a statistical deformation model (SDM) is presented. The SDM uses statistics of voxel-wise displacement learned from pre-computed deformation vectors of a training dataset. This allows an atlas instance to be directly translated into an intensity volume and compared with a patient's intensity volume. Rigid and nonrigid transformation parameters were simultaneously optimized via the Covariance Matrix Adaptation - Evolutionary Strategy (CMA-ES), with image similarity used as the objective function. The algorithm was tested on CT volumes of the pelvis from 55 female subjects. A performance comparison of the CMA-ES and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex optimization algorithms with the mutual information and normalized cross correlation similarity metrics was conducted. Simulation studies using synthetic subjects were performed, as well as leave-one-out cross validation studies. Both studies suggested that mutual information and CMA-ES achieved the best performance. The leave-one-out test demonstrated 4.13 mm error with respect to the true displacement field, and 26,102 function evaluations in 180 seconds, on average.

  10. Alignment of sparse freehand 3-D ultrasound with preoperative images of the liver using models of respiratory motion and deformation.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Jane M; Penney, Graeme P; King, Andrew P; Hawkes, David J

    2005-11-01

    We present a method for alignment of an interventional plan to optically tracked two-dimensional intraoperative ultrasound (US) images of the liver. Our clinical motivation is to enable the accurate transfer of information from three-dimensional preoperative imaging modalities [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] to intraoperative US to aid needle placement for thermal ablation of liver metastases. An initial rigid registration to intraoperative coordinates is obtained using a set of US images acquired at maximum exhalation. A preprocessing step is applied to both the preoperative images and the US images to produce evidence of corresponding structures. This yields two sets of images representing classification of regions as vessels. The registration then proceeds using these images. The preoperative images and plan are then warped to correspond to a single US slice acquired at an unknown point in the breathing cycle where the liver is likely to have moved and deformed relative to the preoperative image. Alignment is constrained using a patient-specific model of breathing motion and deformation. Target registration error is estimated by carrying out simulation experiments using resliced MR volumes to simulate real US and comparing the registration results to a "bronze-standard" registration performed on the full MR volume. Finally, the system is tested using real US and verified using visual inspection.

  11. Evaluating topographic effects on ground deformation: Insights from finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assumed the Earth's surface as flat. In the last years, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g. slope, aspect, curvature, etc.). For this, we bring together the results exposed in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D Finite Elements (FE) models results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas considering their diverse topographic features (e.g. collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars, etc.). Final conclusions may be also useful for the design of an optimal geodetic monitoring network. This research was partially funded by the European Commission (FP7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO")and RYC-2012-11024.

  12. Mathematical and computational modeling of a ferrofluid deformable mirror for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Aaron J.; Griffiths, Ian M.; Groff, Tyler D.; Rousing, Andreas W.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    Deformable mirrors (DMs) are an enabling and mission-critical technology in any coronagraphic instrument designed to directly image exoplanets. A new ferro fluid deformable mirror technology for high-contrast imaging is currently under development at Princeton, featuring a flexible optical surface manipulated by the local electromagnetic and global hydraulic actuation of a reservoir of ferro fluid. The ferro fluid DM is designed to prioritize high optical surface quality, high-precision/low-stroke actuation, and excellent low-spatial-frequency performance - capabilities that meet the unique demands of high-contrast coronagraphy in a space-based platform. To this end, the ferro-fluid medium continuously supports the DM face sheet, a configuration that eliminates actuator print-through (or, quilting) by decoupling the nominal surface figure from the geometry of the actuator array. The global pressure control allows independent focus actuation. In this paper we describe an analytical model for the quasi-static deformation response of the DM face sheet to both magnetic and pressure actuation. These modeling efforts serve to identify the key design parameters and quantify their contributions to the DM response, model the relationship between actuation commands and DM surface-profile response, and predict performance metrics such as achievable spatial resolution and stroke precision for specific actuator configurations. Our theoretical approach addresses the complexity of the boundary conditions associated with mechanical mounting of the face sheet, and makes use of asymptotic approximations by leveraging the three distinct length scales in the problem - namely, the low-stroke ( nm) actuation, face sheet thickness ( mm), and mirror diameter (cm). In addition to describing the theoretical treatment, we report the progress of computational multi physics simulations which will be useful in improving the model fidelity and in drawing conclusions to improve the design.

  13. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  14. dMODELS: A MATLAB software package for modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli, Peter F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a MATLAB software package for the most common models used to interpret deformation measurements near faults and active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the expressions have been checked for typographical errors that might have been present in the original literature, extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. A set of GPS measurements from the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is used to test the software package. The results show that the best fit source to the GPS data is a spherical intrusion (ΔV=5×10 km3), about 880 m beneath the volcano's summit.

  15. Outcome analysis after helmet therapy using 3D photogrammetry in patients with deformational plagiocephaly: the role of root mean square.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Mahsa Bidgoli; Brown, Trevor M; Clausen, April; DaSilva, Trevor; Ho, Emily; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-02-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) is a multifactorial non-synostotic cranial deformity with a reported incidence as high as 1 in 7 infants in North America. Treatment options have focused on non-operative interventions including head repositioning and the use of an orthotic helmet device. Previous studies have used linear and two dimensional outcome measures to assess changes in cranial symmetry after helmet therapy. Our objective was to demonstrate improvement in head shape after treatment with a cranial molding helmet by using Root Mean Square (RMS), a measure unique to 3D photogrammetry, which takes into account both changes in volume and shape over time. Three dimensional photographs were obtained before and after molding helmet treatment in 40 infants (4-10 months old) with deformational plagiocephaly. Anatomical reference planes and measurements were recorded using the 3dMD Vultus(®) analysis software. RMS was used to quantify symmetry by superimposing left and right quadrants and calculating the mean value of aggregate distances between surfaces. Over 95% of the patients demonstrated an improvement in symmetry with helmet therapy. Furthermore, when the sample of infants was divided into two treatment subgroups, a statistically significant correlation was found between the age at the beginning of treatment and the change in the RMS value. When helmet therapy was started before 7 months of age a greater improvement in symmetry was seen. This work represents application of the technique of RMS analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of deformational plagiocephaly with a cranial molding helmet.

  16. Modeling deformation associated with the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Battaglia, M.

    2011-12-01

    We estimate deformation sources active during and after the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) by inverting campaign and continuous GPS (CGPS) measured deformation between 2000 and 2011. All data are corrected for background deformation using a tectonic model that includes block rotation and uniform strain accumulation. The campaign GPS surveys characterize the deformation over a large area, and the CGPS data allow estimates of time-dependent changes in the rate of deformation. Only one CGPS station, JRO1, was operating near MSH prior to the start of unrest on September 23, 2004. Most other CGPS stations, installed by the Plate Boundary Observatory and Cascade Volcano Observatory, were operating by mid-October, 2004. The inward displacement of JRO1 started with the seismic unrest on September 23, 2004, and continued at a rate of 0.5 mm/day until the last phreatic explosion on October 5, 2004 (note there was another explosion in March 2005). The deformation then decayed exponentially until activity ceased in January, 2008. The rate of decay was estimated using a number of clean CGPS time series, and then it was fixed to estimate amplitudes for all CGPS station displacements. The inward and downward movements (deflation) observed at all stations during the eruption (2004-2008) were best-fit by a prolate spheroid with geometric aspect ratio 0.19 ± 0.6, a depth of 7.4 ± 1.7 km, and a cavity volume decrease of 0.028 ± 0.005 cubic km. This source is practically vertical (dip angle: 84 ± 5; strike angle 298 ± 84) and is located beneath the dome. All errors are 95% bounds and have been estimated using jackknife. The post-eruption deformation (2008 - present) is characterized by deflation in the near field (within 2 km from the dome) and inflation in the far field. The near-field deflation signal is best fit by a very shallow sill-like source (~0.18 ± 0.05 km below the crater floor) with a radius of 0.5 ± 0.3 km and a cavity volume decrease of

  17. Midterm results of resection arthroplasty for forefoot deformities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the risk factors associated with patient dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Kadono, Yuho; Nishino, Jinju; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasui, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the midterm results of resection arthroplasty of all 5 metatarsal heads in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and forefoot deformity and analyzed the factors that affect patient satisfaction levels. Of 64 patients (1 male, 63 females), 107 feet were treated with resection arthroplasty for forefoot deformity at our hospital from January 1992 to December 2005. The mean follow-up period was 5.8 ± 3.1 years, with all patients having at least 1 year of follow-up. Of the 64 patients, 75% were satisfied with the surgery. The mean score for the postoperative Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot lesser metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scale was 75.0 ± 15.8 points. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patient-reported dissatisfaction was significantly associated with the recurrence of hammer toe deformity (odds ratio 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 6.97), shortening of the resection arthroplasty space (odds ratio 0.85 for a 1-unit increase, 95% confidence interval 0.74 to 0.96), and the recurrence of hallux valgus (odds ratio 1.04 for a 1-unit increase, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.09) during the postoperative period. From our results, interventions to prevent recurrence of hammer toe deformity, especially in toes with preoperative metatarsophalangeal joint dislocations, have been shown to be important in preventing complications and patient dissatisfaction after resection arthroplasty.

  18. Modeling static and dynamic thermography of the human breast under elastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H

    2011-01-07

    An abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of increased risk of breast cancer. Numerical modeling techniques for thermography are proposed to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques did not account for gravity-induced elastic deformation arising from various body postures, nor did they suggest that a dynamic thermal procedure may be used to enhance clinical diagnosis. In this paper, 3D finite element method (FEM)-based thermal and elastic modeling techniques are developed to characterize comprehensively both the thermal and elastic properties of normal and tumorous breast tissues during static and dynamic thermography. In the steady state, gravity-induced breast deformation is found to cause an upper-lower asymmetric surface temperature contrast for sitting/standing up body posture, even though all the thermal and elastic properties are assumed uniform. Additionally, the tumor-induced surface temperature alterations are found to be caused primarily by shallow tumors and to be less sensitive to tumor size than to tumor depth. In the dynamic state, the breast exhibits distinctive temporal patterns that are associated with distinct thermal events: cold stress and thermal recovery induced by changes in the ambient temperature. Specifically, the tumor-induced thermal contrast shows an opposite initial change and delayed peak as compared with the deformation-induced thermal contrast. These findings are expected to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Numerical simulation of flows around deformed aircraft model in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenkov, A. V.; Bosnyakov, S. M.; Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Kuzmina, S. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Matyash, S. V.; Ishmuratov, F. Z.

    2016-10-01

    To obtain accurate data of calculation method error requires detailed simulation of the experiment in wind tunnel with keeping all features of the model, installation and gas flow. Two examples of such detailed data comparison are described in this paper. The experimental characteristics of NASA CRM model obtained in the ETW wind tunnel (Cologne, Germany), and CFD characteristics of this model obtained with the use of EWT-TsAGI application package are compared. Following comparison is carried out for an airplane model in the T-128 wind tunnel (TsAGI, Russia). It is seen that deformation influence on integral characteristics grows with increasing Re number and, accordingly, the dynamic pressure. CFD methods application for problems of experimental research in the wind tunnel allows to separate viscosity and elasticity effects.

  20. A GPS and modelling study of deformation in northern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; DeMets, C.; Rogers, R.; Tenorio, C.; Hernandez, D.

    2009-09-01

    We use GPS measurements at 37 stations in Honduras and El Salvador to describe active deformation of the western end of the Caribbean Plate between the Motagua fault and Central American volcanic arc. All GPS sites located in eastern Honduras move with the Caribbean Plate, in accord with geologic evidence for an absence of neotectonic deformation in this region. Relative to the Caribbean Plate, the other stations in the study area move west to west-northwest at rates that increase gradually from 3.3 +/- 0.6 mm yr-1 in central Honduras to 4.1 +/- 0.6 mm yr-1 in western Honduras to as high as 11-12 mm yr-1 in southern Guatemala. The site motions are consistent with slow westward extension that has been inferred by previous authors from the north-striking grabens and earthquake focal mechanisms in this region. We examine the factors that influence the regional deformation by comparing the new GPS velocity field to velocity fields predicted by finite element models (FEMs) that incorporate the regional plate boundary faults and known plate motions. Our modelling suggests that the obliquely convergent (~20°) direction of Caribbean-North American Plate motion relative to the Motagua fault west of 90°W impedes the ENE-directed motion of the Caribbean Plate in southern Guatemala, giving rise to extension in southern Guatemala and western Honduras. The FEM predictions agree even better with the measured velocities if the plate motion west of the Central American volcanic arc is forced to occur over a broad zone rather than along a single throughgoing plate boundary fault. Our analysis confirms key predictions of a previous numerical model for deformation in this region, and also indicates that the curvature of the Motagua fault causes significant along-strike changes in the orientations of the principal strain-rate axes in the fault borderlands, in accord with earthquake focal mechanisms and conclusions reached in a recent synthesis of the structural and morphologic data

  1. Multiaxial deformation and life prediction model and experimental data for advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Liu, K.C.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This paper summarizes recent experimental results on creep and creep rupture behavior of a commercial grade of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic in the temperature range of 1150 to 1300C obtained at ORNL; and introduces a tentative multiaxial deformation and life prediction model for ceramic materials under general thermomechanical loadings. Issues related to the possible standardization of the data analysis methodology and possible future research needs for high temperature structural ceramics in the area of development of data base and life prediction methodology are also discussed.

  2. Non-linear feedbacks affecting sea ice deformation in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Maslowski, W.; Mills, T.; Hunke, E. C.; Craig, A.; Osinski, R.; Cassano, J. J.; Duvivier, A.; Hughes, M.; Zeng, X.; Brunke, M.; Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Fisel, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present the latest results of high-resolution sea ice simulations from the fully coupled Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), including explicit melt ponds, form drag and anisotropic sea ice rheology. RASM is a pan-Arctic model composed of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) and Los Alamos Sea ice Model (CICE5) at ~9km resolution, coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at 50km resolution using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) coupling framework. Using RASM, we have analyzed coupled feedbacks resulting from different sea ice mechanics formulations. Strong spatial and temporal scaling of sea ice deformation has been observed in the Arctic using the Radarsat Geophysical Processing System and Global Positioning System equipped buoys. Whereas previous results from stand-alone ice-ocean simulations suggest that the established Elastic Viscous Plastic (EVP) rheology is unable to replicate these features, RASM simulates the observed scaling using EVP, with a spatial scaling fractal dimension of around -0.23, as compared to the observed range of -0.18 to -0.20. Using this metric, we extend our analysis to test for spatial scaling in sea ice deformation using a recently revised EVP formulation, as well as the new Elastic Plastic Anistropic rheology in CICE5. Our results suggest that a fundamental source of scaling stems from feedbacks associated with frequent coupling between high resolution ocean and atmospheric models, and this result serves as an example of the broader utility of limited-area, fully coupled models in isolating coupled feedbacks and evaluating them using daily in-situ and satellite measurements.

  3. MO-C-17A-03: A GPU-Based Method for Validating Deformable Image Registration in Head and Neck Radiotherapy Using Biomechanical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Neylon, J; Min, Y; Qi, S; Kupelian, P; Santhanam, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) plays a pivotal role in head and neck adaptive radiotherapy but a systematic validation of DIR algorithms has been limited by a lack of quantitative high-resolution groundtruth. We address this limitation by developing a GPU-based framework that provides a systematic DIR validation by generating (a) model-guided synthetic CTs representing posture and physiological changes, and (b) model-guided landmark-based validation. Method: The GPU-based framework was developed to generate massive mass-spring biomechanical models from patient simulation CTs and contoured structures. The biomechanical model represented soft tissue deformations for known rigid skeletal motion. Posture changes were simulated by articulating skeletal anatomy, which subsequently applied elastic corrective forces upon the soft tissue. Physiological changes such as tumor regression and weight loss were simulated in a biomechanically precise manner. Synthetic CT data was then generated from the deformed anatomy. The initial and final positions for one hundred randomly-chosen mass elements inside each of the internal contoured structures were recorded as ground truth data. The process was automated to create 45 synthetic CT datasets for a given patient CT. For instance, the head rotation was varied between +/− 4 degrees along each axis, and tumor volumes were systematically reduced up to 30%. Finally, the original CT and deformed synthetic CT were registered using an optical flow based DIR. Results: Each synthetic data creation took approximately 28 seconds of computation time. The number of landmarks per data set varied between two and three thousand. The validation method is able to perform sub-voxel analysis of the DIR, and report the results by structure, giving a much more in depth investigation of the error. Conclusions: We presented a GPU based high-resolution biomechanical head and neck model to validate DIR algorithms by generating CT equivalent 3D

  4. A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  5. Knowledge-based deformable surface model with application to segmentation of brain structures in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanei, Amir; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2001-07-01

    We have developed a knowledge-based deformable surface for segmentation of medical images. This work has been done in the context of segmentation of hippocampus from brain MRI, due to its challenge and clinical importance. The model has a polyhedral discrete structure and is initialized automatically by analyzing brain MRI sliced by slice, and finding few landmark features at each slice using an expert system. The expert system decides on the presence of the hippocampus and its general location in each slice. The landmarks found are connected together by a triangulation method, to generate a closed initial surface. The surface deforms under defined internal and external force terms thereafter, to generate an accurate and reproducible boundary for the hippocampus. The anterior and posterior (AP) limits of the hippocampus is estimated by automatic analysis of the location of brain stem, and some of the features extracted in the initialization process. These data are combined together with a priori knowledge using Bayes method to estimate a probability density function (pdf) for the length of the structure in sagittal direction. The hippocampus AP limits are found by optimizing this pdf. The model is tested on real clinical data and the results show very good model performance.

  6. Insights from analogue modelling into the deformation mechanism of the Vaiont landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Montanari, Domenico; Santoro, Simone; Sani, Federico; Fanti, Riccardo; Casagli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Vaiont landslide (Southern Alps, Italy) represents one of the most catastrophic landslides in the world recorded in the modern history. The landslide, occurred on 9th October 1963, involved about 3 × 108 m3 of rock that collapsed in an artificial lake: more than 1900 people died as a consequence of the tsunami produced by the sudden fall of the mass in the water. Despite the importance of this event, many aspects of the Vaiont rockslide still remain unexplained, particularly its fast emplacement. In order to obtain a better understanding of the Vaiont disaster, this paper focuses on the results of analogue models designed to get insights into the internal and surficial deformation patterns that characterized the sliding rock mass. Plan view reconstructions of surface model displacement reveal that the rock mass is subdivided into compartments with different relative movements and differential rotations, believed to have played a significant role in causing the fast collapse. The deformation of the analogue models, compared with geological cross sections and in-situ data, suggests that sliding of the rock mass was accomplished by the development of some new (or the reactivation of pre-existing) fractures into the rock mass.

  7. Deformable Model-Based Methods for Shape Control of a Haptic Jamming Surface.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2017-02-01

    Haptic Jamming, the approach of simultaneously controlling mechanical properties and surface deformation of a tactile display via particle jamming and pneumatics, shows promise as a tangible, shape-changing human-computer interface. Previous research introduced device design and described the force-displacement interactions for individual jamming cells. The work in this article analyzes the shape output capabilities of a multi-cell array. A spring-mass deformable body simulation combines models of the three actuation inputs of a Haptic Jamming surface: node pinning, chamber pressurization, and cell jamming. Surface measurements of a 12-cell prototype from a depth camera fit the mass and stiffness parameters to the device during pressurization tests and validate the accuracy of the model for various actuation sequences. The simulator is used to develop an algorithm that generates a sequence of actuation inputs for a Haptic Jamming array of any size in order to match a desired surface output shape. Data extracted from topographical maps and three-dimensional solid object models are used to evaluate the shape-matching algorithm and assess the utility of increasing array size and resolution. Results show that a discrete Laplace operator applied to the input is a suitable predictor of the correlation coefficient between the desired shape and the device output.

  8. A comprehensive model of postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake deduced from GPS observations in northern Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Endra; Sagiya, Takeshi; Ito, Takeo; Kimata, Fumiaki; Tabei, Takao; Ohta, Yusaku; Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Agustan; Nurdin, Irwandi; Sugiyanto, Didik

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (SAE) using 5 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) data located in northern Sumatra. Continuous GPS data from northern Sumatra suggest that the relaxation time in the vertical displacement is longer than horizontal displacements. This implies that there are multiple physical mechanisms that control the postseismic deformation, which refer to afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. In this study, we introduce an analysis strategy of postseismic deformation to simultaneously calculate multiple mechanisms of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. The afterslip inversion results indicate that the distribution of the afterslip and the coseismic slip are compensatory of each other. Also, afterslip has a limited contribution to vertical deformation in northern Sumatra. In our rheology model, we use a gravitational Maxwell viscoelastic response and the result indicates that the elastic layer thickness is 65 ± 5 km and the Maxwell viscosity is 8.0 ± 1.0 × 1018 Pa s. We find that afterslip plus Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation are appropriate to explain the deformation in northern Sumatra. We also find that our rheology model reproduces the long-term features of the GPS time series in Thailand. Applying our rheology model to the data in Andaman Islands our afterslip estimation is located at the down-dip part of the plate boundary. Finally, we showed that our rheology model is applicable to the GPS datasets of postseismic deformation of the 2004 SAE located in northern Sumatra, Thailand, and Andaman-Nicobar, respectively.

  9. A combined crystal plasticity and graph-based vertex model of dynamic recrystallization at large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2015-06-01

    A mesoscale model of microstructure evolution is formulated in the present work by combining a crystal plasticity model with a graph-based vertex algorithm. This provides a versatile formulation capable of capturing finite-strain deformations, development of texture and microstructure evolution through recrystallization. The crystal plasticity model is employed in a finite element setting and allows tracing of stored energy build-up in the polycrystal microstructure and concurrent reorientation of the crystal lattices in the grains. This influences the progression of recrystallization as nucleation occurs at sites with sufficient stored energy and since the grain boundary mobility and energy is allowed to vary with crystallographic misorientation across the boundaries. The proposed graph-based vertex model describes the topological changes to the grain microstructure and keeps track of the grain inter-connectivity. Through homogenization, the macroscopic material response is also obtained. By the proposed modeling approach, grain structure evolution at large deformations as well as texture development are captured. This is in contrast to most other models of recrystallization which are usually limited by assumptions of one or the other of these factors. In simulation examples, the model is in the present study shown to capture the salient features of dynamic recrystallization, including the effects of varying initial grain size and strain rate on the transitions between single-peak and multiple-peak oscillating flow stress behavior. Also the development of recrystallization texture and the influence of different assumptions on orientation of recrystallization nuclei are investigated. Further, recrystallization kinetics are discussed and compared to classical JMAK theory. To promote computational efficiency, the polycrystal plasticity algorithm is parallelized through a GPU implementation that was recently proposed by the authors.

  10. Applying Evidence In The Care Of Patients With Rheumatoid Hand And Wrist Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    The traditional approach in managing rheumatoid hand deformities is based on the individual surgeon’s experiences. In the current era of evidence-based medicine (EBM), formulating treatment for the rheumatoid hand fits perfectly within the framework of EBM by leveraging the best evidence from the literature, incorporating surgeons’ experience, and considering patients’ preferences. In this special article, we use a case example to illustrate how EBM can be practiced within the framework of treating rheumatoid hand deformities by distilling the best evidence from the literature to guide surgeons in a rational approach for treating this common condition. PMID:23783062

  11. Finite Element Modeling of the Deformation of a Thin Magnetoelastic Film Compared to a Membrane Model

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, M; White, D; Steigmann, D; Rudd, R

    2009-04-08

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles (magnetoelastomer) was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This new material was formed as a thin film using spin casting. The deformation of this material using a magnetic field has many possible applications to microfluidics. Two methods will be used to calculate the deformation of a circular magneto-elastomeric film subjected to a magnetic field. The first method is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method (FEM) and the second is based on nonlinear continuum electromagnetism and continuum elasticity in the membrane limit. The comparison of these two methods is used to test/validate the finite element method.

  12. InSAR observations and models of crustal deformation due to a glacial surge in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriac, A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A.; Spaans, K. H.; Björnsson, H.; Pálsson, F.; Pinel, V.; Feigl, K. L.

    2014-09-01

    Surges are common at all the major ice caps in Iceland. Ice masses of gigatons may shift from the upper part of the outlet glacier towards the terminus in a few months, advancing the glacier front by up to several kilometres. The advancing ice front may be up to 100 m thick, increasing the load on crustal rocks correspondingly. We use the observed change in crustal loading during a surge of the western part of the Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, during 1993-1995 and the corresponding elastic crustal deformation, surveyed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar, to investigate the material properties of the solid Earth in this region. Crustal subsidence due to the surge reaches ˜75 mm at the edge of the Síðujökull outlet glacier. This signal is mixed with a broad uplift signal of ˜12 mm yr-1, relative to our reference area, caused by the ongoing retreat of Vatnajökull in response to climate change. We disentangle the two signals by linear inversion. Finite element modelling is used to investigate the elastic Earth response of the surge, as well as to confirm that no significant viscoelastic deformation occurred as a consequence of the surge. The modelling leads to estimates of the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the underlying Earth. Comparison between the observed and modelled deformation fields is made using a Bayesian approach that yields the estimate of a probability distribution for each of the free parameters. Residuals indicate a good agreement between models and observations. One-layer elastic models result in a Young's modulus of 43.2-49.7 GPa (95 per cent confidence) and Poisson's ratio of 0-0.27, after removal of outliers. Our preferred model, with two elastic layers, provides a better fit to the whole surge signal. This model consists of a 1-km-thick upper layer with an average Young's modulus of 12.9-15.3 GPa and Poisson's ratio of 0.17, overlying a layer with an average Young's modulus of 67.3-81.9 GPa and Poisson's ratio of 0.25.

  13. Evaluation of myocardial deformation in patients with Kawasaki disease using speckle-tracking echocardiography during mid-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, Reyhan; Barut, Kenan; Oztunc, Funda; Atik, Sezen; Adrovic, Amra; Sahin, Sezgin; Cengiz, Dicle; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2017-04-05

    Speckle-tracking echocardiography is a recently developed technique for the evaluation of myocardial deformation or strain. Our objective was to examine strain through a mid-term follow-up of patients with Kawasaki disease.

  14. A patient alignment solution for lung SBRT setups based on a deformable registration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Bo; Mittauer, Kathryn; Li, Jonathan; Samant, Sanjiv; Dagan, Roi; Okunieff, Paul; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors propose a novel registration strategy for translation-only correction scenarios of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy setups, which can achieve optimal dose coverage for tumors as well as preserve the consistency of registrations with minimal human interference. Methods: The proposed solution (centroid-to-centroidor CTC solution) uses the average four-dimensional CT (A4DCT) as the reference CT. The cone-beam CT (CBCT) is deformed to acquire a new centroid for the internal target volume (ITV) on the CBCT. The registration is then accomplished by simply aligning the centroids of the ITVs between the A4DCT and the CBCT. Sixty-seven cases using 64 patients (each case is associated with separate isocenters) have been investigated with the CTC method and compared with the conventional gray-value (G) mode and bone (B) mode registration methods. Dosimetric effects among the tree methods were demonstrated by 18 selected cases. The uncertainty of the CTC method has also been studied. Results: The registration results demonstrate the superiority of the CTC method over the other two methods. The differences in the D99 and D95 ITV dose coverage between the CTC method and the original plan is small (within 5%) for all of the selected cases except for one for which the tumor presented significant growth during the period between the CT scan and the treatment. Meanwhile, the dose coverage differences between the original plan and the registration results using either the B or G method are significant, as tumor positions varied dramatically, relative to the rib cage, from their positions on the original CT. The largest differences between the D99 and D95 dose coverage of the ITV using the B or G method versus the original plan are as high as 50%. The D20 differences between any of the methods versus the original plan are all less than 2%. Conclusions: The CTC method can generate optimal dose coverage to tumors with much better consistency

  15. TU-AB-303-11: Predict Parotids Deformation Applying SIS Epidemiological Model in H&N Adaptive RT

    SciTech Connect

    Maffei, N; Guidi, G; Vecchi, C; Bertoni, F; Costi, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to investigate the use of epidemiological models to predict morphological variations in patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). The susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) deterministic model was applied to simulate warping within a focused region of interest (ROI). Hypothesis is to consider each voxel like a single subject of the whole sample and to treat displacement vector fields like an infection. Methods: Using Raystation hybrid deformation algorithms and automatic re-contouring based on mesh grid, we post-processed 360 MVCT images of 12 H&N patients treated with Tomotherapy. Study focused on parotid glands, identified by literature and previous analysis, as ROI more susceptible to warping in H&N region. Susceptible (S) and infectious (I) cases were identified in voxels with inter-fraction movement respectively under and over a set threshold. IronPython scripting allowed to export positions and displacement data of surface voxels for every fraction. A MATLAB homemade toolbox was developed to model the SIS. Results: SIS model was validated simulating organ motion on QUASAR phantom. Applying model in patients, within a [0–1cm] range, a single voxel movement of 0.4cm was selected as displacement threshold. SIS indexes were evaluated by MATLAB simulations. Dynamic time warping algorithm was used to assess matching between model and parotids behavior days of treatments. The best fit of the model was obtained with contact rate of 7.89±0.94 and recovery rate of 2.36±0.21. Conclusion: SIS model can follow daily structures evolutions, making possible to compare warping conditions and highlighting challenges due to abnormal variation and set-up errors. By epidemiology approach, organ motion could be assessed and predicted not in terms of average of the whole ROI, but in a voxel-by-voxel deterministic trend. Identifying anatomical region subjected to variations, would be possible to focus clinic controls within a cohort of pre-selected patients

  16. A voxel-based finite element model for the prediction of bladder deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: A finite element (FE) bladder model was previously developed to predict bladder deformation caused by bladder filling change. However, two factors prevent a wide application of FE models: (1) the labor required to construct a FE model with high quality mesh and (2) long computation time needed to construct the FE model and solve the FE equations. In this work, we address these issues by constructing a low-resolution voxel-based FE bladder model directly from the binary segmentation images and compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of the voxel-based model used to simulate bladder deformation with those of a classical FE model with a tetrahedral mesh. Methods: For ten healthy volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic region was recorded at regular intervals of 10 min over 1 h. For this series of scans, the bladder volume gradually increased while rectal volume remained constant. All pelvic structures were defined from a reference image for each volunteer, including bladder wall, small bowel, prostate (male), uterus (female), rectum, pelvic bone, spine, and the rest of the body. Four separate FE models were constructed from these structures: one with a tetrahedral mesh (used in previous study), one with a uniform hexahedral mesh, one with a nonuniform hexahedral mesh, and one with a low-resolution nonuniform hexahedral mesh. Appropriate material properties were assigned to all structures and uniform pressure was applied to the inner bladder wall to simulate bladder deformation from urine inflow. Performance of the hexahedral meshes was evaluated against the performance of the standard tetrahedral mesh by comparing the accuracy of bladder shape prediction and computational efficiency. Results: FE model with a hexahedral mesh can be quickly and automatically constructed. No substantial differences were observed between the simulation results of the tetrahedral mesh and hexahedral meshes (<1% difference in mean dice similarity coefficient to

  17. Metastable vacuum decay and θ dependence in gauge theory. Deformed QCD as a toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoonah, Amit; Thomas, Evan; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2015-01-01

    We study a number of different ingredients related to the θ dependence, metastable excited vacuum states and other related subjects using a simplified version of QCD, the so-called "deformed QCD". This model is a weakly coupled gauge theory, which, however, preserves all the relevant essential elements allowing us to study hard and nontrivial features which are known to be present in real strongly coupled QCD. Our main focus in this work is to test the ideas related to the metastable vacuum states (which are known to be present in strongly coupled QCD in large N limit) in a theoretically controllable manner using the "deformed QCD" as a toy model. We explicitly show how the metastable states emerge in the system, why their lifetime is large, and why these metastable states must be present in the system for the self-consistency of the entire picture of the QCD vacuum. We also speculate on possible relevance of the metastable vacuum states in explanation of the violation of local P and CP symmetries in heavy ion collisions.

  18. A trishear model for the deformation of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenauer, Iris; Riller, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    The Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), Canada, is an impact-induced layered sheet of crystalline rocks deformed into an asymmetrical fold basin, the Sudbury Basin. The basin geometry at depth is largely unknown as few attempts were made to quantify displacement and rotation of layer contacts. We propose that the dip of layer contacts and foliation surfaces in the southern SIC can be approximated by trishear fault propagation folding. Trishear deformation accounts for: (1) angular discordances between upper and basal SIC contacts, (2) local overturning of the SIC, (3) progressive steepening of foliation surfaces from NW to SE, (4) strain gradient in the Sudbury Basin sedimentary rocks, and (5) thickness variations in SIC layers. Moreover, the South Range Shear Zone, a zone of moderately strong metamorphic fabrics, coincides with the surface manifestation of the proposed trishear zone. We demonstrate the use of structural data together with forward kinematic modelling to identify the strain distribution within the SIC, rotation of SIC contacts and thickness changes of SIC layers. Backward kinematic modelling provides information on the initial geometry of the SIC and is used to restore the shape of the igneous sheet, showing that the SIC was shortened by approximately 10 km in NW-SE diameter. Most of the shortening was accommodated by 40% reduction in the thickness of the upper SIC layer.

  19. Nonlinear laser-induced deformations of liquid-liquid interfaces: An optical fiber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkeland, Ole Jakob; Brevik, Iver

    2008-12-01

    Experimentally, it turns out that radiation forces from a cw laser on a liquid-liquid interface are able to produce giant deformations (up to about 100μm ), if the system is close to the critical point where the surface tension becomes small. We present a model for such a fingerlike deformation, implying that the system is described as an optical fiber. One reason for introducing such a model is that the refractive index difference in modern experiments, such as those of the Bordeaux group, is small, of the same order as in practical fibers in optics. It is natural therefore to adopt the hybrid HE11 mode, known from fiber theory as the fundamental mode for the liquid system. We show how the balance between hydrodynamical and radiation forces leads to a stable equilibrium point for the liquid column. Also, we calculate the narrowing of the column radius as the depth increases. Comparison with experimental results of the Bordeaux group yields quite satisfactory agreement as regards the column width.

  20. Review of Advances in Cobb Angle Calculation and Image-Based Modelling Techniques for Spinal Deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoglou, V.; Stylianidis, E.

    2016-06-01

    Scoliosis is a 3D deformity of the human spinal column that is caused from the bending of the latter, causing pain, aesthetic and respiratory problems. This internal deformation is reflected in the outer shape of the human back. The golden standard for diagnosis and monitoring of scoliosis is the Cobb angle, which refers to the internal curvature of the trunk. This work is the first part of a post-doctoral research, presenting the most important researches that have been done in the field of scoliosis, concerning its digital visualisation, in order to provide a more precise and robust identification and monitoring of scoliosis. The research is divided in four fields, namely, the X-ray processing, the automatic Cobb angle(s) calculation, the 3D modelling of the spine that provides a more accurate representation of the trunk and the reduction of X-ray radiation exposure throughout the monitoring of scoliosis. Despite the fact that many researchers have been working on the field for the last decade at least, there is no reliable and universal tool to automatically calculate the Cobb angle(s) and successfully perform proper 3D modelling of the spinal column that would assist a more accurate detection and monitoring of scoliosis.

  1. Deformations of T 1 ,1 as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-12-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T 1,1 in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T 1,1, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T 1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS5 × T 1,1 , classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  2. Dislocation model for continuous recrystallization during initial stage of superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Tan, M.J.

    1998-02-03

    According to dislocation models, grain boundary sliding (GBS) causes stress concentrations when the sliding is impeded. Relaxation of the stress concentrations can be done by the emission of dislocations from one grain boundary to another. This process could be limited by the rate at which the dislocations are emitted (source control), or traverses the grains (glide or lattice climb control), or are absorbed into the boundaries (grain boundary climb control). The rate at which the grains slide past each other can be controlled by (1) the removal of a pile-up of lattice, the emission of lattice dislocations from grain boundary ledges and by the removal of pile-ups of grain boundary dislocations. These models require the grains to have high angle mobile boundaries such that grain boundary sliding processes can occur and are then accommodated by dislocation movements. For some quasi-single phase aluminum alloys, at the initial stage of superplastic deformation most of grain boundaries have low angles. Since movement of these subgrain boundaries needs very high energy, grain boundary sliding becomes difficult. It is widely reported that continuous recrystallization mechanism dominates the initial stage of superplastic deformation in quasi-single phase aluminum alloys.

  3. The influence of storing alginate impressions sprayed with disinfectant on dimensional accuracy and deformation of maxillary edentulous stone models.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of storing impressions for 3 hours after spraying them with a disinfectant solution on dimensional change and deformation of maxillary edentulous stone models. Three brands of alginate impression materials, characterized by a small degree of contraction in 100% relative humidity, were used. The spray disinfectants used were 1% sodium hypochlorite solution and 2% glutaraldehyde solution. A stone model taken from an impression that had not been sprayed or stored was prepared as a control. The results indicated that the differences in dimensional change between the control and disinfected stone models were less than 24 mum, and that no deformation was observed in the stone models.

  4. A consistent geodynamic model for predicting the velocity and plate-internal deformation of Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, Rob; Garcia-Sancho, Candela; Warners-Ruckstuhl, Karin; van der Burgt, Janneke; Wortel, Rinus

    2015-04-01

    The motion and deformation of tectonic plates is driven by gravity and resisted by frictional forces. In principle it should thus be possible to build mechanical models that reproduce plate velocities and surface deformation. Here we present a new approach that overcomes many of the previous obstacles to achieving this goal. Our approach to quantify the forces is based on mechanical equilibrium of the whole Eurasian plate, meaning that an increase in, for instance collision, forces must be matched by other plate tectonic forces. We first focus on present-day Eurasia. We include basal tractions from a global convection model, lithospheric body forces, and edge forces resulting from the interaction of the Eurasian plate with neighboring plates. The resulting force distribution is constrained by observed plate motion and by stress observations. Eurasia's stress field turns out to be most sensitive to the distribution of collision forces on the plate's southern margin and, to a lesser extent, to lithospheric density structure and normal pressure from mantle flow. Stress observations require collision forces on the India-Eurasia boundary of 7.0 - 10.5 TN/m. A similar analysis is performed for Eurasia at 20 Ma and 40 Ma. Plate geometry is taken from the global Lausanne (Stampfli) reconstruction, as are plate velocities and oceanic ages. Lithospheric body forces are accounted for in a simplified way because we lack detailed enough information on the plate scale topography. For the Miocene, we find ˜1.2 TN/m for the collision force on the India-Eurasia boundary. In the Eocene, the collision force we find is ˜0.4 TN/m. We conclude that the magnitude of the collision force on Tibet increased significantly after 20 Ma: from 40-20 Ma, the plate contact force on the India/Tibet plate boundary segment was of the same order of magnitude as resistive forces on subduction plate boundaries elsewhere. Our timing of the collision force on Eurasia, is substantially younger than the

  5. Volcanic deformation sources associated with Fogo 2011-2012 unrest, Azores - The first modelling result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Jun; Araújo, João; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Lorenzo, Maria; Ferreira, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic deformation is often observed at many active volcanoes in the world by using space geodesy techniques, namely GNSS and InSAR. More difficulties in judgement if eruptions are imminent or not arise when such phenomenon occurs at dormant volcanoes due to the lack of eruption experiences with monitoring data. The eruption triggering mechanism is still controversial at many cases, but many attempts to image deformation sources beneath volcanoes have been made using geophysical inversion techniques. In this study, we show the case study of Fogo (Água de Pau) volcano, S. Miguel Island, Azores which represents over 450 years of eruption dormancy since 1563-1564. In the recent decades Fogo has exhibited three prominent unrest episodes (1989, 2003-2006, and 2011-2012). The lack of geochemical and hydrothermal evidences for a magmatic intrusion during those episodes does not encourage discussions on resuming volcanic activity of Fogo. However, the inflation/uplift are evident on the edifices at least for the last two unrest episodes based on GPS data by Trota et al. (2009) and Okada et al. (2015), respectively. The preliminary deformation modelling based on repeated GPS campaign data suggested a shallow expanding spheroid (Trota et al. 2009) or a single Mogi sources beneath the summit caldera. We performed a more integrated inversion for the 2011-2012 episode using a genetic algorithm optimizing the source parameters. The best fit model agrees well with the regional/local tectonic lineament suggesting the close relation between the volcanic sources and the regional/local tectonics. The regional extensional stress (between Eurasia and Nubia plates) may play important roles for the ascent of volcanic fluids at Fogo volcano. We do not discard the possibility that Fogo may have been preparing for eruptions by intermittent ascents of magma at shallow crust (i.e. experiencing "failed eruptions") during the apparent dormant period. As a local monitoring agency, CIVISA

  6. Postseismic Deformation Following the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake: Observations, Kinematic Inversions, and Dynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Christopher; Barbot, Sylvain; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Due to its location on a transtensional section of the Pacific-North American plate boundary, the Salton Trough is a region featuring large strike-slip earthquakes within a regime of shallow asthenosphere, high heat flow, and complex faulting, and so postseismic deformation there may feature enhanced viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip that is particularly detectable at the surface. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was the largest shock in the Salton Trough since 1892 and occurred close to the US-Mexico border, and so the postseismic deformation recorded by the continuous GPS network of southern California provides an opportunity to study the rheology of this region. Three-year postseismic transients extracted from GPS displacement time-series show four key features: (1) 1-2 cm of cumulative uplift in the Imperial Valley and 1 cm of subsidence in the Peninsular Ranges, (2) relatively large cumulative horizontal displacements 150 km from the rupture in the Peninsular Ranges, (3) rapidly decaying horizontal displacement rates in the first few months after the earthquake in the Imperial Valley, and (4) sustained horizontal velocities, following the rapid early motions, that were still visibly ongoing 3 years after the earthquake. Kinematic inversions show that the cumulative 3-year postseismic displacement field can be well fit by afterslip on and below the coseismic rupture, though these solutions require afterslip with a total moment equivalent to at least a earthquake and higher slip magnitudes than those predicted by coseismic stress changes. Forward modeling shows that stress-driven afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation in various configurations within the lithosphere can reproduce the early and later horizontal velocities in the Imperial Valley, while Newtonian viscoelastic relaxation in the asthenosphere can reproduce the uplift in the Imperial Valley and the subsidence and large westward displacements in the Peninsular Ranges. We present two forward

  7. Constitutive Modeling of Hot Deformation Behavior of High-Strength Armor Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Madhu, Vemuri

    2016-05-01

    The hot isothermal compression tests of high-strength armor steel under a wide range of deformation temperatures (1100-1250 °C) and strain rates of (0.001-1/s) were performed. Based on the experimental data, constitutive models were established using the original Johnson-Cook (JC) model, modified JC model, and strain-compensated Arrhenius model, respectively. The modified JC model considers the coupled effects of strain hardening, strain rate hardening, and thermal softening. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of these developed models was determined by estimating the correlation coefficient ( R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The results demonstrate that the flow behavior of high-strength armor steel is considerably influenced by the strain rate and temperature. The original JC model is inadequate to provide good description on the flow stress at evaluated temperatures. The modified JC model and strain-compensated Arrhenius model significantly enhance the predictability. It is also observed from the microstructure study that at low strain rates (0.001-0.01/s) and high temperatures (1200-1250 °C), a typical dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs.

  8. Numerical modeling of the deformations associated with large subduction earthquakes through the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitout, L.; Trubienko, O.; Garaud, J.; Vigny, C.; Cailletaud, G.; Simons, W. J.; Satirapod, C.; Shestakov, N.

    2012-12-01

    A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to model deformations through the seismic cycle in the areas surrounding the last three large subduction earthquakes: Sumatra, Japan and Chile. The mesh featuring a broad spherical shell portion with a viscoelastic asthenosphere is refined close to the subduction zones. The model is constrained by 6 years of postseismic data in Sumatra area and over a year of data for Japan and Chile plus preseismic data in the three areas. The coseismic displacements on the subduction plane are inverted from the coseismic displacements using the finite element program and provide the initial stresses. The predicted horizontal postseismic displacements depend upon the thicknesses of the elastic plate and of the low viscosity asthenosphere. Non-dimensionalized by the coseismic displacements, they present an almost uniform value between 500km and 1500km from the trench for elastic plates 80km thick. The time evolution of the velocities is function of the creep law (Maxwell, Burger or power-law creep). Moreover, the forward models predict a sizable far-field subsidence, also with a spatial distribution which varies with the geometry of the asthenosphere and lithosphere. Slip on the subduction interface does not induce such a subsidence. The observed horizontal velocities, divided by the coseismic displacement, present a similar pattern as function of time and distance from trench for the three areas, indicative of similar lithospheric and asthenospheric thicknesses and asthenospheric viscosity. This pattern cannot be fitted with power-law creep in the asthenosphere but indicates a lithosphere 60 to 90km thick and an asthenosphere of thickness of the order of 100km with a burger rheology represented by a Kelvin-Voigt element with a viscosity of 3.1018Pas and μKelvin=μelastic/3. A second Kelvin-Voigt element with very limited amplitude may explain some characteristics of the short time-scale signal. The postseismic subsidence is

  9. Importance of the temperature field and its uncertainties in modeling ductile deformation of the southern California lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Chapman, D. S.; Williams, C. F.; Hearn, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is arguably the most important parameter controlling ductile deformation in tectonically active regions. Laboratory measurements at lower crust and upper mantle conditions define the mechanisms controlling ductile deformation and constrain quantitative rules relating stress and strain rate. Exhumed ductily deformed rocks reveal the micromechanics of deformation, supplying ground truth that can be compared with lab results. However, even if the mechanism and ductile deformation rules are accepted at face value, strain rates are exquisitely dependent on temperature. Here we critically assess observational data relevant to constraining the southern California lithospheric temperature field. Our goal is to improve estimates of the 3D temperature field and its real uncertainties and apply them to regional deformation modeling. We use a phased approach to estimating geotherms, beginning with simple 1D steady state conductive models. We identify the most important parameters and disaggregate them, separately examining the effects of varying radiogenic heat source concentration, rock type, crust and lithosphere thickness and asthenosphere solidus. We assess geotherm uncertainties by assigning realistic error bounds on all input quantities, propagate these uncertainties by Monte Carlo sampling and determine probability density functions for the geotherm. We find that although other parameter uncertainties contribute, variability in heat sources produces the largest variation in model-predicted geotherms. Because heat production depends strongly on rock type, better characterization of crustal lithology using refined seismic imaging results now becoming available beneath southern California is likely to produce the largest improvements in thermal models. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty will remain, arguing for adoption of one or a few standard thermal models as common starting points for regional deformation modeling in southern California and elsewhere.

  10. Comparison between spring network models and continuum constitutive laws: application to the large deformation of a capsule in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Walter, J; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-04-01

    A capsule is a liquid drop enclosed by a solid, deformable membrane. To analyze the deformation of a capsule accurately, both the fluid mechanics of the internal and external fluids and the solid mechanics of the membrane must be solved precisely. Recently, many researchers have used discrete spring network models to express the membrane mechanics of capsules and biological cells. However, it is unclear whether such modeling is sufficiently accurate to solve for capsule deformation. This study examines the correlations between the mechanical properties of the discrete spring network model and continuum constitutive laws. We first compare uniaxial and isotropic deformations of a two-dimensional (2D) sheet, both analytically and numerically. The 2D sheet is discretized with four kinds of mesh to analyze the effect of the spring network configuration. We derive the relationships between the spring constant and continuum properties, such as the Young modulus, Poisson ratio, area dilation modulus, and shear modulus. It is found that the mechanical properties of spring networks are strongly dependent on the mesh configuration. We then calculate the deformation of a capsule under inflation and in a simple shear flow in the Stokes flow regime, using various membrane models. To achieve high accuracy in the flow calculation, a boundary-element method is used. Comparing the results between the different membrane models, we find that it is hard to express the area incompressibility observed in biological membranes using a simple spring network model.

  11. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  12. Microstructure-based modelling of arbitrary deformation histories of filler-reinforced elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, H.; Klüppel, M.

    2012-11-01

    A physically motivated theory of rubber reinforcement based on filler cluster mechanics is presented considering the mechanical behaviour of quasi-statically loaded elastomeric materials subjected to arbitrary deformation histories. This represents an extension of a previously introduced model describing filler induced stress softening and hysteresis of highly strained elastomers. These effects are referred to the hydrodynamic reinforcement of rubber elasticity due to strain amplification by stiff filler clusters and cyclic breakdown and re-aggregation (healing) of softer, already damaged filler clusters. The theory is first developed for the special case of outer stress-strain cycles with successively increasing maximum strain. In this more simple case, all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of the cycle and the mechanical energy stored in the strained clusters is completely dissipated, i.e. only irreversible stress contributions result. Nevertheless, the description of outer cycles involves already all material parameters of the theory and hence they can be used for a fitting procedure. In the general case of an arbitrary deformation history, the cluster mechanics of the material is complicated due to the fact that not all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of a cycle. For that reason additional reversible stress contributions considering the relaxation of clusters upon retraction have to be taken into account for the description of inner cycles. A special recursive algorithm is developed constituting a frame of the mechanical response of encapsulated inner cycles. Simulation and measurement are found to be in fair agreement for CB and silica filled SBR/BR and EPDM samples, loaded in compression and tension along various deformation histories.

  13. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  14. Numerical modelling of polyphase deformation and recrystallisation in polar firn and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Florian; Weikusat, Ilka; Bons, Paul; Griera, Albert; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Roessiger, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica contain a significant amount of air within their upper approximately thousand meters and air hydrates below. While this air is still in exchange with the atmosphere in the permeable firn, the gas is entrapped at the firn-ice transition at 60 - 120 m depth. Understanding the dominant deformation mechanisms is essential to interpret paleo-atmosphere records and to allow a more realistic model of ice sheet dynamics. Recent research shows how the presence of air bubbles can significantly influence microdynamical processes such as grain growth and grain boundary migration (Azuma et al., 2012, Roessiger et al., 2014). Therefore, numerical modelling was performed focussing on the mechanical properties of ice with air inclusions and the implications of the presence of bubbles on recrystallisation. The full-field crystal plasticity code of Lebensohn (2001), using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), was coupled to the 2D numerical microstructural modelling platform Elle, following the approach by Griera et al. (2013), and used to simulate dynamic recrystallization of pure ice (Montagnat et al., 2013). FFT calculates the viscoplastic response of polycrystalline and polyphase materials that deform by dislocation glide, takes into account the mechanical anisotropy of ice and calculates dislocation densities using the local gradient of the strain-rate field. Incorporating a code for polyphase grain boundary migration driven by surface and internal strain energy reduction, based on the methodology of Becker et al. (2008) and Roessiger et al. (2014), now also enables us to model deformation of ice with air bubbles. The presence of bubbles leads to an increase in strain localization, which reduces the bulk strength of the bubbly ice. In the absence of dynamic recrystallisation, air bubbles quickly collapse at low strains and spherical to elliptical bubble shapes are only maintained when recrystallisation is activated. Our modelling confirms

  15. Geodetic measurements and numerical models of deformation at the Svartsengi Geothermal Field, Iceland, 1992 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Wang, H. F.; Fridleifsson, G. O.; Sigurdsson, O.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2012-12-01

    To study rheology — the constitutive relations between stress and strain— we apply a known impulse to a mechanical system and then measure the subsequent response. For example, by ringing a bell and listening to the resulting sound, we can infer that the material in the bell behaves as an elastic solid with little attenuation. By modeling the impulse (stress) and measuring the response (strain), and defining the constitutive relations between the two, we can make inferences about the underlying physical processes. In the case of the earth, the response is crustal deformation that can be measured using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Such experiments are feasible where industrial extraction of oil, gas, water, or heat causes subsidence, provided that data are available to describe both the impulse and the response. The Svartsengi geothermal field meets the requirements for a rheological experiment. Located on the Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland, it is associated with a segment of mid-ocean ridge of the same name. The operators of the Svartsengi field have monitored the water level, borehole pressure and surface deformation since beginning production in 1976. In this study, we analyze radar images acquired on 78 distinct dates between 1992 and 2010 by six satellite missions: ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and TanDEM-X. As in previous studies (Vadon and Sigmundsson, 1997, Keiding et al., 2010), the InSAR results indicate subsidence at the order of several centimeters per year over an area roughly five kilometers in radius. To describe this deformation, one can consider a simple model that assumes a half space with uniform elastic properties. For a reservoir shaped like a prolate spheroid, the model parameters include depth, length of the semi-major axis, width of the semi-minor axis, strike of the spheroid axis, plunge of the spheroid axis, and a pressure change (Yang et al., 1988). This model has been applied to the Coso geothermal

  16. Thermomechanical model for the plastic deformation in high power laser diodes during operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martín, A.; Avella, M.; Iñiguez, M. P.; Jiménez, J.; Oudart, M.; Nagle, J.

    2009-10-01

    A thermomechanical model for the mechanism of rapid degradation of AlGaAs based high power laser bars (808 nm) is presented. Thermal stresses induced in the device by local heating around a facet defect by nonradiative recombination and self-absorption of photons are calculated, as well as the conditions for the beginning of plastic deformation, when these thermal stresses overcome the yield strength. The values of the power density and of the local temperature at which the yield limit is surmounted are in agreement with the threshold values for the degradation of Al based lasers given in the literature. The present model can also elucidate the role played by the packaging stress, being able to explain how this stress reduces the optical power density threshold for failure of these lasers.

  17. Modeling reactive transport in deformable porous media using the theory of interacting continua.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Daniel Zack

    2012-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the work done as part of an Early Career LDRD aimed at modeling flow induced damage of materials involving chemical reactions, deformation of the porous matrix, and complex flow phenomena. The numerical formulation is motivated by a mixture theory or theory of interacting continua type approach to coupling the behavior of the fluid and the porous matrix. Results for the proposed method are presented for several engineering problems of interest including carbon dioxide sequestration, hydraulic fracturing, and energetic materials applications. This work is intended to create a general framework for flow induced damage that can be further developed in each of the particular areas addressed below. The results show both convincing proof of the methodologies potential and the need for further validation of the models developed.

  18. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    PubMed

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  19. Parsing Based on Parselets: A Unified Deformable Mixture Model for Human Parsing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Zhongyang; Yang, Jianchao; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    Human parsing, namely partitioning the human body into semantic regions, has drawn much attention recently for its wide applications in human-centric analysis. Previous works often consider solving the problem of human pose estimation as the prerequisite of human parsing. We argue that these approaches cannot obtain optimal pixel-level parsing due to the inconsistent targets between the different tasks. In this work, we directly address the problem of human parsing by using the novel Parselet representation as the building blocks of our parsing model. Parselets are a group of parsable segments which can generally be obtained by low-level over-segmentation algorithms and bear strong semantic meaning. We then build a deformable mixture parsing model (DMPM) for human parsing to simultaneously handle the deformation and multi-modalities of Parselets. The proposed model has two unique characteristics: (1) the possible numerous modalities of Parselet ensembles are exhibited as the "And-Or" structure of sub-trees; (2) to further solve the practical problem of Parselet occlusion or absence, we directly model the visibility property at some leaf nodes. The DMPM thus directly solves the problem of human parsing by searching for the best graph configuration from a pool of Parselet hypotheses without intermediate tasks. Fast rejection based on hierarchical filtering is employed to ensure the overall efficiency. Comprehensive evaluations on a new large-scale human parsing dataset, which is crawled from the Internet, with high resolution and thoroughly annotated semantic labels at pixel-level, and also a benchmark dataset demonstrate the encouraging performance of the proposed approach.

  20. Modeling multi-phase transport in deformable, hygroscopic porous media: Applications to convective drying of lumber

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio, C.M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1999-07-01

    A fundamental model of multi-phase flow in deformable, hygroscopic porous media has been developed through application of macroscopic energy and mass conservation equations. Microscopic effects are included via volume-averaging techniques for the three phases present in the porous media: liquid, gas, and solid. The model includes convective and capillary transport of free water, convective and diffusive transport of water vapor and air, and diffusive transport of bound water. Porosity variations in deformable media have been included during development of the governing equations. The model is applied to convective drying of lumber via appropriate boundary conditions and transport parameters which are available in the literature. The governing coupled, non-linear equations are rewritten and solved in terms of three governing variables: moisture content, temperature, and gas phase pressure. The conservation equations presented in vector notation have been simplified to one spatial dimension for solution here. Control-volume formulations are used to discretize the governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions with a power-law scheme used to proportion the diffusive and convective flux contributions across the control volume interfaces. An uncoupled solution strategy is employed although each conservation equation is solved implicitly. Presented model results include predictions of moisture, temperature, and gas phase pressure during drying both as averages over time for convective drying at two different ambient conditions and as distributions within the board at any time for high temperature air drying. Flows of individual moisture species (liquid/free water, water vapor, and bound water) within the board are also presented.